The East Carolinian, September 23, 1986






Gtoe
(ftaroltmatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.61 No.7
Tuesday, September 23,1986
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
GOP Candidate On Campus
Moye
"if Es C,
Napping Between Classes
You never know what you'll find in the halls of the art building!
By CAROLYN DRISCOLL
Assistant News Editor
Howard D. Moye, first district
republican congressional can-
didate was at ECU yesterday
drumming up student support for
the November 4 election.
While on campus, he introduc-
ed Brian Lassiter as chairman of
the Student Committee for Moye
at the university.
"I also took the opportunity to
discuss some of the issues of my
campaign with those present. I
want students to recognize my
stand and realize that I am in-
terested in students he said.
Moye, running against incum-
bent democrat, Congressman
Walter B. Jones, stated that the
main issue of his campaign is the
federal deficit. "I am all for a
balanced budget he said,
"while my opponent opposed the
Gramm-Rudman plan to require
a balanced budget
According to Moye, one of the
most important implications of
the growing deficit is the effect it
will have in the future on people
who are students now.
"We, as a nation, are spending
more money than we are taking
in � this is a scary thing to be
passing on to the next
generation he stated.
Also at issue in this campaign
is that of the tobacco farmers.
Moye said that upon being
elected, he would bring a bill
before Congress which would re-
quire "truth-in-labeling" by
tobacco manufacturers. This
stems from his concern that 27
percent of U.S. tobacco exports
last year was not pure U.S. tobac-
co; instead, he claims, it was im-
ported trom countries such as
Brazil, and then exported again.
This practice, said Moye, had
the effect of "replacing a large
amount of tobacco that could
have been produced b U.S.
farmers as well as "lowering
the quality of tobacco said to be
produced here
He attributed practices which
have hurt the American tobacco
farmer to the lack of "adequate
representatives to fight for fair
markets a situation which he
said exists for every other type of
farmer in the country.
"There is a misconception
he continued, "that the problems
of the U.S. tobacco farmers �
and of all farmers � were in-
evitable. But that is not true. My
interest is in representing the
tobacco farmers of this district. 1
will not be used by the big
cigarette firms
Howard Moye
NC To Serve As Waste Disposal Site
(UPI) � At least one North
Carolina county is bolstering its
defenses against a possible low-
level radioactive waste disposal
site, which officials say they must
open somewhere in the state even
if they withdraw from a regional
compact.
"We're going to have to spend
Student Loans Still A vailable
RALEIGH-Despite new
federal regulations that have
slowed the processing of financial
aid applications for college
students, an official at North
Carolina's central lender for stu-
dent loans says money still is
available for the 1986-87 school
year.
"We started with more than 66
million dollars in available loan
money explains D. L. Paul,
president of Raleigh-based Col-
lege Foundation Inc. (CFI) "We
will have adequate loan funds for
North Carolina students at
undergraduate and graduate
levels throughout the academic
year and also for summer school
in 1987. The loans can be used at
accredited colleges, universities,
vocational and technical schools,
in or out of state
CFI's sole purpose is providing
financial assistance specifically
for North Carolina students.
New regulations from the
Department of Education has re-
quired a vast increase in the
amount of paperwork for college
financial aid officers, often
delaying distribution of funds.
One regulation now requires
campuses to verify at least half of
the income statements of all aid
applications. Another new re-
quirement forces all students ap-
plying for a Guaranteed Student
Loan to first apply for a Pell
Grant, even if they don't qualify.
Pell Grants are awarded to the
neediest students, those whose
parents earn less than $28,000 per
year.
"In theory, the new regula-
tions are good Paul says.
"They were designed to make
sure only qualified students
receive federal money. But the
regulations have tremendously
increased the paperwork of col-
lege financial aid officers. In ad-
dition, the timing of the new
regulations have resulted in some
having to wait until
students
they're in school to find out if
they were approved for a loan.
Many schools advised students to
report as scheduled. Financial aid
officesand our offices-are still
handling applications and ques-
tions.
"Once loan applications are
received at CFI, we process them
as quickly as possible Paul
adds. "We are very sensitive of
the time factor involved for the
students applying for loans
Loan funds are provided an-
nually by the state's full - service
banks and are administered by
CFI. Of the 63 North Carolina
banks, 46-or 73 percent-either
have participated or are par-
ticipating in funding the educa-
tional loan program administered
by CFI.
a lot of time and a lot of money
on this problem said Grier
Lackey, chairman of the Alex-
ander County Board of Commis-
sioners. "We think everybody
will be building a defense.
Hopefully, we're going to be a
step ahead of everybody else
But state officials said Monday
they would rather counties direct
their energies toward helping the
state locate the best site instead of
toward barring the facility from
their areas.
"I hate to see all efforts on the
local level gearing up to fight a
site and not gearing up to help the
State come up with the site
selection process said Dayne
Brown, chief of the state Depart-
ment of Human Resource's
radiation protection section.
North Carolina, selected this
month by the Southeast Compact
Commission to host the region's
next waste facility, must soon
begin looking for possible
disposal sites whether the state
honors its committment to the
Southeast Compact Commission
or breaks off to open its own
facility.
"One way or another, there is
going to be a site said Earl Mac
Cormac, Gov. Jim Martin's
science advisor.
Alexander County commis-
sioners have set up a fact-finding
committee to bolster the count) 's
case against opening a waste
facility there. Count officials
also are planning to hire a lob-
byist to plead their case in
Raleigh.
"We knov that no action has
been taken pertaining to the
selection of a site, but we can't go
to sleep on this issue Lacke
said.
"We feel it's really premature
for anybody to get alarmed
said Chuck McLendon.
spokesman for the state Depart-
ment of Human Resources. "The
actual location of a site is a year
See COV3TST1ES page 3
Club Day To Inform Students
By THERESA ROSINSKI
SUf f Writer
"Club Awareness Day gives
students the opportunity to get
involved with the organization
they've been looking for said
Anthony Jackson, vice-president
of SGA.
The event is designed so that all
the organizations on campus
could get together and inform
students about their organiza-
tions.
The purpose of Club
Vigil For POW-MIA's
ByDA�fi�SEJ
WARD
A candlelight vigil honoring
POW - MIA soldiers from the
Vietnam Conflict was held Fri-
day, Sept. 19, in front of ECU's
Joyner Library.
The purpose of the vigil was to
enhance awareness among the
general public of soldiers who
have not returned, explained Jim
Reid, organizer of the vigil.
"One of the things we want to
do is focus upon the 61 North
Carolinians who are still there
(Vietnam) while also bringing to
light the more than 2,000
Americans missing, as well
Reid said.
Among the programs that the
Greenville Veteran's Organiza-
tion have established include the
vigil, Veteran's Day Parade, and
a specially designed flag. ECU
was the first college campus in
the nation to fly the POW-MIA
flag. The flag, which flies directly
below the American Flag near
Joyner Library, shows the
sillouette of a man with the letters
POW-MIA written above it.
In attendance at the vigil were
several East Carolina students.
"One thing that thrills me is to
see this generation growing up
and having fun stated Dusty
Hanks, a Vietnam Veteran. He
went on to comment that the
students attendance meant a lot.
"They, the students, prove that
the war is not forgotten
"It doesn't matter what you
thought of Vietnam stated Jen-
nifer Walker, an ECU Senior,
"they are our men and we want
them back � dead or alive
Anyone interested in this cause
should contact the Greenville
Veteran's Outreach Center
located on 150 Arlington
Boulevard.
ON THE INSIDE
Editorials4 Record review, Big Foot part 2,
Style1 �� cly animation � see STYLE
Comics7 P�g� 7.
Sports10 Newly constructed frisbee-golf
Classifieds12 course in Greenville � see
Announcements9 SPORTS page 8
Awareness Day is two-fold, ac-
cording to Steve Cunanan, presi-
dent of SGA. "For one, it allows
organizations to attract new
members, and secondly, it allows
the students to look at all the
organizations under one roof and
decide what they're interested
in
The event will take place
Wednesday, Sept. 24 from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. on the mall.
Twenty-five organizations will
be represented this year including
media groups, religious groups,
SRA, SGA, Student Union, and
many more.
"We're trying to alleviate some
of the student apathy b getting
them involved with the campus
said Jackson. "A lot o students
come to ECU wanting to get in-
volved in an organization but
they don't know who to get in
touch with. Club Awareness Day
alleviates this problem
It's a great opportunity for
organizations large and small to
spark up excitement in the
students, according to Jackson.
"There's something for
evervone
Cable TV In Dorms
; Discussed by SRA
ECU students any have the luxury of bring" JblVto geTcabletv In"
the dorms. Discussion of this possibility comes before the SRA this
afternoon.
By CAROLYN DRISCOLL
AaUUUBfl Newi Editor
The possibility of bringing
cable television to the dorms at
ECU is being discussed among
the Student Residence Associa-
tion and the Department of
Residence Life, according to
Bryan Lassiter, SRA president.
"The administration is looking
at this as a definite possibility
said Lassiter.
If cable were to be installed in
the dorms, it would include basic
cable only. Movie channels
would not be an option, he said.
Lassiter said the reason for this
is that the cable company was
afraid that the dorm students
would do damage to the boxes
that come with your subscription
to the movie channels. Off-
campus students who have movie
channels do a lot of damage to
the boxes, according to the cable
company, but those students
have to sign a written release.
In terms of the university as a
whole, Lassiter stressed that the
option of cable in the residence
halls might help fill the dorms to
100 percent capacity instead of 98
percentWe (residence halls) are
in direct competition with the
area apartments, and if we can't
provide cost-effective, comfor-
table space for students on cam-
pus, then the whole system is in-
efficient
Elmer Meyer, associate dean of
Student Life saidIn the long
run, the potential for cable in the
dorms is there. In addition to the
regular cable stations, there are
some unused stations. Hopefully,
we would be able to get some
educational programs on, pro-
grams that would be of direct in-
terest to students
However, he said, there is a
concern among the administra-
tion that it mean students having
to choose between going to the
library and staving in to watch tv.
Another caution is that it will
mean raising the rent for rooms
in those dorms which will have
access to cable. Although reluc-
tant to give an estimate of how
much rent will go up, Meyer did
estimate twenty to forty dollars,
maybe more.
Still in the planning stages, the
possibility of cable will be
discussed at today's SRA
meeting, at 4 p.m. in
Mendenhall. "These meeting are
open to everyone. If anyone has
any ideas or suggestions, they are
welcome to attend the meeting
said Lassiter.
1


ft

'
�UBv





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 23, 1986
Sept. 11
3:00 a.m.
A Slay Dorm resident was
observed being in possession of
an alcoholic beverage while being
under age.
2:55 p.m.
A Scott Dorm resident reported
the breaking and entering of his
room and the larceny of clothes
and money.
3:10 p.m.
A Fletcher Dorm resident
reported the larceny of her bicy-
cle from the west side of Aycock
dorm.
8:00 p.m.
An officer, after serving a search
warrant, reported finding drug
paraphernalia in a Scott Dorm
room.
9:45 p.m.
A Greenville resident reported
the larceny of a gym bag and its
contents from the handball court
at Minges Coliseum.
11:20 p.m.
An officer reported that a Green-
ville resident was in possession of
liquor east of Scott Dorm while
being under age.
Sept. 12
12:40 a.m.
An Aycock Dorm resident was
found to be in possession of
alcohol while being under age.
The student was found south of
Jenkins Art Building.
2:00 a.m.
An Umstead resident was
reported intoxicated and in
possession of alcohol, south of
Garrett Dorm.
2:15 a.m.
An officer reported a group of
nine white males were excessively
loud and that six of the subjects
had consumed alcohol and all of
them were under age. The group
was located northeast of Slay
Dorm.
2:45 a.m.
An Aycock resident and a Scott
resident were intoxicated and
under age in White Dorm lobby.
3:30 a.m.
A Greenville resident had con-
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sumed alcohol while being under
age. He was found northwest of
the Graham Building.
7:05 a.m.
An officer reported that a win-
dow in the trailers owned by the
T.H. Electrical Company had
been vandalized at the construc-
tion site of the new classroom
building.
12:38 p.m.
A Greenville resident reported a
hit and run accident with a per-
son injured on Campus Drive
east of the Graham Building.
12:40 p.m.
A Jones Hall resident reported
the larceny of his bike from the
shed at Jones Hall.
4:00 p.m.
An Umstead resident reported
the breaking and entering of his
vehicle and the larceny of his bat-
tery. His vehicle was parked in
the 3rd and Reade Street parking
lot.
9:27 p.m.
A Greenville resident was banned
from campus for suspicious ac-
tivity on 4th floor of Jones
Dorm.
10:00 p.m.
An Aycock resident was reported
being intoxicated and disruptive
on the 1st floor of Jones Hall.
11:45 p.m.
Two Aycock residents were
discovered having alcoholic
beverages in their dorm room.
Sept. 13
12:25 a.m.
An Aycock resident was in
possession of alcohol while being
under age. He was found north
of Aycock Dorm in the Cour-
tyard.
12:40 a.m.
A Greene Hall resident reported
the breaking and entering and
larceny of her wallet and jewelry
from her dorm room.
2:20 a.m.
A Slay Hall resident reported the
larceny of his clothing from laun-
dry room on the 1st floor of Slay
Dorm.
6:30 p.m.
A White male from Johnson Air
Force Base and a white male
from Cherry Point were arrested
in North Stands of Ficklen
Stadium for simple affray.
9:10 p.m.
A Greenville resident was ar-
rested at Ficklen Stadium for be-
ing intoxicated and disruptive.
10:00 p.m.
A White male from Greensboro
was arrested for DW1, driving
while license was revoked and
stop sign violation on Faculty
Drive.
11:15 p.m.
A Greenville resident reported
the larceny of her pocketbook
from Section 37 of Ficklen
Stadium.
11:20 p.m.
A Greenville resident reported
the larceny of her pocketbook
from Section 22 of Ficklen
Stadium.
Sept. 14
12:26 a.m.
Two Belk Dorm residents were
found in possession of drug
paraphernalia in Belk Dorm.
1:39 p.m.
A Cotten Hall resident reported
vandalism to her vehicle tire
while parked south of Cotten
Hall.
2:41 p.m.
A Jarvis resident reported van-
dalism to his vehicle tires while
parked south of Cotten Hall.
8:05 p.m.
A Jarvis resident reported the
breaking and entering of his vehi-
cle and the larceny of a pocket-
book from the same. The vehicle
was parked north of Jarvis
Dorm.
10:08 p.m.
An officer confiscated a boot
knife from a white male on Mall
Drive.
Sept. 15
5:15 p.m.
Director of Jarvis Dorm reported
the door to a first floor Jarvis
room was set on fire.
9:10 p.m.
An Aycock student reported the
larceny of his wallet from his
dorm room.
11:05 p.m.
Three black males were arrested
for trespassing after previously
being banned from campus.
Sept. 16
10:35 p.m.
A black female from Camp Le-
juene was arrested and banned
from campus for assaulting a
Tyler Hall resident.
11:30 p.m.
A Jones Dorm resident was
found to be in possession of beer
on College Hill Drive.
Sept. 17
1:35 p.m.
Two members of the Athletic
Department reported the larceny
of their personal property from
the StaffFaculty locker room in
Minges Coliseum.
10:54 p.m.
An anonymous complaintant
reported a peeping torn on the
fourth floor, northwest stairwell
of Aycock Dorm. An Aycock
resident was found at that loca-
tion with binoculars.
Sept. 18
4:30 p.m.
A Garrett Hall resident reported
the breaking and entering of his
room and the larceny of a check.
Sept. 19
12:15
A Garrett Dorm resident was
found to be in possession of d
weapon on campus.
1:20 a.m.
A Kingston Place resident was ar
rested for DW1 and speeding
north of Flanagan.
1:45 a.m.
A Slay Hall resident was found to
have consumed alcohol while
under age on Campus Drive.
Sept. 20
6:02 a.m.
Two officers arrested two men
for the breaking and entering of a
motor vehicle and the larceny of
doughnuts from the Krispy
Kreme truck. The truck was
parked in the Jones Cafeter.d
loading area.
1:11 p.m.
A Greene Hall resident reported
unknown person(s) entered her
vehicle and looked through the
contents of the glove compart-
ment. The vehicle was parked in
the lot south of Greene Hall.
11:15 p.m.
Two officers located a vehicle on
campus that was wanted by the
Greenville Police Department
The vehicle was stopped at the
Afro-American Culture Center
and held for Greenville Police.
Sept. 21
3:45 p.m.
A Garrett Dorm resident wa
found to be in possession ol
weapon on campus.
8:40 p.m.
A Garrett Dorm resident
reported the larceny of wood
from outside his dorm room.
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2 Blocks From ECU
m m m u
��� - -m -m f
American
LONDON (UPI) - s. ki
dent Anatoly Shcharanskv warn-
ed the United States to stand
B against the Soviet Union
m the arrest of U.S. journalist
'� Ids Daniloff, saving the
Kremlin feeds on weakness
It's exact!) like in the case of
?rists said Shcharau �
i arrived in Britain Sundav I
week's visit, including a
eting Tuesday with Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher.
"There can be no compromis-
ing. The minute the Amen
president speaks from weakness
'hev will have no chance The on-
h the K()B and Soviel
Government understands
weakness
He said the Soviets a-
moment" before a supe
summit might release Dai
and claim they are making
-el
1
Ml
StJ
u
y
mm
i,
By MABY-EliSHA ADAMS
el
I
i
What is insomrj and '
it be treated?
Insomnia is described as tl
ability to sleep, or sic
prematurely ended or interrupl
by periods of wakefuiness
somnia is not a disease but may
be the symptom of many
diseases. The most frequent
causes of insomnia are anxiety
and pain, followed by the
tion of substance conta
nicotene or caffeine which are
stimulants.
There are several treatme:
may try for insomnia. These
elude.
�Don't stay in bed if you're w,de
awake. The more you lie in bee;
and worn about not being able
to sleep, the harder n will be
sleep.
�Don't use your bed as your �
chen table, study area or TV
viewing area. Your body may re-
pond by wanting to eat, w
TV, or read instead of sleep s
Counties Co
For Radioacl
Continued from pa�e 1
or two away.
About 15 counties of the 36
named in a consultant's
which the compact used to se
North Carolina as the
have called Brown's H ce, �
ried that they werep
host counties, he aiu. But
ficials said the state will disregard
the report's suggestions
"Ou basic opinion on the
DamesgtMoore list of ?6cour
is thai you c i d thro 'in
ash can McClendon said.
"We'r: not bound in any wav
Get the
word out
in the
Announcements
in The Easi CtroliniM

.





; x ket 4.30 p m
ehicle A Ciarrett Hall resident reported
Jarvis the breaking and entering of his
room and the larceny of a check.
Sept. 19
boot
)i Mall 12:15
A Ciarrett Dorm resident was
found to be in po�,session of a
vseapon on campus.
1:20 a.m.
sd A Kingston Place resident was ar-
'arvis rested tot DW1 and speeding
north of Flanaga
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
I 4 a.m.
the A S!j Hall resident was found to
have consumed alcohol while
under age on Campus Drive.
Sepi :
to officers arrested two men
� Hreakmg and entering of a
motor vehicle and the larceny of
gl tits from the Krispy
krerr.e 'ruck. The truck was
Iced in the Jones Cafeteria
a
ene Hall resident reported
�rs (s) entered her
vked through the
; glove compart-
as parked in
� ireene Hall
i ated a vehicle on
was wanted by the
. e Department.
cie was slipped at the
V - :an Culture Center
. : Mr Greenville Police.
?1
� hi
resident was
: session of a
on c
D rm resident
cen) oi wood
- jorm room.
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HUNTS
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oz can
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tnc
i
SEPTMEMBER 23, 1986
American Accused Of Spying In China
LONDON (UPI) - Soviet dissi-
dent Anatoly Shcharansky warn-
ed the United States to stand
strong against the Soviet Union
over the arrest of U.S. journalist
Nicholas Daniloff, saying the
Kremlin feeds on weakness.
"It's exactly like in the case of
terrorists said Shcharansky,
who arrived in Britain Sunday for
a week's visit, including a
meeting Tuesday with Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher.
"There can be no compromis-
ing. The minute the American
president speaks from weakness
they will have no chance. The on-
ly thing the KGB and Soviet
Government understands is
weakness
He said the Soviets at "the last
moment" before a superpower
summit might release Daniloff
and claim they are making con-
cessions to make up for their
other human rights violations.
"It's very important to be
strong in this case he said.
Shcharansky, 38, a founder of
Moscow's Helsinki Watch group,
was convicted in the Soviet Union
of spying for the United States
and was imprisoned for nine
years until his release in February
in what the Soviets called an
East-West spy swap. The United
States denies that Shcharansky,
who now lives in Israel, was a
spy.
Daniloff, a Moscow-based cor-
respondent for U.S. News
World Report, was arrested Aug.
30 on spy charges after a source
handed him a package the Soviets
said contained military secrets
about the war in Afghanistan.
Daniloff said he accepted the
package thinking it was a going-
away present.
He is in the custody of the U.S.
Embassy in Moscow until his trial
or a diplomatic resolution to his
case.
Shcharansky said the Soviet
Union tried in 1977 to frame a
U.S. correspondent in a similar
case, but it fell through.
Shcharansky urged President
Reagan to "be strong" and said
U.S. officials erred initially by
saying in "no way" would it af-
fect overall superpower relations.
But he said the U.S. decision
last week to expel 25 Soviet
diplomats at the United Nations
was "a good step
Shcharansky talked to
reporters before addressing 5,000
activists campaigning for the
release of Soviet Jews denied per-
mission to emigrate. Jewish of-
ficials estimate 30,000 Jews,
known as "refuseniks have
been denied permission to leave
and say perhaps an additional
400,000 would leave if they
could.
"They are in the front line in
the battle between democracy
and totalitarian governments
he said, adding the West should
not abandon the concept of link-
ing Western trade to Jewish
emigration from the Soviet
Union.
204 East 5th St
Jppk ocoids
WANTED:
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The East Carolinian is looking for an all
purpose illustrator. Art majors and those with
experience are preferred. A portfolio is
required. Call 757-6366 or stop by the
Publications Building.
Mon-Thuf 10 AM-9 PM
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Phone 758-1427
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�y MABY-ELfSHA ADAMS
What is insomnia and how can
it be treated?
Insomnia is described as the in-
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prematurely ended or interrupted
by periods of wakefulness. In-
somnia is not a disease but may
be the symptom of many
diseases The most frequent
causes of insomnia are anxiety
and pain, followed by the inges-
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nicotene or caffeine which are
stimulants.
There are several treatments you
may try for insomnia. These in-
clude:
�Don't stay in bed if you're wide
awake. The more you lie in bed
and worry about not being able
to sleep, the harder it will be to
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�Don't use your bed as your kit-
chen table, study area or TV
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TV, or read instead of sleeping
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�Try to keep the hours before
bedtime as anxiety-free as possi-
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�Don't drink caffeine-containing
drinks or foods in the evening or
before bedtime.
�If you smoke, decrease the
number of cigarettes you smoke
in the evening.
�Certain medicines, including
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at night. Read the "side effects"
and "warnings" sections on your
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ching to similar medicines with
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�Warm milk, a warm bath, and
reading something less
stimulating may help to relax
you.
�Don't eat heavy foods before
bedtime.
�Try to go to sleep and rise each
day at the same time.
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Counties Considered
For Radioactive Dump
Continued from page 1
or two away
About 15 counties of the 36
named in a consultant's report,
which the compact used to select
North Carolina as the host state,
have called Brown's office, wor-
ried that they werep i ospective
host counties, he saiu. But of-
ficials said the state will disregard
the report's suggestions.
"Our basic opinion on the
Dame-&Moore list of 36 counties
is thai you could throw it in
the irash can McClendon said.
"We'r. not bound in any way by
that report. We will decide on our
own, through the legislative pro-
cess and through a special com-
mittee

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15
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Stye last Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
TOM LUVENDER, Central Manage,
Daniel Maurer, M�f(�� ��
Patti Kemmis. sews Eduor Steve Folmar, w�r � mmmi
Scott Cooper, omm &,� Anthony Martin, mnmcmk mi
Rick McCormac, tvS� ���� Meg Needham, 0,�� Manager
John Shannon, w &� Shannon Short, produa.cn Manager
Pat Molloy, rm nm ir- �i'w DeChanile Johnson, .� ��,��
September 23. 1986
Opinion
Page 4
.Campus Forum
Election Time
Dear Editor,
Normally, alumni do not feel it
necessary to get involved with student af-
fairs; it is usually over after graduation.
However, my interest in Student Govern-
ment has had to extend into my alumni
status because of the actions of a remain-
ing individual, Chris Tomasic.
In last fall's elections, I felt it was
perfectly legitimate for a person to run for
Class Officer and Day Representative,
concurrently. Chris read the constitution
and interpreted it in such a way that 1) it
was unconstitutional for me to run for
Class Officer and Day Representative, and
2) it was morally wrong to run for both
because a person should run only for the
office that he or she could serve best. In
the subsequent conversation with Chris, he
was obviously vehement that this was con-
stitutionally and morally incorrect.
Now, a year later, Chris has decided that
it is alright to pursue two offices at the
same time. This can be for one of two
reasons; either he has had a serious change
of heart on this issue or now that the rule
effects him, he has changed his mind.
Chris, you can not have it both ways.
You can not hold people up to moral stan-
dards that you create and then not follow
them yourself.
Where do you stand, Chris?
Chris, do the right thing. If you stand
where you stood before, you must be
responsible to and uphold your own moral
standards. Either run for the Day
Representative position or for the Class
Office, but not both!
Kirk shelley
� Senior Class President.
Class of 1986
Scott Thomas
Dear Editor:
I will make this short because I realize
how limited and valuable a student's time
can be. My name is Scott Thomas and I am
a candidate in the Student Government
Association election to be held Sept. 24.
I have been actively involved in SGA
since entering ECU; first serving on the
judicial review board, then later as class
president and day representatfrer"
Representing you in student government
has been both a pleasure and challenge and
I appreciate the support you have given me
in the past.
There will be many important issues fac-
ing the SGA this year, so I have decided to
again seek office in order for your voice to
I be heard. I am running for the offices of
Sophomore Class President and Day
Representative. This combination will help
me to be better informed of the happenings
in student government and will allow me to
support the things that will benefit the en-
tire student body of ECU.
1 am asking your vote and support and
in return I promise to give you the kind of
open, honest, fair and efficient representa-
tion that you deserve, and can be proud of.
Scott Thomas
Sophomore Class Candidate,
SGA Elections
Brian Lassiter
To whom it may concern:
We, the students, have an important
choice to make on Wednesday for Senior
Class President. The choice is between
Bryan Lassiter and Chris Tomasic.
1 have known Bryan four years, and in
that time I have seen in him great leader-
ship ability. I have seen an unsurpassed
ability to clearly and promptly speak for
the students of ECU all over the state of
North Carolina and throughout this entire
Nation.
Bryan knows what needs to be done to
get students' grievances heard. He has
represented you and me before the Deans
of this school, Chancelor Howell and the
Governor of this state. Far more important
than all of this, Bryan Lassiter is a true
friend. When 1 met Bryan, I met someone
who cared for me as a person.
We have a clear choice to make. I ask
you to join me and vote for Bryan Lassiter
for Senior Class President.
Edward I ash.
Senior, Art
VtttOWrVIHOHUiAJ&Bwtwa), tMT7B�ftPrrvGSryrV'
England's Labor Party Troubled
Forum Rules
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expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the entrance
of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
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and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
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ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Students, facul-
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are reminded that they are limited to
one every five issues.
LONDON � The Labor Party in
England has problems similar to those
of the Democratic Party in America,
though England's problems are more
desperate than our own because the
positions of its extremists are extremer
than our own.
On The Right
By WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY
When we think of extremism in
America we think of, oh, Bella Abzug
and John Kenneth Galbraith, and
although it is prudent to assume that if
either became the chief of government
in America, the republic would last
about a fortnight after their inaugura-
tion, it is also pretty safe to assume that
no such thing is likely to happen.
In Great Britain, the problem isn't
with socialist romantics, but rather with
a very hard-bitten set that doesn't have
control of the Labor Party, but which
leaves the Labor Party, in the absence
of their support, suspended in
powerlessness.
The Militant Tendency (we do not
joke � that is what they call
themselves) are "Trotskyists and
although Trotsky's works are given out
to anyone who comes close to their base
of operations, it is doubtful that if you
stopped at random one of the 8,000
members on the street and asked him
three questions that reached into Trot-
sky's theories you would come out lear-
ning much about Trotsky.
The Militants use Trotsky in the way
the Third World uses Marx. You can
butcher away as you like, if only you
float a banner above your party with a
label on it that once attracted hard in-
tellectual thought, and U.N. types will
say that you are in communion with a
great ideological movement.
Well, what would the Militants do?
Their projection of things to come is
roughly as follows. Margaret
Thatcher's Conservative Party will lose
the next election to a coalition of Labor
and Alliance (itself a coalition of Social
Democrats who split from Labor and
the old Liberal Party). The new Labor
Party will rule for a while, but will do
nothing to satisfy the cravings of those
within the Labor Party (the Militants)
with fire in the belly about reform.
The new administration will not be
able to come up with 1 million new jobs
(14 percent of British labor is
unemployed), and in the general chaos,
fresh elections will be called. The Con-
servatives will win these elections (1 am
continuing as the narrator of the
Militants' scenario), and, face-to-face
with a desperate domestic situation,
they will institute a "Bonapartist"
regime.
By that 1 mean a strongman,
Napolean-style, will take over and begin
to run things. Ah, but that is the mo-
ment for the Militants: They will seize
power and, with or without the shed-
ding of blood, undertake to implement
their program. Which is?
Just to begin with, they will abrogate
ties with NATO. They will nationalize
the banks and the insurance companies,
and everything else that vaguely inter-
rupts their vision. (Oh. yes. they will
abolish the monarchy and the House of
Lords). �
It is in one sense Laugh-In time, if we
focus only on what it is the Militants
would like to accomplish and what it is
that they would bring on if they had
their way. But it is all a little less than
entirely ludicrous because the Militants'
hold on the Labor Party is a little like
the bloodstain's hold on Lady Macbeth.
For all that Neil Kinnock parades his
intention of excreting these crazies, he
cannot do this and still hope to achieve
power, because although the member-
ship is not large, the Militants' influence
is organizationally significant, much as
Lenin's was significant on the assembly
dominated by Kerensky.
The city of Liverpool is ruled by
Militants; they take in, in revenue,
about a quarter of the money spent an-
nually by Labor; an estimated 30
members of the Parliament are
Militants.
Kinnock is given to periodic aenun
ciations of the extremes in his parts,
designed to reassure the majority of the
British that they are doing less than
committing suicide by voting Labor,
and to a certain extent he has succeeded
The polls show that whereas a few mon-
ths ago Alliance voters were divided a-
to which party they preferred to lead a
coalition government, they are now in-
clined, by 11 points, to make common
cause with the Labor Party.
All of this might be dismissed a a
very bad dream, except that it leaves the
observer wondering, wondering. Grea:
Britain, by most standards, is deemed a
civilized state, yet the principal opposi-
tion party is in favor of what rea!l
amounts to unilateral surrender to the
Soviet Union (unilateral nuclear disar-
mament equals the end of NATO equal
the end of the U.S. umbrella equals the
probable end of the political in-
dependence of Western Europe).
If that much can happen to the party
of Bevin, Attlee and GaitskeU, wha1 �
to stop it all from going . "er9
William F. Buckle) a the editor of
National Review magazintLJe adao
hosts a television talk show called 'Tir-
ing Line. "
Campus Spectrum
In addition to :he "Campus
Forum" section of the Editorial
Page, The East Ctrolinian has re-
established the "Campus Spectrum
This is an opinion column featuring
guest writers from the student body
and faculty. The columns printed in
the "Campus Spectrum" will contain
current topics of concern to the cam-
pus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of
grammer and decency. Persons sub-
mitting columns must be willing to
accept "by-line" credit for their ef-
forts, as no entrys from ghost writers
will be published.
Evangelicals Make Bid For Political Power
By JOHN B. JUDIS
rw Nr. RcpaMtc
In 1980 and 1984, conservative evangelicals were
loyal lieutenants in the Republican army, but as the
Reagan era draws to a close, they have become a
large and unruly force. Pat Robertson's presidential
candidacy is merely the most visible sign of the
evangelical right's new strategy. In almost every
Southern, Midwestern and Western state, they are
running candidates and seeking party leadership
positions. And they are having an impact.
In the Oregan State primary, fundamentalist
minister Joe Lutz received 43 percent of the votes in
his narrow loss to incumbent Senate Finance Com-
mittee Chariman Robert Packwood, although
Packwood outspent Lutz by almost 50-to-l.
In Indiana, the Rev. Don Lynch astonished local
officials by winning a Republican congressional
primary over a candidate anointed by local party
leaders.
Local Republicans have become alarmed by the
evangelicals' bid for political power. Indiana Coun-
ty Chariman John Sweezy said: "If the Christian
right becomes a major portion of the (Republican)
voting bloc, then it has the potential to destroy it.
We would lose our centrist base
Evangelicals, who often call themselves "Bible
conservatives stress social, moral and religious
issues. They favor the rollback of communism, but
in a more militant and uncompromising manner
than other conservatives.
Transfixed by a vision of Armageddon � the
final battle between good and evil � they believe
the United States must seek military superiority in
preparation for an eventual war.
Above all, Bible conservatives don't sound or
look like Republican conservatives. The grass roots
of the movement tend to be poorer, more blue col-
lar and less cosmopolitan than the average
Republican.
The evangelical movement is neither tightly con-
trolled nor politically unified. The initial upsurge
was inspired by national leaders and organizations
� the Rev. Jerry Falwell's Liberty Federation,
Robertson's Freedom Council, Christian Voice and
the American Coalition for Traditional Values.
Much of the ferment, however, appears to be
spontanous. Most often the national organizations
become important after a spontaneous local move-
ment has made a candidate or issue visible.
Within the movement's leadership there are sur-
prising disagreements about strategy. The sharpest
difference is between Falwell and the rest of the
movement. In 1984, Falwell saw himself used as a
successful rallying point for the opposition. In
response, Falwell adopted what might be called a
middle-of-the-road strategy.
This January, Falwell changed the name of the
Moral Majority to the Liberty Federation, and he
publicly endorsed Vice President George Bush.
Even his own lieutenants acknowledge that Falwell
was moved in part by expediency.
Falwell is also backing California's pro-choice
Republican Senate candidate Ed Zschau,
calculating that Zschau's opponent, Alan
Cranston, is worse. The rest of the Christian right
finds Falwell's support for Zschau incomprehensi-
ble.
Robertson's run for the presidency is as con-
troversial among evangelical leaders as Falwell's
support for Zschau. Many fear that Robertson will
not only diminish their influence in the presidential
nominating process, but will also expose Christian
fundamentalism to hostile and destructive scrutiny.
Robertson is a Pentacostal Christian who prays
by speaking in tongues, believes in faith healing and
seems to regard God as a kind of supreme guidance
counselor.
Robertson writes, "Yet as I was praying before
God the next week, he said to me, 'Pat, I want you
to have an RCA transmitter
Evangelical leaders worry that by identifying the
entire movement with Robertson's Pentecostalism,
liberals will be able to discredit evangelism as a
whole.
Right-wing evangelism began to gain popularity
when the Cold War and the nuclear age appeared to
confirm its prophecies of Armageddon. As explain-
ed in books like Robertson's The Secret
Kingdom, the onset of a seven-year period of
tribulation is near. Its imminence is confirmed by
the founding of the state of Israel, which the fun-
damentalists believe confirms biblical prophecy,
and by the hostility between Israel and the Soviet
Union.
The Tribulation will begin with the signing of a
pact between the Anti-christ and Israel. The Anti-
christ will break his pact, and Armageddon will
commence, culminating in a nuclear war between
West and East that will wipe out one-third of the
globe. With a handful of humans remaining, Christ
will return.
The fundamentalists draw basic political conclu-
sions from this scenario. Because Israel is the most
important bulwark against the Soviet Union, they
make the defense of Israel their highest priority.
The fundamentalists also believe that attempts to
reach arms accords with the Soviet Union are futile
and self-delusionary. They do not welcome, but
they also do not fear, the prospect of nuclear war.
Conservative intellectuals have two competing
views of what today's right-wing evangelical up-
surge will mean for the Republican Party. The op-
timistic view is that the evangelicals are leading a
shift in political priority both in the Republican
Party and nationally from economic to cultural
issues.
Political consultant Robert Teeter voices the
more pessimistic and far more widespread view.
Teeter does not think the cultural issues can bind
the Republican coalition. "It is the economic
themes that all the parts of the Republican coalition
have agreed upon. With cultural ssues, the cracks
begin to show. Cultural issues have added new peo-
ple to the Republican coalition, but it is not what
has unified them
Jay Wickliff, the Muncie businessman whom
Don Lynch defeated in the primary, has a
nightmare about 1988. "The worst possible
scenario is that you get Democrats stuck in the
whole welfare thing and you get Republicans cover-
ing their fundamentalist flank, screaming about
social issues and banning books.
"You get a big fight going and you have the
whole middle of the political spectrum saying,
'What are these guys doing?' You end up with a
fuss over all these unproductive issues that split the
country and you get no real focus on leading the
country forward
Wickliffs nightmare won't come to pass. The
Republicans will not nominate Robertson for presi-
dent. And the Democrats are unlikely to stake their
tenuous political future on a promise to expand the
Great Society.
But if Robertson is able to mobilize a noisy
minority in the primaries, and if the right-wing
evangelicals continue to press for power in the
Republican Party, then many Republicans may
wish that they had slept through the 1988 elections.
John B. Judis, a semior editor of In These Times,
is completing a biography of William F. Buckley
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 23, 1M6
A PRue FREE
SOCIETY
lit PRINK
TO THAT'
GT3U
J
Troubled
ei odic denun-
hts party,
n ajorit) of the
ng less than
� N ting I abor,
nexu ehass ceded:
H hereas a few mon-
ters a ere dided as
Ferred to 'cad a
tie i arc nov in-
nts make common
Party.
smissed as a
rial il leaves the
dering. Great
Is, is deemed a
incipal opposi-
of what really
surrender to the
raJ nuclear disar-
� NATO equals
N mbrella equals the
the political in-
estern Europe).
appen to the party
Gaitskell, what is
� going further?
luckley is the editor of
- .how caHed "Fir-
Campus Spectrum
to the "Campus
: the Editorial
Carolinian has re-
in pus Spectrum
umn featuring
the student body
The columns printed in
'rum" will contain
' -oncern to the cam-
� or nation.
� are restricted in con-
"egard to rules of
decency. Persons sub-
� mu be willing to
t for their ef-
from ghost writers
;hed.
Power
th in the Republican
economic to cultural
sultam Robert Teeter voices the
more widespread view.
think the cultural issues can bind
:an coalition. "It is the economic
It all the pam of the Republican coalition
Id upon With cultural 'ssues, the cracks
low Cultural issues have added new peo-
Republican coalition, but it is not what
them
tkliff, the Muncie businessman whom
:h defeated in the primary, has a
about 1988. "The worst possible
that you get Democrats stuck in the
tre thing and you get Republicans cover-
fundamentalist flank, screaming about
s and banning books.
St a big fight going and you have the
Idle of the political spectrum saying,
lthese guys doing?' You end up with a
these unproductive issues that split the
Id you get no real focus on leading the
Iward
js nightmare won't come to pass. The
is will not nominate Robertson for presi-
jhe Democrats are unlikely to stake their
litical future on a promise to expand the
Ftv-
Robertson is able to mobilize a noisy
the primaries, and if the right-wing
continue to press for power in the
Party, then many Republicans may
ley had slept through the 1988 elections.
Tudis, a semior editor of In These Times,
g a biography of William F. Buckley
f
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-





THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 23, 1986
Washington DC Just Like Any Other City
WASHINGTON (UP1) � In
many ways, the nation's capital is
a real city, not unlike others in
the country.
Washington, District of Col-
umbia, has buildings and streets,
trees and lawns, statues and
monuments, policemen and
firemen, theaters and movies and
rush hour traffic.
And, certainly, Mayor Marion
Barry's administration can go up
against any city in the area of
scandal � past, present and
under investigation.
But people in the rest of the
country � at least those few who
might give it a thought � fail to
realize that their capital is also
unlike any other city.
It is a feudal state ruled collec-
tively by 535 kings and queens of
Congress, who, in their largesse,
permit one delegate to sit, but, of
course, not vote with them.
The kings and queens, possibly
knowing the eventual outcome,
did some years back approve a
constitutional amendment gran-
ting statehood to the District of
Columbia. The thought raised an
amazing lack of interest in the
states and is ratification is now
considered a dead issue.
As a result, the district, as it is
most commonly referred to,
operates on something cal led
limited home rule. Loosely
translated, this means that the
citizens can elect a mayor and
council and run the city � up to
point.
Although the subject of
dispute. Congress controls the
purse strings, all the way accor-
ding to some, part of the way in
the thinking of others.
There are those who say that
money the city itself generates is
subject to the whims of the kings
and queens, in addition to the
money provided by the federal
government.
The realization to what degree
the District of Columbia is a
chattel of Congress comes to light
rarely, most senators and con-
gressmen finding more rewards in
weightier (a tax reform bill) or
political (a public works project
for their state) matters.
But come to light it does, as it
did last week when the Senate
had to act on the fiscal 1987 ap-
propriations bill for the District
of Columbia. Given its standing
among priorities, the deed was
undertaken at night and the bill
passed by voice vote.
But the committee's report
outlined some matters the Senate
would like the city to attend to,
which is awfully close to an
order.
For instance, the Senate gave
the city a gentle nudge to increase
the minimum drinking age to 21,
thereby calling what the report
calls the "blood borders" with
Virginia and Maryland where the
thirst-quenching age has already
been increased.
The Senate is also concerned
about the gypsy moth in the
district, properly so, and feels
"clearly a more vigorous effort is
required" to combat this pest
that threatens to destroy the
hardwood trees.
And the Senate is really mad
about the city's slow pace in
building a new prison, as if any
neighborhood is eager to have the
jailed cons next door.
No matter, if the city doesn't
have site and acquisition plans by
next month, it will have to give
back $40 million of tie $50,000
so far allocated for the pen. And
no trying to enlarge the current
prison, located in nearby
Virginia.
Of course there's the question
of abortion. There always will be
a question of abortion as long as
the Senate's anti-abortion conser-
vatives make a career out trying
to outlaw it.
To keep within the rules, the ci-
ty has used its self-generated
revenues to provide abortions for
the poor in cases of rape or incest
because the law prohibits the use
of federal money for abortion ex-
cept when the life of the mother is
in danger.
The House, in its great
wisdom, decided that the crea
tions of rape and incest don'
qualify for abortions, no matter
where the money comes from
The Senate decided to let well
enough along, but only by a
48-42 vote.
But the bill provided one more
clue that the k:ngs and queens
would just as ' on set the people-
free. Included was $100,000 to
keep alive the process by which
the District of Columbia would
become the 51st state � should
the states ever grant that
privilege.
Liberals Follow Conservative's Trail
COMING ATTRACTIONS
(CPS) � A liberal think tank
says it may soon start funding
overtly liberal papers on a
number of campuses.
Copying the strategy of the
conservative Institute for Educa-
tional Affairs (1EA)�which has
provided start-up money for
some 60 overtly right-wing cam-
pus papers since 1983�the
Center for National Policy
(CNP) in Washington, D.C. says
it will try to start funnelling
money to leftist papers sometime
this year.
Students from William and
Mary, Boston College, Penn,
Texas. American University and
Michigan, among others, already
have "expressed interest" in get-
ting funding from the CNP,
reports the CNP's Peter Scher.
Scher, who refuses to say how
much money the group will spend
or how many papers it plans to
fund, says the CNP will start
choosing which papers to under-
write in October.
"Oh, we have a lot of student
interest in starting alternative
newspapers Scher says. "On
many campuses, the more conser-
vative element has resulted in
one-sided issue debates only
The idea for mounting a liberal
alternative to the lEA's funding
of campus papers first arose at an
early August CNP meeting at
which Scher, CNP President Kirk
O'Donnell and about 100 col-
legians f.om around the country
bemoaned how conservati es had
come to dominate campus opi-
nion.
"I'm sure some people still
think the world is square, too
replies IEA President Leslie
Lankowsky.
The CNP's O'Donnell says,
"our major purpose here is to
promote public dialogue and
public research about public pro-
blems
The conservative papers have
promoted dialogue by adopting
many of the issues and arch tones
of The Dartmouth Review, which
was the first conservative paper
published with IEA money.
The Dartmouth paper is now
self-sustaining, Lenkowsky
reports, though the IEA still
makes annual grants of about
$3,500 each to 33 other conser-
vative papers.
The papers themselves have
stirred up almost constant con-
troversy by readily attacking
campus homosexuals, "liberal"
professors, course catalogs, anti-
apartheid activists and others
with pejoratives in their news col-
umns.
Most recently, Dartmouth
Review staffers stood trial for
vandalizing anti-apartheid
"shanties
"A few years ago recalls Ben
Bagdikian, dean of
Cal-Berkeley's graduate school
of journalism, "Dartmouth, Yale
and Berkeley newspapers were
subsidized to be neoconservative.
The feeling was that there was
not enough conservative papers
around
"The danger he adds, "ex-
ists when papers receive subsidiz-
ed financial backing to create an
artificial political point-of-view
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that doesn't exist in the com-
munity already
The CNP and others fret cam-
pus papers those funded by
students as well as by the IEA -
no longer reflect the liberalism
that exists in the college com-
munity.
Some Harvard students, for
example, started the liberal Har-
vard Perspective last year "when
it became clear the Daily Crimson
a very good moderate daily, by
the way was only interested in
what the dean said instead of
what the issues were says Peter
Robinson, the Perspective's
president.
But "the conservative Salient,
dealing with political issues,
basically dominated and set the
agenda (for discussion on cam-
pus) says Robinson, who adds
the Perspective intends to talk to
the CNP about funding later this
fall.
The IEA's Lenkowsky
disagrees. "In our view, the
liberal and .left:0 views
already dominate the main
papers He says the IEA still
averages "one call a week" from
students interested in starting
conservative papers on their cam-
puses.
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SERVICES
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204 E.Arlington Blvd.
Arlington Centre Office Complex
Greenville. NC 27834
355-7190
Not an agency Never a fee
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Wednesday Movie
When Father Was
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Weekend Lot Shows
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Monty Python and
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East Carolina University
Black Sororities
Host
A Fall Rush
Black Sorority Informal Fall Rush
September 14, Registration $1.00 and Reception
7.00 Mendenhall Multi-purpose Room
September 15, Rush Party, Alpha Kappa Alpha,
Coffee House, 7:00
September 16, Rush Party, Delta Sigma Theta, Coffee
House, 7:00
September 17, Rush Party, Zeta Phi Beta, Coffee
House, 7:00
September 18, Rush Party, Sigma Gamma Rho,
Coffee House, 7:00
September 19, Social, TBA
September 22, Rush Party, Alpah Kappa Alpha,
Coffee House, 7:00
September 23, Rush Party, Delta Sigma Theta, Coffee
House, 7:00
September 24, Rush Party, Zeta Phi Beta, Coffee
House, 7:00
September 25, Rush Party, Sigma Gamma Rho,
Coffee House, 7:00
HU
') Clay Fi
By MIC AH HARRIS
Clay Animation is an an form
which has only begun to come in-
to its own although it has beer.
around roughly as long as tradi-
tional drawn animation. It r
been overshadowed b
latter's domination of theav
houses. Cartoons were
more economical
So. it was with the TV age
clay animation began to
Stable. Art Clokey's "GumK-
ho debuted in 1955, was
first clay animated persona
jrho could b recognized
Jnerchandized like his I -
dimensional cousins.
I Clay animation contir.ties I
iised in children's prograr
as "Sesame Street" and Pee Uee
Hermans' new Saturday mo-
program. But the theatre screen!
are the arena of clay anim
champion Will Vmton, a
of Portland, Oregon.
I Vinton's work is nevertheless
�most familiar on the tele
;screen. His studio is respor
Ifor Kentuckv Fried Chicker-
animated chicken nugge
;paign. He also provide thi
animated antics of punk
ghetto-box toting Vance an: I
Ipick-pocketing pig in a reel
John Fogeny video.
But the large screen has always j
been Vinton's area of concentra-
tion. In the mid-seven ties, he andl
a partner created an Acaden
Award nominated short end I
Closed Mondays" w- I
; followed a drunk's surrea. I
journey into a museum where hef
became an exhibit himself.
In his later work Vie I
favored classic talcs. The sur f
matter was initially determines
j'by Vinton's financial backer J
I the 'ime, the educational E j
� Budd films.
Fo- Silly Budd. Vimon create
-4an Wnkle � The 3tr�
uciaiis of the miniature sets werj
matched by those of the clay pui
pets.
IComedv In
Sh
I By MONT
t
"Hey pal. didja here the I
Sabout the
s
I
I
I
P
f
k
oflai
" ���������- � " mgn�ii"i� rn
mmi�nn





her City
r. plans by
jve to give
e $50,000
pen. And
ic current
nearb
question
ivs will be
long a?.
n conser-
trwng
I rs, the ci-
nerated
;ons for
yt incest
the use
tion ex-
Mher is
in danger.
The House, in its great
wisdom, decided that the crea-k
tions of rape and incest don't
qualify for abortions, no matter
where the money comes from.
The Senate decided to let well
enough along, but only by a
48-2 vote.
But the bill provided one more
clue that the k;ngs and queens
would just as on set the people-
free. Included was $100,000 to
Weep alive the process by which1
the District of Columbia would
become the 51st state � should
the states ever grant that
privilege.
ACTIONS
it&
ising
s
�vie
Was
siness
IOWS
1 00 PM
n and
rail
1
rJ.
gathering place
orority Informal Fall Rush
Registration $1.00 and Reception
Viendenhall Multi-purpose Room
Rush Party, Alpha Kappa Alpha,
�:00
IRush Party, Delta Sigma Theta, Coffee
Rush Party, Zeta Phi Beta, Cofiee
Rush Party, Sigma Gamma Rho,
:00
Jociai, TBA
ush Party, Alpah Kappa Alpha,
1.00
tush Party, Delta Sigma Theta, Coffee
Lush Party, Zeta Phi Beta, Coffee
Lush Party, Sigma Gamma Rho,
:00
THE EAST CAROLINJAN
Style
SEPTEMBER 23. 1986
Page-
Never Bothered Gumby
By M1CAH HARRIS
Mf Writer
Clay Animation is an art form
which has only begun to come in-
to its own although it has been
around roughly as long as tradi-
tional drawn animation. It has
been overshadowed by the
latter's domination of theatrical
houses. Cartoons were simply
more economical.
So, it was with the TV age that
clay animation began to be
viable. Art Clokey's "Gumby
who debuted in 1955, was the
first clay animated personality
who could by recognized and
merchandized like his two-
dimensional cousins.
Clay animation continues to be
used in children's programs such
as "Sesame Street" and Pee Wee
Hermans' new Saturday morning
program. But the theatre screens
are the arena of clay animation
champion Will Vinton, a native
of Portland, Oregon.
Vinton's work is nevertheless
most familiar on the television
screen. His studio is responsible
for Kentucky Fried Chicken's
animated chicken nuggets cam-
paign. He also provided the
animated antics of punkish,
ghetto-box toting Vance and his
!pick-pocketing pig in a recent
! John Fogerty video.
But the large screen has always
been Vinton's area of concentra-
tion. In the mid-seventies, he and
a partner created an Academy
Award nominated short entitled
"Closed Mondays" which
followed a drunk's surrealistic
journey into a museum where he
became an exhibit himself.
In his later works, Vinton has
I favored classic tales. The subject
� matter was initially determined
by Vinton's financial backer of
(the time, the educational Billy
I Budd films.
j Fo- Billy Budd. Vinton created
t musnine adaptation afMp
Ran W'nkle . The intricate"
! uciaiis of the miniature sets were
matched by those of the clay pup-
pets.
The "actors" were built over
jointed armatures for stability.
While certain physical laws
sometimes require an awkward-
ness of figure design, the faces
are exquisite in their expressions.
Vinton's puppets emote, they
breathe, their eyes sparkle with
life.
An adaptation of The little
Prince was next and it remains
one of Vinton's studio's shining
moments. The screenplay cap-
tured the elusive spirit of the
book. The characters' expres-
sions were rich. And a technique
of actually painting with clay
provided dazzling optical effects.
In addition, actor Cliff Robert-
son's narration is warm and mov-
ing. The Little Prince is a true if
undervalued gem in the history of
animated films.
Vinton later produced an adap-
tation of Tolstoy's lovely tale,
"Where There Is Love, There is
God Also" as Ivan the Cobbler.
This is another film that
transcends the silliness many
associate with the term "anima-
tion
Breaking with children's
classics, Vinton produced a short
entitled "A Christmas Gift" with
music by the "Paul" of Peter,
Paul and Mary fame. There was
also another Oscar nominated
short, an animated version of
"The Creation
Vinton provided clay anima-
tion effects (he has trademarked
his own process as
"Claymation") for Walt
Disney' Return To Oz Vinton's
animated version of the gnome
king was very preferrable to the
live actor version of the character
used in close-ups.
Vinton's latest effort was this
past summer's The Adventures of
Mark Twain, a stunning, entirely
Claymation feature which was in
the works for approximately
three years.
I jFhf 4$rfn�3'frl�M�e ftim in-
volved Twain, accompanied by
Tom, Becky, and Huck, flying a
Jules Verne-type space craft to
rendez-vous with Haley's Comet
(with which Twain had pro-
phesied he would depart this
world � and did, though not in
the elaborate fashion of the film).
However, the bulk of the
movie was adaptations of
Twain's lesser known and more
cynical tales, such as "The Diary
of Adam and Eve" and "The
Mysterious Stranger While this
film marked Vinton's return to
classics, the material was
decidedly anti-God and made a
startling contrast with his earlier
work.
Although Mark Twain's tone
was depressing as opposed to the
bitter sweetness of The Little
Prince or Ivan the Cobbler, it was
more visually stunning than
anything the studio had attemp-
ted before. The visualizationof
Satan in "The Mysterious
Stranger" segment is as chilling
as Disney's version in "Night On
Bald Mountain" in Fantasia.
Satan is depicted as a mound
is foot. Part II
Tracks Spark Fear
By MONTE GIBBS
9Uff Writer
"The biggest, ugliest tracks
I've seen Brody Parker summ-
ed up the overall feeling of most
people in North Carolina for-
tunate enough, or unfortunate
enough, to have received a
Bigfoot visit.
In fact, it seems that the elusive
creature suspected of lurking in
our state is not welcome at all.
Though most people do not grant
the creature existence, some have
been given a showing, willing or
not. This installment discusses
two such people within our state.
Brody Parker, a resident of
Chatham County, thought she
had been warned of the creature's
presence before the tracks were
found. The Parker family dog
was behaving strangely a few
days before. "He was almost
having a fit he was so scared
said Parker.
The next day, the Parkers
awoke to find one hundred three-
toed footprints making a trail
across their acre garden, leading
into the thick woods near the
river. The tracks, measuring
nineteen inches long with a yard
stride in between prints, lead to a
bean patch, which showed
evidence of a visit. The tops of
some of the beans had been bitten
off, then tossed to the ground.
Limbs from a pecan tree were
broken as well.
Game Warden A.C. Goodwin
of Chatham County was notified,
as was the sheriff. Although the
tracks would later be written off
by the game warden as hoaxes,
the deputy sheriff, Larry Harris,
believed the footprints were ge-
nuine. By the time the investiga-
tion was over, some 200 people
had gathered at the Parker farm,
insisting that a hunt be organiz-
ed.
Harris dismissed the crowd,
and the Parkers plowed up the
field, destroying the evidence.
The disgruntled onlookers gave
up on the hunt, as well as
testimony. But Brody Parker
began to wonder if her farm was
a regular path for the creature,
and remembered the words of her
landlady ten years before when
the family had moved in.
"She told me there were two
and three hooks on every door
and to use them
Another individual, a hunter
who wished to remain
See PEOPLE, page 8
'Comedy In The Zone
Shock Dishes Up The Wit
By MONTE GIBBS
9Wf rttec
5-
I "Hey pal, didja here the one
about the
Every office, classroom, dorm
and restaurant in the world has
heard this intro by the now
famous "local-yokel the guy
who cracks jokes, usually corny
ones, all day as if he were paid to.
Sometimes the jokes and the
comedy may get on your nerves,
especially when the delivery is
poor.
Rm Stock breagM �ean of ImgMtr to the cyw of
�tT.Wt Comedy Zone.
Well T.Ws has done comedy
right.
T.Ws, the fashionable night
club located four miles from cen-
tral campus down 10th street,
then left on 264 bypass, has
unveiled a new source of comedy
entertainment in Greenville ap-
propriately called " The Comedy
Zone Held Wednesday nights
on center stage in T.Ws, this oc-
casion is the perfect vehicle for
up and coming comedians to use
to display their material and test
the waters.
The Comedy Zone is part of a
national resurgence in live com-
edy entertainment. Comedians
who began by doing stand-up
comedy in night-clubs � per-
formers like Jay Leno, Billy
Crystal, and David Letterman �
became successful through
movies, television series and
specials, popularizing comedy.
"I've found that small towns
like Greenville really do have a
lot of people waiting for some
good laughs said comedian
Ron Shock, the feature act last
Wednesday. Indeed Greenville
must, because Ron Shock and his
opening act, Danny Gray, had
the entire audience in tears.
Shock, who is currently tour-
ing the United States, does a ter-
rific range of material ranging
from discussion about Oral
Roberts' 900 feet tall Jesus to a
hilarious bit called "Sex is Good
When The somewhat less ex-
perienced opening comedian
Danny Gray, though less funny,
still had the audience entranced.
These two talented performers
are just a few of the headlincrs
that will be featured at T.Ws.
The club presents acts in a com-
fortable, leisurely atmosphere
that makes it hard to be uptight
for long. The comics are usually
at ease, too, and perform good,
uncensored fun for patrons over
18 years of age.
of alien dust from the waist
down, a robotic exo-skeleton
from the waist up, but with no
head. Instead, he holds a
theatrical mask above his neck
when he speaks and the mask oc-
casionally distorts horribly as the
creature's evil exceeds his ability
to contain it.
Rip Van Winkle, The Little
Prince, and Ivan the Cobbler
have appeared on select pay-
movie channels over the holidays
under the umbrella title of
"Trilogy
"A Christmas Gift" has shown
up on CBN's "700 Club" and
Return To Oz is available on
video cassette along with "Closed
Mondays which is part of the
Fantastic Animation Festival
And if you are lucky, you mav
catch the John Fogerty 'Will Vin-
ton collaboration on MTV.
Any new Vinton productions
should be watched for. Thev
create a sense of wonder which is
the very soul of animation.
Above is rnn artist's conception of the size a Sasquatch ma reach.
The Review
Heads Firmly Planted
By D. A. SWANSON
What a pretty, pretty album.
Beat Rodeo's Home In The Heart
Of The Beat is so neat and clean
and obvious that you'd better
cover your stereo with plastic
before playing it. (When you
desperately try to remove the nee-
dle from the disk you may ac-
cidentally spew that wonderful
Mendenhall Pirate Burger lunch
all over it.) Maybe they just tried
too hard.
But, seriously now, how could
not only Beat Rodeo, but I.R.S.
records as well, allow something
like this Nutra-Sweet coated
hunk of armadillo doo-doo to
even make it to the printers?
Especially after such a promising
debut release last year with Stay-
ing Out Late With Beat Rodeo
Who knows?
The primary, and probablv
sole reason for this unfortunate
flop however, is in the produc
tion by Scott Litt. Whereas the
debut was produced primarily b
See NEW ALBUMS, page 8
Hooters Offers Fare
For All Occasions
By BECKY TOY
9Uff Writer
It seems hard to imagine that a
civilized establishment would ex-
ist in the shadow of a Farm Fresh
grocery store, but that is where
you'll find Hooters. A cozy
place, with a spacious cathedral
ceiling and loft, Hooters is open
seven days a week to offer a wide
variety of soups, salads, sand-
wiches and some of the best ap-
petizers around to munch on.
You, meanwhile, may kick back
with a beer or a drink, relaxing
The appetizers run the gamut
from Boiled Shrimp ($6.25),
Fried Mushrooms or a Vegetable
Medley, fried also (around
$2.50), to Beer Batter Onion
Rings ($1.45) and the ever
popular Potato Skins ($3.50),
with a variety of toppings.
They're all highly edible, but the
Fried Mushrooms always call my
name on any menu.
Hooters also offers a Mexican
selection of appetizers ($2.75 to
$5.25), with choices ranging from
Nachos to Mexican Pizza.
In the entree section it is im-
possible to choose one category.
The stuffed potatoes ($3.75 to
$4.25) which come with a salad
are huge and full of diet-defying
shrimp, hamburger, or ham and
mushrooms, and drip with
cheese.
The burgers ($4.25) are done
untraditionally: with names like
Cheeseburger in Paradise and a
Bacon and Swiss, how can you go
wrong? The sandwiches are a
mixture of the classics, like the
French Dip or Corned Beef on
Rye ($4.25 to $3.50) and some
killer-combos like the Hooter,
the Nite Owl Spectacular, or the
Lite Owl ($3.75, $3.95, $2.95).
For dessert you may have a
hard time choosing from the
Kahlua Mousse and Fried Ice
Cream ($1.75, $1.50), or giving it
all up for a coffee, liquour and
whipped cream concoction,
which is just as sinful and satisfy-
ing.
So, when you're out on the 264
Neon Way, scoping the usual fast
food joints, thinking about
eating your way through the
grocery store, stop: check out
Hooter's. It's an intimate little
place, with great food and ex-
cellent service.

����:�" � "T3L l
���
m � m
mamim�a
mm





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 23, 1986
New Albums By Beat Rodeo And Talking Heads Reviewed a 1tthnr
Continued from page 7 BeaI Rodeo and Sku, Go baV).line .nvthin. hv Ph,kH�,H � . . JM W I I I J I
Continued from page 7
North Carolinian Don Dixon and
was recorded live, this new effort
has a one hundred percent studio
sound. All of the spontaneity and
soul of this actually fine band has
been mercilessly sanded and hon-
ed down to a flat, obsequious
Muzac-combo.
This tragedy does have its
moments, however. If you listen
very, that's VERY � closely to
"Everything I'm Not" you may
hear the deeply quavering
soprano of New Jersey's Syd
Straw. But you've got to dig
under Steve Almaas' sometimes
bothersome voice and the Holi-
day Inn organ keyboards.
It" some well-meaning friend
should give you this piece of
vinyl, you might want to try-
listening to that song and perhaps
"New Love" and "Home In The
Heart Of The Beat But, even
here, beware. My apologies to
People Tell
Of Bigfoot
Visitations
Continued from page 7
anonymous, relayed his story to
Gordon Strasenburgh, an avid
Bigfoot hunter from Atlanta,
Georgia. Strasenburgh has since
moved, but continues to pursue
Sasquatches throughout the
southeast. The hunter's story was
particularly interesting since he
had seen the creatures over four
times in the last 20 years.
Remarkably, the creatures had
been spotted in the same loca-
tion.
Strasenburgh received a call
from the hunter, a native of
Charlotte. The hunter had spent
a great deal of time tracking on
South Mountain, one of the
many ranges along the Blue
Ridge Mountains, which extends
down from Morganton and
Hickory.
"For the latest encounter, he
was camping near a stream in
South Mountain said Strasen-
burgh. "Around twilight, after
he had finished eating but with a
fire still going, his dog first bark-
ed and then curled up and whin-
ed. He saw something bent down,
which then straightened up. 'I
know it was seven feet tall,
because I'm 6'2 the hunter
said
According to Strasenburgh,
the hunter said, "It had no neck,
smelled like a really bad dump,
and made a sound which began
with a growl and went to a howl
or whistle
Strasenburgh continued, "He
took it for granted that it was a
male. He had a 30-30 Winchester
with him and fired at it after it
began to walk away. It let out
another howl or whistle and went
off into the woods
"He said he almost fainted
when it first stood up said
Strasenburgh, "and that it was
like a big human, with long arms
and shoulders he described as
'widehugemaybe four feet
across. The arms were as big as
telephone poles
William Roemmerman,
founder of the American Sas-
quatch Association, started that
group after seeing and tracking
several creatures in Washington,
Oregon, and California. He is
widely known as an expert among
Bigfoot investigators.
Roemmerman said, "Though
they (Sasquatches) certainly are
not as commonly seen or
numerous in reports, there is a
definite study showing the
presence of this, or some similar
type of animal within the con-
fines of the state of North
Carolina
Perhaps the creature is not
welcome here. But local animosi-
ty would not be unwarranted.
The Sasquatch has been known,
within this state, to have caused
property damage, destroyed
fences, eaten crops and animal
feed, yelled and howled for ex-
ceptionally long periods at night,
and scattered garbage cans.
Aside from the obvious fact of
how unsettling it would be to run
into one of them, creatures do
have some history of a hatred of
pursuit, in particular by dogs. In
some isolated incidences, dogs
have been torn in two, and slam-
med into the sides of houses by
the creatures. Some Sasquatches
have been witnessed mangling
dogs with their own hands as if
they were wadded pieces of
paper.
The Bigfoot creature has not
made friends within our state.
MM
v
Beat Rodeo and Skully. Go
throw a rock at Litt.
But, all is not sludge this week.
New, from the Talking Heads, is
True Stories and it is a treat.
What once appeared as "David
'Psycho Byrne and his Talking
Heads" has finally transformed
into Byrne-Frantz-Weymouth-
Harrison, all-American flipped-
out family! The music is even and
solid, Byrne's voice is as multi-
layered as ever, and Tina
Weymouth has finally taken full
control of her once slightly timid
bass-line.
With True Stories this once
aloof and austere group of
musical artists from the seventies
(More Songs About Buildings
And Food, Fear Of Music) has
made the full promenade through
synthetic experimentation and
finally rediscovered the American
Dream.
In fact, there is a considerable
amount of dreaming going on
here. "City of Dreams" and
especially "Dream Operator"
may be more dreamlike than
anything by Pink Floyd.
But the most overwhelming im-
age on this album is the wide-
open-spaces feeling strongest in
songs like "Radio Head" and
"People Like Us Something
here is very reminiscent of Re-
main In Light's "The Big Coun-
try The better part of this new
LP was recorded in various
studios in Texas giving it a quali-
ty which is a complete turn-
around from their early days in
Rhode Island and New York. It
sounds like they've finally got
their feet firmly planted in the
earth.
"Love For Sale" and "Papa
Legbo for all you old Heads
fans, have got just enough of the
old frantic Byrne sound to re-
mind us that, yes, this is the same
group. And "Hey Now with its
strolling-in-Barbados rhythms
may even attract a few new fans
from the Jimmy Buffet ranks.
The only weak spots here are in
"Puzzlin' Evidence and
"Wild, Wild Life" (now receiv-
ing heavy airplay). But even these
songs are relatively good
True Stories may not become
an all-time best-seller, but for
people of especially
discriminating taste, this is the
album of the year.
Next week we'll be looking at
The Johnson's debut album.
Break Tomorrow's Day as well as
� (drum roll, please) � The new
Boston disk. So, see you there.
And once again, thanks to
WZMB and Dangerous Dave
Elliot for all of the continuing
support and celestial insight.
WE WILL MATCH
ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE
PRICE IN GREENVILLE, N.C.
Excluding Meat, Produce,
Deli, Bakery & Continuity
Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With
You. We Will Match
Like Items Or Equal
Quality.
The supermarket with
Will?!
lYAKHHIMISi;
MUCKS
OIULITY TIM
SS�0cllVSi �R�UGM SAT SEPT 2' AT iA. ACEN'irR MGRCEMvi-it
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES
u
ntroducing
plus
Double Coupons
See store for details
POLICY
BEEF - PORK - LAMB - VEAL
Fiesh C ut
A&P s tnmmmg mo-e from their beef than ever before and that s good news for you'
Because lean beef m an important source of nutrition for today s health and d.et-conscous
American You see lean beef provides h.gh amounts of nutrients - especially protein ,ron
zmc. and Vitamin Bt2 in relation to its calorie content Did you know that a 3' oz (80 q)
serving of s.riom tip has (ust 168 calor.es? So go ahead En)0y lean beef today
A&P s THIN TRIM pol cy
makes it easy'
sameFiavo- Better Value
ZJflffVfflflKVfl
BONELESS TOP
GOLDEN RIPE
Sirloin Steaknumbo Honeydews
32 oz.
jar
LIMIT ONE WITH AN AOOlTION
PURCHASE AT EVERVOAV LOW P
DOUBLE � Q
Chunk
UaMT TWO WTT
PURCHASE AT EV
REGULAR OR
re
risco S
riscol s3fc'r,e�9 3
-�" I j C
tMIT ORE OF YOUR Cl
PURCHASE AT E
OPEN SUNDAY
� mWiWi i�hmrOTi
�yiiii � in mi � uii
!� ' 1"
(UPI) � Toiling barefoot in an ween
enchanting garden of strange has
I shaped cacti helps visionary tholoi
author Robert Silver berg steer his comr
soaring mind back to the planet to gn
I Earth. mechi
"They're truly a science fiction for t.
I kind of plant said SiKerberg of 5tor
the alien-like world of succulents Fine,
he grows outside his stone and and
I brick home hidden on a pinnacle futunj
of the Oakland hills just east of them
jSan Francisco. begins
At high noon each day, Bor
jSilverberg promptly sets aside his and
jtask of creating new galaxies and L'nivel
space tales to enter the garden his fii
and dig in the dirt. It helps him C, at
relax and switch off a vivid lm- Teen
agination. The top selling author prohfi
who has turned out more than 40 tc
books in a 30-year career of Nebuij
science fiction writing follows a as pre
rigid daily routine. He gets up at tion
6 a.m eats breakfast, feeds his Siivt
three cats, shuffles through the sionali
;mail and sits down at his com- wand
puter in a stone guest cottage scienc
where he creates cosmic chaos nove.si
from 8:30 a.m. until noon. novel
He doesn't drink coffee, ned sc
smoke cigarettes or space out more
once a project is underway. And books
he never works on weekends. scienc
"By noon I've reached the 'i
point where what I'm writing no reader,1
longer makes sense to me he have
said. "I really work in a headlong :
way that wipes me out. So I'm d on
happy to stagger out, get some blastn
lunch and go into the garden. I 'Thl
start recovering about m;d after- deeply
noon and I try not to think about is moi
my work at all until the next mor- fun '
ning Sih
Presently, Silverberg is bet- ideas
Anno
SOCIAL WORK
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
riser xa inaat 9 of Mt nas �-c
CORSO or Two Seot 23 a 5 15 p - -
.DSta.T ioeo� a AAe-ae A Sac a
�ftorK cc Cf mum) Just.ce r-aars ana Ml
fO�o WHm are aikeo c �t�no
t 1
ECUSURFIN6
The team n-ieis were held 'as Suneav a'
Rooanme You can �t.n surt a- Na a� I
ou missed the Try outs The I -v contes s
OC 11 12 n Ocean City. Me "There � �� a
school van gong or Hi 5 h- p -err � � r
meeting this Thurs a" I - -00m g "i
JOyner Library Br,nQ a insurance 0 Ml
"sure you eg.b.i.N or �he 'ea- Bwst) anc
girls art welcome '0 me MMltoaj �nc a
newcomers are crgee to aftenc
ECU AMBASSADORS
A�oassaoors1 Dor' torse' �doa.
recept on tor new memoers or wee Sec
24tr A general meeting for mew ene aw;
members oe wee Oc� 1 at S IS n the
multipurpose room of Menoenhah
PPMA
Pre D'Otess orj neaNk A a-ce nave
a mee� rig on wee Seo Jam M -00 J4 a" t
p m a) RAenaenn �tAe'nbers a'e 'Sc c
atteno Aim any r-eresfec $tyoe"ts are
welcome to come to me meet no a, M
ALPHA EPSILON
DELTA
Attention members There w be a
meet.no .n F �7 at 7 ane Este AAason ��
tor of voluntw Services a' PCMM � oe
me speaker Everyone we come 0f cers
There w-H be a meet.no, a' I 3C M P anager
Study Lounge
ECUGOSPELCMOIR
The ECU Go�pei Co e'eser's once aga R
their annual Song Show Tues Sec Z3
pm in Menor x Theare Aa ss or sja-e
aoor prizes w M be g ver ewa
EARLY CHILDHOOD
EDUCATION CLUB
ECJ memiers want vou 'ciki pa" at mm
? amily Please 10 us for a mee' ngor wee
sept 24Wi a � 3C - So�g� 301
PRIME TIME
Sponsorec by Campus C-uveoe tor C m
W� 0�t together every Thursoay at� c �
�n I'fwi'r room 10 6 Three reasons M
have tun fellowship, ana gooo '&
teachings s�e you mere
MARAUDERS
An on campus aovenhjre group .mute ��
' "Tereatea students to afno first mee�mg
Oct 1 a' 5 - room 711 aAenoenrujii
LAW SOCIETY
Will hotd its second meeting Tes -�g"
S�P� 23 �-B-ewster D '3e'i Members�rc
enceurpge �o bring a friend and all n
'eretttd students are invited to attend
Pl�)e remember that due are still being
collected Let ut litigate;
COUNSELING CENTER
Arc you planning an taking me GRE
LSAT. MAT. MEOCAT or ottwjr standard!
�� tnttT Tnit workshop win cover bagic tn-
'brmajtton about these test, test taking
�'ra��gy and �mp�e terns Sa)t.�.�ip.l"
JU Wrtgw BKtg Maw ta aw wail on me 6RE1
' rm arg planning on taking me GRE Mr eo
migaMn sg Grad School mis � fcariaa can
���� V� prepare Tyagg a� im�. Mat taking
����v. scores and sample iMn� win be
�at B.Spm 3'3 ffr" �'dg
k"






8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTFMBfcR2.1, 986
New Albums By Beat Rodeo And Talking Heads Reviewed
Continued from page 7
North Carolinian Don Dixon and
was recorded live, this new effort
has a one hundred percent studio
sound. All of the spontaneity and
soul of this actually fine band has
been mercilessly sanded and hon-
ed down to a fiat, obsequious
Muzac-combo.
This tragedy does have its
moments, however. If you listen
very, that's VERY � closely to
"Eerthing I'm Not" you may
hear the deeply quavering
soprano of New Jersey's Syd
Straw But you've got to dig
under Stee Almaas' sometimes
bothersome oice and the Holi-
day Inn organ keyboards.
It some well-meaning friend
should give you this piece of
vinyl, you might want to try
listening to that song and perhaps
"New Loe" and "Home In The
Heart Of The Beat But, even
here, beware. My apologies to
People Tell
Of Bigfoot
Visitations
Continued from page 7
anonymous, relayed his story to
Gordon Strasenburgh, an avid
Bigfoot hunter from Atlanta.
Georgia. Strasenburgh has since
moed. but continues to pursue
Sasquatches throughout the
southeast. The hunter's story was
particularly interesting since he
had seen the creatures oer four
times in the last 20 years.
Remarkably, the creatures had
been spotted in the same loca-
tion.
Strasenburgh received a call
from the hunter, a native oi
Charlotte The hunter had spent
a great deal of time tracking on
South Mountain, one of the
manv ranges along ihe Blue
R:Jge Mountains, which extends
down from Morganton and
Hickorv.
"For the latest encounter, he
was camping near a stream in
South Mountain said Strasen-
burgh. "Around twilight, after
he had finished eating but with a
fire stiM going, his dog first bark-
ed and then curled up and whin-
ed. He saw something bent down,
which then straightened up. T
know it was seven feet tall,
because I'm 6'2 the hunter
said
According to Strasenburgh,
the hunter said, "It had no neck,
smelled like a really bad dump,
and made a sound which began
with a growl and went to a howl
or whistle
Strasenburgh continued. "He
took it for granted that it was a
male. He had a 30-30 Winchester
with him and fired at it after it
began to walk away. It let out
another howl or whistle and went
off into the woods
"He said he almost fainted
when it first stood up said
Strasenburgh, "and that it was
like a big human, with long arms
and shoulders he described as
'wide.hugemaybe four feet
across. The arms were as big as
telephone poles
William Roemmerman,
founder of the American Sas-
quatch Association, started that
group after seeing and tracking
several creatures in Washington,
Oregon, and California. He is
widely known as an expert among
Bigfoot investigators.
Roemmerman said, "Though
they (Sasquatches) certainly are
not as commonly seen or
numerous in reports, there is a
definite study showing the
presence of this, or some similar
type of animal within the con-
fines of the state of North
Carolina
Perhaps the creature is not
welcome here. But local animosi-
ty would not be unwarranted.
The Sasquatch has been known,
within this state, to have caused
property damage, destroyed
fences, eaten crops and animal
feed, yelled and howled for ex-
ceptionally long periods at night,
and scattered garbage cans.
Aside from the obvious fact of
how unsettling it would be to run
into one of them, creatures do
have some history of a hatred of
pursuit, in particular by dogs. In
some isolated incidences, dogs
have been torn in two, and slam-
med into the sides of houses by
the creatures. Some Sasquatches
have been witnessed mangling
dogs with their own hands as if
they were wadded pieces of
paper.
The Bigfoot creature has not
made friends within our state.
Beat Rodeo and Skully. Go
throw a rock at Liu.
But, all is not sludge this week.
New, from the Talking Heads, is
True Stories and it is a treat.
What once appeared as "David
'Psycho' Byrne and his Talking
Heads" has finally transformed
into Byrne-Frantz-Weymouth-
Harnson, all-American flipped-
out family! The music is even and
solid, Byrne's voice is as multi-
layered as ever, and Tina
Weymouth has finally taken full
control of her once slightly timid
bass-line.
With True Stories this once
aloof and austere group of
musical artists from the seventies
(More Songs About Buildings
And Food, Fear Of Music) has
made the full promenade through
synthetic experimentation and
finally rediscovered the American
Dream.
In fact, there is a considerable
amount of dreaming going on
here. "City of Dreams" and
especially "Dream Operator"
mav be more dreamlike than
anything by Pink Floyd.
But the most overwhelming im-
age on this album is the wide-
open-spaces feeling strongest in
songs like "Radio Head" and
"People Like Us Something
here is very reminiscent of Re-
main In Light's "The Big Coun-
try The better part of this new
IP was recorded in various
studios in Texas giving it a quali-
ty which is a complete turn-
around from their early days in
Rhode Island and New York. It
sounds like they've finally got
their feet firmly planted in the
earth
"Love For Sale" and "Papa
legbo for all you old Heads
fans, have got just enough of the
old frantic Byrne sound to re-
mind us that, yes. this is the same
group. And "Hey Now with its
strolling-in-Barbados rhythms
may even attract a few new fans
from the Jimmy Buffet ranks.
The only weak spots here are in
"Puzzlin' Evidence and
"Wild. Wild Life" (now receiv-
ing heavy airplay). But even these
songs are relative!) good
True Stories mav not become
an ail time best seller, but for
people of especially
discriminating taste, this is the
album of the year
Next week we'll be looking at
The Johnson's debut album.
Break Tomorrow 's Day as well as
� (drum roll, please) � The new
Boston disk So. see vou there
And once again, thanks to
WZMB and Dangerous Dave
Elliot for all of the continuing
support and celestial insight
WE WILL MATCH
ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE
PRICE IN GREENVILLE. N.C.
Excluding Meat. Produce,
Deli, Bakery & Continuity
Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With
You. We Will Match
Like Items Or Equal
Quality.
The supermarket with
WAICHIMMISi:
l�ltM:b
WIAiJTY UNI
PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGHSAT SEPT 2 AT SAV �0 �- ,�,ts.
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QuAN' T f S
WjIKKHOIISI
I
plus
Double Coupons
See store for details
nt
Ft
roducinq
New
ff
POLICY
BEEF PORK-LAMB VEAL
I
f M-sh e ut
A&P trimming more from heir beef than ever be'ore and that s good news tot you'
Because iear beef is an important source of nutrition for today s health and diet conscious
AmrriCdn You see iean beef provides high amounts of nutrients especially protein iron
rin( arJ Vitamin B'2 in relation to its calorie content Did you know that a 3 oz (80 g1
sfving of sinoin t p has ;us! 168 calories9 So go ahead EnOy lean beet today
AiP s THiN TRIM pol cy
makes it easy'
sameFiavo Better Value
THIN TRIM GRAIN FED BEEF
BONELESS TOP
GOLDEN RIPE
Sirloin Steakl'Jumbo Honeydews
ii

DUKE'S
m m m WW FRESH
Mayonnaise pfohoe Frm
V' IO
0
JMlT ONE WITH AN ADD' TIOSAl
PURCHASE AT EVER? DAY LOW PRICE
DOUBLE "Q" � IN OIL OR WATER
Chunk Light Juna
CRISP FANCY GOLD OR
Delicious AppleS
Mfe
P&Q
V
V
6.5 oz.
can
UNIT TWO WITH AM AOOmONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE.
iNri
bsA
�PEI
REGULAR OR BUTTER FLAVOR
risco Shortening
f(risc s3h�� 3 ib. 168
I -� �-�� i � can
tea
IT ONE OF YOUR CHOICE AlIH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
HOMESTYLE � REGULAR
Paper Towels
:
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERVOAV LOW PRICE
Coca Cola
99�
2 Liter
Bottle
Good only in Greenville, N.C.
CHICKEN � TURKEY � SALISBURY STEAK
MEAT LOAF � CHOPPED BEEF
Banquet Dinners
89
11 oz.
pkg
H&
TROPICANA
W T'W"�"
m �f�
Orange Juice
REGULAR � LIGHT
Stroh's Light
STRdf)H
64 oz.
ctn.
ctn. of
12 oz.
cans
BEEF � TURKEY � CHICKEN
Morton Pot Pies
8 02.
pkgs.
OPEN SUNDAY 7 A.M11 BMlK 703 GREENVILLE BLVD. OPEN 24 H0URS
Author
(UPI) � Toiling barefoot in ar.
enchanting garden of strange
shaped cacti helps visionar
author Robert Silver berg tied
soaring mind back to the plane
Earth.
"They're truly a science fiction
kind of plant said Sirverberg �f
the aUen-hke world of succuki
he grows outside his stone and
brick home hidden on a pinnacle
of the Oakland his just east of
San Francisco.
At high noon e- da)
Silverberg promptly sets aside I
task of creating new galaxies I
space tales to enter
and dig in the din V hell
relax and switch off a vivid ai
agination. The ' t e
who has turned out more thai i
books in a 30-yea' carea
science fiction writing Pol � �
rigid daily routine He gel
6 a.m eas breakfasi Ph I
three ca shuffle- thx
mail and sits dow at his n
puter in a stone . "age
,here he creae- cosmic
from 8:30 a.m. until n
He doesn it
smoke cigarettes i -race
once a project - inderwa
he never works " eee-
"By noon I've rear
point where wha
longer make- sense tc m
said. "1 really work in a head
way that wipe1- me
happy ' staggei
lunch and go
start recovering aboui I
noon and I try not t
my work at all ant th -
ning "
Presently. Sii-
ee.
has
thole
comit
to gl
� � -
F in
Be
( i
l
Anno
SOCIAL WORK
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
!� � � " - t - s -
-an Turnz
- W�3 -��
� �- - - -a � t � VS�-
��-3�C B OTS '� a�
ECU SURFING
� ���- �� a wer head
ROUfrtftt -x - � s �-? -
- Mi � ssc Me � .� -� �� �
� 1-11 - D:ta- Dly. MS 1 mr � r� a
sc-oc .a" r - � .
meeting m�j rtturs a' I - -
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s Reviewed
in the
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tw fans
Irks
are in
and
ireceiv
songs are relatively good.
True Stories mav not become
an all time be-a-seller, but for
people of especially
discriminating taste, this is the
album of the ear.
Next week we'll be looking at
I he Johnson's debut album,
Hreak Tomorrow 's Day as well as
(drum roll, please) � The new
Boston disk So, see ou there.
nd once again, thanks to
WZMR and Dangerous Dave
Elliot: for all of the continuing
support and celestial insight.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 23. 1986
(UPI) � Toiling barefoot in an
enchanting garden of strange
shaped cacti helps visionary
author Robert Silverberg steer his
soaring mind back to the planet
Earth.
"They're truly a science fiction
kind of plant said Silverberg of
the alien-like world of succulents
he grows outside his stone and
brick home hidden on a pinnacle
o( the Oakland hills just east of
San Francisco.
At high noon each day,
Silverberg promptly sets aside his
task of creating new galaxies and
space tales to enter the garden
and dig in the dirt. It helps him
relax and switch off a vivid im-
agination. The top selling author
n ho has turned out more than 40
books in a 30-year career of
science fiction writing follows a
rigid daily routine. He gets up at
6 a.m cats breakfast, feeds his
three cats, shuffles through the
nail and sits down at his com-
puter in a stone guest cottage
vhere he creates cosmic chaos
from 8:30 a.m. until noon.
He doesn't drink coffee,
Ntnoke cigarettes or space out
once a project is underway. And
he never works on weekends.
"By noon I've reached the
point where what I'm writing no
longer makes sense to me he
said. "I really work in a headlong
way that wipes me out. So I'm
happy to stagger out, get some
lunch and go into the garden. I
start recovering about mid after-
noon and I try not to think about
my work at all until the next mor-
ning
Presently, Silverberg is bet-
ween science fiction novels. He
has been editing a sci-fi an-
thology in which he analyzes and
comments on the selected stories
to give readers a sense of the
mechanics that go into writing
for this genre. His latest novel,
Star Of Gypsies, (Donald I.
Fine, $18.95) was just released
and he'll begin work on a new
futuristic book as soon as Nor-
thern California's rainy season
begins.
Born in New York City in 1935
and educated at Columbia
University, Silverberg published
his first novel, Revolt on Alpha
C, at age 20 and it became a
Teenage Book Club selection. A
prolific writer, he has since won
two Hugo Awards and four
Nebula Awards, and has served
as president of the Science Fic-
tion Writers of America.
Silverberg says it takes profes-
sionalism rather than a magic
wand to consistently create good
science fiction and fantasy
novels. He produces about one
novel a year, and he has also pen-
ned scores of short stories and
more than a dozen non-fiction
books in the fields of history,
science and archeology.
"I don't write for dimwit
readers said Silverberg. "I
have enough of an adult science
fiction audience to sustain me. I
don't have to write ray-gun
blasting nonsense.
"The best science fiction is
deeply moving and powerful and
is mostly middle of the road
fun
Silverberg said most of his
ideas arrive internally and sub-
Of
consciously as a "little subliminal
twitch which he either accepts
or rejects.
"The beginning's usually very
small, a little dust nucleus around
which a snowflake will form, a
fleck of something in my mind,
often a title he said. "A tide
will come to me and obviously
something is attached to it in my
subconscious and I will think,
'What kind of story will fit a title
like that?' It's not a conscious
question because in the process,
suddenly the story follows
In Star of Gypsies, Silverberg
creates an epic and complex story
in which vagabond gypsies
descended from a dead Earth
roam the galaxies of the future
seeking their true identity and
home � a place called Romany
Star.
"I write the situation down
and then follow a process of
manipulating it said Silverberg.
In Gypsies, the situation started
as gypsies from Earth going into
space and wandering from planet
to planet the way they wander on
Earth.
"That idea rapidly led me to,
'Suppose gypsies came from
space to begin with?' And next,
whose story are we telling? What
happens to them? What are the
obstacles that need to be over-
come and so on. That's how it
happens. It's largely an un-
conscious process that occurs
over and over
Within the plot, Silverberg in-
vents a new form of space travel
called relay sweep and shows
readers such scenes as green ten-
tacles wriggling above an icepack
Announcements
SOCIAL WORK
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
There will be a meeting of the NASW ana
CORSO 00 Tues . Sept 23 at 5 15 p m ,n
upstairs looby of MenrjenhaM All Social
Work and Criminal Justice maiors ana m
'endea maiors are asked to attend
ECO SURFING
team tri8is were tieie last Sunday at
tne You can still surf on the team if
ssec the fry outs The first contest is
� n Ocean City, Md There MM be a
van gomg on this trip There is a dub
ig this Trur5 at in room B 104.
Lbrary Bring all insurance info, to
you eiig.b'iity on the team Guys and
r� welcome to the meeting and any
"ers are urged to attend
ECU WINDSURFING
CLUB
The ECU Windsurfing Club is now being
formed There will be an organizational
meeting for anyone interested in windsurf
� ng in Mendenhall 247 on Wed . Sept 24th at
� Trips, instruction and FUN IN THE SUN!
Beginners welcome
POLITICAL SCIENCE
TheDept of Pol Science needs work study
students for clerical positions Please appiy
in the Political Science Office Brewster
A 124 or inquire at 757-4030
The
Rjioan
Ou m
Oct II
SCtlOOi
Tiff' n
JOyner
nsure
3'r's a
"ewcc
ECU AMBASSADORS
Aoassadors! Don't forget about the
-ecept.on for new members on Wed Sept
24Hl A general meeting for mew and old
emoers will be Wed , Oct 1 at 5 15 m the
multipurpose room of Mendenhall
ECU VETERANS
CLUB
Will meet on Tues .Sept 30 at 7 30 p m ,n
room 212. Mendenhall The mam topics will
be nommahons of officers, discussion of the
Veterans Day 10K race and parade, and the
club's Tailgate Party at the next home game
against Southwestern Louisiana on Oct 4
Come and share your idaat and give us you
support involvement is the key to this year's
success! All students, faculty, and staff are
mvited to attend. See you there!
ECU FACULTY AND
STAFF CLUB
Applications for the ECU Faculty erw
Staff Club are available by calling ext 4454
Apply before the next activity on October
11th to take full advantage yMr(y
dues
Riggan Sho Repair
111 West 4th St.
Downtown Greenville
"Shoe Repjir Ai rhe I en Best
758-0204
PPMA
Pre professional Health Alliance will have
a meeting on Wed . Sept 24th ,n room 247 at 7
in Mendenhall Members are urged to
'teno Also any interested students are
eicome to come to the meeting as well.
ALPHA EPSILON
DELTA
Attention members There will be a
-eetmg ,n F 307 at 7 and Estel Mason, dlrec
tor of Volunteer Services at PCMH, will be
rht speaker Everyone welcome. Officers
'here will be a meeting at a 30 in Flanagen
Study Lounge
5TH STREET IMPORT
SERVICE
MOVES
ECUGOSPELCHOIR
The ECU Gospel Choir presents once again
their annual Song Show Tues Sept 23. 7
P m m Hendrix Theatre Admission is SI and
door pr.zes will be given away
EARLY CHILDHOOD
EDUCATION CLUB
EC2 members want you to be a part of our
family. Please iom us for a meeting on Wed .
sept 24th at 4 30 in Speight 30i
�Finest in Foreign Car Repair
�We repair Toyota, Honda, VW, Fiat, Porsche
Volvo, Datsun, Lotus, Mercedes, BMW, Audi'
bubaru and others
�New Location! Dickinson & Memorial - across
from Lincoln Mercury Dealership.
4500 sq.ft.
2204 Dickinson Ave.
756-9434
PRIME TIME
Sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ
e get together every Thursday at 7 30 p m
'� Brewster. room 103 B Three reasons: to
"ave fun, fellowship, and good Bible
'each.ngs see you there
MARAUDERS
An on campus adventure group invites all
"terested students to attend its first meeting
Oct 1 at 5 in room 221 Mendenhall.
LAW SOCIETY
Win hold its second meeting Tues. night,
Sept 23 in Brewster D 113 at I. Members ere
encourage to bring a friend, and all m
'erested students are invited to attend
Pease remember that dues ft still being
collected. Let us litigate)
COUNSELING CENTER
Are you planning on taking the GRE
i-SAT, MAT, MEDCAT or Other stendardiz
eo tests? This workshop will cover basic In-
formation about these tests, ta�t taking
strategy and sample items. Sept 29. 4-S p.m.
5'J Wright Bldg Mow to do well on the GRE!
H you are planning on taking me GRE for ad-
mission to Gred School, this workshop can
n�P ou prepare Types of items, teat taking
strategy, scores, and sample items will be
aicussed Sept. 30. 4-5 p.m JU Wright Bldg
HELP WANTED:
The East Carolinian is now hiring
typesetters to work mornings and
afternoons. Typing speed of 40 wpm and
faster preferred. Call 757-6366 or stop by
the Publications Building.
that turn out to be the tops of
trees living in a frozen, buried
forest.
The decision to make the wav-
ing tentacles a plant instead of an
animal was a twist of imagery,
said Silverberg, and it creates a
surprise for the reader. The relay-
sweep, in which a sphere of force
picks up space travellers and fl-
ings them haphazardly through
galaxies, was just subconscious
improvisation, he added.
BLOOM COUNTY
"I don't think anything like
that relay system has ever been
used in science fiction and I
didn't spend two minutes inven-
ting it he said. "It was just
there when I needed it
Silverberg said his background
in history and archeology gives
him some down to earth perspec-
tive on other worlds and events
which, of course, must be highly-
imaginative and exciting.
"I think the one thing that's
say, rWrooY-Poes
the vwflifry (f
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THAT WITHOUT i5 W 'All?
HVNTEfiS UOULP OHUlttP I:�-�
" t- :CJr5if, in no vme
MQlhiK SfMteWOK P
TOASTER i
very important for science fiction
books to do, besides the complex-
ities of plot and the interesting
aspects of character and all that
standard fiction stuff, is to toss
the reader something astounding
every once in awhile. In fact,
more than every once in awhile.
"A novelist is God said
Silverberg. "I've created galax-
ies, made up planets and invented
whole new worlds. But it's all in
the name of entertainment
by Berke Breathed
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THE EAST CAROl INI AN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 23, 1986
Page 10
An uninspired ECU football
team ran into an explosive 10th-
ranked Auburn squad, and the
result was a 45-0 loss for the
Pirates.
ECU fell behind early in the
contest, giving up 21 points in the
opening quarter and trailed 31-0
at the half.
The tone for the contest was set
on Auburn's first possession, as
the Tigers took the opening
kickoff and promptly marched 73
yards in 10 plays. Reggie Ware
covered the final yard with a dive
"The close loss ECU had last
week obviously took a lot out of
them Dye commented. "I still
think ECU has some fine football
players and a fine football
team
However, Baker refused to
blame his team's poor showing
on the West Virginia game.
Last week, we lost a big game
to West Virginia but that's no ex-
cuse for today's performance
Baker said. "We played terribly
on offense and on defense, and
our kicking game was the most
atrocious that I can ever
remember it being
Quarterback Libretto had his
over the top of the line putting first freshman-like outing for the
JON JORDAN- KC'J PHOTO LAB
Airborne!
Cornerback Roswell Streeter flys through the air in an attempt to
block a point after touchdown attempt.
Cross Country Teams
Make Good Showings
By TIM CHANDLER
vmnri, Writer
The ECU men's and women's
cross-country teams once again
had respectable showings this
weekend in the Seahawk Invita-
tional at Wilmington.
In the men's event the Pirates
placed in the seventh position in
the 10-team field.
William & Mary took first
place in the event followed by St.
Augustines. Baptist College
managed to place third, with
Pembroke College grabbing
fourth and Christopher Newport
in fifth.
The leading runner for the
men's team was Milton Matheny,
who placed in the 23rd position
overall with a time of 26:42 on
the 8,000-meter course.
Rob Rice was next for the Bucs
with a time of 27:19, which put
him in 30th place. Third for the
Pirates was Mike McGehee, who
grabbed the 31st position with a
time of 27:23.
Other runners whose scores
counted for ECU included Pete
Higgins, who finished in 46th
place overall with a time of 28:25,
and John Byrd, who placed in
47th place with a 28:27 time.
The Pirates had two other run-
ners whose score did not count.
They were Matt Schweitzer (49th
place with time of 28:58) and
Vincent Wilson (60th place with
time of 31:42).
The women's cross-country
team finished third overall in
their competition out of a field of
eight teams.
St. Augustines won the event
followed by UNC-Wilmington,
who nosed the Pirates out for the
second spot.
Baptist College finished
fourth, with the fifth spot taken
by Coastal Carolina College.
The top finisher for ECU was
once again Annette Burton, who
for the second-straight week
finished in the second spot
overall, with a time of 20:22 over
the 5,000-meter course.
Kim Griffith was next for ECU
with a time of 22:09, which put
her in seventh place. She was
Sheri Swick, who took the 31st
position with a clocking of 26:28.
Lucretia West also ran for the
women's team and placed in 39th
position with a time of 30:10. Her
score however did not count since
only the top-five runners count in
cross-country events.
Assistant coach Steve Thomas
credited the Pirates with another
good performance.
"I was once again impressed
with the performance this
weekend, especially Annette's
(Burton). Milton (Matheny) and
Rob (Rice) also had outstanding
races said Thomas. "The
men's team has been hurt some
with injuries, but the times still
were not that bad
Thomas went on to say that the
Pirate runners were making
noticeable improvements in their
running.
"We're getting there, we're not
exactly where I wanted to be at
this time but we are still improv-
ing stated Thomas.
Auburn up 7-0
Then, on ECU's second snap
from scrimmage, Shan Morris in-
tercepted a Charlie Libretto pass
at the Pirate 34.
Auburn went the distance in
five plays, scoring on a one-yard
touchdown run by Tim Jessie to
go ahead 14-0.
The game was never close from
that point, as the Pirate offense,
playing without starting guards
Greg Thomas and Rich Autry,
was never able to generate any
scoring threats.
Pirate coach Art Baker was
disappointed in his team's play �
especially their lack of intensity.
"Our first mistake was getting
off the bus Baker said. "I can't
explain our team's attitude. We
went on the field slow, came off
the field slow and looked like we
were in slow motion on the field.
There was just no spring or
bounce in our team this week
While the Pirates came out
flat. Auburn came out smoking.
The Tigers, using a well-balanced
offensive attack, netted 17 first-
downs in the first half alone,
gaining 189 yards passing and 163
yards rushing in the opening two
quarters of play.
"Our first half was the best I
can remember since against
Georgia Tech in 1984 Auburn
coach Pat Dye said. "I really
think we played well. If we
didn't, there is no way the score
could have been like it was
Dye felt that that ECU was still
suffering from the close loss the
Pirates suffered a week ago to
West Virginia.
Bucs, hitting on only three of 12
passes with one interception.
Both Baker and Dye attributed
his performance to the extra week
Auburn had to prepare for the
Pirates' run and shoot offensive
attack.
"The fact that they had two
weeks to prepare for us helped
them a great deal Baker said.
"Charlie (Libretto) was very inef-
fective today. They completely
shut our passing game down
"We completely disrupted his
(Libretto's) concentration Dye
said. "He is a young quarterback
and our defensive coaches came
up with a lot of schemes and dis-
quised them well to create pro-
blems for them
Among the few bright spots for
the Pirates was the running of
Jarrod Moody, who gained 65
yards on eight carries and the
kickoff returning of Walter
Wilson and Reggie McKinney.
Wilson gained 91 yards on four
returns while McKinney had 68
yards on just two.
While ECU head man Baker
was obviously down after the
tough loss, Auburn coach Dye
hardly seemed like a man who's
team had won 45-0.
"There's no doubt I still have
strong feelings for ECU Dye
said. "When the score got out of
hand I had mixed emotions. I
wanted our young players to do
well, but at the same time I cer-
tainly didn't want to put any
more points on the scoreboard
and embarrass them. They ob-
viously are a much better football
team than they showed today
Kickoff Return
ESl ZZZZZ' Wi,5�n '80're,urni'kkk� �
Soccer Team Sweeps
In Wesleyan Tourney
B TIM CHANDLER
4Bi�Ual Hporu fcdllac
The ECU soccer team had a
very succesful weekend as it pick-
ed up a pair of wins in the North
Carolina Wesleyan Tournament.
The Pirates picked up the first
of the two wins on Saturday with
a hard fought 1-0 decision over
Washington & Lee.
Sophomore midfielder Robert
Larrison scored the winning goal
for the Bucs on an assist from
senior Jamie Reibel.
The Pirate defense held strong
throughout the game allowing
only 12 shots at the goal b
Washington & Lee.
In Sunday's contest, ECU used
a high-powered offensive attack
to defeat Shenandoah 4-1.
The Pirate defense once again
had an outstanding game as it
allowed Shenandoah only five
shots at the goal.
Reibel got the scoring under-
way for the Pirates with a goal on
an assist by Larrison to give EC I
a 1-0 lead.
The Bucs increased their lead
to 2-0 when freshman midfielder
Roy Andersch scored a goal.
Andersch received an assist from
treshman Jeff Corson.
After Shenandoah had closed
the gap to 2-1. Corson retaliated
for the Bucs as he knocked in a
goal off an assist from Andersch
to boost the lead to 3-1.
Corson added the final goal of
the game for ECU on a penalty-
kick late in the match.
The two wins over the weekend
lifts the Pirates season mark to
4-3-1.
The next action for the soccer
team will come on Sept. 2" as
they will host American Universi-
ty on the ECU Soccer Field at 2
p.m.
American should prove to be a
stiff test for the Pirates as they
finished the season last year as
the runner-up in the NCAA
Division-I soccer tournament.
' vu.joguaiui, LJivision-i soccer tournament
New Irate Disc-Golf Course
followed by Stephanie Ingram, Irate team member Bob DeMan r't01
who finished in the 11th position four fifth hole on thTtri!L courT. d,ffiCUlt P"r
with a time of 22:29.
Other scores which counted for
the women's team included Jill
Gorenflo, who finished in 20th
place with a time of 23:29, and
Men
By SCOTT COOPER
OMfc�Mtof
A frisbee-golf course in Green-
ville?
Well, it is Finally becoming
reality as ECU's Irates have
recently constructed a new nine-
hole course off of Charles
Boulevard, between the women's
softball field, Harrington Field
and Bunting Track. It's called the
Irate Disc-Golf Course.
Although the Irates were the
sole creator of the course, the
SGA (Student Government
Association) and the IRS
(Intramural-Recreational Ser-
vices) supplied the funding for
the equipment needed. The Irates
provided the muscle and sweat to
actually create the course.
The cost of the course was
$1,700. The SGA put up $1,250
as the IRS added the $450 to
complete the course. IRS coor-
dinator of Club Sports, Pat Cox,
overlooked the entire process of
fund raising, information and the
use of land.
The Irate Disc-Golf Course
idea began back in the fall of
1985 by the ECU Frisbee Club.
The Irates then sent away for
literature from the Tri-State Disc
Golf Association. Bob DeMan,
Randy Allen and John Brady and
the Irates then planned the outlay
ELLIN MUBFMY - TMt 1AST CAROLINIAN
and here's how it ends up.
of the course. Director of IRS,
Steve Cohen, said he was 100 per-
cent behind the golf course idea
� and hopes to plan IRS ac-
tivities (possibly a frisbee-golf
tournament in the spring of '87).
Sports Fact
Tues. Sept. 23,1908
By failing to touch second
base, Fred Merkle costs the
Giants the pennant. Merkle is
on base when Al Bridwell hits
what appears to be a game-
winning single against the
Cubs. As the winning run
scores, Merkle returns to the
dugout without touching se-
cond. Johnny Evers alertly tags
second base, and umpire Hank
O'Day calls the force-out,
which wipes out the run. The
Giants filed a protest, and the
entire game is replayed two
weeks later with the Cubs winn
ing the game and the pennant
By DON RUTLEDGE
Sparta Writer
It was a good day for the ECU
Tennis program last Wednesday,
as the men and women both
scored impressive victories. The
men, playing at Campbell in their
first-dual match of the season,
won 7-2, the only losses being
close 3-set contests.
All but one of ECU's wins
were in straight sets. Coach Sher-
man was particularly pleased
with the play of the doubles
teams. "Previously our singles
play had been much stronger
than our doubles Sherman
said, "and at the Campbell
match our doubles play was very
strong
The women were at home on
the Minges courts Wednesday
taking on UNC-Wilmington.
Luuiiwuiicm in iac spring or oj
Camels; Women Dog 'Hawks
ECU had nnlv rn� l.cat m�i. . . "
ECU had only one 3-set match as
they rolled the Seahawks 9-0 for
their second win of the year
against no losses.
"We've been working a lot on
serves and returns, and they
(ECU women) placed their serves
well and forced their returns, get-
ting on offense early in every po-
ing said a happy Coach Sher-
man.
Summing up Wednesday's ac-
tion, the coach said, "Both the
men and the women served really
son, the nation's top-ranked
NAIA tennis team two years ago,
were too strong as they handed
the women their first loss of the
season.
Playing on clay there, the
breaker, and a five-and-a-half-
hour long one at that.
"It was a great comeback by
Susan (Montjoy) and that was
about all the coach could muster
:rz:r'Ti �����k
but came back to take two
doubles contests and lose the
third in 3-sets. Although it was a
tough loss, coach Sherman was
"super, super pleased with our
playing. Davidson's coach said
that was the best any ECU
zc �" asr pos,t,on 2"added � he sh�-
Sunday's match at UNC-
Charlotte was a repeat of Satur-
early in each point.
While the men's team had the
weekend off, the women travell-
ed to Davidson College and
UNC-Charlotte for what turned
out to be a grueling nine-and-a-
half hours on the courts. David-
adding, "Susan had about nine-
and-a-half hours on the court in
two days
Wednesday is the men's first
home match. They'll take on
UNC-Wilmington to make it 2-0
for the season. Then on Friday,
both teams will travel, the women
Although the frisbee club now
has a nine-hole course, DeMan
feels nine more wouldn't be a
problem.
"We're hoping the Student
Government (Association) can be
as generous as last time, because
nine more holes is twice as nice
DeMan said. "It's a student golf
course and we're planning stu-
dent activities for intramurals.
"Raleigh has three courses.
New Bern has one, Jacksonville
has one, Winston Salem has one,
Durham has one DeMan
continued, "and Greenville
should have one. Those (other)
places are great � thev have
tournaments all the time.
Hopefully Greenville will have an
18-hole tournament one day
Goldsboro native Perry Smith,
who recently ranked 81st in the
world in a Huntsville, Ala tour-
nament, praised the newly-
constructed frisbee-disc course.
According to DeMan, Smith felt
that "the course was one of the
best he had played on and that it
was one of the more competitive
courses around
Another individual w ho played
a big role in the development of
the frisbee-golf course is Crl
Hartsfield. Hartsfield, advisor to
the frisbee club and an ECU
employee, has been instrumental
to the club, according to DeMan.
"He's not just an advisor, he's
a good friend to the team
DeMan explained. "He plays
with us on occassion. He's a nice
guy and gets behind us and sup-
ports us.
"He's our advisor and helps us
with a lot of situations between
the frisbee club and the IRS
DeMan added. "He can make
those guys bend a little and make
us betid a little to make us meet
� he's a good communicator
With the hard work of the
day score-wise, but the ECU
women were in a position to win
this one as three of their losses
came in 3-sets. It was a heart-
going to Meredith College for the ECU frisbee dub anth �f 5l
East� Collegiate motional, pleanuthf ID
?or thAm? �0ItoRichmond Golf Course Unow a reyltl;
for the Richmond Invitational. open every day and �iTsTdentT
See PIRATE . .� 11 Sft "? SUff w �� �
!ee riKATfc page 12 their hand at the new course.
Intra
What's Comil
Volleyball Ai
Do the terms spike, net, hits, foe
fault, and serve mean anything I
you? Does the sport of vollevbal
come to mind? It should! The n
tramural sports program is gear
ing up for an exciting voUeybaJ
season. Get a team together an
participate. Registration for tl
"in bounds" activitv is Mon
Oct.6, in Merorial Gym roon
105-C from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m A
team captains meeting is sche
ed on Tues. Oct. 7, in Brew
C-103 at 5:30 p.m. Some re-
ing division champions who wi
be trying to defend their title are
men's independent, Lack) Seven
fraternity A Phi Kappa Tau
fraternity 'B Phi Kappa Tau
mens residence hall, 307 spikes
womens independent. The Good
Bad and Ugh; sorority, Sigma
Sigma Sigma; women's reside
hall, The Gumbys. It's sure t
an exciting season.
Anyone interested in officia
volleyball should attend the I
clinic which is scheduled or.
Mon Oct. 6, in Memorial Gvm
room 102 at 9 p.m Any ques
tions, contact Patty Conn
sport manager, at 757-6381
stop by Memorial Gym 104-A
Swimmers, G,
Suits: Ready,
A swim meet, intramura:
style guaranteed to be "he
of fun. Anyone may participate
as long as he or she is currei
enrolled at ECU. The eve-
range from a 50-meter freestyle
to a 100-meter innertube relav
Registration for this spla
one day event will be held on
Mon Sept. 29 in Memorial
Gym, room 105 � C 11 a.m. un-
til 7 p.m. The team captam-
individual participant meeting
will be held on Tues Sept. 30, at
6:30 p.m. in Brewster B-102.
Don't miss registration! You will
have the opportunity to "dive"
into the following events:
50-meter freestyle
preliminari� M-meter butterflv
JS
Be on the lookout for Co-Rec soft
you.
1: you're finding
tighter than usual, now - �
join The Spa. Studt I
on a monthly basis lor onhj
month. That's $25 t �I rj
any strings attached.
The Spa offers 52 I
outs every week, exerc: I
weights, steam room, saur
pool. Plus, there are plentyl
n







Page 10
m 1
JO jO�D�n � icu �OTO LAB
tjf Return
It U ilson (80) rtturns a kickoff in Satur-
am Sweeps
van Tourney
ncreased iheir lead
2 � freshman midfielder
R Vndersch scored a goal.
I an isl Tom
A:
rer Shenandoah had closed
ap to 2-1, Corson retaliated
le Bucs as he knocked in a
assist from Andersch
he iead to 3-1.
added the final goal of
for ECU on a penaltv
ate in rhe match.
� wins over the weekend
he Pirates season mark to
The next action for the soccer
,ome on Sept. 27 as
k v. ill host American Universi-
n the ECU Soccer Field at 2
n p.m.
American should prove to be a
e stiff test for the Pirates as they
finished the season last year as
runner-up in the NCAA
Division-I soccer tournament.
If Course
Although the frisbee club now
has a nine-hole course, De.Man
feels nine more wouldn't be a
problem.
"We're hoping the Student
Government (Association) can be
as generous as last time, because
rune more holes is twice as nice
DeMan said. "It's a student golf
course and we're planning stu-
dent activities for intramurals.
"Raleigh has three courses,
New Bern has one, Jacksonville
has one, Winston Salem has one,
Durham has one DeMan
continued, "and Greenville
should have one. Those (other)
places are great � they have
tournaments all the time.
Hopefully Greenville will have an
18-hole tournament one day
Goldsboro native Perry Smith,
who recently ranked 81st in the
world in a Huntsville. Ala tour-
nament, praised the newlv-
constructed frisbee-disc course.
According to DeMan, Smith felt
that "the course was one of the
best he had played on and that it
was one of the more competitive
courses around
Another individual who played
a big role in the development of
the frisbee-golf course is Carl
Hartsfield. Hartsfield, advisor to
the frisbee dub and an ECU
employee, has been instrumental
to the club, according to DeMan.
"He's not just an advisor, he's
a good friend to the team
DeMan explained. "He plays
with us on occassion. He's a nice
guy and gets behind us and sup-
ports us.
"He's our advisor and helps us
with a lot of situations between
the frisbee club and the IRS
DeMan added. "He can make
those guys bend a little and make
us bend a little to make us meet
� he's a good communicator
With the hard work of the
ECU frisbee club and other peo-
ple and groups, the Irate Disc-
Golf Course is now a reality. It is
open every day and all students,
faculty and staff are invited to try
their hand at the new course.
� IAN
s
cr-
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 23. 1986
11
Intramural Athletics
What's Coming Up Next:
Volleyball And Putt-Putt
By DENISE CROMER
Do the terms spike, net, hits, foot
fault, and serve mean anything to
vou? Does the sport of volleyball
.orne to mind? It should! The in-
ti amural sports program is gear-
ing up for an exciting volleyball
reason. Get a team together and
participate. Registration for this
"in bounds" activity is Mon
Oct.6, in Memorial Gym room
105-C from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m A
earn captains meeting is schedul-
ed on Tues. Oct. 7, in Brewster
( -103 at 5:30 p.m Some return-
ng division champions who will
e trying to defend their title are:
men's independent, Lucky Seven;
aternity A Phi Kappa Tau;
fraternity 'B Phi Kappa Tau;
mens residence hall, 307 spikes;
a omens independent, The Good
Bad and Ugly; sorority, Sigma
�Mgma Sigma; women's residence
hall, The Gumbys. It's sure to be
an exciting season.
Anyone interested in officiating
volleyball should attend the first
clinic which is scheduled on
Mon Oct. 6, in Memorial Gym,
room 102 at 9 p.m Any ques-
tions, contact Patty Connor,
port manager, at 757-6387 or
stop by Memorial Gym 104-A.
Putt-Putt-Putt
Team Putt Putt registration
will be held Mon. Sept. 29,
Memorial Gym 105-C between 11
a.m. and 7 p.m. The tournament
will be held for one full week of
fun beginning Oct. 6. Organize a
team or register as an individual.
Kick In The Grass
Kickoff to an exciting season
of intramural Soccer. It will keep
you "indirectly" on the defense.
Registration for this charge of a
game is scheduled for Oct. 13 in
Memorial Gym, room 105-C
from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m The
teams captains meeting will be
Oct. 14 in Brewster C-103 at 5:30
p.m.
The first officials clinic will be
held on Oct. 13 in Memorial
Gym, room 102 at 9 p.m
Anyone interested please stop by;
no experience is necessary. If you
have any questions, contact Todd
McCullom at 757-6387 or stop by
Memorial Gym room 104-A.
Don't miss out! Get up a team
and be a part of it!
Swimmers, Grab Your
Suits: Ready, Set, Swim
Flags Fly As Winners
Take To The Fields
A swim meet, intramural
-lyle guaranteed to be "heats"
of fun. Anyone may participate
as long as he or she is currently
enrolled at ECU. The events will
range fr.n a 50-meter freestyle
to a 100-meter innertube relay.
Registration for this splashing
one day event will be held on
Mon Sept. 29 in Memorial
Gym, room 105 � C 11 a.m. un-
til 7 p.m. The team captain-
individual participant meeting
will be held on Tues Sept. 30, at
6:30 p.m. in Brewster B-102.
Don'r miss registration You will
have the opportunity to "dive"
viuo ihe following events:
50-meter freestyle
preliminary 50-meter butterfly
50-meter backstroke
50-meter breaststroke
200-meter medley relay
100-meter T-shirt relay
50-meter freestyle finals
100-meter butterfly
100-meter backstroke
100-meter breaststroke
100-meter freestyle
100-meter innertube relay
100-meter individual medley
200-meter freestyle relay
Team conpetiton may be quite
challenging with the defending
All-Campus and Fraternity-
Sorority Champions (Lambda
Chi Alpha and Zeta Tau Alpha)
returning with anticipation of
repeating. Don't pass up a great
chance to splash around!
Spikers Take To The Net!
Volleyball registration takes place Oct. 6 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. in
Memorial Gym room 105-C. Everyone interested in a slamming
good time should get a team together and sign up. Registration is
your ticket to fun!
Only two weeks into the
season, and already we are seen-
ing outstanding performances
displayed by all participants. To
give you just a taste of what pro-
mises to be a funfilled season,
here are some early highlights:
G-Force vs Milwaukee's Best:
Defense dominated the first half
of play between these two
powerhouse teams. Mania Pitt,
off G-Force, intercepted two
passes while his teammate, Tony
Lewb picked off one. This
stalemate was broken when
Sidney McCall of G-Force caught
a short pass for a touchdown.
G-Force continued to dominate
yet another by David Chestnutt.
Milwaukee's Best finally got on
the board with Rick klinton who
caught a touchdown pass and
also scored the two point conver-
sion on a bootleg play. Rick Klin-
ton of Milwaukee's Best then in-
tercepted a pass and Aaron
Beavlier finished the drive with
the touchdown. David Chestnutt
capped off the game by scoring
hes second touchdown. The final
score was 24 � 14 in favor of
G-Force.
N.F.C. East vs Odds Makers:
In the NFC East's first possesion,
Al Stewart ran a reverse for a
65-yard first score. On their
fourth possesion, the NFC East's
Stewart scored from 10 yards out
to close the half. The second half
was again controlled by the NFC
squad as Mike King, Stewart,
John Kilpatrick and Bruce Pit-
man all scored. When it was all
over, NFC East took the victory
34-6
Classic Freestyle vs Golden
Hearts B: The classic Freestyler's
opened the game with a 35-yard
run by Jane Gaiter who also got
the extra point conversion.
Gunter then came out throwing
with a 20-yard pass to Jackie
Pellinger for the second
touchdown of the game. Then, in
the second half, it was Susan
Locke who made an interception
and also finished the drive with a
20-yard reception for the score.
The half was closed out with a
30-yard touchdown pass from
Gunter to Dellinger.
Flag Football
Rankings (Sept. 18)
Men
1 Lake Boys
2 Shake Masters
3 Armed and Dangerous
4 Doggie Style
5 Jones Y Team
Women
1 Enforcers
2 Alpha Phi
3 ARBNAF
4 Greene Rebels
5 Campus Crusade
Co-Rec Begins With Race
(�'� r'

Be on the lookout for Co-Rec softball, coming soon to a field
near
The Dept. of Intramural
Recreational Services will host a
cross campus fun run which will
take place on SatOct. 18, during
homecoming weekend. It will
start at 8:45 a.m. and you can
register between 8 and 8:30 that
morning. The race is open to all
ECU students, faculty, and staff
as well as alumni. The event will
have two separate races, so you
have the choice of a two-mile or a
four-mile run. Get involved, run
for fun!
Co-Rec Flag Football
If you would like to be a part
of a mixed up group of flag foot-
ball participants, then get involv-
ed with our Co-Rec Flag Football
league. The teams are comprised
of eight members, four men and
four women. It's sure to be a
"rush" for fun. Registration will
be Oct. 20 in Memorial Gym
room 105-C from 11 a.m. to 7
p.m The team captains meeting
is Oct. 21 in Biology room N-102
at 5:30 p.m. The Third Regiment
was last year's All Campus
Champions and intend to repeat
again this year, so let's give them
some competition for their pass-
ing thoughts.
Dribble, ShootScore!
Bounce into Co-Recreational
Basketball! To register for this
challenging event you must go by
room 105-C in Memorial Gym on
Tues Oct. 20 between 11 a.m.
and 7 p.m.
A team captain's meeting will
be the following day, Oct. 21, in
Biology N-102, at 6:30 p.m
Each team will consist of five
members, three females and two
males. Rule modifications to ac-
comodate this unique situation
have been made: field goals by
men are two points but those by
women will be three points.
Co-Rec Cageball is the newest
co-rec sport sponsored by the In-
tramural Recreational Services.
The action and fun will be ex-
citing for you and your friends in
late October. Watch this space
for more details and registration
dates.
Save your breath.
Plant a tree to make
more oxygen.
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Corner 10th & Dickinson Ave
We Buy Gold & Silver
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If you're finding your bathing suit
tighter than usual, nows a fitting time to
join The Spa. Students can join The Spa
on a monthly basis for only $25 per
month. That's $25 for 30-days without
any strings attached.
The Spa offers 52 aerobics work-
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weights, steam room, sauna and whirl-
pool. Plus, there are plenty of trained
instructors to help you shape up.
So, if your body is flunking the
beach test, call or drop by The Spa for
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Improving your grades at the beach
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a Weekly Specials
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Wednesday: Margarita $1.759 Pitcher $6.75
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.�,���. � m
T� n�rr- -i -ti�i jfii. j j
j





1. THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 23, 1986
j�HHp��4MMI JHHHMHE��� ������� ���������
Classifieds
t��������������������������������
������4HHMHM��������������������������
Pirate Tennis Results
PERSONAL
SIO EPS: What can we say? It was
def inately a great way to prepare for
Monday morning! Let's do it again
� and soon! Love, the AOTT's.
CHIPPER
headlights!
Watch
those
CHI OMEGA: Congratulations to
our new Fall pledges, the Beta Etas:
Kim Akkis, Marcia Amatangelo,
Alyce De St. Aubin, Kelly Belton,
Terrie Dills, Kimberly Du.s, Kelly
Easterling, Tina Marie Harrelson,
Lori Hayes, Whitney Hearl,
Catherine Hickman, Julie Holland,
Melissa Lin, Catherin Lynham,
Vicki Lynn Martin, Missy
Michalove, Lori Moore, Michelle
Sheeran, Carole Shore, Windy Spell,
Angie Spencer, Caroline Stovall,
Lisa Thompkins, Amada Weathers
poon and Carole Weeks. Ya'll are
GREAT! The Sisters of Chi Omega
SIG EPS: The little sisters would
like to congratulate the fall 1986
pledge classwelcome to the best
fraternity on campus!
DELTA ZETA SISTERS: We love
you and we're proud to be a part.
The Jammin' Pledge Class Beta
Omicron. P.S. Thanks tor the burnt
weenies
LONELY GUY: Seeking "attractive
white lady who enjoys fuzzy navels,
walks by the river, and road trips to
the beach. Call 752 8308, ask for J.
ZTA: Congratulations to newly
elected ZTA officers: President-
Ellen McPherson, Vice President
Scotia Miller, Secretary Tobi
Ferguson, Treasurer Pam
Meacher, and Panhellenic Delegate
Crina Kern.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: Hey Sig
Eps, we know this is late but we just
want to say that PREF NIGHT WAS
GREAT! Can't waif to party with
ya'll again! Love, the Chi O's.
KNIGHTS OF SIGMA NU: L.Sleft
me with a STD.Should 1 go for those
ribs? Ace"Scream i ngfor
Vengeance"
CHUCK:Guesswhat?1still
rememberhowtospellourlast
name! Bythewa howwasthe
test?
CHI OMEGA: Thanks to the Beta
Zeta's for your great pledge project
Ya'll did a great job this weekend
and the flowers look super! We love
va'M! The Sisters
ATTENTION KA FALL PLEDGES:
Just a CONGRATULATION on your
decision to join the GREATEST
fraternity at ECU. Looking forward
to meeting you all. Love, Your Little
Sisters.
PIKA: The brothers of Pika want to
congratulate the following new
pledges: James Johnson, Stephen
Goodwin, Rich Harker, Wayne
Barber, Tim Sheehy. Sam Jackson,
Ben Reinhold, Matthew Ricks,
Cabell Lawton, Mike Patrick, Joe
Gngsby, Jeff LeBlanc, Tim Slavin,
R.J. Will, Chris Walters, Dig Chavis.
Eric Smith, Kevin Smith, Scott
Lamon, Tim Bowles, Kevin Thomp
son, BMly Mac Wilson, Tim
McNamara, Andrew Vansickle,
John Taylor and Brian Spruill.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY STEPHEN:
How about dinner this weekend- any
place you want. Or better yet, a
roast beef sandwich in Jones. From,
a friend (a.k.a Lovebunny) P.S.
Kissy, Kissy.
DELTA ZETA: We'd like to con
gratulate and welcome Nikki
Malhmood to our fall 1986 pledge
class We love you! The Sisters and
Pledges of Delta Zeta.
LAMBDA CHI: Thanks, you guys,
for a wonderful blast, the food and
the drink flowed a little too fast,
thanks for showing our pledges the
best you brothers of Lambda Chi
have outdone the rest. Alpha Phi's.
ORGAN: The solution to everyone's
problemsget laid.
KNOTTHEAD AND LIZZARD: Y'll
did a terrific job with rush and we're
really proud of you! Knotthead- no
more family reunions. Lizzard Stay
out of those Briar Patches! The
Alpha Phi's.
ALPHA PHI: Would like to con-
gratulate the Beta Omicron Pledge
Class Julie Daniel, Karen Shep
para, Sarah Daugherty, Elizabeth
Lee, Martha Walton, Crystal Nolan,
Beth Haun, Nancy Haeussler, Amy
Gillespie, Dale Rankin, Donna
Kahlbauch, Marcia Jauregui, Sherri
CArter, Renee Hoffman, Amy Pro
ehl, Bonnie Armentrout, Leann
Cherry, Kristy Childs and Amy Har-
rington
RICHMOND CREW:
great weren't they?
AAE was
JAY THE GERBIL: Been running
on any treadmills lately?
LEA R Happy 19th! You finally
made it to the drinking age and they
deeked you again! We'll get around
it somehow We love you! TKE's are
the d?daies! Adair Barbara anc
Kathy.
PETEY: Hope your 22nd was the
greatest We love ya JT and
MB.
TO JMC: Congratulations on Alpha
Sigma Phi little sister. Time to
celebrate at Western Sizzlin. LET'S
FRAME IT Love, KAS.
TKE LITTLE SISTER RUSH
Wed. Thurs Sept 24th 25th, 8 11
p.m. Come Party With The Best
RANDY FRANCIS: Desperately
seeking female companionship. On
ly prerequisite is a functioning
cardio pulminary system. Any
animate female is urged to call
752-6217. No fat chicks. Please.
DELTA PLEDGE CLASS: We went
after Quality and Quantity and got
them both; Good Luck. Brothers of
Pi Kappa Alpha.
THE LADIES ZOO IS BACK
Wednesday night! Beau's
nightclub's Ladies Zoo mega keg
party! 756-6401.
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
S205 Abortion from 1? to 18 weeks at
additional cost. Pregnancy Test. Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For
further information, call 832-0535 (toll free
number: 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5
p.m. weekdays. General anesthesia asailable
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
GpmEdy Zpne
NOW ADMITTING AGES 18 &
UP EVERY NITE!
ADMISSION SPECIAL
ONLY $2.00 UNTIL 9:30 �.
BRING A FRIEND IN FOR FREE
UNTIL 9:30
t COMING SAT. SEPTEMBER 27
Chairmen of the Board
Don't Drive oil the liberty Hide
For More Info Cull 78-5570
Kt fVutnl
WEDNESDAY I WEDNESDAY I WE
DNESDAYILADIES ZOOl: Ladies
Zoo! Kegs! Kegs! Kegs! Ladies!
Ladies! Ladies! Beau's Niteclubl
756 6401.
BEAU'S ALL NEW LADIES ZOOl:
Wednesday Nite! Ladies! Kegs!
Music! Beau's Niteclub 756-6401.
KA BROTHERS, PLEDGS AND
LITTLE SISTERS: Thanks for all
your support during our rush. You
all are the BEST EVER! What a
FANTASTIC fraternity! Remember
our meeting at 8:15 p.m. Sunday.
Love, Little Sister Officers.
NEED A D.J.T: Are you having a
party and need a D.J.? For the best
in top 40, beach and dance call
Morgan at 758 7967. Reasonable
rates. References on request.
FOR SALE: 1 Fender strat, 1
Fender Bullet, 2 Boss Effects
pedals- reasonable. 758 9028. Leave
message.
FOR RENT: 3 blocks from ECU. 1
bedroom with private entrance.
Utilities paid. $160month. Call
758 1274 after 6 p.m.
WINDSURFING: The ECU wind
surfing club is now being formed
There will be an organizational
meeting for anyone interested in
windsurfing in Mendenhall 247 on
Wed Sept. 24th at 6. Trips, instruc-
tion and FUN IN THE SUN! Begin
ners welcome.
SALE
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc. Call
Anne at 752-3015 and leave a
message.
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICE: Word processing. The
Dataworks specializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertions,
theses, resume's and more. All work
is computer checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary. Rates
are as low as $1.75 per page, in-
cluding paper (call for spedific
rates.) Call Mark at 757 3440 after 7
p.m.
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SERVICES: Typ
ing resumes, term papers, thesis
papers. Call SDF Professional Com
puter Services Inc 106 E. 5th St.
(near Cubbies) Greenville. 752 3694.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER-
VICE: Experience quality work,
IBM Selectric typewriter. Call Lanie
Shive at 758-5301.
WANTED
Continued from page 10
ECU Mea 7-CaapMI 2
T Reynolds(C) d. Dan LaMont
7-5.3-6.6-3
J. Melhorn(EC) d. T. Maynor 6-3.6-1
G Loyd(EC) d. C. Maynor 6-3.7-5
R He$ter(Q d. J. Taylor 1-6.6-3.7-5
P. Campanaro(EC) d. J. Gaskms
6-3.4-6,6-1
T. Sumner(EC) d. D. Lai 6-1.6-2
Doable
Taylor-Melhorn(EC) d. Maynor-Maynor
6-3,6-2
Loyd-LaMont(EC) d Reynolds-Hester
6-1,6-4
Campanaro-Scott Avery(EC) d.
Gaskins-Lai 6-4,6-1
ECU Women 9-LNC-VYUmiagtoa 0
L. Eichholz(EC) d. J. Phillips 6-2.6-0
A Zeimer(EC) d. M. Tyynisman 6-1.6-4
Ty Myers(EC) d. W. Todd 6-1.6-1
M. Swaim(EC) d. J. Tolson 6-4,3-6,6-1
H Murray(EC) d. S. Evans 6-2,6-3
S. Montjoy(EC) d. M. Unchurch 6-0,6-1
Doable
Eichholz-Zeimer(EC) d Phillips-
Tyynisman 6-2,6-0
Murray-Swaim(EC) d. Todd-Tolson
6-3,6-2
Myers-Montjoy(EO d. Evans-Unchurch
6-2.6-1
WmkmdR�dU:
ECU Woata 1-Davtfeoa 7
McNeilsD) d. EichhoU 6-1.6-4
Stonc(D) d. Zeimer 6-1.62
Podohn(D) d. T. Myers 61.63
Johnson(D) d. Swaim 64,61
PriceD) d Murray 6-0,60
StubbKD) d Montjoy 7-5.4-6.63
A.
M.
D
M
J
A
Eichholz-Zeimer(EC) d McNeils-
Johnson 64,6-4
Stone-Pnce(D) d. Swaim-Murray
63.4-6.64
Mont)oy-Myers(EQ d. Carr-Hall 7-5,6-3
ECU Woaaea M' NC -Charlotte 7
Eichholz(EQ d. M. Dorn 2-o.6-4.6-4
C. van NeiHUNC-C) d. Myers 7-5.67 6-3
S Smith(UNC-Q d Swaim 4-6.63.62
M Auffant(UNC-C) d. Murray 61.63
SwaimfEQ d D Wangann 64 5-7 7.5
D Ciolfi(UNC-0 d. Kim BeTaer 63 6-4
DoaMea
Auffant-van NeiKUNC-Q d Eichholz-
Berger 62.62
Dorn-Smith(UNC-C) d. Swaim-Murrav
6-2.6-4
Wangann-Ciolfl(UNC-C) d. Mont.ov-
Myers 64,0-o.7-6

JOB WANTED: Man desires job as
houskeeper or attendant for the sick.
Non-smoker, non-drinker and have
good references. 752-6079.
WATERBED FOR SALE: King size
waterbed ro sale. Semi-waveless,
heater included. Less than 6 months
old. Headboard included. $250. Call
758-9768 after 12 noon. Ask for Craig.
$60 PER HUNDRED PAID: For
remailing letters from home! Send
self addressed, stamped envelope
for informationapplication.
Associates, Box 95 B, Roselle, NJ
07203.
REWARD: Free trip to Daytona,
plus commission money. WANTED
Organized group or individual to
promote the number 1 Spring Break
trip to Daytona. If interested call
DESIGNERS OF TRAVEL,
1 800 433 9074 immediately!
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Christian atmosphere, responsible 2
bedroom condo. in Treetops. $150
plus utilities and phone. Call Beth
756-6320, 756 2724, or 758 3471 Ext. 240
(NCNB).
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share
tew apt. located at 405 E. 5th St
(Regency House Condos Apt 10.
Iblock (300 steps) from Downtown
and 1 block from campus
Everything is new, must see! No
deposits req'd for either apt. or
Jtilities! Rent $175 plus 12 util. Call
155-6686 and leave name 6 phone
lumber.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Free
security deposit of $150. Kingston
Place Aptv, Central heatair, full
furnished, includes all kitchen uten-
sils, and use of pool. $150 per month
plus utilities. For ,nfo. call Don
Fazio at 757 3218
FORSALECanyou buyjeeps,
cars,4 x 4's seizedin drug raids for
under$100?Callfor factstoday.
602 837 3401.Ext. S 711.
COMMODORE 64 COMPUTER
AND DISK DRIVE FOR SALE: Ex
cellent condition. Lots of extras-
diskettes, cartridges, books, etc.
$400. Call 758 7461 and ask for Suzi.
MODEL WANTED: Girl with
shoulder-length or longer brown hair
needed to model for two paintings.
$30 minimun paid for each plus 40
percent of any sales. Needs any kind
of white dress, pref. long. Pref. to be
available 11-1 on weekends. Call An
dy at 752-7284.
I
I
I
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Georgetown Apts 2 bedroom, close
to campus, need 1 or 2 roommates
Call 752 9245.
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
Award Winning ice Cream �
321 East 10th Street Greenville, N.C. 27858 H
Call 758-4896
Buy One Blend-In or Sundae
Get the Second
1 2 PRICE!
One Coupon Per Order. Please Coupon Expires Uon September 29, 1986 I
�I
I
I
eo KROCERINC FOR ALL YOUR
Tailgate Party
Needs!
Register To WW I WM
Pirate Football Tickets
To eto Qivn Awmy
For Each Home Gama ft�lst� Now
ALL VARIETIES
SERVE N SAVE
Sliced
Lunchmeat
Lb.
Pkg.
99
Qt.
Ctn.
KROGER 2t LOWFAT
OR HOMOGENIZED
Whole
Milk
69
SSSSSSS�
V.VAV.V.VAV.W
mm
" 11
� �?���??�??���
????????�??�
(��t2
Ltr.
NRB
DIET COKE. CHERRY COKE.
CAFFEINE FREE COKE OR
Coke
Classic
99
CAROLINA PRIDE
ALL MEAT OR
All Beef
Wieners.
12
Oz
Pkg
$119
NABISCO
Premium
Saltines.
16
Oz
Box
�T Blihit
STOKELV PEAS
Corn or
Green Beans
16
Ox
Cans
SENECA
Apple
Juice
Gal.
Btl.
$
119
MOUSE (5 OZ.) HAIR
SPRAY (9 OZ.) CONDITIONER OR
Aqua Net
Shampoo
16
Oz.
Btl.
99
Lb.
NEW CROP
CALIFORNIA
Tokay
Grapes
69
KROGER
OLO FASHION
White
Bread
VHS Video Movie Rentals
$
199
� 24Nour
aai rwiui
MunOrooB of fovoifto movt0t
to ehoooo homl
MILLER LITE
Beer
$
095
24 PK
12 OZ CANS
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised
items is required to be
readily available for sale in
each Kroger Sav-on. except
as specifically noted in this
ad. if we do run out of an
item we will offer you your
choice of a comparable
item when available,
reflecting the same sav-
ings or a ralncheck which
will entitle you to pur
chase the advertised item
at the advertised price
within SO days Only one
vendor coupon win be ac-
cepted per Item

Go Krogering
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
r?
- � � -





Title
The East Carolinian, September 23, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 23, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.494
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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