The East Carolinian, September 25, 1986






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(Earnlmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.61 No.8
Thursday, September 25, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
12P�g�
Full Capacity
Circulation 12,000
Dorms Become Popular
B DAWN STEWART
Dorm residents nationwide
again found themselves crammed
in nooks and crannies. Housing
officials say they don't know why
the overcrowding has become a
permanent feature of fall terms,
bur they say it won't go awav
soon.
Students found themselves
located into study lounges, small
dorm spaces, single dorm rooms
and any other available corners.
Duke, Alabama, Florida, Cal-
Davis and, according to one na-
tional campus housing official,
"the great majority" of colleges
across the country are running
out of room to house on-campus
students for the fall.
The culprit, officials say, is an
unanticipated flock of new
freshmen. So many new
freshmen registered a: Emory
University in Atlanta, for exam-
ple, that administrators offered
upperclass men $1,000 or a lux-
ury off-campus apartment if they
agreed to move out of the dorms.
It wasn't supposed to happen
at all, said James Grubb, presi-
dent of the Association of Col-
lege and University Housing Of-
ficers.
"We all looked at shrinking
enrollments through the 1980s
and nineties Grubb explained.
"Colleges didn't buy or build
new dorms because housing was
expected to stay steady or decline
during that period
Grubb felt colleges had simply
misjudged enrollment trends,
which were supposed to head
downward because there are
fewer 18 year olds in the popula-
tion.
According to a College Board
census released last week.college
enrollment did fall two percent
last year. It has been steady over
all, however, through most of
this decade
Grubb was not sure why some
schools have stayed so over-
crowded "although colleges are
actively marketing themselves, I
don't think that in itself would
explain the increases in housing
demands
One reason for overcrowding
may be that freshmen gravitate
toward dorms for social reasons.
"Students who are new to the
community have no sense of
belonging, no friends yet com-
mented Tom Strong, housing
chief for Alabama. "Dorms of-
fer easy ways to develop them
Another reason may focus
upon finances. "1 wouldn't
make a blanket statement that
dorm living is cheaper Grubb
commented, " but it is still a fair-
ly economical way to live and eat
while you're in school
"We can't give an insight as to
the cause of the problem stated
Eleanor Bunting, ECU's Room
Assignment Coordinator, "but
the problem has existed for the
past two years
East Carolina can assign 2,256
male residents to dorms with an
addition of 54 extra beds. As a
result, the beds are stacked into
rooms meant for two occupants
only.
The rooms where over-
crowding occurred are located on
the first floor of Jones anc jhe se-
cond floor of Garrett.
These room assignments are
only temporary, Bunting said.
As the semester progresses a tur-
nover of space occurs due to
drop-outs or no shows.
"We would never make such
arrangements if we didn't feel
they were only temporary con-
cluded Bunting. Currently, only
three rooms have three oc-
cupants.
Not all college dorms, of
course, are overcrowded. The
University of Texas at El Paso
closed one of its two dorm towers
this fall.
"We would need about 100
more students to reopen the
tower said Becky Baker,
UTEP's housing director. Baker
explained further that UTEP's
large number of commuter
students has probably muted de-
mand for dorm rooms on cam-
pus.
Grubb was "suprised" to hear
of UTEP's decision at a time
when a number of colleges, final-
ly tired of the dorm shortages
that have become a fixture of
every fall term, are debating
building new dorms.
At the University of Florida,
for example, housing Director
James Grimm thinks there is "a
50-50 chance" UF will build a
new dorm. This decision was
made after 10 long years of over-
crowding.
"Right now we've got an
overflow of 400 Grimm said,
"For the first time, we've had to
put students up in the local Holi-
day Inn
Jon Jordan � PhM t.��
If Chris Edward's dorm room is overcrowded, it appears to only be because cf an
overabundance of 'extras
Offer Found Unacceptable
SGA Class Officers Elected
By PATT1 KEMMIS
Nan Editor
Wednesday's elections for
SGA representatives and class of-
ficers ended in a landside victory
for Bryan Lassiter over Chris
Tomastic in the race for Senior
Class President.
Lassiter received 102 of the 134
votes cast by seniors for the
presidency seat. Jeff Parks won
the office of vice-president as a
write-in candidate.
Lisa Carrol ran unopposed for
the Junior Class President, her
vice-president is Marcie Green.
President. The vice-president,
Larry Murphy, won by write-in
votes.
Kelly Jones won the office of
Freshman Class President by
three votes over Jeffrey Eyer-
man. Karen Prevost won the seat
of vice-president.
According to SGA election
rules, Eyerman can call for a re-
count within 24 hours since he
lost by less than 25 votes.
Lisa Roberts ran unopposed
for Graduate President.
In the elections for day
representatives, 38 positions were
open. Only 15 names were on the
Also running unopposed was ballot after the others were dis-
Scott Thomas, Sophomore Class qualified. Mark Simon received
the most votes for day represen-
tatives.
An applicant could have been
disqualified for one of four
reasons: not having a high
enough G.P.A not being a full
time student, not attending the
mandatory meeting or not turn-
ing in an expense account by the
deadline.
There were 18 names written in
for day student representatives.
Three positions are still available.
In the dorm representative
elections, two positions are
available from Greene Dorm and
one from White Dorm.
Any student interested in these
positions should contact the
SGA.
According to Jennifer
Carpenter, election chairperson,
435 students voted in Wednes-
day's elections. Carpenter also
said three ballot boxes could not
be counted because the number
of ballots in the boxes did not
match up with the number of
people who had signed the voting
sheets.
The SGA's first meeting will be
Monday, Sept. 29 at 5 p.m.
"I would like to see a smooth
running and productive
legislature said Steve Cunanan,
SGA president. "I hope to see
everyone standing up for what
they believe in
UNITED NATIONS (UPI) �
The Soviet Union has made a new
offer to resolve the dispute over
American journalist Nicholas
Daniloff but it was "not accep-
table an administration official
said today.
Declining to go into details, the
official, who asked not to be
identified, said "by and large the
proposal contains the same
elements" of past proposals.
"They want to trade Daniloff for
(Gennadi) Zakharov the Soviet
employee of the United Nations
accused of spying by the United
States
The proposal was made when
Secretary of State George Shultz
and Soviet Foreign Minister
Eduard Shevardnadze met Tues-
day, first for 40 minutes at the
United Nations, and again for 90
minutes Tuesday night at the
Soviet U.N. Mission.
"It was not acceptable the
official said.
The impasse over Daniloff has
led to a delay in the planning for
a second summit meeting bet-
ween President Reagan and
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev.
Neither side apparently wants the
Daniloff case to derail the
meeting Reagan hopes to hold in
Washington late this year or early
next year.
"There have been a number of
Soviet proposals the official
said, but added, "You're left
with the same basics" and that is
"the question of whether we will
do a straight trade" of Daniloff
for Zakharov.
The Washington Post, quoting
U.S. officials, said the Kremlin's
new offer would allow Daniloff
to leave the Soviet Union. Subse-
quently, an imprisoned Soviet
dissident, termed "a political
prisoner" by U.S. officials,
would be freed to emigrate and
accused Soviet spy Gennadi
Zakharov would be permitted to
leave the United States.
The newspaper quoted one
source as saying it appeared the
Soviets wanted to avoid trials and
resolve the issue quickly.
Shevardnadze told reporters
"there are good chances" for
resolving the issue that has
damaged U.S. Soviet relations.
Bernard Kalb, State Depart-
ment spokesman, who had told
reporters the first meeting did not
resolve the Daniloff matter,
declined to repeat that assessment
after the second session.
Asked after his morning
meeting with Shultz if he had
made am new proposals on the
Daniloff case, Shevardnadze
said: "Yes, I have made all my
proposals. My conscience is
clear
Daniloff, 51, a correspondent
for US NewfcWord Report was
siezed on August 30 on what
Reagan ha- called "trumped-up"
espionage charges in retaliation
for the Aug 23 arrest of accused
sp Gennadi Zakharov, a Soviet
U.N. employee.
Daniloff was released from a
Soviet prison to the U.S. Em-
bassy Sept. 12 on the condition
he not leave Moscow. In return,
Zakharov was released to his am-
bassador under the same restric-
tions.
U.S. officials postponed a
move Tuesday to set an early trial
date for Zakharov on three
counts of spying leading to
speculation that the government
was buying time to try to reach a
settlement. Instead, U.S. At-
torney Andrew Maloney told
U.S. District Court Judge Joseph
McLaughlin that the government
wanted a security specialist to
protect any secret documents that
might be produced in the trial.
No date was set for the trial.
University Will Host
Chinese Educators
GREENVILLE � East Carolina
University will host a delegation
of Chinese scholars and
educators during a three-day
symposium Oct. 17 - 19. Visitors
from the Tianjin College of
Finance and Economics will be
presented a variety of educational
opportunities while exploring the
University and the American
culture.
Foundation Plans A
Greeting Card Contest
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Wednesday was election day for SGA representatives and
class officers. Signs should disappear by the end of the
week.
By THERESA ROSINSKI
MMMi
The ECU Foundation is spon-
soring their second annual Holi-
day Greeting Card Design Con-
test. Winners of this year's con-
test will receive $100.
Two designs will be chosen and
these will be the official Universi-
ty greeting cards for the
Chancellor's office and the Of-
fice of Institutional Advance-
ment.
Designs must be no smaller
than 3x7 and must be turned in-
to the Taylor Slaughter House,
located on 5th Street. They will
be accepting designs on Oct. 6
and the deadline is Oct. 24.
"It's a great opportunity for
students to put on paper what
East Carolina or the holiday
season means to them said
Sven Vanbaars, coordinator of
the design contest. "Plus the
hundred dollars never hurts
around Christmas time
The cards will be sent to
business leaders and alumni
throughout the country and the
designs will receive a lot of ex-
posure, according to Vanbaars.
"The contest gives artists an
opportunity to let their work be
seen and it looks great on a
resume said Vanbaars.
Anyone who has questions
concerning the contest should
contact the Taylor Slaughter
Alumni Center.
Dr. Ernest B. Uhr, dean of the
ECU School of Business, said
"our visitors' principal interests
are marketing, management, and
related fields in which they have
not been traditionally involved
But he indicated that the delega-
tion will examine "all aspects of
the American lifestyle For ex-
ample, they will discover a uni-
que aspect of our culture when
they attend the ECU Homecom-
ing football game on Oct. 18
Uhr said.
The China Symposium is part
of an ongoing China Exchange
Program, a cooperative educa-
tional exchange agreement bet-
ween the University and a
number of Chinese educational
institutions. Dr. Philip Cheng,
Coordinator of Asian Studies
and a recent participant in the
China Exchange, noted that the
program was initiated in May,
1985, when Chancellor John M.
innnnnnriiinriiinonnrrvnnnrnrr)onnoooo
Howeil appointed a delegation
from East Carolina University to
visit China
The delegation was headed by
Dr. William E. Laupus, Vice
Chancellor and Dean of the
School of Medicine. The delega-
tion, Cheng said, "visited several
cities in China and formulated
cooperative agreements with 12
institutions. These institutions
are Nankai University, Jinan
University, Shanxi University,
Tianjin College of Finance and
Economics, Tianjin Medical Col-
lege, Tianjin Normal University,
Tianjin Foreign Languages In-
stitute, Shanghai Teachers
University, Shanxi Medical Col-
lege, Shanxi
ment Coi
University,
tion College
n mic Manage
Norwestern
Shanxi Educa-
See SYMPOSIUM page 5
ON THE INSIDE
"i
and weekend
ENTERTAIN-
� Movie review
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MENT page 7.
�Preview of Saturdays game bet
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SPORTS Date 10.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 25. 1986
Campus Research Affected By Movement
(CPS) � The animal rights
movement � and its success in
pushing laws and bans going into
effect this fall � is driving up the
costs of campus research by con-
vincing more public animal
shelters to stop supplying stiays
to labs, various researchers say.
"We are not at the critical
stage yet, but we will be in the
very near future says Susan
Wilson, acting director of the
division of Animal Resources for
the University of Arizona's
medical school.
"Animals will now cost us five
to 10 times more she says.
At Harvard, "a lot of in-
vestigators have had to rearrange
their budgets or apply for addi-
tional funds reports Dr.
Ronald Hunt, the school's direc-
tor of animal resources.
Wilson estimates the local
pound's refusal to give more
animals to Arizona could amount
to "a loss of $200,000 to
$600,000, not including (lost)
research grants
But while some scientists say
the movement's impact�which
spread quickly through U.S.
campuses after the 1982 convic-
tion of a University of Maryland
professor for cruelty to
animals�is economically crippl-
ing, others minimize the cost in-
creases and say many schools are
adopting new research
technologies to replace animals.
Local shelters near the univer-
sities of Florida, Tennessee-
Memphis, Ohio State and Cal-
Davis, among others, recently
have stopped supplying free or
cheap stray animals for campus
experiments.
Eleven states in all have
outlawed "pound seizures" of
animals during the last four
years.
The Humane Society of the
U.S for one, doubts the
pounds' actions will inhibit
research or make it more expen-
sive.
"No one has local sources for
animals says a Humane Society
spokesperson. "Everyone buys
long distance
"These (anit-pound seizure)
measures have stopped the flow
of cheap animals concedes Dr.
Randall Lockwood of the socie-
ty.
But they have helped preserve
animals, too. "It is parallel to the
ban on the importation of rhesus
monkeys. They were treated like
disposable commodities to pick
up, use and throw out. When
they became expensive, they were
ultimately treated like valuable
items
Harvard's Hunt doesn't see the
laws helping to save animal lives,
however.
"We are talking about animals
that are going to be destroyed
(anyway) he says.
And while Lockwood says
dogs bred for research are better
anyway because scientists know
the animals' genetic histories,
"it is somewhat
breed a dog (for
then destruction)
when hundreds of thousands are
available
Harvard's expenses for buying
research animals have tripled as
the result of a new Massachusetts
law prohibiting using pound
animals in labs.
Tennessee-Memphis estimates
its research animal costs will rise
"five to ten times" after a new
animal law goes into effect on
Dec. 31.
"It's a ridiculous situation
says UT-Memphis Chancellor
Dr. James Hunt. "People prefer
to kill (unwanted) animals (in
pounds) rather than allow
Hunt thinks
ridiculous to
research and
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animals to be used to enhance
mankind. They are putting
animal values ahead of human
values
The law "will affect the
volume and flexibility of
research he adds.
University of Chicago
spokesman Jonathan Kleinbard
last spring testified that a propos-
ed Chicago law to control the
flow of animals into labs would
stop "most of the medical
research that takes place in this
city (on) heart disease, AIDS,
diabetes, accident injuries, etc
And in July, 1985 a group of
multiple sclerosis sufferers,
organized as The Incurable 111 for
Animal Research, organized to
protest local Arizona shelters'
then-proposed plans to stop sell-
ing strays to UA labs.
Now, UA's Wilson says there's
no overestimating the impact.
"This will affect our teaching
program she says, "the ac-
creditation at the medical school
and, ultimately, the quality of life
in Arizona
Others think the changes will
force the way scientists do
research.
"New technologies, computers
and video, I've seen these types
of things develop says Har-
vard's Hunt. "But we still use
animals
UT-Memphis' Hunt adds, "we
are being forced into being in-
novative. We will survive and im-
prove
Personal Computers
Computers Given Credit For Grades
URBANA, IL (CPS) - Personal
computers are changing students'
study habits, making students
feel more "involved" in
acamdemics and may even be
helping students improve their
grades, University of Illinois
researchers said last week.
They added it may be "too ear-
ly to tell" if personal computers
really do help students get better
grades.
However, they did find vast
differences in the ways men and
women use the same computer
system.
During the first year of a four-
year study, UI found students us-
ed computers most for writing
course papers, personal cor-
respondence, resumes and play-
ing computer games.
Students who had access to
computers also tended to study
more in their dorms than in other
areas on campus.
"We found most students
study in the residence halls says
Howard Diamond, one of the
authors of the study. "I know
when I went to college, I did most
of my studying at two or three in
the morning. Most computer
centers close at midnight. Since
residence halls are already
24-hour buildings, we are finding
they are good places for the
study
Though researchers are still sif-
ting through the data they
gathered during the first year of
the study of how students used
the machines, they did notice
women seemed 'nore uncomfor-
table with them at first than did
men.
Female students tended to take
more part in formal computer
training sessions before the study
began.
Even during the study, male
students used computers far more
often than did the women, Dia-
mond says.
But men used the computers
for different things than women.
Men, for example, used the
machines for playing games
about 16 percent of the time,
while women used them for
games only one percent of the
time.
"The study shows certain
malefemale traits adds
Sheldon Smith of EDUCOM, a
group that helps member colleges
adopt and adapt computers for
their campuses. "Men interact
more by doing things. They are
sports-oriented, games-oriented,
task-oriented. Men don't throw
around personal experiences like
women do
"Women are more prone to
doing that. Traditionally, women
are more open he adds. "A
group of women will talk for
hours and on a fairly
sophisticated level. Men, on the
other hand, rarely talk in a group
unless it's about business or,
traditionally, sports
Researchers found men and
engineering students tend to have
more computer experience, and
generally are more willing than
others to use them, although Dia-
mond says the study found most
students had had some previous
experience with computers "in
one form or another
About 48 percent of the men
had access to a home computer
during high school. Only 25 per-
cent of the women did.
About 15 percent or 20 percent
of the 250 students in the studv
said they initially felt comfor-
table with personal computer
systems.
Those who don't learn to
become comfortable with the
machines, Smith adds, will suffer
academically.
"Schools without computer
are now falling behind drastical-
ly. Humanities, for example,
once looked at computers as not
being particularly enhancing
Smith notes.
"Now in English composition
or lit classes, students write lots
and lots of papers he says. "A
kid who has a word processor i
going to be far ahead of a kid
with just a plain old typewriter
If something needs to be
changed in the middle of a paper
for any kind of class work, Smith
says, "with a computer, it's just a
flick of the keys. For the kid with
a typewriter, it's 'white-out "
"Computers don't necessarily
reduce the quantity of
homework, but they do enhance
the quality Smith concludes.
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HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S C
(CPS) � State colleges that try to
prove they do a good job
teaching students should get
more money than other colleges.
a new report by the National
Governors Association (NGA)
says.
The report suggests states give
schools that grade themselves
with "assessment tests" a bigger
percentage of the higher educa-
tion budgets the states give out
each year.
"Incentive funding said the
report, called "Time For
Results "will send a t -
signal that policymakers expe
and demand proven quality in
higher education.
But some educators fret su I
"incentive funding" would give
legislators, not administrators
and faculty member, control of
some campus courses and r
grams.
And in education, says B -
Aaron of the National Asso
tion of State Universities i
Land-Grant College-
Washington, DC, "bea�
the eye of the beholder
The Governors, he says, have
"taken the bottom-line ap-
proach" to funding and grading
colleges' performances.
"(The governors want to)
reassure taxpayers by having col-
leges demonstrate that lea"
going on
In many states, education is the
single largest expenditure of tax-
payer money and "they are look- i
ing for ways to have money used
in the most effective manner
Aaron says.
While many colleges and states
have begun to require students to
take competency tests in recent
years, none has yet tied the
amount of money colleges get to
their students' test scores.
Maryland has come the closest
to adopting a NGA-type plan. In
April, the state's Board for
Higher Education okaved plans

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vement
I tie's New technologies, computers
.1 d video, !e seen these types
ing gs develop says Har-
BC vard's Hunt "But we still use
M nphis' Hunt adds, "we
ed into being in-
v- W c uii! survive and im-
or Grades
a - fell comfor.
computer
learn to
: table with the
. will suffer
. computers
nd drastical-
eample,
mputers as not
. a enhancin .
"Now i Enj ; position
tdents write lots
ipers he says. "A
processor is
tx fai ahead of a kid
a p ain old w pewriter
iething needs to be
ddle of a paper
� class work. Smith
nnputer, it's just a
keys For the kid with
� 'white-out "
don't necessarily
quantity of
but they do enhance
Smith concludes.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTMEMBER 25, 1986
Report Recommends Incentive Funding
HILTON HEAD ISLAND. S.C.
(CPS) � State colleges that try to
prove they do a good job
teaching students should get
more money than other colleges,
a new report by the National
Governors Association (NGA)
says.
The report suggests states give
schools that grade themselves
with "assessment tests" a bigger
percentage of the higher educa-
tion budgets the states give out
each year.
"Incentive funding said the
report, called "Time For
Results "will send a clear
signal that policymakers expect
and demand proven quality in
higher education.
But some educators fret such
"incentive funding" would give
legislators, not administrators
and faculty member, control of
some campus courses and pro-
grams.
And in education, says Bob
Aaron of the National Associa-
tion of State Universities and
Land-Grant Colleges in
Washington, D.C "beauty is in
the eye of the beholder
The Governors, he says, have
"taken the bottom-line ap-
proach" to funding and grading
colleges' performances.
"(The governors want to)
reassure taxpayers by having col-
leges demonstrate that learning is
going on
In many states, education is the
single largest expenditure of tax-
payer money and "they are look-
ing for ways to have money used
in the most effective manner
Aaron says.
While many colleges and states
have begun to require students to
take competency tests in recent
years, none has yet tied the
amount of money colleges get to
their students' test scores.
Maryland has come the closest
to adopting a NGA-type plan. In
April, the state's Board for
Higher Education okayed plans
A tine,
I we
must I
I find I

some-
i one
to test sophomores at all state
campuses in 1988.
Board members would then
grade colleges' efforts to teach by
how well students do on the tests.
But critics say they don't really
trust the tests' ability to measure
how will colleges are doing, and
that the scores would be ques-
tionable because the students
taking the tests would have little
motive for doing well on them.
Florida, South Dakota,
Georgia and Tennessee now all
require students to take com-
petency tests to prove they are
qualified to become college
juniors.
The Texas legislature currently
is debating a bill to subject Texas
sophomores to similar tests.
None of those states, however,
make funding dependent on how
well the students do.
Even if they do adopt the NGA
plan to attach purse strings to test
scores, the NGS's Joe Nathan
thinks states would adopt in-
dividual � not national �
methods of grading colleges.
Northeast Missouri State
University in Kirksville, Mo for
example, asks sophmores to
retake either the Scolastic Ap-
titude Test (SAT) or the
American College Testing (ACT)
program test, and compares the
results with their high school
Student ID Schedule
Wednesday FridayOctober 1, 1986 October 3, 19862:30pm 2:30pm- 3:30pm - 3:30pm
WednesdayOctober 8, 19862:30pm- 3:30pm
Wednesday FridayOctober 15, 1986 October 17, 19862:30pm 2:30pm- 3:30pm � 3:30pm
WednesdayOctober 22, 19862:30pm� 3:30pm
Wednesday FridayOctober 29, 1986 October 31, 19862:30pm 2:30pm� 3:30pm 3:30pm
WednesdayNovember 5, 19862:30pm� 3:30pm
Wednesday FridayNovember 12, 1986 November 14, 19862:30pm -2:30pm -3:30pm 3:30pm
WednesdayNovember 19, 19862:30pm -3:30pm
WednesdayDecember 3, 19862:30pm -3:30pm
scores, explains Dr. Charles Mc-
Cain, NMSU's president.
Then in their senior year,
students take comptency tests in
their chosen majors.
The scores, McClain says,
show the students' level of pro-
gress and are made available to
the public.
Alverno College in Milwaukee,
on the other hand, give its
students competency tests about
100 times in four years, reports
Frank Miller, Alverno's vice
president of marketing.
But Maryland college officials,
in protesting last April's decision
to measure campus education by
giving tests to students, objected
that colleges would be less willing
to try new academic programs if
they couldn't necessarily lead to
higher test scores right away.
NMSU's McClain disagrees.
"In Byzantine administrations,
it would throttle innovation, " he
says, "but it's probably throttled
anyway
Moreover, he adds, "most of
my faculty would leave if we do
something silly like teaching to
(do well on) the test
Asked how he thought the
governors' report would affect
higher education, McClain said:
"It will re-establish integrity.
When governors get interested,
boards get interested and the
president gets interested
"I've been saying this for
years, but because of the gover-
nors actions, you're calling me
now
Woodsy Owl says
No Noise Pollution Here!
ALL ABOAARRD
I(
Ticket Good for
HOBO SANDWICH
Only $2.85
Ribeye, Cheese, Grilled Qion s
French Fries
HAMBURGER (14 b)
Lettuce. Tomato. Frenchfties
Clip & Bring to XTC STATION
Stop Your Train At
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B XTC
?S STATION
CAROLINA EAST MALL (Across from KERR Drugs)
Breakfast SUPER TASTE TRIP TICKET! Dinner
Kentucky Fried Chicken
$1.99
plus tax
FOR ONE COMPLETE
2-PIECE PACK
2 Pieces of Chicken
1 Small Mashed Potato and Gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
Expires Dec. 31, 1986
MONDAY:
MEXICAN MADNESS
FREE NACHO BAR 10 PM UNTIL
.75 DRAFT �3.50 PITCHERS � 1.99 MARGARITAS
TUESDAY:
BEACH NIGHT
1.67 WINE SPECIAL � 1.50 HOUSE HIGHBALLS
HAWAIIAN PUNCH . . . 2.95
GIFTS SUPPLIED FROM HAWAIIAN TROPIC
WEDNESDAY:
RIBTACULAR 5-9 PM
ALL YOU CAN EAT BEEF RIBS 7.95
INCLUDES SALAD, POTATO AND BREAD
BOSTON TEA PARTY
LONG ISLAND TEA . . . 2.95
THURSDAY:
COLLEGE NIGHT
3.50 PITCHER � .75 DRAFT � 1.67 WINE SPECIAL
FRIDAY:
SCHNAPPS NIGHT
CINNAMONPEPPERMINTAPPLERASPBERRY
& PEACH SCHNAPPS FOR 1.50
SATURDAY:
SOURS & COLLINS FOR 1.99
SUNDAY:
.99 DRINK SPECIAL
SLOE GIN FIZZS � BLOODY MARYS
MIMOSA � CHAMPAGNE � SCREWDRIVERS
� -
J
-wi





' j
(Hilt Eaat (Kar0lintan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender, G�,r�M��f�
Daniel Maurer, ��, ea,w
Patti Kemmis, mm mm Steve Folmar, am.
Scott Cooper. rwpwo ,� Anthony Martin, mmmucmt, w�,
Rick McCormac. cm. mm, Meg Needham. cmmmm imr
John Shannon. ��� Shannon Short, -c
Pat Molloy. �������, �,� DeChanile Johnson. � z
September 25, 1986
Opinion
Page 4
Pat Robertson
Not A Snow Ball's Chance In
� � �
We have just one question.
Would you want a television
talkshow host for president?
We find it unlikely. However, the
good Rev. Pat Robertson thinks
otherwise. In fact, he's giving
serious consideration to running for
the office himself.
On closed-circut television from
Constitution Hall in Washington
D.C Robertson announced he
would run for the Republican
Presidential nomination if he
received three million signatures
from supporters.
Robertson, host of a morning
talkshow called "The 700 Club"
asked his followers to donate $100 a
piece to Americans for Robertson.
"There is an urgent need he said.
With a little arithmatic and some
common sense, anyone can see that
Robertson has asked for $300
million dollars and the guarantee of
three million votes. Hell, who
wouldn't run if they had that in
their back pocket. Unfortunately,
such donations will not help
Robertson. An analyst perhaps, but
not money.
It's true, a few Christian conser-
vatives like Robertson have left
their political mark on several
states. But such minor victories
have little significance. The
Republican Presidential nomina-
tion is a completely different story.
It would, in Robertson's case,
amount to a public embarrassment.
What's worse, in the hostile polic-
tical arena it would likely expose
Christian fundamentalism to
distructive scrutiny. He could do
nothing but hurt himself and his
religious faction, not to mention in-
sult intelligent voters.
With such an obvious outcome,
we feel Robertson's running for the
nomination would be absurd. It is
true that as an American citizen he
is entitled to run for the office of
the president � but then so is
Johnny Carson, Merv Griffin and
David Letterman.
Pat Robertson, President of the
United States of America. Can you
imagine it? We can't.
P6ARAWAJ6A,
WLTim Hope.
wmsniLThwe!
Murderers Deserve No Leniency;
Capital Punishment All The Way
Last Friday, at approximately 2 a.m
John William Rook died by lethal injection
at Central Prison in Raleigh. This is not
news, however, to anyone. The local media
felt it was necessary to saturate us with all
sorts of information about the Rook case.
It began on Wednesday, as the
newspapers lent a sympathetic ear to his
final appeals and requests for leniency. On
Friday we got a reaJ treat; a front page arti-
cle packed with all kinds of exciting execu-
From The flight
By LANCE HARDIN
tion trivia. We learned wv at time he woke
up, what time he fell asleep, who visited
him, what he was wearing, who got the
body, and of course, what his last words
were.
The News and Observer took in-
vestigative journalism to new heights by
reporting not only his last meal, but also
his next to last meal.
Why must the media focus this kind of
attention on the fate of trash? Here was a
man who abducted a woman, Ann Marie
Roche, and proceeded to beat her with a
tire iron, cut her with a knife, rape her,
and then run over her with a car.
So why does the media insist on this out-
pouring of compassion and concern for
Rook? Where is the compassion for Ann
Marie Roche, who died a painful, slow,
agonizing death? She was battered to death
� Rook went to sleep painlessly. Why
aren't her words recorded for posterity?
Apparently the media thinks that she, an
innocent victim, is not as important as
Rook, a cold-blooded, merciless killer.
The media's compassion for killers is a
slap in the face to the victim's memory and
to the victim's family. Kindness to the
cruel is cruelty to the kind. It's time we
stopped highlighting killers and inventing
excuses for their actions. It is not because
they were abused children, or on drugs, or
poor, or unemployed. They (the killers)
had a situation, knew full well the possible
consequences, and made their decisions ac-
cordingly.
The rest of us pay the consequences for
our decisions. What's wrong with the ex-
pecting murderers to do the same? Tell a
person he's not responsible for his actions
and he'll act accordingly.
A study by Dr. Stephen K. Layson, a
professor at UNC-Greensboro, was
published in the July 1985 issue of the
Southern Economic Journal. In his study
he concluded that each execution deters,
on the average, 18 murders that would
have occured without it. There are current-
ly over 1,000 inmates sentenced to die in
the United States. That multiplies out to
18,000 people; more than all the ECU
students and faculty put together. Eighteen
thousand innocent victims who wouldn't
have to die at the hands of killers like John
Rook, if only we carried out the sentences
already passed.
To me, the evidence is clear. These con-
victed killers have shown that they have lit-
tle or no regard for human life, so we
should not feel guilty about taking theirs.
Let's quit the delays and give them the
punishment they deserve. It's time we
started focusing our attention and compas-
sion on the victims, and do all we can to
reduce the number of victims in the future.
Lance Hardin is a sophomore Business
major from Newport News, VA.
THE BRITISH AAHlrS "COHCORDE. ' CA� To RQLElbtl TEUSPAY.
THE SPECIAL CHARTER FLOW WILL CriRfi'Y 100 P�oPl� FaM
AIORTH CfJROLlA) TO LONDON
"WHAT?!1 NO BflRBECUefU!
Alcohol Abuse Leads To Violence
By TERRI ORE
�ttt Writer
What is it about college football
games that makes students want to get
wild and do destructive, obnoxious
things? Okay, to narrow it down, what
is it about East CarolinaN.C. State
football games that makes people
crazy? Is it the Wolfpack red that makes
us ECU students run wild, want to
destroy things, and injure innocent of-
ficers? Or could it be that there is usual-
ly one underlying element in all of these
incidents � alcohol.
Last year's game, from which we
emerged victorious, was a night of col-
lege students at their wildest. There
were approximately 58,400 people in at-
tendance with only one arrest. This is
surprising since before the game even
began, there was a fight involving 10
people in the parking lot.
With all the talk about crowd
violence, I decided to look into exactly
how much damage was done at our last
two football games against N.C. State
and came up with some alarming, but
not unexpected, facts. These excerpts
from the police report are just the
highlights:
� 8:04 p.m fight on grass hill between
12 people, involved all ECU students.
� 8:15 p.m female drunk and disorder-
ly on grass hill reported.
�8:16 p.m ECU person passed out at
Section F. � 8:48 p.m another fight on
the grass hill.
� 8:55 p.m fight between ECU and
NCSU students on area behind the grass
hill.
� 10:42 p.m Glass liquor bottles being
thrown. One officer hit in the groin with
a bottle, another officer hit in head with
bottle and received mild concussion.
� 10:45 p.m ECU students pushing on
fence, throwing bottles at officers.
� 10:48 p.m person reported being
pushed to ground by intoxicated ECU
students.
� 10:51 p.m ECU student arrested for
throwing bottle at officer.
To sum up the night of Sept. 7, 1985,
there were 80 bottles of liquor con-
fiscated in the stadium before and dur-
ing the game (only a fraction of the ac-
tual number on the grounds), and of-
ficers responded to 11 fights (7 of these
involved 6 or more people). The Red
Cross treated 20 people who had been
injured, several people were found pass-
ed out, the ECU flag was stolen from
the stadium, and 6 entrance gates were
damaged.
The 1986 game in Raleigh was ap-
proached a bit differently because of the
year before. There was a new emphasis
placed on making officers visible in lots
within the field area. There was a
definite decrease in people throwing
things at officers, and all in all the
crowd behaved much better.
Still not what would be described as
acceptable, but tolerable. However,
drinking in the parking lot was still a
problem, 100 bottles of liquor were con-
fiscated. The following is a rundown of
the specific incidents from this year's
game.
Campus Forum
� 6:08 p.m alcohol violation tor peo-
ple refusing to pour out liquor.
� 6:10 p.m three bottles of liquor con-
fiscated from ECU students.
� 6:11 p.m grass fire reported.
� 7:55 p.m fight near scoreboard
(ECU territory).
� 8:28 p.m fight on grass hill (ECU).
� 9:30 p.m fight on grass hill involving
ECU students.
� 9:38 p.m two subjects refuse to pour
out liquor
All in all, our game this year was
much less violent than our game the
year before. But I have to wonder why
there were so many fights between ECU
students. Most all of the fights on the
grass hill involved ECU students
because that is visitor territory- and I am
not ashamed to admit that it embar-
rasses me, as an ECU student, to think
that we fought among ourselves in front
of another University.
We may be known as a partying
school, which does not bother me, but
when I think that all of those good "ol
boy" State students were standing back
watching us beat the crap out of each
other, I can't help but be upset with the
image that we presented.
I can halfway understand the fights
between ECU and NCSU students only
because of the rivalry between the
schools, but come on guys, if you have
to fight, at least do it with someone
other than a fellow East Carolinian.
Terri Ore is a junior English major
from Greensboro, NC.
Candidate Defends His Position
Dear Editor,
Once again I've been the victim of the
radical conservatives. Mr. Shelly
pointed out to you, in his letter on
9-23-86 that I had a moral opinion
about running for two office � well I
do.
You, the student body, do not have
fair representation in the student
government. With the exception of
Tony Jackson, SGA vice-president, the
student government is comprised largely
of radical conservatives and white
fraternity individuals.
As concerned students, you need in-
dividuals who will represent you as a
whole, not people who represent special
interest? Most of you are neither radical
conservatives nor involved in frater-
nities, you are just students trying to
make the grade. Is it fair for the minori-
ty to rule the majority?
Now about Mr. Shelley questioning
my moral character, ask him about his
actions in the election last spring and
the incident at a NCSL gathering which
caused a young lady to be afraid to par-
ticipate any longer. Now Kirk, you
should not throw rocks.
Now, the reasoning for me running
for two offices Mr. Shelley gave me
the inspiration to do so.
In closing, it's better to get the story
from the horse's mouth rather than
from it's rear-end.
Chris Tomasic,
Senior,
Education
Creationism
Dear Editor:
The following letter concerns Steve
Van Cleve's reply (9-16) to my Spec-
trum article on Creationism (8-26).
Although commendably restrained in
tone, his arguments contained many in-
accuracies.
Among the lesser offenses were No.
1. an implication state religions are a
thing of the past (ecclesiastical con-
trol by any one church, such as that
which existed at one time in Europe and
the colonies "VC), perhaps unknowing-
ly creating the impression such a threat
is an outdated concern. In fact, many
nations of the world retain state chur-
ches, and their citizens have varying
obligations to those denominations as a
result (ex. SwedenLutheran,
IranMoslem).
No. 2. There was also an inaccurate
characterization implicit in Mr. Van
Cleve's statement "Atheism is one of
the basic tenents of humanism"(VQ.
Too many view the world in over-
simplified, absolute dichotomies of
black or white, us or them, which
overlook the complexities of reality. Ac-
tually, atheism is far less common to
"humanism" than those who stand to
gain by such indictments would have us
believe.
As a wise man once said, "sensible
men are not given to denial of what they
cannot disprove, but only to doubt or
suspension of judgment Hence, many
branded as atheist are actually agnostic
� "doubters
The term "atheist" (against god)
reinforces the unfair perception that
those who have doubts in varying
degrees about religion are "anti-God
Such a characterization also does disser-
vice to many possessed of traditional
religious values within the so-called
"humanistic" movement who, because
they are not the "right kind of Chris-
tian" are assumed to be anti-God.
These points are tangential to the core
of Mr. Van Cleve's complaint, a core
which, despite his matriculation in
biology, reveals a poor grasp of evolu-
tion.
For instance, although it is not sur-
prising Mr. Van Cleve had to return to
1929 for the quotation he interpreted as
critical of evolution, it is surprising a
graduate student in biology would
write, "The situation has not changed
since the time of these statements, ex-
cept for a drastic loss of objectivity con-
cerning the subject"(VQ.
The synthesis of Mendelian genetics
with natural selection theory did not oc-
cur until after 1930 with the confrima-
tion of chromosomal inheritance. DNA
was unheard of in 1929, while such vital
extensions of theoretical evolution as
punctuated equilibrium would not be
tendered for decades.
Mr. Van Cleve's idea of stagnating
evolution may be due to a common
misconception: evolution actually has
two aspects. As Darwin put it, "I had
two distinct objects in view; firstly, to
show that species had not been separate-
ly created, and secondly, that natural
selection had been the chief agent of
change
The first aspect, that evolution has
occured, is scientific fact. The "theory
of evolution" involves the second
aspect, the "how" of evolution, and
debate over the relative importance of,
say, natural selection in relation to
genetic mutation, is continuing.
Before some readers get too heated,
there must be a further explanation of
what is meant by "scientific fact As
Stephen Jay Gould, popular writer on
biology, puts it, a fact in scientific
thought means "confirmed to such a
degree that it wold be perverse to
withhold provisional assent To be
"proved beyond a shadow of a
doubf'fVC), as Mr. Van Cleve implies
is his standard, is to impose the absolute
values of theological dogmatism on the
more speculative world of science.
In summary, the courts throughout
this land have echoed common sense by
repeatedly declaring evolution is not
religion, but science, and creationism is
not science, but religionand religion
of very narrow scope
Contrary to Mr. Cleve's assumption,
I am not as worried that the existence of
God might be acknowledged in the
public schools as I am under whose
terms it might so be. That is the threat,
and the reason the Supreme Court
wrote, in Everson v. Board of Educa-
tion, "Neither a state nor the Federal
Governmentcan pass laws which aid
one religion, aid all religions, or prefer
one religion over another Amen.
David Lewis,
Graduate Student, Art
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Artist At
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lecture Monday at 7:30 p n
Looking For tu
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B RIMY HARRINGTON
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taur" defined ir. "What's
rock 'n roll said another
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Theatre Frida) and S
11 p.m All you Malory �
and or late night PBS viewers
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Python is not a kni
r�und Table, or een a person at
all. but the name of a grouf
British comedians: Tern Gilliam,
John Cleese, Graham Campbell,
and Mike Palin.
The movie is in the zanv trad:
tinn of the comedians' television
sfnes. "Moot) Python's Flying
Gjrcus " As the story opens.
King Arthur, accompanied only
by a servant, approaches a castle.
TJiey are riding pantomime horse
(everybody rides pantomime
horses in this movie) and while he
tries to convince the guard that he
hi "King of the Britons the
gsard continually annoys him by
enquiring where Arthur got the
coconuts to make that horse
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UTIMZwHOPe,
CoVtyHs
AOUintr
THfEASTtAROI INI AN
v rXV
To Violence
� 6:08 p.m alcohol violation for peo-
ple refusing to pour out liquor.
� 6:10 p.m three bottles of liquor con-
fiscated from ECU students.
� 6.11 p.m grass fire reported.
� 7:55 p.m fight near scoreboard
CU territory).
� 8:28 p.m fight on grass hill (ECU).
� 9:30 p.m fight on grass hill involving
ECU students.
� 9 38 p.m two subjects refuse to pour
out liquor
� n a our game this year was
much less violent than our game the
year before. But I have to wonder why
there were so many fights between ECU
students. Most all of the fights on the
�ass hill involved ECU students
because that is visitor territory and I am
not ashamed to admit that it embar-
rasses me, as an ECU student, to think
�hat we fought among ourselves in front
of another University.
We may be known as a partying
school, which does not bother me, but
when 1 think that all of those good "ol'
boy" State students were standing back
watching us beat the crap out of each
other, I can't help but be upset with the
image that we presented.
I can halfway understand the Tights
between ECU and NCSU students only
because of the rivalry between the
schools, but come on guys, if you have
to fight, at least do it with someone
other than a fellow East Carolinian.
Terri Ore is a junior English major
from Greensboro, C.
s Position
tion of chromosomal inheritance. DNA
was unheard of in 1929, while such vital
extensions of theoretical evolution as
punctuated equilibrium would not be
Itendcred for decades.
Mr Van Cleve's idea of stagnating
(evolution may be due to a common
misconception: evolution actually has
two aspects. As Darwin put it, "1 had
two distinct objects in view; firstly, to
show that species had not been separate-
ly created, and secondly, that natural
selection had been the chief agent of
change
The first aspect, that evolution has
occured, is scientific fact. The "theory
of evolution" involves the second
aspect, the "how" of evolution, and
debate over the relative importance of,
say. natural selection in relation to
genetic mutation, is continuing.
Before some readers get too heated,
there must be a further explanation of
what is meant by "scientific fact As
Stephen Jay Gould, popular writer on
biology, puts it, a fact in scientific
'hought means "confirmed to such a
degree that it wold be perverse to
withhold provisional assent To be
"proved beyond a shadow of a
doubffVC), as Mr. Van Cleve implies
is his standard, is to impose the absolute
values of theological dogmatism on the
more speculative world of science.
In summary, the courts throughout
this land have echoed common sense by
repeatedly declaring evolution is not
I religion, but science, and creationism is
not science, but religionand religion
I of very narrow scope
Contrary to Mr. Cleve's assumption,
II am not as worried that the existence of
JGod might be acknowledged in the
public schools as I am under whose
terms it might so be. That is the threat,
land the reason the Supreme Court
Iwrote, in Everson v. Board of Educa-
tion, "Neither a state nor the Federal
iovernmentcan pass laws which aid
me religion, aid all religions, or prefer
ne religion over another Amen.
David Lewis,
Graduate Student, Art
Entertainment
SEPTEMBER 2?. 198
p�r7
People Is Good For Laughs
BvD.A.SWANSON
Staf u m
Comedy? Von aut comedy?
Well, with a line-up like Danny
Devito, Bette Midler, Ellen
Slater, and Judge Reinhold, in
the Michael L.auner film,
Ruthless People, you just can't
miss.
Here's a film in the classic style
of the Shakespearian comedy,
with all its twists, turns and in-
numerable sub-plots that will
entertain you to no end.
Sam Stone (Devito) is the cut-
throat fashion tycoon who is
driven to kill his over-bearing
wife, Barbara (Midler), and run
off with all of her money � and a
voluptuous woman named Carol
(Anita Morris). At the same time,
Carol is planning to blackmail
Sam with his dirty deed, and run
off with her own bimbo played
by Michael Colubier.
Enter the wholesome couple,
ihe Kesslers (Reinhold and
Slater), who's fashion ideas were
stolen by Sam Stone. They kid
nap Stone's wife to recover the
money they've been tricked out
of, only to find out that Sam
could care less if they pitch her
off the nearest twenty story
building.
That's where the hilarity
begins. In the end, honesty
remarkably wins out, and the
Kesslers are set for life after they,
with the help of Barbara, ruin
Stone and his fortune. All in all,
it's a fun little farce that will
leave you laughing and reaffirm-
ed in the strength of goodness.
The best performance, by far,
is presented by Ellen Slater. Mrs.
Kessler, the meek little fashion
designer and total innocent,
literally bubbles over with kind-
ness. You just can't help but fall
in love with her.
However, whereas she is so
true to her devotion and honesty,
Reinhold, as her husband,
displays an interesting, and
sometimes funny struggle bet-
ween his natural tendency toward
wholesomeness and his desire to
be as ruthless as Stone. Though
the role has potential to be
awkward, Reinhold pulls it off
with amazing sensitivity.
Bette Midler, as the obnoxious,
foul-mouthed, and kidnapped
wife of the decadent Stone, hands
in her usual lively performance.
The most intriguing part of her
character is the transformation
that she goes through as a
prisoner in the Kessler's base-
ment.
When she arrives, she is in a
grotesque state of obesity. Then,
as her captivity continues to be
prolonged, she takes up exercis-
ing with television aerobics pro-
grams to pass the time.When she
is fi nally freed by Mrs. Kessler,
she has lost twenty pounds. The
outrageous Miss Divine plays the
entire shift with pure authentici-
ty, becoming a thin person in
shape and in character.
The best line in the movie
comes just after Midler and
Slater (captive and captor)
become friends. Slater tells
Midler the whole sad story of
how her husband won't pay the
ransom, which has been
systematically cut from $50,000
to $10,000. Midler sobs, and
cries, "Oh my God. I've been
kidnapped bv K-Mart
This film, as do most com-
edies, has several points at which
one must exclaim, "Who in their
right mind would ever do
something like that?" Leave your'
rotor Purple and About Last Mght.
attitudes at home. This flick is
strictly for fun, so enjoy.
Hoffman's New Show To Air
The theme running through m work is rmself � I almost make
art about my husband and our animals said Karon Dokerty,
artist-in-residence in Ceramics. Doherty will discuss her work in a
lecture Monday at 7:30 p.m. in Jenkins Auditorium
-
Looking For Fun Things To
Do In Downtown Greenville
B Rl STV HARRINGTON
surrwrtm
"Rock 'n Roll Bill "Cen
iaur" defined it. "What's hot is
rock 'n roll said another .
"Women said another. Which
brings us to what's hot in Green-
ville � Rock 'n Roll and
Women.
The Attic has some heavy acts
scheduled for the weekend, star-
ting off with their Heavy Metal
Thursdav with MANNEKIN.
WZMB's knob twisters have been
giung away passes for SKIP
CASTRO's show on Fridav, but
it you haven't gotten one yet,
vjheck it out. Rounding up the
weekend will be Nantucket on
$aturda. Women will be there
every night
Corrigans will have PBS tor
cfieir featured entertainment on
Thursday, for one night only, but
Women will be there every night.
"Big Al" Covett and his
brothers will rock the New Deli
e)n Friday night. Yes, it's the
OTHERMOTHERS, straight
from Greensboro. Saturdav,
LIGHTNIN' WELLS and
ROC KIN' HORSE, ccd 1 sa
more, but Women will also be
there both nights.
A damn good acoustic show
Thursday night at the Tree House
� BRUCE FRYE for one night
only, so get your friends together
and sing along. Rumor has it that
Women will be there also.
T.Ws will not have Frank
Sinatra, however, CHAIRMEN
OF THE BOARD will be there
Saturdav night. A lot of Women
will be there also.
If all this is too much foi you,
then the Student Union films
committee is sponsoring two
movies at Hendrix theatre at
Mendenhall. Thursda through
Sunday, C ompromising Posi-
tions will screen at 8:00 p.m. each
night. On Friday and Saturday
nights, Monty Python and the
Holy Grail will be the late movie
at 1 1 :00 p.m. Besides a
"KlI I ER RABBIT Women
will be there.
Remember that all dates and
acts are subject to change, so call
the clubs in advance, and support
live entertainment!
NEW YORK (UPI) Yippie co-
founder Abbie Hoffman has
taken his brand of activism to the
airwaves as the host of a weekly
FM-radio talk show. Radio Free
ISA.
"It's time to bring this point of
view out in the open says Hoff-
man of his Prairie Homeless
C ompanion, as the show is
nicknamed, after Garrison
Keillor's popular public radio
show Hoffman says the time is
right because he sees a new avant
garde emerging, more activism
on campus, and he wants "to
create a place where people can
discuss, argue the issues and con-
gregate
Hoffman's open-ended format
pi's celebrity guests such as Kurt
Vonnegut Jr. Hunter Thompson,
Norman Mailer and Paul Simon
against himself, each other, and a
live audience in a symposium
style that recalls the chaotic
media gatherings of the 1960s.
The shows are broadcast live
over the freewheeling listener-
supported station WBAI-FM
from what Hoffman calls "the
Roy Conn Memorial Lounge"
downstairs in the Village Gate. A
mixture of live music, Hossman's
comedy-laced hosting and a
freewheeling interchange between
audience and panelists lends the
show a party atmosphere.
Hoffman's brand of lefty ac-
tivism has always involved a
liberal dose of humor, dating
back to 1967 when he first made
headlines by throwing money on
the floor of the New York stock
exchange in what he conceived as
a symbolic clearing of the money
lenders from the temple.
Hoffman, along with Jerrry
Rubin and Paul Krassner, found-
ed the Youth International Partv
Search For The 'Holy Grail' Will
Be Continued At Hendrix Theatre
Bv M1CAH HARRIS
Ml Vkrtler
Monty Python and the Holy
Grail will be showing at Hendrix
Theatre Friday and Saturday at
11 p.m. All you Malory scholars
and or late night PBS viewers
know of course that Monty
Python is not a knight of the
round table, or even a person at
all, but the name of a group of
British comedians: Terry Gilliam,
John Cleese, Graham Campbell,
and Mike Palin.

The movie is in the any tradi-
tion of the comedians' television
siries, "Monty Python's Flying
Qjrcus As the story opens,
Kjjng Arthur, accompanied only
by a servant, approaches a castle.
TJiey are riding pantomime norse
(everybody rides pantomime
horses in this movie) and while he
tries to convince the guard that he
is. "King of the Britons the
guard continually annoys him by
enquiring where Arthur got the
coconuts to make that horse-
galloping effect.
h"he mood is established, and
from now on things go from
crazy to, well, to crazier. Even-
tually, Arthur gathers his knights
about him and begins the Grail
quest. All the familiar faces of
the Of Sing-Around-The-Round-
Table Gang are here sort of:
Sir Beldevere, Sir Lancelot the
Brave, Sir Galahad the Pure, and
Sir Robin the not-so-brave as Sir,
Lancelot who wet himself at the
Battle of Boden Hill.
After an unsuccessful attempt
at storming a castle whose in
habitants catapult livestock at
them, the knights divide to search
for the Grail separately (in the
best Malory tradition, natch).
They finally reunite to seek the
sage advice of that mage of the
magicks arcane Tim. Tim leads
them to the lair of a horrible
creature, a white bunny rabbit
"with a mean streak a mile wide"
who decapitates one of Arthur's
knights faster 'n you can say
"Farmer McGregor's garden
The path to the Holy Grail is
laced with other such dangers
cultimating in a cacophony of ab-
surdity by the film's climax.
Some of the gags are reminis-
cent of those of animation direc-
tor Tex Avery, such as the
aforementioned catapulting of a
cow. However, these Python bits
are even more stunning to behold
than Avery's because they are
performed in live action. Another
such Avery-style gag occurs when
a knight admiring Camelot from
afar is told by a page that "it's
just a model
But the best gag is when the
knights are being pursued by a
many-eyed dragon, one of
Python member Terry Gilliams
fascinating cut-out animations
featured throughout the film. As
the dragon goes in for the kill, the
narrator informs us that the
animator suffers a heart attack.
Cut to the artist falling from his
animation stand to the floor
and the dragon disappears. Talk
about your deus ex machina
One hesitates to peg Monty
Python's brand of humor as
"subtle but this movie my take
a repeated viewing to catch every
joke and gag. At the least, it will
convince you that there will never
be another Camelot, and make
you wonder how there ever was
one to begin with.
in the 1960s, the protest group
better known as the Yippies.
He also was a member of the
Chicago Seven, a group of anti-
Vietnam War activists charged
with organizing violent
demonstrations at the
Democratic National Convention
in 1968.
"I'm against nuclear
power, so I'm hardly sup-
porting the Soviet Union.
I'm very much against 'ists'
and 'isms
� Abbie Hoffman
In 1973 Hoffman was arrested
on drug charges and went
underground until 1980, when he
turned himself in. Since then he's
been in demand as a lecturer.
Now Hoffman says people
send him film scripts based on his
life story. "I've gotten six so
far he says. "They take the
politics out and leave the humor
and adventure in.
"If I want to cut out the
politics and be Howard Stern I
can do that, but if I want to keep
my politics honest I've got to try
and raise issues
Radio Free USA has wasted no
time in raising issues.
During the first show Hoffman
gave tips on how to beat drug
tests and collected urine
specimens to send to the White
House.
"We had someone dressed as a
nurse in the bathrooms asking
people for samples Hoffman
laughs. "We're saying that the
hysteria surrounding drugs in the
80s replaces the hysteria surroun-
ding communism in the 60s. The
loyalty oath has been replaced by
the urine sample. We don't think
Americans should be judged by
the contents of a dixie cup
As final preparations to go on
the air are being made. Hoffman
tells the studio audience, "You
have to realize there are times
when we're on the air that it's not
so interesting for you because
ju're used to watching MTV all
the time, so you've got to talk to
each other
As the band does its sound
check Hoffman, wearing a Mets
cap over his greying and receding
hair, corkscrews in his seat and
waves his arms in the air, middle
finger outstretched, in time to the
music.
The announcer introduces
Hoffman as "That rabble rous-
ing teddy bear of the '60s, that
subterranean beaver of the '70s,
and America's most riveting
radio host of the '80s
"You know where I come
from Hoffman tells the au-
dience. "I don't
Hoffman is only half kidding
there. "People are always asking
me what I am now. 'Are you a
radical?' If I say yes it means I'm
a has-been, 1 haven't changed my
underwear. If 1 say no it means
I'm a boring yuppie. There's a lot
of things when you get middle
age that you can't say yes or no to
because life is a contradiction
Times have changed and so
have Hoffman's methods, if not
his goals. During the question-
and-answer period of one show
Hoffman explodes at the au-
dience, saying, "Everyone wants
to show they can bum you out
more than the last person. I speak
at American Legion halls,
Kiwanis clubs, that's why I like
the environmental movement,
because you can get beyond the
proverbial Left.
"1 don't even see this as a lift-
wing show says Hoffman.
"I'm against nuclear power, so
I'm hardly supporting the Soviet
Union. I'm very much against
'isls' and 'isms I'm for gnus-
roots power and democratic prin-
ciples. I probably would be a
dissident in any system
Hoffman and executive pro-
ducer Steve Robinson envision
Radio Free USA as a nationally
syndicated show by next year.
Their target is 100 stations.
"We have to make it on
underwriters and sponsors says
Hoffman, "not loans from
friends. We already have 20 sta-
tions (to begin broadcasting in
January) and 3 or 4 local spon-
sors lined up, including Ben
Jerry's ice cream and LA. Week
ly. If we don't get enough spon-
sors we'll all be meeting and talk-
ing in Washington Square Park
because this show wil cease to ex-
ist
From The Not So fight
Pat Rags On The Freshmen
By PAT MOLLOY
EMtflaiaaM fMm
Ola senoritas y senors. And
welcome once again to Pat
Molloy's corner of confusion.
Folks, I'm here today not to
speak of Edwin Meese � he
speaks enough for everybody.
I'm not here to talk about
Jerry Falwell or Pat Robertson �
both close personal friends who
have popped more than a few
tops with me.
I'm not even here to talk about
Chancellor Howell � can he still
talk?
No, ladies and gentlemen; and
any other living organism with a
respiratory system, I want to talk
about (dare I say it?)
FRESHMEN.
There, it's out in the open,
that that word. I apologize to
those whom 1 have upset or of-
fended, but I truly feel the need
to discuss these cretins.
We see them every fall, in-
vading classrooms, taking up
space at the football games
(though God knows nowadays
they're welcome to it), and wear-
ing those grotesque plaid shorts
that hang to their knees.
The girls are plagued by a
desire to carry a bookpack and a
purse. I imagine that's in case
they run out of rouge and No.2
pencils at the same time.
Freshmen males are a disgrace
to the entire school. You can
usually find these studs hanging
out in front of the Student Store
wearing some form of head gear
(CAT hats are a perinnial
favorite) and a Kappa Sigma
jersey.
Also characterizing these
clowns are the dreaded "droop-
ing drawers This phenomenon
occurs when one or more males
considers it cool to let his boxer
shorts hang past his outer
garments. Very stylish, indeed.
I 'd love to see what you dudes do
with a jock strap.
Freshmen in general bring a
whole new thrill to the mundanity
of walking to class.
I especially like walking behind
the freshmen girls who wear
those extremely white leotards
under a God-awful pair of
flourescent pink shorts. You
know, the girls who look like they
spent too much time on the set of
"Solid Gold yep, them's the
ones.
1 like to walk up to them and
start humming a tune by Andy
Gibb � the chicks don't even
realize it, but they start bopping
around like they're having a
seizure � no such luck, I guess.
Simply walking past frehmen
dudes can be a blast. Have you
ever really watched their eyes?
These cats live in a void. It's as if
they know they're scum, and are
just waiting for you to say
something to them. "Down on
your knees, slime, and polish my
shoes Oh my, life is fun.
How about when they ask you
directions? Yeah, dude, like I'm
really concerned that your appen-
dix is bursting. "The infirmary is
just next to Kroger � try to pick
up some brew while you're there,
okay?" Get bent, pal. (Thanks
Jeff).
Okay, okay folks, maybe even
I am being just a bit too caustic.
Afterall, there really are some
cool freshmen out there.
Angie, any babe who can kill a
fifth of Wild Turkey, do the jit-
terbug, call me a wimp after I've
downed five straight shots, and
still not spill any on her dress, has
my admiration. You have my ad-
miration, for sure; you also have
my sympathies. Please don't do
that again.
Come to think of it folks, I was
a cool freshmen; if 1 do say so.
It's simple.
All you have to do is wear real-
ly dark sunglasses (to cover up
those pretty morning-after eyes);
drink lots of liquids � need I
elaborate here? And then, if all
that doesn't work, you must im-
mediately go to the Elbo Room
and drink the warm PBR on tap
for a dime a pop � then you'll be
really cool.
Yeah, yeah, that's it; that's the
ticket.
m





8 1 Hh EAST t AROLIN1AN SEPTEMBER 23. 1986

Long-Running Play Opens New Season
f anttmm n�tNN Bi
The only musical ever to win a
Pulitzer Prize for drama, and
Broadway's longest running play,
A Chorus Line, opens the East
Carolina Playhouse season on
October 15 with additional per-
formances October 16, 17, 18,
and 20.
A Chorus Line opened in 1975
and swept the theatre's
prestigious Antoinette Perry
(TONY) awards. Currently in its
eleventh year on Broadway, A
Chorus Line has become woven
into the permanent fabric of our
culture long after most
Americans have forgotten the
Watergate scandal.
The recent film A Chorus Line
has spurred new audiences to see
live performances of the musical
in order to experience, in person,
"the pure raw energy of the
actor-dancers upholding the
tradition and discipline of the
theatre" that cannot be
duplicated on screen.
From November 12 to 15, the
season's second offering, Master
Haroldand the boys, will be
presented. The drama is the six-
teenth play of South Africa's
most celebrated playwright,
Athol Fugard. Mr. Fugard is
renowned for his poetic examina-
tion of such harsh subjects as
poverty, repression and anguish.
Blood-Knot, Sizwe Ban si is
Dead, and A Lesson From Aloes
are among his best-known works.
Master Haroldand the boys
focusses on a white teenage boy,
Hally (Harold of the title), and
two of his family's servants, Sam
and Willie. On a rainy afternoon
filled with warmth and fun the
loving bond between Hally and
Sam flourishes, but their rela-
tionship is shattered when reality
intrudes upon their world.
Following the world premiere
of the drama, Frank Rich of The
New York Times reported: "At
the end of Athol Fugard's new
play, two black men fox trot to
old-time jukebox music, gliding
about a deserted South African
restaurant, Astaire-Rogers style.
The audience, meanwhile, is in
emotional ruins. While some
theater goers struggle to stand
and cheer, others cringe in their
seats, their heads in their hands,
so devastated that they can't even
look at the stage
A Chorus Line, Oct. 15, 16, 17,
18, and 20, 1986.
Master Haroldand the Boys,
Nov. 12, 13, 14, and 15, 1986.
All performances begin pro-
mptly at 8:15 p.m.
Single tickets may be purchas-
ed for each show at the cost of $9
for A Chorus Line, and $5 for all
other productions. Students may
purchase single tickets for A
Chorus Line for $6 and all other
productions for $4; obtainable
with ECU I.D.
Announcements
ISA
The 'ea' or� S'uoe Assix at.on ,n
"�ip a -nanaatory rneet,ng f(y 4i members
and rers �ic a-e nt�.re5tea t0 a.scuis "��
�oio"g emfrgpit, lojn ?r,p �P the mown
'a ns tor fan break v.s I o 'nf ;a'ee' piann
ng center aa otne- eoucat.ona. rKrM
' oa acfi � f, P'me aerd me mee- r.
at � 30 on Sa Sec' g a- "e ("te-nat.ona
Noose 30 E �"� s-
MARAUDERS
An on campus adventure group invites an
"terest students to alend its first meeting
on Oct 1 at 5 in room jj MendenhaH
ECANS
There will be a W -g or- ThurS sept 2i
a'a 00 cm 'or"r ioi A -embers ano pro
see .e iemoe-s ae en. ocagec to atter-c
nope o see �cv there
ENROLLMENT IN
SOPHOMORE NURSING
Ah students nc pian t declare lurvng as
a ma or aa sr 'c rc in The sophomore
nursing courses n spr.ng semester 1987
snouia pick up a- ntent to enroll form in the
tvurj ng s. - rtfl 'oom 157 anc 'eturn by
OO '5 Th 5 jpj.es part.cularl, to
'�-esnmen Howeve- rh 5 'Orm mys" also be
submttec Dv s'uoen's r.c s' to re enroll
n the nursing piKi'ii
NORTHERN
TELECOM
Students interested m cooping at Nor
them Telecom Research Triangle Park
should contact Cooperative Education as
soon as possible Positions for CSCi INDT
DSCI. MKTG. and Technical Writing maiors
with a 2 �� GPA For more into, contact
Cooperatve Educaton 313 Rawi
PHI ETA SIGMA
There will be a meeting on Sept 30 a' 6 00
In MendenhaH room 212 All members art
eipecteo to attend It unable to attend please
can Pam at 752 2570
ECU AMBASSADORS There will be a general meetng members, new ana old on vec Oct 1 at J pm .n the Multipurpose Room Menoennaiifor 15 of
ECU ICE HOCKEY CLUB
Tne-e , De a mee' ng Monday Sep' ?9
at 4 pm roe a ose ntereVea in par
-a- ng rh s ,ea- �Ve will be a scuss ng
turtle' prac .es ana a e an tor games and
ce t.me Dues w II also be a mam top.c it
you are nteres'ec piease come to the
meet ng or contact George Sunaenano at
7 52 005 or M �e W 'e a' 752 2051 Don t
torge' pra e Meor a Gyfn 10 pm
TOktiGr
LSS SOCIETY
Remember two things 1) collect things to
se.i in ,8ro sale on Oct llfh. and 2) sketch
oeas for a I sh.rt Mf Roth of these things
need to be turned m by Oct 3rd! Will ah
"Ounce where soon Thank you!
WESLEY FOUNDATION
Dance Friday Sept 26 from I 00 until
m.onight at the Methodist Student Center
Happy Daysarest.il here! Come ixn us tor a
dance with music provided bya top notch
professional D J Bill Sabistan
SENIORS
The t me s now to reglSTe. t ,cx. "a.f-
no seen tr-e 1. ,e' s t ,ou "j.e not eara pro
tessors an.ncx.nce ' n class, or t you -avr
not seer ar es - tne Ees' Caro. n ar-
3'esae note that you must p-ck up a reg.stra
'on packet and return it tn M eligible for on
:ampus ntery.ews or t0 be eligible to have
your resumes sent out to employers who call
Even f employers do not come on campus to
�K'uHO'iou' "SiOi ' s w se'o estabish
a F e M ee Reteren.es NOW
CHEMISTRY DEPT.
The East Carolina University Chemistry
Department has opened a department iearn
ng center in Flanagan 215 The center Is
open Monday through Thursday from 2 5
pm The purpose of the center is to provide
help m chemistry outside class to students
who are enrolled m beginning chemistry
courses such as CHEM 1150 1160. 1120 am
0150
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
$205 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at
additional cost. Pregnancy Test, Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For
further information, call 832-0535 (toll free
number: 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5
r m. v.cekda- General anesthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
end Ion
Benetton
638B Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, NC
355-7473
Stotv Hours
Mon-Sat 10-6
Scholarships fory
medical and senior
pre-med students
Medical school costs are rising every day.
They're climbing faster than many students can
handle without the right kind of financial help.
If you're a medical student, the Air Force may
have the best answer for you. We offer an excel-
lent scholarship program that can ease the finan-
cial strain of medical or osteopathy school and
allow you to concentrate on your studies. Par-
ticipation is based on competitive selection. Let
the Air Force make an investment in your profes-
sional future. For more information contact
TSgt. McCullen 919-
856-4130
Vfc
SW
&
mom�,
uaaata
MAY NURSING GRADUATES
There will be a meeting on Fn OC at
noon in room 209 210 in the nursing btdg tor
all those graduating in Mac W� will be
nom.natmg class ottue Please plan to at
tend
PRIME TIME
Pr.me Time sponsored by Campus
Crusade tor Christ We get together at 7 �
p m m Brester 102 B Three reasons to
have fun fellowship, and good Bible
teaching See you there
INDTSOPH STUDENTS
Are you -nter esteo n ga.n.ng exper ppi n
manut acturing with a F or tune 500 company
earning 11100 per month and beng eligible
for free tuition untfi you graduate? it this
sounds good to you and you have a 2 7 GPA
contact Cooperative Educator 313 Raw' to
learn more
SURVIVORSOF THE
LOUSY MOVIE LOCK-IN
If you have not picked up yoi r Lousy
Movie Lock in T Sh.rts. please come by the
Student Union Room 234 in MendenhaH Stu
dent Center Be sure to bring your receipt 01
ECU ID card in order to receive your t shirt
COUNSELING CENTER
Are you planning on taking the GRE.
LSAT MAT MEDCAT or other standardil
ed tests? Th,j workshop will cover basic m
formation about these tests, test taking
strategy ano sample items Sept 2�. 4 5
P m . 312 Wright Bidg HOW TO DO WELL
ON THE GRE I If you are planning on taking
the Graduate Record Exam for admission to
grad school, this workshop can h�ip you
prepare Types of items, test taking
strategy scores and sample .terns will be
discussed Sept 30. 4-5 p m , 312 Wright
Bidg
Humor Colum-
nists Needed
Call 757-6366
Ask For Pat
POLITICAL SCIENCE
STUDENT ASSOCIATION
There win be a meeting of the Political
Science Student Association on Tues Sep!
30 at 7 00 pm m room BC 104 An students
are invited to attend The guest speaker a
be Mr Greg R.deout Mr Rideout was a
former political aide of U S Rep Walter B
Jones He is currenfi, active in the cam
paign of U S Senate candidate Terr, San
ford
BKA
The Financial Management Association
will meet Tues. Sept 30 at 3 00 m room 221
MendenhaH Guest speaker. Mr Hugh
Thomson from IDS American Express Of
ficers will be elected at this meet.ng AH
business students art welcome
BACCHUS
BACCHUS iBoost.ng Auoho Con
sciousness Concerning the Health of univer
sity Students), formertahe Campus AicoNrw
and Drug Program -s having ,Ts first
meeting of the new school tear this Thu'S
the 25tn in rbom 242 MendenhaH at 6 00 pn
All interested persons please attend lOin a
group to help your fellow students Bring a
tr,eno
RHOEPSILON
HONOR FRATERNITY
There will be a meeting Tnuri . Sept 25"
at 4 00 in room 205 Raw if ,ou are in
teresteo m this Honor Reai Estate Fratern,
ty please attend or contact Jon Aaier a'
758 5337
WOMEN WOULD KILL
RATHER THAN MISS AN
ArrWMEHT WITH OR. F1ICKSTYIN

1 v! Hiw
1 1 iJ.X I I I � S I'M
UUi
r
R� A PARAMOUNT PICTUHt-0
Show dates
Sept. 25, 26, 27, 28
8:00 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
WANTED:
Staff Illustator
The East Carolinian is
looking for an all purpose
illustrator. Art majors
and those with experience
are preferred. A portfolio
is required. Call 757-6366
or stop by the
Publications Building.
consolidated
Theatres
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LOS ANGE1 I PI)
j Owners and users of a not one
toxic aste dump thai �
taminated a local water s I
should reimburse federa.
state agencies for more than V:
million spent to clean up th
a court-appointed overseer j
The federal and state gover
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The Envin nmei
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M W YORK
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courses b age II - I
classes mu1 include
about contracer
succeed bn redu.ir .
of teenage pregtancie
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Frank L. Mott, a
L'niversit author
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key to his proposa
children be taught ab
birth control b-
sexual active
Unless tha-
unlikely thai e�
courses will have i
teenage sexual
dent pregnancies M
"Many adult; w
whole issue to go awa
won he said "The rr
Symposi
Continued from page 1
Since the mtroductio:
China Exchange Program,
number of ECU faculty, member!
have taken advantag
port unity to pur
interests abroad. Dr 1 ouis Eck;
tein, School of Business, recentl
returned from Tiannn. where rvj
presented three formal lecture
and nartK;ina:ec
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id. Call 757-6366
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 25.19J6 S
LOS ANGELES (UP1) -
Owners and users of a notorious
toxic waste dump that con-
taminated a local water supply
should reimburse federal and
state agencies for more than $30
million spent to clean up the site,
a court-appointed overseer ruled.
The federal and state govern-
ments sued in 1983 to recover
cleanup costs from the owners of
the Stringfellow Acid Pits and 30
companies that dumped 34
million gallons of toxic wastes at
the 20-acre site between 1956 and
its closure in 1972.
The Environmental Protection
Agency labeled Stringfellow,
about 50 miles east of Los
Angeles, one of the most
dangerous hazardous waste sites
in the country and allocated
money from the $1.6 billion
Superfund to halt the
underground spread of toxic
chemicals from the dump and to
clean up the area.
Leakage from the dump con-
taminated underground water
wells supplying residents of the
small community of Glen Avon,
one mile from the dump.
Retired Superior Court Judge
Harry Peetris, the court-
appointed special master, agreed
Tuesday with California and the
EPA that most of the defendants
named in the suit were liable for
more than $30 million in Super-
fund monies and more than
$400,000 in state funds spent at
Stringfellow since 1981.
Peetris issued summary
judgments of liability against the
owners and 12 firms that dumped
wastes at the site, including
General Electric Co Northrop
Corp. and Rockwell Interna-
tional Corp.
If his ruling stands, a trial
would be needed to decide the
amount of damages against each
defendant.
The judgments are not legally
binding and either side can lodge
objections with U.S. District
Judge James Ideman, who ap-
pointed Peetris to monitor the
mammoth lawsuit and .issue ad-
visory rulings.
A hearing to discuss possible
objections was scheduled Oct. 7.
The defendants claim that
California should pay for the
cleanup since the state licensed
and monitored the dump while it
was open.
Research Suggests Early Sex Ed. Classes
NEW YORK (UPI) - Children
should begin taking sex education
courses by age 11 or 12, and the
classes must include lessons
about contraception if they are to
succeed in reducing the number
of teenage pregiancies.a resear-
cher says.
Frank L. Mott, an Ohio State
University authority on teenage
sexual behavior, said Tuesday the
key to his proposals is that
children be taught about sex and
birth control before they become
sexual active.
"Unless that happens, it is
unlikely that sex education
courses will have an irrnact on
teenage sexual behavior and stu-
dent pregnancies Mott said.
"Many adults would like the
whole issue to go away but it
won't he said. "The reality is
that some young people are going
to have sex
Mott and Wilbam Marsiglio,
an Oberlin College sociologist,
are the authors of a new study,
"The Impact of Sex Education
on Sexual Activity, Contracep-
tive Use and Premarital Pregnan-
cy Among American Teenagers
in the journal "Family Planning
Perspectives
Mott, a senior staffer at the
OSU Center for Human
Resource Research, said the
report found that of those
teenagers who begin having sex
by age 18, no more than half had
a sex education course and no
more than half had a sex educa-
tion course and no more than
two-fifths had instruction in birth
control.
"I think the earlier basic sex in-
formation is given to youth the
better. And it can be done he
said. "It is possible to give all the
information without encouraging
them to become sexually active
Asked the ideal age, Mott said,
"11 or 12 It is obvious if you wait
until the eleventh grade, it is too
late for a lot of young people
Mott said it also is crucial the
courses include information a
where to get contraceptives,
noting that more than half of the
courses he examined described
contraceptives but did not say
where they could be obtained.
"When it comes to contracep-
tives, people just cover their eyes
and ears and make believe that
everything will go away. That's
schizophrenic he said.
Symposium Held
Continued from page 1
Since the introduction of the
China Exchange Program, a
number of ECU faculty members
have taken advantage of the op-
portunity to pursue professional
interests abroad. Dr. Louis Ecks-
tein, School of Business, recently
returned from Tianjin, where he
presented three formal lectures,
and participated in informal
discussions with both students
and faculty.
"Their culture is rapidly
changing said Eckstein, and
"is highly influenced by Western
civilization Eckstein discovered
the Chinese people to be "very
friendly and receptive to
Americans, appreciating the
chance to exchange knowledge
and ideas
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The East Carolinian is
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afternoons. Typing speed
of 40 wpm and faster
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THE EAST CAROl IN IAN
SEPTEMBER 25, 1986
Mexican Leftist Ordered To Leave U.S.
BLOOM COUNTY
Fl PASO, TX (CPfc) - An im-
migration judge has ordered
University of New Mexico pro-
fessor Margaret Randall to leave
the U.S. by December 1, 1986,
because, Randall's lawyers say,
she is a leftist.
Officially, the court ruled Ran-
dall is a Mexican citizen being
deported for violating a U.S. law
prohibiting certain leftist
foreigners from living here.
Her lawyers, who are appeal-
ing the decision, say Randall will
stay in this country while her case
winds its way through higher
courts.
Randall. 50, born a United
States citizen, has been under fire
from the U.S. Immigration and
Naturalization Service (INS)
since she returned to the U.S. as a
"permanent resident alien" in
1984, 23 years after she moved to
Latin America to live with her
then-husband and renounced her
citizenship.
The writer, editor, historian
and poet's only crime, her
lawyers say "was to write
positively about world com-
munism
"The immigration judge went
to great lengths to say the only
reason Margaret couldn't stay
was because of her writings
David Cole, Randall's attorney,
claims.
"We will contend (in the ap-
peals process) that for the
government to take an alien liv-
ing in this country (and) say,
'We're going to deport you
because we think you advocate
world communism is a violation
of the First Amendment right to
free speech Cole says.
Cole estimates the appeals pro-
cess could take two to four years.
In the meantime, Congress
may intervene to keep Randall in
the country.
Two separate bills � one in the
House and one in the Senate �
seek to change the 1952
McCarran-Walter Immigration
Act, which the administration is
using to try to deport Randall.
The McCarran-Walter Act lets
the government exclude
foreigners who have been af-
filiated with communist or anar
chist groups.
The INS, which did not res-
pond to requests for information
about the case, charges Randall is
a communist who, while living in
Latin America, harshly criticized
U.S. foreign policy as imperialist.
"No, Margaret Randall is not
a communist says Michael
Maggio, an attorney for the
Center for Constitutional Rights
who is working with Cole on the
appeal.
Instead, "she's the American
Solzhenitsyn he says, referring
to the Nobel Prize-winning Rus-
sian novelist whose writings
angered Soviet leaders, who even-
tually deported him.
"If Margaret's case had hap-
pened in the Soviet Union, we
would have called it a shocking
scandal, a moral outrage and an
international issue of human
rights he says.
"By giving up her American
citizenship in 1967, she subjected
herself to the laws of a non-
citizen Rep. Barney Frank,
D-Mass sponsor of the propos-
ed House amendment to the Mc-
Carran act, says.
"My bill would make her
political beliefs irrelevant he
says. "I don't believe this coun
try should exclude people because
of their beliefs unless those
beliefs cause one to behave in
damaging ways
Frank expects his bill to reach
the House floor next year about
"right in the middle of the ap-
peal Cole estimates Randall
will be judged by whatever law is
on the books at the time.
"When that bill passes,
Margaret will definitely be allow-
ed to stay Cole says
Randall's deportation hearings
hav e been the only ones held sole-
ly on the charge of political
beliefs, Cole and Maggio say,
although two other professors in
recent years underwent a similar
process.
South African poet Dennis
Brutus and Latin American
literature professor Angel Rame,
both represented by Maggio, fac-
ed immigration.
Brutus, now a professor at
Northwestern, eventuallv receiv-
ed political asylum because, a
court ruled, he would face certain
prosecution upon his return lo
South Africa.
Rame, who taught at the
I Iniversit) of Maryland, died in a
plane crash before his case was
resolved, Maggio adds
Both Cole and Maggio feel the
impact on Randall's career will
be negligible at best. Their main
concern. Cole says, is that the
"freedom of though: and the
freedom ol speech in aadenna"
be maintained.
Watches To Face New Innovations
WASHINGTON (UPI) � A
Japanese jeweler and an
American message center have
joined forces to produce
wristwatches that let the wearers
know when they are wanted on
the telephone.
Maybe there are demands for
watches that page you, but that
seems to me only a minor step
forward. There is more need at
this time, I wouid think, tor
pages that watch you.
The next major step may be a
telephonic answering machine
you can strap on your wrist.
Suppose, for instance, you had
a toothache and wanted to reach
your dentist, who was out on the
golf course.
Under the old-fashioned way
or doing things, you would call
his office and someone would ac-
tivate the beeper on his belt. Par-
ticularly if he is about to putt.
A beeping wristwatch would
only be a modest improvement.
He still would miss the putt. How
much better off you both would
be if your ring were answered by
a friendly voice that said:
"Hi! This is young Dr.
Gillespie. I can't talk on the
phone right now but if. at the
tone, you'll leave your name and
number and slate the nature of
your complaint, I'll get "right
back to you
Sure enough, true to his word,
the dentist stops at the 19th hole
and listens to his messages. Then
he dials your number and learns
vou underwent an emergency
tooth extraction just five minutes
ago.
But the important thing is: his
afternoon off was uninterrupted
by beltline beeping. That leaves
him free to make real estate deals
later.
I can see where a combination
wristwatch and answering
machine could become popular
with other professions as well �
an ideal gift for your favorite
doctor, marriage counselor,
divorce lawyer, tax accountant or
politician.
"Hi! This is Dr. Fixitt of the
office of Dwight, David and
Eisenhower. I can't answer the
telephone just now. Take two
aspirins and call me in the morn-
ing
Dr. Fixitt is, of course, a mar-
riage counselor. Would a physi-
cian leave a recorded message like
that? He would be more inclined
to answer thusly:
Hi! This is Dr. Feelgood. I
can't talk on the phone right now
A

Save your breath.
Plant a tree to make
more oxygen.
and I don't care what your ail-
ment is. Just take two aspirins
and call me in the morning
Your lawyer, on the other
hand, could be expected to speak
to his wrist as follows:
"Hi! This is Dr. Splitem, your
friendly divorce lawver. I can't
talk on the phone right now, so
take two aspirins and call me in
the morning
However, a tax accountant
might leave the following
message:
"Hi! This is Dr. Loophole. I
can't talk on the phone just now
but if, at the tone, vou'll leave
your name and the number of
your tax shelter, I'll examine
your file as soon as I get back to
the office
Or, a politician could take ad-
vantage of a wristwatch recorder
in this way:
"Hi! This is Senator Klaghorn,
your friendly candidate for presi-
dent. I can't talk on the phone
right now, but if, at the tone,
you'll leave your name and ad-
dress, I'll see that you get a cam-
paign solicitation form letter and
are placed on my mailing list
Get the
word out
in the
Announcement
in The Easl Carolinian
1
QUESTION 3.
WHAT EXACTLY IS
AT&T'S "REACH OUT AMERICA"?
a) A long distance calling plan that lets you make an
hour's worth of calls to any other state in America for
just $10.15 a month.
b) A 90-minute special starring "Up With People
c) A great deal, because the second hour costs even
less.
d) If you'd read the chapter on Manifest Destiny, you'd
know.
e) Too good to pass up, because it lets you save 15 off
AT&T's already discounted evening rates.
If you can guess the answers to this quiz, vou could save on vour
long distance phone bill, with AT&T s "Reach Out America long
distance calling plan. K you live off canTpuTfTets you make a
full hours worth of caTToliycerstaTe in America-
including Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Ria,and the U.S.
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All you have to do is caTftveekends,
11pm Friday until 5pm Sunday, and
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Sunday through Friday. The money you
could save will be easy to get used to.
To find more about 'Reach Out America
or to order the service, cantoH frelT .
today at 1800 CALL ATT, Jf Jr TZ
that is 1800 225-5288. X L
�1986 AT&T
AT&T
The right choice.
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SEPTEMBER 23, 1916
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IHt tAST C MUM INI AN
Sports
SF-IM i MH1 H 25 IVNft
K 10
Pirates
B RICK McCORMAC
&
SCOTT COOPER
Sparb talari
ECU will travel to State Col-
lege, Pa this weekend to face
the nation's seventh-ranked Nit-
tany Lions in Beaver Stadium.
The Pirates, who battled Penn
State on even terms before losing
P-10 last year, will be seeking to
break a 12-game losing streak.
The Lions, 2-0 and are
celebrating their 100th year of in-
:ercollegiate football, are coming
off a 26-14 wm over Boston Col-
lege last week. Penn State coach
Joe Paterno expects the teams on
the schedule to play better than a
year ago.
"One of the things 1 said in
preseason was that I thought the
schedule would play tougher
because a lot of people we had
beaten last year, we didn't exactlv
devastate Paterno said at his
weekly press conference.
"We were very, very fortunate
to win some of those games. I
think East Carolina feels this
way Paterno continued.
"They've got a lousy 12-game
losing streak and they know thev
played us reallv well last year and
I'm sure they feel they have a
good chance to beat us
Despite last week's 45-0 loss to
Auburn, Paterno says that his
players will not be looking past
the Pirates due to the type of
game they played last year.
"I don't think there's any
question that they (our players)
remember how tough East
Carolina played us he con-
tinued. "Thev were quick and
res came at us. What we have to
realize is that East Carolina is
coming up here with the idea that
they can beat us. They did come
close last vear
The Nittany I ions, who are a
senior-dominated team, return
nine starters on offense and eight
on defense. Penn State is led by
senior tailback and Heisman can-
didate D.J. Doier, who led the
Lions in rushing with 723 yards
last year. The fullback tandem of
Steve Smith and Tim Manoa add-
ed 801 vards on the ground in
'S5.
John Schaffer will once again
handle the quarterbacking duties
as backup Matt Kniter may also
see some time. Four starters from
last year's offensive line return to
anchor the potent PSU ground
attack.
ECL coach Art Baker respects
We played one of our
better games ever (last
year) and I hope we
can do it again. I
certainly beleive we
can do it again
� Art Baker
Nationally
yards by quarterback Ron Jones.
Defensively, ECU also had some
impressive numbers. ECU held
the Nittanv Lions to the fewest
number of first downs (16),
fewest offensive plays (59) and
the fewest yards of total offense
(324) of any one of the Buc's op-
ponents.
The Pirates' three fumbles at
Penn State last year, which tied
their most in a single game, is un-
doubtly what led to the ECU
defeat. And on the other hand,
it's been a trademark oi the Lions
to take advantage of their opposi-
tion's mistakes. A case in point is
in last week's win over Boston
T
TH'FuTuRELC0K9r3ttR.H
0Vfs&
ows that
good as
the Nittany I ions and k
Paterno's squad is as
anyone's in the nation.
"Thev hae an excellent foot-
ball team. The have all of those
awesome players � the have
some great athletes Baker said,
"and thev're one of the bettei
coached teams too
"We played one oi our bettei
football games ever (last year)
and 1 hope we can do it again.
Baker added. "1 certainly believe
we can do it again
In fact, the Pirate offense had
its most productive day oi '85 at
Penn State, rolling up 385 vards
of total offense � including 189
Optimistic Outlook?
Lions
oilege Penn State's defense
forced seven 1 agle turnovers
(two tumbles and five intercep
Molls)
"We try to make the other
team paranoid about turning the
ball over said senior corner
back Duff) Cobbs. "We try I
break on the ball on passes and
strip the ball on running plays
It's something we work on in
practice and we take a great deal
ol pride in it
The Nittanv Lion defense is
spearheaded b consensus All-
America linebacker Shaneon-
lan, who led PSU with 91 tack
.n '85. Conlan is one oi the
Lions' best ever, according I
Paterno and Baker concui
"Shane Conlan is one ol the
tines! football p 1 a v e r
America. Just watching him play.
is worth the price of adrm
alone Baker said.
Only three defensive -� irtei
graduated from last year PSU
squad, with hero Michael Zor-
dich being the major i
Paterno.
A positive note for the P -
will be the return of senio- f
ive guard Rich Autry, wh.
i pair oi games with a eg
jury. Also, offensive guaro '
Thomas has returned to pra
week, but will be oue
tionable tor 'his week game
However, junior Ron Jones i
sophomore Tim Wolter wil fc tl
be out for an indefinite lei gtl
time due to arthroscopic Knee
surgery performed yesterday.
On Penn State's front, n
tackle Aoatoa Polamalu
injured knee and nose tacl
Mike Russo is sufferii . m a
sprained neck. The tw :ed
I ibtl .1 for Saturday's con-
test, according to a ; icl
rerv ��
Sports Fact
Thur.Sept. 25. 15
Fifty-nine-year-old Sa
Paige activated for one game
and pitches three shutout inn-
ing- for the Kansas City
tl letics against the Bo-
Red Sox. During the -tint Paige
yields onlv one base hit, a dou-
ble to C arl Yastremski.
Photo By - MAR STABTARI
Riddick Tops Surf Tryouts
By DAVID COLBY
-t� �. lo Tbr R�jlarntnc
The ECU surf team held it's
annual team try-outs last Sun-
day at Cape Hatteras. The
trials were held at Rodanthe
Pier, which is about halfway
between Nags Head and the
Hatteras lighthouse.
Twenty-six surfers from
ECU sacrificed a Saturday
night downtown to make the
three-hour drive to the Outer
Banks early Sunday morning.
The waves at sunrise on the
day of the contest left a lot to
be desired. Conditions improv-
ed during the morning
however, as well formed two-
to three-foot faces started roll-
ing in. Clear skies and
85-degree weather added to the
overall success of the contest.
Sophomore Blair Riddick,
from Virginia Beach, took top
honors of the day by using
good wave selection all the way
thru the finals. David Dees,
from Atlantic Beach, followed
closely with a strong second-
place finish by taking some of
the largest waves of the day.
Johnny Glee, also from
Virginia Beach, placed third in
the event with his ever consis-
tent style and form, kob
Hearst from Jacksonville
finished fourth by utilizing a
good backside attack on the
small waves.
The surf team graduated
many surfers from a year ago,
leaving several of slots to be
filled. Furthermore, this year
expects to be a very competitive
season for the Pirates as they
are surfing against more
schools this fall than they have
ever surfed against in a whole
year before.
The first contest will be in
Ocean City, Md in two weeks.
The ECU team does not know
w hat kind of competition to ex-
pect as they will be facing two
new opponents � the Universi-
ty of Maryland and Salisbury
State College. The Pirates are
excited about the trip since
many of them have never surf-
ed north of Virginia Beach.
Surfing contests are made up
of several heats with four to six
surfers. Judges score the top-
three waves for each surfer in a
timed heat. Top placers in each
heat advance into quaters,
semis, and a final. In in-
terscholastic competition,
points are awarded to each
team according to placings in
the heats. One of the biggest
disadvantages is that the waves
don't always cooperate with
the contest dates.
The surf team operates out
of the ECU surfing club which
is open to all ECU students.
Guys and girls are both
w elcome to join the club and go
on trips with the team. It is still
possible for students to surf on
the team even if they missed
last weekend's try-outs. To
find out more about the surfing
club or team attend the meeting
this Thursday night at 8:00 in
room B-104 in Joyner Library.
ECU-PSU Battle
(Left) Pirate coach Art Baker hopes to be in a happier mood after the
Pirates play Penn State this weekend. (Right) Former Pirate QB Ron
Jones (8) pulls away from a defender in last year's game as Anthon
Simpson (31) makes a block.
Soccer Team
Hosts NCAA
Runner-Up
The ECU soccer team will
host the American University
Eagles Sat Sept. 2" at 2:00
p.m. American was the NCAA
Division- runner-up in 1985
and was ranked number-two in
the 1986 preseason poll.
American sports a 2-4 record
and travels to Howard Univer-
sity todav. The Pirates are
4-3-1 and played Atlantic
Christian College yesterday.
The match will take place on
the ECU soccer field adjacent
to Minges Coliseum and there
no admission charge.
Team Trial Finishes
Blair Riddick
David Dees
Johnny Glee
Rob Hearst
Todd Parker
Mike Temple
Surf Team
Schedule
Fall Contest
Oct. 1112 � Maryland,
Delaware St Salisbury St
George Mason � Ocean City,
Maryland
Vov. 25-26 � UNC-W, UNC-
CH, Coastal Carolina Comm.
Coll. � Hatteras
Xov. 29-30 � Univ. of Florida,
F.I.T. � Melbourne, Fla.
Rugby Club Splits With UNC-G
By PHILLIP RITCHEY
Sprrial lo Tto K�jt CaraiMu
The ECU Rugby club opened
their season with a split with last
year's state champs UNC-G. The
Ruggers drop the "A" game with
a 12-3 loss.
UNC-G struck first with a field
goal to put them ahead 3-0, but it
didn't take long for the Ruggers
to strike back with their own.
Mike Brown split the uprights
with a 30-meter kick to tie the
match, which ended the scoring
for the first half. The second half
remained a hard-hitting battle ex-
cept for a couple of loose plays in
which the state champs took ad-
vantage of. The Spartans scored
a pair of trys in the second half to
put them up 12-3.
The match secretary David
Sgroi was quoted as saying, "I
was very impressed with the ef-
fort our Ruggers put into the
match. However we are a young
team, losing five-key players
from last year due to
graduation
The Ruggers expect to improve
every week considering all the
young talent coming out.
In the second game, the Rug-
gers "B" side took UNC-G to the
ground playing a hard hitting
match, winning 16-3. Mike
Scruggs opened the scoring with
his first try, breaking the game
open right from the start. The
young Ruggers didn't have in-
dividuals, just good team effort
to win their first match of the
season.
The Ruggers travel to Durham
this Saturday to take on Duke
iaJtoLvsTi r 4 �
7
The ECU rugby club will be in action this wek�nri .h� w-
tr.vel to nrh.m to h.ttu nL. m wekend � they
travel to Durham to battle Duke.
will
Sheid
RALEIGH (UPI)
Carolina State football coa
Dick Sheridan says his Wolf pa ,
is tired of needing second
comebacks to dodge defea
The Wolfpack has outscored
its three opponents so far 81-14
the second half to durr :
Pittsburgh and, last week, rally
past Wake Forest in the .
final minute. But Sheridc
that N.C. State could have ti
ble producing those sort
second-half fireworks aga
No. 16 Maryland
"Their defense is verj
Earnhal
DAYTONA BE AC H
For the seventh time in the I
. eight races, challengers Dr.
' Waltnp and Tim Richn
finished in front of N -
Winston Cup points ieader
Earnhardt, but Ea-
maintained a solid lead
National Champions-
Earnhardt, who finishec
in Sunday's Goody's
Winston Cup stock ;a e at
Martinsville (Va.) Speed
� continues to lead the stan 1
with 3,630 points
Richmond, who finishec
is second with 3,494 and
who finished four
3,471.
The Goody's 500 was the
race of the 29-een- Winston C'i
season. Earnhardt could elm
Devils Se
DURHAM (UPI) � Duke w
looking to brean Virginia
this weekend when the Cav
meet on the Blue Devils
the two teams' Atlantic (
Conference opener,
opener.
Virginia has beaten Duke in
their last three clashes � 37-14,
38-10, and 38-30 � but
Saturday night the Blue D-
will enter the game fresh from a
win while the Cavaliers have
tered two back-to-back los e
season.
"This is a very critical game
for us. We're tired ol
beating us three years in a r
said Duke head coach S:eve
Sloan in a Monday news con
ference.
"1 don't think they are better
than we are. but I remembe- last
year that they blocked us the besl
of anybody Sloan said. "Our
biggest concern about Virginia
that they are faster than we are.
They are a dangerous team offen-
sively "
The Blue Devils are 2-1 tl
season following a 22 roul I
Ohio University in Duke's hi
opener last Saturday nigh:
Virginia, 1-2, lost to Nav �
last Saturday Georgia T
defeated the Cavaliers 28-14.
Sloan said he'll be counting on
Duke's star freshman this year to
boost the team's speed. T J Ed-
How
If you're finding your bJ
tighter than usual, now s a fiJ
join The Spa. Students can j
on a monthly basis for only
month. That's$25for I
any strings attached.
Tht :pa offers 52 aen
uts every week. exerciM n
weights, steam room. sauna
pool. Plus, there are plenty

i
I





'

���-
I HE FASTC AROI INI AN
Sports
SFPTT.MBl k 2 ISW6 Par 10
Pirates
By RICK McCORMAC
&
SCOTT COOPER
sport. Edltori
ECU will travel to State Col-
lege, Pa this weekend to face
the nation's seventh-ranked Nit-
tany Lions in Beaver Stadium.
The Pirates, who battled Penn
State on even terms before losing
P-10 last year, will be seeking to
break a 12-game losing streak.
The Lions, 2-0 and are
celebrating their 100th year of in-
tercollegiate football, are coming
off a 26-14 win over Boston Col-
lege last week. Penn State coach
Joe Paterno expects the teams on
the schedule to play better than a
year ago.
"One of the things I said in
preseason was that I thought the
schedule would play tougher
because a lot of people we had
beaten last year, we didn't exactly
devastate Paterno said at his
weekly press conference.
"We were very, very fortunate
to win some of those games. I
think East Carolina feels this
way Paterno continued.
"They've got a lousy 12-game
losing streak and they know they
played us really well last year and
I'm sure they feel they have a
good chance to beat us
Despite last week's 45-0 loss to
Auburn, Paterno says that his
players will not be looking past
the Pirates due to the type of
game they played last year.
"I don't think there's any
question that they (our players)
remember how tough East
Carolina played us he con-
tinued. "They were quick and
they came at us. What we have to
realize is that East Carolina is
coming up here with the idea that
they can beat us. They did come
close last vear
The Nittany Lions, who are a
senior-dominated team, return
nine starters on offense and eight
on defense. Penn State is led by
senior tailback and Heisman can-
didate D.J. Dozier, who led the
Lions in rushing with 723 yards
last year. The fullback tandem of
Steve Smith and Tim Manoa add-
ed 801 vards on the ground in
'85.
John Schaffer will once again
handle the quarterbacking duties
as backup Matt Knitzer may also
see some time. Four starters from
last year's offensive line return to
anchor the potent PSU ground
attack.
ECU coach Art Baker respects
We played one of our
better games ever Oast
year) and I hope we
can do it again. I
certainly beleive we
can do it again. M
� Art Baker
the Nittany Lions and knows that
Paterno's squad is as good as
anyone's in the nation.
"They have an excellent foot-
ball team. They have all of those
awesome players � they have
some great athletes Baker said,
"and thev're one of the better
coached teams too.
"We played one o our better
football games ever (last year)
and 1 hope we can do it again.
Baker added. "I certainly believe
we can do it again
In fact, the Pirate offense had
its most productive day of '85 at
Penn State, rolling up 385 yards
of total offense � including 189

Nationally
yards by quarterback Ron Jones.
Defensively, ECU also had some
impressive numbers. ECU held
the Nittany Lions to the fewest
number of first downs (16),
fewest offensive plays (59) and
the fewest yards of total offense
(324) of any one of the Buc's op-
ponents.
The Pirates' three fumbles at
Penn State last year, which tied
their most in a single game, is un-
doubtly what led to the ECU
defeat. And on the other hand,
it's been a trademark of the Lions
to take advantage of their opposi-
tion's mistakes. A case in point is
in last week's win over Boston
T
TH'FoTuRE LOOK? (31E.HH
Optimistic Outlook?
Photo By � MAR STARTARI
Riddick Tops Surf Tryouts
By DAVID COLBY
Special to The Fail CarotMaa
The ECU surf team held it's
annual team try-outs last Sun-
day at Cape Hatteras. The
trials were held at Rodanthe
Pier, which is about halfway
between Nags Head and the
Hatteras lighthouse.
Twenty-six surfers from
ECU sacrificed a Saturday
night downtown to make the
three-hour drive to the Outer
Banks early Sunday morning.
The waves at sunrise on the
day of the contest left a lot to
be desired. Conditions improv-
ed during the morning
however, as well formed two-
to three-foot faces started roll-
ing in. Clear skies and
85-degree weather added to the
overall success of the contest.
Sophomore Blair Riddick,
from Virginia Beach, took top
honors of the day by using
good wave selection all the way
thru the Finals. David Dees,
from Atlantic Beach, followed
closely with a strong second-
place Finish by taking some of
the largest waves of the day.
Johnny Glee, also from
Virginia Beach, placed third in
the event with his ever consis-
tent style and form. Rob
Hearst from Jacksonville
finished fourth by utilizing a
good backside attack on the
small waves.
The surf team graduated
many surfers from a year ago,
leaving several of slots to be
filled. Furthermore, this year
expects to be a very competitive
season for the Pirates as they
are surfing against more
schools this fall than they have
ever surfed against in a whole
year before.
The first contest will be in
Ocean City, Md in two weeks.
The ECU team does not know
what kind of competition to ex-
pect as they will be facing two
new opponents � the Universi-
ty of Maryland and Salisbury
State College. The Pirates are
excited about the trip since
many of them have never surf-
ed north of Virginia Beach.
Surfing contests are made up
of several heats with four to six
surfers. Judges score the top-
three waves for each surfer in a
timed heat. Top placers in each
heat advance into quaters,
semis, and a final. In in-
terscholastic competition,
points are awarded to each
team according to placings in
the heats. One of the biggest
disadvantages is that the waves
don't always cooperate with
the contest dates.
The surf team operates out
of the ECU surfing club which
is open to all ECU students.
Guys and girls are both
w elcome to join the club and go
on trips with the team. It is still
possible for students to surf on
the team even if they missed
last weekend's try-outs. To
find out more about the surfing
club or team attend the meeting
this Thursday night at 8:00 in
room B-104 in Joyner Library.
ECU-PSU Battle
(Left) Pirate coach Art Baker hopes to be in a happier mood after the
Pirates play Penn State this weekend. (Right) Former Pirate QB Ron
Jones (8) pulls away from a defender in last year's game as Anthony
Simpson (31) makes a block.
Lions
College. Penn State's defense
forced seven Eagle turnovers
(two fumbles and five intercep-
tions).
"We try to make the other
team paranoid about turning the
ball over said senior corner-
back Duffy Cobbs. "We trv to
break on the ball on passes and
strip the ball on running plays
It's something we work on in
practice and we take a great deal
of pride in it
The Nittany Lion defense is
spearheaded bv consensus All-
America linebacker Shane Con-
Ian, who led PSU with 91 tackles
in '85. Conlan is one of the
Lions' best ever, according to
Paterno and Baker concurs.
"Shane Conlan is one of the
finest football players in
America. Just watching him plav.
is worth the price of admission
alone Baker said.
Only three defensive starters
graduated from last year's PSU
squad, with hero Michael Zor-
dich being the major loss for
Paterno.
A positive note for the Pirates
will be the return of senior offen-
sive guard Rich Autry, who miss-
ed a pair of games with a leg in-
jury. Also, offensive guard Greg
Thomas has returned to practice
this week, but will be ques-
tionable for this week's game
However, junior Ron Jones and
sophomore Tim Wolter will both
be out for an indefinite length of
time due to arthroscopic knee
surgery performed yesterdav.
On Penn State's front, nose
tackle Aoatoa Polamalu has an
injured knee and nose tackle
Mike Russo is suffering from a
sprained neck. The two are listed
as doubtful for Saturdays con-
test, according to a coaches
report.
Sports Fact
Thur. Sept. 25, 15
Fifty-nine-year-old Satchel
Paige is activated for one game
and pitches three shutout inn-
ings for the Kansas City
Athletics against the Boston
Red Sox. During the stint Paige
yields only one base hit, a dou-
ble to Carl Yastremski.
Soccer Team
Hosts NCAA
Runner-Up
The ECU soccer team will
host the American University
Eagles Sat Sept. 2 at 2:00
p.m. American was the NCAA
Division-1 runner-up in 1985
and was ranked number-two in
the 1986 preseason poll.
American sports a 2-4 record
and travels to Howard Univer-
sity today. The Pirates are
4-3-1 and played Atlantic
Christian College yesterdav.
The match will take place on
the ECU soccer field adjacent
to Minges Coliseum and there
admission
Team Trial Finishes
1. Blair Riddick
2. David Dees
3. Johnny Glee
4. Rob Hearst
5. Todd Parker
6. Mike Temple
Surf Team
Schedule
Fall Contest
Oct. 11-12 � Maryland,
Delaware St Salisbury St
George Mason � Ocean City,
Maryland
Vov. 25-26 � UNC-W, UNC-
CH, Coastal Carolina Comm.
Coll. � Hatteras
Nov. 29-30 � Univ. of Florida,
F.I.T. � Melbourne, Fla.
Rugby Club Splits With UNC-G
By PHILLIP RITCHEY
Sp�dal to TV Eut (iralMu
The ECU Rugby club opened
their season with a split with last
year's state champs UNC-G. The
Ruggers drop the "A" game with
a 12-3 loss.
UNC-G struck first with a field
goal to put them ahead 3-0, but it
didn't take long for the Ruggers
to strike back with their own.
Mike Brown split the uprights
with a 30-meter kick to tie the
match, which ended the scoring
for the first half. The second half
remained a hard-hitting battle ex-
cept for a couple of loose plays in
which the state champs took ad-
vantage of. The Spartans scored
a pair of trys in the second half to
put them up 12-3.
The match secretary David
Sgroi was quoted as saying, "I
was very impressed with the ef-
fort our Ruggers put into the
match. However we are a young
team, losing five-key players
from last year due to
graduation
The Ruggers expect to improve
every week considering all the
young talent coming out.
In the second game, the Rug-
gers "B" side took UNC-G to the
ground playing a hard hitting
match, winning 16-3. Mike
Scruggs opened the scoring with
his first try, breaking the game
open right from the start. The
young Ruggers didn't have in-
dividuals, just good team effort
to win their first match of the
season.
The Ruggers travel to Durham
this Saturday to take on Duke.

The ECU rugb club will be in action this weekend when tH .n
travel to Durham to battle Duke. � tbey wUI
heridt
RALEIGH (UP1) - North
Carolina State football coach
Dick Sheridan says his Wolfpack
is tired of needing second-half
comebacks to dodge defeats
The Wolfpack has outscored
its three opponents so far 81-14 in
the second half to dump ECU, tie
Pittsburgh and, last week, rally
past Wake Forest in the game's
final minute. But Sheridan said
that N.C. State could have trou-
ble producing those sort of
second-half fireworks against
No. 16 Maryland.
"Their defense is very stingy
Earnhal
DAYTONA BEACH fUPI) -
For the seventh time in the first-
� eight races, challengers Da
I Waltnp and Tim Richmond
finished in front of NASCAR
Winston Cup points leader Dale
Earnhardt, but Earnhardt
maintained a solid lead for
National Championship.
Earnhardt, who finished I2tfc
in Sunday's Goody's 500
Winston Cup stock car race at
Martinsville (VaSpceddv
! continues to lead the standings
with 3,630 points.
Richmond, who finished 10th.
is second with 3,494 and Wa.
who finished fourth, is third
3,471.
The Goody's 500 was the 24
race of the 29-event Winston I
season. Earnhardt could d
Devils Se
DURHAM (UPI) - Duke will be
looking to break Virginia's trend
this weekend when the Cavaliers
meet on the Blue Devils' turf in
the two teams' Atlantic Coast
Conference opener,
opener.
Virginia has beaten Duke in
their last three clashes � 37-14,
38-10, and 38-30 � but this
Saturday night the Blue Devils
will enter the game fresh from a
win while the Cavaliers have suf-
fered two back-to-back losses this
season.
"This is a very criticaJ game
for us. We're tired of them
beating us three years in a row'
said Duke head coach Steve
Sloan in a Monday news con-
ference.
"I don't think they are better
than we are, but I remember last
year that they blocked us the best
of anybody Sloan said. "Our
biggest concern about Virginia is
that they are faster than we are.
They are a dangerous team offen-
sively
The Blue Devils are 2-1 this
season following a 22-1 roul
Ohio University in Duke's home
opener last Saturday night.
Virginia. 1-2, lost to Navy and
last Saturday Georgia Tech
defeated the Cavaliers 28-14.
Sloan said he'll be counting on
Duke's star freshman this year to
boost the team's speed. T.J. Ed-
-N i C&
'
tfow
At'
If you're finding your b
tighter than usual, now s a nj
join The Spa. Students can iJ
on a monthly basis for only
month. That's $25 for 30-daJ
any strings attached.
The Spa offers 52 aem
outs every week, exercise m
weights, steam room. sauna
pool. Plus, there are plenty
j





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 23. 19J6
11
Lions

Penn State's defense
seven agle turnovers
bles and five intercep-
make the other
� aboul hi mug the
sa d senioi corner-
� obbs "W e trj to
or passes and
g plays.
k on in
- a ;i eai Jeal
lefense is
census All-
( on-
91 ackles
: the
ic� ling to
ne of the
� avers in
him play.
admiss
� c starters
-ear's PSU
V1 chad Zor-
loss for
e Pirates
� offen-
a ho miss-
a leg in-
lard Greg
' practice
be ques-
ek's game.
3 � Jones and
er will both
te length of
scopic knee
terday.
v - front, nose
a I imalu has an
and nose tackle
from a
I he ' a i are listed
S irda 's con-
.i caches
i.
i
Sports Fact
Thur. Sept. 25. 1965
ne-ear-old Satchel
activated for one game
id pttche- three shutout inn-
the Kansas City
thletics against the Boston
� - : S � During the stint Paige
only one base hit, a dou-
v arl Yastremski.
lorn
Soccer Team
Hosts NCAA
Runner-Up
L � team will
- .an University
� 2" at 2:00
was the NCAA
runner-up in 1985
rid wa inked number-two in
198( preseason poll.
-ports a 24 record
Howard Univer-
The Pirates are
p tyed Atlantic
liege yesterday.
will take place on
�cei field adjacent
Mingesoliseum and there
th UNC-G
the start. The
u Ruggers didn't have in-
als, just good team effort
their first match of the
rhe Ruggers travel to Durham
i Saturday to take on Duke.
15
ifi
k 4, , 4

in action this weekenc when they will
�e.
RALEIGH (UPI) North
Carolina State football coach
Dick Sheridan says his Wolfpack
is tired of needing second-half
comebacks to dodge defeats.
The Wolfpack has outscored
its three opponents so far 81-14 in
the second half to dump ECU, tie
Pittsburgh and, last week, rally
past Wake Forest in the game's
final minute. But Sheridan said
that N.C. State could have trou-
ble producing those sort of
second-half fireworks against
No. 16 Maryland.
"Their defense is very stingy
Wolfpack
Of Comebacks
and their offense is the sort that
keeps the ball away from you for
a very long time Sheridan said.
"They've got the kind of team
that is very tough for anyone to
catch from behind
North Carolina State's defense
was scored upon in the final
period for the first time this year
when it gave up two fourth-
quarter touchdowns in
Saturday's 42-38 defeat of Wake
Forest. But Sheridan remained
pleased with his team's efforts.
"Our defense was great in
shutting out East Carolina and
Pitt in the second half Sheridan
said to reporters gathered for his
weekly press conference. "With
Wake Forest, you saw two ex-
cellent offenses that were ex-
ecuting very well
North Carolina State and
Wake Forest exchanged the lead
Saturday five times in the fourth
quarter, the last time when
Wolfpack quarterback Erik
Kramer tosses a 15-yard
touchdown pass to split end Dan-
ny Peebles. The finale thrilled
spectators and gave N.C. State a
share of the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference lead at 1-0.
But Sheridan said he would
prefer a different type of thrill.
"Anyone who saw the game, ex-
cept a coach, would think it was
very exciting he said. "My idea
of exciting is when you're ahead
42-0 and all you have to worry
about is making sure that
everyone who dressed out gets to
Play
Sheridan, now off to a 2-0-1
start in his first year at N.C.
State, said he had gotten a
bellyfull of exciting finishes last
season. That's when he watched
Maintains
Georgia Southern use a last
minute score to down his Furman
squad in the NCAA Division
I-AA Finals.
"That was very exciting, but I
didn't enjoy it very much
Sheridan said.
Sheridan said this was the week
his team needed more than ever
to play error-free football. He
noted Maryland has a 21-1 record
against ACC opponents in the
four years Bobby Ross had
coached the Terrapins and
credited their three-straight
league titles to consistency of ef-
forts.
"That team has dominated the
ACC for three years. That's a
remarkable achievement for any
football program, no matter
what conference Sheridan said.
"To have a chance against a team
like that, we need to play consis-
tent like they do and totally
eliminate all the mistakes we've
been making in the first half.
"I don't know how we're go-
ing to do it, but we have to play
two second halves of football in
one game and put them together
against Maryland he said.
DAYTONA BEACH (UPI) �
For the seventh time in the first-
eight races, challengers Darrell
Walt rip and Tim Richmond
finished in front of NASCAR
Winston Cup points leader Dale
Earnhardt, but Earnhardt still
maintained a solid lead for the
National Championship.
Earnhardt, who finished 12th
in Sunday's Goody's 500
Winston Cup stock car race at
Martinsville (Va.) Speedway,
continues to lead the standings
with 3,630 points.
Richmond, who finished 10th,
is second with 3,494 and Waltrip,
who finished fourth, is third with
3,471.
The Goody's 500 was the 24th
ace o the 29-event Winston Cup
season Earnhardt could clinch
his second NASCAR Winston
Cup Championship by finishing
fourth or better in each of the re-
maining events; regardless of
what either Richmond or Waltrip
do.
Earnhardt, however, has
finished in the top-four in only
one of the last five races second
to Richmond at Richmond (Va.)
Fairgrounds Raceway Sept. 7.
Bobby Allison is fourth in the
Winston Cup standings with
3,212 points, followed by Bill
Elliott's, 3.163; Ricky Rudd,
3,148; Goody's 500 winner Rusty
Wallace, 3,088; Geoff Bodine,
3,047; Bobby Hillin, 2,940; and
Kyle Petty, 2,894.
Earnhardt also leads the
Winston Cup circuit in money
winnings with $966,100. He
would become the third driver in
motorsports history to surpass $1
million in winnings in a single
season by winning Sunday's Hol-
ly Farms 400 race at North
Wilkesboro (NC) Speedway.
The first two men to reach the
$1 million plateau were Elliott
and Waltrip last season.
Elliott, who stands a good
chance of also surpassing $1
million this season, is second in
winnings with $806,880; followed
by Waltrip ($729,890); Richmond
($652,410); Bodine ($587,735);
Rudd ($480,185); Harry Gant
($437,605); Terry Labonte
($435,965); Allison ($392,640);
and Wallace ($372,760).
Alan Kulwicki of Greenfield,
Wisconsin leads the Champion
Spark Plug Rookie of the Year
standings with 197 rookie points
to the 185 of second place Mike
Waltrip, brother of the three time
Winston Cup Champion.
Pole qualifying is scheduled
for Friday and Saturday at North
Wilkesboro, the only track on the
schedule using a two-day average
qualifying system to determine
the front four rows of the starting
field. The Holly Farms 400 is set
to begin at 1 p.m. EDT Sunday.
Hug an
East Carolinian
employee . . .
WE NEED IT
Bucs Host Indians
Devils Seek Change
DURHAM (UPI) � Duke will be
looking to break Virginia's trend
� his weekend when the Cavaliers
meet on the Blue Devils' turf in
the two teams' Atlantic Coast
Conference opener,
opener.
Virginia has beaten Duke in
their last three clashes � 37-14,
38-10. and 38-30 � but this
Saturday night the Blue Devils
will enter rhe game fresh from a
win while the Cavaliers have suf-
fered two back-to-back losses this
season.
"This is a very critical game
for us. We're tired of them
beating us three years in a row
said Duke head coach Steve
Sloan in a Monday news con-
ference.
"I don't think they are better
than we are, but I remember last
year that they blocked us the best
of anybody Sloan said. "Our
biggest concern about Virginia is
that they are faster than we are.
They are a dangerous team of fen-
Mvely
Trie Blue Devils are 2-1 this
season following a 22-7 rout of
Ohio University in Duke's home
opener last Saturday night.
Virginia, 1-2, lost to Navy and
last Saturday Georgia Tech
defeated the Cavaliers 28-14.
Sloan said he'll be counting on
Duke's star freshman this year to
boost the team's speed. T.J.Ed-
wards on his first college carry
sprinted 64 yards for Duke's
third touchdown against Ohio.
"Freshman running back T.J.
Edwards will see more playing
time against Virginia Sloan
said. "We hope he can pump
some life into our running game.
HeN very fast and has very good
balance. He's probably our
fastest back and he has a nice air
of toughness about him
Edwards moves up to 2nd str-
ing i Iback behind Duke's
leading rusher, senior Julius
Granth. i, who has rushed 46
times ft a net of 1 yards in
three gai s.
Lookin back at the Ohio
game, Slon notes "We just have
a lot of things we still need to im-
prove on. Our kicking game
against Ohio was less than ade-
quate
Doug Peterson, Duke's
freshman kicker, missed an extra
point in the second quarter
against Ohio, ending a personal
streak of 97 accurate conver-
sions.
"Our running game still has a
long way to go Sloan added.
"We're working hard to im-
prove, but our running backs
have to break more tackles, and
we're working very diligently in
practice with our inexperienced
offensive line
The ECU Lady Pirate
volleyball team opened the
season last weekend, splitting two
matches.
In the season opener, ECU
defeated Campbell college three
games to none. The scores were:
15-4, 15-2 and 15-10.
The Lady Pirates dropped their
other game of the weekend to
Atlantic Christian three games to
two. The game scores were:
ATTIC
SEPT
SEPT
THUR
FOUR IN
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$1.00 all ECU students
wcoupon
W piRD
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If you're finding your bathing suit
tighter than usual, now's a fitting time to
join The Spa. Students can join The Spa
on a monthly basis for only $25 per
month. That's $25 for 30-days without
any strings attached.
The Spa offers 52 aerobics work-
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weights, steam room, sauna and whirl-
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So, if your body is flunking the
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Improving your grades at the beach
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(ECU score first) 15-12, 10-15,
15-7, 13-15, 7-15.
The next match for the Lady-
Pirates will be on Sat. Sept. 27,
when ECU will play host to the
CAA favorite William & Mary
Indians. Game time is 10:00 a.m.
in Minges Coliseum. Admission
is free.
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EDITORS
WANTED
The East Carolinian is
now taking applications
for Sports Editor and
Assistant Sports Editor to
begin work in the Spring
Semester. Writing
samples are a must.
Experience is preferred.
Call 757-6366 or stop by
the Publications Building.
NEED MONEY?
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Monday Night FOOtball: Quarter Draft Melon
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TOOSty Tuesday: Toasted Almonds $2.25
Wednesday: Margarita $1.75, Pitcher $6.75
Thirsty Thursday: Drink and Drown � Pitchers $2.75,
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Fried Friday: Get Fried Early at our new Attitude
Adjustment hour at 4:30; end the night upside down! Free hors
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Saturday: House Drink � Tequila Blues
109 E. 5th St.
752-4926
n





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 25. 1986
SUWANEE, Ga (UPI) -
Atlanta Falcons coach Dan Hen-
ning finds himself in an unac-
customed position.
After two straight 4-12 seasons
during which one of his biggest
battles was to get his beleaguered
troops believing in themselves,
Henning suddenly finds himself
battling against over confidence.
The Falcons, off to a 3-0 start
for only the second time in their
21-year history after upsetting
Dallas Sunday, 37-35, next visit
the Tampa Bay Bucs, a team
which the past few years has been
struggling even more than Atlan-
ta.
"Beating Dallas in Dallas is a
great accomplishment, but it is
something we must put behind
us said Henning. "Tampa Bay
(1-2) is also coming off a con-
fidence building win (24-20 at
Detroit).
"There was little to choose bet-
ween our two teams in the
Henning Unaccustomed To Success
preseason game (which the
Falcons won with a last moment
field goal) and I expect this
week's game will be as in-
teresting said Henning. "They
have made some changes since
opening week, and that makes
preparation more difficult.
"Being 3-0 says we are capable
of getting into a donnybrook
with a team of high quality and
coming out on top said Henn-
ing. "It doesn't mean that we can
do it every day
The Falcons young quarter-
back, David Archer, says he and
his teammates realize that they
might have trouble getting ready
to play "after winning such a big
game. But I'm sure if it looks like
we haven't got our minds on the
Bucs, there'll be some people in
the lockerroom who will redirect
our attention
Archer, one of the lowest-rated
passers in the NFL last season, is
off to a pretty good start � com-
pleting 55 percent of his passes
for 636 yards and five
touchdowns, with only one in-
terception.
Archer also has proven himself
to be one of the better running
quarterbacks in the league,
rushing 118 yards on 15 keepers
for a 7.9 average.
"We're at the third plateau
said Archer. "Dallas was an early
test to see if we were good enough
to play a team that is going to be
in the playoffs. We played them
to a standoff on both sides of the
football.
"It's neat that we won, but
now we're ready to move on.
Now, we've got to prove we're
good enough to be in the
playoffs. You've got to get ready
every week or someone will rise
up and get you
When the Falcons returned to
"That was a moment to
enjoy said Henning. "When
we came back from Dallas last
year (after a 24-10 loss that put
them at 1-7), only one fan was
waiting at the airport.
"We are continuing to grow as
a football team and each week
presents a different challenge
said Henning. "Sunday, we
played an established team with
great tradition, and we were able
to win. It was a great win because
not many teams go to Dallas and
come away with a victory. While
we have room for improvement
in execution, we can not ask for
more effort. There were many
times we could have become
discouraged, but no one ever
gave up
The Falcons, trailing 35-27,
scored 10 points in the closing
minutes, the last three on a Mick
Floyd Dixon.
But the Cowboys had one last
gasp, Danny White throwing to
Tony Hill on a play that went 63
yards before Bobby Butler
knocked Hill out of bounds at the
Atlanta nine after time had ex-
pired.
"I told the team last week
before the game that it was not
going to be the end of the world if
we lost or if we won because it is
a long season said Henning.
"But, I must admit, comparing
last year's 0-6 start to being 3-0,1
like this better
Classifieds
Atlanta Sunday night, a crowd of Luckhurst field goal with just �
more than 1,000 met them at the seconds remaining following a
airport- 63-yard pass from Archer to
WANTED:
Staff Illustrator
The East Carolinian is looking for an all
purpose illustrator. Art majors and those with
experience are preferred. A portfolio is
required. Call 757-6366 or stop by the
Publications Building.
PERSONAL
CONGRATULATIONS: To the new
Phi Kappa Tau pledges. Be
prepared to blow it our with our little
sisters tonight.
PI KAPPA PHI PLEDGES: The
Brothers of Pi Kappa Phi would like
to congratulate you on becoming
pledges. You guys are gonna do
great! We would also like to thank
Tracy Newman for her help durino
rush!
ALPHA SIGMA PHI: Would like to
congratulate our fall pledge class:
Martin Harrell, Chris Mathews,
Bradley Cates, Paul Martin, Gary
Hoffman, Brian Bartram, Walter
Perkins, John Carter, Donald God
win, Greg Vaocek, David Core,
Steve Wall, David Foster, Craig
Belcher, David Kluttz, Robert
Lockhart, Darrin Stephens, Eric
Hayes, Joseph Gore, Robert Morris,
Jeff Medlin, Steve Draughon, Bryan
Sepich, Sean Gray, Steve Jewell,
David Custer. Welcome aboard
guys, you all are the best! p.s.
Alpha Phis, get ready for the party
of your life.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: The
brothers and little sisters would like
to welcome the Fall 1986 Pledge
Class into the most jammin' frater-
nity on campus! Congratulations to:
Jeff Emerson, Ross Klingman, Trey
Johnson, Bill Rice, Chris Trum,
John McAuley, Jeff Rooney, Zamir
Siddigi, Tim Re idling, Bob
McManus, Joe Tippett, Mike
Basseti, Tripp Williford, Jim
Fullowan, Tom Wheeler, Bill Peter-
son, Alan White and Matt Keysers
CONGRATULATIONS!
LIDDY: If that's the solutionwhy
don't you? -ORGAN
NANCY: Your favorite prehistoric
animal is what? A pterodactyl?
ALPHA OMICRON PI: The sisters
would like to welcome our new Beta
Thetas to AOTT! Sharon Kott, Angie
Lineberry, Melinda Huffman, Renee
Roberts, Angela Bunn, Lisa
Grosshandler, Sally McLean, Amy
Cacciamani, Chris Brackman,
Robin Sprigg, Kathy Messer, Laurie
Guthrie, Amanda Brewer, Leslie
Liedel, DeLynda Carter, Ann Water-
bury, Pamela Christie, Pamela
Vaughn, Jayne Carter, Georgeanne
Athanaelos, Kim Ferrell, Collette
Gualitieri, Tiffany Kilpatrick, Chris-
ty Waters, Theresa Morse, Tracy
Parrish, Ronnia Westmoreland,
Debbie Schroeder, Sara Garber,
Kristi Schipper, and Patti Kemmis.
We love ya!
TO THE MONDAY NIGHT DIN-
NER CREW: I don't think we had
enough fun - let's do it again every
Monday night - Gilligan.
SALE
SCOTT: You have just got to get
over that complex of yours!
FOR SALE: 1976 Chev. Caprice
Classic in good condition. Rebuilt
engine, new brakes, windshield and
carpet. Fully powered and more.
Call Hal 758-2598.
JENNY LEE: I have a picture.
AZD BETA MU PLEDGE CLASS:
From one pledge class to another,
AZD is the place to be. Congratula-
tions. From the Beta Lambdas!
APE-LIKES: You are planning a
fish fry, formal, outdoor bash, mix-
er, etc and need a disc jockey or a
hand, contact the TRASHMAN or
dial 752-3587.
ATTENTION DEADHEADS: Trip
pin' set coming up Friday night at 10
pm on ROCK-OUTLET with DEAD
REDD PHILIPS. We're on the bus to
the Fabulous Fox Theater in Atlan-
ta, Georgia, Oct. 28-29, 1985. Enjoy
the show!
COMPUTER DATING: No lists of
names distributed or any informa-
tion given without your consent. We
offer a very personal way for you to
meet new people. Introductions
guaranteed or your money back.
Student discounts. Katz Services
3557595.
TO MY SNF: You are cordially in-
vited to dinner Friday night (6:30) at
the home of your SMF. How about
it? Please RSVP!
TO THE BROTHERS OF LAMBDA
CHI ALPHA: We surely won't do it
withouf cha. We're psyched for the
wild night and what we'll look like
is a scary sight! The password's
POLYESTER, so we know our first
social will be the bester! The
Sigmas.
TYPING: Top quality word process-
ing equipment that can meet all your
needs backed with years of ex-
perience. Low student rates. Mon-
Sun 9 am to 9 pm. 355-7595.
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SERVICES: Typ
ing resumes, term papers, thesis
papers. Call SDF Professional Com-
puter Services Inc 106 East 5th St.
(near Cubbies), Greenville, 752-3694.
SIGMA NU AND ALL CONCERN-
ED: What would you do if you had
swabs stuck up your pee-pee? Infor-
mation printed by me Tuesday was
printed in haste and anger, not bas-
ed on test results. I'm clean and so is
L.S. Sorry! Plus c'est change plus
c'est la meme chose. Ace "d'yer
mak'er"
FOR SALE: Furniture. One coffee
table with two matching end tables.
Price negotiable. Call 751002 or
757 1118.
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc. Call
Anne at 752-3015 and leave a
message.
FITZ: Hope you have a fantastic
22nd birthday! The past two weeks
have been great. Let's party this
weekend! Teri, James, and CDF
TAROT CARD READINGS: Learn
more about yourself! Private in-
dividual readings or group parties
(minimum 6 people). Perfect for
rushes or dorm parties. Call
"Reader" 355-2562.
Sept. 29 � Oct. 4
Tom Togs Factory Outlet
1900 Dickinson Ave, Greenville
EVERYTHING DIRECT FROM FACTORY
� Close-outs � Overruns � Irregulars
From 25 To Not Over $10
TROCADERO
Famous Names That We Cannot Mentior?
SUMMER, FALL, AND WINTER MERCHANDISE
HOURS
MON-TUES 9:30-6:00 WED-FRI 9:30-8:00
for your shopping convenience SAT 9:30-6:00
Located in Hie WMmli Aim
in tfce iwr of Ike WM�
MEN'S, LADIES, CHILDREN'S. ANQ INFANTS WEAR
FOR SALE: Single Greenville
Athletic Club membership. Call
after 5 pm 355 2932.
WANTED
753 2245.
WET SUIT. Call
I���ii l ,jLtl��������
FREE CAT: 3 years old, had all
shots, very affectionate, neutered,
needs nice home. 355-6349.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
At Georgetown Apartments. Ex
cellent location, close to campus.
Need 1 or 2 roommates to share 2
bedroom townhouse. Call 752-9245.
&
RETRIEVER TRAINING: In
terested in learning to train a
retriever in hunting or field trialing,
call Ben at 756 3010 after 9 pm.
MALE STRIPPER WANTED: For
Oct. 3 birthday party! Serious in-
quiries only! Call Tonya immediatly
at 355-5949. Good pay for less than an
hour!
DJ; Are you having a party and need
a D.J.? For the best in Top 40, Beach
and Dance call Morgan at 758-7967.
Reasonable rates. References on re-
quest.
FOR RENT: 3 blocks from ECU. 1
bedroom with private entrance.
Utilities paid. $160month. Call
758 1274 after 6 pm.
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share
new apt. located at 405 E. 5th St.
(Regency House Condos Apt 1C).
Iblock (300 steps) from Downtown
and 1 block from campus.
Everything is new, must see! No
deposits req'd for either apt. or
utilities! Rent $175 plus 12 util. Call
355-6686 and leave name & phone
number.
Even Thursday Night Is I
I TACO NIGHT !
I Two Great Tacos for only. 99
1 60 oz. Pitchers SI. 99
Offer Good From 7p.rnl! p.m. - Not Valid on Deliveries I
ALL DAY FRIDAY
32 oz. Bucket of Your Favorite Draft I
1 215 E. Fourth Street 99C I
Hm�'�����mTMrnnSn
FOR SALE: King sized waterbed.
Semi-waveless, heater included.
Less than 6 months old. Headboard
included. $250. Call 758-9768 after 12
noon, ask for Craig.
$60 PER HUNDRED PAIO: for
remailing letters from home! Send
self-addressed, stamped envelope
for informationapplication.
Associates, Box MB, Roselle, NJ
072O3.
FOR SALE: Can you buy Jeeps,
Cars, 4x4's, Seized in drug raids for
under $100? Call for facts today
602-837 3401. Ext. S711
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. Ex
perienced, quality work. IBM Selec-
tric typewriter. Call Lanie Shive
758-5301.
IS IT TRUE That you can buy jeeps
for $44 through the U.S. govern-
ment? Get the facts todayl Call
1 312 742-1142 ext 5271-A.
Quality Copies

fcMfrc
321 E10ttl Street �19)752-0875
Monfey-FrW 7:00�n-iftOOpm Mm
MOam-6:00pm
aiU�MHItMIIMHMIIIIH�IIIIUIMHIIim�����lllH1M
WANTED
JOB WANTED: Man desires (ob as
houskeeper or attendant for the sick.
Non-smoker, non-drinker and have
good references. 752-6079.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Christian atmosphere, responsible 2
bedroom condo. in Treetops. $150
plus utilities and phone. Call Beth
756 6320, 756-2724, or 758-3471 Ext. 240
(NCNB).
Drink Some Suds
While You
- Do Your Duds
AMFM Music
2 Color TV's with Cable
Game Room
s
:
Visit our convenient location on 14th St.
8 AM 12 Midnight
ROOMMATE WANTED: Free
security deposit of $150. Kingston
Place Apts Central heatair, fully
furnished, includes all kitchen uten-
sils, and use of pool. $150 per month
plus utilities. For info, call Don
Fazio at 757-3218.
S
s
I
I
I
LOST DOG: Female, 15 yrs. old.
Beaglecollie mixed. Long haired,
brown and white. Has large growth
on front paw. Has dog tags. Call
752-4575.
i




'fVr The

1 FREE Wash With
One Paid Wash
Available only at the 14th & 10th St. locations
s (One block from Belk Dorm)
Coupon Hours 2 PM-10 PM Daily
I Limit one per customer
�����,������,mmmmmmmmmm-
Buccaneer Babes Selections
Athletic Department is selecting outstanding ECU coeds to assist
the coaches in recruiting scholarship athletes
Social and Informative Meeting
Monday, September 29
L986 at 7:30 PM
Pirate Club Building
For more information and interviews contact one of the following
people:
Mary Powers757-6447
Director of Babes
Susan Gurganus757-6034
Recruiting Secretary � Football
Coach Ellis Johnson757-6330
Recruiting Coordinator � Football
Mc
nm r �- n. m m �fc





Title
The East Carolinian, September 25, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 25, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.495
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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