The East Carolinian, October 2, 1986






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Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.61 No.10
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 2,1986
ECU
1
1.
Cultural
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East Carolina University School of Medicine
Pitt County Memorial Hospitalr
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Located west of Groerwtlle on Stantonsburg Rosd
� 'a Practjc Cama
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E
'f i�jt�
Afro American
Center
2. Amphitheater
3. Austin Building
4. Aycock Residence Hall
5. Belk Building � School of
Allied Health and Social Work
6. Belk Residence Hall
7. Blount House � Public Safe-
ty, Traffic, and Informatioin
Center
8. Bloxton House
9. Brewster Building
10. Cafeteria Building
11. Central Supply � 2nd Floor
12. Chancellor's House
13. Christenbury Memorial Gym-
nasium
14. Clement Residence Hall
15. Cotten Residence Hall
16. Croatan Building
17. Erwin Hall
18. Faculty Offices
19. Ficklen Stadium
20. Flanagan Building � School
of Technology
21. Fleming Residence Hall
22. Fletcher Music Center �
School of Music
23. Fletcher Residence Hall
24. Garage
25. Garrett House � Computing
Center Annex
26. Garrett Residence Hall
27. Graham Building
28. Greene Residence Hall
29. Harrington Field
30. Heating Plant
31. Home Economics Building �
School of Home Economics
32. Howard House � News
Bureau
33. Infirmary
34. International House
35. Irons Building
36. Jarvis Residence Hall
37. Jenkins Fine Arts Center �
School of ArtGray Gallery
38. Jones Residence Hall
39. Joyner Library
40. Leisure Systems Studies
41. Maintenance Building, Cen
tral Warehouse
42. Mamie Jenkins Building
43. Mendenhall Student Center
44. Messick Theatre Arts Center
45. McGinnis Auditorium
46. Minges Coliseum
47. Nursing Building � School
of Nursing
48. Personnel Department
49. Pirate Club Building
50. Publications Building
51. Ragsdale Hall
52. Rawl Annex
53. Rawl Building � School of
Business
54. Regional Development In-
stitute
55. Scales Field House
56. Science Building
57. Scott Residence Hall
58. Slay Residence Hall
59. Speech and Hearing Building
60. Speight Building � School of
Education Department of
Psychology
61. Spilman Building
62. Sports Medicine Building
63. TaylorSlaughter Alumni
Center
64. Tyler Residence Hall
65. Umstead Residence Hall
66. Whichard Building
67. White Residence Hall
68. Wright Annex
69. Wright Building
New General classroom
Building now under construction
Parking 1986
Suggested Routes for General Public Parking � Ficklen Stadium
1 Field Parking � G'wvti Boulevard (264 Bypass) lo Chertes Boutavard
2 Mingaa Collaaum Area Lola - G'�env.ita Bvd o� i�lh Slraai lo Chart Btvd lo F�Hn tiv
3 Elmhurst School Lot � E'thar 1�th Slrwt Of Gra�nvill� Boulavard lo Elm Slrael lo Overtook Or've
4 Allied MeaHh Lot � Eitr� lOlh Siraei or 14th Stre�t lo Chartas Boulevard
Parents' Weekend Schedule
Time Event Location
Friday, October 3
8 p.m.
Saturday, October 4
8 a.m. � 11 a.m.
8:30 a.m. � 10:30 a.m.
9 a.m. � 10:30 a.m.
10 a.m. � 5 p.m.
11:15 a.m. � 1:15 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
8 p.m.
Sunday, October S
9 a.m. � 9:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. � 11 a.m.
9:30 � 1 p.m.
2 p.m. � 5 p.m.
11 a.m. � 5 p.m.
ft Tickets Required
Movie: Out of Africa
(No Admission Fee)
Mendenhall Student Center
Hendrix Theatre
I
Registration, Check-In
and Ticket Pickup
On-Campus Tour
Chancellor's Reception
Frisbee Tournament
Tailgating ft
(BBQ and Chicken by Bill's
Wilson, North Carolina)
Football: ft
ECU vs University of
Southwestern Louisiana
Movie: Out of Africa
(No Admission Fee)
Church Service
Continental Breakfast
(No Admission Fee)
Lacrosse Tournament
Rugby Match
Frisbee Tournament (continued)
Mendenhall Student Center
Room 244
Mendenhall Information
Desk
Mendenhall Student Center
Multipurpose Room
College Hill Drive Field
Ficklen Stadium
North Side
Ficklen Stadium
Mendenhall Student Center
Hendrix Theatre
Mendenhall Student Center
Hendrix Theatre
Mendenhall Student Center
Multipurpose Room
Allied Health Fields
Allied Health Fields
College Hill Field
WELCOME
ECU
PAREISTTS
Page �ae photos by Ellen
Marpay. Portraits of Dr.
gaoler aad Dr. Meyer courtesy
of the ECU News Bareaa.
Stye lEaat
Ear0ltmati
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender, arai
Daniel Maurer, ��� ��r
PATTl KEMMIS, JVews EUto, STEVE FOLMAR, Drnrcror qf Ad�trtuit
Scott Cooper, coom & Anthony Martin, tmimaoedn �.�
Rick McCormac, coupon b Meg Needham, am
John Shannon, &.� Shannon Short, pm
Pat Molloy, Bermm attor DeChanile Johnson, m �c�r
Parents'
Seating
Sectloas 30 aad 31 of flddea
Stadium hare beea referred for
parent seatfag.
I
I
�P
'
Terry Sanford. Democratic candids
from students.
The P
By CAROLYN DR1SCOLL
Assistant News Editor
Eighty-three percent oi all .
lege students in this country hold
some type of credit card, ace
ding to the American Institute
Cunanan L
By PATTI KEMMIS
News Editor
"Our trip was definitely
thwhile said Steve Cunanan,
SGA president, about his trip
Washington, D.C. to lobb
Financial Aid.
Cunanan and 15 other student
representatives from the UNC
school system �cn:
Washington Sept. 11 and 12
meet with senators and con-
gressmen.
"We didn't go to ask foi add
tional money said Cunar
"just better access to what is
already in the funds
Cunanan stated the three main
goals the group had were: reduce
the number forms that need to be
filled out from three to one.
reduce the number of forms that
need to be enfied and hae an
automatic escape from having
ECU
For Sp
By PATTI KEMMIS
News Editor
According to Ron Speier.
associate dean of Student Ser-
vices, approximately 2.500 lo
3,000 parents are expected to ar-
rive on the ECU campus this
weekend for Parents Weekend.
"Because oi the number of
parents who have season tickets
to the football games, we can't
give an exact number said
Speier.
"This weekend gives parents a
chance to see how their money is
being spent said Scott Cooper.
"But seriously, its a chance for
parents to get together with their
kids and see how they spend their
opTthe
Entertainment9 �
Comics12
Sports13
Classifieds15 '
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ECU
tural 37. Jenkins Fine Arts Center �
School of Art Gray Gallery
38. Jones Residence Hall
39. Jovner I ibrary
40. Leisure Systems Studies
hool of 41. Maintenance Building, Gen-
ial Work tral Warehouse
42. Mamie Jenkins Building
lie Safe- 43. Mendenhall Student Center
fmauoin 44 Messick Theatre Arts Center
45. McGmnis Auditorium
46 Minges Coliseum
4 Nursing Building � School
of Nursing
Floor 48. Personnel Department
49. Pirate Club Building
Gm- 50 Publications Building
51. Ragsdale Hall
1 52 Raw! Annex
53. Raul Building � School of
Business
54 Regional Development In-
iiute
55. Scales Field House
:hool 56. Science Building
Scott Residence Hal!
58 Slav Residence Hall
ter � 59. Speech and Hearing Building
60. Speight Building � School of
Education Department of
Psychology
iputing 61. Spilman Building
62 Sports Medicine Building
63. Taylor Slaughter Alumni
Center
64 Tyler Residence Hall
65. I'mstead Residence Hall
66. Whichard Building
ng � 67. White Residence Hall
68. Wright Annex
News 69. Wright Building
New General classroom
Building now under construction
Id Schedule
Location
ienhall Student Center
Hendrix Theatre
-
inued)
Mendenhall Student Center
Room 244
Mendenhall Information
Desk
Mendenhall Student Center
Multipurpose Room
College Hill Drive Field
Ficklen Stadium
N rth Side
Ficklen Stadium
Mendenhall Student Center
Hendrix Theatre
Mendenhall Student Center
Hendrix Theatre
Mendenhall Student Center
Multipurpose Room
Allied Health Fields
Allied Health Fields
College Hill Field
22
ECUZ o s H X � z o �23A
c3 24

O � I
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a 26

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NO �
nanV. 3C
SCOREBOARD"V 3iSsvy
t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 2. 1986 Page 3
! Democratic Candidate
Sanford Visits Campus
x C rv JON D. JOKDAN � TM� PHOTO LAB
from studenL Dem�Cratic candidate for S��te, visited ECU Wednesday and answered questions
By PATTI KEMMIS
New Editor
During a visit to ECU Wednes-
day, Terry Sanford, Democratic
candidate for Senate, told
students he hoped to show the
public that a campaign can be run
on a high level without getting
dirty � and hopefully this will
get young people back into the
elections.
Sanford, former North
Carolina Governor, is running
against Republican Senator Jim
Broyhill.
When answering questions
from the audience, Sanford
claimed Financial Aid to be the
"single most important educa-
tion issue in Washington today
"I've been fighting for Finan-
cial Aid all along said Sanford.
"I plan to stay behind that
fight
He said the biggest problem in
the National Defense budget is
waste.
"A report was recently
published showing the waste and
also weapons that aren't as
reliable as they should be said
Sanford. "Tens of billions of
dollars are wasted every year
because of poor management
He added, "We need a strong
National Defense, but we don't
need to pay for less
When asked what he thought
about the emphasis politicians
are now placing on the country's
drug problem, Sanford said he
thought better education about
drug and alcohol use might help
reduce the problems.
Sanford named farming to be
the biggest economical problem
in the state. He said that instead
of finding new methods ovtr the
years, old methods have simply
been patched up.
"Something has to be changed
� such as the ways farmers can
get credit he said.
Sanford said the farmers
should be doing the talking, not
experts, because the farmers
know what the real problems are.
"I think the right goal to go for
is that the ordinary farmer will be
able to make a profit he said.
Author of three books, San-
ford was a N.C. Senator from
1953 - 1955, and as Governor of
N.C. in the years 1961 - I965, he
was ranked one of the 10 best
American governors of this cen-
to by a Harvard Universitv
study.
The Pros And Cons Of Credit Cards
By CAROLYN DRISCOLL
Assistant News Editor
Eighty-three percent of all col-
lege students in this country hold
some type of credit card, accor-
ding to the American Institute of
Certified Public Accountants.
However, warns the AICPA,
many of these new cardholders
may not be aware of the hidden
costs that are often involved in
using plastic.
Before obtaining a card, the
AICPA recommends shopping
around. Only five banks in the
Greenville area offer credit cards
to students: BBPT, First Federal,
NCNB, Peoples and Wachovia.
NCNB offers a student VISA,
for which a parent may or may
Cunanan Lobbies In Washington
By PATTI KEMMIS
News Editor
"Our trip was definitely wor-
thwhile said Steve Cunanan,
SGA president, about his trip to
Washington, D.C. to lobby for
Financial Aid.
Cunanan and 15 other student
representatives from the UNC
school system went to
Washington Sept. 11 and 12 to
meet with senators and con-
gressmen.
"We didn't go to ask for addi-
tional money said Cunanan,
"just better access to what is
already in the funds
Cunanan stated the three main
goals the group had were: reduce
the number forms that need to be
filled out from three to one,
reduce the number of forms that
need to be verified and have an
automatic escape from having to
apply for a Pell Grant.
"The problem with having one
standardized form is the cost of
switching systems Cunanan ex-
plained.
The group wanted the number
of forms that have to be verified
cut from 50 percent to 30 percent,
but were told that it would be im-
possible because the default rate
is already so high,
The only students eligible for a
Pell Grant are those whose
parents make under $28,000 a
year. Cunanan said they sug-
gested an automatic escape from
applying for the grant for those
who know they do not qualify,
thinking this would cut back on
the waiting process.
"There are some real problems
in the Financial Aid process, so-
meone has to do something about
them said Cunanan. "We
weren't getting paid to lobby, so I
honestly think we made more of
an impact than a professional
lobbying group would have
He said letters from two
senators and six congressmen had
already been received saying their
(the group's) concerns would be
addressed.
Cunanan said the next step will
be follow - up letters and
hopefully another another trip to
Washington.
"Even though we were well
received by the congressmen and
senators, we really won't know
how effective our trip was until
Congress goes back into
session he explained. "But now
we know that they know the
students' concerns
This past summer, Cunanan
represented ECU in Raleigh to
lobby against tuition hikes.
not have to co-sign � depending
on the applicant. The other four
banks, however, require a parent
to co-sign before considering the
student's application.
When a parent co-signs a credit
card application, the card and the
bills are in the student's name,
while the final responsibility for
unpaid bills Kerwfth the parent.
The finance charge on a credit
card is 18 percent (annually) at
each of these five banks. A
finance charge is the portion of
the unpaid balance imposed as an
interest fee.
Because rates vary from 12.5
percent to 21.6 percent, the AIC-
PA empasizes the importance of
comparing rates of different
banks and savings and loan
associations. Very often an out-
of-state bank will offer better
terms than a local bank.
For students who expect to pay
their balance in monthly in-
stallments, a credit card with low
interest rates is best. On the other
hand, those who expect to pay
each bill in full should look for a
card which offers an interest-free
grace period (from the time a
purchase is made to the time the
finance charge is imposed). This
grace period is actually an in-
terest free loan for about one
month.
Another aspect to consider,
says the AICPA, is the annual fee
that is charged to cardholders in
addition to the finance charge.
The Greenville banks each charge
18 dollars per year. Other banks,
however, may not charge an an-
nual fee but a "transaction fee
each time the card is used.
Students with a bad credit
history should look for banks
that will issue a credit card when
the student opens a savings ac-
count with that bank. The stu-
dent's credit line will then depend
on the balance in the account.
Credit cards issued by gasoline
companies and department stores
are often easier for a student to
obtain than those issued by
banks, and are a good way to
establish a credit history.
Upon obtaining a credit card,
students ought to keep an up-to-
date list of card numbers and
issuers' phone numbers. In case
of theft or loss, the issuer should
be contacted immediately, warns
the AICPA.
When using a credit card,
students should make sure the
See STUDENTS page 8
ECU Hosts Parents
For Special Weekend
By PATTI KEMMIS
News Editor
According to Ron Speier,
associate dean of Student Ser-
vices, approximately 2,500 to
3,000 parents are expected to ar-
rive on the ECU campus this
weekend for Parents Weekend.
"Because of the number of
parents who have season tickets
to the football games, we can't
give an exact number said
Speier.
"This weekend gives parents a
chance to see how their money is
being spent said Scott Cooper.
"But seriously, its a chance for
parents to get together with their
kids and see how they spend their
time
Included in the special ac-
tivities planned for this weekend
are a Chancellor's reception, a
tailgating picnic and a continent
tal breakfast.
Chancellor Howell will be
holding a reception in the
multipurpose room of
Mendenhall Saturday morning
from 9 -10:30. Students and their
parents are invited to come and
meet various department heads.
The ECU Ambassadors will also
be conducting tours of campus
from 8:30 - 10:30.
According to Nancy Smith,
associate dean of Resident Life,
close to 2,000 picnic tickets have
been sold. The picnic will be on
Entertainment9 �Wright Auditorium nears corn-
Comics12 pletion � see Entertainment page
Sports13 9
Classifiedsis 'Weekend game against SW
Announcements15 Louisiana previewed � see
SPORTS page 13.
the intramural field on the north
side of the stadium from 11:15
a.m. - 1:15 p.m. Saturday.
Chicken and barbeque will be
served.
The Student Union will be
hosting a continental breakfast
Sunday morning from 9:30 -11.
There will also be an in-
terdenominational church service
in Mendenhall at 9 a.m. Sunday.
Parents' football tickets should
be picked up in room 244 of
Mendenhall Saturday morning,
from 8 - 11 a.m. It is important
for students who plan on sitting
with their parents to know they
must pick up their student tickets
Saturday morning. Additional
tickets can also be bought then.
"I think its really important
for parents to be here while
school is in session so they can
meet their children's, meet some
of their instructors, and just see
what our school is like said
Smith.
She added, "This weekend can
also be a good recruiting tool
because the parents can see how
the school is run
JB �UM�E(�T-TI��e��tC�rol.n,in
The new classroom building has taken on different looks in the past few months. It is scheduled to be
completed by Aug. 1987.
New Building Still Unnamed
By LESLEY DEES
Staff Writer
After eight months of steady
construction, the new structure
located on central campus is
beginning to look less like a steel
skeleton and more like a
classroom building.
The new building, which has
not yet been named, will house
general classrooms and faculty
offices in addition to many dif-
ferent academic programs.
Insuffficient faculty office
space and the influx of new
students called for the expansion
by East Carolina University, ac-
cording to Angelo Volpe, vice
chancellor of Academic Affairs.
"Predominantly, we need to
catch up on the number of
students we have and offer the
faculty sufficient space said
Volpe.
The academic programs that
will be included in the building
are as follows:
�School of Business
�Department of English
�Department of Foreign
languages and Literature
�Business Education and Ad-
ministrative Services
�BBAT Center for Leadership
Development
�Cooperative Education Pro-
gram
�Honors Program
�International program
�Aerontology program
The structure, which will have
160,000 square feet and be the
largest building on campus, is
estimated at a cost of 1,500,000
dollars.
The expected date of comple-
tion is Aug. 1987, putting the
building in the works for a year
and a half.
. �;�,��-a-g��r�:xr � . - . . f ,1uiMrjt
ll�llrtlWN
.i�-Vv






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 2. 1986
Honors Promotes Pride
By TOBI FERGUSON
Staff Writer
The Honors Program at ECU
is an attempt to bring together
students, give them a sense of
community and help them
understand that intellect is a good
thing � not something to be
ashamed of, but something of
value, according to David
Sanders, program director.
This university-wide endeavor
exists "to ensure superior
undergraduate students an excep-
tional experience, beginning with
their first day of class he said.
According the Sanders, accep-
tance into the Honors Program is
by invitation only to those
students currently enrolled with a
3.4 GPA and to entering
freshmen who meet or surpass
the same criteria.
Class size is intentionally
small, with a maximum of 20
students per course section. The
course format emphasizes discus-
sion with active learning rather
than lecture and passive learning.
The Honors Program promotes
more interaction between some
of the best instructors at ECU
and the brightest, most motivated
students, said Sanders.
The honors curriculum,
designed to meet General College
requirements, offers students in-
troductory courses in the
disciplines of English, history,
anthropology, and psychology.
Honor seminars are also con-
ducted to cover an array of topics
and academic subjects.
"In the past Sanders said,
"honor seminar topics have been
'Brain, Mind, Language,
Thought 'The Landscape,
Literature, and Painting of
America 'Banning Books: Cen-
sorship in America 'Coming of
Age in the Modern South 'The
Horrific, The Holy, and the
Heroic in American Popular and
Folk and 'Masculinity-
Feminity: Sociobiological
Perspectives
According to Sanders, this
semester's seminars include:
"Philosophical Visions and
Literary Images "Fiction into
Film "Psychology I and
"The Theory of Relativity
"Topics to be covered by
seminars this spring include
'African and Carribean
Literature 'Britain: What Re-
mains Typically British about
Britain and 'Political Economy
of International Relations
stated Sanders.
In the future, the Honors Pro-
gram will be relocated in the new
classroom building. The new
location would be "more central
to the traffic flow of campus for
honor students to frequent
Sanders added.
He also anticipates the honor
student group will be stronger
and will achieve some political
clout in the future. He added, "I
would like for honor students to
be recognized as the outstanding
students on campus, not the quiet
students who just make good
grades, but who take the lead in
campus politics, campus func-
tions, and who are the real
leaders on campus
Sanders describes the benefits
of student participation in the
ECU Honors Program as "the
chance to socialize with the
Honor Student Organization, the
use of the honors lounge on the
second floor of Ragsdale and in-
dividual counseling. It also offers
special lectures, occasional
discussion groups, trips to con-
ventions and honors recognition
for academic excellence as an
honors student
He continued, "Graduating
from the Honors Program should
open doors to graduate andor
professional schools and to ex-
ceptional opportunities in the job
market
Honors is a term respected na-
tionwide, and the honors pro-
gram at ECU follows the
guidelines of the National Col-
legiate Honors Council, par-
ticipates in honors conventions,
and belongs to the Honors Ex-
change Program, said Sanders.
For additional information,
students can contact Sanders at
212 Ragsdale.
HIIHI!
MIIINHMNIttlNlinUimtMNNHii.
NEWMAN-CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER
953 East Tenth Street
Greenville, N.C. 27858
i
K
I
New Drug For AIDS Victims
WASHINGTON (UPI) - AIDS
victims who meet certain re-
quirements can begin receiving
the new drug AZT within a week
now that the government has ap-
proved a master plan for wider
testing of the product.
The Food and Drug Ad-
ministration, under orders from
Assistant Secretary of Health,
Robert Windom, to act quickly,
evaluated the plan under its ac-
celerated review program for
AIDS drugs and issued approval
late Tuesday.
"I congratulate the FDA and
FDA Commissioner Frank
Young for handling this promis-
ing new drug so quickly Win-
dom said in a statement.
The approval means "patients
who meet the eligibility can start
receiving the drug as soon as the
company can supply it an FDA
keNiTian said.
I he FDA announced
September 19 it had approved
Mder testing of the drug, known
formally as azidothymidine. All
that remained was for the Bur-
roughs Wellcome Co. of
Research Triangle Park, N.C, to
tell the agency how it planned to
go about distributing it � which
it did Friday.
A company spokesman said
patient enrollment could take as
little as a week.
i isl ueek Windom referred to
AZT, which works by preventing
the AIDS virus from reproduc-
ing, as "the first therapeutic
agent that seems to hold some
promise for AIDS patients
To meet standards for the
drug, a patient must have ex-
perienced pneumocystis carinii
pneumonia, a type of pneumonia
common among AIDS victims.
Estimates say about 6,000 pa-
tients meet this standard.
The government approved
wider distribution of AZT
because it was effective in limited
testing and researchers felt they
could not withhold it any longer.
The early studies, involving
145 AIDS patients who received
AZT and 137 who received a fake
drug,or placebo, showed AZT
improved survival rates and
lessened some symptoms.
Researchers and health of-
ficials have cautioned that the
drug cannot be considered a cure
for AIDS and that many ques-
tions remain about it. Some of
these may be resolved in other
small-scale tests of the drug on
other AIDS patients, including
those who have Kaposi's Sar-
coma, a kind of cancer.
Acquired Immune Deficiency
Syndrome destroys the body's
immune system, proving fatal by-
leaving victims open to a variety
of infections. It has struck about
25,000 people since 1981, killing
nearly 14,000.
Burroughs Wellcome said pa-
tients who wish to receive drug
must, besides having suffered
pneumocystis carinii, must meet
the following standards:
They must not be receiving
drug therapy for other AIDS
related conditions, drugs that
could harm kidney, bone marrow
or other cellular function, nor
can they be undergoing ex-
perimental chemotherapy.
They must have adequate
kidney and liver function and
healthy bone marrow.
Patients under 12 and pregnant
women, nursing mothers and
women of childbearing age tak-
ing birth control pills are exclud-
ed.
PEOPLE
Domino' Pizza, the world s largest
pizza delivery company, is now hiring
delivery drivers N you are IB years
old. have a valid driver's license,
automobile insurance, a good driving
record, and access to a car. you can
� Make above average wages
� Enjoy the freedom of being on the
road
� Work flexible hours
� Be part of the excitement of the
world's fastest-growing pizza
delivery company
To apply, stop m at tne Rivergate
Dommo's Pizza store today or call
752-4996
C 1MB Oonwio � Pi�� inc
CAMPUS MASS SCHEDULE
Sunday-11:30 a.m.
Biology Building, Room 103
9:00 p.m. Newman Center
Wednesday-5:30 p.m.
Newman Center
(followed by a fellowship dinner)
SHARE THE WORD BIBLE STUDY
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.
at the Newman Center
All are welcome
For information, call 752-4216
fTllllItflllflllltlltllflllfflllflllltltttlltllfltfltllftfltllllllilltlllltlfllllHtlltllllllltllllllltlllllllllftlllltlfllllinin;
IliT

This Style Frame With
Single Vision Rx Lenses
for only
$21.95
Up to � or 2.00 sphere
'Hither vrviVdfi' mk&tianeJj
Offer Expire. Oct. 10, 1984
RAY BAN sunglasses. . 30OFF
ran
puctans
315 Parkview Commons
Across From Doctors Park
752-1446
Open MonFri. 9 a.m. til 5:30 p.
Hillcrest Lanes
Memorial Drive 756-2020
FREE
GAME
Riggan Shoe Repair
111 West 4th St.
Downtown Greenville
"Shoe Repair At The I en Best"
7580204
Stagecoach is the name tor vVeb
Sizzlm s broiled Chopped Srtotn set ed
with hot bread and your choice of t -
potato or French fries Delicious'
SPECIAL
Wednesday & Thursday
$1.99
r
2903 East Tenth Street
. ififuiiin
bo
7.
I Bowl One Game & Receive
j Another Game FREE With This
I Coupon. j
LiniiilCoqnJPej;J�son.j
Wear a Benetton sweat shirt or Tee Shirt.
Receive a fifteen percent discount on your
purchase at Benetton. Offer ends October 7.
1986.
638 B Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, NC Phone:355-7473
Store Hours
Mon-Sat 10-6
SKIING VACATION FILM
Film on Keystone, Colorado
Wednesday, October 8, 7:30 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
The Student Union Travel Comittee has 20 places left on the Spring
Break Skiing Vacation at Keystone Resort, Colorado. If you are
interested in going on the trip or just interested in skiing, this film is
for you!
FROM WASHINGTON, D.C.
"The President's Own"
UNITED STATES
MARINE BAND
Colonel John R Bourgtiii- Director
WEDIMESDAY. OCTOBER 29.
1 986
WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
EAST CAROLIIMA U M I V E R S I T Y
Matinee :2: OOR. M .
Evaning :a :OOR .M.
ADMISSION
MATMEE:
ECU s"��-�t.m and Gr-o�.D� ��
ICIF-Cty �"d St.ff -P,t3 SO ��
Rufatic and at th. Door- - Vsb
EVEN IMG:
ECU Faculty end St.ff - Si SO
Public and at �h. Door- - ,6oo
Tickats Available at the Cantral
Monday - Friday, 11: OO a . m -
Call 1919) 757-6611. ��.
A Student Union Special Concerts Presentation
Health
� camssm
ui
The ECI Stuck Healt
Center provides man
for student othei
they are sick � injured
ding to Kav VanN
associate director of a
tion.
"We are pan -
institution and vetal
ly; wetry tobean m!t
the students' edu u
said.
Emergency services an
Student
available after 445
before 8 a.m. Emerge
tions are classified -
occur without u .
high fevers or extre
worsen without treato
need treatment before
clinic h o u r . An
Who
CHAPEL HILL. NC �
Financially independei
students, who are eligible
more federal aid U
who still get money help fi
their parents, genera
the extra aid f
released last week
Southern Association ol -
Financial Aid A
(SASF.AA) says.
At the same time, a
sional committe approved a
of changes n the way studt
can qualify for aid a inde;
dent students.
The changes, one sow
will cause "an incredible a
of confusion" among students
They seem mostly "ar
to wipe out the perception
the federal student aid
being abused says SASFAA c
author Stuart Bethune, al
aid official at North Car
Chapel Hill.
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imiH)IIHIIIimilHIIIUHHIIMIIIHI�IIHIHIIHUHMIIHHmt
l-CATHOLIC (
IT CENTER
It Tenth Street
N.C. 27858
r
K
SCHEDULE
1 1:30 a.m.
(ding, Room 103
lewman Center
iav-5:30 p.m.
ion Center
fellowship dinner)
5
RD BIBLE STUDY I
7:30 p.m.
man Center
welcome
m, call 752-4216
llltllillllflllllllilllllllltllllllllllMIIIIIIHItlllllllllllllllllll
SlELClM
f
fk
tern
-
IAL
& Thursday
.99
iin
"enth Street
ee Shirt,
on your
October 7,
Store Hours
Mon-Sat 10-6
C.
fD
- 2 OO
3 . SO
SS . OO
- S3 .OO
SO
6 . OO
Offi
Presentation
V
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 2, 196
Health Services Offered
B'cA3?�,mj?ia8�LL
The ECU Student Health
Center provides many services
for student other than care when
they are sick or injured, accor-
ding to Kay VanNortwick,
associate director of administra-
tion.
"We are part of an educational
institution and we take it serious-
ly; we try to be an integral part of
the students' education she
said.
Emergency services are
registered nurse will assess the
condition and either treat it or
call a physician if necessary.
There are always at least two
doctors on call if there is no one
in the center, said VanNortwick.
Walk-in, outpatient clinic
hours are from 8 a.m. to 4:45
p.m Monday through Friday,
and from 3:30 to 5:30 on Satur-
days and Sundays during the
regular school year,
ment in needed.
No appoint-
vides pharmacy services for
prescriptions written by Health
Service physicians and nurse
practitioners. Other non-
prescription drugs are dispensed
at no cost by a licensed phar-
macist. A reduced charge is made
for medications such as oral con-
traceptives.
Other health services offered
by the Student Health Center are:
�Health Education
�Allergy Clinic
�Laboratory and Radiology Ser-
vices
�Hypertension Clinic
�Acne Clinic
�Wart Clinic
�Psychiatric Services
Written class excuses are not
provided by the Student Health
Service, said VanNortwick. "We
will verify that a student was here
or was too sick to come to class,
but we try to treat students as
adults and teach them to take
care of themselves
Voter Registration
Student Health Center
available after 4:45 p.m. and
before 8 a.m. Emergency condi-
tions are classified as those which
occur without warning, cause
high fevers or extreme pain,
worsen without treatment and
need treatment before regular
clinic hours. An on-duty
Whether or not a student needs
in patient care is determined by
someone at the Health Center.
Facilities are available for obser-
vation of an illness or injury, in-
travenous frlids or medication.
The Health Center also pro-
By RUSTY HARRINGTON
Staff Writer
As the political campaigns
target thehiselves towards their
Final leg, many college students
fail to properly exercise their
rights as citizens � by not voting.
In order to participate in the
next general election, which will
be held November 4th, everyone
who is of voting age should
register to vote if they have not
already done so.
Those eligible to vote in this
next election should be registered
by Oct. 6, according to the State
Board of Elections.
To be eligible to vote, one must
first be 18 years of age, be a U.S.
citizen 30 days prior to the elec-
Who Deserves Aid
CHAPEL HILL, NC (CPS) �
Financially independent college
students, who are eligible for
more federal aid than students
who still get money help from
their parents, generally deserve
the extra aid they get, a report
released last week by the
Southern Association of Student
Financial Aid Administrators
(SASFAA) says.
At the same time, a congres-
sional committe approved a raft
of changes in the way students
can qualify for aid as indepen-
dent students.
The changes, one source savs,
will cause "an incredible amount
of confusion" among students.
They seem mostly "an attempt
to wipe out the perception that
the federal student aid system is
being abused says SASFAA co-
author Stuart Bethune, also an
aid official at North Carolina at
Chapel Hill.
Last year, U.S. Secreatary of
Education William Bennett
charged many students are in fact
abusing the system by claiming
they support themselves when, in
reality, they are being supported
by their parents.
To remedy the problem, the
administration has tightened the
rules under which students can
qualify for independent student
aid checks.
But the SASFAA "found little
willful manipulation of the
system Bethune says.
"Independent students getting
financial aid rely overwhe lm-
ingly on self help" to finance
their educations, he says.
"What our report suggests is
that independent students do not
lie. We asked (the 2,000 student
sampling) if, in order to qualify
for funds, you had to misrepre-
sent your relationship with your
parents, would you?" Bethune
recalls.
"Only 2.6 percent indicated
that would apply. So, 97.4 per-
cent had not (and would not)
misreport their relationship
Bennett charged that 13,000
students whose parents earned
$100,000 a year were receiving
federal student aid.
But the National Association
of Independent Colleges and
Universities (NAICU) asked Ben-
nett to retract his statement, say-
ing its own study of the eligibility
rules were tightened.
Such "independent" students'
status, however, was further con-
fused last week when a congres-
sional conference committee, as
part of the new Higher Education
Reauthorization Act, again
changed the procedures for
establishing which students are
fi scall y sel f-s u fficient.
No one is sure just what the
changes will mean.
ATTIC
FRIDAY
ICE
WATER
MANSION
SATURDAY
bLVL, "
3K�
II III'IU I'UWt
Caterers
Simply Elegant
Catering � Restaurant -Tavern
TAILGATE PARTY CATERING
Oven Fried Chicken stuffed Pita
(Choice of Chicken, Ham, or Shrimp)
Make a Sandwich Bar j Much More
TWO Day Notice Call For More Information
757-1227
uodnoo
(9861 01 jaqojDQ
rcJII�E3j
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8091 ZSZ � i��MS suoaj up
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tion date, and be registered with
the board of elections in their
home county.
If after Oct. 6, a person
reaching their 18th birthday may
then register at the polling place.
According to Margaret W.
Hardee, supervisor of Elections
of Pitt County, "students who
may have questions concerning
the voting process may come by
(the office) and we would be glad
to answer any question they may
have
One problem students have is
in obtaining an absentee ballot.
To get an absentee ballot, a re-
quest must be made to the board
of elections in their home county
no later than Oct, 28.
Kentucky Fried Chicken. jfp,
$1.99
plus tax
FOR ONE COM1 xXTE
2-PIECE PACK
2 Pieces of Chicken
1 Small Mashed Potato and Gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
Expires Dec. 31, 1986
�Sr
710 North Green Street
752-0090
SEAFOOD EXTRAVAGANZA
All You Can Eat
Fried Shrimp
Steamed Shrimp
Crab Cakes
Clam Strips
Trout
Flounder
Deviled Crab
Oysters
With Alaskan
Crab Legs
7
$50
$
10
6
ggBBgggBSEggBBfl
g Select 3 Items Of Your Choice
Flounder Fried Chickee
Trout
; CrabCakn A i 4 E!
; Deviled Crab 3 � 1 Yd
P
4 vryatcro SS
Clan Strips
Oysters
SSSSSSSBBB
vxw�fcx� ,
E
Scallop
Barbecue
Fried Chicken
SSS
Select 4 Items Of Your Choice
Shrimp
Flounder
Trout
Crab Cakes
Deviled Crab
Steamed Shrisap
Steamed Crab Lees
Oysters
6
95
��N�X�V��X'�
Oyster Bar Now Open
gRIVERSIDE
TSteak bar
aV
J1S STUNTONSeuXG "OiO
QXtCNVILLE N C
I
We serve USDA Choice Beef that is always fresh and cut daily
Bull's Cot10.95
T-Bone(24o�)
Ssrlosn (22 �)
Rl Eye (16 ot.)
SALADBARA POTATO BAR ONLYTT. 5.00
If two (2) people prefer to spit one of our BuTs Cut Steaks, there wtM be � $5.00 charge for the
Salad. Potato, and Bread.
Filet Mkjnon (12 aj
New York Strip (16 oxi
8.95
T-Bone (14 ox)
SsTki (16 ox)
Rfc Eye (12 ox.)
FUet Mkjnon (8 ox)
New York Strip (12 ox)
Indudm aM thm Salad, Baked Potatoes, and Bread you want.
Beverages all abc Permits
V
Soft Drinks
Iced Tea-Coffee
.65
55
Greenville's Unique Dining Experience
This ad upside down at rtqyest of cimm.
?:
s!sMmmmvai�
-e. � ��' 4Lm4
�����
i v
4i .





6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 2, 1986
Mendenhall Offers A Wide Variety
ECU
By VIRGINIA LIVINGSTON
Staff Writer
You deserve a break, right"7
After all, the pursuit of happiness
is in the constitution. But the new
drinking laws have left a lot of
students believing happiness is
finding a good fake I.D. Not all
happiness is found in a beer bot-
tle and East Carolina has provid-
ed students with a way of having
fun. The best part is that it
doesn't cost as much as a night
downtown.
So where is this place you may
ask. It is Mendenhall Student
Center. Yes, Mendenhall. Most
of you know it at as a place to eat
and to go see a free movie, but
there is a lot more. To find out
what is in Mendenhall let's go
downstairs.
The first thing you will notice
is the bowling alley. You can go
between 2 p.m and 5 p.m. on
weekdays and bowl a few games.
It is 80 cents a game and a 25 cent
shoe rental. Intramurals sponsors
bowling tournments at the alley
and there are leagues for frater-
nities, sororities and indepen-
dent- organizations. On Fridays
the bowling ally has discount
bowling.
But maybe bowling isn't your
style. Perhaps a game of biliards
may interest you. If so, let's walk
across the big room downstairs
and go onto the game room. Here
you can play billiards,table ten-
nis, or maybe chess, Monopoly
or Trivial Pursuit. A biliards
table is rented by the hour. Get
the balls from the person up front
and they will time you. If you
want to play table tennis you
have to buy a ball or bring your
own, paddles are provided. The
games room sponsors tour-
naments in biliards, table tennis,
backgammon and chess. They are
members of the Association of
College Unions International
(ACUI). To enter in these tour-
naments go to the games room to
pick up a entry form. Tourna-
ment winners go on to compete in
regional tournaments. A biliards
tournament for women is being
held on Oct. 9 and the men's
tournament will be on Nov. 6.
This year the Student Union will
be sponsoring a table tennis club.
The club hopes to be able to par-
ticipate is regional matches. If
you are interested in any of the
events mentioned you should
contact Kevin Sessoms for more
information.
All this activity may sound
great but you might want
somehing a little less active right?
Since we are still downstairs we
i in ee what is on the big screen
T It is located through the dou-
b .doors beside the biliards room
anu it is a great place to see the
soaps in between classes. There is
also a crafts center downstairs
and the Underground; a place
where all sorts of interesting
entertainment goes on.
Let us move from downstairs
to upstairs and see what the se-
cond floor has to offer. Second
floor holds the offices for the
SGA, the Student Union, and the
programs office. This is where
you come to talk to your
representatives and program-
mers. Pirate Walk is also housed
in the student government offices
for anyone interested in helping
out.
One of the events that the Stu-
dent Union sponsors that brings a
lot of excitement is the Student
Union sponsored trips. This year
students have a chance to visit
New York for Thanksgiving and
spend Christmas in Hawaii. The
New York trip is Nov. 26 to Nov.
30 and you could be in Hawaii
WSSSS
from the 30 of Dec. to the 7 of
Jan. The Hawaii trip is $790 with
a 100 dollar deposit, call
757-6611 for information about
the New York trip.
The programming office will
be bringing a lot of exciting talent
to ECU. The President's own U.
S. Marine Band will be coming in
Oct and it will be followed by
Burl Ives, the Suzuki child
violinist and several chamber
music groups.
Most of this stuff sounds fan-
tastic. And now I can admit that I
exaggerated a little at the beginn-
ing when I said that some of this
stuff isn't as expensive as a night
downtown, but face it; quality
costs and ECU is earning a
reputation for bringing the arts
to the east and since we are right
here, take advantage of it all.
Taking advantage of all this
will require money and you can
get it either from one of the
automatic teller machines that
are outside on Mendenhall or
from inside at the student bank.
The student bank will cash checks
from parents, grandparents, and
other in the immediate family.
But not step-parents. They will
cash student financial aid checks,
work study checks and another
student's check to you if both
students are there with I.D. in
hand. You can keep money at the
student bank and withdraw it at
anytime, any amount up to Si25
a week. You earn no interest but
you are not charged for
withdrawal.
Mendenhall is also looking
toward the future. It will soon be
expanding by 35,000 sq.ft. A full
service dining room, a multi-
purpose great room and offices
will be located in the new section.
WZBM, the campus radio sta-
tion, will also be in the new sec-
tion. Construction is scheduled to
begin in Aug of 1987 with the
completion to be in late 1988
WSWSSStS.ViWSSSSSSSSSS'SMSSffWSfSWS.
I'LL BE BACK
TREY BURLEY '86
FAMILY BUFFET
ABORTlOSS UP TO 12th WEEK OF PREGNANCY $205 Abortion fnm 1? 10 18 weeks at additional eosi P-ti.rta - Tev, Birth Control, a Problem Pregnano t ifttnseting For fun her information, call 82 0533 coll tree
4Vf�
1 MW �' aW. JMwnumber 1-800-532-5384) between 9 am and 3 p n vveekdavs Genera anesthesia available RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS
B Deanne L, C uoper
iaff Writer
The Talur-Slaughter Alu
House, located on Fifth Street
as purchased b East Carolina
Alumni Association, Inc on Dec
10, 1979
Funds for the purchase of this
house were donated b tw
Carolina alumni, E M
Slaughter, Jr and 1 M Ta
each contributed $50,000
Slaughter is a businessmu
the tidewater Virginia area vh
a former recipient of the Outstan
355-2172
'Ml�Mi
Mim�ML)
LUNCH
$369
DINNER
$469
featuring
Help Yourself Home Cooking
ALL YOU CARE TO EAT
One Low Price Does It All!
EntTM � Dss�rt � Solod Bar � Vg��abU� � Drinks
Thru October ECU Students Get 10 Off With ID
Quality Copies 5
fivers, brochures, reports
HMD'S Collating
convenient hours f aI frtendlv staff
Padding !3n� RESUMES
Binding
Enlargements
passport photos
fcreat service
fast, quality copies
much, much more
Great Food Within
Your College Budget!
321 E 1001 Street (919) 752-0675
Monday - Friday 7:00am - 10-OOpm Saaurtay aixar- � xxr
- p
ka&�
The Alumni C enle
r H
maxEll
maxell
rtD
CO KROCERINC FOR ALL YOUR
Jf Tailgate Party
Needs!
vim
Register To
Pirate Football Tickets
2 Pairs To Be Given Away
For Each Home Game Register Now!
When choosing 3 floppy disk, the
name Maxell is all you need to
know. Indeed, your Maxell floppy
disk is endowed with such a per-
fect memory it comes with a life-
time warranty. Maxell is the
floppy disk deemed so reliable, so
faultless in performance, that
drive manufacturers choose it for
the critical testing and certifying
of new drive equipment. Each
Maxell MD1 Mini-Floppy Disk is
tested and certified error-free.
Student Stores
East Carolina University
Wright Building
Greenville, NC 27834
W.W.V.V.

i
HOLLY FARMS
Fresh Fryer
Combo Pak
�118
g CONTAINS:
Lb.
3 BREASTS
3 MUMSTICM
3THMHS
KROGER 2 LOWFAT
OR HOMOGENIZED
Whole
Milk
Qt.
Ctn.
KAHN S
German
Bologna
Lb
$i59
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Breyer's jaj
Yogurt dm
990
DIET COKE. CHERRY COKE
CAFFEINE FREE COKE OR
Coke
Classic
Ltr
NRB
ALL VARIETIES
BETTY CROCKER
Cake
Mixes . .
I'O �OOl.
PuRCMASt
49c
KROGER 1-LB.
All Meat
Weiners .
I u; r
BUY ONE
GET ONE
FREE
GREEN GIANT PEAS. CUT OR
FRENCH STYLE GREEN BEANS, CREAM
STYLE OR WHOLE KERNEL
Corn or
Green Beans
KROGER
OLD FASHION
White
Bread
r
16-17
Oz.
Cans
OFF LABEL
Close Up
Toothpaste
yftHcuui Jruatu
VHS Video Movie Rentals

�a " Rental
Hundred of tmvorlto movlot
to choomm from!
EASTERN GOLD OR RED
Delicious
Apples
199�
ADVERTISEO ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised
Items 1$ required to be
readily available for sale In
each Kroger sav-on except
as specifically noted in this
ad if we do run out of an
Item we will offer you your
choice of a comparable
Item when available,
reflecting the same sav-
ings or a ralncneck which
will entitle you to pur-
chase the advertised Item
at the advertised price
within SO days Only one
vendor coupon will be ac
cepted per Item

Go Krogering
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. � Greenville
Coovnnt 19�s
"fOJfSlvOn
Ont Sow o DCWert
informatix t
the news events of the d
sports coverage,
features about the people,
things surrounding you at
Greenville. So can your
$25 your parents can get a o
subscription to The East C
Serving the campus i
1925, The Ea.t Carotin
valuable insight into studei
Carolina University
w
Rev



rr
; � ,





iety
I ou earn no interest but
charged for
t
all is also looking
tture. It will soon be
. t) 15,000 sq.ft. A full
ling ioom, a multi-
. . .i room and offices
in the new section.
campus radio sta-
- be in the new sec-
on is scheduled to
i � 1987 with the
be in late 1988.
As UP
: WEEK
SCY
a MMrol,
'free
�-i id 5
� � i Jaiable
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Copies 5
Collating
s
k1I staff
m RESUMES
s Binding
merits
m
(919) 752-0875
Surmv 9 0Cw - 9XJOjn
WIN
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To
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Register Now!
�ERRY COKE
REE COKE OR
Coke
Classic
99
49c
KROGER
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White
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5
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9
"�on Soa To ojir,
on
i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 2. 1986
ECU Alumni Assc, House
By Denne L. Cooper
Staff Writer
The Taylor-Slaughter Alumni
House, located on Fifth Street,
was purchased by East Carolina
Alumni Association, Inc. on Dec
10, 1979.
Funds for the purchase of this
house were donated by two East
Carolina alumni, E.M.
Slaughter, Jr. and L.M. Taylor,
each contributed $50,000.
Slaughter is a businessman in
the tidewater Virginia area who is
a former recipient of the Outstan-
-� -mm
dinj; Alumni award, and a former
president of the Alumni Associa-
tion.
Taylor, who is an attorney in
Pain Beach, Florida, is also a
former recipient of the Outstan-
ding Alumni award. He currently
serves on the Board of Directors
for the E.C.U. Foundation.
IThc Talyor-Slaughter House
contains the office of Institu-
tional Development as well as the
Alumni Affairs office. Both of
these offices provide money for
aca.demic scholarships.
The Alumni Association,
�4P
which began in 1912, alone con-
tributes approximately $90,000
yearly in scholarship funds.
The association sponsors many
programs ranging from ar-
rangements for alumni reunions
and seminars to sponsorship of
professional societies. However,
fundraising and alumni affairs
work together.
According to Donald Leggett,
assistant to the vice chancellor
for Institutional Development,
"There is no way to separate the
two
There are approximately 8,000
3EP
fS$8�
The Alumni Center is the headquarters for many campus fund raisers.
I
Every
Tuesday and
Thursday you
can read the most
informative stories about
the news events of the day, the best
sports coverage, and interesting
features about the people, places, and
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Greenville. So can your parents. For
$25 your parents can get a one year mail
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Serving the campus community since
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Our remarkable staff works around
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Reward yourself with any 10 or 14 karal gold or Siladium ring
and get a $50 necklace, free
Our Repres entalive is on campus with distinguished
tradi tionaJ and contemporary styles-
each backed by a Full Lifetime Warranty
CLASS RINGS
Thursday-Friday 9:00-4:00
in Lobby of Student Store
active members in the Alumni
Assocition, these members are
the monetary contributors. There
are more than 50,000 general
members, and these members
need only to have attended East
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of Leggett who serves on the
Parent's Day coordination com-
mittee, all the departments of
East Carolina work together to
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"I
A
Advance
Auto Parts
"We've Got It For East Carolina"
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PHONE: 756-9899
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EgMlMM" 1' � �ftrt�Mft��
(Q� ttfc yjn
' i�� wjidinw k�i





8
I HtEAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 2, 1986
�pt 24
A 4 5 p. in
x Greenville resident reported
he larcen) o his bike from the
rack northwest of Speight
Building.
B 00 p.m.
N Scot! Hall resident was found
I ssi ion of stolen propern
onging to .i local store.
45 p . m .
larvis Hall resident reported
image to her v ehicle while park-
d in the 5th and Reade Street
ing lot.
4 5 p. in
' cer reported observing a
ing to an Aycock
. re dei
orm i evident was
discharging
� om the 3rd floor
' Dorm.
Belk I k rm resident was
n C oliege Hill Drive in
ssession of beer and supplying
underage student.
. ! a
II Public Safety officer
assisting the Greenville
dice Department in the ap-
tension of a man wanted for
v .ittie House without
his meal.
male broke the
i froi i ciass at Fleming
lent to an affra
i him and Kenny Gorman
Mk: acl Fesole and
1):an, Jr all from
pLt . I homas, Pesole
banned from
impie affray and co-
simple affra.
bsei ed a group
I in an intox-
ipti e manner on
; the Brewster
rwo were students one
t Beik i rm tnd one of Fletcher
ee nonstudents,
anned trom campus.
m.
Dorm residents were
b in .olation of the
I alcohol policy.
i
enville resident was ar-
� e Allied Health
espassing.
x ofl icer reported
Greenville Police
� in reference to a
Dorm resident being in
I construction sign
the English Annex.
itead Dorm residents
a Fletcher Hall resident were
in possession oi alcohol while
erage and in the Central
wa of the first floor of
instead.
ept.28
2:04 a.m.
wo Ayden residents were bann-
i from campus for giving false
rmation to a police officer
ind impeding traffic.
.248 am
X resident of Belk reported the
creen of the window to a 3rd
floor Belk room and the window
w as up and the residents were not
n.
8:330 p.m.
A Scott Dorm resident reported
'he breaking and entering of his
room and the larceny of money
from the same.
Sept. 29
1:00 P-m-
A Clement Hall resident reported
vandalism of her vehicle tire
while parked in the 9th and
Cotanche Street student parking
lot.
2:28 p.m.
A Fletcher Dorm resident
reported that unknown person(s)
punctured a tire of her vehicle
while the vehicle was parked in
the 9th and Cotanche Street stu-
dent parking lot.
6:45 p.m.
An Aycock dorm resident
reported the breaking and enter-
ing of his room and the larceny of
his wallet.
6:50 p.m.
An Aycock dorm resident
reported the breaking and enter-
ing of his room and the larceny of
his wallet.
7:30 p.m.
A Scott dorm resident was issued
a State citation for careless and
reckless driving.
10.40 p.m.
An officer reported finding an
Aycock Hall resident on the roof
of Aycock without authorization.
Oct. 1
2:40 a.m.
Two Aycock Hail residents were
in possession of potted plants
that may be the property of the
university or College Hill Drive.
They had also consumed alcohol
while being under age.
Students And Credit
Continued from page 1
salesperson returns the card righu
away. Asking for the carbon
copies of the receipt and destroy-
ing them prevents anyone els:
from getting hold of the card
number and using it.
A cardholder's liability for
"unauthorized charges says the
AICPA, is limited by federal law
to 50 dollars per credit card.
However, there is no liability for
any charges made after theft or
loss is reported to the issuer of
the card.
The AICPA recommends
against giving credit card
numbers over the phone to
soliciters. Ask the caller to put hi
request in writing.
Department store credit car-
dholders may refuse to pay for
"unsatisfactory goods or ser-
vices" purchased on the card as
long as an attempt is made to
solve the problem directly with
the store, according to the AIC
PA.
EXTRA LOW
� 1:1111 J �: ; i
OR TOP ROUND
FOOD LION
PRICES!
We Reserve The Right
To Limit Quantities.
� 0m am 0m aamm) 0m To Limit Quantities
ROASTS USDA Choice Beef
Prices in this ad good thru
Sunday. October 5, 1986.
ROUND ROASTS
$198
HONEYDEWS
USDA
CHOICE
Each
USDA Choice Beef Bottom
Large Western
COLLARD
FUnJlTk
Pancaki
Mix
99c
Ptltsftury � 32 Oz.
Btftterwlrk Complete
Scott
Towels
$"99
3 Roll Pick
rm FAST AftOI INIAN
Wright
B DA su anson
No thai hav
tmg used to the arm . fence
�hat's block ing
Student Store, the hi �
are packing theii bag
a will sc or. bt ev
friends, irm r
finally con ing
�'The most bej it I
in the Ea- k g
Auditorium I �
opening its
The lao I
ou were ir.
probabK .
just that vi. a. like a
hall. Echo Ci
prepare � elves foi
extraordinary . (Pi
remarkablo K
1etamorph osts
close)
That old, na
has been re bufled Tl rak
Looking at the plush naMes ot trn n
Drop Add was never like fbi-
Videos:
B MICAH HARRIS
Greeting s, conno
culture. Tllis is the first in a sei
of articles which will periodica
review new music videt -
forth on the MTV, Mght Tn
and Friday ight iideos Vine.
We have .i vintage so let's -
pickingvr panning a- tht -
may be.
Chicagc has brought their 191
-ong, "Twenty-Five or Six I.
Four in o the eighties 1984
be exact. The ideo dep
futuristic anti-utopia and
forts of a young couple to es
into the past.
This video in etremeh well
Tapscott h
i
B JOHN SHANNON
It has happened
before to j ou
standing, it: a clearing:
suddenly two
curling roods converge
The opening lines of Stephen
Tapscott'?. poem "It Has Hap
pened" will have acquired new
significance when his road
crosses ECU students' Monda
night. Tapscott will be reading
Stephen Tapscott
Md
l
I
I
e
Li!
tic
Hi
hett
ISti
m
hoi
Fej
sial
peJ
haf
whl
aw
enj
Bel
ani
bo
ed
� "





Ki �1 IMN
i H IOHI K 2, IVNf
Cotanche Stiee; studeni parking
lot.
2:28 p in
A Fletchei Dorm resident
reported thai unknown per son (s)
punctured a tire oi hci vehicle
hile the vehicle was parked in
the sth and Cotanche Street
dent parking lot
6 4 p.m
An Aycock dorm resident
reported the breaking and entci
mg of his room and the larceny oi
his wallet
6 50 p.m
� n Aycoc k doi m i esidi
reported the breaking and entei
ing of his room and the Ian en
lus wallet.
7:30 p m
A Scott dorm lesident was issued
a State citation for careless and
teckless driving
10 40 p.m.
n officei ieported finding an
ycock Hall resident on the roof
01 Aycock without authorization.
kt 1
2 4i a.m.
1 wo Aycock Hall residents were
in possession tit potted plants
that ma be the properts of the
university or (ollege Hill Drive.
I hey had also consumed alcohol
v hile being under age.
Students And Credit
Continued from page 1
salesperson returns the card ngh
away. Asking for the carbon
copies of the receipt and destroy
ing them prevents anyone els:
from getting hold of the card
number and using it.
A cardholder's liability foi
"unauthorized charges says the
A1CPA, is limited by federal lav
to 50 dollars per credit card.
However, there is no liability for
any charges made after theft or
loss is reported to the issuer ot
the card.
The A1P A re
against giving �� card
numbers over the pi
soliciters Ask the caller t i put
request in writing
Department store
dholders may refuse
"unsatisfactorv g
vices" purchased on the
long as an attempt is made
solve the problem dire I
the store, according
PA
Wright
B I
n the
Speight
epoi ted
� t , ark-
v Street
Ucock
-
. i
iville
a
d Net
if1 a
man
le and
. Pesole
i�
cam
; ,�!u .
; e d
i
being in
tion sign
lex
( dents
lent were
ol while
( entral
� floor of
anii
. false
fficei
d the
a "rd
' e window
u.ere not
t reported
tering of his
larceny of money
p.m.
r Hall resident reported
her vehicle tire
a !ule parked in the 9th and

EXTRA LOW
�IMiTMTjTTT
OR TOP ROUND
PRICES!
We Reserve The Right
To Unit Quantities.
� 0 mm 0 mm gW To Limit Quantities.
ROASTS USDA Choice Beef
Pricejs in this ad good thru
Sunfay. October 5, 1986.
ROUND ROASTS
$198
HONEYDEWS
Lb
SDA
CHOICE
$129
Each
USDA Choice Beef Bottom
1
Large Western
CHUCK ROASTS QUARTERS
USDA Choice Beef
IPRfS
6 5 Or Reg.Rldgie Potato Chips
7 0 Nacho BravosBravo Triangles
Milwaukee's
Best Light
$179
Pkg ot 6 12 Or Cans
resh
� FREE " FREE
l FVIEE MILK
9 AT THE CHECKOUT upto$l 00
ANY 3 fi Cenxjli �
I
2 Liter Pepsi-Free, Diet Pepsi, Diet 1
Pepsi-Free 1,
EXTRA LOW PRICES Everyda
Apple
Juice ,P
64 Oi White House
Pancake
Mix
303 Can CutFrench Style Green Beans
Whole Kernel Or Cream Style Corn
Honey Pod Peas
Ramen Pride
Noodles
s89�
3 Oz ChickenBeet (Mushroom
Pillsbury 32 Or.
Buttermilk Complete
24 Or
Jimmy Dean Hot, Mild,
n v D
Spe
cial Recipe
CIIH� ��� � i.
1 �!
Food Li on
tt Lowfat
Milk Gallon I. OH
Tasty
Seal test
Buttermilk , ui .99
Pillsbury
Cake Mixes
18 5 Oz. WMttYttlowBtrtter
0eils F�4
Scott jf Surf
Towels
Deterqent
3 Roll Pack
147 Oz. S2 50 Ofl
$170
20 Lb. Hartz MMntatH PrtartwN
Allpo Dog
Food
14 0z AN Ravm
.�-A-
Looking a' the plustt iosi
Drop d(i a nrver itkt
Videos:
Bv MK U HRRI'�
C
Tapscot
Bx J �HN Mi (M)
It �� .
- � . �� . -
pened" -
- � ax c crosses II night Tr
Stephen Tapoti
MM
I





And Credit
gh
bon
rov
the
law
rd
The AICPA recommends
against giving credit card
numbers over the phone to
soliciters. Ask the caller to put his
request in writing.
Department store credit car-
dholders mav refuse to pay for
"unsatsstactorv goods or ser
vices" purchased on the card as
kg dv an attempt is made tc
solve the problem directlv wit
'�he More, according to the A1C
PA
ES!
i
i in this ad good thru
ay, October 5, 1986.
m
bch
i
i
t
0
�K ?( ��OvH6H If ���
frei"
EE MILK
:CKOUT up to $1.00)
I fT Cereals
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
J
in
.owfat
Gallon
r � �!
1.59
lilk
i Gallon �
99
). White YellowButter
Devils Food
14 Oz. Alt Ftovtn
THf FASTt AROI INIAN
Entertainment
(X IOBI R 2, IVM Pae
Wright Auditorium Soon To Be Re-Opened
B D.A.SWANSON
sitff Wnin
Now thai you have started get-
ng used to the annoying fence
's blocking traffic next to the
student Store, the brick masons
ire packing; their bags and the
j will si'on be cleared. Yes,
�tends, this past year of misery is
all comiing to an end. and
The most beautiful concert hall
the Eavt" that's Wright
uditorium folks -will be re-
opening its grand doors.
The last time the scarce few of
uere in that cavernous hall it
riblv looked, and sounded,
si that way; like a cavernous
hall. Echo City, that is. Well,
p epare ourselves for something
aordinary. (Probably not as
�emarkablf as Kafka's The
Metamorphosis, but darntootin'
se).
That old, nastv wooden floor
as been rebuffed. Those creakv
folding chairs have been replaced
by beautiful, plush theater scats.
Even the tacky old curtains that
hid those charming arched win-
dows have been given finely
crafted shutters.
It is definitely a sight to behold
on the East Carolina campus.
And each and every student
should make a point of visiting
the theater before that "Pomp
and Circumstance" march.
Planning for renovations
began on the building over six
years ago under Chancellor
Thomas Brewer. Brewer, who
had just assumed his post, took
the deteriorated Wright (one of
the oldest buildings on campus)
on as his own project, though he
certainly did not forsee the years
of hard work ahead.
$1.25 million dollars were
originally allotted by the state for
the job In 1980 that went far
enough to covej the bare
necessities: a new roof, a fire
sprinkler system, balcony, sloped
floor and reconstructed stage.
The Chancellor's Planning
Committee on the Wright
renovation promptly renamed
that project as "Phase One" (im-
plying, we assume, that they had
not completed the job they set
out to do - only kidding folks)
and handed the whole headache
over the Department of Universi-
ty Unions.
The new committee, formed
under the Department of Univer-
sity Unions and director Rudolph
Alexander, formulated the final
plans for the renovation. In 1985
the General Assembly ap-
propriated an additional $1.6
million for the project. And, in
August of that year construction
began, that dreaded obstacle was
erected, and life on 'Greek Street'
was temporarily set into a
tailspin.
But, as all of the work finally
comes near completion it seems
j B HUMIERT - eCU MOTO LAO
Looking a I the plush inside of he nw Wright Auditorium, students of old ma be sent into culture short
lrop Add was never like this. � ZJL
that all of the inconvenience was
worth the hassle. The
auditorium, with its fresh coat of
pastel blue'grey and salmon
paint, burgundy carpets, and
gracefully suspended chandeliers
is spectacular, to say the least.
Those old booming acoustics
have also been toned down and a
portable orchestra shell erected
on stage. In addition the entire
sound recording system has been
revamped.
In a tour of the work-in-
progress Alexander proudly-
noted that with the renovation of
not only the theater itself, but the
backstage areas as well, we can
now both attract and accom-
modate the world's best perform-
ing artists.
Immediately behind the
sprawling stage is a new storage
and general purpose room larger
than the largest classroom in
Brewster. Flanking this, and
moving into the former domain
of the ECUROTC offices, are a
large Green Room, primary per-
formers' dressing rooms,
showers, and other facilities
designed to make any interna-
tional performer feel right at
home. Huge airlines is the rule
throughout this fine arena-of the
arts.
If you make it to no other cam-
pus event this year, shell out a
few bucks to attend one of the
outstanding world class perfor-
mances in Wright Auditorium.
You will be glad you did.
Nearly a month prior to the
billed "Gala Grand Opening
the Suzuki Talent Education
Tour will arrive directly from
Japan. Their appearance in
Wright will only be one of two
North Carolina dates. Noted for
their accuracy and intonation,
this group of talented youngsters
is guaranteed to delight you with
their "singing strings
Two weeks later the perennial
grandfather type and Snowman-
narrator of the classic Christmas
feature, "Rudolph The Red-

J 0 NUMIERT - ECU PMOTO LAB
This view of the fover in Wright Auditorium affords the viewer a keen
insight as to whv the theater has been so heralded during the past ear.
Nosed Reindeer Burl Ives will
enter the spacious stage with
ballads and stories.
Finally, on Sunday, November
16, the entire structure will be
abuzz with dignitaries as the
metamorphical champagne bottle
is shattered against the foot o
the stage. Appearing together in
the official grand re-opening of
the old building will two of North
Carolina's finest musical groups:
the North Carolina Symphony
and the East Carolina L'niversitv
Symphonv. The evening promi-e-
to be spectacular, to a the lea-
Mso to be showcased in otn
new theater wil! be the Czech
Philharmor.se. the Boston
Museum Trio, the Mendelssohn
String Quartet, and Joffrev 11
Dancer and the fun and ever .
Pilobolu- Dar.ce Tneatre troupe.
This i- a line-up of enter i
ment un-equaled in Ea-t
Carolina historv. Don't mis-
Videos: From Paul Schaffer To Dinosaurs
B MICAH HARRIS
NUff �nlr
Greeting s, connoisseurs of pop
culture. This is the first in a series
of articles which will periodical
review new music videos shooting
forth on the MTV, Mght Tracks
and Friday Night ideos Vine.
We have a vintage so let's start
pickingor panning as the case
may be.
Chicago has brought their 1970
-ong, "Twenty-Five or Six To
Four in:o the eighties 1984 to
be exact. The video depicts a
futuristic anti-utopia and the ef-
forts of a young couple to escape
:nto the past.
This video is extremelv well
s f ted and requires repeated
viewings to take it all in.
Evocative imagery � I don't
know what it has to do with the
song, but boy, is it evocative.
And, if you think the video
resembles a Ridley Scott film,
vou're right. The same set
designer worked on Blade Run-
ner.
On the other hand, Stacey Q's
"Two of Hearts" contains no
evocative imagery whatsoever
with the exception of Stacey Q
herself. All you beady-eyed
rascals who watch videos for the
bevy of prevocatively wiggling
beauties who frequent them (not
a bad reason) will love this. Oh
yeah. The song is catchy, too.
Pop king Lionel Ritchie has
another hit on his hands and he's
"Dancing On The Ceiling" about
the whole thing. Ritchie has pro-
ven he's capable of wringing
moody love pangs or joy from us
with his music. Here, it's the lat-
ter and the production manages
to give you the good feeling an
old Gene Kelley musical does
when Gene and several by-
standers start hoofing in spon-
taneous, perfect choreography.
Paul McCartney's latest,
"Press is great fun to watch.
Rebelling against the obligatory,
Cecil B. DeMille production ex-
pected of such a superstar, Mc-
Cartney went into the New York
subway with one cameraman
while on vacation and knocked
the tape out in four hours. This
"candid camera" approach
perfectly matches the light-
hearted song. Less, as they say, is
more.
Don Johnson's video for
"Looking for a Heartbeat" is
well crafted, but I suppose the
ladies will find Mr. Johnson
himself better crafted. As if he
wasn't enough, the producers
have also thrown in teen demi-
god, Dweezil Zappa, and � girls,
tell your beating hearts to be still
� Paul Schaffer!
Don Johnson has wisely
regulated Schaffer to a brief
cameo, probably out of fear he
will steal his scenes. As for the
song, it's slickly produced, cat-
chy, and I understand the album
features some veteran rock
talent, but as a vocalist, Don
Johnson has a great future as an
actor.
Til Tuesday's "What About
Love like McCartney's
"Press is a perfect synthesis of
sight and sound. Tead singer
Aimee Mann's beautiful, haun-
ting voice (as opposed to her hair
style which is merely haunting)
supports the lush visuals which,
through contrasts, underscore
this bitter sweet love song.
The husband-wife team of Nu
Shooz have released their follow
up to "I Can't Wait it's called
"Point Of No Return The
animation technique of Pixila-
tion, the animating of people
most notably in Peter Gabriel's
"Sledgehammer" used to
good effect here This is another
light-hearted video, fun to watch,
as Nu Shooz is deluged bv a sun-
dry multitude of swarming shoe-
that seem to be desperatelv seek-
ing Mrs. Marcos.
Finallv, Luis Car Jena v�
of "Walking in the Rain" is a
must-see as it features a punk
rock band of dinosaurs animated
by the same folks who brought
you "Large Marge" in Pee Wee's
Big Adventure.
I'm at the end of this article
and also at the end of my hitherto
unfailing wit. So, I'm tempted to
say something corny like "those
dinosaurs really know their
scales But 1 won't. Aren't vou
glad?
Tapscott Recites His Poetry
By JOHN SHANNON
����(� hdll.ir
If has happened
Wore to you
landing in a clearing:
suddenly two
curling roads converged
The opening lines of Stephen
LapscottV. poem "It Has Hap-
pened" will have acquired new
'gnificar.ce when his road
crosses ECU students' Monday
night. Tapscott will be reading
Stephen Tapscott
his poetry at 8 p.m. in
Mendenhall 244.
Most students are probably not
familiar with Tapscott, simply
because poets receive notoriously
little publicity these days. Those
who do know his name, however,
associa e it with poetry of the
highest caliber, state-of-the-art
criticism and prestigious literary
awards.
Speaking of awards, Tapscott
fairly lives off them. In 1986, a
Year-long Fellowship for
Literary Criticism from the Na-
tional Endowment for the
Humanities cushioned the in-
herent difficulty of the poet's ex-
istence; The National Endow-
ment for the Arts similarly
honored him with a Year-long
Fellowship for Poetry in 1977.
While awards may confer a
stamp of official approval on a
poet, ultimately his writing will
have to stand on its own, a fact of
which Tapscott is no doubt well
aware as he is a prolific writer of
criticism as well.
In 1984 he published American
Beauty: William Carlos Williams
and the Modernist Whitman, a
book of literary criticism publish-
ed by Columbia University Press.
He has also published articles
in many major journals on
writers as diverse as Williams,
Marcel Proust, Robert Frost, An-
thony Powell and Walt Whit-
man.
Other bright feathers in
Tapscott's cap are his transla-
tions. He has published transla-
tions from the Russian, German
and Spanish languages, and his
translation of One Hundred Love
Sonnets by Pablo Neruda was
published this year by the Univer-
sity of Texas Press.
Wesleyan University Press
published a book of his poems,
Mesopotamia, in 1976. More
recently, Tapscott published a
chapbook of poems, Penobscot,
by Pym-Randall Press in 1983.
In addition to the reading
Monday night, Tapscott will con-
duct a workshop at 10 a.m. Tues-
day in Mendenhall 221. People
interested in learning from
Tapscott first-hand are asked to
bring copies of their poems.
The reading is sponsored by
the Poetry Forum, and made
possible with financial backing
from the SGA. Don't let this in-
vestment go to waste � go hear
Stephen Tapscott.
Three Hits Minus Two
The latest incarnation of Three Hits will debut a. New DeB Friday .igh . The new group feature .
drummer, a keyboard player and new songs. Opening for the Hits will he a local handiciImYoITilV
ami a group from Raleigh called Fatal Shapes - who deacrih. their �TTJSJS.
� � � � -v -
� m
i n i i mii� m m
. fc m ir-�n�-)�-ii-Mr �i i ,m m
L





10
1MI I AM -Koi INIAN
iK loill'K 2, 1986
Artists To Give Discussions
rhrec shows and tv lectures
are scheduled to take place at the
Gray Gallery during the month ot
Octobei lsitmg art t Cynthia
v � � Ison u ill be exhibiting
"Drawings from the Monumnent
Series" from Octobei 3 to
Novembei 1. Carlson will be gi
re open to the public on
3rd at p.m. in the
k ns uditorium, School ot
� 11
l
re will be a reception in
Gallery following the
'
how ing tioni t Ktobei
igh November In! will be
.mis 1' 2tXi prints from
atoid International Col-
lins exhibition embraces
poi ai and traditional ap
�s to photography
Quesi '86 1 he Video
win be viewed at the
during the month ot Oc-
�l ,i- well. It is a ideo gh ing
rview ot contemporary
- rig artists in North
a 1 his ideo features still
' art �oi k w uh a voice-
each, artist's own words
i tobei 6th, v isiting artist
wock will be giving a lec-
hei work at 7:30 p m at
kins Auditorium. An ex
ol "Drawings" b the
n.ill be shown at the Gray
in November.
son's "Monu-
ieries showing a) the
?ctober, marks a
;� the artist's work.
. � liei woi k consisted of pat-
tings, firsi on paper with
� painted surfaces. She then
ig directly on walls:
ture became her canvas.
i was recently praised bv
I Mander, former Curatoi
lern ri at the Allen
A Museum in
. Ohio .iv a "new oice
opinion, Carlson encom-
: scale ol descrip
i J critical vocabulary of the
hei w oi k, from
"pattern-painting, decoration,
site-specific, social, monument d,
temporal, to architectural
The 1985 "Monument Senes
a departure tor Carlson, consists
ot large scale charcoal drawings
in black and white with touches
of color. The woiks are exhibited
raised and titled, on painted
wooden frames, giving them an
'unexpected sense o t
weightlessness according to
Cheryl Brut van, Assistant
Curator at the AJbright-Knox
Museum in Buffalo, NY, wheie
the work was first show n.
Although the artist still uses ar
chitectual sources to create visual
metaphores, in this series,
i at Ison wanted to create in
dependent and lasting works ol
art. Her formei installations can
now only be viewed in
photographic documentation.
One of the mam inspirations
tor the "Monument Series" was
a visit by Carlson to Foresi I awn
Cemetary in Buffalo, NY. The
monuments there represent
various architectural styles, b.is
-d upon impressions and
photographs from this site,
( arlson created her -cries. Draw
ing freehand, she "added a new
layer" to the history she en-
countered.
Cynthia Carlson received hei
MIA degree from Pratt Institute,
Brooklyn, N.Y in 1967, and
presently lues and woiks in New
York City. She has had numerous
one-artist shows, and has par-
ticipated in many group exhibi
tions as well.
The other work also on exhibit
.it the Cray Gallerv during the
month of October, "Selections
I is the firsi of the annual ex
hibitions Polaroid plans to pre
sent of New York, acquired foi
the International Polaroid Col-
lection.
I he images were eated in col
oi and black and white, and on
all available Polaroid film foi
mats. Both well-known artists,
such as William Wegman, Bai
A
I ucas Sai.i ii a � anu i
emerging artists aie feature
the exhibition. Included are
winks from several European
countries, North Amercia, and
Japan. Professoi I . Fritz
Cmiber; Vice Presidcnl ol the
Photographic Society ol lei
many and curatoi ol the show
speaks of a "new surge ol fan
tasy" he sees in the works. After
its debut in WH2 at Photokina in
Cologne, Germany, "Selections
I" has been shown widely at
in ii sen m s and galleries
throughoul Europe, Asia, and
the United States
The (Iray iallei located in
the Jenkini Fine Arts Center,
EC! I. I he lectures � ill hi- held in
the auditorium of the lenkins
line Aits Center, Room 1220
I he reception will be held in the
(ira Gallery, u)A all events arc
tree and the public is cordially in
vited. Parking is available in lots
adjoining the Fine Arts Center.
Gallery hours are from 1( a.m. to
5 p.m. Monday through Saturday
and until 8:00 p.m on Wednes
day. Foi more inf n mation, call
(9W 757 6336.
THE SHOE
OUTLET
Name Brand Shoes
Bass
Topsider
French Shriner
Bostonian
Nine West
Joyce
Canvas Boats
Dress and Casual Shoes
Factory Returns, Some
Irregulars All Priced
Below Dealer Cost
3 Blocks from Campus, on the corner of 9th and
Washington
V

I
PHIMll H I'HUIIMI AM
(. vnthia t arlson ill nivt a lecture on tier art in Jenkins uditorium
October 3, at 7 p.m.
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY
1 rps. ihecadui
i re part ol
: . � �

:
� �� �
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
A WORD FROM
"PYTHOH'TOCOPO EX'WRESTLBR
ABOUT MILLER LIT!
7
'A Room Witi
Two Hours
ByEDTOSCHACH
��o I.M�i armmm
If you're not a fan i I
tion drama and comed
that have been so prevaie-
summer, you might
Room Huh A He
change of pae B�i
novel bv E.M F rstei
well-crafted, inteli �-
with a strong feel Foi
a good sense I
Lucy Honey
Bonhamartei i,a
ladv. is a � iiris
at the picture's
compamed I
chaperone, Chai
(Maggie Smitl
woman and �
ty poop
In Florence.
assortment ol .
among them
Mr. Emcrs
and
Sands). She and ge .
love, althougl .
admi: it, and
England, u ��
marriage pro
named I
Things ge"
the Emerson-
cidence.
movem
Lucy, leaving
choice between a n
and a marrir
In reviewing -1 Room H
1 fri trt ��NiSf
A MIR. ' Pr �

KLAUS MARIA BIUNDAl r R
TT.RT' ISU ��.��
rtTYTVI fvmiMAN s ffMrj I
km LL"EDTKr: SYTJNEi POLLACK
?.
SHow4a Oct 2 3 4 S
Tint: 8-0C p m
Ptoc�: KWndni TK�atre
PITT
COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
MACI
Thru ot the Board's
ts ere up for
�ta
�lection November i
All Pitt County Voters
Vote For One
Vote For One
Vote For 0n�
Pa d ic
DR
Everv Thursdav
10 0
LAD
DR
Every Sunday 9:0
75C T.
IOC Dl





OE
ET
Shoes
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 2, 1986
11
0
1 bfioes
li s Some
i Priced
('ost
yrnc of 9th and
'A Room With A ViewIs
Two Hours Well Spent
By ED TOSCHACH
M�MY
If you're not a fan of the ac-
tiondrama and comedy movies
that have been so prevalent this
summer, you might just find A
Room With A View a refreshing
change of pace. Based on the
novel by E.M. Forster, it is a
well-crafted, intelligent romance
with a strong feel for period and
a good sense of humor.
Lucy Honeychurch (Helena
Bonham Carter), a young English
lady, is a tourist in 1907 Florence
at the picture's onset; she is ac-
companied by her cousin and
chaperone, Charlotte Bartlett
Maggie Smith), a prudish
woman and an olympic-level par-
t poop.
In Florence, Lucy meets an
assortment of strange characters,
among them the retired journalist
Mr. Emerson (Denholm Elliot)
and his son, George (Julian
Sands). She and george fall in
love, although Lucy refuses to
admit it, and she returns to
England, where she accepts the
marriage proposal of a snob
named Cecil Vyse.
Things get a little messy when
the Emersons, by pure coin-
cidence, return to England and
move in just down the street from
Lucy, leaving her faced with a
choice between a man she loves
and a marriage she deems proper.
In reviewing A Room With A
View, if one wanted to mention
c ry actor who does a good job,
one would simply reprint the cast
credits; no one is below par, or
even just average. Even so, a few
really stand out.
Maggie Smith handles
Charlotte Bartlett's change from
Lucy's stern chaperone to an
apologetic ally with beautiful
subtlety. As Cecil Vyse, Daniel
Day Lewis gives us the snotty af-
fectations of an English socialite
nerd while remaining credible �
a character, not a charactature �
and, in the roles of Lucy and
George, Helena Bonham Carter
and Julian Sands captivate the
audience from the beginning.
As George, Sands is at once
aloof and passionate, and Ms.
Carter brings Lucy's prim befud-
dlement very credibly to life.
In A Room With A View,
director James Ivory has cap-
tured the period impeccably,
almost creating a window in time,
and yet the quiet humor of Ruth
Prawer Jhabvala's screenplay
transcends the years.
Producer Ismail Merchant can
be proud of the Merchant Ivory
production, it is two hours of ex-
cellent entertainment with a light
tone that gives it sort of an ef-
fervescent quality; it's a picture
that shouldn't be missed.
A Room With A View is play-
ing at the Plitt Theaters at
Carolina East Center.
Movie
By JONATHAN PRINGLE
auffWritor
Class of Nuke'em High, new
release from the Troma team at
Troma, Inc shows how to get a
well rounded education;
"readin. writin and
radiation The movie shows
what happens when perfectly
normal kids go to school a
quarter of a mile from a nuclear
power plant. The radiation comes
in the form of a bubbling green
pool that shows up in water foun-
tains, on the front lawn, and
ironically enough in the fallout
shelter.
This radiation causes strange
things to happen. The schools
best behaved (and nerdiest) stu-
dent sips green water from the
fountain, then begins foaming
out of his mouth, nose, and ears.
In his fit, he throws himself out
of a window and proceeds to
dissolve into a bare skeleton.
The members of the high
school honor society are mutated
into the Cretins, a group of
leather jacketed perverts with
punk hair cuts and nose rings.
In addition to extortion and
mugging, the Cretins also push
dope grown in one of the power
plant's dump sites. This ir-
radiated dope, sold with the pro-
mise of an "atomic high falls
into the hands of our heroes War-
ren and Chrissy, played by
Gilbert Benton and Janelle
Brady. Under its effects, these
(
KEATS LRl BRANLWER
IBBTOJOn MMIOBGEVSP
KUKT ITEDTKE SYDNEY POLLACK
ISJUU
- 'Ut�. M
�maWM�aMH
wmmm
onsoudafed
Theatres
All Seats $2.00 Everyday Til 5:30 PM I
�WPWHWl
BUCCANEER MOVIES
Class of Nuke 'Em
High
.li. S SI
Ends Today!
zJs.
i 00-3 005 oo-? oo-soo
LETHAL
Ends Today! �PG�
00 3 00-5 00-7 00-9 00
The Money Pit
Ends Today! �PG�
n 11
SKowdot. Oct. 2, 3, 4, 5
Tim 8:00 p.m.
Ploc�: HWndrix Th�otre
Starts Tomorrow
Special Ladies Only Showing � Friday, Oct. 3rd
10:30 AM, Courtesy of WRQR Hit Radio, first
come, first serve seating capacity. A Must See!
FARRAH FAWCETT
EXTREMITIES
A
L
Vulnerable and alone.
1
'�OM Tk ANTIC RfKA&'NC COUP
PITT
CC'JNTY
COMMISSIONERS'
BACI
Thr� of th Board's
six Mat art up for
�toction November 4.
All Pitt County Voters
.BUCXUiBkMatkXTteL TS�'TkrUJi .nfrjy,
MARY LOU
SUGG
County Commissioner
Vote For On�
Candidates For November Election
DemocratRepublican
Tom Johnson Mary Lou Sugg
Vote For One
Kenneth Dews
Andy Andrews
Vote For One
Charles McLawhorn
Paid for by the Mary Lou Sugg for Commissioner Committee
P.O. Box 3037, Greenville, N C. 27B36 3037 752-259
Presents
DRAFT NITE
Every Thursday 9:00-2:00 AM $1.50 Guys $1.00 Ladies
1K Draft All Nite
Presents
THKFS
ONLY ONE
UTfKER
LADIES NITE &
DRAFT NITE
Every Sunday 9:00-2:00 AM $1.50 Guys 50 Ladies
75 TALL CANS ALL NITE plus
10 Draft All Nite
!iese
good kids lose all control and
have their first sexual experience.
As it happens, Chrissy gets im-
pregnated, and gives birth to a lit-
tle green monster through
regurgitation. The creature runs
wild in the water pipes of the
school, and Warren becomes a
hulking monster who mindlessly
kills two of the Cretins.
Bent on revenge, the Cretins
take over the school and kidnap
Chrissy. They exact their revenge
on the school by riding their
motorcycles in the halls, breaking
windows, and generally messing
things up.
The show down occurs with a
bit of a twist. Warren is there,
Chrissy is there, the Cretins are
there, but instead of fighting each
other, they must flee for their
lives from Chrissy's little baby
now grown into a twelve foot
nuclear Juggernaut.
If this sounds the least bit in-
teresting to you, go see the
"youth of tomorrow" in Class of
Nukt'em High. There's not a lot
of plot, but there is a lot of action
and a lot of radiation. The movie
is R-rated, and it's now showing
at the Buccaneer theater.
COLOR PRINT
FILM
DEVELOPING
$400
OFF
Student Stores
East Carolina University
Wright Building
Look Wilt SUPtlCOl
Every Tuesday Is
College Night
Ham & Cheese
Bologna A Cheese
Ham, Salami & Cheese
7 p.m11 p.m. Pepperoni, Salami & Cheese
QO Cline Turkey & Cheese
yyv subs Ham Turkey & clwHe
Your Choice of
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60 Oi. Pitchers $1.99 �
11 a.mll p.m. 752-2183 215 E. 4th St.
I
I
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VALUABLE COUPON
COLOR PRINT FILM
DEVELOPING
$�00
OFF
Kodocolor, Fuji or 3M, color
print film
1 10, 126, 135, film only.
Offer Expires 10-9-86
Coupon must occompony J �
each order
STORE NAME
This coupon musi accompany o�o(
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FELLOWSHIP
invites you to meet
The Rt. Rev. B. Sidney Sanders
Bishop of the Diocese of East Carolina
Wednesday, October 8th
St. Paul's Episcopal Church
401 E. 4th Street
5:30 p.m. � Eucharist � Bishop Sanders,
Celebrant
Fellowship supper following the service
�g&2�X&-
YOU'RE
WORTH
GOLD
9
A FREE $50 NECKLACE
WITH ANY ARTCARVED COLLEGE RING
Reward yourself with any 10 or 14 karat gold or Siladium ring
and get a $50 necklace, free.
Our Representative is on campus with distinguished
traditional and contemporary styles �
each backed by a Full Lifetime Warranty.
IKOPVED
CLASS RINGS
Thursday-Friday 9:00-4:00
in Lobby of Student Store
C1906 ArtOvM Oaas Ang
� Up �
�'l����W)N�W�u.i���f�l��,l.l�,
I





1?THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 2. 1986
BLOOM COUNTY
MtLO I PONT UH
UKBThe I 77 W&?5
txmSMN I Wftt� ��
Wv dUNWTlP
FOR TOMORROW.
1 oftet. . �
1nmr.m
wrjtf-
by Berke Breathed Undercover Cats
1
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" bOOP JOKE
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ANQFUtiW CiT POWN
JOKF IN ITS PRIMK.
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ANP PBAP
JOKE.
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WHIMSICAL
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KNEW YE
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most qftuesoMt a
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TntT 006 down The
5TRUTHRC60THIS
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frill! iwftfk H0ti AW
MS; SMS yfc M only cm ft�
if new �' YWMrt'MZ
PIQ SOU SCI M POLL
on m semi m?
45 for mML,m
fbK5AHfQRPeW 1152
WAD NO OPINION
We FAMttrsryMflu77v
PCOPlc WHO uSTCN 10 I
A-hA,W0RRy ABOUT FASH-
ION TRENDS, AND WATCM
'lOVL CONNECTION" FOR
By BROOKS
1
3 eo, Ls i�4o5fc ocdw
CUip: fou, yeU, sp rf '
V
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.By SoveLove & CheRrv
Pepe. te .it.t. X hfe" -r jcin
r- w .r�Ar iir i ice.
"AVC i g I ,
Or 1(JL-J Afr
M�,
ALL NEXT WEEK!
THE
Overkill
5 Owe Of OKitf A HWDFUi. Of UCASlM MBA PKSimPs
Trtr GCaJCRAL ?W6UC ClAJ WftZ.ARRElRD IS DCSTiAiOTD
(30 DOWaj "0 ril$ToR.V'AWD WCvOHlS fOAiS CtWAJCCTcXj Wi7S
Wtfb
-m is A picTURf; of:
BAI SUPERSrR
By FRIEDRICH
Campus Comics
IT Sfiys HERE THAT
"OFfK TREES ORE
PRODUCING OWSOftLLI
L ft ROE NUMBERS OFu
ft CORNS WIS FftLL
SOME PEOPLE SEB.
this fts n SORE
5I6N OF PI COUP
WINTER. ftHEftP.
HOWEVER THERE
iS NO SCIENTIFIC
EVIDENCE OF SUCH
ff relationship:
By BARBOUR
v THIS is also ft i�?y
GOOD VEftR FOR PECANS
At
� 4r 1AI&OUR
County American Legion Fair
featuring
Eastern Carolina's Largest Midway and Free
Attractions Each Night!
WATCH FOR MORE ON OCTOBER 7tti
Located on 264 East By-Pass
0mm&mmmimi0mtm m n� WMmwui� mmm w mim "� �.
s �ji.�&at sv itiqiriZ
I
&
The Pirate defense toP
puts the hit and Ron Gilli
Tailgi
B TIM( HANDLE
BMta .x(j �rn�.
E
hw
the Pirate Tailgate i
. with the Pu
celebration
The tailj s I
is e PI
Club, teature a grand pn
a trip for I SI
for a five da
at the Sheraton Bal Hai
four-star -
the ECl M
The tr.
Lines.
The contest will be
to the game with
ticipants bei: .
Plaver Profi
ECU
B PHIII FRNt
set betheessenot
existence. The 6-2. 18
ju: om lexanjria.
th.
the is he does
Aver hasthe
a huge ballmaj I
. nis program before his Jer
F Coach Sherman seems
a well and she views
big. strong, hard
working person wh
talen: to make it to one o
top-single �
currently, Averj pa
lumber-10 singles -
lumber-three double- -
Aver) ma be ranked big)
tan he is right now; however,
�as experienced quite a bit
Jard luck getting undera
all.
At the beginning ol pn
Uer complained of discornfc
' his back. After undergoing
�AT-scan, Aer was diagnose
having a herruated disc in h'
trtebrae (a similar iniurv
iture to that of Joe Montana
le was told during tryouta thi
" would not be allowed to plal
:ause of the risk of possibil
ralysis. Aver didn't view hi
jur as senoush as did the dod
rs.
"It doesn't hurt that bad and
nt see wh the won't let rr
� was a statement ofterj
ird in the Avery househol
p"ing the time he was forced ofj
court. Avery refused to lei
however. His off-court
rkouts were stepped up in in-L
sity as he now worked harder
" ever.
In the meantime, Avery con-
lued to pester the Sportsi
licine staff to let him rejoin
team and finally before the
Itch, the decision to play was
to the person it belonged





1aV�&
BJ3RYANT
' �
By BROOKS
el
Love CheRry
T AC. j pt io 5
-
V
' -
ft
?dS
�kC -� � '
K!
lion Fair
ay and Free
ilR 7th
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 2, 1986
Pa�el3
ECt Hones To Slum Stre
Winless Pirates Host SW Louisiana
The Pirate defense stops a USL runner last year as Lam Berrv (90)
puts the hit and Ron Gilliard (85) converges.
By SCOTT COOPER
O Sf� mur
The University of
Southwestern Louisiana, 2-1
under first-year head coach
Nelson Stokley, will visit Ficklen
Stadium Saturday to battle the
ECU Pirates.
The Ragin Cajuns are very
similar to the Pirates in their of-
fensive unit as they use the run-
and-shoot offense as well as a
starting freshman (redshirt)
quarterback. The similarity is
also seen by ECU coach Art
Baker.
"It's an unusual situation
because the two teams run almost
identical offensive and defensive
schemes Baker said. "They run
with the run-and-shoot. I believe
the personnel is very similar
After dropping their first game
of the season to Oklahoma State
(21-20) in the final .08 seconds of
play, USL has defeated Nor-
theast Louisiana (24-20) and
Memphis State (26-10). The Ca-
juns had an open date this past
week.
Coach Baker feels that USL
may have an advantage in "the
fact they are winning and feeling
good about themselves. They had
an open date this week to prepare
for us and an extra week to get
over injuries he said. "At the
same time, I hope we'll have an
advantage of being at home.
"We've got to bounce back
and have confidence. I have con-
fidence in our coaching staff and
our players Baker added.
The series between the two
schools has been relatively even
as the Ragin Cajuns lead 4-3, in-
cluding wins in the last two
meetings. Last year's contest saw
a late fourth-quarter field goal
lift USL past ECU 16-14 in a
driving rainstorm in Lafayette,
La.
Freshman quarterback Richard
Pannell runs the senior-
dominated offensive unit. The
ground attack is spearheaded by
senior tailback Dwayne Williams,
who rushed for 524 yards last
year, and senior wingback Karl
Bernard, who missed most of last
season with injuries.
Sophomore Glen Floyd is solid
at fullback as the USL coaching
staff feels is capable of being
their first ever 1,000-yard rusher.
Floyd, Bernard and Williams will
run behind an experienced offen-
sive front which includes three
juniors and a pair of seniors
Senior Dana Herrick and
junior John Carter are Pannell s
main targets in the popular run-
and-shoot offense.
"We incorporate the run-and-
shoot passing game, along with
the triple-option running game
USL offensive coordinator Barry
Wilson said. "The quarterback is
the key to it all, the trigger man.
What kind of game he has deter-
mines how we play on offense
The USL defensive unit is one
that the coaching staff likes to
run with "reckless" abandon-
ment. Defensive coordinator Ron
West's defense "is basically a
4-4-3 type of scheme. We are a
wide open defense that shows a
lot of looks and makes the of-
fense execute every phase of its
game plan
West went on to say that his
unit especially tries to make tur-
novers. They use a lot of stunts
and blitzs to acccomplish this.
Senior outside linebacker Joe
DeForrest, who is the leading-
returning tackier from last year
with 75 stops, heads the unit. He
is joined with senior linemen Carl
Issac, Jed Hebert and Benny
Carey. Also returning is
"Bandit" Steve Judice.
The secondary is led by
another senior in cornerback
Elton Slater. Joining Slater in the
secondary will be cornerback
Patrick Taylor and safety Jim
Brenner.
Two ECU secondary players,
Ellis Dillahunt and George
Franklin, expressed their feelings
on this weekend's game.
"It feels good to be back at
Ficklen Dillahunt said. "It's a
good chance for us to come out
and break this (losing) streak.
They run basically the same thing
with the run-and-shoot. I can't
take anything away from
Southwest Louisiana
"This is our hometown, our
own backyard. We want to bring
a victory to the fans of Green-
ville Franklin said. "We want
to end it (the losing streak) right
here and show people that we're
for real
A note of interest between USL
and ECU lies in some of the assis-
tant coaches. Former Pirate assis-
tant, Rex Kipps and ECU
graduate Steve Hale, are now the
defensive line coach and outside
linebacker coach, respectively.
On the other hand, Pirate offen-
sive coordinator Don Murry serv-
ed as an assistant at USL in '83,
before coming to ECU.
B TIM CHANDLER
?wor �,iru �rll�!
Another exciting weekend of
football will be
highlighted this Saturday with
the Pirate Tailgate Challenge,
along with the Parent's Day
celebration.
The tailgate challenge, which
is sponsored b the Pirate
Club, features a grand prize of
a trip for four to Miami, Fla
r a five day, four-night stay
at rhe Sheraton Bal Harbour
four-star motel and tickets to
E I Miami, Fla game.
'rip is sponsored by Delta
Air L ines.
The contest will be held prior
to the game with the par-
ants being divided into
Plaver Profiled
three lots, in addition to the
grand-prize winner, there will
also be a winner from each of
the three lots.
The winner of each lot will
receive a three day, two-night
trip for four to the Fairfield
Harbor Resort in New Bern.
Consolation prizes will also be
awarded to other participants
in the contest. The consolation
prizes will be furnished by the
University Book Exchange.
Lee Workman, the Director
of Marketing for ECU, said
that he expects about 100 par-
ticipants for the tailgate
challenge.
Workman went on to sa
that the idea for the contest was
brought about because of the
growing participation in
Weekend Highlight

AW
to Q'p0U& legate
the 1 ChHen9e
&
Oct. 4. 1986
ECU v
Southwestern
Louisiana
tailgating at ECU.
"The contest was established
to get more people invoved in
the social event of Pirate foot-
ball Workman said. "We
want the fans to have fun, en-
joy tailgating and also give
them a chance to win a trip.
Tailgating has become a big
part of ECU football and we
feel that the amount of people
tailgating is growing every
game.
The contestants in the
tailgate challenge will be judg-
ed on the basis of several
categories. Among those
categories are theme, food
display, creativity, use of pur-
ple and gold, enthusiasm, use
of vehicle, maturity of content
and use of official university
logos.
Although the deadline for
entering the contest has passed,
Workman reminds other peo-
ple who may wish to tailgate to
not forget the Kentucky Fried
Chicken Tailgate special.
"Everytime someone pur-
chases a Pirate Tailgate Special
at Kentucky Fried Chicken,
they (Kentucky Fried Chicken)
will donate one dollar to the
athletic department for athletic
scholarships Workman said.
Workman added that any
fans that would like to look at
the various tailgating displays
in the contest are welcome to
walk through the lots and
observe them.
Other events that are plann-
ed for this season by the
marketing office include a
jersey day which will be held
Homecoming weekend (Oct.
18).
For Jersey Day, the first
1,250 youths, which are 12 and
under, to enter the gates will
receive a free Pirate football
jersey, compliments of the
Coca-Cola Bottling Company
of Greenville.
ECU Netter A very Returns
By PHILI FARNEY
Sporu Writer
For Scott Avery playing tennis
eems to be the essence of his very
tence. The 6-2, 180-pound
junior from Alexandria, Va
ranks about tennis as much off
the court as he does on.
Avery has the potential to leave
ige hallmark on the ECU ten-
lis program before his departure.
( oach Sherman seems to think so
w ell and she views Avery as a
strong, hard-serving, hard
working person who has the
alent to make it to one of the
p-singles spots on the team.
Currently, Avery plays the
number-10 singles slot and the
number-three doubles slot.
Avery may be ranked higher
han he is right now; however, he
has experienced quite a bit of
hard luck getting underway this
fall.
At the beginning of practice,
Avery complained of discomfort
in his back. After undergoing a
CAT-scan, Avery was diagnosed
as having a herniated disc in his
vertebrae (a similar injury in
nature to that of Joe Montana).
He was told during tryouts that
he would not be allowed to play
because of the risk of possible
paralysis. Avery didn't view his
injury as seriously as did the doc-
tors.
"It doesn't hurt that bad and I
don't see why they won't let me
play was a statement often
heard in the Avery household
during the time he was forced off
the court. Avery refused to let
up, however. His off-court
workouts were stepped up in in-
tensity as he now worked harder
than ever.
In the meantime, Avery con-
tinued to pester the Sports
Medicine staff to let him rejoin
the team and finally before the
match, the decision to play was
left to the person it belonged
with, Scott Avery. Needless to
say, he rejoined the team.
Avery came back with a
vengeance. In speaking with
coach Sherman, all the hard work
and effort has paid off. "He is
playing well. He shows no effects
of his injury Sherman said.
The only adverse effect on
Avery was that he was forced to
start as the last seed on the team.
He now has to win challenge mat-
ches to move up the ladder. So
far, he has won his only challenge
convincingly.
Success is not something new
for Avery. Dating back to his
high school days, Avery knows
what it's like to be a winner. As a
senior and top-seeded player on
the 1984 Rogers High School ten-
nis team in Alexandria, Avery
was able to lead his team to a
state high school championship.
Avery also realizes the impor-
tance of an education. "I believe
athletics should be second to
academics Avery explained,
"but this is not always the case
with myself He is so driven by
his tennis game that his studies
sometimes suffer because of it.
However, he knows how impor-
tant grades are and maintains a
fine grade-point average.
Avery is also an advocate of
drug testing on the collegiate level
to keep the game clean. However,
' 'He is playing well. He
shows no effects of his
injury
�Pat Sherman
aMt� By � ANN! RAAMOT
Scott Avery
m beginning to feel
good about my game
�Scott Avery
Avery feels as if the game has its
own built in testing mechanism.
"You can't play the game
wasted said Avery.
This season so far has had its
ups and downs for Avery, who
sums it up well when he said,
"I'm beginning to feel good
again about iny game Coach
Sherman added, "His doubles
game is coming along real well
Once Scott Avery does "get in
the groove expect big things to
come from him. The future in
tennis for Avery looks bright and
who knows, maybe that will
brighten the future of ECU ten-
nis.
SiSl H CiHT THi l� "�� S-1" S�. � W��� wiD be seeking revere for their
Sports Fact
Tnur. Oct. 2,1967
Running sixth in the stretch
'at the Marlboro Cup, The
mighty Forego suddenly ac-
clerates and beats Honest
i Pleasure to the wire by a head.
The big gelding carries 137
pounds (we think they're refer-
ring to the jockey, or at least
I we hope so), conceding eigh-
teen or more pounds to his
rivals.
Volleyballers Win
The ECU volleyball team easily
defeated N.C. Wesleyan last
night in three-straight games, im-
proving its season record to a
.300 mark.
The Lady Pirates, 2-2 after the
win, topped Wesleyan 15-10,15-6
and 15-4. They played Atlantic
Christian College last night in
Wilson. m
The ladies will be on the road
for a pair of games later this week
as they travel to Virginia Techn
Friday and Radford CoUete 2
Saturday. ��
1 I
BmrmmMimmto Hutu m mmw �
1 �� Mg'Wf1
�'l�lll
� �y y � V" � ?"�-�� � �-������ �, , , m , � . .





1
14 THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 2. 1986
By PHILIP RITCHY
Wm to T W Ijji Canlkta
The Rugby Club traveled to
Durham last weekend to play
Duke, but due to many injuries
the Ruggers were forced to start
many young players.
After a scoreless first half, the
Blue Devils opened the scoring in
the second haJf with a field goal.
The Ruggers struck back with
one of their own. Ed Jimenez
scored a try off a blocked punt to
put the Ruggers ahead 4-3.
The next score for the Rugby
Club came off "The Human
Keg Bob Eaon broke four
Blue Devil tackles before dishing
the ball off to freshman sensation
Mike Scruggs who walked in for
the score, putting ECU up 8-3.
The inexperience of the young
Ruggers later prevailed however,
giving up two Duke scores and
allowing the Blue Devils to take
the lead 15-8. The Ruggers did
manage to score again, this time
off a Mike Scruggs drop kick,
closing the margin to 15-11.
The Ruggers were knocking on
the door for another score but
time was against them as the
clock ran out and the match end-
ed 15-11 in favor of Duke. Greg
Roche, who was sidelined with an
injury, witnessed the match and
was impressed with the play of
his fellow teammates.
I was very proud of the oung
Parents'
Weekend:
Football
Parents Weekend is right
around the corner and that means
we students have to find
something to do to keep our
parents occupied and that they
will enjoy. Lets go to see ECU
football.
The Pirates will be at home this
weekend for a clash with
Southwestern Louisiana.
Although the Pirates have hit
tough times lately, there's no
reafofP&lose faith in the alma
'mater.
You have to admit � there's
nothing as much fun as a Satur-
day home game in Ficklen
Stadium, well almost nothing.
Just because we're not winning as
many games as we could, that's
no reason not to back ECU foot-
ball, in fact, that's all the more
reason.
The Pirates always get fired up
to play at home because they
know the fan support will always
be there. And now that
everyone's parents are in town,
the support should increase that
much more.
It's not every weekend that
your (you students) parents come
to Greenville, so get them excited
and take them to Ficklen Stadium
Saturday afternoon � they'll be
glad you did.
And an incentive for you
students, if you really do need
one, is that post-game meal that
you can get when mom and dad
want to see the town. You know,
when your parents want to take
everybody out to eat, including
that suite-mate that you can't
stand. But it usually all works out
in the end.
So for an excellent time on
Saturday, be optimisitic and
witness the Pirates as they begin
their brand-new win streak.
�Scott Cooper
Hampe
Ruggers, also the new team
leaders Roche said. "But the
many penalties hurt us badly.
When these new ruggers learn the
game, ECU will be the club to be
reckoned with
The Rugby Club will take on
State this Sunday, Oct. 5 behind
the Allied Health building at 2
pm. The Wolfpack, who are
ranked No. 1 in the state this
year, are the Ruggers greatest
rivals. Match secretary David
Sgroi commented on the fierce
ECUState rivalry.
"When State comes to Green-
ville, the two clubs provide the
hardest hittin match Sgroi
said. "We want State badly and
many sacrifices will be made to
defeat this N.C. State Club
The last time Stale came to
ECU, the two clubs provided the
most exciting match of the year in
front of 500 ECU fans. The Rug-
gers would like to see this same
type of support this year.
ELLIE'S
Ladies Fashions and Sportswear
Buy one item and recieve 2nd item
at half price.
Great savings on dresses, sweaters,
I jeans, pants, skirts, shirts, and etc.
I
j 2806 E. 10th St.
( Greenville
across from Highway Patrol
Next to new White's Store
ALL ABOAARRD
Ticket Good for
HOBO SANDWICH
Only
ty p� Ribee, Cheese, Grilled Onions
X.OO French Fries. �Hh Medium Drink
or
HAMBURGER (14 b)
Lettuce, Tomato, French Fries
with Medium Drink
Clip & Bring to XTC STATION
$1.99
Although the Rugby Club lost their match to Duke over the past weekend, you can bet they will be fired up
when N.C. State comes here Sun. Oct. 5.at 2 pm.at the Allied Health Field.
Stop Your Train At
a XTC
Hi' STATION
CAROLINA EAST MALL (Across from KERR Drugs)
Breakfast SUPER TASTE TRIP T ICKET! Dinner

Slick: We hope you We
enjoyed your studying
this week, cuz. We have
a wierd feeling that you
were also checking out
the trim-mings
�Coop and Rap pin' I
QUESTION 2.
HOW CAN THE BUDGET-CONSCIOUS
COLLEGE STUDENT SAVE MONEY?
a) Save over 50 off AT&T's weekday rates on
out-of-state calls during nights and weekends.
b) Don't buy textbooks when "Monarch Notes" will do
just fine.
c) Save 40 off AT&T's weekday rate on out-of-state
calls during evenings.
d) Count on AT&T for exceptional value and high quality
service.
e) Hang around with the richest kids in school; let them
pick up the tab whenever possible.
If you're like most college students in the western hemisphere,
you try to make your money go a long way. That's why you should
know that AT&T Long Distance Service is the right choice for you.
SfC AT&T cfffenTso many terrific values. For example, you
can save over 50 off AT&T's day rate on calls during
weekends jf until 5 pm Sunday, and from 11 pm
to 8 am, jf Sunday through Friday.
Call between 5 pm and 11 pm,
Sunday through Friday, and you'll save 40
off our day rate.
Ever dial a wrong number? AT&T gives you
immediate credit if you do. And of course, you can count on
AT&T for clear long distance connections any place you call.
To find out more about how AT&T can help save you money,
give us a call. With a little luck, you won't have toTiang; around with
the rich kids. Call toll-free today, atfBOO 2224&Q0 �- s
S
� 1986 AT&T
AT&T
The right choice.
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
TM ECU
5US D ai S30 �! M BM
n�T.OT
� �- .
' . " Teas
Classifieds
SALE
$40 PER HUNDRED PAID F
remaiimg letters from home
self addressed, stamped envelope
for infora' on act cat
Associates Box 95 B Rose e N.
07203
EARN HUNDREDS WEEKLY
FROM HOME E� I
gram o exper ece necessa'
FREE oe'a s serc sape-
addressed enve ope o Pr �Sar'
P O Box 847 Choi � �- N C
27514 0847
FORSALEHonaa Aeros'ar'er 80
1983Only 1tOO miles Mint c:
tion,electrc star outomal
transmissionSpeecs 'o 50m pr
$4757569133
FORSALE:Sofa� ' - "� a 's:
Square tableA tstools SSC
756 9526
FORSALE:1978Re-a. ' LeCa-
Excenent cond or $500Ca
anytime 757 3408
LOW MONTHLY PAYMENT
Assume $126 K montt"
a 1985 Renault encore Rec 2 dr
4 speec, 24 QOC es .� . z
dition, gets grea m eage Mus's
mit credit aopi'cat on and ca. pre
sent owner $257 Ca 758 6912 a I
Dr. Larry Hines
STRAW BOSS: NO ac: 1�
to spin recoras for nops formats
basnes, m xers, etc Entry fine OJ
service Da Tne TRASHMAN a'
752 3587
"ECU PIRATE FAN S-gns are
now available at trie fcnow ng oca
lions: University Book Exchange
Apple Records, Stop Shop BACK
THE PIRATE ATTACT
NEW OPENING: Modern
oeoroom on East sr S' $245 Ca
Carl at 758 1983 N B�ts �nd
weekends 355 6558
FOR SALE: Can you buy jeeps
cars, 4 x 4's seireo in drug ra as for
under $100? Call for facts fooay
602 837 3401 Ext S 711
FOR RENT: Condominium at Af a
tic Beach for the week of Octooer
4th-llth Fully equipped Ca
756 9170.
WORJT PROCESSING: Tyc
resumes term papers ?r-es s
papers Call Laa A : c a - c
Washington oay 946 8043 n Bht
927 3412
NEVER QUIT, NEVER SUR-
RENDER: Bag awsnana oecce
a contenaer THE PlRAiNTS
FOR SALE: Piraints bags -
oreak the nat-on's ionges los ng
streak of 0 13. Look for ?ne or cam-
pus ana before the game Ca er
at 757-3131 for further details.
FOR SALE: 1 fenaer stral I fe
bullet and 2 boss ettec's peca s
must sen CaM 758 9028 anc eae a
message
FOR SALE :ls it true you can buy
jeeps tor $44 through the U S
government? Get ttie facts todav!
Call 1-312-742-1145 Ext. 5271-A
TAI
FOI
C-a
PO
-��
Bf
D.
a
a'
-�
COI
I
1st Annual Pu
Sunday, Oc
at Allii
East Carl
d
Winnel
Come
and Supp
�'� �
��� � -� � ).m,mmimm�m m .ranw�.i,�,i. �-
�"� m ���,

1





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
LIE'S
ns and Sportswear i
nd recieve 2nd item
alj price.
n dresses, sweaters, i
kirts, shirts, and etc. i
i
across from Highwa Patrol ;
Next lonen White's Store :
QAARRD!j I
OCTOBER 2. 196
15
10 SANDWICH
i her-f (.rilled Onions
rrenh f nrv vulh Mfdium lrinU
or
GER(14fcO
lulu rrenih fne

$1.99
At
XTC
STATION
C1 BS from KE:RR Drugs)
RIP TICKET! Dinner
IOUS
EY?
o0o

Announcements
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
The ECU Chapter of the College
Republicans w.n be meeting this Tues
Room 771 in Mendenhall Student Center at
j 30 pm Help defeat the liberal left on cam
MIS Dm 830 1291 or 752 3587 tor more mtor
nat.on
STOP SMOKING
A three week "stop smoking" program
will be held in Room 107 at the Student
Health Center The program will be held
from 3 4 pm on Tues . oct 7, 14. and 21 and is
open to students, staff, and faculty No
registration is necessary Call Mary Elesha
Adams at 757 641 for additional informa
tion
LAW SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will hold its regular
bi weekly meeting Tuesday night, t pm in
room 231 Mendenhall. All members are urg
ed to attend and all interested students are
welcome
JEWISH STUDENTS
Attention Jewish students Dr and Mrs
Resnik will be hosting a Kol Nidre Dinner
before Yom Kippur Oct 12 at 5 pm For in
formation call in advance the Resniks at
75540 or Sarah Petlek 75 M�7 There will
also be a break the fast Oct 13 at Qua.I Ridge
Country Road Clubhouse
MASSAGE CLINIC
The Physical Therapy Club will be having
a massage clinic on Mon . Oct from 5 30 to
30 in the Allied Health building The cost is
II for 10 mmutes of wonderful massage
Come and get your day to day stresses
massaged away Donations ere made to
charity from ftie proceeds
Classifieds
sale
$60 PER HUNDRED PAID: For
remailing letters from home! Send
self addressed, stamped envelope
? or informationapplication.
Associates, Box 95 B, Roselle, NJ
07203
EARN HUNDREDS WEEKLY
FROM HOME Exciting new pro
gram, no experience necessary. For
FREE details, send stamped, self-
addressed envelope to: ProfitStart,
P O Box 847, Cnapel Hill, N.C ,
27514 0847.
FOR SALE: Honda Aerostarter-80.
1983 Only 1,400 miles. Mint condi-
tion, electric start, automatic
transmission. Speeds up to 50 mph.
S475 756 9133.
FOR SALE: Sofa and chair, $25.
Square table w6 stools, $50. Call
756 9526.
FOR SALE: 1978 Renault Le Car.
Excellent condition. $500 Call
anytime. 757 3408.
LOW MONTHLY PAYMENtT
Assume $126 95 monthly payment on
a 1985 Renault encore. Red, 2 dr
4 speed, 24,000 miles, very good con-
dition, gets great mileage. Must sub
mit credit application and pay pre
sent owner $257. Call 758 6912, as for
Dr Larry Hines.
STRAW BOSS: Now accepting dates
to spin records for hops, formals,
bashes, mixers, etc.Extry fine D.J.
service Dial the TRASHMAN at
752 3587.
TAROT CARD READINGS: Learn
more about yourself! Private in-
dividual readings or group parties
(minimum 6 people). Perfect for
rushes or dorm parties. Call
"Reader" 355 2562.
FOR SALE: 1976 Chev. Caprice
Classic in good condition. Rebuilt
engine, new brakes, windshield and
carpet. Fully powered and more.
Call Hal 758 2598.
FOR SALE: Single Greenville
Athletic Club membership. Call
after 5 pm 355 2932.
DJ; Are you having a party and need
a D.J.? For the best in Top 40, Beach
and Dance call Morgan at 758-7967.
Reasonable rates. References on re-
quest.
COMPUTER DATING: No lists of
names distributed or any informa
tion given without your consent. We
offer a very personal way for you to
meet new people. Introductions
guaranteed or your money back.
Student discounts. Katz Services
355 7595.
LSSSOCIETY
All LSS Students The Society .s having a
Yard Sale Oct 114 12. H you have any kind
of donation please take it to the LSS building
and put it m the basement! Please do mis by
Fri, the 3rd. if possible Also, if you rtvt a
design for a T shirt, ptease put it m the LSS
Society suggestion box at the LSS Building
by Oct 3rd Thanks!
RENT A NURSE
Anyone mteresIM in ranting a nurse a
Sat .Oct II for gyardwor housework. art
ting witn the elderly or babysitting can
75470 or 7S� 045 after 6 pen The cat will
beeotorhrs end SO tor 4 hr. It j a great
opportunity for getting your fall ctearMtg
clone, ana yes we do window si if yeu M
unable to reach anyone at than nmtQen.
contact the ECANS oH-ce at me Sctte at
Nursing
TYPING: Top quality word process-
ing equipment that can meet all your
needs backed with years of ex-
perience. Low student rates. Mon
Sun 9 am to 9 pm. 355-7595.
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SERVICES: Typ
ing resumes, term papers, thesis
papers. Call SDF Professional Com-
puter Services Inc 104 East 5th St.
(near Cubbies), Greenville, 752-3694.
FOR SALE: Furniture. One coffee
table with two matching end tables.
Price negotiable. Call 752-1002 or
757-1118.
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc. Call
Anne at 752-3015 and leave a
message.
WANTED
HELP WANTED: Local law firm is
seeking Computer Science or Deci-
sion Science maor with good typing
skills for part-time word processing
position. 10-15 hours per week. Call
758 6200 and ask for Mary.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Share 2 bedroom, $100 rent, te
utilities. Must be non-smoker and
non-drinker. Call Arnold at 758-9738.
SPANISH TUTOR NEEDED: For
up to level 3. Call 752-1230 ask for
Ryan.
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share
new apt. located at 405 E. 5th St.
(Regency House Condos Apt 1C).
lblock (300 steps) from Downtown
and 1 block from campus.
Everything is new, must see! No
deposits req'd for either apt. or
utilities! Rent $175 plus 12 util. Call
355-6686 and leave name & phone
number.
HELP WANTED: Eager student to
help an electrician wire houses. No
experience necessary. Call Mitchell
Goff at 752 3037.
See CLASSIFIEDS, page 16
ECANS
All nursing students, tnere anil be an
ECANS meeting Thurs Oct. In MS �1 at
� pm All nursing students ere invite te
come and see what we're all about nan o
see you there
Scholarships fo
medical and senior
pre-med students
Medical school costs are rising every day.
They're climbing faster than many students can
handle without the right kind of financial help.
If you're a medical student, the Air Force may
have the best answer for you. We offer an excel-
lent scholarship program that can ease the finan-
cial strain of medical or osteopathy school and
allow you to concentrate on your studies. Par-
ticipation is based on competitive selection. Let
the Air Force make an investment in your profes-
sional future. For more information contact-
TSgt. McCullen 919-
856-4130
M
A q�ecrt way o We
"ECU PIRATE FAN Signs are
now available at the following loca
tions: University Book Exchange,
Apple Records, Stop Shop. BACK
THE PIRATE ATTACK
NEW OPENING: Modern l
oedroom on East 5th St. $245. Call
Carl a1 758 1983. Nights and
weekends 355 6558.
FOR SALE: Can you buy jeeps,
cars, 4 x 4's seized in drug raids for
under $100? Call for facts today
602 837 3401. Ext. S 711.
llg to
Get You Back
the Slopes.
Come in and see the largest
selection in the area of
alpine ski equipment,
along with a superb
selection of the
latest in designer
fashion wear.
GORDON'S
264 By-Pass 756-1003
(Neit to Greenville TV and Appliance!
GOLF AND SKI SHOP
Come By And See Why Bond's
Is Your 1 Sporting Goods Store
Greenville 756-6001
SPORTING GOODS
FOR RENT: Condominium at Atlan-
tic Beach for the week of October
4th-11th. Fully equipped. Call
756 9170.
WORD PROCESSING: Typing
resumes, term papers, thesis
papers. Call Linda Woolard
Washington day 946-8043, night
927 3412.
NEVER QUIT, NEVER SUR-
RENDER: "Bag" a win and become
a contender. THE PIRAINTS.
FOR SALE: Piraints bags, Help
oreak the nation's longest losing
streak of 0 13. Look for them on cam-
pus and before the game. Call Jerry
at 757-3131 for further details.
FOR SALE: 1 fender strat, l fender
bullet and 2 boss effects pedals
must sell. Call 758 9028 and leave a
message.
FOR SALE :ls it true you can buy
ieeps for $44 through the U.S.
government? Get the facts todayl
Call 1-312-742-1142 Ext. 5271-A.
204 East 5th St
o4ppfe ocoids
Mon-Thur 10 AM-9PM
Fri-Sot 10 AM- 10 PM
Phone 758-1427
Russell Sweats
New Releases Now In Stock!
BOSTON "Third Stage"
PHANTOM, ROCKER & SLICK "Cover Girl"
HUMAN LEAGUE "Crash"
ALICE COOPER "Constrictor"
SAXON "Rock The Nations"
PEABO BRYSON "Quiet Storm"
CHICAGO "18"
JOHN FOGERTY "Eye of the Zombie"
IGGY POP "Blah Blah Blah"
JESSE JOHNSON "Shockodelica"
O.M.D. "The Pacific Age"
IRON MAIDEN "Somewhere In Time"
RATT "Dancing Undercover"
MEGADETH "Peace Sells But Who's Buying?"
10
i"�- Are
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Bond's -
10
Come By And See Why Bond's
Is Your 1 Sporting Goods Store
Coupon good for
10 off any item
in the store
Expires December 31, 1906
10 SPORTING GOODS J0
COUPON
1st Annual Pirate Lacrosse Tournament
Sunday, October 5th, 11:00 AM
at Allied Health Field
East Carolina vs. N.C. State
Duke vs. El on
Winner and Loser Brackets
Come Out � Catch Some Rays
and Support the Pirate Lacrosse Team
B Tequila Bar
a Weekly Specials
Sunrise Sunday: Imports $1.25t Tequila Sunrise $2.00
Monday Night FOOtball: Quarter Draft & Melon
Margaritas
I Toasty Tuesday: Toasted Aimonds $2.25
Wednesday: Margarita $1.75, Pitcher $6.75
TMrSty Thursday: Drink and Drown � Pitchers $2.75,
Tequila Shot $1.75
Fried Friday: Get Fried Early at our new Attitude
Adjustment hour at 4:30; end the night upside down! Free hors
d'ouevres
Saturday: House Drink � Tequila Blues
109 E. 5th St.
752-992
gaeWIefra)aiaaytft'�e'aei'e�1 �����"�'�'� e���� a i i. �, �� -a
1 � � � � ia�a.
"V"i)"ir'iit(arajm.l1TLirr,r r r






16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 2, 1986
V
Classifieds
Continued from page 15
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 2
bedroom apt. located on First St. On
ly $112.50mo. plus t utilities and
deposit. Available Oct. l. Call
Charles at 752 3389 or leave
message.
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA: From the
moment that we saw you in your
gowns all white, there were no se-
cond thoughts of our choice pref
night. You took us as pledges and
made us a part, thanks to all the
sisters from the bottom of our
hearts. We love you, Sigma pledge
class. P.S. Hugs and kisses to all the
big sisters. Last week was great!
E.T.T Thanks for a great weekend,
it was a blast. Let's hope that next
time we last past 10:30. Love ya,
S.L.P.
A.O.S These past three weeks have
been hell. I miss you and your pink
socks. Love ya, Me.
SOCCER COACHES AND
REFEREES NEEDED: For after
noon hours. Call Pitt County Schools
at 752 2934 ext. 276 Or 267.
HELP WANTED: Student with
MWF mornings free to answer
phone for Mitchell Goff Electric
Call 752-3037.
ZBT LITTLE SISTER PLEDGES:
Congratulations! Dany Brewer,
Laura Coleman, Julie Dawkins, Kim
Denton, Deborah Greene, Stacey
Kohn, Beth Rogers, Sally Stewart,
Amy vest. You're gonna have a
blast! (But stay out of the Crime Col-
umn) Also, a big congrats to the
brother pledges!
THE PLEDGES OF THETA CHI:
Knowing his leadership qualities,
would like to congratulate Bryan
Lasslter on his victory In the election
for senior class president.
LOST
FOUND: Two female kittens. Need
loving home. One grey, one tabby.
Approximately 4 months old. Can't
possibly keep. Call 758-4862.
LOST DOG: Female, 15 yrs. old.
Beaglecollie mixed. Long haired,
brown and white. Has large growth
on front paw. Has dog tags Call
752-4575.
PERSONAL
SIGMA PHI EPSILON LITTLE
SISTER RUSH: The Sig Eps will be
having Little Sister Rush October
6th and October 7th from 7 11 p.m. at
the house (505 E. 5th St.) Come by
and meet the brothers, pledges and
little sisters of Sigma Phi Epsilon!
LIDDY: You have to watch those
chairsthey can come out from
nowhere and cause serious bodily
harm (or possibly just embarrass-
ment! ).
THE MONDAY nTgHT DINNER
CREW: Would like to welcome our
two favorite members, Mark and
Brooke, show us your � J
MARK SIMON: Tf you can't
hangdrink tang!
TO ALLGREEKS:
ud to be a WFI!
Proud to be, Pro
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA: We are
looking forward to a great time
tonight. Be prepared to party all
night! -The Sig Eps.
AOTT SISTERS: We, the Beta
Thetas would like to express our love
and appreciation to all the sisters for
their love and support. Thanks!
Love The Beta Thetas.
SCOTT: "YES Great answer!
Whatta we do at this "cocktail
thing?" Get wasted (Oh, and dance
too). 2 short weeks 'til blast-off
P.S. This Tick-Tock keeps me awake
at night.
JENNI SEWELL: I hope your little
sister grows to mean as much to you
as you have meant to me. Let's keep
up the family tradition! Love, Your
Big Sis, Naomi.
DAVID M KEITH M HOWARD
B ARE NOTHING LIKE THE
R EST: When it comes to being great
guys- they're the absolute best! We
love being with you guys; nothing
you do comes as a surprise! Just
always be friends and the partying
never stops until the very end! Love
the Alpha Delta Pi Party Crew,
(N.M PL W.T C.G J.P.)
TO PIKA LITTLE SISTERS: The
brothers of Pika thank you for the
picnic.
VIKKI: l hope you have a great
B-day. You are one special gal. I've
enjoyed our time together, look for-
ward to more fun, love you always,
JPHL.
TO A CERTAIN BLIND SIG EPl.
Just wanted to say hello and let you
know I'm up to 95 percent and soon
to be 100 percent. Love, Nettles.
SUZANNE LACROIX: How about
those TuesdayThursday ballet
classes?
ANGIE: The AOTTs are glad you
have a date for cocktails.
1ST ANNUAL PIRATE LACROSSE
TOURNAMENT: Sunday, Oct. 5th,
11 a.m on Allied Health fields. ECU
vs. N.C. STATEDUKE vs. ELON.
Come out and support the Pirate
Lacrosse team.
PI KAPPA PHI: Faster than a
speeding SML Ball. More powerful
than the entire Greenville Police
force. It's, It's, it's SUPER
STREAKERSI After the annual pen
ny Olympics in which my little
brother Travis Ennis won, our
heroes encountered several of the
GPD villains. Not once, not twice,
but three times the super streakers
encountered the villains. But, in the
end, justice prevailed as Scott
"Poindexter" Smith fended off the
villains with his trusty Canon. After
the encounter our heroes decided to
take a midnight jog around campus.
After BRANDING the SS Store and
stopping by to see old friends, our
heroes returned to the cool waters of
Tar River. Well, that's the (bare)
end of today's episode. Tune in next
week at the same bare time, same
bare channel! Monday night was a
blast and thaf s the naked truth!
MARTA: We, as a Sisterhood, would
like to sincerely congratulate you on
your initiation into our bonds of
Sigma Sigma Sigma!
SIG EPS: Its been Too long-psyched
for tonight! Se ya there- Tri Sigs.
ANNE: Alright girl None of this old
business! Who needs them anyways
right? -Patti
ED AND PAT: Glad you guys finally
made it to a game! it will be a blast-
Patti.
MIKE GERACI: Last Saturday
night was a blast; the beers at Pan-
tana's, the slammers at Kingston
Place, and the Fun with Credit
Cards at my place. Hope we can do it
again real soon, promise the
stadium lights won't be so bright this
time. Call me! -Sandy.
IN SEARCH OF: The Knights of
Sigma Nu are in search of the rare
Lynn Jourdan commonly known as
"ET The creature was last seen
walking down 10st St heading
towards campus. If you happen to
run into this creature, inform it of
the Lil Sister Rush for Sigma Nu at
the Elbo Room, Thurs. night 9 pm.
The luau Fri. night 9 pm at Doctor's
Prk. And Brotherhood Sun. night
9:30 in 221 Mendenhall. Warning;
this creatureperson may be
dangerous. For information call
758-0870.
IN SEARCH OF: The Knights of
Sigma Nu are in search of the
women of ECU to become Little
Sisters in ECU'S most elite little
sister organization. Rush will be
Thurs, 9:00? at the Elbo. Call
758-0870 for details on becoming a
Sigma Nu Little Sister!
ALPHA SIGS: The P J.Pajama
party was a great success; thanks
for a terrific social. Alpha Phis.
PI KAPPA PHI: The brothers and
pledges of Pi Kappa Phi would like
to congratulate Lisa Carroll on
becoming the 1986 Pi Kappa Phi
Homecoming representative. Lisa is
Junior Class president and a
member of the Alpha Delta Pi
sorority. We wish her the best of
luck. Let's make it two in a row!
PARTY PARTY: The Pi Kappswill
be having a party "by the lake" Sun-
day starting at 1. All friends are in-
vited.
PI KAPPA PHI: We have a football
game tonight at 6 pm against the
ZBTs. Everyone should come out
and support the team.
WAREHOUSE SALE
Sept. 29 � Oct. 4
Tom Togs Factory Outlet
1900 Dickinson Ave, Greenville
EVERYTHING DIRECT FROM FACTORY
� Close-outs � Overruns � Irregulars
From 25$ To Not Over $10
TL$rr'
TOOCADERQ
�w
4 Fajnout Names That We Cannot Mention
SUMMER, FALL, AND WINTER MERCHANDISE
HOURS
MON-TUES 9:30 6:00 WED-F R I 9:30-8:00
for your shopping convenience SAT 9:30 6:00
Located in th� WhoU.oL Ar�o
in th� ror of t�� building
MEN'S, LADIES, CHILDREN'S AND INFANT WEAR
ilMlMlMlMIMMlllJlllllJi
U.B.E
516 S. Cotanche St.
Rear entrance on Evans St.
with 30 parking spaces
Come Explore Our New
Sportswear Storel
Our 60 foot "Sweat Wall"
consists of 17 colors of crewneck
sweatshirts with pants to match,
AND .
12 colors of hooded pullovers
Big Men's Sweatshirts
Also New This Fall -
An expanded children's deptT sizes
range from 6 mo. to size 16.
Larger selection of Baseball caps,
stuffed animals & ECU Novelties.
Remember We Still HaveTs & Shorts!
K
1
PARENTS BUCK $f AskfZiin0erd0rour
Good for j brochures.
$1.00 Off Any $5.00 Purchase : nub
or ! . pirate ll
$5.00 Off Any $25.00 Purchase l"1, rtUeCti�n
Void 10-7-86 j y"
1-800-342-5328
Spend ' 'Parents Day with us.
Sportswear for the entire family!
r jV WS� � f&mte �� 'JfcurfM
JU.
FINAL SET, FINAL SHOW: at the
Fillmore East 4-29-71. Vintage
Grateful Dead on WZMB, 91.3.
Tomorrow night at 10 pm with Dead
Redd. Can't wait til thatMIDNIGHT
HOUR! GREATEST STORY
EVER TOLD is best ever I Enjoy the
show!
CONGRATULATIONS: To the girls
who pledged the GREATEST frater
nity at ECU, Kappa Alpha! We're
looking forward to a fantastic
semester with you all. Love always,
Brothers, Pledges and Little Sisters.
"A TOAST TO"
j ECU Parents I
Weekend
Featuring the finest in "Northern
Italian Cuisine" and all ABC
permits
BOOTS
MonWed5-9:00 P m
Thur Fri & Sat. 5-10:30 p.m.
A
t 1 � T P I
f
KATRINA HARRIS AND CRINA
KERN: Happy birthday! We love
you, the ZTAs.
HEY CRINIS: Happy 21st. D.T. just
wasn't the same sober. Love, Hibby
FRED III: How'bout that Toe-Head
Blonde at the Mini Social Friday
night! Love, the Freds.
TO THE LATE NIGHT ALPHA SIG
BEER BONG DUET: How 'bout
that mini social? P.S. Glen � have
you learned that dance yet? Love,
DeLynda
Serving West Greenville
and ECU Campus
� 1201 Charles Blvd
758-6660
Serving East Greenville
� Rivergate Shopping Center
752-6996
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 2, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 02, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.497
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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