The East Carolinian, September 18, 1986







�he iEast (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.61 No.6
Thursday, September 18,1986
Green ville.N.C.
Circulation 12,000
10 Pages
FSaH

Health Fair Offers
Healthy Guidelines
By PATTI KEMM1S
News Editor
From aerobic demonstrations
to breathalyzer tests,
Wednesday's 'Health Affair' of-
fered a wide number of booths
and demonstrations displaying
different alternatives for staying
healthy.
Sponsored by the West Area
Residents Council, the Student
Health Center, and Intramurals
Department, this was the Health
Affair's second year in action.
"We wanted to show everyone
different alternatives to staying
healthy explained Mary
Elesha-Adams, health educator
at the Student Health Center.
Healthy foods, such as yogurt,
fruit juices, apples and popcorn
were sold by West Area resident
halls.
"This was a great way to get
people to work together and pro-
mote our area said Neva Whitt,
director of Fletcher Dorm.
The Counseling Center, Bac-
chus, The American Cancer
Society and the Lung Association
are a few of the organizations
that participated by offering ad-
vice, pamphlets, and sometimes
extra surprizes.
Blood pressure and sugar level
was checked by the East
Carolinia Nursing Association.
There were also tables where
students could take a
breathalyzer test after drinking
mouthwash, and where they
could have their eyes checked.
Bacchus, the campus drug and
alcohol awareness group, was
making nonalcoholic mixed
drinks called mocktails. One Bac-
chus member said the purpose of
this was to show students an
alternative to alcoholic
beverages.
Food and educational informa-
tion was not all that was
available. There were also several
give-aways.
"I like the milk said Billy
White about Carolinia Dairies
donation to the Affair.
Coupons for putt-putt, in-
tramural activities, visors, but-
tons, and ballons were also given
away.
The Intramural Department
held two aerobic demonstrations.
According to Steve Gerber,
"aerobic observation" was a
prime reason for attending the af-
fair.
There was also an aerobic self-
defense demonstration held by
Doug Cobb, a karate expert.
"We really wanted to en-
courage students to learn good
health habits commented Janet
Johnson, West Area Coor-
dinator. "We're hoping the
things we show them (the
students) today will stay with
them over the years
According to Pam Cope, the
Health Affair was a great oppor-
tunity to pick up some tips on
health, watch a guy teach
aerobics and eat good, healthy
food.
"The educational aspects are
phenomenal said Edmund
Fish.
Medical Loans
SGA Will Decide Future Of Loans
WARD
ECU Fraternities Cope
With Different Rushes
By CAROLYN DRISCOLL
Assistant News Editor
The Inter-Fraternity Council's
policy of dry (alcohol-free) rush,
in effect for a second semester,
has brought about many changes
to the greek system, according to
members of several different
fraternities on campus.
The most obvious difference
between this year's dry rush and
the rushes of the past seems to be
the number of the people atten-
ding.
"We usually had about 200
people each night during wet
rush said a Kappa Sigma
member. "But now we're only
seeing about 90
Mike Christitielo, a third-year
Tau Kappa Epsilon member also
noticed this trend. "We're
definitely seeing a lot less
people he said.
However, most fraternity
members agreed that although
fewer people are attending rush,
the "quality" of the people has
greatly improved under the new
policy.
Said Christitielo, "Dry rush
has brought in a lot of people
who are more interested in
becoming TKE's than in just
drinking our beer
Steve Cunanan, SGA president
and Sigma Phi Epsilon member
commented, "I think it's an ex-
cellent idea. It gives the frater-
nities a chance to show what
they're made of, not what
alcohol can do for them
While some fraternity
members said that dry rush is less
expensive for their organizations
because they no longer have to
supply prospective brothers with
beer, Rob Brugh, a Lambda Chi
Alpha member disagreed.
"It's costing us more money
because we have to pay for alter-
native types of entertainment,
whereas before, the kegs were the
entertainmenthe said.
Because campus sororities,
members of the National
Panhellenic Conference, have
been subject to dry rushes since
the 1960's, new drinking policies
have not affected them as much
as they have the fraternities, ac-
cording to Laura Sweet,
Panhellenic advisor at ECU.
However, according to
Christina Keene, an Alpha Delta
Pi member, the new drinking
laws will mean changes in the
sorority's social functions.
She said, "The new laws mean
that we can't have as many
socials, and they affect what
sisters can and can't drink
Keene added, "But even
though no one in the pledge class
made the drinking age, I think
the new laws brought in more
girls who were serious about join-
ing. Many see it as a good way to
meet people rather than going
downtown.
����?
The Sept. 29 meeting of the
SGA Legislature will debate the
passing of the SGA Emergency
Medical Loan bill which was tem-
porarily reinstated by the summer
legislature.
The loan was to be terminated
last July 1, but John Eagan, SGA
treasurer, and Steve Cunanan,
SGA president, acting as the
summer legislation, temporarily
einstated the bill with two of
three signatures needed.
Last Spring, Eagan chaired a
Student Loan Advisory Commit-
tee to examine the fund. The ma-
jor problem they discovered con-
cerned the payback of the loan.
Several suggestions were offered
by the committee and were im-
plemented into the reinstated bill.
These additions include the
time span to repay the loan,
which went from six months to 60
days. This change took place
because once the funds are
distributed, there is no more
money until the student repays
the loan. It was also found that
once a student graduates, after
six months, they are harder to
find.
In addition, the first day that
payment of loan is overdue, the
borrower's name will be turned
over to the Greenville Credit
Bureau for collection.
Lastly, the penalty for late pay-
ment will be $30 with a process-
ing fee of $10.
"I think these guidelines will
keep people from not paying it
back stated Eagan.
He explained that the con-
troversy goes a little farther than
just the payback issue. Some peo-
ple are concerned that medical
loans aren't the business of SGA.
The loans of up to $150, can be
used to pay for expensive
medicine, doctor's visits, wisdom
teeth removal � any of medical
reason. A student must have a
doctor at ECU Student Health
Center write a statement express-
ing a need for a loan. The student
then takes the note and his or her
ID to the SGA in order to sign the
loan. Once the doctor has written
a statement, the reason for the
loan is confidential and will not
be disclosed to anyone involved
with the loan (unless so desired).
"SGA is here to help the
students continued Eagan.
"Sometimes students who doni
have the finances need medical
assistance. This service is for
them just like refrigerator sales or
busing
Although the loans are present-
ly available, so far no one has
taken advantage of them, said
Eagan.
The fate of the bill will be
known after the September 29
meeting of the legislature. Accor-
ding to Eagan, this issue promises
to hold a lot of controversy.
Eagan concluded, we
brought it (the bill) back. Now
we're going to let the legislature
decide�they have the final say
New Minor Program Starts
ON THE INSIDE
Editorials4 �Star Trek reunion � see
Entertainment6 ENTERTAINMENT page 6
Comics7 'Preview of Saturday's game
SportsJ against Auburn � see SPORTS
7 page I
3
By LESLEY DEES
SUff Writer
ECU will become host to a new
gerontology program that will go
into full swing for the 1987 spring
semester.
Gerontology, which is the
study of the aged, will kick off its
first year as a minors program
after being in the development
stage for four years.
"The demand is just starting
and students are becoming in-
terested said Jim Mitchell,
associate professor of sociology
and director of the gerontology
program.
Studies done by the U.S.
Ceremony
Planned By
AFROTC
The AFROTC Det. 600 of
ECU is sponsoring a formal
Retreat Ceremony on Thursday,
Sept. 18. The ceremony will begin
at 5 p.m. in front of Minges Col-
iseum.
The ceremony is in honor of
the Air Force's anniversary as an
individual organization. The Air
Force, which was once a part of
the Army Air Corps, became in-
dependant on Sept. 18, 1947.
The ceremony will include the
playing of the Retreat, the Na-
tional Anthem, and the lowering
of the flag. Leslie Garner, mayor
of Greenville, will be the guest
speaker.
Bureau of the Census show that
by the year 2020, the number of
elderly people will increase by 95
percent. In the year 2030, there
will be a 121 percent increase.
The increasing population of
old people is a good reason to in-
clude the program along with ma-
jors such as nursing, psychology,
sociology or even parks and
recreation.
"A person is likely to be
employed as a nutritionist, a
therapist or a social worker with
a minor in gerontology said
Mitchell.
He added, "It's broad enough
and interdisciplinary enough that
students can use it with a variety
of majors
To obtain a gerontology
minor, 24 credit hours must be
fulfilled. Courses range from In-
troduction to Gerontology, to
Physical Activities for the Aged
to Death and Dying.
The pattern of study of the
program begins with an Introduc-
tion to Gerontology and is
followed by elective courses.
Research into and a practicum in
gerontology follow. The program
is concluded with a seminar in
gerontology.
Gerontology, a relatively new
field of study, is an "excellent
opportunity for students, because
it provides them with flexibility
to go many ways in the field ex-
plains Mitchell.
He added, "Eventually one
will have to be confronted with
elderly people. Some of us are go-
ing to end up taking care of our
parents
Today b tk� last day to gre blood. If yoa
aavea't given yet, the
to be in is 244 Mendeabafl,
� �" i it rnnimioiur�
- �rf
liWWr" iSftTtfiir '�'���� �� -�� �' � - - it ii
m

J





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 18, 1986
Financial Cutbacks
Financial Aid Eyes Changes
WASHINGTON, D.C. (CPS) �
Nearly four million students na-
tionwide may have trouble get-
ting student loans soon, a
bankers' association warned last
week.
The interest rates students pay
on new loans will rise while many
banks, says the Consumer
Bankers Association (CBA) in
Washington, D.C, may simply
stop making student loans if
Congress approves a proposal to
cut a special government
allowance the banks get for mak-
ing the loans.
"Many banks may just get out
(of the student loan business
completely said William
Clohan, the group's lawyer.
"Students are going to have to
look very hard for an institution
willing to loan them money ad-
ded Bill Kidwell of the National
Education Lending Center.
The last cut in the special
government allowance in March,
1986, convinced California - bas-
ed Security Pacific Bank to stop
making student loans. The bank
sold the loans it had already
made to Marine Midland Bank.
But even Marine Midland of-
ficials are not optimistic. "The
bottom line said bank official
Greg Lancaster, "is some banks
are going to sav 'Why are we in
this?
About 13,000 lenders are in the
Guaranteed Student Loan (GSL)
program now, Clohan estimated.
Their worry is a provision, ap-
proved three weeks ago by a
House - Senate conference com-
mittee, in the proposed Higher
Education Reauthorization Act
that would cut the special
allowance banks get.
To encourage banks to make
marginally profitable loans to
students, the government has let
the banks take an allowance
amounting to 3.5 percent higher
than the rate the government
charges for Treasury Bills.
Banks say they cannot make a
profit on student loans without
the allowance.
When the GSL program began
ten years ago, Kidwell
recalledCongress was literally
begging lenders to come in
"The incentives enticed them
to come in, and build im-
provements in the system he
said.
Congress, the Gramm - Rud-
man balanced budget law and the
administration have all helped
whittle the incentives down over
the last five years. The bill now
before Congress would shave the
allowance from 3.5 percent over
the T - bill rate to 3.25 percent
over the T - bill rate.
"For every dollar 1 lend out
Clohan said, "I get about one -
half a penny back (in profit).
And that doesn't even account
for the .25 percent incentive
reduction
Advocates of the reduction see
it as a way to help cut goverment
costs and balance the federal
budget.
"Yes, the department would
like to see the cut (because) it
would make the cost of operating
the GSL program that much
less said a Department of
Education spokesman. "The
total cost now is $3 billion a year,
which does not include the loans
themselves
The spokesman, who asked not
to be named, wouldn't speculate
about how many students would
be left without loans or might be
pushed out of school by the
measure, but did add students'
alternatives include the
students' own savings, scholar-
ships and parental contributions
to tuition payments
For your Capezio Dancewear, tap shoes,
ballet shoes, jazz shoes, let our
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YOU'RE A STAR IN CAPEZIO �
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Students, bring this ad plus your valid I.D.
to Room 108 in the Messick Theatre Arts
Center and receive an additional THREE
BUCKS OFF our already cheap ($18) season
ticket.
Offer good until October 1, 1986
"Also, remember many col-
leges have begun their own loan
programs he said.
The bankers themselves note
students who already have GSLs
probably won't feel the pinch.
But students who try to take out
loans after the incentive reduc-
tion goes into effect � as soon as
Oct. 1 or as late as next Jan. 1 �
will have to pay higher interest
rates on the money they can find.
"For the first four years (after
the reduction become law), the
interest will be eight percent
Clohan predicts. "From five to
ten years, it will go up to ten per-
cent
For a student who holds
$10,000 worth of loans, Clohan
said, the two percent interest hike
represents an extra $200 year, or
about $17 a month.
"It doesn't sound like a lot,
but many students hold more
than that Clohan said. The
average annual student loan is
$2,390.
But generally, Kidwell predicts
"money will be less available en
masse than before
"Lower - tier schools serving
ethnic groups, specifically voca-
tional schools, need the
Guaranteed Student Loan pro-
gram Kidwell said. "Hard - to -
come - by money will get even
harder to come by
Kidwell believes "most banks
will try to continue, but they may
have to redirect (their efforts) to
loans (they can make) at a lower
cost (to themselves)
"You may see a bailout " of
banks from the program, he add-
ed, estimating as many as half the
program's lenders may quit if the
proposal becomes law
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�tg�� sa� On
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��on Sous To Drtn
on
Gender
Exami
LOUNDONVILLE, N (CPS)
Women get higher gra :�
. and probabU do bettei
ege because .re
Faster, sas a six - yeai
iology profess r at Sic
ege in upstate Ne 'i i f
"Women students consi
I better (at college) nen
-dents said Pro! Pa� '�'
� 1) "During their I
Nchool, women see l mpi e
"neir v,tud habii

"It appears he &aid
sometimes 'he acaden - I I
.ege bee
' for ma �
V .rra, in ti
� some students -
grades than othe
.dents' acader- c and
backgrounds
rangemen a
tivities and stud habii
noticing that gender eerr.r j
fluence their g-ade mosi I
No one is sure �
better college grad
but Cynthia v.
Higher Education Re- Ser-
vices M.u America
may hae some) rung
the vav peop
ed.
"Giris are socia
more erbal, more uerc
polite Sec explained. "
are socialized 10 be r
bunctious at boys
Women scored higher in Mur-
ray's classes than male students
did, and the disparity. be
is much wider in
perclassmen
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I HI- I AS IAHOl I MAN
SEPTMFMBtR 18. 1986
Gender Intelligence Levels
Examined Through Study
LOUNDONVILLE, NY (CPS)
- Women get higher grades than
men, and probably do better in
college because they mature
faster, says a six - year study b a
sociology professor at Siena Col-
lege in upstate New ork.
"Women students consistently
did better (at college) than men
students said Prof. Paul Mur-
ray. "During their four years at
school, women seem to improe
their study habits. The men
don't
"It appears he said, "that
sometimes the academic end of
college becomes a secondary pur-
suit for males
Murray, in trying to figure out
why some students got better
grades than others, examined
students' academic and tamih
backgrounds, living ar-
rangements, extracurricular ac-
tivities and study habits before
noticing that gender seemed to in-
fluence their grades most of all.
No one is sure why women get
better college grades than men,
but Cynthia Secor, director of
Higher Education Resources Ser-
vices Mid America, hypthosises it
may hae something to do with
the way people become socializ-
ed.
"Girls are socialized to be
more verbal, more detailed and
polite Secor explained. "Girls
are socialized to be not as ram-
bunctious at boys
Women scored higher in Mur-
ray's classes than male students
did, and the disparity, he said,
'is much wider in up-
perclassmen
Although she does not disagree
with many of Murray's findings,
Secor added, "The real dif-
ference (in performances) is when
both get out in the real work
world.
"Women do better in school
gradewise than men, and then
don't do as well in the real
world she contended. "Men
will achieve more there
When he started, Murray
hoped to find the characteristics
that separated students who did
well in college from those who
didn't.
"My original focus was to
make only incidental reference to
sex differences Murrav said.
"but it began to appear that this
was the most significant finding.
There is a sex difference on
almost every variable
For example, the study shows
the sons of working mother
scored lower than boys whose
mothers didn't work outside the
home.
But women with working
mothers scored higher on Mur-
ray's tests than women whose
mothers stayed home. Secor
believes women emulate working
mothers and learn that "its okay
to succeed if you work
Murray's tests also indicate
middle - income families produce
high - scoring children, be they
male or female. Yet male
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students from upper - income
families achieved the lowest
scores of all.
"Well, they have it made in the
shade Secor said, laughing. "If
you were single, white, rich and
goodlooking. would you work?"
Among the other findings:
�Off - campus women do hetter
academically than women who
live in the dorms or at home.
�Males living in dorms do better
academically than males who live
off campus.
�Male students who don't have
jobs do better in school that men
who work part - time.
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SEPTEMBER 18. 1986
Opinion
Page 4
Medicine
Whose Body Is It Anyway?
The Naa HcpaMk
Research in modern biology laboratories
routinely requires human cells and DNA,
the hereditary material found in the cells of
all living creatures. Ordinarily no one gives
a passing thought to the donors. In nearly
every case, the cells will not yield anything
of commercial value. But lotteries do have
winners.
What happens if scientists examining a
person's cells find a protein that can be
made into an anticancer drug? Should the
profits go to the patient, whose cells were
essential to the project's success? Or to the
researchers, who transformed material
destined for the trash into a valuable pro-
duct? Whose body is it, anyway?
Consider John Moore, a recovered
cancer patient treated at the UCLA
Medical Center. His doctor removed
Moore's diseased spleen, and then carried
out research on cells from the organ. He
eventually developed a line of cells that
were commercially viable. UCLA patented
the line, a biotechnology company
developed a product based on it, and
Moore sued. The case is in litigation.
In congressional hearings, in journals, in
symposiums and in courtrooms, people are
trying to thrash out answers. Odd as the
questions sound, they are important.
Biotechnology is big business. The Com-
merce Department predicts that the market
for genetically engineered products, under
S100 million today, will increase to tens of
bilions by the 1990s.
Scientists tend to dismiss the body parts
debate as absurd, but they should be wary.
Their funding, stature and independence
depend on the public's trust, and that sup-
port is fragile.
The gravity of the issue is often belied by
the bemused tone of the discussion. Ex-
perts convened several months ago at a
symposium sponsored by the Office of
Technology Assessment, a non-partisan
government agency. Before long, the
panelists had been diverted from
"Patient's Rights in Human Biological
Materials" and found themselves instead
fighting the Great Cookie War.
Thomas Murray, medical ethicist at the
University of Texas, likened a patient who
had allowed researchers to use his tissue to
a cook who had shared a recipe: "You
make a gift of (family recipes) to your
neighbor. And two years later, they turn
out to be the heart of a best-selling
cookbook that your neighbor has publish-
ed Should you feel offended? Have you
been done an injustice? Do you have any
moral claim on a share of the profits from
the sales of this cookbook? I think that is
the question
The pace of technological advance
means there is no ducking these questions.
According to figures compiled by the
House Science and Technology Commit-
tee, "In the last five years, patent applica-
tions for university-owned inventions us-
ing human biological materials increased
over 300 percent as compared with the five
years preceding
Continue to expect more heat than light
from the argument over how those
"human biological materials" � blood,
sweat, tears and the rest � should be used.
Immense practical difficulties further
obscure philosophical and ethical ques-
tions. As Levine noted, "Most of the
timewe don't know who the human
materials came from. The researcher gets
the materials from the surgical pathologist,
and the surgical pathologist, in the interest
of preserving the patient's privacy, does
not tell the name or does not attach any
identifier to the tissue. And so there is no
way to find out anything
In many cases, research requires pooling
the contributions of hundreds or
thousands of subjects. Deciphering the
structure of one hormone required taking
pituitary glands from 7,000 cadavers. As
Levine put it, "Should we go back and of-
fer to share the proceeds with the estates of
7,000 dead people?"
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The Daniloff Affair
The Kremlin Wants Its Spy Back
Concerning the Daniloff affair, a few
observations:
1. It isn't easy to figure out what the
Soviet Union is up to. If what the gang
over there wanted was as simple as the
release of its spy Gennadi Zakharov, the
Soviets would have gone at it in another
way.
On The Right
By WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY
By acting so flagrantly against an
American journalist so flagrantly the
victim of a setup, the Soviet Union has
attracted attention to Zakharov he
would never otherwise have gotten.
Why didn't they just let Zakharov get
convicted, and then a few months later,
as happened in 1979, trade him for a
few dissidents?
The way in which the Kremlin has
played this argues both against the
likelihood of a release of Zakharov and
certainly argues against that happy arm-
in-arm march toward the end of the
rainbow together that the Soviet Union
has been promoting in various cultural
and political theaters ever since the
Geneva summit of last November.
2. In a word, the Soviet move is just
plain stupid, to judge from what it is
that the Soviet Union desires, namely
maximum pressure on the United States
to stall on our Strategic Defense In-
itiative. Speculation necessarily takes
one to the inner politics of the Kremlin.
It is by no means inconceivable that an
arm of the Kremlin � the KGB, most
likely � undertook the frame-up and
publicized the results of it in order to
put a different arm of the Kremlin on
the spot.
We must always bear in mind that the
majority of Russians, as distinguished
from the majority of Russian in-
telligentsia, believe what is told them,
and Izvestia and Soviet television have
been busy broadcasting the obvious
guilt of Nick Daniloff.
It is generally correct to assume that
the Kremlin is united, even as it is
generally safe to assume that the
Vatican is united. But there are factions
everywhere, and in the Soviet Union we
may be seeing in action a faction in very
high gear.
3. Whatever the division within the
Kremlin, there is certainly correspon-
ding division within the Reagan ad-
ministration. Every day the emphasis
seems to change, first in the direction of
toughness, next in the direction of con-
ciliation.
Mr. Reagan, when he addressed the
subject on his way back from Santa
Barbara, Calif was bluntly outspoken
in saying there would be no
"trade-off Zakharov (who is guilty)
in exchange for Daniloff (who is inno-
cent).
But on Wednesday, State Department
press officer Bernard Kalb, a gentleman
of very great sophistication, uttered the
following ominous words: "The objec-
tive here is .to win the release of Nick
Daniloff, rather than engage in
retaliatory actions
But the objective is not merely to win
the release of Nick Daniloff.
Presumably we could do that before
midnight, by giving the communists
back their spy. Our objective is to get
back Daniloff without giving anything
to the Soviet Union it does not now
have. And how can we effect this
without retaliatory action?
Such as? Well, one example is the
prospective cancellation of the "town
meeting" scheduled to take place in
Latvia. The whole idea of a "town
meeting" within the Soviet Union is
something like a black Mass, but we
have got together a pretty impressive
American delegation, including Sen.
Bill Bradley, Assistant Defense
Secretary Richard Perle, Robert
McFarlane, Helmut Sonnenfeldt, Jeane
Kirkpatrick and other luminaries.
Clearly the Soviet Union wishes that
town meeting to take place. Its cancella-
tion would bother them and would
clearly be interpreted as an act of
retaliation.
What else? One is reminded that, last
year, Caspar Weinberger remarked that
980 Soviet representatives were in the
United States, many under diplomatic
immunity, while the United States has,
over there, only 276 representatives.
Most of theirs are KGB agents, though
it doesn't really make much difference,
in dealing with the Soviet official,
whether he is a KGB agent or not.
A member of the KGB is merely
another Soviet communist trained in
specific artifices. Stalin wasn't a KGB
agent but did enough harm without that
special training. A Soviet diplomat is in
America not to protect Soviet tourists,
but to damage America.
Said Weinberger: Why don't we cut
down Soviet representation? And he
made that suggestion a year before
Daniloff. If we were to act now, it
would be viewed as a retaliatorv in
nature. So what, if it is an objective we
desire?
But we could get much more serious
than that. We could freeze agricultural
shipments; why, we could even close
our eyes and pretend that the Soviet
Union is South Africa.
Unhappily, Mr. Reagan is in a spot,
but he needs to remember that just as
his policy has not been to get our
hostages in Lebanon back at any cost,
so it can't be now primarily our objec-
tive to get poor Mr. Daniloff back.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica
tions Building, across from the entrance
of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.
Will The Democrats Fumble
By CHARLES LANE
Tto Nn Rpblk
Once, tax reform was a clearly
Democratic idea. Jimmy Carter called our
tax system "a disgrace to the human
race Liberal academics argued for a
simpler system with fewer loopholes. Sen.
Bill Bradley and Rep. Richard Gephardt,
both Democrats, introduced the first bill
in the current round of reform.
But in 1984, Walter Mondale refused to
call for tax reform, for fear of offending
various constituencies. Subsequently in
Congress, many Democrats balked at hur-
ting special interest-groups and business
PACs. This November, Republicans will
probably get most of the credit for the
new tax reform bill.
If Democrats don't want to miss the
next boat, too, they had better turn their
attention to the Social Security payroll
tax, or FICA. Including the employer
contribution, it will rise to 15 percent by
1990. After tax reform, this will be equal
to the top income tax bracket for 80 per-
cent of taxpayers.
FICA is terribly regressive. Everyone
pays the same rate � right now 7.15 per-
cent, plus a matching share paid by
employers. The only income distinctions
benefit the well-off: income over $42,000
a year is FICA-free, as is income from in-
vestments.
Income-tax rates have been cut,
especially for the well-off, while FICA
has gotten more burdensome, especially
for the poor. As a result, the total tax
burden of a family of four at the poverty
line rose from 1.8 percent of income in
1979 to 10.4 percent in 1985.
The tax reform bill undoes much of this
damage. Households earning less than
$20,000 a year will see their total federal
tax bills cut by a fifth or more. Six million
poor families will be taken off the
income-tax rolls. But many still have to
pay Social Security tax. One of FICA's
worst follies is that it applies to the first
dollar a poor person earns.
FICA is a job destroyer, too. Money-
losing businesses don't pay income tax.
But they do have to pay FICA. New
businesses start paying Social Security
with their first hire. Companies struggling
to avoid bankruptcy get no reprieve. The
FICA tax amounts to a 14.3 percent
penalty on the decision of a company to
create a job and of a worker to take it.
Otherwise intelligent people cling to the
illusion that Social Security is like an an-
nuity � that benefits are just the return
on the money you put in. Mechanically,
this is wrong. Today's FICA payments
pay for today's Social Security checks �
they aren't saved and invested. Even
metaphorically, the "insurance" idea is
bogus. The money today's retirees paid
into Social Security over their lifetimes,
invested at a normal rate of return, would
pay for less than one-sixth of the benefits
a typical retiree gets.
Meanwhile higher FICA tax rates and
benefit reductions set for after the year
2000 mean today's workers may not get as
much out of the system as they put in.
Social Security is, in fact, a transfer
program. Democrats needn't apologize
for suppporting such programs. But this
one is a regressive transfer financed by a
regressive tax. The average income per
capita of the elderly is 15 percent higher
than that of the general population.
From 1973 to 1984, the average non-
elderly couple's real income didn't grow,
but the average elderly couple's did �
thanks to Social Security benefits. That is,
families struggling to keep up with infla-
tion paid more FICA taxes so the elderly
could stay ahead of inflation. What is
liberal about that?
Social Security should be paid for like
any other program: through income
taxes. This makes even more sense now
that we're about to get a broad-based new
tax system. Increasing income-tax rates to
raise the same amount now raised through
FICA would make the overall tax system
fairer and more efficient.
Most people would still face lower total
tax rates than they do now. Simply cutting
FICA would achieve the same purpose.
But if revenues are cut, benefits must be
cut as well. We mustn't squander tne re-
cent reforms, which have brought the
Social Security system into financial and
actuarial balance.
Cutting Social Security poses a
philosophical challenge for Democrats.
Do they really believe in activist govern-
ment to help the needy? Or are they simply
protecting current programs and consti-
tuencies?
The issue isn't destroying Social Securi-
ty. The issue is saving it. There is no
liberal justification for refusing to amend
a system that, on average, takes money
from those with less and gives it to those
with more.
There are a number of ways to prune
Social Security without pushing those
who depend on it into poverty. One is to
tax benefits. Under the new lower rates,
this may not bring in as much as before.
But it's still a step in the right direction �
especially now that the tax system won't
touch poor people.
Sometime soon, someone is going to
make an issue of Social Security and the
regressive, job-destroying FICA tax. Will
the Democrats grab the next tax reform
issue, or fumble it away like the last one?
Charles Lane is associate editor of
The New Republic magazine, excerpts
from which occasionally appear on this
page.
TERNATIONALSTUOENT
ASSOCIATION
"� ' la . �
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ECU SURFING
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-�e 3u� n 'r �-a- s
"� D'�r� nctaM "� nfttmnrirn
STUDENTS FOR
ECONOMIC DEMOCRACI
b,onc Be3� we
: Conor - - , , ��
' 00 k"M, Spc' 2' ' ����
A iff Afi ore
ECU BIOLOGY CLUB
Sec ��� 6 00 �� ��-
Be f'� �ooc .no M.er�g� z.
le'eVM � feotaay are ��
HELP
The East Carolini
typesetters to woj
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Sterling
Silver Coins
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LL0WA6 ITEMS S
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IHEjASTCARQLlNlAN III !��� 5
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rts Spy Back
sv e is reminded that, last
W emberger remarked that
- s rep esentatives were in the
States many under diplomatic
while the United States has,
ml) 276 representatives.
are KGB agents, though
5 make much difference,
- with the Soviet official,
i a KGB agent or not.
member of the KGB is merely
N el communist trained in
fices. Stalin wasn't a KGB
ugh harm without that
ing A Soviet diplomat is in
: to protect Soviet tourists,
image America.
Weinberger: Why don't we cut
wri v wet representation? And he
suggestion a year before
Daml, we uere to act now, it
would be levied as a retaliatory in
nature. So what, if it is an objective we
desire?
Bui we could get much more serious
than that. We could freeze agricultural
shipments; why, we could even close
eyes and pretend that the Soviet
n is South Africa.
Unhappily, Mr. Reagan is in a spot,
he needs to remember that just as
policy has not been to get our
ges in Lebanon back at any cost,
can't be now primarily our objec-
:o get poor Mr. Daniloff back.
Forum Rules
hman welcomes letters
�ints of view. Mail or
'hem ur office in the Publica-
across from the entrance
! ' purposes of verification, all let
us: include the name, major and
address, phone number
and gnature of the authorfsj. Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
� ible- paced or neatly printed. All let-
art subject to editing for brevity,
seemly and libel, and no personal at-
i � a he permitted.
1 Again?
fell. We mustn't squander tne re-
eforms, which have brought the
Security system into financial and
ial balance.
:ing Social Security poses a
phical challenge for Democrats,
py really believe in activist govern-
0 help the needy-Or are they simply
ting current programs and consti-
bs?
issue isn't destroying Social Securi-
e issue is saving it. There is no
justification for refusing to amend
m that, on average, takes money
pose with less and gives it to those
lore.
je are a number of ways to prune
1 Security without pushing those
bend on it into poverty. One is to
tafits. Under the new lower rates,
iy not bring in as much as before.
I still a step in the right direction �
Illy now that the tax system won't
Vor people.
!time soon, someone is going to
n issue of Social Security and the
he, job-destroying FICA tax. Will
piocrats grab the next tax reform
r fumble it away like the last one?
ues Lane is associate editor of
bw Republic magazine, excerpts
hich occasionally appear on this
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
�� ��� �rid dancingi
be .� � Sa,urav. Sept jo. wu ,nere mm
Announcements
ECU SURFING
The team trials are tn,s Sunday at Cape
Matteraj Meet at Rodanthe Pier at to 00
The contest will be held somewhere else so
oe on t,me at the p.er There will not be a
school van going on this trip it you need a
ride call Blair at 75 U�3 or Cree at 7S� HV
and they might be able to help You can surt
�n the trials even if you missed last week's
meeting All contestants must pay their $10
club dues no later than Sunday morning at
Rodanthe Next club meeting is Sept 2$ in
the library instead o� Mendenhail
STUDENTS FOR
ECONOMIC DEMOCRACY
Frustrated by the Reagan ,ears? Move
beyond Reagan,sm and join Students tor
Economic Democracy at ,ts first meeting
00 Sunday Sept 21 m Menoenhal! room 238
All are welcome
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement Ser
vice in the Bioxton House is offering one hour
sessions to help you prepare your own
resume Few graduates get lobs without
some preparation Many employers request
a resume showing your education and ex
perience Sessions to help will be held in the
Career Planning room at 3 p m on Sept. la,
IT, and II
INTERVIEWING
WORKSHOPS
The Career piannmg and Placement Ser
vice m the Bioxton House is offering these
one hour sessions to aid you in developing
better interviewing skills for use in your job
search A film and discussion of how to inter
view on and off campus will be shared These
sessions will be held in the Career Planning
Room at 3 p m on Sept 22. 23. 24. and 25 Be
ready tor Sept �th sign upsl
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIPS
"What m the world is a Campus Christian
Fellowship?-� Good question It is a Christian
fellowship that was inaugurated last
semester We are a statewide group spon
sored by the Churches of ChristChristian
Churches It is a non denominational
organization open to all who would like to at
'end Simply, we are people who care about
people If you are looking for a home away
from home we would like for you to come and
be a very important part of our fellowship.
We meet on Wednesday nights at 5 in room
23 of Menoenhall If that is inconvenient you
may want to come to our meetings on Tues-
day at 4 at my traitor For directions or any
questions please feel free to call me, Jim
Pondexter at any time at 752 7199. I hope to
near from you real soon God bless you.
NEED HELP IN
CHEMISTRYT
ECU BIOLOGY CLUB
The ECU Biology Club is rai ,ng ,ts j�noa,
p.cn.c ana membership drive on Monday
Sep 19� at 6 00 at the Gazebo There will
be tree food an0 beverages An those m
'crested m biology are asked to attend
GAMMA BETA PHI
Ttere w.n oe a general business meeting
t Gamma Beta Phi on September lg, ioaj it
w.il be held m Biology room 103 at 7 00 pm
There w.n also be an executive meeting at
a 00 pm ,n the same room
The Chemistry Dapt. at ECU has opened a
Learning Center in Flanagan JIS. The Center
is open Monday Thursday from 2 5 p m The
purpose of the Center is to provide help to
students outside class who are enrolled in
beginning chemistry classes, such as CHEM
1120. 1150. 110, and 0150.
CLUB AWARENESS
DAY
The SGA and the Student union are spon
soring its 2nd Club Awareness Day on Wed
Sept. 24 on the Central Campus Mall. Ail
campus organizations are invited and en
couraged to participate in this opportunity of
meeting and recruiting students for your
organization. Tables and chairs will be pro-
vided, allowing space for group displays and
seating for 2 club members Student Union is
arranging to have soft drinks provided for
the occasion Contact the SGA Office in 22
Mendenhail. 757-aell, Ext. 211, on or before
Friday. Sept 19th
FRISBEECLUB
If you play with your disk or toss your
frisbee, do it with the fnsbee club The I rates
meet Tues . Thurs and Sunday at 4 30 on
the college hill fields. Come out and have
some fun with us Play Frisbee Golf I A 9 hole
disc course has been set up starting between
the womens Softball fiels and Harrington
baseball stadium it's great fun. Play disc
sports or be oblong
OMEGA PSI PHI
There will be a meeting for all interested
Omega Essencesatlpm. Thursday night at
the Ledonia Wright Cultural Center
BIOLOGY CLUB
ECU Biology Club is having a CAR
WASH Sat . Sept 20. 19U at Burger King
(Greenville Blvd.) from 9 12. All members
and potential members are urged to come
out and help
BIODIVERSITY
TELECONFERENCE
ECU Dept of Biology and Division of Con
tinuing Education, In conjunction with the
Smithsonian institution and the National
Academy of Sciences, will sponsor a
teleconference on Sept. 24. titled
BIODIVERSITY Program speakers will
discuss issues related to the rapid destruc
tion of the earth's natural habitats and the
subsequent lost of plants and animals. The
topic of biodiversity should be of vital M
'erest to all. Students, legislative officials,
madia representatives and the general
public art urged to attend this invigorating
event. The audience will be able to voice
their questions directly to the national ex
perts in Washington, D.C. by means of
satellite This program is tree and will take
place in the ECU Biology bldg room BW2.
from 0-10 p.m. For more info, call 757-4143.
ext 15
Monday Night,
75C Draft
Free
Quarterback
Buffet
Super Door
Prizes
See the game on
our Big Screen
TV
LIVE
Sheraton's in a league all its own.
()
Sheraton
Greenville
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�1t��w�.l� MCTMCAI�rX��� SIWSSSJM
M�'�ll��Mtfl4fffllilllIMIItllltmiitllllUltimilllllimilllllllllllllHMIIllltMIIIMHIIIIIIHfll"iillU
Drink Some Suds
While You
Do Your Duds
AMFM Music
2 Color TV's with Cable I
Game Room
Visit our convenient location on 14th St.
8 AM-12 Midnight
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� Expires 9-30-M �
.MIIMIIM.MHMI.II.m.HM.HI4MtM.MWU
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
S2o; Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at
additional cost. Prcgnanc) Test, Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnanc Counseling. For
further information, call 832-0535 (toll free
number: I-S00-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5
p m. weekdays. General anesthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
ATTIC
SEPT A SEPT
THUR
The ZOO
$1.00 for all ECb
students
FRI
Revival
Tribute: Creedance Clearwater
$1.75 all ECU
students
HcwToliiprove
Y)ur Grades
AtlheBeadi
SAT
BILLY PRICE!
AND THE KEYSTONE ftrfVTriM BAT
$1.75 all ECU
students
If you're finding your bathing suit
tighter than usual, now's a fitting time to
join The Spa. Students can join The Spa
on a monthly basis for only $25 per
month. That's $25 for 30-days without
any strings attached.
The Spa offers 52 aerobics work
outs every week, exercise machines, free
weights, steam room, sauna and whirl-
pool. Plus, there are plenty of trained
instruct! rs t help y n shape up.
So. if your body is flunking the
beach test, call or dn p bv The Spa f �i
rtx ire information.
Impn ing your grades at the beach
simply requires a little home work.
IfSF
a-
GnawiHet
best health club value.
SOUTH PARK SHOPPING CENTER
GREENVTLI F 75&7W1
East Carolina University
Big Tex" is a big quarter pound of prize
western ground beef cooked up into the
hamburger you've been hankering for'
Big Tex" is always a special treat at
Western Sizzlm Bring in the whole family
and enjoy!
Black Sororities
Host
$1.39
includes French Fries
Thursday Sept. 18th
A Fall Rush
Black Sorority Informal Fall Rush
September 14, Registration $1.00 and Reception
700 Mendenhail Multi-purpose Room
September 15, Rush Party, Alpha Kappa Alpha,
Coffee House, 7:00
September 16, Rush Party, Delta Sigma Theta, Coffee
House, 7:00
September 17, Rush Party, ZeU Phi Beta, Coffee
House, 700
September 18, Rush Party, Sigma Gamma Rho,
Coffee House, 7:00
September 19, Social, TBA
September 22, Rush Party, Alpah Kappa Alpha
Coffee House, 7:00
September 23, Rush Party, Delta Sigma Theta. Coff
House, 7:00
September 24, Rush Party, Zeta Phi Beta, Coffee
House, 7:00
September 25, Rush Party, Sigma Gamma Rho
Coffee House, 7:00
wmmm





THFEASTCAROMNIAN
Entertainment
BLOOM COUNTY
SEPTEMBER 18, 1986
Page 6
'Star Trek' Celebrates Twentieth Anniversary
By MICAH HARRIS
MtWttta
Twenty years after its debut in
1966, "Star Trek" is still boldly
going where no man has gone
before. It remains a television
phenomenon, perpetually fresh
and intellectually and emotional-
ly stimulating.
A gala party was held at Disney
Land to celebrate it's twentieth
anniversary, reuniting the cast
and, more significantly, allowing
discussion of a forth-coming
movie, The Voyage Home.
Gene Rodenberry conceived
"Star Trek" as a "Wagon Train
to the stars He modeled his
hero, Captain Christopher Pike,
after the naval hero of literature,
Captain Horatio Hornblower.
The original pilot for the series
was entitled "The Cage The
only surviving character of this
episode was Leonard Nimoy's
"Spock who was in the em-
brionic stages of development. In
an early scene he speaks in a cold,
computer-like monotone; later,
he smiles in pleasure at an exotic,
alien plant.
NBC decided the concept was
okay but the pilot was deemed
too intellectual for television au-
diences. "Go back and make
another pilot they said. "And
one more thing � get rid of the
dude with pointed ears
Happily, Rodenberry did not
compromise on an intelligent
script or the pointed-eared
dude. In fact, the second pilot
was more cerebral than the first.
"Where No Man Has Gone
Before" was a classic Greek
tragedy of the far future involv-
ing psionic powers thrust upon
two innocent crew members and
their progression to a godhood
thev were all too human to han-
dle.
There had been some personnel
changes on the Enterprise by this
time. The late Jeffrey Hunter
who had played Captain Pike
asked for a transfer, so Captain
Jim Kirk was assigned duty.
The Enterprise crew was also
becoming more familiar. Scotty
and Sulu also signed aboard in
this story.
The ordering of a second pilot
was a first for television; one of
several "Star Trek" would
achieve. It was also the first series
to be revived after cancellation
because of a flood of fan mail;
and the first to feature an inter-
racial kiss between Kirk and
Uhura in "Plato's Stepchildren
With Rodenberry at the helm,
the Enterprise was able to cir-
cumnavigate the network cen-
sors. Stories dealt with such con-
troversial subjects of the 60s as
racism ("The Devil in the
Dark"), and the Vietnam War
("A Private Little War").
The secret of "Star Trek's"
continual success can be at-
tributed to several things.
Debuting in turbulent times, it
offered an optimistic view of the
future and what it could be, (a
time of global peace in which
men and women of different na-
tionalities worked together to
reach the stars).
Another reason for "Star
Trek's" popularity is the actors'
determination to create
characters of depth to whom we
can relate and care about. Kirk,
Spock, and McCoy are all lonely
men in conflict with their emo-
tions, whether they admit to
them or not.
Although story continuity was
generally not stressed, William
Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, and
DeForest Kelly took pains to be
sure that character consistency
was.
And again, "Star Trek" has
maintained a high profile via syn-
dication. It continues to gain new
fans every year. This constant ex-
posure keeps Trek enthusiasm
high as opposed to Star Wars in-
terest which is fizzling away
because there has been no Jedi-
related material presented in
three years.
The TV programs continually
promote interest in the new series
of feature films which were a
long time coming There were
rumors of a "Star Trek" movie
in the early 70's. Then it was to
be a new television series, and
finally a movie again.
Star Trek: The Motion Picture
was a major disappointment to
fans when it finally arrived. It
was what "Star Trek" should
never be � dull. How a talented
director, good actors, fantastic
special effects, and an intriguing
concept combined to produce this
failure is a mystery of cosmic
proportions which Carl Sagan
would have difficulty unraveling.
Fortunately, the movie still
made money and Star Trek II:
The Wrath of Khan debuted a
few years later. For my money,
this remains the ultimate Trek
movie. It captured the feel of the
better episodes (interestingly, it
was conceived as a TV movie)
while updating them in style and
character.
The aging of the cast, instead
of being side-stepped, was used
as a springboard for a story large-
ly about Kirk's accepting of his
own � and his friend, Spock's �
mortality. Continuity was also
stessed by picking up a loose
thread and character. Khan,
from the series.
Star Trek III was perhaps the
most controversial of the movies
so far. Many fans wanted Spock
to be resurrected; others felt his
return made the beautiful and
touching previous film futile.
Equally pointless was the ap-
pearence of Kirk's son and (more
painfully) the Enterprise's
destruction.
The meaning of all this carnage
was to show the capacity of
human beings for self-sacrifice.
But somehow suspension of
disbelief was not achieved to this
end as in The Wrath of Khan. In
comparison. Star Trek III is a
sensationalistic movie.
The fourth movie should wrap
up the loose ends of the previous
picture and hopefuly bring the
story line begun in The Wrath of
Khan to a close; thus completing
a trilogy and allowing the Trek
characters to get on to other
things
Correction
Last week The East Carolinian
erroneously reported thai a ski
trip offered b HPERS cost $500.
The correct price is $599. We are
sorry for an confusion this error
may have caused.
On The History And Origin Of Mondays
Bv CLAY DEANHARDT
SUM Writer
1 have a suggestion; a pro-
posal, if you will, that I think will
nelp solve many � if not all �
the problems that face the world
'oday.
You see, I want to ban Mon-
days.
That's right, ban them.
Abolish them. Send them to the
Twilight Zone and let Rod Serl-
ing deal with them. Just plain get
rid of the things.
It's not really the day that's
bad; we can still have a seven day
week. The root of the problem is
really in the name. Monday. Can
you think of any worse name for
a day? It even sounds sick.
I've been told that Mondays
are named for the moon � which
is bad news. After all, everyone
knows that weird stuff happens
because of the moon.
Werewolves come out, things
vanish, and even the Cubs win
because of the moon. 1 want to
know who the genius is who
decided to name a whole day
after it.
1 have m own theory, though,
and I think that monsters and
Mondays are somehow related.
The boogie man that scared us as
children really exists, and
somehow he manages to wreak
havoc once a week, on his day.
Over the course of the last few
months I have only had one Mon-
day when nothing went wrong,
and that doesn't count because I
spent the whole day in bed
hiding.
I couldn't even escape the
Monday monsters on my vaca-
tion. It was my first real vacation
in ovei two years, and on that
Monday my boat broke down, I
lost my wallet, and I sliced my
foot on God-know s-w hat under
What's Happening In Downtown Greenville
By RUSTY HARRINGTON
Staff Writer
Strange but true � there is
something going on in town this
weekend. We now take you to
Hotspots � those places where
the monotony of academia is
violated and you can get in touch
with your true self.
The Attic � features their
Heavy Metal Thursday with The
Zoo. Creedence fans take note
Friday, Revival takes their CCR
tribute to the Attic with special
guests Public Relations.
Saturday night, Billy Price and
the Keystone Rhythm Band finish
the week.
Wrong Way Corrigan's � con-
tinues their Thursday night live
entertainment with Mitch and
Gary Bowen.
New Dell � will be rocking
with the hot N.C. pair The Flat
Duo Jets on Thursday. Rich-
mond's Unseen Force will bring
hardcore to the Deli, and opening
the show will be local hardcorists
P.O.P. (for Pieces of
Pedestrians). A fitting denoune-
ment for the Deli weekend will be
the fusion of Denouement.
If Greenville's hot scene
doesn't feed the bulldog � on
campus entertainment is
highlighted by the film Back To
The Future, which is screening
from Thursday through Sunday
at 8 p.m.
In the event that none of the
aforementioned trips your trig-
ger, and a road trip seems more
appealing, check out some of
these out of town bands and
clubs.
The Brewery in Raleigh ha the
Rev. Billy C. Wirtz on Thursday,
followed by The Bill Lyerly Blues
Band and Messablues on Friday.
Saturday, The Woods will play,
and Sunday night The Right Pro-
file will have their last show
before going into the studio.
If you are hard up enough to
go to Chapel Hill, here's a run-
down of what's happening at
Rhythm Alley. Thursday has The
Right Profile, while straight from
The Brewery is the Rev. Billy C.
Wirtz. N.C. power trio PKM
takes over on Saturday, and
finishing the week will be the
Georgia Satellites on Sunday.
The pick of the week is the Flat
Duo Jets, Thursday at New Deli.
Thei; high energv rock 'n' roll is
unbelievably emitted from just a
guitarist and a drummer (who
needs a bass player?) and is sure
to be intense. Start the evening
off with Palo Viejo ($5.80 a fifth)
and go to the show.
A special note to the lounge
lizards � you can still find the
sexual encounter of your dreams
at any of these other clubs � just
don't wear so much POLO or
HALSTON cologne.
Remember to call the clubs in
advance, since dates and acts are
subject to frequent change, and
support live entertainment.
Elizabeth
table. The film was formerly tilled 'Sexual Perversity I. Chicago bat studios tad motheater"owner, balked at �
film with
a IWe.
water. The next Monday I broke
up with my girlfriend, the follow-
ing Monday I almost lost two
jobs, and the next, classes
started. It's got to be more than a
coincidence. It's the Monday
Monsters.
I'm not the only person the
Monday Monsters are after,
either. How many people can
really remember the last time they
had a good Monday? Ask your
friends. Those who say they can
are probably lying through their
teeth.
Mondays are days when you
find that your girlfriend is now
going with the geek down the hall
(the guy who drives dad's BMW)
and that your girlfriend (the
homely one) isn't really your
psych professor's daughter.
It's also the day you discover
that the paper due this Frida was
really due last Friday. You then
discover the drawer into which
you threw your dirty gym socks
last week � just as the girl who
thinks you aren't sophisticated
enough wallks by.
People have told me all of this
stuff is just in my mind � that all
of those things happen to me
because I'm just a klutz, which is
true to a point. But the clincher
for me came when I found out
that September 1 was a Monday.
Thai's right, remember it?
Even the drinking age went up on
a Monday That day the
Monsters had it out for
everybody � bad. First you woke
up with a hangover; then you
remembered it was an illegal
hangover; then you had a quiz in
you first class which started five
minutes after vou rolled out of
bed.
Thursday's failed test wa
because of Monday's fight. And
that hijacking Friday was pro-
bably because some whacked-out
Libyan got indigestion the Mon-
day before. I read somewhere
that the Monday before he invad-
ed France, Hitler cut himself
shaving. Imagine that � WWII
might have been avoided if Adolf
had only known that two day stu-
ble would soon be a fashion rage.
I would even be willing to bet
my entire checking and savings
accounts (all $.69) that Moham-
mar Gadafi, the Ayatollah
Khomeni, and Jesse Helms were
all conceived and born on Mon-
days. No lie.
So my plan is to save the world
by starting a campaign to end
Mondays. Since Fridays are
usually so nice, I think we'll just
have two Fridays a week.
Of course this means chancing
extra Friday the thirteenths, but
I'm not superstitious.
Moore And Lowe Turn Out
Top Performance In Movie
ByEDTOSHACH
MlWrhr
Can a one night stand be the
beginning of a meaningful and
emotionally rewarding relation-
ship? About Last Night asks just
that, and whether or not you
agree with the answer, the ques-
tion makes one heck of a movie.
In About Last Night, Rob
Lowe and Jim Belushi are
salesmen for a food service supp-
ly company who are both caught
up in the singles scene. Demi
Moore and Elizabeth Perkins are
roommates who show up at the
bar Lowe and Belushi frequent
after a softball game they all at-
tended.
After several lustful looks are
exchanged, Lowe and Moore go
back to his apartment, beginning
an explicit and provocative series
of one night stands. Belushi and
Perkins do their best to talk the
two out of their eventual decision
to move in together � Belushi by
slighting Moore and constantly
mourning Lowe's lost freedom,
and Perkins by constantly
flooding Moore with her stereop-
typed ideas of the American
male.
Turns out the two sidekicks are
mostly worried about not seeing
much of their friends anymore, a
fear that comes true when Moore
moves into Lowe's apartment.
A lot of the good that can be
said about this picture has to do
with the screenplay by Tim
Kazurinsky of Saturday Night
Live and Denise Declue. Based
on the play Sexual Perversity In
Chicago, by David Mamet, its in-
telligent and witty dialogue is a
pleasure from beginning to end.
Most of the good lines go to
Demi Moore, but she deserves
them. She and Rob Lowe were
both in St.Elmo's Fire, and both
are developing well as actors.
Jim Belushi is sometimes very
funny as the unflattering
stereotype of an urban bachelor.
His character is at times allowed
to have a heart; this gives him a
human edge and makes him a lit-
tle more real.
Also turning in a nice perfor-
mance is Elizabeth Perkins as
Moore's cynical roommate.
Although mostly depicted as a
bitter, lonely person, she too has
a compassionate side that usually
turns up in scenes from her job at
a kindergarten.
Overall, About Last Night is a
good way to spend a couple of
hours. Although at times it is just
a tad long, the length is never a
real problem, as the movie takes
the time it needs to deal with its
different themes like sexual at-
traction vs. love, friends vs
lovers, etc.
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P1IMBIR 18, )Kf
Page
iversary
1; ence of Kirk's son and (more
painfully) the Enterpiise's
detr ik tion
The meaning of all this cai nage
ds to show the capacity of
human beings for self-sacrifice.
somehow suspension of
disbelief was not achieved to this
as in The Wrath of Khan. In
comparison, Star Trek III is a
�nalistic movie.
fourth movie should wrap
up the loose ends of the previous
ure and hopefuly bring the
line begun in The Wrath of
j close, thus completing
and allowing the Trek
icters to get on to other
Correction
l ast week I he East Carolinian
erroneousl reported that a ski
trip offered b HPF.RS cost $500
The correct price is $599. We are
sorr for an confusion this error
ma have caused.
days
M�
That dav the
had it out for
bad. First you woke
ingover; then you
was an illegal
er; then you had a quiz in
ass which started five
aftei vou rolled out of
irsda failed test was
because o Monday's tight. And
that hijacking Friday was pro-
bably because some whacked-out
I ibyan got indigestion the Mon-
daj before I read somewhere
that the Mondav before he invad-
ed France. Hitler cut himself
shaving. Imagine that � WWII
might have been avoided if Adolf
had only known that two day sta-
ble would soon be a fashion rage.
i uid even be willing to bet
m ei t checking and savings
act (all S.69) that Moham-
mar Gadafi, the Ayatollah
Khomeni, and Jesse Helms were
all conceived and born on Mon-
dav No lie.
So mv plan is to save the world
starting a campaign to end
Mondays. Since Fridays are
usual!) so rice, I think we'll just
have two Fridays a week.
Of course this means chancing
extra Fridav the thirteenths, but
I'm not superstitious
.owe Turn Out
nee In Movie
A lot of the good that can be
said about this picture has to do
with the screenplay by Tim
Kazunnsky of Saturday Night
Live and Denise Declue. Based
on the play Sexual Perversity In
Chicago, by David Mamet, its in-
telligent and witty dialogue is a
pleasure from beginning to end.
Most of the good lines go to
Demi Moore, but she deserves
them. She and Rob Lowe were
both in St.Elmo's Fire, and both
are developing well as actors.
Jim Belushi is sometimes very
funny as the unflattering
stereotype of an urban bachelor.
His character is at times allowed
to have a heart; this gives him a
human edge and makes him a lit-
tle more real.
Also turning in a nice perfor-
mance is Elizabeth Perkins as
Moore's cynical roommate.
Although mostly depicted as a
bitter, lonely person, she too has
a compassionate side that usually
turns up in scenes from her job at
a kindergarten.
Overall, About Last Night is a
good way to spend a couple of
hours. Although at times it is just
a tad long, the length is never a
real problem, as the movie takes
the time it needs to deal with its
different themes like sexual at-
traction vs. love, friends vs.
lovers, etc.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 18 1986
Undercover Cats
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By BRYANT
TKiSlSAgiOoHOM
Tooth
By BROOKS
By SoveLove � CheRo
Classifieds
SALE
TYPING: Professional service at
low rates includes: proofreading,
spelling and grammatical correc-
tions; 12 yrs. experience; familiar
with all university formats. Cindy:
757-0398 anytime after 6 p.m.
NEED A D.J.T: Are you having a
party and need a D.J.?: For the best
in top 40, beach and dance call
Morgan at 758-7967. Reasonable
rates. References on request.
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER-
VICE: Word processing. The
Dataworlcs specializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dlssertions,
theses, resume's and more. All work
s computer-checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary. Rates
are as low as $1.75 per page, in-
cluding paper (call for spedific
rates.) Call Mark at 757-3440 after 7
p.m.
TYPING ALL KINDS: $1.25 per
page. Call 752-2100 after 6 p.m.
WATEREED FOR SALE: King size
waterbed ro sale. Semi-waveless,
heater included. Leu than 4 months
old. Headboard included. $250. Call
758-978 after 12 noon. Ask for Craig.
MUST SACRIFICE: Sunn-Coliseum
Slave Amp, 900 watts, $250 or best of-
fer; Sunn 8 Channel Mono Mixing
Board, $150. Call Read after 6, (919)
237-3094.
$M PER HUNDRED PAID: For
remaillng letters from home! Send
self-addressed, stamped envelope
for informationapplication.
Associates, Box 95-B, Rosalie, NJ
07203.
JEEPS FOR SALE: Is it true you
can buy jeeps for $44 through the
U.S. Government? Get the facts to-
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cellent condition, $120. Call 756-0696.
FOR RENT: Semi-private room,
furnished, kitchen privileges,
$80mo. Private room-furnished, kit-
chen privileges, $145mo. Near col-
lege. 758-2201.
FOR SALE: Sansui digital quartz
syntheisizer DC stereo receiver: 3
speaker sets capabilites, 2 phone in-
puts, 2 tape, 6 pre ser stations, spec-
trum analyzer, 160 W per side. Just
like new, $300 sugg. ret. $1,200. Call
725-2692 ask for Jim.
NEED A MAP OR CHART: For that
important paper? Give us a call.
Grad. Ink. All work hand drafted.
756-5671 or 758-5300.
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc. Call
Anna at 752-3015 and leave a
message.
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SERVICES: Typ-
ing resumes, term papers, thesis
papers. Call SDF Professional Com-
puter Services Inc 10 E. 5th St.
(near Cubbies) Greenville. 752-3694.
DO-DAD: Ain't nobody got the tunas
or talent that the TRASHMAN got
for spinnin' records. Either a
cocktail, shindig, nice prices for
Greeks. Mighty kind of you. 752 3587.
FOR SALE: Sofa in excellent condi-
tion. Owner moving, must sell! $200.
Call 756-3128 or 756 9559 after 500
pm.
WANTED
WANTED: MALE DIVERS FOR
THE ECU DIVING TEAM. An ex
cellent opportunity to be a varsity
athlete. Call John Rose or Rick
Kobe at 757-6490.
JOB WANTED: Man desires job as
houskeeper or attendant for the sick.
Non-smoker, non-drinker and have
good references. 752-6079.
WANTED: Energetic, loving person
to have fun with happy 6-year-old
girl. Must have car 2.15-7, 3-5 days
per week. Right person will enjoy
swimming, bike riding, and fun with
our child. Night and weekend hours.
Also needed at times. Near ECU.
Phone 756-7007 and leave a message.
REWARD: Free trip to Daytona,
plus commission money. WANTED
Organized group or individual to
promote the number 1 Spring Break
trip to Daytona. if interested call
DESIGNERS OF TRAVEL,
1-800-433-9074 immediately!
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Christian atmosphere, responsible 2
bedroom condo. in Treetops. $150
plus utilities and phone. Call Beth
756-6320. 756-2724. or 758-3471 Ext. 240
(NCNB).
HELP WANTED: Mala or females
for daytime help M-F. Any number
of days a weak. Any hours from 5
a.m 3 p.m. Contact McDonald's on
10th and Cotanche-by the campus!
See CLASSIFIEDS. pge 9
� in '11 rmni m,
' �BIH � � 111 IMP!
m 1 fin
t0mmmmm�
iwpmmpup





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 18, 1986
Page 8
ECU Seeks First Win
Bucs Travel To 10th Ranked Auburn
Senior taiback Brent Fullwood, the second-leading rusher for Auburn
behind Bo Jackson last year, ran for 153 yards against ECU in last
year's game.
By RICK McCORMAC
The Pirates, still in search of
win number one in 1986, will
travel to Auburn Ala this Satur-
day to face the 10th ranked
Tigers.
The Tigers, who are coming
off an open date, defeated the
University of Tennessess-
Chattanooga 42-14 in their open-
ing game.
Auburn is led by an explosive,
well balanced offense. In addi-
tion to a fleet of talented running
backs, Auburn has improved
their passing game considerably.
In fact, in the UTC game, the
Tigers had more yards passing
than they rushing (248 passing,
167 rushing) for the first time
since 1984.
The Tigers operate offensively
from the Pro-I, although they do
employ a number of formations
depending on the situation.
Leading the way from the
tailback position are seniors
Brent Fullwood and Colis Camp-
bell. Fullwood was the second-
leading rusher last year with 684
yards rushing, with 153 of those
coming against the Pirates last
year.
However, Campbell a red-shirt
last year is the starter, due to
academic difficulties Fullwood
encountered this summer.
Fullwood was the leading rusher
in Auburn's opener with 73 yards
on just nine carries.
The fullback position is also
well stocked with junior Reggie
Ware and senior Tommy Agee
returning.
Jeff Burger, who started two
games last year, will be the
quarterback. Burger completed
16 of 25 passes for 245 yards and
three touchdowns. The 245 yards
was the highest total for a
Auburn quarterback since 1972.
Burger's principal targets were
Agee, who caught five passes for
84 yards and sophomore wide
receiver Lawyer Tillman who
caught four passes for 92 yards
Kobe Optimistic About 1986
Bv SCOTT COOPER
Co-Sporti Edhor
Fifth-year ECU head swim
coach Rick Kobe is nothing short
of optimistic for his Bucs and the
upcoming 1986-87 dual-meet
season as the team has just com-
pleted their third week of
workouts.
"I'm really looking forward
(to the beginning of the season)
Kobe said, "it's going to be
fun
As a matter of fact, the men's
and women's squads recently
finished their running program
with the annual biathlon. The
biathlon includes a two-mile
swim, a six-mile trail run, follow-
ed by another mile in the pool.
For the men, junior Patrick
Brennan finished first in one
hour and 30 minutes. Sophomore
David Killeen and senior Stratton
Smith finished second and third
respectively.
Three freshmen took first
second and third-place honors
for the women. Pam Wilbanks
was first with a 1:30.55 time
followed by Leslie Wilson and
Robin Wicks.
The optimism that coach Kobe
feels is due to the fact that the
Pirates have a gigantic incoming
freshman class. The newcomers
include a dozen freshmen (and
three additional JC transfers) for
the men and nine new faces for
the women.
"It's the biggest freshmen class
we've ever had � over half our
team is new Kobe said. "It's a
talented group of people and
they're all from very fine
pograms. They're going to have
to carry on the tradition.
"It's by far the most talented
freshmen class for girls Kobe
continued. "It's always been the
philosophy of the team that
'you're only as good as your
freshmen class So if you want to
get better, you have to bring in
faster swimmers
Kobe feels that he has ac-
complished this feat and that in
order for his team to be suc-
cessful, they need to get adjusted.
"If there's a weakness, it's that
we're so young Kobe explain-
ed. "We have to get adjusted.
"Now � we're a good swim
team, at the end of the year, we
could be a great swim team
Kobe added.
Kobe went on to say that the
team may have some added
pressure, due to their fine success
of a year ago. The men, who won
the conference championship;
and the women, who came in se-
cond (to James Madison) last
year, may face more pressure
from opponents.
"Winning again is twice as
hard Kobe said. "It's a tough
road to hoe. We have brought in
enough talent (for the women) to
catch James Madison this year
With the success that ECU
swimming has maintained
throughout the years, coach
Kobe sees his Pirates getting the
opposition's best efforts.
"Swimming has always been a
good sport at East Carolina
Kobe said. "We got a lot of
respect last year when we travell-
ed � people know we've got a
good team.
"Our veterans are all-
conference performers and all are
top-quality swimmers and
divers Kobe said. "It's the best
mixture (of veterans and
newcomers) we've ever had
In terms of this year's competi-
tion, Kobe mentioned powers like
Carolina, N.C. State, Duke,
Navy, Old Dominion and Rich-
mond as being some of the stiffer
competiton for the Pirates in
1986-87. ECU will begin their
dual meet season on Thurs Oct.
9 in their own Pentathlon in
Minges pool.
Dye Not Taking Bucs Lightly
By TIM CHANDLER
xbtui Sporta Editor
Can the 11th ranked Auburn
Tigers take East Carolina lightly
this Saturday?
According to Auburn head
coach Pat Dye, they had better
not.
"We're not a good enough
football team at this point to take
anybody lightly said Dye in a
telephone interview Wednesday.
"We, too Oike East Carolina) are
in a rebuilding and regrouping
stage with our football team
Dye went own to comment that
at this point in the year, it
wouldn't matter who the opposi-
tion was, he would still be con-
cerned about the game.
"It wouldn't matter if it were
Tennessee that we were lining up
against Saturday commented
Dye. "My main concern now is
our own football team. We didn't
exactly set the woods on fire last
week against (Tennessee) Chat-
tanooga (42-14)
Dye also said that he did not
feel that his players would take
ECU lightly because of the 11
game losing streak the Pirates are
in now or because of the
preseason spot in the 'Worst 20'
poll.
"Our players are not stupid
said Dye. "They (the Auburn
players) played against East
Carolina last year and for the
first half it was very tough
(Auburn led only 7-0 at the half).
They (ECU) have good
players continued Dye. "They
hurt us here last year, especially
with their fullback (Anthony
Simpson)
Dye said that after looking at
the game film of the West
Charge!
Former ECU coach Pet Dye, now leading Auburn University, says his
team would be stupid to take the Pirates lightly this weekend.
Virginia contest that he was quite
impressed.
"I couldn't help but be im-
pressed with the play of the line
and and the fullback stated
Dye. "Defensively they played
good physical D It was a game
that East Carolina certainly
should have won
Dye expressed a great deal of
praise for freshman signal-caller
Charlie Libretto.
"Based on what I have seen of
him (Libretto), he is very poised
and confident said Dye. "I'm
sure coach Baker is very pleased
with his performance
Dye stated that he felt the
Pirates played a good game
against N.C. State except for the
turnovers.
"They (ECU) moved the ball
welgainstStateaswelsWest
"The fans in
Greenville just need to
be patient with the
players and the
coaches. The East
Carolina program will
grow, it is well
coached �Pat Dye
Virginia stated Dye. "The tur-
novers in the State game was
what hurt them
When the subject of coach
Baker came up, Dye expressed a
great deal of respect.
"I have tremendous respect for
coach Baker commented Dye.
"If they (ECU) can win, then he
is the man to get the job done.
"If you trace back most of the
losses that Baker has had, you
will find that in most cases it was
because they (ECU) were over-
matched. But, he has played
some top teams very close and he
has had to do much of it on the
road.
"If you trace back most of the
losses that Baker has had, you
will find that in most cases it was
because they (ECU) were over-
matched. But, he has played
some top teams very close and he
has had to do much of it on the
road.
"The fans in Greenville just
need to be patient with the
players and the coaches con-
tinued Dye. "The East Carolina
program will grow, it is well
coached. He (Baker) just needs to
get his system established
Dye said that he still has fond
memories of Greenville and East
Carolina and thinks of it quite
often.
"I still have strong feelings for
East Carolina said Dye. "I still
love it
Pat Dye's Record at East
Carolina
1974 7-4
19758-3
19769-2
19778-3
19789-3
19797-3-1
Total48-18-1
Sports Fact
Tues. Sept. 16,1930
Cleveland pitcher Bob
Rhoads throws a no-hitter
against the Boston Red Sox.
Two years earlier, on an exhibi-
tion tour of Texas, Rhoads had
saved the franchise in a most
unusual manner: the Indians
had run out of money and
needed $1,600 for railroads
tickets from San Antonio to
Fort Worth, where their next
game was scheduled. Taking
matters into his own hands,
Rhoads visited the local gambl-
ing establishment, the Crystal
Palace, and won $1,800 at the
crap tables. (On the subject of
crap, the sports team has taken
quite a hit of it lately, so if this
is a blank next week, you'll
know why!)
and a touchdown.
The offensive line is anchored
by center Outland Trophy can-
didate Ben Tamburello and
junior tackle Stacey Searels.
Defensively, Auburn uses a 5-2
defense similar to the one the
Pirates faced last week against
West Virgina. However, the ma-
jor difference according to Pirate
assistant Rex Sponhaltz is that
Auburn is "just as big but
faster
Leading the way is sophomore
All-America candidate Tracy
Rocker, who was Auburn's
leading tackier last year with 92
stops.
The secondary returns
preseason All-America candidate
Tom Powell at free safety and
junior cornerback Tom Powell.
One area that looked to be a
weakness for Auburn in the
preseason was at the punter spot
as ALL-America Nate Colbert
graduated. However, Brian
Shulman, a sophomore, averaged
49.8 yards a kick in his first varsi-
ty game two weeks ago.
The Pirates will be somewhat
shorthanded on the trip, as two
starters will not be able to play
due to knee injuries. Senior of-
fensive guard Greg Thomas and
junior slot back Ron Jones both
will be out of action due injuries
from the West Virginia game.
However, offensive guard Rich
Autry is expected back in the
starting lineup, while split end
Amos Adams also is expected
back.
The Pirates will be somewhat
shorthanded on the trip, as two
starters will not be able to pla
due to knee injuries. Senior of-
fensive guard Greg Thomas and
junior slot back Ron Jones both
will be out of action due injuries
from the West Virginia game.
However, offensive guard Rich
Autry is expected back in the
starting lineup, while split end
Amos Adams also is expected
back.
JON JORDAN�CCU PHOTO LAI
ECU swim coach Rick Kobe is takes a good look at his swimmers dur-
ing practice yesterday.
Men Netters Excel In
Opening Tournament
By DON RUTLEDGE
The ECU men's tennis team
competed in the ODU Fall Invita-
tional this past weekend, Sept.
13-14 at the Old Dominion
University tennis facility.
Teams competing in the two-
day event were: ECU, William &
Mary, Penn State, Maryland and
ODU. Team scores were not kept
so that the event would count as
only one date of play, but ODU
was "strong all the way-
through according the ECU
assistant coach John Anthony,
and would have earned the most
points had they been tallied.
All teams took eight players,
who were them divided into three
levels � A, B, and C flights. The
"A" flight players would be the
best players for each team, the
"B" flight would include the next
best, and the "C" flight the last
spots on the eight-man teams.
ECU, a young team, with only
two seniors this year, did better
than expected against the more
experienced teams. In particular,
Jon Melhorn and Dan LaMont
were impressive, as they com-
peted in the "A" flight and won
against veteran opponents.
Melhorn played exceptionally
well, winning two tough matches
against ODU's Schanck and
Penn State's Mercer, before bow-
ing in Sunday's championship-
round final to ODU's Wolf.
Assistant Coach John Anthony
lauded Melhorn's performance
saying, "He played really tough
all weekend. He could have
beaten anyone
LaMont, also competing in the
"A" flight, lost his first-round
championship-round match to
William A Mary's Harvie, but
turned in a great effort to win an
exciting match against an ag-
gressive Sebastian of Penn State,
a big hitter who charged the net
behind his powerful shots.
LaMont, playing "a really in-
telligent match in the words of
John Ant1-jny, "was keeping the
ball low. countering his oppo-
nent's power and aggressiveness;
and when he (Sebastian) came to
the net, Dan was passing him a
lot
In doubles action, LaMont and
his partner of two years, Greg
Loyd, won their opening match
in the championship round "B"
flight, beating Bernstein and
Egan of William & Mary in three
close sets. They were taken out of
the draw by ODU's "B" flight
duo of Greswold and Gustafson,
who both played at the top of
ODU's ladder last year.
Coach Pat Sherman expressed
satisfaction with the men's ef-
forts, saying, "It is important (to
consider) the caliber of play and
the close scores of matches that
our players were in
John Anthony added that
coaches of the other teams were
impressed with the ECU players'
attitudes and with the team's im-
provement on the courts.
Assistant coach Anthony sum-
med up the weekend play with
these thoughts: "Every team was
strong at the top and we were
competitive with everyone, and
were equally as good or better
than William & Mary
The men traveled to Campbell
yesterday for their first dual
match of the season. They will be
on the Minges Courts for their
first home match against UNC-
Wilmington on Wed Sept. 24 at
3 pm. ��
Classifi
Continued from page 7
MODELS WANTED Graduate 5u
dent in photograpr-y neeas oae s
Will trade for photograpns ca
758 6997 for more information
WINDSURFING. The EC
surfing Club is now being tormec
There will be an organ,zat ora
meeting for anyone merestec n
Windsurfing m Menaea 24
Wed, Sept 24 at 6 Ti ps nstr
tion and FUN in the Sun b
ners welcome
MODEL WANTED Gir �,t
shoulder length or ionge- brown ra -
needed to moaei o? wo pa nl ngs
130 minimun pa.a tor c p s
percent of any saies Neeosac
of white dress, pref iong Pre �
available 11 Ion weekenas Ca
dy at 752 7284
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
Quiet area $8C mo Ca Terry a'
7584764
$50 REWARD: For rtformatic
leading to the aer- Heal
white maie respos blefor a I I -
run, 2bikeaec denl Fr za. -
(12th) at9 54a- . . ngafe
student adiacent tc Gaa B
Please call 757 6232 o
security
ROOMMATE WANTED Te Si
new apt locatec a" 4C5 E Srti s
(Regency House Condos -
lblock (300 s'ecs frorr D
and 1 block r: cap-s
Everything s e musl sr s
deposits rea c or e rhcr �
utilities! Re Si 75 c s ' 2 o1 Ca
355 6686 anc ieave lae & phone
number
THI
BECOMIN
on the righi i
earning a BSN
Clifton, v r
ARMYNUR!

&i
3en
638B Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, NC
355-7473
Exj I freed
Dcn :
positive apj roa
Iota and I expeni -
more than ioth
it's � itify : idveni
shared through - . � �
jazz, tap
intermei
classes.
down east
dance
Within walk �
i
S
-m �
��� ip�ii
mr �





d Auburn
he
V
� ueeks ago
tcs will be somewhat
e ip, as two
Se able to play
. ies Senior of-
eg Thomas and
back Ron Jones both
of action due injuries
g nia game.
y lard Rich
back in the
e spin end
- als s expected
be somewhat
a s : u o
iblc to play
senior of-
T homas and
n Jones both
- d le injuries
a came.
guard Rich
back in the
split end
� expected
� �
i
JON JOBDAN � ecu pmoto LAi
ikes a good look at his swimmers dur-
rs Excel In
ournament
great effort to win an
b match against an ag-
e Sebastian of Penn State,
g hitter who charged the net
-erful shots.
t, playing a really in-
' match in the words of
"vsas keeping the
�. countering his oppo-
neir er and aggressiveness;
and Sebastian) came to
. Dan was passing him a
Ita-
1
ii
h
1
ter
re
Inv
Le
jgn
ve
In doubles action, LaMont and
� partner of two years, Greg
eir opening match
� :mpionship round "B"
� . beating Bernstein and
Egan of William & Mary in three
lose sets. They were taken out of
the draw by ODU's "B" flight
duo of Greswold and Gustafson,
both played at the top of
ODU's ladder last year.
ach Pat Sherman expressed
satisfaction with the men's ef-
forts, saying, "It is important (to
consider) the caliber of play and
the close scores of matches that
our players were in
John Anthony added that
coaches of the other teams were
impressed with the ECU players'
attitudes and with the team's im-
provement on the courts.
Assistant coach Anthony sum-
med up the weekend play with
these thoughts: "Every team was
strong at the top and we were
competitive with everyone, and
were equally as good or better
than William & Mary
The men traveled to Campbell
yesterday for their first dual
match of the season. They will be
on the Minges Courts for their
first home match against UNC-
Wrilmington on Wed Sept. 24 at
3 pm.
I
Classifieds
THEEASJCAROL IN I AN
SEPTEMBER 18, 1986
Continued from page 7
MODELS WANTED: Graduate stu
dent m photography needs models
Will trade for photographs. Call
758 6997 tor more information
PERSONAL
WINDSURFING: TheEaTwi
surfing Club is now being formed
There will be an organizational
meeting f anyone interested in
wmdsurf ng in Mendenhall 247 on
Wed, Sept. 24 at 6:00. Trips, instruc
lion and FUN IN THE SUN! Begin
ners welcome.
MODEL WANTED: Girl with
shoulder length or longer brown hair
needed to model for two paintings.
$30 minimun paid for each plus 40
percent of any sales. Needs any kind
of white dress, pref. long. Pref. to be
available 111 on weekends Call An
dy at 752 7284.
TO ALL THE SISTERS OF DELTA
ZETA: I can't thank you enough for
all your love and support these past
couple of weeks. Because of
everyone's spirit and enthusiasm we
had the best rush ever and now we
have the best pledges! Get psychea
for a great year! Love You, Anne
P.S. A special thanks to Kathy and
Dana who had to live with me. You
guys are the best!
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Quiet area. $80mo. Call Terry at
'58 4764
i50 REWARD: For information
eading to the identification of the
white male responsible for a hit and
run, 2 bike accident, Friday morning
12th) at 9:54 am involving a female
student adjacent to Graham Bldg.
Please call 757 6232 or campus
security.
DELTA ZETA: We would like to
welcome our new pledges: Melissa
L Lisa C, Catherine O'C,
Margaret H Elizabeth W Fran G
Leigh H Janette S Mandy P
Kristen E Courtenay T Melissa
L Dana B Pamela T Natascha
H Lisa W Amanda McC, Jackie
B Donna S Kristina A Valerie H
Beth DP Shelley R Mary
Catherine C, Jacqueline M JoAnne
J Mimi S Judy B Holly C, Sarah
V and Sharon S We love ya'll,
anyone for a swim? -The Sisters.
HEY TKE'SI: Delta Zeta would like
to thank ya'll for the best Pref night
on ECU campus! Ya'll are the boys
to party with. We cannot wait for
another one! P.S. Good luck with
ya'lls RUSH! -The Sisters and
Pledges of Delta Zeta.
ATTENTION GIRLS: Those in
terested in rushing Kappa Alpha Lit-
tle Sisters, it starts Monday, the
22nd, 8 11 p.m. Open House, all are
welcome!
ATTENTION KA LITTLE
SISTERS: Don't forget our meeting
this Sunday the 21st at 9 p.m. Plann-
ing for a successful little sister rushi
P. MICHAEL HAYES: Roses are
red, violets are blue, someday I wish
I could be as cool as you The
GirsI of ECU P.S. Paybacks are
hell
SIGMA S: Congratulations to your
new pledges they're terrific. They
will be a great addition to an ex-
cellent sorority. Unforgettable pref
night. Let's repeat. -Kappa Sigma.
SCUBA DIVERS: All interested in-
dividuals are encouraged to attend.
Final nominations and elections will
take place. Future dives and trips
will be discussed. Please attend
Thurs. the 18th in Brewster 1st floor
"B" wing at 3:30 p.m.
KAPPA SIGMAS: Our deepest
thanks for your class and your sup
port on pref night. You really show
ed our new pledges what a great
fraternity is all about. Can't wait to
do it again. Best of lucjc during rush.
Love, the Sigmas!
THANKS PIKAS: It was nice of you
to think of us. Good luck this week
with Rush! -The Tri Sigma Pledge
Class of 1986.
MR. KNOW IT ALL: Did you know it
would be like this? I didn't. Your
Annual Fling.
PHI TAU'S: What can we say, pref
was great! it was surely worth the
long wait. We'll remember that
weekend till we're old and gray
"Party All Night, Sleep All Day
Love, The ADPi's
See CLASSIFIEDS, page 10
Scholarships fo
medical and senior
pre-med students
Medical school costs are rising every day
They're climbing faster than many students can
handle without the nght kind of financial help
If you're a medical student, the Air Force may
have the best answer for you. We offer an excel-
lent scholarship program that can ease the finan-
cial strain of medical or osteopathy school and
allow you to concentrate on your studies Par-
ticipation is based on competitive selection Let
the Air Force make an investment in your profes-
sional future. For more informalwn contact
TSgt. McCullen 919-
r.jjj 854130
r
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share
�ew apt. located at 405 E. 5th St.
Regency House Condos Apt 1C).
DCk (300 steps) from Downtown
and 1 block from campus.
Everything is new, must see! No
-eposits req'd for either apt or
tilities! Rent $175 plus 12 util. Call
155 6686 and leave name & phone
Tiber.
TO BRUNK: I know that we had a
spat, and I am really sorry about
that. Complications in our relation
ship did arise, but they ended with
this message as a surprise. You
mean the world to me, and I say it in
all honesty. Making up was a blast,
so let's forget about that night in the
past Love, Dugar. P.S. Always
remember those precious moments.
THE KNIGHTS OF SIGMA NU: Will
be having dinner Thurs. night at Piz-
za Hut on 10th St. at 8 p.mBrothers
and Little Sisters should attend.
Brothers will be having a meeting
Sunday night at 9:30 p.m. in
Mendenhall 221. For info, call
758 0870.
SIGMA NU LIL SISTERS: Will be
having a meeting Sunday night at
8:30 in Mendenhall. This meeting is
very important, because the upcom
ing lil sister rush will be discussed.
For info, call 758 8711 or 758 0870.
THERE ARE TWO SIDESTO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they re both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as .) member ol the Armv Nurse
C Jorps. The caduceuson the left
means w hi re part t a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
not the exception. The gold bar
on the right means you command respect as an Armv officer. If you're
earning a BSN, write- Armv Nurse Opportunities, P.O Box 7713
( llit'ton. ! 07015. Or call toll tree I-800-US A-ARMY.
VRMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE
yeo' w, pt j.�f
1
Presents
Best Leggs Contest
Tues. Sept. 22, 1986 900-200 M
Admission $2.00 Guys Si.00 Ladies 90c Cans All Nite
PRIZES
i si i xd.uu cash pho i vear Free Pass !v !hf Elbo
2nd $50.00 cash rius, Free Pass to !he Bbo
d $25.00 CaSn rim I .ear Free Pass to the Elbo
Entries can call 758-4591 or come by the Elbo to sign up.
&b
end Ion
Benetton
638B Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, NC
355-7473
Stor Hours
Mon-Sat 10-6
Explore the freedom and pleasure of dance
Down East Dance has a creative and
positive approach to dance, making it a
total and fun experience. Each class is
more man just another lesson;
it's a Gratifying adventure
shared through movement.
ECU
Students
Welcome
Classes in ballet,
jazz, tap & modern. Beginning,
intermediate and advanced
classes. A fun alternative to stay
in shape.
downcast ��
dance 758-8198
Within walking distance from campus.
THE LOVER SPEAKS
When Dave Stewart heard a demo tape from
this unknown British group, he knew he was on to
something sensational. A sound reminiscent of
early Motownfrom catchy pop melodies to
sumptuous ballads. Experience this very seductive
debut. When The Lover Speaksyou II want to
listen.
Features the sizzling single,
'No More 1 Love YouY
$
DAVID & DAVID: BOOMTOWN
Welcome the arrival of a new American act. A
duo. Two L.A. rockers. Two Davids. With a gritty,
fresh sound and a startling vision of the darker sides
of life. David & David. They ve got stones to tell
and a debut that ust may be one of the best albums
of the year.
Features the hit single,
"Welcome to the Boomtown"
ACH
Cassette or IP
BUY 'EM TRY 'EM.
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED,
OR YOUR MONEY BACK.
Sale price good through Sept. 28th
fMNIMI"PM
' �
i r -jw






THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 18, 1986
Classifieds
Continued from page 9
A.L.M. AND A.R What special
AOTT's you two are! Thanks for
everything- p.�
PI KAPPA PHI RUSH INFO Rush
�s tonight at 7 at the Rotary Club
beside the AOTT house. All those in-
terested in a fraternity backed by
pride, tradition, scholarship and ex-
cellence are invited to stop by. If you
need a ride or directions dial
758 1700. Pi Kappa Phi men leaders
of tomorrow.
PI KAPPS: You guys are doing
great! See ya Friday to celebrate!
Love, the AOTTs. PS Thanks Barry
O. & Dillon for your help during
rush!
ALPHA SIGS: Thanks for your am-
min support on Pref night. Looking
forwar to another. Love, the
AOTTs.
JOHN PETERSON: Have a fan
tastic 22nd birthday! I couldn't ask
for a better friend. Love ya, Anne
Leigh.
PHI TAUS & YELLOW BIRD:
Thanks for all your help 8 support
during rush! Love, AOTTs.
CONGRATULATIONS: To the Beta
Thetas! We love ya! The Sisters of
AOTT
SIG EPS: "Don't think we can't par-
ty because we can Look forward
to seeing you on Sunday! The
AOTTs.
AOTT CAR WASH: Saturday,
September 20 at Hardees. 10-2.
DEAN T: Friday night was too �
much fun Thanks! I
ED KNIGHT: Sorry you were so
lonely last week. Now that your
"babes" are home take good care of
them! Love. Anne Leigh 8, Amanda
GINA, SUZANNE, DAWN �. THE
RHO CHI'S: You guys were fan
tastic. Thanks! Love, The AOTTs.
CONGRATULATIONS!I: The Gam-
ma Beta Chapter of SIGMA SIGMA
SIGMA would like to proudly an-
nounce our new Fall Pledge Class of
1984: Elizabeth Jean Amelia, Lilian
Irene Armour, Mary Bennett Baker,
Bridget Yvette Branch, Yolanda
Estelle Brittle, Jennifer Marie
Brown, Sharyl Lynn Butts, Corban
Oswald Carney, Natalie Michelle
Clewis, Catherline Lynn Colonna,
Tammy Linn Ellis, Elizabeth Fonde
Grant, Christen Delarmon Graves,
Kelly Beth Greer, Mary Alice
Harden, Christina Marie Irvin, Jen-
nifer Marie Mackert, Tonya Renee
Martin, Lori Ann McCoy, Melissa
Dawn Moore, Katherine Grace
Niblock, Carrie Ann O'Brien,
Deborah Doyce Padan, Holly Lynn
Parker, Jessica Andres Perry, Kelly
Ann Smith, Leah Katherine Stephen-
son, Melissa Ann Terranova, Liz
Webb, Kristy Michele Wrigley! We
know you'll do a great job - we love
you!
DEADHEADS UNITE): For Friday
night's DEAD SET, let's trip out
west to The Great American Music
Hall in San Francisco on August 13,
1975. WZMB, 91.3 at 10 pm. THESE
ARE THE GOOD OLE DAYS
PIKA'S: We had a great time Pref
night. Thanks for the cool refreshing
champagne showers after the long
hot wait in the gym. Thanks for all
your support. We're looking forward
to another encounter. -AZD's
ALPHA XI DELTA: The sisters of
Alpha Xi Delta would like to con
gratulate the new fall pledges. Good
luck with pledging. You're a great
bunch of girls.
AOTT'S: The time is near, we'll take
shots and chug some beer. The tunes
will jam, and the walls will shake.
And in the end, all heads will ache!
But beware, the Surgeon General
has determined that partying with
the Pi Kspps is dangerous to your
(mental) health!
DELTA SIGS: You made our "V"
pref night terrific. Was it good for
you too? Lef s do it again sometime.
Love, The Zetas
PI KAPPA PHI: Mandatory car
wash is Saturday morning at 10. It
will be at the shell station in front of
Farm Fresh. Football game is Sun-
day at 7.
Get the
word out
in the
Announcements
Save your breath.
Plant a tree to make
more oxygen.
Call Today! Final Week! Ends Sat Sept. 20!
Lobster Availabto By Reservations Only!
The 9th

Annual
St. Timothy's Episcopal Church
Saturday, October 11, 1986
9:00 a.m2:00 p.m.
Livs Lobstsn �7�� Boiisd Lobstsr B"
Lobsters must bs picks up by 2:00 p.m.
Marchia May
355-6939
For Ttekts Call:
Bonma Oansoy
756-0502
Church Office
355-2125
Also available at Gandalfs. K.tchen Cupboard. Eileen's Special
Occasions, Simply Elegant.
Join Us At The Fair!
Specialty Foods
Pony Rides
Children's Mini Fair
Crafts Bazaar
illlllllllllll!illMIIIIII!l!lllllllllllllllllllllllllilllHlltllllUIIHIillllllllHIIHIIIIIHIl!llllilllllinilllMlllillillllim)
COLLEGE NITE
Every Tuesday Nite
8:00-11:00
$1.00 wCollege I.D.
104 E. Red Banks Road
Greenville, NC
756-6000
East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking applications for
Day-Student Representatives
ROOMMATE WANTED: Kingston
Place Apts central heatair, fully
furnished, includes all kitchen uten-
sils and use of pool. $150 per month
plus utilities. For info, call Don
Fazio at 757 3218.
I
I
IIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIillllllllllllimilllllllllllllllJIIUIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIilllilHIIIIIIIIIIIIIttlMllllltlllllHIIHIIIIIIIIIIIII
Showdates
Sept. 18, 19, 20, 21
8:00 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
ONSCrTIUAIID
MlAIWi
Ail Seats $2.00 Everyday Til 5:30 PM
BUCCANEER MOVIES
2 00-4 JO-?.00-9 IS
Karate Kid II
U Held Over! �
l:lS-3:ll-3:lS7.1i.91S
DEMONS
Heldover �R�
� 11111.ii�11����
00-5 00-9 00
Pretty !� Pfk
00-7 00
Ferris Barter! Day Off
VSg�tpy TODA YJ
SEPTEMBER 19th thru 25th
94.3 WRQR Presents:
The Buccaneer Movie Bonanza!
Any patron purchasing an adult ticket Fri-Sat-Sun
will recieve two guest tickets courtesy of WRQR.
Good Thru September 25th.
Starts Tomorrow!
PSYCffO
r-
A UNtVCRSAi PlCT-jail
151
Responsibilities:
Qualifications:
for the 1986-87 Term
Selecting the Student Union President
Approving Committee Chairpersons
Approving the Student Union Budget
Setting Policy for the Student Union
Full- Time Student
Reside Off Campus
Independent
Deadline To Apply: Monday, September 22, 1986
Tequila Bar
a Weekly Specials
Sunrise Sunday: $2:00 per serve
Melo-Mondays: $2.25 per serve
Toasty- Tuesday: $2.25 per serve
Wednesday: SI. 75 Pirates Cane Muitney
Tonic Thursday: $1.75 per serve
Fried Friday: Get Fried Early at
our new Attitude Adjustment hour at
4:30; end the night upside down!
Saturday Night Specials
"House Drink" � Tequila Blues
(Look for our new "Lagoon " Bar)
Located Outside
109E. 5th St.
752926
DORM FOOD
SURVIVAL KIT
Serving West Greenville
and ECU Campus
� 1201 Charles Blvd.
7S8-666C
Serving East Greenville
� Rivergate Shopping Center
752-6996
Got the Dorm Food Blues? One
call to Domino's Pizza will save
you! We make and deliver hot,
tasty, custom-made pizza in less
than 30 minutes. All you have to
do is call! So skip the cafeteria.
Get your favorite pizza instead.
� HOURS
11AM-UM
11AM-2AM
Sun-Thurs
Fri&Sat
Limited Delivery Areas
Drivers carry less than $20 00
4m
Weekday
Special
for Two
$6.99
GetasmaM 12" pizza
with your favoante two
toppings and two cans of
Coke" for only $6 99
Any time Mon thru Thurs
One coupon per pizza
Offer good thru 10 16 86
at Dommo s Pizza
stores in Greenville
Not valid with any
other offer
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
.J
DOMINO'S
PIZZA
DELIVERS
�H�8 Domno't Pura, mc
U�I� �� ������





Title
The East Carolinian, September 18, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 18, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.493
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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