The East Carolinian, September 30, 1986






�te
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.61 No.9
Tuesday, September 30,1986
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
SGA Holds First
Legislative Meeting
Bv DAWN STEWARD
Stiff Writer
The Student Government
Association held its first
legislative session Monday even-
ing.
Tony Jackson, vice president
called the meeting to order at
5:05 and Mark Heizer, SGA at-
torney general swore in new
members.
After introductions were made
of the executive council
members, Steve Cunanan, SGA
president discussed the activities
of the Summer Legislature. Ac-
cording to Cunanan only $5,000
of the appropriated budget was
used due to three factors. One,
the summer term was very inac-
tive with little requests from the
budget. Second, the legislature
was very careful to screen what
was to be taken and what was
not. Last, the legislature was
careful with the allocations of
funds while deciding who got
what according to needs.
Cunanan added that although
business was slow here in Green-
ville, the legislature represented
ECU in Washington and at the
North Carolina Legislature by
lobbying against the proposed
raise in tuition.
Ben Eckert, Aycock Dorm
Representative, was elected as
this semester's Speaker of the
Legislature.
"I want to iron out the con-
troversies between the legislature
and the executive councilex-
plained Eckert. "Last year cer-
tain members of the executive
council were denied the right to
speak � they were shot down. I
want to see an end to this because
I feel they (executive council)
have good opinions and we need
to listen to them
Eckert explained the policies of
the legislature to new members
and then proceeded to open the
floor for new business. The
business of the evening included a
proposed constitution for a new
organization on campus.
The new organization,
Students For America, is a non-
political, non-discriminatory
group whose main focus is to
promote values of equality within
American society. If passed, their
constitution will state, "the
creator who gave us life also gave
us liberty and the sole duty of
government is to protect both
The proposed bill was sent to
the Judiciary Committee who will
"decide its outcome.
Also present at the meeting
were Rudolph Alexander,
associate dean of Student
Unions, and Elmer Myer, vice
chancellor for Student Life.
"The faculty depends on you
(the student legislature) for at-
titudes and opinions so that we
can do our best to help you
commented Meyer.
Meyer explained that students
can aid faculty by serving as stu-
dent members on the University
Administrative Committee or the
Faculty Centered Committee.
Vacancies exist on both commit-
tees currently with thirteen ad-
ministrative openings and eight
facutly centered openings.
"I thought it (the First session)
went well concluded Cunanan.
"People sticking up for what
they believe in and takirig a more
active part than last year. I hope,
as do all presidents, for a smooth
running SGA. I have a positive
outlook for this term
Mark Heizer, SGA attorney general swore in the new members of the legislature durin�MondIt
meeting. J
Illiteracy To Be Discussed
By TOBI FERGUSON
SUff Writer
Anderson Clark, president of
the Project Literacy U. S.
(PLUS) Committee of the ABC-
TV Network, will be at ECU
Daniloff Leaves Moscow
MOSCOW (UPI) � Daniloff,
51, was released Monday, 31 days
after his arrest outside Moscow,
where he had gone to meet a
longtime source.
Daniloff, who flashed a V for
victory sign on leaving the U.S.
Embassy on the way to the air-
port, said he did not know of any
deal connected with his release.
"I want to say that 1 don't
know the terms of the arrange-
ment Daniloff said before
boarding a Lufthansa plane to
Frankfort, West Germany. "As
far as I know, I am leaving in-
dependently
The slight, bespectacled
Daniloff said he learned in the
afternoon he was being allowed
to leave.
"I was informed sometime this
afternoon that 1 would be allow-
ed to leave Daniloff told Cable
News Network in Moscow. "My
passport was returned by the
Foreign Ministry with my multi-
ple entry visas which is still valid
and my press card
Daniloff, who was ending Five
and one half years in the land of
his forebears, said, "I am leaving
more in sorrow than in anger
Daniloff was released 31 days
after his arrest outside Moscow,
where he had gone to meet a
longtime source. Daniloff said
he was set up by the Soviet ac-
quaintance who handed him "top
secret" maps while KGB agents
lay in wait.
The arrest threatened U.S. �
Soviet relations just as the
governments were trying to ar-
range a summit between Presi-
dent Reagan and Secretary -
General Mikhail Gorbachev.
The Soviets denounced
Daniloff as a CIA agent, official-
ly charged him with espionage on
Sept. 7 and threatened to put him
on trial. Gorbechev called him "a
spy who was caught in the act
Daniloff, the son of a Russian
emigre, was incarcerated in a
Soviet KGB cell for 14 days and,
after U. S. � Soviet negotia-
tions, was released to the custody
of the U.S. Embassy while
Zakharov was placed with the
Soviet Embassy in New York.
Daniloff called the move an ex-
change of "one hotel for a much
better hotel
Daniloff maintained his in-
nocence and said he did not want
to be released in what would be
considered a spy swap for
Zakharov. The Reagan Ad-
ministration also came out
against such a deal.
U.S. officials said Daniloffs
arrest was retribution for the ar-
rest of Gennadi Zakharov, a
Soviet Physicist working for the
United Nations. Zakharov was
arrested on a New York subway
platform Aug. 23 and charged
with trying to buy U.S. secrets.
The release, which came after
four meetings between Secretary
of State George Shultz and Soviet
Foreign Minister Eduard
Shevardnadze in Washington and
New York, could help clear the
way for a summit between
Moscow and Washington.
Series Scheduled
ByCAROLYN DRISCOLL
A �i stgn l News Editor
This year's annual Symposium
and Lecture-Seminar Series of-
fers students an opportunity to
enhance their credentials, accor-
ding to Doug McMillan,
chairperson of the committee
organizing this project.
Both students and faculty are
invited to submit papers on this
year's topic, "Institutions in
Transition Of the student
papers submitted, two will be
chosen for awards of $100, both
will be published, and one will be
presented orally at the sym-
posium on February 23, 1987.
McMillan said, "Those are two
separate competitions�students
are competing against each other,
not against faculty members
He added, "This is a great
chance for students to be publish-
ed, which can often increase the
chances of going on to do
graduate work
The topic, said Trenton Davis,
See SYMPOSIUM page 5
Tuesday night to present several
programs affiliated with the
PLUS campaign.
According to Carolyn Stevens,
WCTI-TV 12 PLUS Coordinator,
"PLUS is a major media
outreach program undertaken by
ABC-TV, PBS, and local ABC
affiliates to combat the problem
of adult illiteracy
Clark formerly held the posi-
tion of Senior Pastor at the First
Presbyterian Church of Beloit,
Wisconsin. He presently serves
as the Senior Consultant to
Capital Cities-ABC, Inc for the
PLUS project. As Vice-President
of Institiutional Relations of
Global Exchange, Inc an Ohio
based Third World development
and trading firm, Clark dedicates
his time for the benefit of others.
The purpose of his presenta-
tions is to inform and to
challenge the individual and the
community to positive action
toward eradicating illiteracy in
America.
The general public, faculty
members, and ECU students are
invited and encouraged at attend
all presentations.
At 10 a.m Clark is holding a
press conference in the VanLan-
dingham Room located in the
Home Economics Building.
Clark focuses on the
widespread adult illiteracy
presently in America. His outline
includes how the ABC Television
Network plans to lessen and
eventually eradicate this han-
dicap with the support of the
community.
At 7 p.m in Hendrix Theater
the presentations will continue
with a media highlight on
literacy.
Charles Coble, dean of the
School of Education, officially
opens the evening events at 7:30
p.m. Chancellor John Howell
will welcome guests and the
distinguished speakers.
Democratic Nominee
Senate candidate Terry Sanford will hold a press conference at
ECU on the patio of Mendenhall Student Center at 2p.m. Wednes-
day.
Vsyysy'?sss
ON THE INSIDE
Editorials4 �Luke Whisnant's Short Story
Style7 Anthologized � see STYLE page
Sports10 7.
Classifieds8 "Pair of Jacksonville natives
Announcements3 shine at Penn State � see
SPORTS page 10.
BLLBM MUMHT TH, o LA,
SGA Transit System Is working with the Greenville City Transit to provide extended service for
students.
Leonard Lilley, the coor-
dinator of Adult Education, will
introduce the program
moderator, Dean Phillips, news
anchorman from WCTI-TV.
Bob Scott and Clark will con-
clude the evening by discussing
different facets of literacy.
Mr. Scott, former Governor of
North Carolina, and current
President of N.C. Community
Colleges, will address "Literacy
in North Carolina Dr. Clark
will present the "Project Literacy
U.S program emphasizing its
effects in eastern North Carolina.
Following closing remarks by
Mr. Charles Coble, the con-
ference events will conclude with
a reception in the Multipurpose
Room of the Mendenhall Student
Center.
New Student
Transit Routes
Are Provided
By PATTI KEMM1S
News Editor
The Student Government
Transit System recently made ar-
rangements with the Greenville
Transit System to provide addi-
tional bus service for ECU
students.
According to Brennen Col-
lins, transit manager,the new ser-
vice is a result of students' re-
quests for bus service to
businesses and locations not on
the present routes, such as
Carolina East Mall.
Collins and David Morris, the
city transit manager, have devis-
ed a plan in which ECU students
can ride on city bus routes at no
charge.
"We hope that by using the ci-
ty transit we can save money-
while still not duplicating our
present system said Collins.
Collins estimated the cost of
using the city transit to be $1,000
a semester.
In order to use the city transit,
students will have to pick up
tickets in advance from the SGA
Transit office. The transit office
will then be billed at the end of
each month for the number of
tickets that were used.
"This way we will get what we
pay for said Collins.
Collins added that the new
system will be evaluated at the
end of the semester.
"If it gets too expensive it
might have to be changed to
reduced fares he said.
Students can pick up tickets
Monday through Friday from 10
a.m. until 4 p.m. at the Transit
Office, located on the second
floor of Mendenhall.
Maps of the new routes are
also available in the Transit Of-
fice.
i
, . .
' " - Witi0Cl
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 30, 1986
New Transit Routes Available To Students
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LOCAI ION
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isasf Carolinian
employee . . .
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BAIL BONDS
Clinton Anderson
Answering Service
757-5310
STATEWIDE
SERVICE
24 HOUR SERVICE
355-6340
CLIFF'S
Seafood House arvd Oyster Bar
CO KROCERINC FOR ALL YOUR
Tailgate Party
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WIN
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Pirate Football Tickets
2 Pairs To Be Given Away
For Each Home Game Register Now!

HOLLY FARMS
Fresh Fryer
Combo Pak
$
Lb.
118
�JP CONTAINS:
3 ansASTS
�3 DNUMSTtCKS
�3TMMMS
Qt.
Ctn.
KROGER 2 LOWFAT
OR HOMOGENIZED
Whole
Milk
69
Ltr
NRB
DIET COKE. CHERRY COKE.
CAFFEINE FREE COKE OR
Coke
Classic
99
KAHNS
German
Bologna
Lb.
$159
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Breyer's gy
Yogurt ��
Oz
Cups
99�
ALL VARIETIES
BETTY CROCKER
Cake
Mixes . .
LIMIT wit
S'C 400 L
PURCHASE
18' 2
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Box
49
KROGER 1-LB.
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BUY ONE
GET ONE
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GREEN GIANT PEAS, CUT OR
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STYLE OR WHOLE KERNEL
Corn or
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2
16-17
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Cans
OFF LABEL
Close Up
Toothpaste
6.4
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Tube
$
131
KROGER
OLD FASHION
White
Bread
VHS Video Movie Rentals
EASTERN GOLD OR RED
Delicious
A Apples
ADVERTI$�D ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised
items Is required to be
readily available for sale In
each Kroger Savon except
as specifically noted In mis
ad if we do run out of an
Item we will offer you your
choice of a comparable
item when available,
reflecting the same sav-
ings or a ralncheck which
will entitle you to pur-
chase the advertised Item
at the advertised price
within so days. Only one
vendor coupon will be ac
cepted per item
Go Krogering
(
m aj��ew
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
v �' -
if
A
STUDENTS FOR SANFORD
Oov Terr, S�"TO'C � w a- t
tow October ! to mwl t- f ,
students o E�s' Ca-o �� r . .
torrorrow a' 3 0C
Veioenhai: fa meet .
S E N A O P
v-
ECU COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
C�'f�f Dew - ���. -
torfl sposx a . �, � �
Governor too-orro a' X .
a' AAenan"a Ce� � � � -
C � r O : n � s -r J j E N A 1 -
ECU VETERANSCLUB
� � - ECU f'f c Kt s hi
'� '9�'f Pa �.��
LOU'il EC v 'x"j ,e
Oct 4 frorr n a" prr �� � f �
E ee'a- . - ,
snacus ana o- -�i We� . � .
j' s tor ra s . . � � .
�r-e A?' a' ' ay Co"e ?a- . I
anc oar� io " E
-r-ore i�oa- - a ey �
CO OP IN STATE
GOVERNMENT
Pos lions ava'iatKe I
sep5 Sude
' -
jr's are neeet� .
�tuoes are
' � 3a
COLLEGIATE 4-H
. , H om
' ' '
a 'e �
Series P
Continued from page 1
another committee member.
"lends itself to almost eer
discipline. The papers can be on
anything, as long as the fit in
with the overall theme�we don
want to constrain the student
the faculty. Some of the be
papers we have seen in the ;
have been on unanticipated
topics
The symposiums of the past,
sponsored by Phi Kappa Phi,
honor society, have alwav ha
broad and general topic so they
can appeal to all department-
campus, from the medical school
to the departments of arts and
sciences, said McMillan.
He continued, "we are trying
to encourage more srudents r-�
submit this year. In the .
students were usually four a -
encouraged to write by tcavr
through class contact. This year,
we're trying to make a broader
appeal
The winner of last year's sym-
posium, whose theme was
"What's Right With America
What's Wrong was a
graduating senior.
In the past, there have been
two separate programs, a sym-
posium in which submitted
papers were presented, and a lec-
ture series. This is the first vear
cert
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SIRLOIN
$2.99 AH I i
s4 $cAt place to cot!
STEAK HOUSE
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lD
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTMEMBER 30, 1986
and Oyster Bar
N
MonSat.
REMODELED
WIN
otball Tickets
Given Away
p Register Novw!
III:
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mniiu
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;herrv coke
3ee coke or
Coke
Classic
99
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es
49c
0GER
? FASH
White
Bread
25

EASTERN GOLD OR RED
Delicious
Apples
0
99
�ge- sav �
?uan- - . . prVeO
'� -
on
Announcements
STUDENTS FOR SANFORD
. , sanfora w.n be at ECU tomor
ctober �. to i"p�t and talk w,tr the
�� fs East Carolina Come on out
'w it' 00 pm on the pat.o o
I and meet your ne�t u S
PADDLING CLUB
There will te a meeting tor anyone n
'erected .n forming a paddling dub (kayak
rMJ lanoe.ng etcon Aea Oct 1 ,n Room
'05 Memorial Gym at 5 pm The club will be
open to novire beginner as wen as advanced
students tacult, and staff Lets yet this
sow on the water '
ECU COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
ege Democrats ann students tor San
lord iponsoi a visit from our tor me'
rrow at J OO pm on the pat.o
'� 'a Come on out and meet Nor th
�'�' US SENATOR
VOTER REGISTRATION
The League of Women Voters will be on
campus to register students for the
November election If you are interested in
registering in Pitt County or changing your
cur rent registration, registrars will be n the
student stores lobby on Wed Oct 1,
8 30 1? 10 October 6th ,s the deadline to
'eqister to be able to vote n the Nov 4th
� . 'on
POETRY FORUM
ECU Poetry Forum meeting Thurs 8 00
pm .n MenoenhaH Room 248 Bring 6 or 8
op.es � fj poem to be discussed
ECU VETERANSCLUB
ECl veterans Club is hav.nc; fl
"a-ty before the Southwes'
x s a-a ECU footbai' game on Saturda.
4 � � M am i pm at the E'mhurst
�a . v loci playground Bring food
� . . j � � nkj We wiii have a c oupie of
H LOOklOr 'N'P -n'c Hagor
� A " " an tag C ome ea' �� ' � csv. he up
� . town t.e vf s n teo f- n
tormafioi a 'So 8301 or 7$� 0333
ECU ATHLETICS
The office of academic counseling is now
. rutors n rne following subiec t areas
B.oi Chem indt Math Mist Ph.i Phys
E v Bus Crs ScxwJust To apply call
TV 40S3
BEACH BREAK
The ECU Biology Club is gong to the
-eai h on Oct 10 12. tor the annual FAII
Business meeting of CANCAS Spend a fun
'Hed weekend n Ft CasweM NC (30
�-nutes from Wilmington) on the beach or
�isil Old Brunswck Town and the NC
Vquarum and watch a live feeding of
sharks' The cost .s S22 per person for Fr.day
and Saturday nights for lodging only The
deadline tor s.gnmg up .5 Oct 3 Take a
break from classes and raie a fun weekend
In the su" w th the Bio Cub For more info
i me Bo club at 757 628 or stop by the of
� e
CO OP IN STATE
GOVERNMENT
Iva able tot s'u.ie's -Me'esfeo
�" s stati . ment for spi
tudenfsma . � n,
� ai sci� e. home �
"a usl i e ana 91� ac"
"� A n � � ,�
�a � aqec to ape , For n
"a t Co-OS 313 Raw
COLLEGIATE 4-H
late 4 m d� its
- v- rhurs o : a1 5 30 UI
A -���� esteo i v. 4 m
NAACP
There , , a g eet.nq of NAACP on
Oi ' : 1986 a' s 00 pm room 221 Venoenhan
A tea persons are nvtfO
LIBRARY SCIENCE 1000
New asses beg v ray
� saay asses stai I 15 a�r
� ' - � ' sday asses start Ocl u A
' a a . '�k e- lirsl aa
ECU ATHLETIC DEPT
ECU SURFING
T here w'H be a mandator y meeting Thyrs
at 8 00 n B 04 of Joyner L brary The
eel rtg wnl concern insurance �orms
A . ' � ; a y on going to Mar'a"a for
the contest must attend this meeting Can
7S8 8393 or 758 9627
A
. . ���


' be a part ol the tun ana
� g p 1 v foj . .
'��� 1 of two Iwns
the a . -�a
a 'y �)'
BUSINESS MAJORS
PhBeta Lamaa.the business ciub. whi
� � �on Oct1 Raw302. 3 pm if unableto
af'ena ano na rwrtpaic dues call Susana'
' 5 83 59 0

COLLEGE
REPUBLICANS
U S Congressional Candidate Howard
Moye win speak to the ECU Chapter of the
College Republicans tonight at t JO m
MenoenhaH room 721 Howard Moye is runn
.ng aga.nst long time encumbent Walter B
Jones Sr For more info can 753 357
GAMMA BETA PHI
Nrw member orientation Anyone in the
'00 20 percent of their class ano interested In
lOmmg Gamma Beta Ph. should attend it
wHi be held m mendenhaii room 244 af 7 p m
Wed Sept 30th ano October 1 Dress s in
tormai There wilt be a general business
meeting in Biology 103 on Oct 2nd, at 7 p m
AH members are invteo to attend There
win be an executive meeting a' � . in the
same room
PLANT SALE
The Boiogy Oub is having a pian' sae on
Thurs ano Fri Oct 2nd and 3rd from 7 30
am lpm Bt Biology South Rm in
Greenhouse
INTER-VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
invites you to take a study break ano iOin
us for tun, fel'Owship. and tulf "men ever 1
W�"d n ght Events nclude sng ng sk 's,
gue' speakers �" refreshments served
after each meeting Weekly events .nciude
daily prayer sessions ano B'b'e study
meetings Wed - gn� a' 7 00 in Raw 130
NEED MONEY?
We Pay CASH For:
Sterling Class Rings
Silver Coins Wedding Bands
Any Gold Jewelry
Coin & Ring Man
4th ft Evoni Streat
ift r c srd 3a am f, a one
I
I
I
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
Award Winning Ice Cream
321 East 10th Street Greenville, N.C. 27858
Call 758-4896
Buy One Blend-In or Sundae
Get the Second
1 2 PRICE!
One Coupon Per Order, Please Coupon Expires Mon , Soember 3.
I
I
I
Series Planned
Continued from pae
another committee member.
"lends itself to almost every
discipline. The papers can be on
anything, as long as they tit in
with the overall theme�ue don't
want to constrain the students or
the faculty. Some of the best
papers we have seen in the past
have been on unanticipated
topics
The symposiums ot the past,
sponsored by Phi Kappa Phi.
honor society, have alwas had a
broad and general topic so they
can appeal to all departments on
campus, from the medical school
to the departments of arts and
sciences, said McMillan.
He continued, "we are trying
to encourage more students m
submit this year. In the pas-
students were usually foun a d
encouraged to write by teach'� -
through class contact. This year,
we're trying to make a broader
appeal
The winner of last year's sym-
posium, whose theme was
"What's Right With America
What's Wrong " was a
graduating senior.
In the past, there have been
two separate programs, a sym-
posium in which submitted
papers were presented, and a lec-
ture series. This is the first vear
the two have been combined.
Gene Varbrough, committee
member, commented, "We think
it's important to invite and in-
clude students in the scholarly ac-
tivity
"Phi Kappa Phi (co-sponsor in
the program) said McMillan,
"Is a campus-wide organiza-
tion�we have no restriction.s in
terms of discipline. In fact it is
the one organization of its kind
on campus that reaches out to all
departments
Students with questions con-
cerning the symposium can con-
tact McMillan in the English
department, Austin 124.
Those interested in submitting
papers should submit a note of
intent to prepare a paper by
November 7 and the full
mai uscripl by January 13, 1987
t i McMillan. The selection of
student papers will be announced
by January 30. 1987.
Faculty members who are in-
terested in writing a paper should
submit 10 copies of a one-page
abstract to McMillan by
November 7. The announcement
of faculty papers selected will be
made by December 5. Eight
faculty-written manuscripts will
be selected to be published, along
with one student-written paper,
in the proceedings issue.
Dear Kelly
Don t wait
any longer.
Come home
now, please.
Ichliebadu,
Love,
You Know
Who.
Igi-ectf
rtfip?
ata&
� �'
eatV
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a Weekly Specials
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Monday Night FOOtball: Quarter Draft & Melon
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TOttSty Tuesday: Toasted Almonds $2.25
Wednesday: Margarita $1.75, Pitcher $6.75
Thirsty Thursday: Drink and Drown � Pitchers $2.75,
Tequila Shot $1.75
FHed Friday: Get Fried Early at our new Attitude
Adjustment hour at 4:30; end the night upside down! Free hors
d'ouevres
Saturday.9 House Drink - Tequila Blues
109 E. 5th St.
752S926
Mgj I fltffll





m
IFF'S
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on
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTMEMBER 30. 1986
Announcements
STUDENTS FOR SANFORD
Gov Terry Santord will be at ECU tomor
ow. October I, to meet ana talk with the
students of East Carotin Come on out
tomorrow at 2 00 pm on the patio of
Mendenhaii and meet your next j
S E N A T O R I !
ECU COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
College Democrats and students for San
tend will sponsor a visit from our former
Governor tomorrow at 2 00 pm on the patio
at Mendenhaii Come on out and meet North
Carolina's next us SENATOR
ECU VETERANS CLUB
Tie ECU Veterans Club is having a
Tailgate Party before the Southwest
i-Cxj'Siana ECU football game on Saturday
Oct 4 from 11 am pm at the Elmhurst
Elementary School playground Bring fooo,
snacks and drinks We will have a couple of
gniisfor hot stuff Look for the Pirate flag or
�he American flag Come early to psyche up
ana party dowm Everyone is invited For
more information call 7S4 8301 or 758 0333
PADDLING CLUB
There will be a meeting for anyone m
terested m forming a paddling club (kayak
ng, canoeing etcon Wed , Oct 1, m Room
105 Memorial Gym at 5 pm The club will be
open to novice beginner as well as advanced
students, faculty and staff Let's get this
show on the water!
POETRY FORUM
ECU Poetry Forum meeting Thurs, 8 00
pm in Mendenhaii Room 248 Bring 4 or i
copies of each poem to be discussed
ECU ATHLETICS
The office of academic counseling is now
hiring tutors m the following subject areas
Biol, Chem. Indt, Math, Hist, Phil, Phys.
Econ, Bus Crs Socw Just To apply call
757 4053
VOTER REGISTRATION
The League of Women Voters will be on
campus to register students for the
November election if you are interested in
registering m Pitt County or changing your
current registration, registrars will be in the
student stores lobby on Wed , Oct 1,
I 30-12 30 October 4th is the deadline to
register to be able to vote in the Nov 4th
election
BEACH BREAK
The ECU Biology Club is going to the
aeach on Oct 10-12. for the annual FAII
Business meeting of CANCAS. Spend a fun
'illed weekend in Ft Caswen. NC (30
minutes from Wilmington) on the beach or
rfisit Old Brunswick Town and the NC
Xquarium and watch a live feeding of
sharks! The cost is$J2 per person tor Friday
and Saturday nights for lodging only The
deadline for signing up is Oct. 3. Take a
break from classes and have a fun weekend
m the sun with the Bio. Club For more info
can the Bio club at 757 4284 or stop by the of
fice
NAACP
CO-OP INSTATE
GOVERNMENT
Positions available tor students interested
' careers in state government for spring
semester Students maionng in business, ac
;ount,ng. political science, home ec . com
outer scence. criminal iust.ce. ana graphic
jrts are neeaea Women ana minority
students are encouraged to apply For more
nto contact Caop 313 Rawl
There will be a call meeting of NAACP on
Oct 2. 1984 at 5 00 pm room 221 Mendenhaii
All interested persons are invited
LIBRARY SCIENCE 1000
New classes begin soon Monoay
Wednesday classes start Oct 15 ano
Tuesday Thursday classes start Oct 14. At
tendance will be taken f.rst day
COLLEGIATE 4-H
The Collegiate 4 H Club will hold its mon
thly meeting on Thurs Oct 2 at 5 x in 247
Menaenhaii All interested in Collegiate 4 H
are welcome to jom us
ECU ATHLETIC DEPT.
Would you hke to be a part of the fun and
excitment surrounding Pirate football The
ECU Athletic Dept is in need of two clowns
to distribute baiions in the tailgat.ng areas
� or each of the remaining four home games
If nterested. can 757 4491
ECU SURFING
There will be a mandatory meeting Thurs
at 8 00 in B 04 of Joyner Library The
meeting will concern insurance forms
Anyone planning on going to Maryland for
the contest must attend this meeting. Call
758 8393 or 758 9427
BUSINESS MAJORS
Phi Beta Lamda, the business dub. will
meet on Oct 1, Rawl X2. 3 pm If unable to
attend and have ndt paid dues call Susan at
7 5 8 3 590
COLLEGE
REPUBLICANS
US Congressional Candidate Howard
Moye will speak to the ECU Chapter of the
College Republicans tonight �t 4 30 in
Mendenhaii room 231. Howard Moye it runn-
ing against long time encumbent Walter B
Jones Sr For more info, call 752-3517
GAMMA BETA PHI
New member orientation: Anyone in the
top 20 percent of their class and interested in
ioining Gamma Beta Phi should attend it
will be held in mendenhaii room 244 at 7 pm
Wed Sept. 30th and October 1 Dress is in-
formal. There will be a general business
meeting in Biology 103 on Oct. 2nd, at 7 p m.
All members are invited to attend. There
will be an executive meeting at 4 p m. in the
same room
PLANT SALE
The Biology Club is having a plant sale on
Thurs. and Fri Oct. 2nd and 3rd from 7 30
a.m 1 p.m. at Biology South Rm ill
Greenhouse
INTER-VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Invites you to take a study break and join
us for tun, fellowship, and fulfillment every
Wed night Events include singing, skits,
guest speakers, with refreshments served
after each meeting. Weekly events include
daily prayer sessions and Bible study
meetings Wed night at 7 00 in Rawl 130
NEED MONEY?
W� Pay CASH For:
Sterling Class Rings
Silver Coins Wedding Bands
Any Gold Jewelry
Coin & Ring Mon
4th A Evans Str�?
priori aajerf a� . on r�d ,
sw r�MS
I
I
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
Award Winning Ice Cream
321 East 10th Str�l Graanville. N.C. 27158
Call 758-4896
Buy One Blend-In or Sundae
Get the Second
PRICE!
One Coupon Per Order, Please. Coupon Expires Mon Sovember 3.
I
I
Series Planned
Continued from page 1
another committee member,
"lends itself to almost every
discipline. The papers can be on
anything, as long as they fit in
with the overall theme�we don't
want to constrain the students or
the faculty. Some of the best
papers we have seen in the past
have been on unanticipated
topics
The symposiums of the past,
sponsored by Phi Kappa Phi,
honor society, have always had a
broad and general topic so they
can appeal to all departments on
campus, from the medical school
to the departments of arts and
sciences, said McMillan.
He continued, "we are trying
to encourage more students to
submit this year. In the pa
students were usually fount, and
encouraged to write by teachers
through class contact. This year,
we're trying to make a broader
appeal
The winner of last year's sym-
posium, whose theme was
"What's Right With America,
What's Wrong " was a
graduating senior.
In the past, there have been
two separate programs, a sym-
posium in which submitted
papers were presented, and a lec-
ture series. This is the first vear
the two have been combined.
Gene Yarbrough, committee
member, commented, "We think
it's important to invite and in-
clude students in the scholarly ac-
tivity
"Phi Kappa Phi (co-sponsor in
the program) said McMillan,
"Is a campus-wide organiza-
tion�we have no restrictions in
terms of discipline. In fact it is
the one organization of its kind
on campus that reaches out to all
departments
Students with questions con-
cerning the symposium can con-
tact McMillan in the English
department, Austin 124.
Those interested in submitting
papers should submit a note of
intent to prepare a paper by
November 7 and the full
manuscript by January 13, 1987
to McMillan. The selection of
student papers will be announced
by January 30, 1987.
Faculty members who are in-
terested in writing a paper should
submit 10 copies of a one-page
abstract to McMillan by
November 7. The announcement
of faculty papers selected will be
made by December 5. Eight
faculty-written manuscripts will
be selected to be published, along
with one student-written paper,
in the proceedings issue.
Dear Kelly
Don't wait
any longer.
Come home
now, please.
Ichliebadu,
Love,
You Know
Who.
brar
Ltp"ce
SIRLOIN TIPS
$2.99 All Day
4 jxettf place t cti
STEAK HOUSE
3 Tequila Bar
4 Weekly Specials
uodnoD (9861 01 jaqo-PO �g-ui-dz���h�ji�o
s.m ui 6uuq sno. noA 'ADPud sajidxa jaWO) !SSii"io Im
jajsaiuas
at4 jo jsaj aii joj 0�$
�j:lL6!J op 9M puD 6uiLi auo op 8M
issvio SDiaoa3v ivauo
e si j.ueM noA
lie uaqM �setfs� 40 shuj ADuej aiw e joj 6u;Aed jo paji.i
.ttyi Imports $1.25, Tequila Sunrise $2.00
Monday Night FOOtball: Quarter Draft & Melon
Margaritas
TOUSty Tuesday: Toasted Almonds $2.25
Wednesday: Margarita $1.75 Pitcher $6.75
Thirsty Thursday: Drink and Drown - Pitchers $2.75,
Tequila Shot $1.75
FHed Friday: Get Fried Early at our new Attitude
Adjustment hour at 4:30; end the night upside down! Free hors
d'ouevres
Saturday: House Drink � Tequila Blues
109 E. 5th Si.
752-8926
mm m m
- - - � .� - 4fci
'� ��.






Stlje iEaBt (Karnlttttan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Ll vender, ,Wr� w,�
Daniel Maurer. hmv�u�
Patti Kemmis. vm u� Steve Folmar. aw� innw,
Scott Cooper. cc�m ew Anthony Martin, ��,�� o�, vow
Rick McCormac, to-vor�&i Meg Needham, qomm .�����,
John Shannon, va Shannon Short, �.�-(,�.����,�
Pat Molloy, &www &� DeChanile Johnson, An o,�
SEPTEMBER 30, 1986
Opinion
Page 4
Burnout
Don't Let It Happen To You
There is a disease that strikes col-
lege campuses nationwide. These
are just some of the symptoms:
� A semester course load of 15 to 18
credit hours.
lead to fatigue and depression.
These "academic burnouts" are
students you see in class everyday
and would assume to be model
students. The truth is, were it not
X 0W.Y DO THIS OCCFiSIONPiLLy YOU KNOW.
Jl'n NO ADDICT OR ftNYTHNO LlkETHftT .GOSH,
XT 5URE DOES rtftKE VOU FEEL GooD DON'T IT?1'
J
� Sleeping six hours a night, or less, for this dreaded illness, something
� Participating in one or more cam- akin to workaholism, they would
pus organizations that require a be.
commitment of 35 (sometimes up to
45) hours a week.
� A bad cold that, no matter how
much cold medicine you ingest,
never goes away.
� And finally, severe and sudden
weight loss, due, not to lack of ap-
petite, but rather lack of time to
eat.
We're talking, of course, about
academic burnout.
Every semester a significant
number of over-achieving students
push themselves to the breaking
Victims of academic burnout are
all around us. Just look at
organization presidents and ex-
ecutive staff members, you can see
it in their eyes. Why, our own East
Carolinian desk editors work, on
the average, 40 hours a week. Don't
be surprised. This is not uncommon
among organizations that must
meet deadlines.
The most dangerous aspect of
this affliction, however, is the way
it sneaks up on students. No one
sees it coming until it's too late.
point; the point where they sudden- And by then, there is little you can
ly find themselves asking the ques-
tions "Why am I here; why am I
doing this; and is it all
worthwhile?"
This is when the pressures of
organization related deadlines join,
and sometimes conflict with, the
drive for hieh academic achieve-
do to correct the problem.
Ways to avoid such a danger in-
clude time management and know-
ing when not to work. For the
academic achiever, the former is
simple, the latter is not.
Be aware of academic burnout,
ment. Such pressure can eventually Don't let it happen to you.
WoRRlEp ABoUT STRESS? HAVING
Trouble coping with Job stress,
Marital &TRE&&, Financial STRESi?f
'Campus Forum
Making-The-Grade Student Speaks Out
In Defense Of SGA 'Minority Rulers'
Editor:
I am neither a radical conservative
nor a member of any fraternity,
therefore this is the opinion of a "mak-
ing the grade" student.
I feel the issue discussed by Mr.
Shelley (923) and Mr. Tomasic (925)
is missing the point. Mr. Shelley points
out the moral question of Mr. Tomasic
running for two offices. I say so be it �
if Mr. Tomasic wants to lose twice, he
has that option.
Sorry Chris, David Brown is long
gone. Many people, including myself,
thought there was some "piggy-back"
riding on that ticket anyway. Obvious-
ly, the student body (judging from the
current election) thought so too. Mr.
Shelley, your moral character doesn't
seem to be spotless either.
The point, in my opinion, is having a
member of the SGA Legislature who
will perform hisher job irrespective of
hisher views or affiliations. Just
because a student is a "radical conser-
vative" or "white fraternity individual"
does not imply that the student
disregards people who are not. This,
Mr. Tomasic, is an unfair assumption.
You're forgetting the word "fair" in
"fair representation
Also, these officers are used for help,
not to "rule" � the SGA is not a dic-
tatorship. If the minority is concerned
moreso for my interests than the ma-
jority, I'd rather have the minority
listening to my interests anyway. The
student body can only hope to be
represented by such fair individuals.
I realize this may be somewhat
idealistic, but it is certainly not out of
the question because it can happen and
has happened in the past. It is up to us
to pick that person whom we feel can
live up to these standards.
I believe Mr. Cunanan has done a job
the student body can appreciate, and he
is a "white fraternity individual It is
his personal character which is impor-
tant, not because he is a member of a
fraternity. Many SGA issues affect both
fraternities and independents anyway.
To add, if we (the student body) did
not like the way our SGA was handled,
we have quite a few more independents
that fraternity and sorority members
and therefore we could change things
through our vote. The fact is, Mr.
Tomasic, we have been satisfied with
"minority rulers" because they have
done (or at least for the most part) what
counts � a good job.
Speaking of the horse's mouth and
rear-end, we always have the opportuni-
ty to exhibit either one. It was clear
through their vote that the Senior stu-
dent body felt you, Mr. Tomasic, while
SGA Vice-President, showed the latter.
We all must remember: It is the job we
do, not the B.S. we talk, which gains us
respect.
Randy Mizelle,
Graduate Student,
Psychology
Music Review
Dear Editor:
I'm writing in response to D.A.
Swanson's unfavorable review of the
New Beat Rodeo LP. I am extremely
curious as to how albums are chosen for
review in The East Carolinian. Why not
review albums that feature artists with
at least a slight bit of musical talent? A
good way to avoid negative reviews in
the future would be a better choice of
material to review.
For example, why not review David
Lee Roth's new album? This Warner
Bros, release features the outstanding
guitar wizardry of Steve Vai, who, in
fact, went to one of the most respected
music schools in the world (Berklee in
Boston).
Queensryche's latest, Rage for Order,
is also one of the finest vinyl offerings
in years. I guess finesse and style are not
as popular in modern society, as they
sould be.
If this is an attempt to turn us all into
No Wave Nincompoops, it'll never
work. Some of us still like musicality in
our music. 1 would like to suggest that
you review a wider variety of musical
styles. Review a jazz album once in a
w hile, or some heavy metal, or anything
other than the same old thing week after
week. Perhaps your present reviewer is
not qualified to review a wider variety
ol musk. If not, 1 suggest you find so-
meone who is.
Wh not invite a "musical correspon-
dent" from the School of Music? Either
w a, I believ e there is not a wide enough
variety of styles represented. Please
consider these points carefully. I don't
think I'm alone in these opinions.
P.S. Yngwie Malmsteen's new album
is a killer.
John Williams,
Sophomore,
Music
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the entrance
of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Students, facul-
ty and staff writing letters for this page
are reminded that they are limited to
one everv five issues.
Sen. Helms: Disgrace To N.C The Nation
With the possible exception of Senator McCar-
thy, there has probably never been a senator in our
nation's history who is as disgraceful as Jesse
Helms, and the record of his third term is as bad, if
not worse, than the record of his first two terms.
Helms has thrived on popularity built around his
"stands up for what he believes" slogan, but it is
more evident than ever that the things Helms
believes are ignorant and immoral. In his third term
alone, he has shamed his country (not to mention
North Carolina) again and again. It's not possible
to mention everything here, but there are several
points that must be touched on.
Not long after he was re-elected over former
governor Jim Hunt, the senator decided to take on
a personal vendetta against CBS, which has the
highest news rating's of any major network. Helms
decided that CBS was guilty of an anti-conservative
bias, and that someone had to become Dan
Rather's boss. He then led his own organization,
the so-called Fairness in Media, in an insane at-
tempt to buy CBS stock and gain influence.
Although Helms probably knew the endeavor did
not have a chance, the senator was too thick-headed
to see the difference between his own personal
dislike of Dan Rather and his mad accusation of
anti-conservative bias.
One of Helms' best pals, Jerry Falwell, jumped
on the bandwagon and criticized CBS for its anti-
christian bias, but he couldn't help.
Why? Probably because there was no truth to it.
If CBS did have such a strong anti-conservative and
anti-christian bias, then the evening news would not
get the ratings it does; too many people would be
offended.
CBS News has always been open-minded. During
the week following the Libyian raid, CBS News had
both Casper Weinburger and George Shultz as
guests. "Face the Nation" recently had Pat Robin-
son as a guest. Helms' complaint had no credibility
and the issue died in the dark depths of his mind. It
was time for the senator to find some other way to
embarrass the nation.
Helms loves to throw his influence into foreign
policy, and he never hesitates when he gets the
chance. With the situation in one of the world's
most repressive countries, South Africa, growing
more desparate each day, more and more countries
are favoring economic sanctions against the South
African regime.
From The Left
By BERN McCRADY
When the Senate was faced with a vote for
American sanctions, did Helms do the right thing
and support these sanctions? No, the Senator did
everything he could to prevent the Senate from ac-
ting.
His behavior became so bad that Robert Dole
started a petition to limit Helms speaking time and
prevent him from disgracing the Senate and the na-
tion. Although sanctions were eventually passed,
Helms' behavior was both predictable and im-
moral.
In the sad mind of Jesse Helms, there are only
two kinds of governments in the world; democratic
and communist. If a country is anti-communist,
then it is automatically a democracy, regardless of
what the country does to its people.
An excellent example is the recent Phillipine
revolution, which ousted a Helms buddy, Ferdi-
nand Marcos. When it became clear that Marcos
had stolen the election from Mr. Aquino, the
Senate overwhelmingly passed a resolution which
declared the election a fraud that did not represent
the will of the people.
Did Helms vote for the resolution? No, the
Senator opposed it, and for several weeks claimed
that election fraud was equal on both sides. In his
mind, of course, the Phillipines had always been a
democracy during the Marcos years.
The senator could not find reason to stop with
the Phillipines. He voted against the genocide trea-
ty, which overwhelmingly passed the Senate, and he
then took his show to Latin America.
He constantly urges military support for a group
of terrorists, the Nicaraguan contras, whom he
claims are "freedom fighters The Sandinistas cer-
tainly are not saints that support democracy, but
are they killing peasants in the middle of the night
the way the contras are? People who have visited
Nicaragua say no.
Another stop in Latin America was Chile, whose
leader, Augusto Pinochet, is a ruthless man. The
Reagan administration, to its credit, is pressuring
Pinochet to reform his government, yet Helms
returned from Chile with the news that Pinochet is
responsible for a democracy that is fighting com-
munism.
The Senator's one-man stand on communism is
so bad that he tries his best to influence foreign
policy by delaying appointments and promotions of
ambassadors and other state department officials,
who he thinks are "soft" on communism.
Sometimes the senator gets what he wants by
threatening to use the fillibuster if a certain person
is nominated. Since Reagan was elected, Helms has
used the fillibuster 19 times in an attempt to in-
fluence appointments and nominations.
Helms has criticized American policy toward
China ever since President Nixon visited Peking in
1972. The opening of diplomatic relations with
China was certainly one of the Nixon administra-
tion's most significant accomplishments. China
does not get along well with the Soviet Union, and
the U.S. has been able to take advantage of the
Sino Soviet rift.
Also, world tensions have not been as bad as they
would have been had Nixon not made the trip, but
Helms only sees godless communists, and refuses to
look at the China situation objectively.
With the exception of the Chinese example, all of
the events mentioned have taken place during
Helms' third term. "The Jesse Helms show" began
long before 1984, however.
Helms made a complete fool of himself, and the
nation, when he supported Argentina during the
Falkland island crisis. Why Helms found it
necessary to be the only senator in the nation to
vote against a resolution that supported Britain dur-
ing the crisis will never be understood.
He has constantly tried to make a very silly issue,
school prayer, sound important. Why is it that the
senator cannot understand that organized prayer
belongs in the family and the church?
Probably because he knows that he would lose
the support of the Moral Majority (which is neither)
and various other "Christian" organizations that
help keep the senator afloat. The same probably ap-
plies to his stand on abortion; if he changes his
stand, he loses the support of those who are "born
again
Despite the evidence, a disturbing number of peo-
ple continue to praise Helms and maintain that he
"stands up for what he believes Every time so-
meone criticizes the senator's record, he is prepared
with a simple defense. He just writes it all off to the
liberal media that thrives on undermining President
Reagan and himself, not to mention America.
This is very ironic, for it is the "Jesse Helms
show" that undermines America. Who are the peo-
ple who insist on defending the senator? Probably
the same people who sob that a true conservative,
Jim Broyhill, is a flaming liberal under the thumb
of TipO'Neil. Sob, sob.

i'iwit.w�w i i�i i � i immmm � �' ���
This
Be
PIT
VILLAGE
' DONNA FDW ARD
Owner
Select Groul
511 Evans St.
Greenville, NC 27834
Phone. 756-9222
Greenville's
Hi
Expires October 15 Col
if)
O
o
C5
UJ
Q.
O
o
Greenville's
Hav
Get 3,
Expires October 15 Coupot
This
Be





THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 30. IWt 5
f
S
vo�
GOSH,
J0N'T IT?1
Speaks Out
tv Rulers'
to turn us all into
ipoops, it'll never
ill like musicality in
nld like to suggest that
variety of musical
album once in a
metal, or anything
ame old thing ueek after
present reviewer is
e a s ider variety
! suggest you find so-
'musical correspon-
ol of Music? Either
is not a wide enough
les represented. Please
ts carefully. 1 don't
; m these opinions.
Malmsteen's new album
John Williams,
Sophomore,
Music
Forum Rules
inian welcomes letters
mints of view. Mail or
it ffice in the Publica-
from the entrance
� verification, all let-
nelude the name, major and
address, phone number
� the author(s). Letters
typewritten pages,
otly printed. All let-
editing for brevity,
and no personal at-
rmitted. Students, facul-
ting letters for this page
hat they are limited to
� issues.
Nation
- nave not been as bad as they
had Nixon not made the trip, but
ees godless communists, and refuses to
hina situation objectively.
Kception of the Chinese example, all of
mentioned have taken place during
"The Jesse Helms show" began
Aeer.
mplete fool of himself, and the
I he supported Argentina during the
md crisis. Why Helms found it
ie only senator in the nation to
lution that supported Britain dur-
will never be understood.
instantly tried to make a very silly issue,
tr, sound important. Why is it that the
? understand that organized prayer
ie family and the church?
because he knows that he would lose
f the Moral Majority (which is neither)
rther "Christian" organizations that
senator afloat. The same probably ap-
stand on abortion; if he changes his
es the support of those who are "born
evidence, a disturbing number of peo-
to praise Helms and maintain that he
for what he believes Every time so-
Jzes the senator's record, he is prepared
defense. He just writes it all off to the
that thrives on undermining President
Ihimself, not to mention America.
Irv ironic, for it is the "Jesse Helms
indermines America. Who are the peo-
on defending the senator? Probably
ple who sob that a true conservative,
, is a flaming liberal under the thumb
Sob, sob.
The East Carolinian's
COUPON PAGE
(Published Tuesdays)
This Space Could
Be Working For
You!
PET
VILLAGE
DONNA EDWARDS
Owner
Small Neons 4 for $1.00
Male Bettas Reg.$3.98
NOW $2.75
Select Group of Guppies $1.99 a pair
SPECIAL 10 gal. Starter Kit
i-
Sll Evans St.
Greenville, NC 27834
Phone: 756-9222
$14.95
Greenville's Only Premium Quality
Cleaners Since 1935 . . .
Laundered Shirt Special
5 for $2.99
OR
Have 2 Pair of Pants Cleaned
3rd Pair Cleaned FREE 752-2131
Expires October 15 Coupon must be presented with incoming order Comer of 10th & Evans
LUNCH
$369
Jlchesonfe
FAMILY BUFFET
DINNER
$469
featuring
Help Yourself Home Cooking
???ALL YOU CARE TO EAT� thi"
One Low Price Does It All! eot F�� e BudR!
Entrees � Dessert � Salad Bar � Vegetables � Drinks rf C0
Thru October ECU Students Get 10 Off With ID Yo1
H
Kentucky Fried Chicken fc
$1.99 '
plus tax
FOR ONE COMPLETE
2-PIECE PACK
2 Pieces of Chicken
1 Small Mashed Potato and Gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
Expires Dec. 31, 1986
fib
enellon
Wear a Benetton sweat shirt or Tee Shirt.
Receive a fifteen percent discount
purchase at Benetton.
638B Arlington Blvd. - -
Greenville, NC uner ends
355-7473 October 7, 1986.
on your
Mon-Sot 10-4
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SPECIAL SANDWICHES
MARYLAND CRAB
CORN BEEF
PHILLEY STEAK
6 oz HAMBURGER
mfQ Taste tne difference in our cold cut subs � 20 slices of meat � 4 slices
IU O of cheese. WSe also have pizzas with a northern flavor
OFF
10
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Cleaners Since 1935 . . .
Have 2 Sweaters Cleaned
Get 3rd One Cleaned FREE
752-2131
Expires October 15 Coupon must be presented with incoming order Corner of 10th A Evans
This Space Could
Be Working For
You!
THE WASH HOUSE
Drink Some Suds
While You
Do Your Duds
Visit our convenient location on 14th St.
8 AM-12 Midnight
AMFM Music
2 Color TV's with Cable
Game Room
2 Liter Pepsi 75
when using our facilities.
ALL ABOAARRD
Ticket Good for
HOBO SANDWCH
Only $2.85
Ribcye. Chceae, Grilled Oton t
French Fries
Stop Your Train At
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STATION
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Lettuce. Tomato, Frenchfhes . -
Clip A Bring to XTC STATION j
CAROLINA EAST MALL (Acns from KERR Drugs)
JBreakfast SUPER TA�rajW TICKET! Dinner
-XJ- -
1? m -� - - �� �
�? � � 4 ���? '





THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 30, 1986
Business School Offers Scholarships
Sixteen scholarships for ap-
proximately $7,700 are available
for School of Business majors.
Students interested in making ap-
plication should secure forms
from the Financial Aid Office or
one of the following department
offices in the School of Business.
Accounting � R325; Decision
Sciences � R238; Finance �
R343; Management � R137;
Marketing � R223.
All applications must be sub-
mitted to Ruth Jones (Rawl 334),
Chairman of School of Business
Scholarship i ommittee, by Oc-
tober 24, 1986. A student may
apply for one or more of the
scholarships (even when funding
is pending).
Final selection will be made by
the ECU Student Scholarships,
Fellowships, and Financial Aid
Committee upon recommenda-
tion of the Dean of the School of
Business. The Dean's recommen-
dation will be made from can-
didates selected by the School of
Business Scholarship Committee.
Teaching About Constitution
Discussed At Symposium
ECU News Bureau
Teaching about the U.S. con-
stitution in middle and secondary
schools will be the theme of the
22nd annual Symposium on
History and the Social Studies
scheduled at East Carolina
Uniersity Sept. 26.
"This year's symposium is
dealing with a very timely topic,
in the sense that it coincides with
the bicentennial celebration of
the drafting and adoption of the
U.S. constitution said Dr.
Hugh Wease, chairman of the
history department. Wease has
coordinated each of the past sym-
posia sponsored by ECU's
history department and the N.C.
Council for Social Studies.
Professor Donal Higgen
botham of the UNC-Chapel Hill
history faculty and Professor
John J. Patrick, director of the
Social Studies Development
Center. Indiana University will
be featured speakers. Higgen-
botham is an authority on Col-
onial and Revolutionary U.S.
history and Patrick, a noted
specialist in the teaching of social
studies.
The daylong program begins
with plans for the N.C. Commis-
sion on the Bicentennial of the
U.S. Constitution being outlined
by Dr. Robert Sikorski, associate
director for research for the N.C.
Commission.
Professor Donald Lennon,
director of the East Carolina
Manuscript Collection at ECU,
will speak on the subject, "From
Confederation to Constitution
and ECU history professor
Walter Calhoun will present a
paper on "James Madison and
Federalist Views" followed by a
presentation by Dr. Fred Ragan
of the ECU history faculty on
"Willie Jones and the An-
tifederalist Views
Higgenbotham's presentation
will be on "James Iredell and the
Evolution of American Constitu-
tional Thought and Patrick
will deliver a presentation of
"Lessons on the Constitution
Pre-registration for the sym-
posium is recommended because
of space limitations. Registration
fee is $2.50. Pre-registration may
be made with the Department of
History, East Carolina Universi-
ty, Greenville, NC 27858.
Scholorships are as following:
�MAX R. JOYNER: 2 at $788
each; scholarship and citizenship.
�UNIVERSITY BOOK EX-
CHANGE: $500; Academic
merit.
�NCNB: 4 at $500 each;
Academic merit.
�J. FRED HAMBLEN: $350;
Academic excellence in business
law course and good citizenship.
�CREDIT WOMEN INTERNA-
TIONAL: $200; Financial need,
scholarship, and citizenship.
Recipient must have graduated
from public or private high
school in Pitt County. (Funding
is pending; you may make ap-
plication).
�CAMERON-BROWNFIRST
UNION SCHOLARSHIP for a
deserving student specializing in
finance, economics, real estate,
or accounting. 3 at $500 each.
Accounting Majors Only:
�LATNEY W PITTARD
MEMORIAL: Annual earnings
of established corpus; scholar-
ship, citizenship, and need. Per-
manent residence of a candidate
for this scholarship must be in
Eastern North Carolina (East of
Highway 1-95) or any county west
of 1-95 in which Pittard and
Perry, Inc maintains an office.
�RALEIGH-DURHAM
CHAPTER INSTITUTE OF IN-
TERNAL AUDITORS: $350;
recipient must have at least 3.00
GPA, must have completed at
least 12 semester hours of ac-
counting, and must have express-
ed strong interest in internal
auditing profession. (Funding is
pending; you may make applica-
tion.)
Decision Science Majors Only:
�GRANT FOR DECISION
SCIENCE MAJORS: $125;
scholarship, need, and citizen-
ship.
Finance Majors Only:
�ARCHIR R. BURNETTE:
$600; Academic excellence and
citizenship.
WAREHOUSE SALE
Sept. 29 � Oct. 4
Tom Togs Factory Outlet
1900 Dickinson Ave, Greenville
EVERYTHING DIRECT FROM FACTORY
� Close-outs � Overruns � Irregulars
From 25C To Not Over $10
-4tCKi
wflftr
TROCADERQ
& Fafnout Names That We Cannot Mention
SUMMER, FALL, AND WINTER MERCHANDISE
HOURS
MONT UES 9:30-6:00 WED FRI 9:30-8:00
for your shopping convenience SAT 9:30-6:00
Located in tfc� Wholesale Aim
in Hm ror of tfco building
MEN'S, LADIES, CHILDREN'S. ANO INFANTS WEAR
Meet
TERRY SANFORD
Our Next U.S. Senator
WHO:
Governor Terry Sanford
Candidate for U.S. Senate
WHERE:
Mendenhall Student Center � Patio
(Inside in case of inclement weather)
WHEN:
Wednesday, October 1, 2:00 p.m.
WHY:
Students to speak to Governor Sanford
Riggan Shoe Repair
111 West 4th St.
Downtown Greenville
Shoe Kepdir At The en Best'
758-0204
THE SHOE
OUTLET
Name Brand Shoes
Bass
Topsider
French Shriner
Boston.an
Nine West
Joyce
Canvas Boats
Dress and Casual Shoes
Factory Returns, Some
Irregulars All Priced
Below Dealer Cost
3 Blocks from Campus, on the corner of 9th and
Washington
L
The Student store Lobby $20.00 Deposit
ALL NEXT WEEK!
THE
The Pitt County American Legion
featuring
Eastern Carolina's Largest Midway and Free
Attractions Each Night!
WATCH FOR MORE ON OCTOBER 7th
Located on 264 East By-Pass
COMING ATTRACTIONS
OCTOBER 2, 3, 4, 5
Out of Africa
OCTOBER 8
The Trip
Bountiful
Late Show
OCTOBER 10, 11
Harold and
Maude
OCTOBER 7
BingoIce Cream
un i s
Short St
B DON Rl'TI.EDGF
HIMki
Bernard sa s n '$ nor had � � �
See, I'll terry this brochure
'cause here's just too much to
remember. Lookit. see, ther
four different models and they all
got different feature You km m
to keep 'em strain hi I got to pa
attention-
Bernard he talki'
these old w kite women � n eee
Old htte women toting shopp-
ing sacks With -heir diamond
jewels on. Ah ha ha ha. Bernard
That's an excerpt from
"Wallwork a short am
the pen (or wore
.Luke Whisnant, comp
vjmmer of 1983
Whisnant, EC I .
tion and non-fiction m
leaned back in his chair in
English Annex office with the
picture of William Shakespeare
on the old plaster wail and an old
Remington manual typewriter sit-
ting, in all its steel black splen-
dor, on his desk. He seemed, in
his jeans, white shin and
pink tie, a fixture in the familiar
environment of the literati.
He relaxes sou a: once with a
diffident but trusting smile and
an easy, comfortable manner
His
I
ofte
aJ
a tral
W I
Wrii
a
autc
1
in hi
I
I
Rer
par;
' I
writ
M
I
won
plaij
v
havi
Revitali
B MICAH HARRIS
Maff Vk - f
I
Remember those Supcrn
stories you enjoyed as a
Well, forget "em. Those si
never happened. Supermar.
literally become a hero of
eighties.
DC Comics is attemptir
Plavhouse Updt
Auditions
KaM t aroma Pla� ao�r iMtK
The East Carolina Playhouse
will hold open auditions for
Master Haroldand the boys on
Thursday and Friday from 7
�J).m. in Room 205 of the Messick
�Theatre Arts Center on campus.
� The play, written by South
Africa's most celebrated
"playwright, Athol Fugard, has
Shree character- a 1 year-old
I
I
Easl
-eaj

8:1.
Fl
poeJ
that!
Pianist Sch
m
HI r� Barraa
Works by Beethoven, Deb
$criabine and Brahms will be per-
formed bv Dr. Henry Doske of
She ECU School of Music facult)
in a campus recital set for Mon-
day night.
The recital will begin at 8:15
p.m. in the Fletcher Music Center
Recital Hall and is free and open
to the public.
'� Doskey's program will include
"the Beethoven Sonata in G Ma-
Frer
CiaJ
d'orl
OPB
d'ai
soni
Alea
9.
Bral
S
dianl
DoMkey will appear in recital M
' i m m � iM �
� � � � �-
��i�.i� m -a �wu�,i� ���a. aia��'
s





I H I . � � V K O L INIA N
Business School Offers Scholarships
i�
Bi e 11
en � � making;
shoi. d e� ti t.
Kid Ol ik !
d pai imei
� . v. ol Business
R25 Decisio
K238 Finance
Ma igemi R131
irk j k 22)
N �. -lit1
lied (RawI 334
-�: ol Busines
ec, In Oc
indent ma;
i � the
! undniK
1H
I ti scl i. will be made In
It Student v hol.ti ships,
Fellowships, and Fit id
ommittee upon i ecommenda
ion ol ij ol
Busine� I he Dca mimen
lation � ill he made m om
lidate-i -els. St lux
Busines S�
leaching About Constitution
Discussed At Symposium
egin
N ommis
. H
H
Scholorships are as Following:
�MAX R JOYNER: 2 at $788
eat h; scholarship and citizenship.
�l NIVERSITY BOOK IX
HANOI $500; Academic
met n
�N NB 4 al $500 each;
cademic merit.
�I FRED HAMBLEN: $350;
cademic excellence in business
law course and good citizenship.
�( HI 1)1 I WOMEN INTERNA-
I IONA1 : $200; Financial need,
'larship, and citizenship.
Recipient must have graduated
from public or private high
?ol in I'm . ouni (Funding
is pending; you ma make ap-
ation),
�( W1I k( �N BROW N 1 IRSI
I 1 N S H il ARSH1P foi a
deserving student specializing in
finance, economics, real estate,
iccou tting .t' $500 each.
ounting Majors ()nb
� LAI MY W PITTARD
MEMORIA1 nnual earnings
' established corpus; scholar-
ship, citizenship, and need. Per
manent residence of a candidate
for this scholarship must be in
Eastern North Carolina (East of
Highway 1-95) or any county west
of 1-95 in which Pittard and
Perry, Inc maintains an office.
�RALEIGH-DURHAM
CHAPTER INSTITUTE OF IN
TERNA1 AUDITORS. $350;
recipient must have at least 3.00
OPA, must have completed at
least 12 semester hours of ac-
counting, and must have express
ed strong interest in internal
auditing profession. (Funding is
pending; you may make applica-
tion.)
Decision Science Majors Onlv:
�GRANT FOR DECISION
SCIENCE MAJORS: $125;
scholarship, need, and citizen-
ship.
finance Majors Onlv:
�ARC HIR R. BURNETTE:
$600; Academic excellence and
citizenship.
WAREHOUSE SALE
Sept. 29 � Oct. 4
Tom Togs Factory Outlet
1900 Dickinson Ave, Greenville
EVERYTHING DIRECT FROM FACTORY
� Close-outs � Overruns � Irregulars
From 25$ To Not Over $10
�MfM t
9
TRIM lFKO

& Famous Names That We Cannot Mention
SUMMER, FALL, AND WINTER MERCHANDISE
HOURS
MON TUES 9 30 6 00 WEDFRI9 30B
for your shopping convenience SAT 9 30 6 00
Located in tn� Wholesale Area
in rh� rear of the building
MEN'S. LADIES. CHILDREN'S AND INFANTS AtAn
Meet
TERRY SANFORD
Our Next U.S. Senator
WHO:
Governor Terry Sanford
Candidate for U.S. Senate
WHERE:
Mendenhall Student Center � Patio
(Inside in case of inclement weather)
WHEN:
W ednesday, October 1, 2:00 p.m.
WHY:
Students to speak to Governor Sanford
Riggan Shoe Repair
111 West 4th St.
Downtown Greenville
"Shoe Repair At The Very Best"
75e-0204
THE SHOE
OUTLET
Name Brand Shoes
Bass
Topsider
French Shriner
Bostonian
Nine West
Joyce
Canvas Boats
Dress and Casual Shoes
Factory Returns, Some
Irregulars All Priced
Below Dealer Cost
3 Blocks from Campus, on the corner of 9th and
Washington
COMING ATTRACTIONS
Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday; 9:00-4:00 in
The Student Store I obby $20.00 Deposit
ALL NEXT WEEK!
THE
'j
mmwn
ft ms33 &
The Pitt County American Legion Fair
featuring
Eastern Carolina's Largest Midway and Free
Attractions Each Night!
WATCH FOR MORE ON OCTOBER 7th
Located on 2-t East Bv-Pass
OCTOBER 2, 3, 4, 5
Out of Africa
OCTOBER 8
The Trip
Bountiful
Late Show
OCTOBER 10, 11
Harold and
Maude
OCTOBER 7
BingoIce Cream
ShortS
I
Bv I
Revitali
Bv Mil '
Playhouse i
Auditions
Pianist Set
i

I fci "
Henn Doske wM appear in reciul M�H

1





HOUSE SALE
. 29 � Oct. 4
s Factory Outlet
fckmson Ave, Greenville
DIRECT FROM FACTORY
fs � Overruns � Irregulars
X To Not Over $10
m
TROCADERQ
ft
r� i.
s That We Cannot Mention
ND WINTER MERCHANDISE
HOURS
306 00 WED FRI 9:308:00
ng convenience SAT 9:30-6:00
in tn� Wholesale Area
rear of the building
I -tILDRENS AND INFANTS WEAR
SHOE
TLET
Brand Shoes
Bass
"opsider
rich Shriner
ostonion
ine West
Joyce
nvas Boats
d Casual Shoes
Returns, Some
ars All Priced
Dealer Cost
�ous, on the corner of 9th and
ashington
CTIONS
4,5
Irica
P
I
n
nd
ream
THE LAST CAROLINIAN
Style
SEPTEMBER 30. 198
Page 7
Short Story A ttracts A ttention
B DON RUTLEDGE
Miff Writer
Bernard says it's not bad work.
See, I'll carry this brochure
'cause there's just too much to
remember. Lookit, see, there's
four different models and they all
pot different features. You know,
to keep 'em straight I got to pay
utten tion�
Bernard be talking shit to all
these old white women. Hoooeee.
Old white women toting shopp-
ing sacks. With their diamond
jewels on. Ah ha ha ha, Bernard.
That's an excerpt from
"Wallwork a short story from
the pen (or word processor) of
1 uke Whisnant, composed in the
�unimer of 1983.
Whisnant, ECU lecturer on fic-
tion and non-fiction writing,
leaned back in his chair in his
1 nglish Annex office with the
picture of William Shakespeare
on the old plaster wall and an old
Remington manual typewriter sit-
ting, in all its steel black splen-
dor, on his desk. He seemed, in
his jeans, white shirt and thin
pink tie, a fixture in the familiar
environment o( the literati.
He relaxes you at once with a
diffident but trusting smile and
an easy, comfortable manner.
His words are spoken directly but
softly, and he makes eye contact
often, but gently, as he talks.
As Whisnant puts it, "Life
doesn't have to make sense, but
fiction does. Fiction can't be just
a transcription of life For Luke
Whisnant, it's the old idea: "Life
is random, art is shaped
Writing is shaping words to make
a kind of sense, to mean
something that life doesn't
automatically provide, but that
the mind perceives.
Whisnant composes his stories
in his modest but cozy apartment
on a word processor, of course.
This explains the relative
painlessness with which he was
able to write the beginning and
the end of "Wallwork" before
filling in the middle. The old
Remington cannot delete whole
paragraphs at the press of a key.
Nor can it rearrange what's been
written without additional paper.
As for the creative process,
Luke admits to having difficulties
working out the ideas (there's
hope for us all, yet). "Whenever
I have writing problem he ex-
plained, "and I can't figure out
what to do next, I take a nap.
And when I wake up, I always
have the solution to the problem
� invariably
The characters in Whisnant's
fiction are often something like
people in his life, but "never
exactly as they are in real life. It's
really bits and pieces of my life
and then asking 'What if?' " said
Luke.
The fiction writer must also
take chances in his writing, accor-
ding to Whisnant. "Sometimes
when you're doing the best of
whatever you're doing, you're
taking a lot of risks. I think
'Wallwork' takes some risks
too related the author.
"Wallwork" and its author are
receiving quite a bit of attention.
The story has recently been
selected for inclusion in New
Stories from the South: The
Year's Best, 1986, an annual col-
lection of the year's outstanding
Southern short fiction, to be
published this month by Algon-
quin Books of Chapel Hill.
"Wallwork" was first publish-
ed in New Mexico Quarterly, br-
inging its author the grand sum
of $25. And that was after six re-
jections. It was then republished
in New Mexico Humanities
Review in 1984 before being seen
by Shannon Ravenel, the annual
editor of the Houghton-Mifflin
Company's "Best American
Short Stories" series, and a
recognized authority on the short
story in America. Ravenel
selected from hundreds of short
fictions appearing in some 200
literary journals and reviews.
Luke's piece was one that im-
pressed her.
Whisnant's work has been im-
pressing editors for a few years
now; his submitted pieces have
appeared in Esquire, Grand
Street, Seventeen, Campus
Voice, and Sportstyle, among
others. His work has been chosen
for the Distinguished Story List
of The Best American Short
Stories 1983 and, for
"Wallwork in The Best
American Short Stories 1985.
This latest is a collection of the 20
best stories and 100 runners-up
from over 1600 U.S. and Cana-
dian authors.
But the success of a literary ar-
tist is not very different from that
of a visual artist, a painter for in-
stance. Every story that's been
accepted usually has a history of
rejections that could make even
the least sensitive writers deep-six
their typewriters. The story which
Luke regards as his best, "The
Death of Elvis was rejected a
total of 21 times in two and a half
years before finally being ac-
cepted by The Crescent Review
out of Winston-Salem. It is due
to appear this month also.
Despite rejection slips which
seem to come with the job, Luke
Whisnant is self-assured, confi-
dent of his abilities, though
By DON ffUTLEDGC
Luke Whisnant, whose short story in Sew Stories From The South
will be available soon in the Student Store, relaxes in his office.
perhaps not always in complete
command of whatever "varn"
he's weaving. "For me, it's
always something discovered in
the process he said. "I may
start to write something, thinking
about jealousy or love, but it
ends up being a story with a con-
flict of subcultures he said of
the unconscious way his stories
gravitate toward a central theme.
This theme of the conflict of
subcultures � and in particular,
the tension between the two dif-
ferent worlds of the suburbs and
the inner city � is one of the
ideas underlying "Wallwork a-
the excerpt above suggests. The
conflict of subcultures is a com-
mon thread in "Across from the
Motoheads published in Grand
Street in 1985, and in "Watching
TV with the Red Chinese a
delightfully reflective tale about
shared knowledge, football, and
buxom redheads, not to mention
three Chinese students in
America, that appeared in Fs-
quire in 1982. For the deta.ls �t
"WaMwork" you will have to
wait, mv friends, until ou read
it.
It was tilting that Luke Whis-
nant, the young writer-teacher,
informed me of these words of
Flannery O'Connor, the great
American writer who died in
1964: "H.iw can 1 know what I
mean until I see what I say?"
Well, for a man who is now
working on a novel "like
everyone else in America it's a
good thing he has that word pro-
cessor.
Revitalized Hero May Not Please Everyone
B MIC AH HARRIS
vi � Untrr
Remember those Superman
stories you enjoyed as a kid?
Well, forge; 'em. Those stories
never happened. Superman has
literally become a hero of the
eighties.
DC Comics is attempting to
revitalize their flagship character
who in recent years has been
shoved from the limelight by
heros with a fresher approach
such as Spider-Man. DC has
taken the drastic step of going
back to the very beginning to
streamline their hero. His official
early adventures were chronicled
in a six-part series, The Man of
Steel released twice a month over
the past summer.
Superman is now the only sur-
vivor of Krypton; there are no
Phantom-zone Prisoners; Krypto
the Superdog never existed; there
is no Bizarro world; Ma and Pa
Kent are still alive; Supergirl is
dead and on the shelf, and I don't
feel so well myself.
Admittedly, many of the
changes were good ones. Super-
man stories had become rather
silly and so the sacrifice of Kryp-
to and the Bizarro world was a
relief. Likewise, Clark Kent's
childhood career as Superboy has
been erased for the better. These
tales were occasionally fun but
still pretty silly.
Playhouse Update
Auditions Set For Upcoming Production
K�sl C arolia Plat nur Rrinx
The East Carolina Playhouse
will hold open auditions for
Master Haroldand the hoys on
Thursday and Friday from 7 to 9
-p.m. in Room 205 of the Messick
Theatre Arts Center on campus.
The play, written by South
Africa's most celebrated
playwright, Athol Fugard, has
three characters: a 17-year-old
white teenager and two black
men in their late 30s.
Master Haroldand the boys
is the second production in the
East Carolina Playhouse 1986-87
season. The play will be
presented November 12-15 at
8:15 pm in the McGinnis Theatre.
Fugard is renowned for his
poetic examination of subjects
that many playwrights are reluc-
tant to approach. Subjects such
as poverty, repression and
anguish are a few. Blood-Knot,
Sizwe Bansi is Dead, and .4
Lesson From Aloes are among
Fugard's best-known works.
Master Haroldand the boys
focuses on a white teenage boy,
Hally (Harold of the title), and
two of his family's servants, Sam
and Willie. On a rainy afternoon
Pianist Scheduled To Perform
Ml Ne�s Bureau
Works by Beethoven, Debussy,
Scriabine and Brahms will be per-
formed by Dr. Henry Doskey of
the ECU School of Music faculty
in a campus recital set for Mon-
day night.
The recital will begin at 8:15
p.m. in the Fletcher Music Center
Recital Hall and is free and open
to the public.
Doskey's program will include
the Beethoven Sonata in G Ma-
jor, Opus 31, three pieces by
French Impressionist composer
Claude Debussy ("Poissons
d'or "Etude pour les Sonorites
opposees" and "Feux
d'artifice"), the "Black Mass"
sonata of Russian composer
Alexander Scriabine (Sonata No.
9, Opus 68) and Johannes
Brahms' "Variations on a Theme
by Paganini Opus 35.
Doskey has degrees from In-
diana and Southern Methodist
Universities and has won several
major performance awards, in-
cluding two Silver Medals in the
International Piano Recording
Competition sponsored by the
National Guild of Piano
Teachers and a Musical Awards
Award from the Society of
American Musicians.
He currently chairs the piano
teachers' section of the North
Carolina Music Teachers
Association.
filled with the warmth of friend-
ship and fun, the loving bond
between Hally and Sam
flourishes, but their relationship
is shattered when reality intrudes
upon their world.
Following the world premiere
of the drama, Frank Rich of The
New York Times reported: "At
the end of Athol Fugard's new
play, two black men fox trot to
old-time jukebox music, gliding
about a deserted South African
restaurant, Astaire-Rogers style.
The audience, meanwhile, is in
emotional ruins. While some
theatergoers struggle to stand and
cheer, others cringe in their seats,
their heads in their hands, so
devastated that they can't even
look at the stage
Rehearsals for Master
Haroldand the boys will begin
on Monday.
There is nothing wrong with
getting rid of crippling story
elements, but shouldn't any
changes in a character, including
deletions, open up new story
possibilities instead ot shutting
them off?
Where does the annihilation ot
all Krypton's inhabitants leave
us? Writer-artist John Byrne's
new designs make the planet
visually more intriguing than
ever, but as it is made perfectly
clear that Krypton's ancient
culture is being amputated for
keeps, what's the difference?
Additionally, the inhabitants
of Krypton now have such cold-
fish personalities that they make
the inhabitants of Spock's
Vulcan look like party animals.
"Good riddance we think as
the entire planet goes up not with
a bang but with a whimper.
What a waste! John Byrne,
talented individual that he is,
could have taken this opportunity
to do something fresh with Kryp
tonian culture if a remnant was
allowed to survive. The rationale
behind this genocide was to keep
"Superman special
Now, no one wants Kryptonian
cousins popping up with the alar-
ming frequency of pimples on an
adolescent's face, but if being the
sole survivor of a dead planet is
the only thing making the new
Clark Kent special, he's got to be
one bland person. An occasional
meeting with a fellow Krypto-
nian, especially a Phantom-Zone
ullian who could give him a run
foi his monev. would be verv in-
teresting in this new format.
Especially, sa. if said person
were evil and female.
A storv in Ahich Superman en-
counters someone similar to
himself could be used to show us
what does make the Man oi Steel
unique. In fact, the fifth issue of
the mini-series docs jual thai,
although without featuring
another native of Krypton. A
clone of Superman engineered bj
I.ex Luthor but gone awrv and
cyrstallizing is introduced as the
new Bizarro.
Certainly, a clone would come
closer to jeopardizing a person's
uniqueness than a mere native of
the same planet, yet this storv
reveals something that really sets
Superman apart. Bizzaro-
Superman encounters Lois
I ane's blind sister and subse-
quently heals her through
sacrificing his life. Through this
literal and literary doppleganger.
we learn of an important aspect
of Superman's character: his
capacity for self-sacrifice for a
virtual stranger.
Byrne's version of the young
Kent makes the character more
realistic than any Superboy story
ever did. Here, the adolescent
Clark is using his powers selfishly
to be a super athlete and garner
praise, attention, and girls. That
See SUPERHERO, pane 9
Artist Swims In Big Pond
gathering place
By D. A. SWANSON
Slrff Writer
Marti Jones �
(A and M)
Match Game
MARIANNC
Henry Doskey will appear in recital Monday at 8:15 p.m. in Fletcher Recital Hall.
i � ICU Nr�� lurwu
Marti Jones, appearing now in
record stores everywhere with her
second solo release, Match
Game, is no stranger to the North
Carolina scene. You may
recognize her from a few years
ago when she used to appear with
the N.C. band Color Me Gone.
Or from a year ago with her
debut album, Unsophisticated
Time. Whether or not this is the
first time you've ever heard of
her before, this is definitely an
album to be reckoned with.
Don Dixon (yes music fans, it's
him again), appears on Jones' se-
cond album, as on her first, as
musician, producer, and ever in-
fluential guide. Looking at the
musical line-up of this L.P. it is
difficult to determine whether the
album is a true product of Marti
Jones, or whether she is but a
mast-head for the invincible Dix-
on. Just take a gander at who ap-
pears in the background: Dixon,
Mitch Easter, Marshall and
Robert Crenshaw, T-Bone
Burnette, Treva Spontaine (The
Graphic), Anne Richmond
Boston (Swimming Pool Q's),
and new-comer Harry Simmons
(of The Brewery fame). As
ZMB's Dave Elliott proclaimed,
"If this album were a watch, it
would be a Rolex
Musically, Match Game can-
not be beat. Dixon, as usual,
managed to put all of these ex-
traordinary performers into a
New York studio and produce a
clear, tight and uncluttered
masterpiece. But it appears that
he forgot about our sweet
heroine, Marti. She seems more
awe-struck than anyone else by
the never-ending cast.
Her quiet smoky voice runs
beautifully on many cuts like the
sun-shiny Dwight Twilley tune,
"Chance Of A Lifetime and
the Dixon song "Touch Tone
But, more often than not, she
seems just plain petrified. On
Elvis Costello's "Just A
Memory and David Bowie's
"Soul Love" she is on track, but
sounds desperately out of control
and weak.
Jones is considerably better
than her stylistic counterparts,
Ricky Lee Jones and Carly
Simon; but it seems that her men-
tor, Dixon, had his ambitions set
just a little high for her. On her
rendition of the Marshall Cren-
shaw tune, "Whenever You're
On My Mind she displays so
much potential, she comes so
close, but misses the mark by
microseconds.
Still, this is a wonderful album
for any of you fans of Dixon or
female pop vocalists. The sound
absolutely shimmers with texture
and depth. Jones' voice is
wonderfully clear and rough. She
just needs to open up and shake
her stage fright. And Don Dixon,
he just needs to settle down and
let his up-and-coming talent
develop at a normal pace. (You
know something is amuck when
the name of the album's producer
See MARTY, page 9
ii r
mmmm
mm
mmnmmk,m- a
ji. 11 � At �m a m !�i
mm mm
0kx A 0& I
- �v �
J





Classifieds
BLOOM COUNTY
PERSONAL
SIGMA PHI EPSILON LITTLE
SISTER RUSH: Coming Soon!
SHAWN: My skirt size is 9, my
favorite colors are white and navy
blue, nothing under $50! J L.S.
SIG EPS: We thought we had seen it
all. but apparently Brian and Jay
had something else in mind!
MELODY, KAREN, CINDY,
RAMONA, KIM, BECKY, LISA.
Wishing you the best semester ever!
"Are We Having Fun yet?" Lynn.
PHI TAU: Grab your P.Js and
don't be late cause the party tonight
is gonna be great Love, the Chi
O's
CHRIS TOMASIC: If you can't play
bail with the big boys, then do
. ourself a favor and don't play at all
White Fraternity Individuals.
ZETA TAU ALPHA: Proudly
presents the fall Beta Pledge class
Kathy Alexander, Susan Barnard
'sa Browder, Annette Burton
Kristi Cannad, Joyce Daniels.
Susan Gibson, Ginger Herron, Kris
rVauza Ginny Robbins, Allyson
Schlagel, Adnann Smoak, Sue
Svecz, Kimberly Taylor, Krissy Ted
aer, jooi Turner and Kim Wilkins.
Congratulations You're the Best
ove, The Alpha Class.
DELTA ZETA DRAFT NIGHT: At
�ne Elbo! October l!
SIGMA NUS What a week! Litle
ster rush! Dinner! A luau!
"ailgating even Whooa Nellie
. fe is good Ace "Rebel Yell"
PI KAPPA PHI: Sorry Pomdexter, I
it;st couldn't help myself
SANDY SOUL TRAIN: Coke is it in
tr"e am You're groovier than Elvis
C Smart as hell.
TO GEORGE: MINE! Yours
THE PIKAS DON'T HAVE A
CHANCE: At winning the free keg at
the Attic on Wed. The P Kapps will
win and will keep the keg However,
? ney will share it with the sorority
a ho has the best attendence
ALL GREEK SOCIAL: On Wed at
the Attic Wine ana women on Wed
Dance Night)
THE PIKAS: Plan on winning the
free keg at the Attic on Wed. but they
will give it to the first sorority to
chow up with 15 sisters.
HE KNIGHTS OF SIGMA NU:
Aouia like to extend an invitation to
all of the sorority girls of ECU to at
tpnd our fall lil sister rush Thurs
night, 9 p.m. at the Elbo Room. For
nio call 758 0870
SIGMA NU: Will be having their lit
'le sister rush Thursday night at The
Elbo Room 9? All girls interested
should come on by and meet
veryne. "You don't have to take
your clothes off to have a good
lime?" "cherry wine?" To be con-
tinued
THE KNIGHTS OF SIGMA NU: Are
having their Luau party Friday
night at Doctors Park Pool, 9-?.
Brothers, Pledges and Little Sisters
should attend It's free It should
prove to be a real good time.
Brotherhood, Sunday 9:30, room 221
Mendenhall Bring money for Beach
Weekend
SIGMA NU LIL SISTER RUSH:
Thursday night, 9 p.m at the Elbo
Room All interested women of ECU
should come on down and party with
the Knights of Sigma Nu, and find
out what it means to be a real little
sister to a fraternity.
THETA CHI PLEDGES: Con
oratulations on your induction into
THETA CHI. We welcome the
following men into our onganization:
William McLuskie, Michael Grind
staff, Christopher Swain, Gregory
Lucas, Patrick Melim, Rodney Top
per, Scott Aldridge, James Russell,
Glenn Smith, Stephen Landi, Ed
ward Simpkins, James Stevenson,
Paul Jones, Patrick O'Brien, John
Anderson, Lawrence Fountain,
Lance Windley, John Davis, David
Walker, Patrick Zeller, Patrick
Moye, Brian Mclntosh, Donald
Batts, Jeffrey Kotzan, Jay Rogers
and David Fogleman GOOD LUCK!
SALE
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SERVICES: Typ
ing resumes, term papers, thesis
papers. Call SDF Professional Com
puter Services Inc 106 East 5th St.
(near Cubbies), Greenville, 752 3694
FOR SALE: Furniture. One coffee
table with two matching end tables.
Price negotiable. Call 752 1002 or
757 1118
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc Call
Anne at 752 3015 and leave a
message.
TAROT CARD READINGS: Learn
more about yourself! Private in
dividual readings or group parties
(minimum 6 people). Perfect for
rushes or dorm parties. Call
"Reader" 355 2562
FOR SALE: 1976 Chev. Caprice
Classic in good condition Rebuilt
engine, new brakes, windshield and
carpet Fully powered and more.
Call Hal 758 2598
FREE CAT: 3 years old, had all
shots, very affectionate, neutered,
needs nice home. 355 6349.
RETRIEVER TRAINING: Trv
terested in learning to train a
retriever in hunting or field trialing,
call Ben at 756 3010 after 9 pm.
EARN HUNDREDS WEEKLY
FROM HOMED: Exciting new pro
gram, no experience necessary. For
FREE details, send stamped, self
addressed envelope to: ProfitStart,
P.O. Box 847, Chapel Hill, N.C
275140847
FOR SALE: 1979 Toyota Corolla,
blue two door, four speed, 79,000
miles, engine in good condition, gets
great gas mileage. Call 758 4514 for
more info.
DJ; Are you having a party and need
a D.J.? For the best in Top 40, Beach
and Dance call Morgan at 758 7967.
Reasonable rates References on re
quest.
FOR SALE: Single Greenville
Athletic Club membership. Call
after 5 pm 355 2932
$60 PER HUNDRED PAID: for
remailing letters from home! Send
self addressed, stamped envelope
for informationapplication.
Associates, Box 95 B, Roselle, NJ
07203.
RAT-TAT-TOODLE-LAY: Disc
Jockey Service available now.
Beach Music, Rock n Roll, Oldies,
Boogie, etcBest rates in the coun
try. Dial 752 3587 ask for the
TRASHMAN
FOR SALE: Rip Curl Wet Suit. Ex
cellent condition. Size Large. Call
752 7295 ask for Greg.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER-
VICE: Experienced, quality work,
IBM Selectric typewriter Call Lanie
Shive at 758 5301
COMPUTER DATING: No lists Of
names distributed or any informa
tion given without your consent We
offer a very personal way for you tc
meet new people introductions
guaranteed or your money back
Student discounts Katz Services
355 7595
f
TILL Wt
rw i� mi im n
iHPtm5ep �you pt$M
WANTED
FOR RENT: Condominium at Atlan
tic Beach for the week of October
4th 11th. Fully equipped Call
7569170
TYPING: Top quality word process
ing equipment that can meet all your
needs backed with years of ex
perience. Low student rates Mon
Sun 9 am to 9 pm 35i 7595
HELP WANTED: Local law firm is
seeking Computer Science or Deo
sion Science major with good typing
skills for part time word processing
position 10 15 hours per week Call
758 6200 and ask for Mar
See CLASSIFIEDS, page 12
CHI OMEGA: A special welcome to
Audrey Trimeau. Shari Cramer and
Robin irwm Congratulations and
good luck with pledging Love, The
Sisters
ALAN'S GONNA HAVE A BABY
We didn't know he had it in him but
it's true Just wait 'til May 17. And
Joyce, you'd best leave Daddy
alone Congratulations Alan! From,
The East Carolinian
E.T.T Thanks for a great weekend
I was a blast. Let's hope that next
time we last past 10 30. Love ya,
S LP
A D.S These past three weeks have
oeen hell I miss you and your pink
socks Love ya, Me
WE WILL MATCH
ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE
PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce,
Oeli, Bakery & Continuity
Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With
You. We Will Match
Like Items Or Equal
Quality.
The supermarket with
WAiri
WAUKHUHSi;
I'KMXS
WMLIITTIIO
wT rII��Ctm oIV� M SAT �CT 4 T SAV A CENTER IN GREENVILLE
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES
Introducing
New
n
plus
Double Coupons
See store for details
POLICY
BEEF - PORK - LAMB - VEAL
A&P is trimming more from their beef than ever before and that s good news for you'
Because lean beef is an important source of nutrition for today s health and diet-conscious
American You see. lean beef provides high amounts of nutrients - especially protein iron
zinc and Vitamin B12 - in relation to its calorie content Did you know that a 3' i oz (80 g)
serving of sirloin tip has ust 168 calories So. go ahead Enjoy lean beef today
A&Ps THIN TRIM policy
makes it easy!
Same Flavor
Better Value
- i c
THIN TRIM GRAIN FED BEEF
Whole Rib Eve
D OR GOLD
k
!
e
Ti
ius Apples
99
0
SJ
ULAR � BUTTER
Shortening
can
HOlCE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
VERYDAY LOW PRICE

j
i
Superb
Continued from pane 7
is, before Pa Ken: takes him
aside.
Speaking of whom, I
r.he decision to keep the eider
Kents alive, but unles tl
characterization is rounded
to make them more than
"sugar parents they're be
off in the background, or ba �
the ground as the case ma he
Superman's relation
Bat Man has also eer.
established, evidentlv I
them in line with their Dark
Knight personnas. Thi wa
wise decision. I never liked
two of them being "buddies
They are now uneasy allies
Superman disapproves of Ba-
Man's vigilante methods He
even tries to arrest him.
Hopefully, Bat Man will a
be placed in the background or,
better still, ignored altogether
now that the obligatory met
is done. Teaming these two a
like putting Dirty Harry and Obi-
Wan Kenobi together for an
adventure. Right. They d
belong in the same reality
As for the rest of the cast. 1 e
Luthor now has a hair style :nat
r Bozo the Clown would envy
although he'll eventually shave
his head. He is now a crime lord
out also a surface philanthropist.
He hates Superman for usurping
his power in Metropolis. This is
certainly a preferrable motivation
Date: Wed Oct. 1, 1986
Place: Hendrix Theatre
Time: 8:00 p.m.
Admission: ID & Activity
� Card
Tuesday, Septi
Admission!
10
Wednesday,
Admission!
10
� "j
11





!H' AM l AROl 1S
M I' i 1 MBI K n ;�
Classifieds
BLOOM COUNTY
PERSONAL
SIGMA PHI EPSILON LITTLE
SISTER RUSH: Coming Soon!
SHAWN: My skirt sue .s 9, mv
favorite colors are white and navy
blue, nothing under $50! JLS
SIG EPS: We thought we had seen it
all but apparently Brian and Jay
had something else n mind!
MELODY KAREN CINDY,
RAMONA KIM, BECKY LISA
Wishing you the Pest semester ever!
Are We Having Fun yet?' Lynn
PHI TAU Grab your P J s and
I : � ateause the party tonight
S gonna do great'1 Love the Chi
CHI OMEGA A special welcome to
Audrey Ti neau Shar Cramer and
Rob .� ngrefutations and
k with pU Igmg Love The
ALAN S GONNA HAVE A BABY!
Vi � � ki m he had it in him but
St wait 'til Aay 17 Ana
oyce rOu'd best leave Daddy
� i ng ati afions Alan! From
rhe E ast Car ol nian
T T Thanksfoi a great wee.
was js1 et's I or. � fhaf riex'
� a. jsf past 10 30 Lo e , a
A D s '�� past three weeks have
� ' � I m ss ou ana your pnk
� , a Me
CHRIS TOMASIC: if you can't play
i ft 'he big boys then do
st f a favor and don't play at all
Vfi ft Fratern �, Individuals
ETA TAU ALPHA. Proudly
. j, �ts the tan Beta Pledge class
� � Alexandei Susan Barnard
Bi a �� Annette Bur I
Cannad oyce D ir �
- bson Ginger Herron Kr.s
i a Ginnv Robbins, Aiiyson
- �� A : ann Smoak Sue
i. Kimtx " Krissy Ted
joc Turnei and Kim Wilkins
jraf ati on; N u're the Best
� � The A pha Class
ELTA ZETA DRAFT NIGHT: At
� ; � October l'
:GMANUS What a At-eK ! Li tie
s t e r rush! Dinner! A i u a u !
) .a' ng even Whooa Nellie
�� s good Ace "Rebel Yell"
KAPPA phi Sorry Poindexter, I
� ouldn help myself
NDY SOUL TRAIN: Coke is I
� e a r You re groovier than e
Smai tashi
O GEORGE MINE! Yours
HE PIKAS DON'T HAVE A
IANCE A a nning the free keg at
Aft A'ed The P' Kapps v.
keep th �� . How . i
shan f with the sore I.
� no ras the bes' attende
-LL GREEK SOCIAL: On Wed at
� Att A ne anc iwomen on Wea
� � N �' '
HE PIKAS: Plan on winning the
Keg at the Attic on Wed but they
give it tc the first sororit to
1 how up W'th 15 sisters
HE KNIGHTS OF SIGMA NU
ould like to extend an inv tation to
i Of the sorority girls Of ECU to at
: Our tall !ii S'Ster rush Thurs
ghl 9 p m at the Eioo Room For
�fo call 758 0870
SIGMA NU Will be having the lit
s.ster rush Thursday night at The
i ibo Room 9All girls interested
jla come on by and meet
eryne "You don't have to take
� clothes off to have a good
� me7" "cherry wine?" To be con
" nueo
THE KNIGHTS OF SIGMA NU: Are
havmg their Luau party Friday
night at Doctors Park Pool, 9 ?
Brothers, Pledges and Little Sisters
rould attend It's free It should
prove to be a real good time.
Brotherhood, Sunday 9 30, room 221
endenhall Bring money for Beach
� nekend.
MGMA NU LIL SISTER RUSH:
'lursda night, 9 p m at the Elbo
: own All interested women of ECU
ould come on down and party with
the Kr.ights of Sigma Nu, and find
' Amat it means to be a real little
" ster to a fraternity
THETA CHI PLEDGES: Con
"atulations on our induction into
HETA CHi We welcome the
� lowing men into our onganization.
AMIiam McLuskie, Michael Grind
faff, Christopher Swam, Gregory
ucas, Patrick Melim, Rodney Top
� r Scott Aldridge, James Russell,
,ienn Smith, Stephen Landi, Ed
A-ard Simpkms, James Stevenson,
Paul Jones, Patrick O'Brien, John
-nderson, Lawrence Fountain,
ance Wmdley, John Davis, David
Walker, Patrick Zeller, Patrick
Moe, Brian Mrintosh, Donald
Batts, Jeffrey Kotzan, Jay Rogers
and David Fogleman GOOD LUCK!
SALE
WORD PROCESSING AND
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ng resumes, term papers, thesis
papers Call SDF Professional Com
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( near Cubbies), Greenville, 752 3694
FOR SALE: Furniture One coffee
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Price negotiable Call 752 1002 or
757 1118
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FOR SALE: 1976 Chev Caprice
Classic in good condition Rebuilt
engine new brakes, windshield and
carpet Fully powered and more
Call Hal 758 2598
FOR SALE: Single Greenville
a thletic Clul . � ship Can
after 5 pm 355 2932
FREE CAT: 3 years old, had all
shots, very affectionate, neutered,
needs nice home 355 6349
RETRIEVER TRAINING: In
terested m learning to tram a
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( an Ben at 756 3010 after 9 pm
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a D JFor the best m Top 40, Beach
and Dance call Morgan at 758 7967
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try Dial 752 3587 ask for the
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FOR SALE: Rip Curl Wet Suit Ex
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FOR SALE. 1979 Toyota Corolla
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miles, engine m good c ondition, gets
great gas mileage Call 758 4514 for
more mfo
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: Experienced, quality work,
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FOR RENT: Condominium at Atlan
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4th llth Fully equipped Call
756 9170
TYPING: Top quaht, worrj process
mg equipment that can meet all our
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Because lean beef is an important source of nutr.tion for today s health and diet-conscious
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�,s
� v v
(

1 �f)
Li
I
Superh
( ontJBued
r.hc d
Kci
chai :
Ha- V
estal
knight pei
wise de
� ��
Ihe are no�
Super .
Man' vig a
even ti k I
HopefuJly, Bai M i
be placed in
�ttei . gnof
nov
:one. Tean: j
:ke g Dir' Ha
Wan Kenv
adventure. R
belong in the same i
AaS for the resi
Luthor nov
Bozo the Clown ,ould er
althoug:
his head. He is i
out a
He hates v
his pov
- i
Date: Wed Oct. I, 9U
Place Hendr;x 1
Time: B p. rr
Admission ID A ci
Wednesday. O
Admission!
10
f
�?�
.1





BLOOM COUNTY
�E �
OMPUTER DATING No lists Of
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ivi pei sonai way tor you tc
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kVAIMHIMIVI
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details
F OLiCY
3K lAMB-VEAL
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AUFORNIA
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ious Apples
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lag
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tino's Pizza
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nu- you
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iAPtV3�( you PKBln
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IPIPN T WAN WtYRE
TO INSULT TH�mKKMk
THiM WITH A REAPINO
RACIAL SLUR PV0LIC
merRe vcry
'ORGIVING
by Berke Breathed
r"ji
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 30. 1986 9
meirte
HAVNO A THEYm
CAMFFlRt! tUOmC
you iv
effiOY
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term
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dm cm!
Superhero Remodeled
Continued from page 7
is, before Pa Kent takes him
aside.
Speaking of whom, I applaud
he decision to keep the elder
Rents alive, but unless their
characterization is rounded out
to make them more than just
"sugar parents they're better
off in the background, or back in
he ground as the case may be.
Superman's relationship with
Bat Man has also been re-
established, evidently to bring
them in line with their Dark
Knight personnas. This was a
u,se decision. I never liked the
two of them being "buddies
They are now uneasy allies since
Superman disapproves of Bat
Man's vigilante methods. He
even tries to arrest him.
Hopefully, Bat Man will also
be placed in the background or,
better still, ignored altogether
now that the obligatory meeting
is done. Teaming these two up is
like putting Dirty Harry and Obi-
Wan Kenobi together for an
adventure. Right. They don't
belong in the same reality.
As for the rest of the cast, Lex
Luthor now has a hair style thai
Bozo the Clown would envy
although he'll eventually shave
his head. He is now a crime lord
out also a surface philanthropist.
He hates Superman for usurping
his power in Metropolis. This is
certainly a preferrable motivation
than hating Superman for caus-
ing his baldness as the previous
version had it.
Of course, the series and
character are always open to
change. If nothing else this major
overhaul has proven that maybe
in the future, Byrne or another
writer will chisel away some of
the new concepts now etched in
stone to allow for even more
possibilities. In the meantime, the
first issue of the new Superman
regular title is on the racks. You
may not agree with every change
made, but at the very least the
series is interesting and enjoyable
to look at. And that counts for a
whole lot in the medium of the
comic book.
For your Capezio Dancewear, tap shoes,
ballet shoes, jazz shoes, let our
experienced shoe fitters help you.
The Plaza only.
fcfejt YOU'RE A STAR IN CAPEZIO �
Date: Wed Oct. 1, 1986
Place: Hendrix Theatre
Time: 8:00 p.m.
Admission: ID & Activity
� Card
miiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiaiiiiiiiiiiititufiiitiiuiiiiiiitiifiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiitiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifi
( SP0RTSW0RLD
COLLEGE NITE f
Every Tuesday Nite
8:00-11:00
$1.00wCollegel.D.
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756-6000 I
TiltlJIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIItllllllllllltlHIIItlllMIIHIllllllllllllttllllllllilllilttllllMUIIIIIIlltlllltllHHimilllllMIMIHIMI
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Corner 10th & Dickinson Ave
We Buy Gold & Silver
1NSTANT CASH LOANS v
Vy All Transactions Confidential � C
Buy � Sell � Trade !
752-0322
" Hours 9:00 � m -6:00 p.m. MM-Sal
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Present
AFT NITE
Tuesday, September 30, 1986 9:00-2:00 AM
Admission $1.50 Guys 1.00 Ladies
10C Draft All Nite
SkAFT NITE
Wednesday, October 1, 1986 9:00-2:00 AM
Admission $2.00 Guys $1.00 Ladies
10 Draft All Nite
& Delta Zeta
Present
Marty Jones'
Album Has
Potential
Continued from page 7
is the most prevalent item on the
back cover credits.)
In other news, you probably
noticed that although we promis-
ed you Boston's newest album
this week, it did not appear. But
stay tuned, word has it that ZMB
just received it.
Also in the world of recording:
in case you didn't catch ZMB's
"Adventures In Modern Recor-
ding" last night you missed cuts
from the new Boston L.P. as well
as tunes from the new Iggy Pop,
Pretenders, and Bolshoi albums.
Be sure not to miss their show
next week, though. Skully has
assured us of a cut-loose sampl-
ing of the latest from Berlin, 'Til
Tuesday, New Order, Joan Jett
and the rerelease of Don Dixon's
"Most Of The Girls Like To
Dance And remember, sup-
port your local purveyor of vinyl.
This has been an
"ElliottSwanson Production
PLANT SALE
ECU Biology Club
burs. Oct. 2, 1986
Fri. Oct. 3, 1986
7:30 a.m1:00 p.m
Biology South Room
Greenhouse
CAPP
Central American Peace Project
CAPP will meet Wednesday evening, 7:30
p.m. at the Methodist Student Center, 5th
Street. All are welcome. For more info call
830-0349.
DO YOU WANT TO WORK
Immediate Job
Opening
�Secretaries
�OfficeClerical
��Free word processing
training for typists
�Factory Workers
�Data Entry
Full and Part time temporary
work � Perfect for students.
KELLY
SERVICES
The Kelly Girl People
204 E. Arlington Blvd.
Arlington Centre Office Complex
Greenville. NC 27834
355-7150
Not an agency-Never a tee
EOE MFH
Quality Copies 5
��-
! KURD'S
fivers, brochures, reports
HMD'S Collating
i
convenient hours Cfgn-Jjm- fncndh staff
Padding llz?�9 RESUMES
Binding
Enlargements
passport photos
great service
fast, qualitv copies
much, much more
321 E 10tft Street (919) 752-0875
Honamj - Ffmj Mm - lOOOpm Mwofty 9-Ooar -e�n
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Friday
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-
-�





THE EASTCAROl INIAN
Lions Roar
Sports
SEPTEMBER 30. 1986
Page JO
Penn State Rolls Past Pirates 42-7
NEIL JOHNSON - SPORTS INFORMATION PHOTO LAB
Touchdown!
Kedshirt freshman Travis Hunter scores the Pirate's first touchdown
against Penn State on a keeper around the right side.
By TIM CHANDLER
& SCOTT COOPER
Snorto Wrlttn
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. �
The seventh-ranked Penn State
Nittany Lions, who built a 35-0
halftime lead, controlled both
lines of scrimmage as they over-
powered the Pirates, 42-17.
It was the largest crowd to ever
witness an ECU football game as
84,774 fans packed PSU's Beaver
Stadium.
"Once again it was a long
Saturday for us said ECU
coach Art Baker. "Our biggest
culprit was that we seemed to be
in the habit of stopping'
ourselves.
"I congratulate Penn State,
they are as good as we thought
they would be Baker con-
tinued. "Penn State didn't do
anything that we didn't expect.
They are probably on of the most
fundamentally sound teams in
the country
The Nittany Lions dominated
the first-half play as they rolled
up 271 total yards, including 164
vards rushing, compared to just
20 for ECU.
Penn State elected to kickoff
and begin the game with their
stingy defense. On the Pirates' se-
cond play from scrimmage,
freshman quarterback Charlie
Libretto was intercepted by
senior safety Ray Isom, who
returned the ball to the Pirate 24.
A face-mask penalty put the ball
on the ECU 19.
The Nittany Lions capitalized
on the Pirate miscue three plays
later as D.J. Dozier went over
from three yards out. Massimo
Manca added the PAT for an ear-
ly 7-0 lead.
The Lions pushed the lead to
14-0 by the end of the period
when John Shaffer hit Ray
Roundtree on an eight-yard scor-
ing strike.
ECU's deepest penetration of
the half was in the first quarter
when the Bucs crossed into mid-
field to the PSU 48. The Pirates
could not maintain a drive and
punted three plays later.
Meanwhile, the Nittany Lions
added three more touchdowns in
the second stanza to build an in-
surmountable advantage, 35-0.
"We were fortunate we scored
that many points in the first
half Penn State's Shaffer said.
"We kind of relaxed. And they
gained some momentum in the
second half.
"They respected us a lot
deep Shaffer continued. "They
were giving us the outs and
you've got to take them
The Pirates did manage to turn
the tide as they outscorcd the Nit-
tany Lions 17-7 in the second
half. The Pirates totalled 180
yards in the second half while
Penn State netted 174.
The Pirates got their first
points in two weeks early in the
third period after sophomore
Junior Johnson blocked a John
Bruno punt. Three plays later,
junior Chuck Berleth nailed a
45-yard field goal, his longest as a
Pirate.
There was no further scoring in
the third quarter as both defenses
maintained successful com-
bativencss.
The fourth period saw Penn
State increase the margin to 42-3
as it capped off a 41-yard drive
with a one-yard burst by backup
tailback Blair Thomas.
After a short performance by
sophomore Berke Holtzclaw,
ECU's third signal caller, Travis
Hunter, entered with 12:04 re-
maining to play.
One possession later, Hunter
executed a 10-play, 76-yard drive
to give the Pirates their first
touchdown in almost eight
quarters. Hunter capped the
drive with a five-yard scamper
around the right side.
After a Penn State turnover
late in the game, Hunter con-
nected with junior split end Tony
Smith for a 17-yard touchdown
play with :52 left in the contest
This cut the deficit to 25 points
42-17.
"Travis gave us the spark we
needed today Baker said
"Travis is our best option
marterback his problem has
been with throwing the ball. The
onl way that you can judge
quarterbacks is by how many
times he gets you into the end-
zone � and Travis did that
"I don't think our people can
afford t take anybody for
granted PSU coach Joe Pater-
no said after the win which tied
him for 13th place on the Divi-
sion 1A list of all-time coaching
leaders. "They're (ECU) struggl-
ing a little bit because of the inex-
perience at quarterback, hut 1
think the second half would he a
big plus for them
The Pirate loss gives the Bucs
an 0-4 mark on the season. Tha-
is the worst start for ECU since
1970. The Pirates will be at home
next week to host the Ragin Ca-
juns from Southwestern Loui-
siana.
Dillahunt Sparks Buc Defense
B TIM CHANDLER
v - � Sporu Wrllrr
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -
Although the Pirate defense has
fallen on hard times against the
tough opponents thus far this
year, junior free safety Ellis
Dillahunt has proven to be a
spark in the defensive attack.
Dillahunt, from his safety posi-
tion, is currently fourth on the
team in tackles with 22.
Dillahunt's best game this season
came against West Virginia when
he had five unassisted tackles and
four assisted tackles.
Dillahunt hails from Jackson-
ville and attended Jacksonville
High School. While in high
school, Dillahunt helped guide
his team to a three-year record of
38-3. included in that was a state
4-A championship and also a
runner-up position in the state
championship.
A'hough the Pirates have suf-
fered through 13-straight losses,
Dillahunt said that he doesn't
really think about it.
"1 haven't even thought about
being 0-13 said Dillahunt. "I
consider us 0-4. It is a new season
now and the main concern I have
is getting a mark in the W col-
umn
Dillahunt attributed a lot of
the hard times that the Bucs have
had to the demanding schedule.
He feels the scheduling process
was made with the graduating
seniors in mind.
"I wish we could play more
teams on our own level said
Dillahunt. "In '83 when the
schedule was made after the good
season (8-3), they (the athletic of-
ficials) failed to realize that all
the guys that played on that team
were leaving
"You can't put a baby in the
driver's seat of a car and expect it
to drive added Dillahunt.
Dillahunt went on to say that
although the schedule has been
State) I was nervous playing The humble Dillahunt says that it
against such a big team, but this
year all I was thinking about was
that I was not going to let them
(Penn State) run over us
Dillahunt went on to say that
the Pirates decided at halftime in
Saturday's game that they were
not going to give up, instead they
were going to go out and try to
make something happen.
"The coaches told us not to
give up said Dillahunt. "They
(the coaches) said that there was
just makes him happy that people
look up to him.
"It makes me feel good when
kids ask me for autographs
stated Dillahunt. "I always tell
them to just be themselves and to
always have friends because you
have to have friends to make it
When asked what he would tell
Pirate fans who are becoming
anxious for a win, Dillahunt
laughed and said that he had
dreamed about that the other
'7 haven't even thought about being 0-13, I con-
sider us 0-4. It is a new season now and the main
concern I have is getting a mark in the 'W col-
umn.
��
Ellis Dillahunt
Ellis Dillahunt
tough, that some good has come
out of it.
"You get psyched up when you
are playing teams like Penn
State said Dillahunt. "You
know that you have a chance to
go in there and knock them off
their pedestal.
"It is a also a chance to show
pro scouts that you can play
added Dillahunt. "The pro
scouts might not even be there to
watch you but if you have a good
game then you might catch their
eye and that could benefit you
later in life
Dillahunt said that by playing
at Penn State last year he was
able to overcome the pre-game
nervousness this year.
"My first time their (Penn
still 30 minutes of football left
and for us to go out and make
something happen
The Pirates did improve in the
second half as they held Penn
State to only seven points, while
scoring 17 of their own.
Pirate head coach Art Baker
labelled Dillahunt a "team
leader" after the West Virginia
game. Dillahunt said that being a
team leader requires being a
motivater.
"When I see a player down on
himself, 1 try to talk to them and
get their adrenaline flowing
again stated Dillahunt. "I feel
that a team leader has to support
the team, not put them down �
and always talk positive
People from Dillahunt's
hometown say that he is a
modern day hero in the town.
night.
"In my dream I was speaking
at a pep rally said Dillahunt. "I
told the fans that I know that
they expected more than an 0-4
start to the season. I also told
them that they had been such
good fans at sticking with us
through thick and thin and I said
for them to continue to keep their
faith and hope because we still
need their support. And I promis-
ed them that if they stuck with us
that things would get better and
thatveryonewouldbehappy'
N�IL JOHNSON � SPORTS INFORMATION PHOTO LAB
Airborne!
ECU's Reggie McKinney (20) goes airborne as Bob White (34) puts the
hit and Brian Chizmar (47) converges.
ECU Golfers Finish Eighth
By TIM CHANDLER
�wsior Sporti Writer
The Pirate golf team competed
in it's first tournament of the fall
season this past weekend and
came away with an eighth-place
tie out of the 18-team field.
Augusta College won the three-
day event with a team total of
883.
Florida Southern and South
Florida tied for second with a
total of 891, followed by Ken-
tucky in the fourth position at
Sports Fact
Tues. Sept. 30,1971
The Senators find a new way
to lose in their Washington
finale. With two outs in the
ninth, the Senators are leading
the Yankees, 7-5, when fans
begin to filter out onto the
field. The umpires are unable
to clear the diamond for play,
and the game is forfeited to
New York.
901
UNC-Charlotte grabed the
fifth position with a team total of
904, while Tennessee placed sixth
at 904 and San Francisco 10th
with 910.
The Pirates tied for eighth
place with Maryland with a team
total of 911.
In the individual competition,
Roger Rowland of Augusta Col-
lege captured honors with rounds
of 70-69-72, for a total of 211.
Chris Hunsacker of UNC-
Charlotte finished in second
place with a total of 215. Hun-
sacker had rounds of 68-72-75.
The top finisher for ECU was
senior Mike Bradley who finished
in the 13th position with a total
of 222. Bradley fired rounds of
75-72-74.
Other scorers for the the
linksters included Paul Steel man,
who had rounds of 77-75-77 to
finish with a 229 total. Also,
Mark Arcilesi, who turned in a
tournament total of 230 with
rounds of 72-80-78.
Chris Riley was next for the
Pirates as he carded rounds of
79-76-80 for a 235 total. Tony
Jarrett rounded out the scoring
with a 238 total, which included
rounds of 83-76-79.
Head coach Hal Morrison said
that he was not very pleased with
the linksters performance in their
first match.
"We're making progress, but
we're not as consistent at this
point as I would like for us to
be said Morrison.
"We've got a lot of worlc left
to do continued Morrison.
"The potential is there, we just
need to gain enough confidence
to pull off the good scores when
we need to
Morrison went on to say that
he expects to see gradual im-
provement week to week out of
the golfers and he added that this
would aid in bringing confidence
to the team.
The next action for the golfers
will be Oct. 17-18 in Durham.
They will be participating in the
John Ryan Memorial Tourna-
ment, which is hosted by Duke
University and will be played on
the Duke Golf Course.
Linderman Interviewed
ii
By SCOTT COOPER
o-S�om� E�ior
America's so-called leading
football forecaster, Larry
Linderman, recently talked to
The East Carolinian about his
"20 Worst College Football
Teams" which appears in the
October issue of Penthouse
magazine.
It's an annual tradition for
Linderman, who has been
writing the poll for Penthouse
the past nine years now. The
story appeared in the Sept. 4
issue of The East Carolinian.
"I do enjoy writing this. It
started out as a satire. I had
written about sports before and
I got tired of the same old
Top-20 Linderman said in a
phone interview last week.
"It's always the same top-15 or
20 teams. You know, no one
writes about the Columbia's or
Vanderbilt's. I thought it might
be fun to write and give them
some pub � as much as the
coaches might mind us
Linderman, a former basket-
ball player and graduate of
Temple University, knows
what it's like to see a school's
program struggle. In fact, he
referred to his alma mater's
26-game losing streak (in foot-
ball). Linderman seems to take
Worst 20 Explained
a historical perspective on our
country's balance of power.
"The Michigan's,
Oklahoma's, Penn State's have
historically had high
standards Linderman ex-
plained. "On the other hand,
Vanderbilt, Wake (Forest) and
Oregon State � it's almost im-
possible to recruit every year
About ECU, who Linder-
man picked 14th. The Bucs are
in the same recruiting predica-
ment as these other schools. "I
really think East Carolina is
like that he said. "I can't say
they're going to be horrible
over the next few years
"You guys are in an area
which produces a lot of great
players Linderman added,
"but the blue-chip players
simply go to the bigger
schools
Like any free-lance writer,
Linderman is well informed on
his subjects, as is the case here
with college football. He
spends time fact-finding and
consulting with many people as
well as using school's practice
reports.
Linderman knows that his
picks may turn the tide and
have a successful season. In
fact, last year he picked Col-
orado in his poll and the Buf-
falo's went on to play in the
Liberty Bowl. This year
Linderman feels that his 15th
pick, Rutgers, may make him
"look like a jerk
"If a team has a winning
season or goes to a bowl game,
then they prove me wrong
Linderman said. "I did it four
years ago with Pennsylvania.
They invited me to come to
their opening game (the next
year).
"The one great value is that
the coaches themselves love to
prove us wrong. It gets their in-
centives going Linderman
added.
Linderman has also done in-
terviews for Playboy; his last
two articles were on Kareem
Abdul Jabbar and Bill Cosby.
Also, he has just recently com-
pleted an autobiography on
Beverly Sills. However, he said
that the Penthouse poll is the
only one he does on a regular
basis.
Perhaps the Pirates can pro-
ve Linderman wrong. In fact,
he may want it that way. "I
wish you guys good luck. Peo-
ple will be watching them he
said. "You've got good talent,
in spite of what looks like a
disaster
Men
By DON RUTLEDGI
The men's tennis team, beful
solid singles pla, made thj
record 2-0 in dual match pla
they overpowered the SeahavJ
of UNC-Wilmington on
Minges Varsity Courts Nednj
day, Sept. 24 It as the
netters' first home matel i
for the No. 1 singles pb
must have seemed
culmination of a long se
ECU's Dan l.aMont and
Seahawks' Terry Grat r �
out for three hours bel
retired with severe tef
the third set tie-breaker
doubles play had to w
to finish, and consequt
Walk-O
By SCOTI COOPrK
( o-Seort rAlar
P:
UNIVERSITY PRK
Despite ECU's 42-17
seventh-ranked Pe:
day, there vsere
moments for the Pira-
ticular the punting game
With the Nittan) 1 .
ing their power, esj
defensive side fin :he
was no wonder hat the
would be forced to p
several occassions.
Enter Craig I
Jacksonville native. I
rune times againsl the Li
ted 408 yards for an impresJ
Craig Lost to
PITT
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COMMISSION
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alx aaats ara up for
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All Pitt County Voters
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Page
irates 42-7
ftei a Perm State turnover
in the game, Hunter con-
ed with junior split end Ton
a ard touchdown
with :52 left in the contest,
he deficit to 25 points,
fravis ae us the spark we
ay Baker said.
our best option
t back his problem has
wing the ball. The
you can judge
a ks is b how many
. into the end-
I I ravis did that
k oui people can
take anybody for
f'Sl coach Joe Pater-
win which tied
p ace on the Divi-
of all-time coaching
"They're (ECl struggl-
ecause of the inex-
quarterback, but 1
le second half would be a
hem
ss gives the Bucs
tie reason. That
an :or ECU since
ttes will be at home
s( 'he Ragin Ca-
:m Southwestern Loui-
�-
if

PMOTOLAB
t
ornei
es airborne as Bob hite (34) puts the
lerges.
I
Explained
falo's went on to play in the
1 ibertj Bowl. This year
1 inderman feels that his 15th
� Rutgers, may make him
k ;ike a jerk
"If a team has a winning
season or goes to a bowl game,
then they prove me wrong
Linderman said. "I did it four
years ago with Pennsylvania.
They invited me to come to
their opening game (the next
year).
"The one great value is that
the coaches themselves love to
prove us wrong. It gets their in-
centives going Linderman
added.
Linderman has also done in-
terviews for Playboy; his last
two articles were on Kareem
Abdul Jabbar and Bill Cosby.
Also, he has just recently com-
pleted an autobiography on
Beverly Sills. However, he said
that the Penthouse poll is the
only one he does on a regular
basis.
Perhaps the Pirates can pro-
ve Linderman wrong. In fact,
he may want it that way. "I
wish you guys good luck. Peo-
ple will be watching them he
said. "You've got good talent,
in spite of what looks like a
disaster
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 30. 1986
11
Men Netters Win; Women Finish Second
By DON RUTLEDGE
Sparta Writer
The men's tennis team, behind
solid singles play, made their
record 2-0 in dual match play as
they overpowered the Seahawks
of UNC-Wilmington on the
M.nges Varsity Courts Wednes-
day, Sept. 24. It was the Pirate
letters' first home match; and
for the No. 1 singles players, it
�mist have seemed like the
culmination of a long season.
ECU's Dan LaMont and the
Seahawks' Terry Gratz battled it
out for three hours before Gratz
etired with severe leg cramps in
the third set tie-breaker. The
doubles play had to wait for them
to finish, and consequently the
matches were halted due to
darkness with the Pirates as
decisive victors with a 6-1 lead.
Both the men's and women's
teams were away at tournaments
over the weekend. The men, play-
ing in the Spider Invitational in
Richmond, Va earned third
place in the four team draw.
The Richmond Spiders were
first with 45 points, then Virginia
Commonwealth with 33 points,
ECU with 22 points, and Rad-
ford with just seven points.
Divided into four flights, with
two men in each flight for a total
of eight men per team in the
singles, the tournament offered a
good challenge to the Pirates. Bill
Wing and Scott Avery, playing in
the fourth flight, grabbed the
most points for ECU as they
finished second and third respec-
tively.
Assistant Coach John Anthony
was not surprised at the strength
of the field, but said, "In-
dividually, we had as much depth
as anyone, as evidenced by our
fourth flight showing He add-
ed, "Bill Wing and Scott Avery
helped the team point-wise a
lot Other team members per-
formed well in the tough draw,
particularly Dan LaMont, in the
first flight. "Dan played really
well. He lost to Richmond's
second-place finisher in three
sets said Anthony.
Meanwhile, the women, who
took their stuff to Meredith Col-
lege for the Meredith Invitational
Tournament, came away with a
strong second-place finish in the
six-team draw which was
dominated by ECU and the win-
ners from ACC.
ACC's women took the other
two and lost to ACC players in
four finals. Susan Montjoy, the
tireless captain of the Lady
Pirates, was her usual determined
self, winning both her singles
flight and her doubles flight with
partner Ty Myers. They beat an
ACC duo to take that title.
Coach Sherman was extremely
pleased with the women's perfor-
mance, considering the strength
and depth of the Atlantic Chris-
tian team.
'Susan Montjoy played cxcep-
Walk-On Losito Supplies Leg For Bucs
B SCOTT COOPER
Co-Sports taunt
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -
)espite ECU's 42-17 loss to
! cnth-ranked Penn State Satur-
day, there were some shining
moments for the Pirates, in par-
:cular the punting game.
With the Nittany Lions show-
ig their power, especially on the
defensive side (in the first half), it
was no wonder that the Pirates
would be forced to punt on
several occassions.
Enter Craig Losito. The
Jacksonville native, who punted
nine times against the Lions, net-
ted 408 yards for an impressive
45.3 yard average. Included in
those nine punts was a career-
high 56 yarder in the third period.
Currently, Losito has a four-
game total of 27 punts for a
1,090-yard total � an average of
40.4 yards per punt. Over the
past two games, he has had 20
punts.
Losito's statistics are im-
pressive indeed, but the fact that
the redshirt sophomore is a walk-
on makes it even harder to
believe.
"I'm really impressed and
pleased with Craig's play. He was
kicker Baker said. "But with
the injury to Wolterwe were in
need and he came out of the pack
(of backups). He really has a
good natural leg
It's not as if Losito hasn't ex-
perienced success before,
however. The 5-11, 220 pounder
had a successful high-school stint
in Jacksonville before going to
Appalachian State for one
season. Losito was an all-star
kicker, an all-East punter and
kicker and played for the East �
squad in the prestigious IlPfPjt
EastWest Ail-Star Game. In two
strain in the Penn State game.
Brandon will miss this week's
game and is questionable for the
Temple game. Sophomore tight
end Matt McLaughlin snapped
the remainder of the PSU game
and will be used next week
against Southwest Louisiana.
Junior receiver Tony Smith will
back up McLaughlin.
tionally well in singles and
doubles with Ty Myers. And Ty's
first round loss to the eventual
winner (from ACC of course)
was by far the strongest match of
the third flight coach Sherman
said.
She went on to credit the team
for their fine play this past
weekend. Always looking ahead,
Sherman said, "We found out
some things we need to work
harder on. ACC was a stronger
team, and we will be meeting
them in the very near future
The women's schedule for the
week includes Peace College at
home Tuesday, Meredith at home
Thursday, and finally Pfeiffer
will come here on Friday to face
the ECU women, who are 2-2 in
dual competition.
The men's schedule this week
has Mt. Olive coming here on
Wednesday, and then the Pirates
go to Wilmington for the
weekend for the Wilmington In-
vitational.
Wednesday's Results:
ECU Men 6 UNC-Wilmington 1
D. LaMont (ECU) d. T. Gratz 7-5,5-7.6-6
(5-2, ret.)
J. Melhorn (ECU) d. Troy 6-1,6-1
G. Loyd (ECU) d. R. Lawrence 7-6.6-2
J. Taylor (ECU) d. M Kinkema 6-1.6-3
D. Smith (UNC-W) d. P Campanaro
6-1,6-2
T. Sumner (ECU) d. M. Carter 6-4,6-4
S. Avery-P. Campanaro (ECU) d D
Smiih-M. Carter 6-3,6-3
Weekend Results:
Richmond 45. VCU 33, ECU 22, Radford
7
Flight A-J. Melhorn 5th, D. LaMont 6th
Right B-G. Loyd 4th, J. Taylor 7th
Flight CT. Sumner 5th, K. Plumb 6th
Right dB. Wing 2nd, S. Avery 3rd
Flight A doubles-Taylor-Melhorn 4th,
LaMont-Loyd 6th
Flight B doubles-Sumner-Wing 5th,
Campanaro-Avery 6th
ACC 22. ECU 13. Campbell 8. Salem 5.
Meredith 4, Pembroke 0
L. Eichholz lost semifinals to M. Register
(Campbell) 6-2,6-4
A. Ziemer lost finals to S. Milne (ACC)
6-1,6-0
T. Myers lost 1st round to S. Murkenee
(ACC) 4-6.7-5,6-1
M. Swaim lost finals to S. Maxwell (ACC)
4-6.6-4,6-1
H. Murray lost finals to W. Smith (ACC)
6-1.6-4
S. Montjoy winner defeated L Mav
(Campbell) 6-1,6-2
Eichholz-Ziemer lost finals to Andbom-
Milne (ACC) 6-1,6-2
Murray-Swaim lost 1st round to Maxwell-
Murkejee (ACC) 6-2.6-1
Montjoy-Myers winners defeated Myers-
Parker (ACQ 6-2.6-1
Indians
Tm really impressed and pleased with Craig's VolleybCillerS
playHe really has a good natural leg. "
�Art Baker
excellent (against PSU) coach
Art Baker said. "With a 45.3
average, you're kicking the ball
pretty good � he really wants to
play
The fact is that Losito tried out
as a placekicker in the spring and
was not very effective, according
to coach Baker. However, when
sophomore starter Tim Wolter
injured a knee in practice and was
unable to kick effectively in
ECU's opener, Losito filled the
bill and has been doing so ever
since.
"We were looking at him as a
years of varsity football, Losito
kicked 20 field goals and 74
PAT's while maintaining a
40-plus yard punting average.
Losito also played on the '82
N.C. 4-A state championship
team under coach Ray Durham.
He was joined on that squad by
Pirate teammates Ellis Dillahunt
and Bruce Simpson.
Unfortunately for the Pirates,
deep snapper Tom Brandon, also
an ECU walk-on, suffered a neck
pin
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The Lady Pirate Volleyball
Team lost a match over the
weekend to William & Mary.
The Pirates lost three games to
none, with the match scores being
15-4, 15-4 and 15.
The Lady Pirates are now 1-2
on the season and will play again
tonight at 7:00 in Minges Col-
iseum.
ECU Students
'Register By October 6th

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12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 30, 1986
IRS In Full Gear
jr DENISE CROMER
In the first week of action, the
bowling lanes in Mendenhall
were echoing with "strikes The
race for top honors as All Cam-
pus Champions is definitely off
and running.
Ling Sriramon of Phi Kappa
Tau had an outstanding match
with a total score of 377 when his
team was up against Sigma Tau
Gamma. In the spotlight for hte
Umstead Terminators with a
match score of 355 against Scott
Guess Who was Malcolm Phelps.
The Powerhouse team took on
the waxers and won the match
with a total pin score of 1107.
Scott Garrett of Sigma Phi Ep-
silon had an almost perfect game
with 7 strikes and 3 spares for a
game score of 231.
For the women, Loleta Lee of
Dominating Force was dancing in
the Allies with an individual
match score of 339 and a team
score of 1091 in their win over the
Sig Ep Goldenhearts A team.
In Co-Rec Softball Action
Hard-hitting action was seen
when Tau Kappa Epsilon took on
You Guys and came out vic-
torious with a final score of 12-2.
Ricky Poplin from TKE lead his
team in their tromp by pounding
out two three-run homers, one
coming in the first inning and the
next came in the second inning.
The A team took on the
Unstead Terminators which pro-
ved to be a very close game. BUI
Owen of the A team gave his
team an early lead of 4-1 after
three innings by going 3-for-3 at
the plate. But Maria Joeys of the
Umstead Terminators slammed a
triple in the fourth inning which
cut the lead to 4-2. After a heated
match the A � Team came out
ahead 5-4 with the help of Craig
O'Brien who made a game saving
catch in the bottom of the inning.
Get your friends together and
get ready for more fun than you
ever imagined possible in a
recreational activity. Co � Rec
Cageball is the hottest new event
to come to Memorial Gym. It in-
volves battling with an oversized
ball in order to get it on the other
side of the court to score points.
The games are played to 11 points
and the best two-out-of-three
wins the match. Stop by
Memorial Gym, room 204 for
more details. Come out and join
in the action!
Phi Taus vs ZBT's
The Phi Tau's broke onto the
score board with a pass from
Classifieds
Continued from page 8
LOST DOG: Female, 15 yrs. old.
Beaglecollie mixed. Long haired,
brown and white. Has large growth
on front paw. Has dog tags Call
752 4575
FOUND: Two female kittens. Need
loving home. One grey, one tabby.
Approximately 4 months old. Can't
possibly keep. Call 758-4842.
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share
new apt located at 405 E. 5th St.
(Regency House Condos Apt 1C).
1 block (300 steps) from Downtown
and 1 block from campus.
Everything is new, must see! No
deposits req'd for either apt. or
utilities Rent $175 plus 12 util. Call
355 6684 and leave name & phone
number.
LOST: l ring of business keys'
About 30 on l ring, if found, please
return to ECU Police Dept. Leave
name and phone number $ioo
reward if returned!
WANTED: Ride to Atlanta, Ga. on
Fall break weekend. Call 756-4070.
SOCCER COACHES AND
REFEREES NEEDED: For after
noon hours. Call Pitt County Schools
at 752 2934 ext. 276 or 267.
HELP WANTED: Student with
MWF mornings free to answer
phone for Mitchell Goff Electric
Call 752-3037.
Ling Sciraman to Steve Folmar.
The ZBT's came back with a 20
yard touchdown run by quarter-
back Dave Dennison. With five
minutes left in the half, the Phi
Taus Sciramen, ran 30 yards and
then pitched to Chip Bunn for a
touchdown to end the half with
the score 13 to 12 in favor of the
Phi Tau's.
Phi Taus dominated the second
half with a pass from Srirman to
Roger Muller. The game ended
with Phi Kappa Tau's ahead
27-12.
Alpha XI Delta vs. Zeta Tau
Alpha
Michelle Taylor threw a short
touchdown pass to Katrina Har-
ris for their opening drive. Then
with a pass from Jenny Jarvis to
Sharon Hancock the Alpha Xi
Delta's evened the score. The
Zeta Tau Alpha's came back
strong with a pass from Taylor to
Susan Rernard for a touchdown.
To close the game Cindy
Newman intercepted a pass and
went the distance for the
touchdown. ZTA's won with a
final score of 31-13.
The enforcers walked away
with a 26-0 win over the
Goldenhearts A team. Phylis
Willis, quarterback for the En-
forcers, opened the first half by
throwing a long touchdown pass
to teammate Jill Contarino. The
game ended on touchdown pass
from Bellos to Diane Abramson.
Aerobics
Come get involved with the
aerobics program offered on a
drop-in basis for Sl.OO-students
and $2.00 -staff. The current ses-
sion will run through Oct. 17
Runners Compete At VCU
By RICK McCORMAC
The ECU men's and women's
cross country squad each finished
third in three-way meets this past
weekend in Richmond.
The men's meet was won by
Richmond with 31 points, with
Virginia Commonwealth
finishing in second with 44. ECU
finished with 54 points.
The women's race was won by
Virginia Commonwealth (29
points), Richmond was second
with 38 while the Lady Pirates
had a total of 62.
Matt Schweitzer was the top
finisher for the men, placing
fourth with a time of 23:52.
Milton Matheny was next for the
Pirates with a time of 23:58 for
sixth place. Rob Rice finished in
12th for ECU with a time of
24:12, while Pete Higgins was
14th in 24:42. Rounding out the
totals for the Pirates were Vin-
cent Wilson and Russel Williams,
who finished 21st and 22nd.
Wilson's time was 25:38 while
Williams finished in 25:44.
For the women, Annette Bur-
ton again led the way. Burton
finished in third place with a time
of 20:59. She was followed by
Kim Griffith, who finished 10th,
with a time of 22:14. Stephanie
Ingram captured 13th place in
22:39 while Jeannie Jones was
17th in 25:21. Sherri Swick was
19th in a time of 26:19 and
Lucretia West was 20th with a
time of 29:59.
Pirate assistant coach Steve
Thomas was pleased with both
team's performance, especially
considering the number of hills
on the course.
"This type of course will help
prepare us for the conference
meet at William & Mary
Thomas said. "Getting ex-
perience on these hills will make a
difference
He was especially pleased with
the efforts of Burton and Jones
on the women's side.
"Annette ran an outstanding
race for her first attempt at runn-
ing hills Thomas said. "I was
also very pleased with Jeannie
(Jones), who was competing in
her first meet
On the men's side, Thomas
praised his top-three runners.
"Matt Schweitzer did really
well Thomas said. "He's from
the area and has some experience
on the hills.
"Matt, Milton and Rob all did
a really good job Thomas con-
tinued. "I'm not disappointed
with the rest of the team � they
were just too far back to compete
with Richmond
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4






12
1 HI lsit Ktl IM AS
M 1'U MHl-R M 1W6
IRS In Full Gear
fcyOEMSK CROMER
In the first week, of action, the
bowling lanes in Mendenhall
were echoing with "strikes The
race foi top honors as ah Cam
pus champions is definitely ofl
and running
1 inn Sriramon o Phi kappa
Tau had an outstanding match
with a total score of 377 when his
team was up against Sigma Ian
Gamma. In the spotlight tor hte
I instead Terminators with a
match score of 355 against Scott
Guess Who was Malcolm Phelps
The Powerhouse team took on
the wavers and won the match
with a total pin score of 1107
Scott (.arrett of Sigma Phi 1 p
silon had an almost perfect game
with ' -tnk.es and 3 spates for a
game score of 231
Foi the women. 1 oleta lee oi
Dominating Force was dancing in
the Allies with an individual
match score oi 339 and a team
e oi 1091 in their win over the
s g Bp Goldenhearts ream.
In Co-Rec Softball Action
Hard-hitting action was seen
w hen I au Kappa Epsilon took on
ou Guys and came out vie-
a final score of 12-2.
Rick Poplin from T KI lead his
"� in p b pounding
ree i tr I omcrs.
coming in the first inning and the
next came in the second inning.
The A team took on the
Instead Terminators which pro-
ved to be a very close game. Bill
Owen of the A team gave his
team an early lead of 4-1 after
three innings by going 3-for-3 at
the plate. But Maria Joeys of the
Umstead Terminators slammed a
triple in the fourth inning which
cut the lead to 4-2. After a heated
match the A � Team came out
ahead 5-4 with the help of Craig
O'Brien who made a game saving
catch in the bottom of the inning.
Ciet your friends together and
get reach for more fun than you
ever imagined possible in a
recreational activity. Co � Rec
Cageball is the hottest new event
to come to Memorial Gym. It in-
volves battling with an oversized
ball in order to get it on the other
side of the court to score points.
The games are played to 11 points
and the best two-out-of-three
wins the match. Stop b
Memorial Gym, room 204 for
more details Come out and join
in the action!
Phi Taus s ZBT's
The Phi Tau's broke onto the
score board with a pass from
Classifieds
(Ontinued from pan' N
LOST DOG F( - . .Qlc
Beagli e mixed. L
DrOv. - - �. na; Jrg ,( fi
I � �� Has dog aqs Ca
FOUND. � ili - �� s Neec
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itely 4 rr �� : Ca" '
keep Ca 756 486:
ROOMMATE WANTED Tc s-are
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- ' �� -ouse C fcpt c
300 s?eps fron Downtcv-
an � campus
Everytt ing is new, us see '�
depos s rep I foi e thei spl
ties pe i7c r s ' : - Ca
355 6684 - eave -ae & pnone
LOST ring of business keys!
PU 3C 0" 1 r.qg f f0unQ piease
return to ECU Poi.ce DepT Leave
name aa phonP nUrnber $ioc
reward if returnee'
WANTED: Pae to Atlanta. Ga on
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SOCCER COACHES AND
REFEREES NEEDED For af'er
"oon hours Can P.tt County Schools
at 752 2934 ext 276 or 267
HELP WANTED: Student A fh
MAP -orn.nqs free to answer
Dhone for Mitchell Goff Electric
Ca 752 3037
I ing Sciraman to Steve Folmar
The ZBT's came back with a 20
yard touchdown run by quarter
back Dave Dennison. With five
minutes left in the half, the Phi
Taus' Sciramen, ran 30 yards and
then pitched to Chip Bunn for a
touchdown to end the half with
the score 13 to 12 in favor of the
Phi Tau's.
Phi Taus dominated the second
halt with a pass from Srirman to
Roger Muller. The game ended
with Phi Kappa Tau's ahead
27-12.
Alpha Xi Delta vs. Zeta Tau
Alpha
Michelle Taylor threw a short
touchdown pass to Katrina Har-
ris for their opening drive. Then
with a pass from Jenny Jarvis to
Sharon Hancock the Alpha Xi
Delta's evened the score. The
Zeta Tau Alpha's came back
strong with a pass from Taylor to
Susan Rernard for a touchdown.
To close the game Cind
Newman intercepted a pass and
went the distance for the
touchdown. ZTA's won with a
final score of 31-13.
The enforcers walked awa
with a 26-0 win over the
Goldenhearts A team. Ph lis
Willis, quarterback for the En-
forcers, opened the first half by
throwing a long touchdown pass
to teammate Jill C ontarino The
game ended on touchdown pass
from Bellos to Diane Abramson
Aerobics
Come get involved with the
aerobics program offered on a
drop-in basis for Si .00-students
and $2.00 -staff. The current ses-
sion will run through Oct. 17
Runners Compete At VCU
By RICK McCORMAC
i o-Sport rdHor
The ECU men's and women's
cross country squad each finished
third in three-way meets this past
weekend in Richmond.
The men's meet was won b
Richmond with 31 points, with
Virginia Commonwealth
finishing in second with 44. ECU
finished with 54 points.
The women's race was won bv
Virginia Commonwealth (29
points), Richmond was second
with 38 while the Lady Pirates
had a total of 62.
Matt Schweitzer was the top
finisher for the men, placing
fourth with a time of 23:52
Milton Mathenv was next for the
Pirates with a time of 23:58 for
sixth place. Rob Rice finished in
12th for ECU with a time of
24:12. while Pete Higgins was
14th in 24:42. Rounding out the
totals for the Pirates were Vin-
cent Wilson and Russel Williams.
who finished 21st and 22nd.
Wilson's time was 25:38 while
Williams finished in 25:44.
For the women, Annette Bur-
ton again led the way. Burton
finished in third place with a time
ol 20:59. She was followed bv
Kim Griffith, who finished 10th.
with a time of 22:14. Stephanie
Ingram captured 13th place in
22:39 while Jeannie Jones was
Pth in 25:21 Shern Swick was
19th in a time of 26:19 and
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
Tar River Apts 1 bearoom, $137 50
rent, '2 utilities Can Jeana at
"58 6650
�mm
ABORTIONS i P
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGSANC
5-�5 Ab from 13 1 18 weel
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Pi ' en Pregna . �
forma 832-0535 free
- � 53; 5384) betwei .
- � lavs l cnera mes c 1 1
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
I ucretia West was 20th with a
time of 29 9
Pirate assistant coach Steve
Thomas was pleased with both
team's performance, especiallv
considering the number of hills
on the course
"This tvpe ol course will help
prepare us for the conference
meet at William &. Marv
Thomas said. "Getting ex-
perience on these hills will make a
difference
He was especiallv pleased with
the efforts of Burton and Jones
on the women's side.
'Annette ran an outstanding
race for her first atten
ing hills Thomas - a
also verv pleased witl
(Jones), who wj
her first meet
On the men's side.
praised his top-three i
"Mat! Schwei'er did rea
well Thoma H�
the area and has m me ex
on the hills
"Mat. Milton and Rob a
a really good job 1
tinued "I'm not lisap
with the rest f the tea
were just too far ha.�
with Richmond
C�MF;DY ZpNE
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1 ADMISSION SPECIAL
ONLY $2.00 UNTIL 9:30
BRING A FRIEND IN FOR FREE
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Coming Sot. October 4
Billy Scott's
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SI.OO Off wECUFootball Stub
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For More Info Call fSt-SSTD
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An Evolution of The Original
FOR MEN & WOMEN
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Coupon Expires Oct. 10, 1986
s.
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 30, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 30, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.496
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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