The East Carolinian, September 16, 1986






She Saat (Earnlmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.61 No.5
Tuesday, September 16,1986
Greenville, N.C.
16 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Work Program Eyes Changes
B CAROLYN DRISCOLL
A new college work-study pro-
gram has been put into effect at
ECU this semester, according to
Pam Spell, assistant director of
financial aid and coordinator of
the new program.
She said, "The new program
will benefit everyone by giving
more responsibility to the
students and the employers � at
the same time we hope it will give
students more of a 'real-world'
experience
The new program, which will
affect approximately 800
students this year, includes a new
placement process. Under the old
system, when a student qualified
for financial aid, his name would
automatically be matched to a
job on campus, with little con-
sideration given to his experience
or skills. However, when a stu-
dent qualifies for aid from this
semester on, he must find a job
he wishes to apply for on the list
in the financial aid office. From
there, he must have an interview
with the department which is hir-
ing.
Spell feels that this reflects
real-world situations because "it
give the employer control over
who he hires and it gives the stu-
dent more choice of where he
wants to work
Another change brought about
by the new program is a new
wage scale. Rather than each stu-
dent earning minimum wage, he
can now earn from $3.35 - $4.25
per hour, depending on his ex-
perience and other factors.
"Students have gone long
enough without being ap-
propriately compensated for the
work that they do. This universi-
ty depends enormously on the
work-study students. The new
wage system now gives students
incentive on the job said Spell.
"We think that this is a much
more realistic approach she
said. "Since college is an educa-
tional experience to prepare you
for life after you leave ECU, we
hope that by giving students a
chance to learn what to say and
what not to say, etc. in an inter-
view, we are helping to prepare
them
Some students have never held
a job before they came to school,
so this is a first-time experience
for many, Spell added.
The new program has been
met, for the most part, with sup-
port, according to Spell. She said
that many offices have not been
able to hire due to the backlog at
the financial aid office, but those
who have begun to hire have been
very positive.
"Other institutions have tried
this type of program and it seems
to be very effective. We're very
confident that it will work out
well Spell said.
Shirley Odell, a senior at ECU
who has worked for 2 years in
work-study compared the new
system favorably to last year's.
"The new system is better. If
you have a little experience, you
have a chance to make more than
minimum wage. Last year, you
were awarded a certain amount
of money for the entire year. But
half of it had to be earned in the
first semester and half in the se-
cond. This year, you have all year
to earn the whole amount she
said.
The new program may also
help to eliminate some problems
that have cropped up in the past.
According to Ron Speier,
associate dean of Student Life,
problems within the old prbgram
which came to his attention last
semester were mainly students
falsifying time sheets for the
number of hours that they work-
ed, and students making long-
distance phone calls while on the
job.
The new program, said Spell,
"might deter this type of
behavior because students are
treated end compensated like
adults.
Alumni Association Plans Telefund
Bv THERESA ROSINSKI
"This year's telefund promises
to be a huge success after rising to
the challenge of last year said
Cindy Kittrell, annual Giving
Director.
The telefund is an annual event
of the Giving Program designed
to solic t monetary support for
ECU. Tne money raised goes to
various campus programs �
ranging from scholarship funds
to homecoming events.
The telefund will begin on
Monday, Sept. 22 and run
through Nov. 20 from 6 p.m. to 9
p.m. every night. The telefund is
the most profitable event for br-
inging in private funding to the
Universitv.
"It's the private funding we
receive that makes the difference
between a good university and a
great one. We couldn't do it on
state funding alone said Kit-
trell.
The Alumni Association relies
heavily on the Ambassadors, a
service organization composed of
students, to help with the tele-
fund. Amy Peebles is the Student
Telefund Coordinator and helps
to line up the callers for each
night.
SGA also contributes bus ser-
vice from the Alumni Center to
the Willis building where the tele-
fund takes place.
The students raise money by
calling ECU alumni all over the
U.S. to make contributions to the
University. They raise money
from parents, alumni, faculty,
and friends.
Last year a total of $200,000
was raised with much of the suc-
cess attributed to the students
and the Dowdy challenge.
The theme for this year's tele-
fund will be "Proud to Say East
Carolina
Students who participate in the
telefund will receive dinner every
night that they help and will also
be allowed one free long-distance
phone call.
Additional prizes will be given
each night to callers who raised
the most money. The prizes in-
clude dinner for two at various
local restaurants, and free movie
passes.
"I am impressed with the en-
thusiasm and willingness of the
students to get involved with the
telefund. The students have a
love for the university and it
shows in their efforts to make a
good university even better
said David McDonald, Director
of Institutional Advancement
The students are directly
responsible for the success of the
telefund. "They get the alumni
excited about East Carolina and
that's good public relations
said Kittrell.
According to McDonald, "It's
a great opportunity for the
students to get involved in a pro-
gram that has such a far reaching
impact. It's their opportunity to
make ECU the best it can be
Records Needed
Immunization Proof A Requirement
By TOBI FERGUSON
Staff Writer
"We've got a tremendous pro-
blem said Kay Van Nortwick,
administration manager at the
Student Health Center. "The
legislature passed a law called the
immunization law. It affects all
students who enter the univer-
sities in N.C. after July 1. It also
applies to students who have been
going to ECU if they break their
enrollment
She added, "Breaking enroll-
ment is defined as if they are not
in school during fall or spring.
So, we have a lot of students that
are affected by this law during
fall semester
She explained, "When a stu-
dent was admitted through the
admissions office, which would
be freshmen and transfers, or if
they were admitted to the grad
school or if they were readmitted,
they were sent a letter telling
them about this immunization
law, and they were sent a health
certificate
The required immunizations
fall under three age categories:
�Students 17 years of age and
younger require: 3 DTP
(diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis) or
TD (tetanus-diphtheria doses); 3
polio (oral) doses; 1 measles
(rubeola) dose, on or after the
first birthday; 1 rubella dose.
Recommended: 1 TD dose within
the last 10 years.
�Students 18-29 years of age re-
quire: 3 DTP or TD doses; 1
Measles (Rubeola) dose, on or
after the first birthday; 1 Rubella
dose. Recommended: 1 TD dose
within the last 10 years.
�Students 30 years of age and
older require: 3 DTP or TD
doses. Recommended: 1 TDdose
within the last 10 years.
A record of physician
diagnoses measles disease is ac-
ceptable in place of Rubeola
dose. Only laboratory proof of
immunity to rubella is accep-
table. Dates of the tetanus series
and booster are necessary.
"So states Kay VanNort-
wick, "the students we are deal-
ing with fall semester are any new
students at the university who are
taking classes during the day, any
Spare Time
Warn weather gives most of us the perfect excuse to spend oar free time outside instead of inside stu-
dying.
student who was not here during
the spring semester but is present-
ly taking a day class, and new
grad students
Only those students who ex-
clusively have night class are ex-
empt from the N.C. immuniza-
tion law.
After the drop-add period, a
computer printout was compiled
listing those students delinquent
in their immunization records.
All affected students received a
letter from the registrar last week
calling their attention to the im-
mediacy of the crisis. VanNort-
wick said, "According to the law,
they (the affected students) have
30 days from the date that they
enter ECU, which we defined as
the first day of class, to comply
with the law, or legally they are
not supposed to remain as a stu-
dent at ECU
There are 1,200 students delin-
quent in their immunization
records.
According to VanNortwick,
there are three ways to verify
your immunization: your high
school record, a doctor's
signature, or a health department
stamp.
She said, "Those are the only
three ways that we can accept
verification of the shot record.
And the other alternative is to
give the shots ourselves. And
we're giving shots to anybody
that needs them free. We're get-
ting the Health Department to
furnish the serum and we're just
absorbing the cost of labor, syr-
inges, etc
VanNortwick said, "Next
week, we're going to set up a
clinic in room 2 (to administer the
vaccinations) at the Student
Health Center on the 16, 17, 18,
and 22 from 9-11 and from 2-4
Students are urged to
See IMMUNIZATIONS page S.
JOM JMOAN - TMI PMOTO
LaTrenda Blackwell is one of the many students employed through
the campus work-study program. She works in the Joyner Library.
ROTC Blood Drive
Challenges Students
By JESSICA WALLACE
Staff Writer
The Air Force ROTC Detach-
ment of ECU is sponsoring their
annual Blood Drive this Wednes-
day and Thursday, September 17
and 18, in room 244 of
Mendenhall Student Center from
12 noon until 6 p.m.
Theresa Schallock, organizer
of this year's blood drive,
challenges all sororities, frater-
nities, and other organizations to
compete for the highest dona-
tions.
Schallock said, "We're hoping
the competition among organiza-
tions here on campus will pro-
mote more donations
The Air Force ROTC Detach-
ment has set their goal for 800
pints of blood, exceeding the
Biology Club's of 700 pints last
spring.
When asked about the growing
concern of contacting AIDS
through needles while giving
blood, David Parsons of Red
Cross said that it was "absolutely
impossible to get AIDS from
donating blood. The needles are
sterile when used and then totally
incinerated
"The AIDS scare is an excuse
not to give blood, causing shor-
tages in the hospitals said Par-
sons. "Meanwhile, people keep
on bleeding
To be eligible to give blood,
one must be 17 years old, weigh
at least 110 pounds, and not be
infected with any potentially
communicable diseases. Students
who aren't sure should ask a
nurse.
"There's no problem at all in
giving blood and people should
be encouraged to do so said
Mary Elesha-Adams of the Stu-
dent Health Center.
Schallock, however, is hopeful
of a good turnout from ECU
students despite the fear many
people have to give blood.
Health Affair Scheduled
By PATTI KEMMIS
Newt Editor
The second Annual "Health
Affair" will be held Wednesday,
Sept. 17, from 3-6 p.m. in front
of Mendenhall.
The event, sponsored by the
West Area Residents Council,
The Student Health Center, and
Intramurals Department, will
feature a variety of health-related
booths, demonstrations, foods,
and give-aways.
"Last year's affair was very
successful, I hope this year's will
be too said Mary Elesha-
Adams of the Student Health
Center.
Booths will include exhibits
featuring running shoes, eating
disorders, drug usage, and the ef-
fects of smoking.
"We hope to show everyone
alternative ways of staying
healthy, "said Elesha-Adams.
Several dorms from west area
will be selling items such as
frozen yogurt, popcorn, apples.
Free milk will also be given
away.
The East Carolinia Association
of Nursing Students will be pre-
sent to check blood sugar levels
and blood pressures.
Intramurals will also be on
hand to demonstrate various
sports equipment.
At 3:15 and 4:15 there will be
aerobic demonstrations con-
ducted by intramurals.
"We hope the students will en-
joy these demonstrations said
Elesha-Adams. "Everyone is
more than welcome to join in
Doug Cobb will have a presen-
tation on aerobic self-defense at
5:15, and the band Soul Train
will start performing at 6:00.
According to Elesha-Adams,
visors, ballons, buttons and dis-
count coupons will be avaliable
to students as give-aways.
"We want to show everyone
that a big part of staying healthy
can be fun said Adams.
ON THE INSIDE
Editorials.
Style
Sports.
� �Mgfoot Lurfces in NC �
I� STYLE page 9.
I3 �ECU loses to West Virginia
n see SPORTS page 13.
.14
'� -
� �� ��?��?-? ���





THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 16, 1986
Congress Intervenes In Drug Problems I Scienti
(UPI) � Congress of late has
been getting high on drugs. Not
from sniffing, injecting or
swallowing illegal substances, but
from acting as though the
lawmakers finally are going to do
something about the problem of
drug abuse in this country.
This euphoria has been seen as
both Senate and House members
appointed task forces, held news
conferences, introduced bills and
began voting on proposals for a
crackdown on the drug trade,
aiming at everyone from pro-
ducers to consumers.
Unfortunately there are skep-
tics, including a few members of
Congress, who question whether
this 'high' will last much beyond
Nov. 4 � Election Day.
The problem of drug abuse has
been around for a long time, but
it was only this summer that Con-
gress saw the light and decided it
might be time to act. The inspira-
tion for this was polls and other
constituent soundings that show-
ed Americans consider drug
abuse to be a major problem,
possibly the No. 1 problem facing
this country.
Like the good politicians they
are ,the lawmakers are respon-
ding. And you can be sure their
voters will hear all about it during
the election campaigns back
home.
In the House, the leadership
gathered together an assortment
of bills that had been languishing
in several different committees
and produced an omnibus anti-
drug bill that was passed over-
whelmingly followed by an excess
of speech making.
In some ways that was the easy
part. The hard part will come in
trying to pass bills to pay for the
$3 billion effort proposed in the
House bill. Also difficult will be
sticking with the issue and mak-
ing sure the program is working.
Rep. Leon Panetta, D-Calif
one of the calmer members of the
House, pointed out the pitfalls in
the way Congress often ap-
proaches such high visibility pro-
blems as drug abuse
"It disturbs me that we are
treating the drug issue as we do so
many issues: an event triggers na-
tionwide concern about a pro-
blem, three weeks of media
coverage and magazine covers
follow, quick drafting of legisla-
tion occurs followed by passage
by the Congress and signature by
the President, and then we forget
the issue as we move on to
another crisis Panetta said.
"All too often we run hot and
cold on issues that need a long-
term, consistently applied
policy he noted.
"Remember the energy crisis,
the farm crisis, the crisis in
education? We are cheating this
country if we dispose if the drug
crisis in the same way
Panetta argued such a quick fix
approach "actually works
against solving the problem. Peo-
ple see extensive coverage in the
media, frenzied action by Con-
gress, then assume that
everything has been taken care of
and the problem cured
"The drug problem has been
with us for decades, and is ob-
viously not something we can
solve in three weeks or even three
years. It will take years of consis-
tent hard work to educate
Americans on the evils of drug
abuse, to improve our enforce-
ment capabilities and to develop
with foreign nations strategies for
curbing production of killer
drugs Panetta said.
The House bill "must not be
seen as a knee-jerk reaction to a
media circus but a serious com-
mitment to a drug-free
America he said.
Perhaps the skeptics are being
too hard on Congress. Perhaps
the senators and representatives
should be given credit for actual-
ly trying, in late summer of 1916,
to do something about the drug
problem.
But the voters back home
should not be distracted by all the
self-congratulatory hoopla that is
accompanying the current anti-
drug push. Instead, the voters
have every right to ask why Con-
gress did not deal with the drug
problem long before now, and
whether the current effort will
produce real results five, 10 or 20
years down the road.
(UPI) � The newly crowned
Miss America revealed a pageant
secret Monday by reciting three
numbers: 35-22-35, while one of
the contest's losers described the
winner as the "least liked girl" at
the competition.
Kellye Cash won because she
fit the "country" image that the
judges wanted, loser Molly
Pesce, Miss Florida, told the
Orlando Sentinel.
"Honey, between you and me,
that girl was the least liked girl
around Pesce said. "She acted
like she knew she was going to
win
Pesce also criticized Cash's
choice of gifts for her fellow
beauty queens.
"About half of us went around
giving everybody mementos from
our states. I didn't know about it
but you know what she gave us
all? Autographed pictures of
herself. Can you imagine?"
Pesce said.
Cash, 21, of Memphis, Tenn
declined to comment on Pesce's
statements, but her chaperone,
Ellie Ross, said the former Miss
Tennessee "was very well liked
and a real crowd pleaser
"She did pass out her picture
but also some of the other state
girls did too Ross said. "It's a
common practice
Cash, the grandniece of coun-
try singer Johnny Cash, wore a
white knit skirt and patterned
sweater and a single strand of
pearls to the traditional Monday
Manhattan news conference that
follows the Saturday night
pageant in Atlantic City.
Smiling brightly, Cash revealed
Miss
her measurments � and said the
competition judges look at the
"total girl" and "the
measurements are not the major
area
But she defended her decision
to remain silent on questions
about women's rights and abor-
tion that have plagued contest
winners in the past.
"There are little girls that look
up to Miss America and I don't
think we need that kind of con-
troversy she said.
Cash, who has described
herself as a "conservative Chris-
tian" also agreed with forcing
Vanessa Williams to give up her
Miss America crown in 1984 for
posing for nude photographs,
saying it was important to main-
tain "the image" of Miss
America.
"It isn't going to happpen to
me she laughed.
Cash also asserted marriage
should be "for life" and that a
woman probably should hive up
her career if she has a family.
"I don't think you can really
have both and be successful at
both she said.
But Cash said she was not par-
ticularly eager to find a
boyfriend.
"I'm not in a rush to have
romance she said. "All that
can wait
Cash, who also won the
pageant's swimsuit and talent
competitions and will receive a
total of $36,000, said she would
use some of the money to finish
her education but probably
would take the bulk in cash.
She eventually hopes "to one
day become a dynamic talkshow
host according to her pageant
biography.
As for advice to young girls
who would 'ke to follow in her
outsteps, cash suggested:
"Dream big, you can reach your
dreams" and "Always be
yourself Because that's the only
person you can be
Health Services Offered For Women
By MARY ELESHA-ADAMS
Student Health Center
What Services are Offered for
Women at the Student Health
Service?
The Student Health Service
(SHS) provides confidential .
prevention, diagnosis, and treat- f
ment of health problems specific
to women as well as educational
services.
Sexuality classes are offered at
the SHS on Mondays at 10 a.m.
and Thursdays at 3 p.m. These
classes will also be taught in the
evening in many of the residence
halls during September and Oc-
tober. Attendance at a sexuality
class is necessary before making
an appointment to obtain a
method of contraception from
the SHS.
Routine pap smears and pelvic ,
exams are provided by appoint- i
ment. Morning and afternoon i
appointments are available as '
well as evening appointments on
Thursdays. There is a $15 fee.
Appointments can be made by
calling 757-6317 or stopping by
the Student Health Center's ap-
pointmentcashier office.
What Contraceptive Methods
Are A vailable at the SHS?
Oral contraceptive agents
(birth control pills) are available
by prescription. One pack or cy-
cle of pills costs $5. Students
should plan to buy three packs of
pills at a time.
The diaphragm is also
S
1
ICE CREAM
PARLOR
Pitt Plaza
31 Flavors
Mon-Sat 10:00-9:00
Sun 12:30-6:00
One Scoop Sundae 85C
Offer Expires 9-30-86
kSSSSSSSJSSSSS.Sfrfrw
Then if m i i the ground IV�r in xir Hiu �m lralrn ' iiv pcigrani
for college freshmen Miphomores and (urouc You could start
planning on a career Ukr the men in this ad haw nd also have some
great advantages like
� harning i li� I a month during tht school vear
� As a freshman Of sophomore whi
could complete vour has training
during r� six week summer
sessions and earn more than 11 ' �
dunng each session
� juniors earn more than S.11�I dur
ing one len-week summer session
available by prescription. The
cost for the diaphragm plus the
contraceptive jelly is $7. Con-
doms are sold by the SHS at the
cost of 12 for $2.
If you didn't get your copies at
KINKO'S
you paid too much
i i
E mi Cafon� I h. � �,
521 E 10th St
752 0875
Monday - Friday
7:00arn- 10:00pm
Saturday
9:00am - 6:00pm
wmMwwiiMiwMinwuMMtmwiimiititiimiiiniiiMiMMMiiirffff
T
� Seniors and graduates can he i1 miniissx kkiI through the Officer
t andidaie (lass Program
� Vw can take free civilian fhing lessons
� You re commissioned upon graduation
II vou re looking lo mow-up quK-kh k�ik linn itie ManiK Urps
comnussH ming programs You could
start iff making
more than SIM mm
He'tvluoking tor a teugottdmen.
See Capt. Canker Oct. 21-23 at the
Wright Building or call 1-800-722-6715.


i
i
STUDENT UNION
Open House
Invited:
All Past Student Union Members Who
Haven't Been Contacted
All Present Student Union Members
All Students Not Involved Yet In The
Student Union
Here's Your Chance To Meet All 12
See What We're All About!
Come To Room 221
Wed. Sept. 17th
5:00 p.m.
Refreshments Will Be Served
Get Involved Now
WASHINGTON (UPI) - It is 3
p.m you have been trying to
lose 50 pounds for some month
now, you already had lunch anc
yet you have an uncontrollable
craving for a snack � a cookie, a
cracker, even lumpy oatmeal �
but not protein.
Is there something wrong with
you? Are you the undisciplined,
weak-willed dieter you think you
may be?
Probably not.
Scientists have found that some
overweight people who crave car-
bohydrates apparently need
them. Without them, they do not
produce enough of a
neurotransmitter known a
serotonin and they feel worse for
it.
The same appears to be true
for smokers, drinkers, pe
O!
DM
I
Journalist
MOSCOW (UPI) - An
journalist Nicholas Daniloff
shrugged off the possibility of a
trial for espionage and returned
to work today, still hoping
case will be resolved before Ff
day's U.SSoviet talks on a
superpower summit.
Daniloff said he ftnalh made
telephone contact this morn
with the KGB investigating of-
ficer handling his case. Under the
terms of Daniloff's release he is
to report daily to the KGB, but he
was unable to reach the office
telephone through the weekend.
Asked whether he had received
any news about an unconditional
release, Daniloff said it is too ear-
ly for that to occur.
"If there is any good new-
will come later in the week. Right
now I want to try and get back to
normal and do a little work in the
office said the Moscow cor-
respondent for U.S. News '
World Report magazine.
Earlier today, Daniloff rr.e'
with senior U.S. Emaba
ficials to be briefed on the latest
developments in Washington
diplomats haveuecn working
fto clear the Daniloff case before
Friday, when Secretary of State
George Shultz is to meet So :et
Foreign Minister Eduard
Shevardnadze in Washington for
two days of discussions designed
to lay the groundwork for a se-
cond superpower summit.
Shultz has promised to bnna
1
I
afu
i
tnei
I
at
wi
M
I
Immunizations
continued from page 1
specifically come at these times
because the Student Health
Center is presently seeing over
300 "sick" patients daily. The
students cooperations will be
greatly appreciated and will aid in
making the imumzation pro-
cedures less hectic for everyone.
No appointment is necessarv
VanNortwick added, "The stu-
U
V v
TlUl
How
Y)i
At'
If you're finding y ur bafl
tighter than usual, now's a firtl
join The Spa. Students can j� A
on a monthly basis tor only $J
month. That's $25 for 30-davj
any strings attached.
The Spa offers 52 aenb
outs even- week, exercise macf
weights, steam room, sauna
pool. Plus, there are plenty
- f- - - ��
��� ����� i�n ��ii w.�ji8 tuNtioiwiini





oblems
rhaps the skeptics are being
d on Congress. Perhaps
ators and representatives
be iven credit for actual-
late summer of 1986,
something about the drug
voters back home
Nr distracted by all the
tulatory hoopla that is
v the current anti-
b push Instead, the voters
ght to ask why Con-
ieal with the drug
before now, and
he current effort will
eaJ results five, 10 or 20
- the road.
America
eps, cash suggested:
you can reach your
and "� Always be
Because that's the only
can be "
s at
much
� - Friday
J0pm
Jay
am - 6:00pm
- i lUlllillllllllllllllllluUMM
NION
se
Members Who
Members
d Yet In The
Meet All 12
About!
221
7th
Served
owl!
IIIIIMIIIIIIIMIMI
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTMEMBER 16, 19W
Scientists Find Carbohydrates Needed
WASHINGTON (UPI) � It is 3
p.m you have been trying to
lose 50 pounds for some months
now, you already had lunch and
yet you have an uncontrollable
craving for a snack � a cookie, a
cracker, even lumpy oatmeal �
but not protein.
Is there something wrong with
you? Are you the undisciplined,
weak-willed dieter you think you
may be?
Probably not.
Scientists have found that some
overweight people who crave car-
bohydrates apparently need
them. Without them, they do not
produce enough of a
neurotransmitter known as
serotonin and they feel worse for
it.
The same appears to be true
for smokers, drinkers, people
with an eating disorder called
bulimia and addicts who are try-
ing to kick the habit � and for
people who suffer Seasonal affec-
tive disorder, a tendency to suffer
depression during winter months.
Dr. Judith Wurtman, a research
scientist in the department of ap-
plied biological sciences a
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, said people who
claimed they were unable to lose
or keep weight off because of the
irresistable carbohydrate craving
were once assumed to be
motivated by things other than
hunger.
In other words, they ate car-
bohydrates because they liked the
taste or because these foods
reminded them of happy events
in the past.
Thev claimed thev liked the
way they felt after eating car-
bohydrates � a somewhat puzzl-
ing revelation, since in most peo-
ple carbohydrate consumption
leads to sluggishness unless ac-
companied or followed by a dose
of protein.
Wurtman and colleagues show-
ed, however, there is a link bet-
ween carbohydrate consumption
and production of serotonin, a
chemical that acts as a messenger
in the brain and is involved in
mood changes and other reac-
tions. Starches and sugars in-
crease the brain's uptake of tryp-
tophan, a precursor of serotonin.
A high- protein diet causes a
decrease in serotonin, Wurtman
said during a panel discussion at
the recent convention of the
Amercian Psychological Associa-
tion.
Journalist Returns To Work
In three studies involving 120
obese people, Wurtman and col-
leagues found carbohydrate
cravers were less depressed after
eating carbohydrates and showed
no change in energy of alertness,
while others who ate car-
bohydrates were more depressed,
more fatigued and less alert.
There seems to be a difference
between the brains of these two
groups of people she said later.
Dr. Neil Grunberg of the
Uniformed Services University of
Health Sciences said other resear-
chers have found one way to help
alcoholics get on the wagon is to
give them sweet-tasting foods. He
also noted heroin addicts kicking
the habit consume enormous
amounts of sugar.
"Maybe the craving for sugar
to ease the pain of smoking of ad-
diction withdraw! is actually the
self-administration of a drug
he said.
In a study done by a colleague,
Grunberg said about 15 smokers
trying to quit who were allowed
heavy carbohydrate consumption
were less anxious and depressed
than 15 others on a low-
carbohydrate diet. A month
later, twice as many of the high-
carbohydrate group had stayed
smokeless
Dr. Norman Rosenthal of the
National Institute of Mental
Health said many victims of
seasonal affective disorder crave
ice cream and other high-
carbohvdrate foods during the
MOSCOW (UPI) � American
journalist Nicholas Daniloff
shrugged off the possibility of a
trial for espionage and returned
to work today, still hoping his
case will be resolved before Fri-
day's U.SSoviet talks on a
superpower summit.
Daniloff said he finally made
telephone contact this morning
with the KGB investigating of-
ficer handling his case. Under the
terms of Daniloff s release he is
to report daily to the KGB. but he
was unable to reach the officer by
telephone through the weekend.
Asked whether he had received
any news about an unconditional
release, Daniloff said it is too ear-
ly for that to occur.
"If there is any good news it
will come later in the week. Right
now I want to try and get back to
normal and do a little work in the
office said the Moscow cor-
respondent for U.S. News '
World Report magazine.
Earlier today, Daniloff met
with senior U.S. Emabassy of-
ficials to be briefed on the latest
developments in Washington
Diplomars have been working
to cear the Darnoff case before
Friday, when Secretary of State
George Shult is to meet Soviet
Foreign Minister Eduard
Shevardnadze in Washington for
two days of discussions designed
to lay the groundwork for a se-
cond superpower summit.
Shultz has promised to brimz
up the Daniloff case if a resolu-
tion is not found to replace the
current interim arrangements
under which the American cor-
respondent and a Soviet U.N.
employee held for spying in New-
York have been released to their
respective embassies Friday.
Daniloff was picked up on spy-
ing charges on Aug. 30, a week
after Soviet U.N. employee Gen-
nade Zakharov was arrested in
New York for allegedly buying
secret documents from as FBI in-
formant.
Daniloff said Sunday he hoped
there would not be a direct swap
for Zakharov � or a trial �
because he is not a spy.
At a news conference Sunday
at the U.S. Embassy, Daniloff
said his experience has left him
with a "benevolent disdain" for
his captors.
Daniloff recounted his two
weeks in an 8-by-10 foot cell that
he shared with a Soviet in
Moscow's Lefortovo prison
before being released pending
trial.
"I was not cold, hungry or
physically abused Daniloff
said. "Bur the mere fact of being
transferred into a prison cell, be-
ing isolated from your family
not being allowed under the
Soviet system to have legal
counsel, being interrogated four
hours a day for two weeks is a
very, very hard burden.
your mind off your problems, the
misfortune that has occurred to
you, and frankly I have to say it's
mental torture
Daniloff said the "insidious"
thing about the Soviet case
against him is that the more a
reporter digs for a story, the
more suspicion he draws.
"All of you are potential
targets for this sort of action he
told reporters.
South Park
Amoco
AMOCO
Complete Automotive Service
756-3023 24 hrv
M0 Greenville Blvd
Immunizations Checked
continued from page 1
specifically come at these times
because the Student Health
Center is presently seeing over
300 "sick" patients daily. The
students cooperations will be
greatly appreciated and will aid in
making the imunization pro-
cedures less hectic for everyone.
No appointment is necessary.
VanNortwick added, "The stu-
dent (seeking immunization)
should go directly to room 2.
We're going to have all the in-
complete records down there, the
computer printouts, and staff so
that we can handle them
separately from the rest of the
student body
September 23 is the deadline
for compliance to the new im-
munization law.
L UNCH SPECIAL
11-3 Mon-Fri
Chicken
Flauta
$3.75
Crisp, golden brown flour
tortilla filled with fresh
sauteed chicken and crowned
with sour cream, guacamole,
cheese, and tomatoes served
with rice.
winter. He found 16 patients felt
just fine after a carbohydrate
snack and worse after protein. It
was the other way around with 16
"normals
These results indicate the
disorder is related to the brain's
serotonin mechanism, he said.
Another study showed that
bulimics showed a quicker reac-
tion time than "normals" after a
lunch heavy on carbohydrates.
Bulimics are binge eaters
whose gorges are often triggered
by feelings of tension, anxiety or
depression. However, bulimics
also consume protein-heavy
foods, so their cravings are
thought to be psychological
motivated.
Ultra-Light Sony Walkman
AM-FM Stereo
ELECTRONIC SHOWROOM
nn ac�
ttfc
Gordon's Golf & Ski Shop
264 Bv Pass Next to Greenville TV.
756-1003
Izod Junior
Short Sleeve Shirts$9.95
Izod Junior
Long Sleeve Shirts$6.95
Izod Corduroy
Slacks and Pants$5.95
Izod Junior
Sweaters (wool and acrylic)$12.95
CB Jackets 20 Off
Men's Izod
Sport Shirts$19.95
(Banded Sleeves)
Skyr
Turtlenecks Reg $20.00 Now $14.95
HowTo Improve
Y)ur Grades
AtTheBeach.
If you're finding your bathing suit
tighter than usual, now's a fitting time to
join The Spa. Students can join The Spa
on a monthly basis for only $25 per
month. That's $25 for 30-days without
any strings attached.
The Spa offers 52 aerobics work-
outs every week, exercise machines, free
weights, steam room, sauna and whirl-
pool. Plus, there are plenty of trained
instructors to help you shape up.
So, if your body is flunking the
beach test, call or drop by The Spa for
more information.
Improving your grades at the beach
simply requires a little home work.
iGv
a
Greenville's
best health club value.
SOUTH PARK SHOPPING CENTER
GREENVILLE 756 7991
I WANT YOU
TO BE A J?HH Hfitl
DATE SEPT 15-17 TIME 7-11 PM
i
m





�te �a0t Olariiliniatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender, . ,� ��,�,�
Daniel Maurer, m �,�.
Patti Kemmis, mm E4,lo, Steve Folmar, w m�w,
Scott Cooper. c� �,�, Anthony Martin, .o m.
Rick McCormac. c � meg Needham. arar�. mw
John Shannon. mm Shannon Short. mmm
Pat Molloy. n �.i�,�. DeChanile Johnson. � o,w,or
September 16, 1986
Opinion
Page 4
Crack
Triggering The Anti-Drug Campaign
It first hit the streets of Los
Angeles in 1981 and it's been
destroying peoples' lives ever since.
An estimated one million
Americans have tried it. Children as
young as twelve are addicted to it.
such as Time and Newsweek. But
that's not the half of it.
Last week, the House of
Representatives voted for a $2
million anti-drug bill that calls for
the use of the military to stop the
And for ten dollars a vial, like they flow of drugs into the country and
�lost a su&P m the rist3.1.
Study
WASHINGTON (CPS)
Despite rising tuitions, middle ii
come families find it no harder tl
afford to send their children tl
college now than they did tel
vears ago, a report by thj
American Enterprise lnstitutl
(AEI) says.
Other experts remain uncorj
Mnced.
After studying families witj
18- to 19-year old college-bouni
students, AEI researcher Ten
Hartle concludes incomes havl
risen in step with rising volleg
costs during the last decade.
"A four-year public college
quired 9.5 percent of an incomj
in 1973-74 he notes. "Today'
that same school requires 9 7 peri
cent
Independent four-year college
did grow relatively more ex pen
Drug Te
say in the trade, it's a steal. The
unknowing, however, are often
robbed of their lives. We're speak-
ing, of course, about crack, new
comer to the illegal drug industry.
And we should thank God for it.
Your probably saying to
yourself, "Hey, wait a minute!
crack is perhaps the most
dangerous, definitely one of the
most addictive, drugs to ever in-
trude on the American way of life;
why should we be thankful for it?
The answer is very simple: Fear.
Plain, unadulterated fear.
It's cheap, easy to make and
highly addictive. While it takes
years of regular cocaine use to form
an addiction, it's only a matter of
weeks before your hooked on
would permit the death penalty for
some drug-related murders.
More importantly the Reagan ad-
ministration has finally taken a
tough, realistic stand against drugs.
On Sunday President Reagan, ac-
companied by his wife, Nancy, said
that he will soon present a series of
proposals that would bring federal
spending on combating illegal drugs
to $3 billion.
That, friends, is why we should
be thankful.
Parking: A Problem For Too Long I Still Re
By TERRI ORE
�f f Wrtler
It's 9:55 a.m. on a Monday morning
and my roommate and I are driving all
over campus frantically looking for a
parking space. The entire lot at the bot-
tom of college hill is full and by 10 a.m.
we have discovered that the lots beside
Speight and Austin are full as well. By
10:05 a.m we have covered the parking
Recreational drugs are nothing lots behind the library and Mendenhall
new. They've been around as long
as history itself. Unfortunately, so
has public tolerance of them. Drug
abuse seems to be a social ill about
which people say, "Oh, that's terri-
ble but then do little about it. Ap-
crack. But that's not ah and surely parently, fear of so ugly a drug as
crack has done away with such
tolerance.
"But you say to yourself. "I
feel strange being thankful for such
a dangerous drug. I should be
disgusted with it
That's only natural. But think of
it this way, if we didn't wait 'til now
to do something about it, theijjftrU
not the worst of it. One of the
primary targets of crack dealers is
school children.
So what does intense fear of one
illegal drug do that should make us
thankful?
That's easy. It has lead to televi-
sion specials on two major net-
works (NBC and CBS) and cover
stories by ma or news publications wouldn't have That problem
i�Campus Forum
Separation Of Church And State
Dear Editor:
I am compelled to reply to the
article by David Lewis which ap-
peared in this paper Aug. 26. In
his article Mr. Lewis expressed
the popular, though mistaken,
opinion that the United States
Constitution and life as we know
it would crumble if the existence
of God is acknowledged in a
public school.
His biggest bugaboo seems to
be the suggestion that creation be
included in the discussion of
origins. As a student of biology, I
am aware of the preeminence
which the theory of evolution en-
joys in our world, both in and
out of my field. This leads us to
belie e that this concept has been
proved beyond a shadow of a
doubt, having been subjected to
rigorous observation and ex-
perimentation. This is not the
case.
Dr. D. M. S. Watson, in an ad-
dress given before a gathering of
his peers in 1929, admitted,
the theory of evolution itself
(is) a theory universally accepted
not because it can be proved by
logically coherent evidence to be
true but because the only alter-
native is special creation, which
(in his opinion) is clearly incredi-
ble
In his presentation Dr. Wat-
son, a staunch evolutionist, ex-
plained that the only reason
natural selection stood as an
atractive mechanism of evolution
is that all other choices had col-
lapsed when subjected to true
scientific investigation, while
natural selection could be neither
substantiated nor discounted by
observation or experimentation.
Even Mr. Darwin himself once
confessed to a colleague, not
one change of species into
another is on record We can-
not prove that a single species has
changed
The situation has not changed
since the time of these
statements, except for a drastic
loss of objectivity concerning the
subject. The sum total of all
reseach and literature purporting
to provide proof of evolution
merely attempts to explain true
scientific phenomena through a
preexistent belief in evolution,
usually while bending, taking ex-
ception to or totally ignoring
established scientific laws.
In reality, evolution is no more
a science and no less a faith than
creationism. It would seem that
to Kach students in our public
schools that evolution is a scien-
tific fact merely because the alter-
native is deemed philosophically
unacceptable should be more of a
question of scientific and
academic integrity than one of
constitutionality.
On the broader question of
separarion of church and state, it
is true that the First Amendment
provides that a certain separation
exists. This was designed, and
rightly so, to prevent the ec-
clesiastical control by any one
church, such as that which ex-
isted at one time in Europe and in
the colonies. But to imagine in
this document an intent to com-
pletely divorce our nation from
God and His principles is a sham,
and perversion of the document
these individuals claim to defend.
If belief in a supreme being is a
religious concept, then it stands
to reason that belief that no such
being exists is also a religious
concept. The courts have
recognized atheism as a form of
religion. Atheism is one of the
basic tenents of humanism, along
with man as the final authority
and evolution. Thus it should be
obvious that, under the guise of
neutrality, humanism has
become the religion our schools
promote.
This is not meant as a personal
attack on Mr. Lewis or any other
individual who might agree with
him. Many sincere, well-meaning
people have jumped on the band-
wagon to protect the "en-
dangered" First Amendment.
But they are sincerely wrong.
Steve Van Cleave,
Grad Student,
Biology
only to find that we are now late for
class and still don't have a place to
park. Does this sound familiar to you?
Many of my days have gotten off to a
bad start because of the never ending
frustration of looking for a parking
place. Let's face it. The parking
available on the campus of East
Carolina University leaves a lot to be
desired.
I fail to understand why the ECU
Traffic Office sells at least twice as
many parking stickers as there are
available parking spaces. In 1985, there
were approximately 2,300 commuter
parking stickers sold per semester, and
you know as well as I do that there are
-�finitely not 2,360 parking areas
available for commuters.
� ffiPwicver, I mu& compliment our
university on its campus bus services.
For the most part, it is a convenience
for those who do not live in dorms. But
for the ones who may not live close
enough to the bus routes, it is an endless
cycle of searching for a place to park
and many times ending up having to
park blocks from campus.
In the years that I have been at this
school, I have always been amazed to
watch the lines of cars waiting patiently
for someone to leave so they can zip in-
to their parking space.
The lot beside the Spieght building is
a prime example. People sit on line in
their cars for hours on end, hoping
desperately to get a parking spot before
their class begins.
I personally, refuse to sit in those
lines and usually end up circling the
campus a time or two, before I finally
end up parking on some side street in
what seems to be Grimesland.
Needless to say, I have several solu-
tions to this problem. First of all, I
think a lot of this hassle could be
eliminated if there were designated Resi-
dent parking only around the dorms
and breaking down the University
Registered Parking into designated
commuter spaces.
One of the main problems is that we
have residents parking away from their
dorms, I assume this is to make their
walks to class a little shorter, but it cuts
out space for the commuters that drive
in from places like Kinston, Goldsboro
or Wilson. It would be more efficient if
resident parking were restricted to dorm
areas, thus opening more spaces for
commuters.
Secondly, I don't think there should
be so many parking stickers sold if there
are not enough parking spaces to ac-
commodate everyone. It thoroughly
disgusts me to ride through campus,
never being able to find an empty park-
ing space, knowing that I spent $25 for
a parking sticker.
Just think, if 3,000 people spend $25
a piece for commuter stickers, there is a
$75,000 going somewhere � probably
to help pay our traffic department
employees, but definitely not toward
improving our parking situation.
At the end of every year, I vow to
myself that not to spend another dime
for parking stickers. But by August, I
am a bit more optimistic and decide,
what the hell, maybe things will be bet-
ter this year. I have fooled myself again.
$25 is a lot of money to a starving col-
lege student and it seems to me that
there should be some justice in all of
this.
On the idea of building new parking
lots, I have only one thing to say. It
would be such a waste to tear down our
beautiful trees on campus only to add a
big, ugly paved parking area. However,
if some of our money was used to con-
struct a parking deck in a place where
there is already a parking lot, then that
would not only solve the parking pro-
blem, but eliminate the needless wasting
of our campus greenery.
My suggestion as to how we can come
up with the funds to do this? How
about using some of that cash that gets
forked over every semester for endless
parking tickets and parking stickers?
Tern Ore is a junior English major
from Greensboro.
Campus Spectrum
-In addition to the "Cmmpus
Forum" section of the Editorial
Page, The East Carolinian has re-
established the "Campus Spectrum
This is an opinion column featuring
guest writers from the student body
and faculty. The columns printed in
the "Campus Spectrum" will contain
current topics of concern to the cam-
pus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of
grammer and decency. Persons sub-
mitting columns must be willing to
accept "by-line" credit for their ef-
forts, as no entrys from ghost writers
will be published.
The Legal Services Corp.
Changing The American Way
What has got into the (usually) good
Sen. Warren Rudman of New Hamp-
shire? In the event you hadn't noticed,
he has critically attached a rider to an
appropriations bill the effect of which
would be to return to the Legal Services
Corp. (LSC) the right to continue its at-
tempt to change the American way of
life, not an exaggerated way to put it if
you study the activities of the LSC in its
evolution since its founding in 1974.
On The Right
By WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY
Sen. Rudman is head of the Com-
merce, Justice, State and Judiciary Sub-
committee of the Senate Appropriations
Committee, and his rider would undo
the careful administrative work done by
the Reagan administration to attempt to
stop funding the revolutionary activities
of ideologized young lawyers who don't
like the way the Founding Fathers set up
this republic.
It is an interesting example of how an
agency established to transact one kind
of thing ends by associating itself most
prominently with a quite different sort
of thing.
It all began in the '60s when Lyndon
Johnson was looking about for any con-
ceivable undone business that could be
called "social justice" and decided that
just as the affluent in America have
education, housing, medical care and
legal services, so the poor should have
all of these.
The idea was for the federal govern-
ment to finance the petition by a poor
person to rectify an injustice, and to
avail himself of legal recourses available
to others through the service of lawyers.
The kind of thing Congress was think-
ing about was how to fetch up the Social
Security check that hadn't been issued,
or to get the divorce, or get child
assistance from the delinquent father �
that sort of thing.
There was much enthusiasm for the
program, except that what then happen-
ed is that it was taken over by the
ideologues. Gov. Ronald Reagan of
California fought bitterly against the
aggressions of the LSC in his own state,
and at one point declared that he would
not accept the federal money in Califor-
nia.
When he became president, an effort
was made simply to eliminate the LSC.
This was blocked by the lawyers lobby,
which is as powerful as any this side of
Israel's, the fanners and the teachers
lobbies. What the president had to settle
for was an internal reorganization, the
purpose of which would be to restore
the LSC to its original function, of sen-
ding money to poor people with which
to hire lawyers to get their work done.
This is different from sending money to
lawyers to celebrate Bolshevism.
Ah, you say, there he goes again, ex-
aggerating the activity of the LSC. Here
is what Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch said,
after investigating the methods and
goals of the LSC study centers: "Their
method was clandestine; their objective
was secret; and their actions were repug-
nant. And yet they fully expected the
federal government to finance their
cabal
Here is what Sen. Jeremiah Den ton
of Alabama wrote: "LSC was to
become the taxpayer-funded fulcrum
for the left to leverage a national
political agenda in the Reagan ere
The Washington Legal Foundation
brought together scholars and jour-
nalists to study the activities of the LSC.
Rael Jean Isaac, one of the authors of
The Coercive Utopians, collected a few
examples of the animating bias of the
legal folk being funded by Congress to
the tune of about $300 million per year.
In Boston, Gary Bellow of the Legal
Services Institute, an offshoot of the
Greater Boston Legal Services, said in
1982, "Most of us agree that
America maintains a deeply stratified
class system; changing this system, and
its most recent manifestation in Reagan
conservatism, is a primary concern of
most of us who do legal services work
Another LSC lawyer spoke of the se-
cond model for the LSC, the first being
the direct aid for legal services. In this
second model, "service to individual
clients is provided only as a means for
winning the confidence of the poor
community and for learning about the
problems faced by poor persons
The true objective "of practicing
poverty law must be to organize poor
people, rather than to solve their legal
problems. The proper job for a poor
people's lawyer is helping poor people
to change this
So has it gone: LSC has become a
lobby of left-minded lawyers to pool
their resources to influence legislatures.
Congress and the general public to rally
around the socialist flag. The question
is why Sen. Rudman should give his
name to a rider that would undermine
any effort to restore legal services to its
original role?
The full Appropriations Committee
has yet to act on that rider, and of
course there is the vote in the Senate,
and in the House. And the veto.
William F. Buckley is the editor of
National Review magazine. He also
writes a syndicated column for Univer-
sal Press Syndicate which occasionally
appears on this page.
I
(CPS) � Testing studer
presence of drugs in their systems
may not do much to stop student
trom using illicit drugs, some ex-
perts say.
The system, various exj
say, is far from foolproof.
The University of Ma
athletic department made athletes!
submit to urinaMi'eststo ca f
drug abusers, but testimony-
taken by the grand jury r-
estigating the cocaine-relatec
death of Maryland basket-
state Len Bias allegedly turned upl
evidence that 'dirty" player J
simply switched urine samr
with people who didn't use drugs.
Whether such tests actually
deter people from taking drugs
remains an open question.
"We have very little ressearc;
available on that issue reports
De. Steve Gust, a research
psychologist at the National In-
stitute on Drug Abuse.
But Gust adds that when tin
Pentagon started giving military

COM
Tl
Wedne!
SI
Wedne!
Speci
Position o
Union Boi
OLT! TO!
���
n�w afrm m
mt
��
� i i �im w��it���m$tmtB
4i
WmMmmWmimm.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 16. JH
r Too Long
$23 is a lot of money to a staring col-
and it seems to me that
jid be some justice in all of
dea of building new parking
ave only one thing to say. It
ild be such a waste to tear down our
ful trees on campus only to add a
- paved parking area. However,
: our money was used to con-
orking deck in a place where
:here ready a parking lot, then that
onl) solve the parking pro-
elimmate the needless wasting
.ampus greenery.
iggestion as to how we can come
the funds to do this? How
Dg -ome of that cash that gets
er every semester for endless
larking tickets and parking stickers?
M
i Ore is a junior English major
I Greensboro.
L
Campus Spectrum
In addition to the "Campus
Forum" section of the EditoriaJ
Page, The East Carolinian ha re-
shed the "Campus Spectrum "
s an opinion column featurg
ers from the student body
and faculty The columns printed in
the "Campus Spectrum" will contain
currer pics of concern to the cam-
pus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only uuh regard to rules of
grammer and decency. Persons sub-
mitting columns must be willing to
accept "by-line" credit for their ef-
brts, as no entrys from ghost writers
1 be published.
erican Way
The Coercive Utopians, collected a few
examples of the animating bias of the
legal folk being funded by Congress to
the tune of about $300 million per year.
In Boston, Gary Bellow of the Legal
Services Institute, an offshoot of the
Greater Boston Legal Services, said in
1982, "Most of us agree that
America maintains a deeply stratified
class system; changing this system, and
its most recent manifestation in Reagan
conservatism, is a primary' concern of
most of us who do legal services work
Another LSC lawyer spoke of the se-
cond model for the LSC, the first being
the direct aid for legal services. In this
second model, "service to individual
clients is provided only as a means for
winning the confidence of the poor
community and for learning about the
problems faced by poor persons
The true objective "of practicing
poverty law must be to organize poor
people, rather than to solve their legal
problems. The proper job for a poor
people's lawyer is helping poor people
to change this
So has it gone: LSC has become a
lobby of left-minded lawyers to pool
their resources to influence legislatures,
Congress and the general public to rally
around the socialist flag. The question
is why Sen. Rudman should give his
name to a rider that would undermine
any effort to restore legal services to its
original role?
The full Appropriations Committee
has yet to act on that rider, and of
:ourse there is the vote in the Senate,
and in the House. And the veto.
William F. Buckley is the editor of
National Review magazine. He also
writes a syndicated column for Univer-
sal Press Syndicate which occasionally
appears on this page.
Study Challenges Rising Tuitions
WASHINGTON (CPS) -
Despite rising tuitions, middle in-
come families find it no harder to
afford to send their children to
college now than they did ten
years ago, a report by the
American Enterprise Institute
(AEI) says.
Other experts remain uncon-
vinced.
After studying families with
18- to 19-year old college-bound
students, AEI researcher Terry
Hartle concludes incomes have
risen in step with rising college
costs during the last decade.
"A four-year public college re-
quired 9.5 percent of an income
in 1973-74 he notes. "Today,
that same school requires 9.7 per-
cent
Independent four-year colleges
did grow relatively more expen-
sive.
"In 1973-74, it was 19.2 per-
cent (of a middle-class family's
income). Now it's 1.8 percent
he says.
Two-year public colleges, by
contrast, claim 7.7 percent of the
average family's income now,
versus eight percent in 1975.
But Dr. A. Dallas Martin, head
of the National Association of
Student Finacial Aid Ad-
ministrators, maintains colleges
consume about the same portion
of family income only because
colleges themselves are keeping
tuition low, and hurting
themselves in the process.
"Tuition costs are rising faster
than the average annual rate of
inflation in part because, over a
long period of high inflation, col-
leges tried to keep tuition as low
as possible Martin says.
" Then the colleges (fall)
behind (meeting their expenses),
so they defer things like faculty
raises and building repairs or they
don't buy needed lab equipment
or books for the library
"Finally, the schools can't go
on without replacing
equipment Martin continues.
"And they have to raise salaries
or the faculty might bolt. They
have to repair the building or the
roof may cave in, and there goes
the entire investment
Faculty are indeed underpaid,
agrees Kent Halstead of the U.S.
Dept. of Education.
Halstead reports faculty pur-
chasing power has decline 20 per-
cent since 1974.
"1984 hit at absolute bottom
(of the drop in real salary) he
says.
"Each year, salaries increased
less that the Consumer Price In-
dex
"It will take another five years,
at least, to catch up and probably
more like eight or nine years
Halstead says.
The only way to push real
faculty earning power back up
and to maintain campuses
physically is to raise tuition,
meaning college will consume a
larger porton of family income
into the future, Martin says.
The "catastrophic" trend of
rising tuitions accounts for addi-
tional student aid requests, Mar-
tin says.
204 East 5th St
iAppfa 'Pwotodg
Phone 758-1427
Mon-Thyr 10 AM-9 PM
Fri-Sot 10 AM- 10 PM
Albumt gnd Cotftti on SALE for S&.99
Intce Homtby ft The Rang 'THE WAY IT IS"
VonHotcn "SI SO"
Lionel ftkhi "DANCING ON THI CHUNG"
Peter Gabriel "SO"
Akatrau "DANGEROUS GAMES"
�onnie Roitt "NINE LIVES"
Albumt and Cottettet on SALE for $7.99
Huey Lewis & The News "FORE"
Poul McCartney "PRESS TO PLAY"
Rod Stewart "ROD STEWART"
Tina Turner "BREAK EVERY RULE"
Many Compact Discs Arriving
Daily � Check Out Our Selection
Drug Testing In Students
Still Remains Questionable
(CPS) � Testing students for the
presence of drugs in their systems
may not do much to stop students
from using illicit drugs, some ex-
perts say.
The system, various experts
say, is far from foolproof.
The University of Maryland's
athletic department made athletes
submit to urinalysisieststo catch
drug abusers, but testimony
taken by the grand jury in-
vestigating the cocaine-related
death of Maryland basketball
state Len Bias allegedly turned up
evidence that "dirty" players
simply switched urine samples
with people who didn't use drugs.
Whether such tests actually
deter people from taking drugs
remains an open question.
"We have very little ressearch
available on that issue reports
De. Steve Gust, a research
psychologist at the National In-
stitute on Drug Abuse.
But Gust adds that when the
Pentagon started giving military
personnel drug tests in 1981, as
many as 40 percent of those
tested showed traces of illicit
drugs in their systems.
After testing for four years,
though, the Dept. of Defense
says only four percent of the tests
are "positive
"False negative"and "false
positive" readings are possible,
experts say, but not probable.
"In general, coke (cocaine)
stays in the body one to three
days. "Barbs (barbituates) last
any where from three to five or
six days. The opiates are about
three to five days says NIDA's
Dr. Michael Walsh.
He adds that prolonged use of-
marijuana - more than a joint a
day - can build up in the tissues
of the body. "There have been
reports of it lasting two to three
weeks
Subscribe
(Biit East &utBlMun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Presents
NITE
Tucs. & Wed. Sept. 16 & 17, 1986 9:00-2:00 AM
Admission $1.50 Guys $1.00 Ladies
10 DRAFT ALL NITE
Presents
Best Leggs Contest
Tues. Sept. 22, 1986 9:00-2:00 AM
Admission $2.00 Guys $1.00 Ladies �Oc Cans All Nite
PRIZES
IS� "MAdKwU COSH plus 1 year Free Pass to the Elbo
XIICI dU.UU COSh plus j year Free Pass to the EJbo
�"CI ftD.UU COSH plus l tear Free Pass to the Elbo
Entries can call 758-4591 or come by the Elbo to sign up.
COMING ATTRACTIONS
Thursday, Friday, Saturday
BACK TO
THE FUTURE
Wednesday, Sept. 17th
KISS OF THE
SPIDERWOMAN
Wednesday Sept. 17th
SOUL TRAIN
Special Concert On Mendenhall
Patio
Position open for Day Representative on the Student
Union Board of Directors. Apply Now in Room 234
Mendenhall Student Center.
Dr. R. Ted Watson
Optometrist
Professional Eye Care For Your Family
M.j'�"Co'ri
L J
�HOC
COMPLETE EYE
EXAMINATIONS &
CONTACT LENS FITTINGS
1 YR. WARRANTY ON
ALL FRAMES & LENSES
WITH COMPLETE
PRESCRIPTION EYEWEAR
24 HR. EMERGENCY
REPAIR ANDOR
REPLACEMENT
SUNGLASSES
FRAMES & GLASSES
COMPLETE FRAME SELECTION & PRESCRIPTION SERVICE
CONTACT LENSES
SAME DAY DISPENSING OF CONTACT LENSES IN MOST CASES
SOFT LENSES � DAILY WEAR. EXTENDED WEAR, BIFOCAL,
CONTACTS FOR ASTIGMATISM. TINTED SOFT LENSES
RIGID - OXYGEN PERMEABLE. BIFOCAL
TRIAL CONTACT LENS WEAR PERIOD
HOURS:
MONDAY, WEDNESDAY.
THURSDAY. FRIDAY
8 AM - 5 PM
TUESDAY 8 AM � 7 PM
SATURDAY HRS. BY APPT.
TM
INSURANCE
ACCEPTED
MEMBER:
American Optometnc
Association
MADE
CIRCLE
ECU
I0TH STREET
FICKLEN
STADILM
O t TED WATSON
C1
0
C'
rm m-aza
1805 Charles Boulevard
Greenville. North Carolina 27858
Telephone 756-4780
gathering place
�� 4. l . � . . - 4 ?.�?�.�
��vr�44. �4t.�i vmm � m � �.��.
. '





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 16. 1986
Rehnquisfs Confirmation Still Debated
WASHINGTON, (UP1) � Even
though Justice William Rehn-
quisfs confirmation is virtually
assured, Senate Democrats are
making a last-ditch effort this
week to show he is not qualified
to become the nation's 16th chief
justice.
With 'wo days of debate on
Rehnquisfs record completed,
the Senate returns today to con-
tinue reviewing the record of the
.man described by one democratic
senator as a "suporter of segrega-
tion
Sen. Paul Simon, D-Ill said
.Friday he knew there was no way
to stop the Rehnquist nomina-
tion, but he urged Rehnquist to
take a "weekend off and walk
on the beach and reflect on the
role of being the synbol of justice
for all of this country
Simon said that Americans
have died for such symbols as the
flag but that Rehnquisfs record
on race shows "a clear pattern
that is going to alienate millions
of Americans if he is our symbol
of justice
A small core of Democrats
spent Thursday and Friday
painstakingly reviewing Rehn-
quist's record and the allegations
that he is insensitive to the rights
of blacks and minorities.
Republicans said the efforts of
their Democratic colleagues were
a lot of "hot air
Although no time agreement
has been reached, Senate
Republican Leader Robert Dole
of Kansas said he hoped to vote
on Rehnquisfs nomination by
Tuesday.
Democrats and Republicans
believe opponents only have 25
votes to stop the man nominated
by President Reagan to replace
retiring Chief Justice Warren
Burger.
Reagan also nominated ap-
peals court Judge Antonin Scalia
to take Rehnquisfs seat on the
Supreme Court, which Dole also
hoped to vote on by Tuesday.
Rehnquist was confirmed as a
Supreme Court justice in 1971
after a lengthy and heated debate
despite extensive opposition to
his record.
Nonetheless, Democrats con-
tinued their review of
Rehnquisfs record that was first
aired at his confirmation hearing
in 1971 and expanded on in his
hearing in July.
There was testimony during his
hearings that he blocked blacks
form voting during elections in
Phoenix in the 1960s, but Rehn-
quist, 61, denied the charges.
Sen. Bill Bradley, D-N.J said
he was voting against Rehnquist
because his elevation to chief
justice will "retard, not advance,
our quest for a truly colorblind
society
Sen. Alan Cranston, D-Calif
who opposed Rehnquist when he
was nominated as an associate
justice in 1971, was more blunt.
"I find Mr. Rehnquist an
unrelenting supporter of segrega-
tion (and) I find that his views
of women's rights would find
wider acceptance in the prior cen-
tury Cranston said.
Company Raises Money
Auctioning Off Trucks
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C.(UP1)
� Mclean Trucking Co which
filed for bankruptcy in January
under Chapter 11, has raised
about $17 million from 20 public
auctions in which trucks and
trailers were sold, company of-
ficials say.
The sale of the equipment
began in July and represents the
end of the second phase of a three
-part liquidation to bring in
enough money for the company
to pay back some of its outstan-
ding debt.
Of the company's 13,500
trucks and trailers, Mclean has
sold about 7,100 items, said
David Wanchick, the company's
chief executive officer. The com-
pany has scheduled 39 auctions,
including one in Winston-Salem,
the largest single collection point
for trucks and trailers. The auc-
tion is scheduled for Nov. 5, 6
and 7 at the Waughtown Street
terminal, where more than 1,000
items are stored.
"This was our major rebuild
shop, and we had the largest
driver domicile here in Winston
� Salem Wanchick said. "So
this is home base and this is
where we grew from and we had
the largest single operation
McLean has raised about $77
million toward repaying some
$200 million in debts, Wanchick
said. Earlier this year, officials
predicted McLean could raise
more than $100 million through
the sale of its assets.
"It's moving along according
to plan Wanchick said.
DO YOU WANT TO WORK
li
�Secretaries
�OfficeClerical
��Free word processing
training for typists
�Factory Workers
�Data Entry
Full and Part-time temporary
work � Perfect for students.
KELLY
SERVICES
The Kelly Girl People
204 E.Arlington Blvd.
Arlington Centre Off Ice Complex
Greenville, NC 27834
35S-7t�
Not an agency-Never a fee
EOE MFH
East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking applications for
Day-Student Representatives
Responsibilities:
Qualifications:
for the 1986-87 Term
Selecting the Student Union President
Approving Committee Chairpersons
Approving the Student Union Budget
Setting Policy for the Student Union
Full-Time Student
Reside Off Campus
Independent
Deadline To Apply: Monday, September 22, 1986
Give a hoot.
Don't pollute.
Forest Service, U.S.D.A, tM
For your Capezio Dancewear, tap shoes,
ballet shoes, jazz shoes, let our
experienced shoe fitters help you.
The Plaza only.
YOU'RE A STAR IN CAPEZJO
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
Corner 10th & Dickinson Ave
We Buy Gold & Silver
SJNSTANT CASH LOANS V
ty f All Transactions Confidential � jf
'� Buy � Sell � Trade f5�
752-0322
Hours: 9:00 a.m4:00 p.m. Mua-Sal
RUSH
-�s s ���� -�
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
BACKED BY TRADITION
A&N
w
C&-
�x$
m&

V600 pi
Cuban P
MIAMI (UPI) - An airborne
"freedom ride" carried 110
Cuban political prisoners and
their families to a new life in the
United States today and long
awaited reunions with relative-
they had not seen in more than
two decades.
One refugee wa unable tc
make the trip after suffering a
heart attack at the Havana air
port and a dozen more cho�.c
stay in their homeland because of
advancing age or fear of lo
contact with relatives
Those who did leave arrived a
Miami International Airpor
6:55 a.m. � clad in new drc
and suits � and jubilantly
through a U.S. Immigration Sei
vice processing center se1
the airport. Each person, ranw
Earthqu
Declared
KAKAMATA, Greece (UPI) -
Four tremors today bro
down a pair of tottering build.
in Kalamata, where at lea 1"
people died from an earthquake
two days earlier and a dozer
more bodies were believed en-
tombed in the rubble.
Crews rescued 31 people � in-
cluding a 10-day-old child � in
the initial 24 hours after the I
quake struck Saturday night A
crew member said today anotr.e-
person had been located t
authorities did not know whe
that person still was alive.
Authorities feared all 12 miss-
ing people were dead, joining the
17 confirmed fatalities Another
300 were injured, 81 seriously,
said Housing, Planning and En-
vironment Minister Evangelo-
Kouloumbis.
Greek officials quicklv
declared Kalamata a disaster
Promotion
CHARLOTTE, NC. (UPI) -
Two female mannequins in slinky
undergarments and the silhouette
of a nude man used in a displav
to promote Calvin Klein's newest
cologne were too risque for the
managers of a Belk's department
store.
"I call it 'pleasing erotica
said Philip Maniscalco, the
store's visual merchandise
manager. "You have to get the
customer to stop. And to get him
to stop, you have to do
something that makes him low
down and think. The impression
of sexuality in Calvin Klein 5
something we wanted to ge:
across to the customer
Calvin Klein's Obsession �a
advertised in the display, which
yjimniHiiimnHHm�MmitH�iiiiimimmtiiiiiitiini�j
I
$
(SM
422 Arltfigton Bbd
Tropical and Marine
(HIMIIHIHMmmiHWIIIIIIItllllllHtlllliltlllllllflHIHIll

HL -
B V
�1 I
F T jr- I � -d
HSj

5TH STRE
SER
MO
JV
�Finest in Foreign Car R
�We repair Toyota, Hon
Volvo, Oatsun, Ljtus,
Subaru ard. others
�New Location! Dickinsor
from Lincoln Mercury Decn
4500 sq. ft.
2204 Dickinson Ave.
-�� m in.� ii mt

-Ni��i iHri
��d-Mi-iiwi-iWr





ebated
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 16 1986
on in his
during his
Iked blacks
flections in
bul Rehn-
Iharges.
�N J . Naid
Kehnquist
to chief
I advance,
i �'lorhlind
society
Sen. Alan Cranston, D-Calif
who opposed Rehnquist when he
was nominated as an associate
justice in 1971, was more blunt.
"1 find Mr. Rehnquist an
unrelenting supporter of segrega-
tion (and) I find that his views
of women's rights would find
wider acceptance in the prior cen-
tury Cranston said.
diversity's
rf of Directors
fions for
resentatives
Term
L nion President
Uee Chairpersons
Y Union Budget
tdent Union
September 22, 1986
dlina Coins & Pawn
10th & Dickinson Avc
Buy Gold & Silver
T CASH LOANS
ransactions Confidential
752-0322
9:00 �.m�.00 p.m. Moo-Sat
S�S
HA
ADITION
y;
Cuban Prisoners Start New Life In U.S.
MIAMI (UPI) - An airborne
"freedom ride" carried 110
Cuban political prisoners and
their families to a new life in the
United States today and long-
awaited reunions with relatives
they had not seen in more than
two decades.
One refugee was unable to
make the trip after suffering a
heart attack at the Havana air-
port and a dozen more chose to
stay in their homeland because of
advancing age or fear of losing
contact with relatives.
Those who did leave arrived at
Miami International Airport at
6:55 a.m. � clad in new dresses
and suits � and jubilantly filed
through a U.S. Immigration Ser-
vice processing center set up at
the airport. Each person, ranging
from the aged in wheelchairs to
tiny tots clutching their parents
hands, gripped a brown envelope
carying immigration papers.
"I'm in my country shouted
Rene Gonzalez Herrera, an elder-
ly man confined to wheelchair.
"I'm very happy and very
grateful to everyone � to all the
American people and all the
religious community. "
Miami's first Cuban-born
mayor, Xavier Suarez, stood at
the front of the line, greeting
each arriving Cuban with a re-
sounding "bien venido, bien
venido" � "welcome,
welcome
Outside the arrival depot, three
bused painted red, white and blue
stood by to ferry the Cubans to
Tropical Park for an expected
tearful reunion with relatives they
had not seen for almost three
decades.
In all, the chartered Eastern
Airlines Boeing 727 was to have
carried 70 political prisoners to
Miami from Havana's Jose Marti
Airport. Another 41 relatives of
the former prisonners were on
board the aircraft.
But immigration officials said
one person who was due to fly to
Miami suffered an apparent
heart attack at the Havana Air-
port. The identity of the victim
was not immediately available,
nor was his condition known.
Under secretary of State Elliott
Abrams, who was at the Miami
airport to greet the new arrivals,
said another dozen Cubans who
were eligible to make the trip
decided to stay in Cuba. He said
some felt they were too old to
travel and begin a new life in a
new country and others feared
they would never again see
relatives they would have to leave
behind.
Abrams said the Cubans had
been carefully checked out in
Havana by immigration
authorities to make sure they
were political prisoners, not
violent criminals.
CLIFF'S
'Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington H.ghway INC 33 Ext J Greenv.lle. North Carolina
Phone 752-3172
(Past RiverbluffApts.)
Flounder
Popcorn Shrimp
$325
$32,
Hours 4:30-9:30 MonSat.
NEWLY REMODELED -
Earthquake Site Officially
Declared A Disaster Area
KAKAMATA, Greece (UPI) �
Four tremors today brought
down a pair of tottering buildings
in Kalamata, where at least 17
people died from an earthquake
two days earlier and a dozen
more bodies were believed en-
tombed in the rubble.
Crews rescued 31 people � in-
cluding a 10-day-old child � in
the initial 24 hours after the first
quake struck Saturday night. A
crew member said today another
person had been located but
authorities did not know whether
that person still was alive.
Authorities feared all 12 miss-
ing people were dead, joining the
17 confirmed fatalities. Another
300 were injured, 81 seriously,
said Housing, Planning and En-
vironment Minister Evangelos
Kouloumbis.
Greek officials quickly
declared Kalamata a disaster
area, sending in medical supplies
and food and setting up a tent ci-
ty in the city of 80,000 located
100 miles southwest of Athens.
Officials said about 112 of
Kalamata's 1,900 houses col-
lasped in the tremblors � in-
cluding the two buildings today
� and 1,350 others were damag-
ed, most to the point where they
will have to be demolished. Most
of the dead were in a five-story
building that collapsed Saturday
night.
Nearly 10,000 survivors slept
overnight in tents outside the city
or in three civilian and two
military ships docked in the har-
bor. Another tent city for
emergency workers was set up in
the city square.
Some guests in a luxury hotel
chose to remain in their quaters
Sunday night, but rushed out
after today's tremblors and spent
Promotion Too Risque
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (UPI) - originally had the two manne-
I wo female mannequins in slinky quins wearing only bras, panties
undergarments and the silhouette garter belts and stockings But'
of a nude man used in a display department store managers said
to promote Calvin Klein's newest the display still was too daring
cologne were too risque for the Slips were added to the manne-
managers of a Belk's department
store.
"I call it 'pleasing erotica "
said Philip Maniscalco, the
store's visual merchandise
manager. "You have to get the
customer to stop. And to get him
to stop, you have to do
something that makes him slow
down and think. The impression
of sexuality in Calvin Klein is
something we wanted to get
across to the customer
Calvin Klein's Obsession was
advertised in the display, which
iiiittiiiiniifiiiiHimiimiitiiiniiiiiiiiiiiuiHHiiiiiiii"
quins. Later, the male silhouette
was missing. By Saturday, the
display was removed altogether.
"We don't want to imply or to
depict vulgarity or nudity or
anything that would be offensive
to our customers said John
McCaskill, Belk Brothers vice
president.
Although Belk officials believ-
ed the display was in good taste,
McCaskill said, "if it's going to
draw this kind of attention, we
don't want it
llimilllllllllilllllMIIIIHtlllllllllll�
422 Arlington Blvd. " Tel 756-7202
Tropical and Marine Fish Arriving Weekly
5
- i-upivai wu inurine risn Arriving vteeKiy
HiiiiiaiitiiiiitfiniiHMiMiiiiiiiitiiHiiimiiitiiiiitiiiiiiiiitiiitiiuiiiiiiiiitfiiiiHiimiiiifiiiiMiiiinHiiiiitfiiiiMii
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
S205 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at
additional cost. Pregnancy Test, Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For
further information, call 832-0535 (toll free
number: 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5
p weekdays. General anesthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
5TH STREET IMPORT
SERVICE
MOVES
�Finest in Foreign Car Repair
�We repair Toyota, Honda, VW, Fiat, Porsche,
Volvo, Datsun, Ljtus, Mercedes, BMW, Audi'
Subaru and others
�New Location! Dickinson & Memorial �
from Lincoln Mercury Dealership,
4500 sq. fi.
2204 Dickinson Ave.
across
756-9434
the rest of the night on the hotel
lawn.
City life slowly retured to nor-
mal today with the reopening of
coffee shops. Survivors pulled
valuables and light furniture
from the rubble and piled them
on sidewalks, as bulldozers
groaned to push rubble nearby.
Among the rescue crews that
hustled to the resort city of
80,000 was a group of men and
rescue dogs from France who
The rescuers' work on Sundav j m v w � &
ECU vs. PENN
The rescuers' work on Sunday
helped find Niki Lambropoulou,
a 15-year-old school girl.
"We drilled a hole through the
rubble and passed a 2 -meter-
long tube to her so she could
drink some water one rescuer
said. Rescuers later pulled her
from the debris.
NO NEWS
IS BAD NEWS
o
a
Riggan Shoe Repair
111 West 4th St.
Downtown Greenville
"Shoe ReHitr At The I en Best"
758-0204

SHOWDATE
Sept.mh 8:00 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
STATE
? Need a Place To Stay?
A. Call (814) 946-1631
Only 45 minutes from State College
$60.00 Single Occupancy
$68.00 Double
Call early for guaranteed reservation
Central Pennsylvania Most Hotel
Complex
V
5.
s
y
.V
1 y
East Carolina University
Black Sororities
Host
A Fall Rush
Black Sorority Informal Fall Rush
September 14, Registration SI.00 and Reception
7:00 MendenhalJ Multi-purpose Room
September 15, Rush Party, Alpha Kappa Alpha,
Coffee House, 7:00
September 16, Rush Party, Delta Sigma Theta, Coffee
House, 7:00
September 17, Rush Party, Zeta Phi Beta, Coffee
House, 7:00
September 18, Rush Party, Sigma Gamma Rho,
Coffee House, 7:00
September 19, Social, TBA
September 22, Rush Party, Alpah Kappa Alpha,
Coffee House, 7:00
September 23, Rush Party, Delta Sigma Theta, Coffee
House, 7:00
September 24, Rush Party, Zeta Phi Beta. Coffee
House, 7:00
September 25, Rush Party, Sigma Gamma Rho,
Coffee House, 7:00
e. ��� -� �
� j. X i. '
�?��������,
m
� �





��E EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 16,1986
The East Carolinian's
COUPON PAGE
(Published Tuesdays)
Drop by and see
our beautiful new shop . . .
Greenville's Newest, Most Unique
Beauty Center!
Stylists:
Petey Hathaway Trudy Barber
Lisa Brann Kay Pase
Lisa Wright Burns Denise Hinnant
Tina Getsinger Mercedes Rivera
Show Your Student ID & Get A
10 Discount
On All Services & Products!
Offer good until Sept. 30, 1986
PARADISE
CheMf
Step into Paradise
Step Out in Style
329 Arlington Blvd. Greenville 756-1579
Wheel Alignment
$15
4-Wheel Drum or
Front Disc Reline
88 with coupon)
$59.88
(with coupon)
Lubrication
Oil Filter, Oil Change
$12.88
(wl�� coupon)
Air Conditioning
Servicing
2 I . .88 (Includts 1
Con Freon)
I 2� Used Tires
$8.88
4-Wtteel Computer
Balance and Rotate
$19.M
(wit coupon)
COGGINS CAR CARE
BFGoodnch
Bf�4 . Ui��ri�lH� H I Plto.w 6- .
Kentucky Fried Chicken
$1.99,
plus tax
FOR ONE COMPLETE
2-PIECE PACK
2 Pieces of Chicken
1 Small Mashed Potato and Gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
Expires Dec. 31, 1986
10
OFF
See-
ges
10
OFF
New To The Area
SPECIAL SANDWICHES
MARYLAND CRAB PHILLEY STEAK
CORN BEEF 6 oz HAMBURGER
10 T & our � subs - 20 slices of meal & 4 slices
IV O of cheese. WSe also have pizzas with a northern flavor 1 0
�" OFF
THEWASH HOUSE
Drink Some Suds
Qb While You
jr Do Your Duds
Visit our convenient location on 14th St.
8 AAA-12 Midnight
AMFM Music
2 Color TV's with Cable
Game Room
2 Liter Pepsi 75C
when using our facilities.
j
ATTIC
TUES
Mason Dixon
WED
See ad on page 7
THUR
The ZOO
Sl.OO for all ECU
students
FRI
The
Revival
Tribute: Creedance Clear-water Revival
$1.75 all ECU
students
's Only Premium Quality
Cleaners Since 1935 .
Laundered Shirt Special
5 for $2.99
Have 2 Pair of Pants Cleaned
3rd Pair Cleaned FREE
Expires September 31, 1986
752-2131
HACK ROOM
branded shoes
Greenville Buyers Market
Memorial Dive
OPEN MON-SAT 10-9
SUNDAY 1-6
SAVE UP TO
60
except Niki, Agner & Reebok
)OOOOOO03B�OOOOCnO0n0�0OOO�OB
Greenville's Only Premium Quality
Cleaners Since 1935 .
Have 2 Sweaters Cleaned
Get 3rd One Cleaned FREE
Expires September 31,1986
i
752-2131
Comer of loth A Evans
r
l
I
I
��cu-
T5&

Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
Award Winning Ice Cream
321 East 10th Street Greenville, NX. 27858
Call 750-4896
Buy One Blend-In or Sundae
Get the Second
L� 12 PRICE!
One Coupon Per Order, Pleose. Coupon Expires Mon Sept. 22, 1986 �
H
-�-� � '���� i � � ,�i a, ammm.m� H�i� imnim
famki m �� � i ��� tm � � ����'����,
wmmmmmimmMn
IS
Dangerfj
A Lack
ByEDTOSHACH
"I don't get no respea
Rodney Dangerfield's said
milbon times. Rodne seems
be getting a Little more with
To School, his latest movie i
opened to rave reviews earh
the summer. Dangt
character in the moue loves
bribe and pay people off, ai
after seeing the movie, you kn
of wonder if Rodney bin
paying off a cntic or two.
Thornton Melon (Dange
is an extremely cu
businessman who has made
bundle off of his chain of ' !
and Tall" clothing stores
social-climbing wife (played qui
bitchily by Adrienne Barbea
leaves him early in the film, so
goes to visit his son, Jason (Keil
Gordon) at college It turn j
that the letters in which Jason n
been telling his father how m
he's been doing at school -
pus Romeo, on the diving
� have been slightly err.
Jason has no sociai life, is
towel boy for the divin: ;en
and is seriously considering droj
ping out. Melon wants him
stay, and to set an exa :
enrolls in school himself.
The elder Melon, however,
not at all your average freshm;
He has carpenters turn ihn
dorm rooms into a huge .ondi
complete with hot tub and bar
He also hires geniuses to do hi
homework for him, and his papej
on the works of Kurt Vonne
Forum L
B JOHN SHANNON
You walk into Mendenh;
with ten or so copies
tucked under you arm. To you.
least, the sheaf of poem j
ceedingly precious cargo I j
tunately, now it may a
damp.
By the time you get ur
and seated among the other poet
� some aspiring, some 1;
� your nervousness can be thru;
aside. The Poetry Forum
gotten where it is today bj :n
timidating newcomers j
Mendenhall fovil
Hurt S
By JOHN SHANNON
Prisoners to the daily u
of college life, students oftet
perceive each week as a -
fuzzy block, a blurry st: rig
days. Luckily for these studc I
an exit exists, a bright, mid-wee-l
flare to look forward to and ba i
upon.
On Wednesday nights the Sti
dent Union Films Committee!
presents "special" films. These)
films are special in that they are
is.
j '��

i
!
Rail Julia and WUham Hart star
playing at 8 p.m. tomorrow Id h
chosen on the basis of artistic
quality and merit rather than
popularity; often they are
acknowledged classics.
Tomorrow's film. Kiss of the
Spider Woman, though released
just this year in the U.S is
already on its way to becoming a
��Kfr





icken
es
10
OFF
rhe Area
NDWICHES
PHILLEY STEAK
6 oz HAMBURGER
fj. es of meat & 4 slices
trthern flavor
10
OFF
iOUSE
Suds
u
uds
tion on 14th St.
iter Pepsi 75C
�en using our facilities.
j
CU
v-4
4
FRI
The
Revival
vedtmce Clearwaier Revival
$1.75 all ECU
students
ium Quality
Since 1935 .
Cleaned
med FREE
� �
752-2131
Corner of 10th & Evans
�made Ice Cream
�g Ice Cream
�t Greenvill, N.C. 27858
M896
Hn or Sundae
Second
RICE!
fes Mon Sept. 22, 1986
I
I
I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
SEPTEMBER 16. 1986 Page 9
Dangerfield Earns
A Lack Of Respect
By ED TOSHACH
9�dal T.TVUji (trailmu
"I don't get no respect
Rodney Dangerfield's said it a
million times. Rodney seems to
be getting a little more with Back
To School, his latest movie which
opened to rave reviews early in
the summer. Dangerfield's
character in the movie loves to
bribe and pay people off, and,
after seeing the movie, you kind
of wonder if Rodney himself isn't
paying off a critic or two.
Thornton Melon (Dangerfield)
is an extremely wealthy
businessman who has made his
bundle off of his chain of "Fat
and Tall" clothing stores. His
social-climbing wife (played quite
bitchily by Adrienne Barbeau)
leaves him early in the film, so he
goes to visit his son, Jason (Keith
Gordon) at college. It turns out
that the letters in which Jason has
been telling his father how well
he's been doing at school � cam-
pus Romeo, on the diving team
� have been slightly embellished.
Jason has no social life, is the
towel boy for the diving team,
and is seriously considering drop-
ping out. Melon wants him to
stay, and to set an example,
enrolls in school himself.
The elder Melon, however, is
not at all your average freshman.
He has carpenters turn three
dorm rooms into a huge condo
complete with hot tub and bar.
He also hires geniuses to do his
homework for him, and his paper
on the works of Kurt Vonnegut,
Jr. is written by Vonnegut
himself. Jason doesn't much like
his father's tactics, and is
especially offended when Melon
has Jason's astronomy paper
written by NASA.
Back To School is stocked up
with high-quality actors, but they
aren't given an awful lot to work
with. The premise has a lot of
potential, but all of it is unrealiz-
ed thanks to a weak script. Per-
formances by the likes of Sally
Kellerman, Burt Young and Ned
Beatty are wasted, and that's a
shame. Dangerfield's lines are a
lot like his stand-up routine �
that is, it's an endless barrage of
one-liners. This works fine in his
night club act, but in Back To
School it's a style that's seldom
funny and all too often predic-
table.
At times, the movie tries to get
serious and a little moving, but at
those times the film just comes
across as smarmy and sometimes
downright confusing: when
young Jason is really down on his
father, Melon's Chauffer and old
pal Lou (Young), in an effort to
defend Melon, tells Jason that
he himself has two sons, one of
whom he put through college, the
other he put through a wall.
Jason gets the point; I don't.
Despite its potential, the best
thing I can say about Back To
School is that it's mildly enter-
taining.
No, I'm wrong.
The best thing I can say about
it is that it's playing at the Park
Theater, and it'll only cost you a
dollar-fifty to get in.
Rodney Dangerfield, Robert Downey, Jr. and Keith Gordon star In drop out. Naturally, Dangerfield sets a poor examnle IUck
�Back to School the fardcal accon.t of a father (IHngerfle.d) School' I, now pJayUgTrhe Park In DotowenJnf
who enrolls in school in order to convince his son (Gordon) not to
to
Bigfoot Lurks In
By MONTE GIBBS
auflwito
Within our state lurks a
mystery, thrashing within the
foliage, scaling the rocky cliffs.
and avoiding man.
It was widely thought that the
mystery being was confined to
the foothills of California. Not so
anymore. New and increasing
evidence has lead some to th
Forum Lets Poets Get Down To Poetry
By JOHN SHANNON
You walk into Mendenhall
with ten or so copies of a poem
tucked under you arm. To you, at
least, the sheaf of poems is ex-
ceedingly precious cargo. Unfor-
tunately, now it may also be
damp.
By the time you get upstairs
and seated among the other poets
� some aspiring, some inspired
� your nervousness can be thrust
aside. The Poetry Forum hasn't
gotten where it is today by in-
timidating newcomers. And to-
Mendenhall Movie
day, 15 or 20 years after its incep-
tion, the Poetry ForjJTO can pro-
perly be called an lnsUtutipa.
Peter Makuck, who leads the
Forum, is an accomplished poet
in his own right, and professor of
English at ECU. Makuck said,
"The atmosphere is casual. The
Poetry Forum doesn't have the
severity of the classroom
Makuck emphasized that
despite its casual atmosphere the
Forum can be an opportunity
even for experienced poets to get
good critical feedback on their
work.
"Anyone who writes poetry
can come said Makuck.
Although many students attend
its meetings, the Forum is open to
faculty, staff and town people as
well.
In addition to providing a
place where local writers of
poetry may meet, exchange ideas
and hear responses to their
poems, the Poetry Forum
receives funding each year from
the SGA to bring a poet to cam-
pus. The poet usually reads a
selection of his or her work
publicly and holds a workshop to
discuss aspects of craft with local
poets.
Hurt Spins A Tragic Web
By JOHN SHANNON
Prisoners to the daily routine
of college life, students often
perceive each week as a single
fuzzy block, a blurry string of
days. Luckily for these students
an exit exists, a bright, mid-week
flare to look forward to and back
classic. The New York Times
praised the "perfect control and
fierce originality that make it one
of the best films in a long while
Critic Roger Ebert calls it a "film
of insights and surprises one
of those rare and entrancing
stories where one thing seems to
happen while another thing is
really happening. There are
upon.
On Wednesday nights the Stu- passages in the movie that seem
dent Union Films Committee to be absolutely self-contained,
presents "special" films. These and then a word or gesture will
films are special in that they are reveal that they have depths we
Rani Jnlia and William Hart star In 'Kim of the Spider Woman
playing at 8 p.m. tomorrow in Hendrix Theatre.
chosen on the basis of artistic can only guess
quality and merit rather than William Hurt, known to many
popularity; often they are for his roles in The Big Chill and
acknowledged classics. Altered States among other well- ��v�. ��w� IJa.�w a ��
Tomorrows film, Kiss of the known films, stars in Kiss of the of the Spider Woman must be ap-
Spider Woman, though released Spider Woman, and in fact won a predated on its own.
just this year in the U.S is best-actor award at the Cannes The movie screens at 8 pjn.
already on its way to becoming a Film Festival for the role. Wednesday in Hendrix Theatre.
Hurt plays Luis Molina, a
homosexual window dresser who
has been jailed for sex offenses.
Actor Raul Julia shares his cell as
Valentin, a revolutionary whose
crimes were only political. The
story revolves around the rela-
tionship between these two men,
and between the ideals they repre-
sent.
Most of the action takes place
in their prison cell, but is expand-
ed and made significant by
flashes to old movies which Luis
recounts in vivid detail. The old
films become something of a
symbol for Luis' immersion in
fantasy. In contrast, Valentin
considers the old films trivial.
For him, everything is secondary
to the Cause.
By the end of the film, both
men have softened in their posi-
tions and come to understand
each other a little, but several fac-
tors prevent them from ever
achieving mutual honesty.
Hurt manages to portray Luis'
cunning so well that only late in
the film does it become apparent
how treacherous he may have
been. By the end of the film his
treachery almost doesn't matter
because it's obvious where Luis'
heart lies, however much digging
it took to reach there.
The ending is dynamic and
momentous. It is also tragic in a
big way. But to tell too much
would spoil the effect; Brazilian
director Hector Babenco's Kiss
This fall the Poetry Forum will
present well-known poet Stephen
Tapscoft. Tapscbtt, whd leaches
at MIT and publishes regularly in
major journals, will come to
ECU in October for a reading
and a workshop.
So if you thought Greenville
was lacking in poetry, take steps
to remedy the situation. The
Poetry Forum may help you im-
prove your writing and meet in-
teresting people without the pain
and rigor of the classroom.
"We ask that anyone who
wants feedback on a particular
poem bring seven to ten copies
said Makuck, so other members
may critically evaluate the work.
Or you can just come to listen.
The Forum meets at 8 p.m. on
the first and third Thursdays of
each month, in Mendenhall. The
first meeting this semester will be
held Thursday night in room 238;
thereafter, meetings will pro-
bably be held in room 248.
conclusion that a large, hairy,
elusive biped conveniently called
Bigfoot has determined North
Carolina as his new stomping
grounds. Literally.
The term Bigfoot in itsdf is
quite wrong for this odd spedes.
The name implies a singular
creature, which is false, as proven
by the variety and number of
clues found by individuals seek-
ing them. The definitive, proper
tide has always been Sasquatch,
from the Indians, meaning
"hairy giant That, it seems, is
definitely appropriate. Sasquat-
ches vary just as people do in
size, height, wdght, color, and
shape. But just as man has deter-
mined the average size for
himself, so have we for the Sas-
quatches.
The mean description of
Bigfoot is given as follows:
Height, approximately ten to
twelve feet erectly standing;
weight, about 890 pounds to 1200
pounds; arms, seventy-two inches
each; chest size, between 190 and
240 inches; long flowing body
hair usually brown or black; a
flat nose; protruding eye teeth;
reflective reddish eyes; leathery
skin; and a distinct odor that
lingers long after the hosts'
departure. The trademark, of
course, is an immense foot size
ranging from 17 inches to a max-
imum of 23 inches in length, with
Woods
an eight inch width. Clearly, the
creature emanates pure, unbridl-
ed strength, quickness, alertness,
and a provocative aloofness from
man.
(When I first started in-
vestigating these reports 5 years
ago, I laughed and snickered a
lot. But I had, as I hope you
have, a thought in the back of my
mind that would not let me ac-
cept the fact that the creature was
fantasy.
Repeatedly I have been shown,
been given, read, examined and
heard evidence that is factual,
tangible, and completely within
the realm of scientific proof. I
finally drew the conclusion that
many have held or are just now
accepting. Something is definitely
prowling our forests, and it's big.
If you've followed this far, allow
me to present some evidence.)
People may wonder what kind
of impact a creature from Nor-
thern California could have on
North Carolina. As stated
before, this is not an isolated
case:
August 6,1976: Roger Hoff-
man of Mount Holly witnesses a
seven-foot hairy creature cross a
path leading to his creek, from
his front porch. He pursues the
creature with a rifle and shoots at
it.
See SASQUATCH, page 12
The Review
Game Theory Debuts
By D. A. SWANSON
and duets, which come through
nicely on this song, but by far
most effectively on the best cut
on the LP, "Regenisraen
If any song gets heavy airplay
on college radio stations, I hope
it will be this one. With crisp
acoustic guitars, three part har-
mony and quiet, flute-like
keyboards, this song sounds like
it could have been one of the
Led Zeppelin's Stairway
Heaven.
To
Take your standard club band
from San Frandsco, put them in
Mitch Easter's Winston-Salem
studio (The Drive-in), with Mitch
behind the board, and you get
Game Theory's debut album,
The Big Shot Chronicles. For bet-
ter or for worse, that about sums
this album up, with a few excep- songs from GodspeB. Its appeal
tions of course. On one hand is almost eerie, along the lines of
Game Theory heavily reflects the
San Frandsco new wave sound of
the early eighties (Times 5, Sud-
den Fun, The Symptoms). On the
other hand there is the trade
mark stamp of producer Mitch
Easter with all of his whispy
guitars and vocals. Actually it's
not all that bad a mix and I like it
quite a bit more than Easter's
own band, Let's Active.
Among the better cuts on this
sometimes wonderful album is
the opening song,
Tomorrow The
heavily electrified acoustics, and
the vocals are just coarse enough
"Here It Is
guitars are
There is something for
everyone on this album, with
cross-overs from the Jethro Tull-
like orchestration of
"Regenisraen" and "Like A Girl
Jesus
"Make Any Vows" and "Never
Mind Give it a chance; this
band may just grow on you.
And as long as we're talking
about North Carolina's number
two producer we might as well see
what the number one Tar Heel is
doing. Don Dixon, formerly of
the best N.C. band of the seven-
ties, Arrogance, set up shop this
summer in New York to work
with The Smithereens on their
first album, Especially For You.
Though Dixon's hand is apparent
in the production of this LP, the
heaviest influence on these New
Jersey boys has got to be Elvis
Costello and Marshall Crenshaw.
If I hadn't seen the name on the
album I would have sworm
EspeciaOy For Yom was a collec-
tion of old, unrdeased Costello
cuts.
The style is straight up
poprock with some nice, mean
guitar riffs thrown in for good
measure. Nothing earth-
shattering here; just some fun
easy-to-listen-to music. The
to, as WZMB's Dave
EUiot cails '� 'Easter's paisley balance is just riant betw�L,l!c
June to bass, and swinging bop of the
about this band are the two part and "Crash Into
vocals used both as harmonies straight up progressive rock on
See RECORD,
tq$4ftf&&1m' � � ii�b�MMM���.�.Mfc� ?��.�,
��� 00il0tmf0nim0





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 16. 1986
NEW YORK (UPI) - Frank
Sinatra idolized Humphrey
Bogart but had a secret affair
with his wife, Lauren Bacall, as
Bogart was dying of throat
cancer, an unauthorized
biography of Sinatra says.
In another juicy tidbit from the
second excerpt of the book
published in People magazine
Sunday, actor Peter Lawford is
quoted as saying Sinatra thought
Nancy Reagan "was a real right-
wing John Birch Society nut �
BLOOM COUNTY
Darker
dumb and dangerous
Sinatra unsuccessfully tried to
block the book, His Way: The
Unauthorized Biography of
Frank Sinatra, by Washington
journalist Kitty Kelley. It was
written without his cooperation
from interviews with associates,
colleagues and other sources.
Kelley said "there was no one
in Hollywood Frank admired
more than Humphrey Bogart"
but by the fall of 1956 "Frank
was involved in a secret relation-
ship with Lauren Bacall
Bogart died Jan. 14, 1957, and
during that year Sinatra was fre-
quently seen with Bacall. But
Bacall told Kelley it wasn't until
March 11,1958, that he proposed
marriage.
Bacall accepted and told a col-
umnist before Sinatra could of-
ficially break the news, so enrag-
ing the singer he didn't speak to
her again for six years, Kelley
wrote.
The excerpt also said that dur-
by Berke Breathed
ing the 1950s and 1960s Sinatra
introduced John Kennedy to
several women. One was Judith
Campbell, a woman who com-
plained Sinatra's sex parties were
"too kinky
According to the book, Ken-
nedy and Campbell were set up
by Sinatra in Las Vegas in
February 1960 and had a two-
year affair that featured twice-a-
day phone calls and several
"romantic interludes" in plush
hotels around the country while
Kennedy was president.
The book also describes several
other Sinatra affairs, including a
spate of liaisons following his
divorce from Mia Farrow with
Hope Lange, Lois Nettleton and
Victoria Principal.
r
Tequila Bar
j Weekly Specials
Sunrise Sunday: $2.00per serve
Melo-Mondays: $2.25 per serve
Toasty-Tuesday: $2.25 per serve
Wednesday: $1.75 Pirates Cane Muitney
Tonic Thursday: $1.75 per serve
Fried Friday: Get Fried Early at
our new Attitude Adjustment hour at
4:30; end the night upside down!
Saturday Night Specials
"House Drink � Tequila Blues
(Look for our new "Lagoon " Bar)
Located Outside
WE. 5thSt.
752-8926
PROBLEM: Where do you FIND
� Social Activity?
� Leadership Development?
� Academic Success?
� Intramural Sports?
� Lifetime Friendships?
RUSH SCHEDULE
TUESDAY:
ANSWER
The Usuals
Rock-N-Roll Rush Blowout
KAPPA
SIGMA
FRATERNITY
For Those Exceptional Gentlemen Serious About A
Lifetime Committment To Excellence
WEDNESDAY:
Formal Rush
Assistance by the Sigma Sigma Sigma
Sorority
A
KAPPA
SIGMA

THE MOST
WANTED
MAN IN THE
COUNTRY
WHERE:
Kappa Sigma House
700 East 10th Street
(Beside Darryl's)
TIME:
7-11 pftl (Tues. and Wed.)
Kappa Sigma
Pride In Excellence
" -1 "nun "i�irtTir�alli'�i"iiiHiwaxM�tmt-i�" i
����
�m,0�m'�t'im mimt"m-m 'mm �i r� �� m -����� m ���
Classifi
CHI OMEGA: Hope oo e
ourselves or Friday g-� nil j
EPS
RUSH SIGMA PHI EPSILON:
guys interesTec ! - . 'nrou
fraternity rush are .nviteo to cor
by the Sigma P Epsion mou
located a' 505 E 5 St (across rroJ
the Art BlagFor more inform
tion can 757 0487 Sgma P'
Epsilon. A Step Above Tne Res
HOPPER: You neea c s'oc - -
arouno 't couia Be cangeraus
SUICIDE CLUB �
members Mee' '�g
rVtenaenhaii roof toca. a 5 p np
RUSH ALPHA SIGMA PHI Cc
meet the Brotrers az " e S s'ei
of Alpha Sga p- from 1
Tonight! An a Vacess "3c�
Races Post Time 8 3C NO OECOf
AOTT'S: Congra's. a" am I e e
AOTT peages We "ac a gree '
Friday rugnr. rr, rigs gol a
though'1 log- � a6-c
another encounter a Hi � ex �
Brothers of Apa S ga p"
RUSH SIGMA TAU GAMMA V
Sanaoa' Pa T�e5 CasS-
Wed Chicken Picked T�u
Ant ma! House a S sa Tat Gemrn
we stress ic ca hj -
AZO'S: Pref night ana Ca
tentnea ere aesce but �
and our "ew ceages are Wh
The Bromers ol p Kappa A c-
Pl KAPPA PHI: Congr3 aons o
the football v ctory The e ga-
t Sunaay at 7.
PI KAPPA PHI: Rush tor � a' I
Rotary Club bes ce Te AO"
For more format OTI ca '5e I7C
Pi Kappa Phi- tne u' -a'e n �-a"?
nat life!
ZTA: Congrats on a, ngitlt I
your "V" Pref night Grea Ddr"(f
You were the best! Delta S gs
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA: CO!
GRATS TO THE NEW S GMAj
AND TO THE OLD ONES T
PREF NIGHT WAS KILLER 1
BEST PART WAS YOU AE �
PARTIED VEGA DE.UXEI
SUPREME TILL THA SEx
MORNING. THEY AL HEARD Ui
SCREAM. WE JAMMED AND A i
DANCED WHILE THE NIGH TWA!
ENHANCED. THE MAI TA
WERE JUST GREAT AND IT JUS
GOES TO SHOW, PREF WITH TM
S1GMAS. WAS TRULY OUR FATi
E SINCERELY THANK VOV
AND LET'S DO IT AGAiN: SOOf
(LIKE MAYBE TONIGHT! OV
THE BROTHERS 0 AP�
SIGMA
iimuinniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiuiitiiniMtiiiiiuiiiiiiil
DE
H
?UllltHIIIIIIIIIIUIIItUJIIIIlilillllllllllll!l!lillllllHll
is currently
I is now lo
I
JsSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSi
J





ker Side
in
Hush
Kennedy was president.
The book also describes several
other Sinatra affairs, including a
spate of liaisons following his
divorce from Mia Farrow with
Hope I ange, Lois Nettleton and
Victoria Principal.
ila Bar
Specials
r serve
serve
r serve
ane Muitney
r serve
rly at
ur at
uila Blues
ar)
E. 5th St.
52-8926
h
DULE
fj�2.Z" -jV I�

&
Is
'lowout
Y:
ush
Sigma Sigma
ouse
eet
V
d Wed.)
igma
Hence
Classifieds
CHI OMEGA: Hope you enjoyed
yourselves on Friday night. The Sig
Eps.
2TA: Congratulations and best
wishes to the Beta pledge class of
Zeta Tau Alpha. Ya'll are simply
terrific. Get psyched for Thursday
night. Aloha! The Alpha Class.
RUSH ilGMA PHI EPSILON: All
guys interestea in yumy mrough
fraternity rush are invited to come
by the Sigma Phi Epsilon House
located at 505 E. 5th St. (across from
the Art Bldg.). For more informa
tion call 757-0487. Sigma Phi
EpsilonA Step Above The Rest
BOTT: Come and be reborn with the
BETA'S at the new BETA THETA
PI house. 13th and Cotanche St.
MonThur. 7 until. "Once a BETA,
always a BETA
HOPPER: You need to stop hanging
around it could be dangerous.
DELTA IE A: Pref night was
great. Let's party again. -T.K.E.
HEY BOURGEOIS: Why do you
need all the wild women at ECU
when you could have the TIGER??
NEED A D.J.T: Are you having a
party and need a D.J.?. For the best
in top 40, beach and dance call
Morgan at 758-7967. Reasonable
rates. References on request.
SUICIDE CLUB: Looking for
members. Meeting on top of
Mendenhall roof today at 5 p.m.
K.M Had a great time Saturday
and I'm looking forward to doing it
again Soon! B.V.
RUSH ALPHA SIGMA PHI: Come
meet the Brothers and Little Sisters
of Alpa Sigma Phi from 7-11
Tonight! Animal Madness- Rodent
Races Post Time 8:30 NO DECON.
AOTT'S: Congratulations to the new
AOTT pledges. We had a great time
Fnday night, things got a little Hot
though Looking forward to
another encounter with you -The
Brothers of Alpha Sigma Phi.
BROTHERS OF SIGMA PHI EP-
SILON: Your Little Sisters would
like to wish you the very best of luck
during rush!
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER-
VICE: Word processing. The
Dataworks specializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertions,
theses, resume's and more. All work
is computer-checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary. Rates
are as low as $1.75 per page, in-
cluding paper (call for spedific
rates.) Call Mark at 757-3440 after 7
p.m.
RUSH SIGMA TAU GAMMA: Mon:
Sandbar Party, Tues: Casino Night,
Wed: Chicken Picken, Thurs:
Animal House at Sigma Tau Gamma
we stress individuality: Rush.
AZD'S: Pref night and Camp Con
tentnea were awesome, but you girls
and your new pledges are the best.
The Brothers of Pi Kappa Alpha.
PI KAPPA PHI: Congratulations on
the football victory. The next game
is Sunday at 7.
PI KAPPA PHI: Rush tonight at the
Rotary Club beside the AOTT house.
For more information call 7581700.
Pi Kappa Phi- the ultimate in frater-
nal life!
ZTA: Congrats on making it through
your "V" Pref night. Great party.
You were the best! -Delta Sigs.
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA: CON
GRATS TO THE NEW SIGMAS
AND TO THE OLD ONES TOO,
PREF NIGHT WAS KILLER, THE
BEST PART WAS YOU. WE ALL
PARTIED MEGA-DELUXE-
SUPREME TILL THAT NEXT
MORNING, THEY ALL HEARD US
SCREAM. WE JAMMED AND WE
DANCEDWHILETHE NIGHTWAS
ENHANCED. THE MAI TAIS
WERE JUST GREAT AND IT JUST
GOES TO SHOW, PREF WITH THE
SIGMAS, WAS TRULY OUR FATE
WE SINCERELY THANK YOU,
AND LET'S DO IT AGAINI SOON!
(LIKE MAYBE TONIGHT!) LOVE,
THE BROTHERS OF KAPPA
SIGMA.
A.L.M.AOTT'S: The hard work
paid OffCONGRATULATIONS!
S.K.S.
SCUBA DIVERS: All interested in-
dividuals are encouraged to attend:
F inal nominations and elections will
take place. Future dives and trips
will be discussed. Please attend
Thurs. the 18th in Brewster 1st floor
"B" wing at 3:30 p.m.
THE KNIGHTS OF SIGMA NU:
Would like to extend an invitation to
all males at ECU who are interested
in becoming a Greek. Tues. and
Wed 8-11 p.m. at Jones cafeteria.
For Rush Information call 758-0870.
THE KNIGHTS OF SIGMA NU: Are
having their Fall Rush at Jones
Cafeteria, from 8-11 p.m. Tues. and
Wed. All males who are serious
about being Greek should attend.
758-0870 for information.
THE KNIGHTS OF SIGMA NU: Will
be having dinner Thurs. night at Piz-
za Hut on loth St. at 8 p.m. Brothers
and Little Sisters should attend.
Brothers will be having a meeting
Sunday night at 9:30 p.m. in
Mendenhall 221. For info, call
758 0870.
SIGMA NUII: The house may be
gone, but not the Pleasuredome
It's moved to 409 E. Eastbrook!
Woo Ace, The "Defender of the
Faith"
SIGMA NU LIL SISTERS: Will be
having a meeting Sunday night at
8:30 in Mendenhall. This meeting is
very important, because the upcom-
ing HI sister rush will be discussed.
For info, call 758-8711 or 758-0870.
FOR SALE: Brother Electric
typewriter, built in correction, pica
and script ball elements, carrying
case. Good condition, $85. Call Bet-
sy. 752-4973 or 758 2874.
TYPING ALL KINDS: $1.25
page. Call 752 2100 after 6 p.m.
per
WATERKD FOR SALE: King size
waterbed ro sale. Semi-waveless,
heater Included. Less than 6 months
old. Headboard included. $250. Call
758 9768 after 12 noon. Ask for Craig.
MUST SACRIFICE: Sunn Coliseum
Slave Amp, 900 watts, $250 or best of-
fer, Sunn 8 Channel Mono Mixing
Board, $150. Call Reed after 6, (919)
237-3094.
FOR SALE: 10 speed Columbia
Bike. 21" frame. Cleaned and
overhauled. $50. Call Anne at
756-8040.
$60 PER HUNDRED PAID: For
remailing letters from home! Send
self-addressed, stamped envelope
for informationapplication.
Associates, Box 95 B, Roselle, NJ
07203.
DISC JOCKEY: Self proclaimed
lowest rates for your party, function
etcWidest selections of tunes plus
lights The TRASHMAN'S DJ ser-
vice et. al Dial 752-3587 anytime.
NEED A D.J.T: For the best in top
40, beach and dance. Call now for
Homecoming parties, cocktails or
formals. 758-1700 or leave name and
number at 758-4591.
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc. Call
Anne at 752-3015 and leave a
message.
JMLL
FREE KITTENS: One male and two
females. Call 752-8674.
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SERVICES: Typ-
ing resumes, term papers, thesis
papers. Call SDF Professional Com-
puter Services Inc 106 E. 5th St.
(near Cubbies) Greenville. 752-3694.
I������
ARE YOU 1
INTERESTED IN . . .
So, Delta Sigma Phi I
Could Be For You! I
510 E. 10th Street f
Leadership
Scholarship
Social
Involvement? I
DELTA SIGMA PHI
I WHERE LEADERSHIP DEVELOPS 1
THROUGH BROTHERHOOD f
FOR MORE INFORMA TION 1
� Mon. � Meet Delta Sigma Phi Night I
(7-11 p.m.) I
� Tues. � Tropical Paradise 1
1 (7-11 p.m.) 1
� �mil�J
I

I
I
Magazine-
The Minority Affairs Publication of East Carolina Un
XO Sir 3. � �' CAROLINA UNIVERSITY GREENVILLE NC?783- 'EL tSK 1&8B)
i versify
is currently under new management and
is now looking to fill the following
positions:
Editor
Features Editor
Photographer
Staff Writer
Apply in Media Board Offices Now!
ssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssl
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 16. 1986
11
TYPING: Professional service at
low rates includes: proofreading,
spelling and grammatical correc-
tions; 12 yrs. experience; familiar
with all university formats. Cindy:
757-0398 anytime after 6 p.m.
FOR SALE: Living room furniture:
couch, chair, ottoman, coffe and 2
end tables. Excellent condition, S400.
Call 752 1444 daily or 758-9122 nights.
$50 REWARD: For information
leading to the identification of the
white male responsible for a hit-and-
run, 2 bike accident, Friday morning
(12th) at 9:54 a.m. involving a
female student adjacent to Graham
Bldg. Please call 757 6232 or Campus
Security.
LIFE'S A HEALTH AFFAIR: Spend
a healthy afternoon with us at the
2nd Annual Life's a Health Affair,
Wednesday, Sept. 17 from 3-6 p.m. at
Mendenhall Student Center. Fun,
games, exhibits, free give-a ways.
Sponsored by the West Area
Residence Council, Student Health
Service, and Intramural-
Recreational Services.
WANTED:
Staff Illustrator
The East Carolinian is looking for an all
purpose illustrator. Art majors and those with
experience are preferred. A portfolio is
required. Call 757-6366 or stop by the
Publications Building.
II �
C�mEdy Zpne
ATTENTION: Tutor needed for In-
tro, to Logic 1500 immediately.
Please call David at 752-1182.
WANTED: MALE DIVERS FOR
THE ECU DIVING TEAM. An ex-
cellent opportunity to be a varsity
athlete. Call John Rose or Rick
Kobe at 757-6490.
jejtYW'?vT-
LOST: Heavy gold braided bracelet
wheavy clasp. Of great sentimental
value. Reward of greater worth of-
fered. Please call 752-3774 or
758-4809. Lost between central cam-
pus and 3rd. St.
JOB WANTED: Man desires job as
houskeeper or attendant for the sick.
Non-smoker, non-drinker and have
good references. 752-6079.
WANTED: Energetic, loving person
to have fun with happy 6-year-old
girl. Must have car 2.15-7, 3-5 days
per week. Right person will enjoy
swimming, bike riding, and fun with
our child. Night and weekend hours.
Also needed at times. Near ECU.
Phone 756-7007 and leave a message.
REWARD: Free trip to Daytona,
plus commission money. WANTED-
Organized group or individual to
promote the number 1 Spring Break
trip to Daytona. If interested call
DESIGNERS OF TRAVEL,
1-800-433-9074 immediately!
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Christian atmosphere, responsible 2
bedroom condo. in Treetops. $150
plus utilities and phone. Call Beth
756-6320, 756-2724, or 758-3471 Ext. 240
(NCNB).
THIS WEDNESDAY AND EVERY
WEDNESDAY WE WILL NOW BE
ADMITTING AGES 18 AND UP.
ADMISSION SPECIAL
��� ONLY $2.00 UNTIL 9:30
BRING A FRIEND IN FOR FREE
UNTIL 9:30
Don't Drive. Call the Liberty Ride.
For More Info Call 758-5570
Ml .BC Perm.
WHERE
WHEN YOU'RE IK A
RUSH
PI KAPPA
Tuesday-Thursday
September 16-18th
Rotary Club mmmnmm
For More Info Call:
758-1700
�i m m- i trfHdfi
�h . - ,iT, � m . ��. �, �� - XJ- "� -





12
-52THE EAST CAROLINIAN SFPTfmppp
16, 1986
Frisbee Dogs Have Come Into Their Own
WASHINGTON (UPI) - Well
why not? Why not a national
competition to determine the best
Frisbee-catching dog in the land?
After all, we have a national
competition to determine the best
professional football team. So
why not one for dogs with as
much leaping ability as corner-
backs?
Much the same question must
have occurred to Irving Lander
of Encino, California, back in
1974 as he was watching a
baseball game in Dodger Stadium
in Los Angeles.
Suddenly, in the eighth inning,
a strange object appeared on the
playing field.
Was it a bird? Was it a plane?
No, it was Alex Stein, an Ohio
State student, and his Frisbee-
catching dog, Ashley Whippet.
For a few moments, while a
pitcher was taking warm-up
tosses, using a baseball, man and
dog held the crowd enthralled.
Then they were hustled off the
field and Stein was thrown in jail.
Small wonder he was arrested.
As Lander described the incident,
the dog didn't have a ticket. But
Stein arranged to pay the $250
bail and the rest, as they say, is
history.
Ashley went on to win the
Frisbee-throwing championship,
staged by Lander, three times.
I had lunch with Lander before
Sunday's finals of the 1986
Gaines Cycle Ashley Whippet In-
vitational, which he directed at
RFK Stadium during halftime of
a pro football game between the
Washington Redskins and the
Los Angeles Raiders.
Stein was one of the judges, as
was Peter Bloeme, a professional
Frisbee thrower. (Yes, Virginia,
there are Americans who make a
living that way).
Ashley, who could jump nine
feet in the air after a flying disc,
died last year of old age. But
Lander assured me a dog doesn't
have to be a whippet to compete.
Entries come in all sizes and
shapes and breeds, he said, and at
least three ex-champs spent time
in dog pounds.
As a matter of fact, Lander got
his own two dogs from a pound.
One, he said, is pretty good at
catching flying discs if there
aren't too many distractions,
such as squirrels.
rut i i
Lander, who is writing
Ashley's biography, is the author
of a booklet titled Teaching Your
Dog To Catch a Flying Disc.
A dog, he said, has to become
attached to a disc, as it would to
"a ball or an old sock One way
to accomplish that is to substitute
a disc for "the usual feeding and
watering" bowl, he added.
Not many owners feed their
dogs balls and old socks. Some
dogs, Lander cautioned, "take
more patience than others
Some, apparently, go for squir-
rels, instead.
He suggested engaging the
canine in a tug of war with a disc
"just as you would with an old
sock or rag and rolling it (the
disc, not the dog) along the
ground in the beginning.
He also pointed out that suc-
cessful "teamwork" may depend
on the owner's throwing arm.
He recommended the "basic
backhand" but conceded a
"power grip" may be needed in
competition.
Lander said nothing about a
Frisbee-catching child but I
recommend teaching your offspr-
ing to crash gates.
Lecithin May Be Good For Memory
(UPI) � A common food ad-
ditive made from soybeans im-
proves memory in older people
and may have important uses in
the treatment of Alzheimer's
disease and other degenerative
neurological disorders, resear-
chers say.
Lecithin not only replenishes
an important vitamin the brain
needs to operate but also appears
to recuperate aged brain cells,
said Israel Hanin, a Loyola
University pharmacologist. It
may even reduce the risk of
gallstones, he said.
But research is still
preliminary, warned Hanin,
chairman of an international col-
loquium on lecithin beginning to-
day
"It's always important to
temper whatever you say with
'may' or 'possibly' and not go
around saying you have a new
wonder drug he said. "The
reason for this conference is not
to unveil a new magic bullet, but
to try to investigate the problem
thoroughly
Scientists from 14 countries
were to meet in Chicago yester-
day to discuss the latest findings
on the soft, waxy substance,
derived mostly from soybeans
but also found in corn, egg yolks,
butter and other high-fat foods.
Among the papers to be
presented is a study by a West
Sasquatch Thought
To Prowl Locally
German researcher of men and
women over the age of 45 that
found that high doses of the
substance significantly improved
performance on memory tests.
A study by an Israeli scientist
indicated lecithin may keep brain
cell membranes more supple and
open to communication with one
another. A City University of
New York study found lecithin
may help keep the liver healthy,
reducing the risk of developing
gallstones.
Hanin sa;d lecithin also may
have important therapeutic value
because it is a rich source of
choline, a member of the vitamin
B family and building block for a
vital neurotransmitter called
acetylcholine.
Choline decreases with age and
is also depleted in the brains of
people with certain neurological
disorders. Once lecithin is
digested, it releases choline into
the blood, which in turn
replenishes the brain's supply.
"Lecithin appears to be effec-
tive in a number of diseases,
Alzheimer's disease being only
one of them Hanin said, ad-
ding Parkinson's disease, Hun-
tington's chorea and
schizophrenia as other examples.
"But it's not being used as
therapy at this point. It's more
experimental

43
Freshman quarterback Charlie Lil
passes for 170 yard, looks for �
Continued from page 9
September,1976: Jim Holl-
ingsworth, a Goldsboro
therapist, views a similar
creature, and spends the next six
years tracking its 18-inch, 3-toed
prints in Chatham County, and
the Cape Fear River area. He gets
close, but only hears its
"deathly" scream at night.
prints are found in a vegetable
garden by Mrs. Brody Parker of
Farmville. Some vegetation had
been eaten, and a split rail fence
had been demolished.
September, 1975: 18-inch foot-
There are several more cases,
1600 in fact nationwide, and 23
within North Carolina. Some of
these cases will be covered in The
East Carolinian in upcoming in-
stallments, along with more
j- , evidence. These cases are all
t.�COrCl BV documented accessible to the
- public, and researched by ex-
0 . f Perts. By publishing these
Sftllt rLPYPPtl C reports, experts hope to en-
amu"c' crtrna courageppktodiscussstrange
incidents like these in the open
and not lightly.
NEXT ISSUE: How close to
your home?
Reviewed
Continued from page 9
drums. Especially representative
of the Costello influence is
"Cigarette The Hammond
organ, high hat, tamborines and
lyrics sung in a mellow, tinny
tenor, would fit perfectly into
Costello's Punch the Clock.
Besides employing the help of
Dixon as producer, pianist, per-
cussionist, and background
vocalist, The Smithereens went
all out with guest performers. On
the best cut on the LP, "In A
Lonely Place Frank Christian
is featured on classical guitar,
Jeffrey Berman on vibraphone,
and Suzanne Vega on back-up
vocals. You might remember
Vega as one of the biggest media-
hype stars from last year, whose
album just plain petered out in
the record stores. I won't say
anything about that album, but
perhaps her niche in the music
world should be as a back-up
singer. Her quiet, crisp soprano
voice is the perfect complement
on this Joe Jackson styled, sw-
ingjazz tune. I love it. It has
dark, smoky nightclub written all
over it. These guys won't rock
your socks off or anything, but
they do know how to write some
good old standard rock songs.
Looking ahead, this Fall
should be a very good season for
progressive, popular, and even
heavy metal music enthusiasts.
The new Talking Heads album,
True Story, should be out this
week. Look for them in next
Tuesday's edition of The Review
and listen for them on WZMB's
"Adventures in Modern Recor-
dings" on Monday nights. Also
in next Tuesday's column we'll be
looking at the new Beat Rodeo
album, Home In the Heart Of
The Beat, and possibly the new
LP from the Dead Milkmen, Eat
Your Paisley. For you head-
bangers out there, be warned that
former Alcatraz guitarist Yngwie
J. Malms teen has just released a
new album, Trilogy. And for
anyone else, yes! Boston has
finally found their way through
the jungles of copyright and will
release 3rd Stage around
September 19th.
Thanks to WZMB and
Dangerous Dave Elliot for their
continued assistance and sugges-
tions in the production of this
column.
Irates
b scon COOPER
KAPP
r
22PJS25E OF SOUTHERN GENTLEMEN
RUSH
7:00-11:00
Each Night
TUESDAY
"THEPLAAD" 1986 Va
Battle of the Bands
Champions
Tri-Sig Sorority Night
WEDNESDAY
"WAX IMAGES"
Chapel Hill's hottest new
band.
THURSDAY
Char-broiled Chicken Picfcin.
Pickin. By Invitation Only.
UL' SB RUSH
Sept. 22, 23 & 25
Forridt ond information p4o�� coll 757-0128 or 752-2124 ond w pro locotod of 500 Eotf 11th St
Solid As
Jnnior Anthony Simpson, who i
day, rambles to score one of Us two I
r i
A
i
-
n
J
���i�m� mm i�i igw i� ���





12
Frisbee Dogs Have Come Into Their Own
i M h. is the authoi
? itied leaihinxour
�- u� j a 11 trig iM
' '� ome
� ' One wa
ubstitute
��- balls and ol I
gs, Land
re path
Sol!
He . .
.
Lecithin May Be Good For Memo
1
-
I
Sasquatch ihoughi
To Prowl Localh
&
Reco r
nith

T i
� H

the
- In the It .
I
. . t f . i
Trilogy nd I
I
t
StuKe a
ji
WZMB �
i Elliot 1
I �
n the production I I
STRIVING FOR EXCELLEN
Highest Fraternity GPA On Campus Wf
2nd Runner-Up Chancellor's Cup
ENTER THE TRADITION � PI KAPPA,
SEPTEMBER 15-17 7:00 PM THE ATTIC
- ��5h
KAPPA ALPH

L"E-HOME OF SOUTHERN GENTLEMEN
RUSH
7 00 1 I
Nighl
TUESDAY
rHC PLAAD" 1986 Va
' f the Bands
Cha is
� - � r i ig
WEDNESDAY
"WAX IMAGES"
Chapel Hill's hottest new
band.
THURSDAY
Char broiled Chicken PK fc
Pickm By Invitation Ok
UL' SIS RUSH
& � ! & . k
For rides and information please call 757-0128 or 752-2124 and we are located at 500 East 11th St
I :gj
da
.





ir Own
He recommended the "I
eded a
'powe B be needed in
x.i � hing about a
- child bul 1
i
Memory
NCE
PA ALPHA
"HE ATTIC
A
ITT
�i
v
5fcW
i
-
��
g
.
:
be
seases
� � ad


r
-i 0)
A� � i'0 n 1 1-� Ur la 3. c :re a: 0 Ig
�:��ino

v.
s
1
C
EMEN
UL' SIS RUSH
SePt 22, 23 & 25
11th St.
fHEEASl CAROi 1NIAN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 16, 1986 Page 13
Hearthregftng Defeat
West Virginia Downs Pirates 24-21
K Mot tuA kt .i . . .
fTMhman r�-�� l u JON JORDAN - ECU PHOTO LAB
resnman quarterback Charlie Libretto, who connected on 12 of 22
asses for 170 yards, looks for a receiver down field.
By RICK McCORMAC
& SCOTT COOPER
oru Ml Ion
The Pirates lost a heartbreaker
Saturday night as West Virginia
came from behind in the final
seconds to defeat ECU 24-21
before a Ficklen Stadium home-
opening record crowd of 33,857.
Mountaineer quarterback
Mike Timko, who completed 20
of 34 passes for 234 yards, con-
nected with junior split end
Harvey Smith with :06 seconds
left to play, concluding a 69-yard
drive in the last minptp-and-a-
haif of the game.
Freshman quarterback Charlie
Libretto directed the Pirates on a
six-play, 65-yard drive capped off
by an Anthony Simpson seven-
yard romp into the endzone. This
Irates Win
gave the Bucs a 21-17 advantage
with 1:26 remaining for what ap-
peared to be the winning score.
"That was the best game we've
played since I've been back at the
was very
disappointed in the
loss, but I was
extremely proud of our
players
�Art Baker
school Pirate coach Art Baker
said. "I was very disappointed in
the loss, but I was extremely pro-
ud of our players
Indeed, Baker had the right to
be proud. The ECU senior-
dominated offensive line showed
their power as the Pirates racked
up 438 total yards against a tough
West Virginia defense.
Junior fullback Anthony
Simpson led the Pirate ground
game with 96 yards on 17 carries
and a pair of touchdowns.
Sophomore Reggie McKinney
collected 92 yards on just nine
rushes, including a 63-yard
touchdown run in the first
period. Senior Pat Bowens con-
tributed 59 yards on seven carries
while Tim James added 21 yards
on four rushing attempts.
West Virginia coach Don
Nehlen said that, "Simpson was
the best inside runner and blocker
that I have ever seen ECU
coach Baker also praised the
Pirates' leading-returninR rusher.
"In addition to two touchdowns
rushing, he (Simpson) had a great
night blocking Baker said.
"Anthony is an unselfish team
player and he is really starting to
assume a leadership role on this
team
As strong as the Pirate ground
game was, the passing game was
as equally impressive. Libretto,
who connected on 12 of 22 passes
for 170 yards, set a school record
by completing passes to 10 dit
ferent receivers. McKinney led
the way with three receptions for
46 yards while nine others each
caught a pass.
Although the Pirates domiated
the game statistically, once again
inopportune turnover speiled
See MISCLES, page 15
By SCOTT COOPER
' � Sroti, KAtor
ECU's Irates won the consola-
ion bracket in the Summer Fall-
lltimate Tournament in
Wilmington Sunday by defeating
�he University of Virginia.
The Irates competed in the
two-day tournament with seven
rther teams from around the area
NC. State. Mr. Pouce (pro-
lounced po-os, a team mainly
nade up of college graduates
from ihe Durham area), UNC-
Wilmingto . Appalachian State,
UNCCharlotte, Winston Salem
and Virginia.
Although it was a two-day
tournament, the Irates were in-
formed of the event late, and
decided to make the trip to Wilm-
ington on Sunday (for the con-
solation bracket).
The Irates, led by just seven
players, include John Bradv,
John Welch, Bob DeMan, Greg
Jackson, Mike Dwyer. Ron
Smith and Richard Willis. Eric
Shearer, who usually plays with
the Irates, did not want to make
the trip, and according to team
members was "lazy, tired and
wouldn't get out of bed to make
the two-and-a-half hour trip
On the serious side, the Irates
competed in two games after they
were put in the consolation
bracket. They handily deafeated
N.C. State 15-5 in the semifinals
and then rallied past UVA 13-6 in
the finals. The Irates were award-
ed a trophy in recognition of their
Netters Thrash UNC-G
accomplishment.
"It went surprisingly well. It
was a jammin' day Jackson
said Monday after the tournma-
nent. "We've got a new team
that's going to get a lot better
Mr. Pouce, who was the best
team on the east coast last year,
won the tournament as UNC-
Wilmington gave them a run for
their money. Three first-year
Irates were singled out bv DeMan
for their perfomances in the tour-
nament. "Mike (Dwyer), Ron
(Smith) and Richard (Willis)
played .incredible DeMan ex-
plained. "They didn't play like
first-year rookies. It's nice to
play with people like that � than
know what's going on.
"We were put in the consola-
tion bracket and we were pro-
bably better off (in terms of
competition) DeMan said of
the tournament. "They're (the
first-year people) the reason we
won � and that everyone else got
better (since last year). We've
never had people practice two
weeks and play as good as thev
did
The Irates will be hosting their
own tournament on Sat. Oct 4
and 5 in Greenville � the
Ultimax XIII will take place at
the bottom of the College Hill as
the Irates will try to repeat last
year's championship.
However, look in Thursday's
paper for an article on the newly-
constructed frisbee-golf course in
Greenville.

An intense Art Baker eyes the
By DON RLTLEDGE
Sports �rtl�f
The ECU women's tennis team
scored an impressive 7-2 victory
over a hosting UNC-Greensboro
squad Saturday.
It was the first match of the
tson for the women and coach
-it Sherman was "very pleased"
' the play of her squad in the
tuning contest of 1986.
"The whole team played very
veil Sherman said. "Some of
players were a little bit tight
-tart, but were able to make
the adjustments necessary accor-
ling to the person they were plav-
g
The Lady Pirate netters won all
but one of their singles matches
o gain a 5-1 lead before the
loubles play even began. They
�vere equally as tough in doubles,
lotching two of three wins there.
There were some close three-set
matches in both singles and
doubles, and the women showed
maturity and guts to win handily.
: 'oach Sherman felt the ladies
itandled the pressure well.
'In tight situations, for the
most part, we were able to win
the big points she said.
The women will play their first
home match on the Minges Varsi-
ty Courts on Wed. Sept. 17.
The following are the match
results for the women vs. UNC-
Greensboro.
Singles
1. D. Fusiano (UNC-G) d. L
Eichholz 6-1, 6-7, 7-5
2. A. Zeimer (ECU) d. M. Riz-
zollo4-6, 6-0, 6-1
3. T. Myers (ECU) d. P. Wilson
2-6, 64, 7-6
4. M. Swaim (ECU) d. J. Hauck
6-1, 6-1
5. H. Murray (ECU) d. L.
Kuchenbecher 6-2, 6-2
6. S. Montjoy (ECU) d. A.
Mikaclian 7-6, 6-2
Doubles
1. EichholzZeimer (ECU) d. Fu-
sianoWilson 6-2, 6-3
2. RizzolloAshby (UNC-G) d.
MurraySwaim 6-2, 6-3
3. MyersMontjoy (ECU) d.
SheppardKuchenbecher 6-2,
JO JORDAP
action Saturday night.
ECU PHOTO I IB
5-7, 6-2
Burton Leads Women
In First Women's Meet
c.
Almost Anything Goes Champs
The Lmsted Terminators defended their Almost Anything Goes
Championship of a year ago compiling a total of 31 points See
page 15 for more on IRS action.
Solid As A Rock
Junior Anthony Simpson, who rushed for 96 yards on 17 carries Satur-
day, rambles to score one of his two TD's against the Mountaineers.
Simpso
By TIM CHANDLER
Sport, Writer
"Anthony is an unselfish team
player and he is really starting to
assume a leadership role on this
team
Those words were spoken by
ECU head football coach Art
Baker at his weekly press con-
ference Monday. Baker was
speaking of the Pirates standout
junior fullback Anthony Simp-
son.
Not only did Baker praise
Simpson for his leadership of the
team on the field, but he also had
nothing but good words to say
about Simpson's offensive out-
put in last Saturday's game
against West Virginia.
Simpson led the Pirates in
rushing for the game with 96
yards on 17 carries. He also
scored two touchdowns in the
losing cause.
But life as a fullback is not all
rushing. Fullbacks are called on
often to block for the tailbacks
and according to Baker, Simpson
showed greatness in that category
Saturday also.
Simpson, a native of Brooklyn,
N.Y shares time at the fullback
with senior Pat Bowens and
sophomore Tim James, but that
doesn't seem to bother him.
"It doesn't bother me at all to

Team
By TIM CHANDLER
AvtaUM Sport, Edhor
The ECU women's cross coun-
try team competed in its first
event ever over the weekend and
finished in fifth place out of the
seven-team field.
The men's cross country team
also competed in the event, which
was called the Pembroke Invita-
tional.
The women's event was won by
Winthrop College with a total of
68 points. Campball finished se-
cond with 69 points while UNC-
Wilmington was third with 75
points. ECU took the fifth spot
with 100 points.
Annette Burton was the top
finisher for the women, as she
finished second overall with a
time of 19.28 over the five
kilometer course (just over three
miles.)
Terri Lynch was next for the
Pirates, in 14th place with a time
of 21.29. Jill Gorenflo's time of
22.31 put her in I7th place, uhe
teammate Carol Moore took the
29th spot with a time of 25.21.
Lucratia West rounded out the
scoring for the women as she
took the 38th spot with a time of
242.
The women had just enough
runners to participate in the
event, as a team has to have a
minimum of five to compete.
Currently there are seven
members on the women's team,
however, injuries sidelined two of
head coach John Welborn's run-
ners.
In the men's event, the Pirates
placed seventh place out of the
15-team field, South Carolina
won the event with a team core
of 18 points, ECU ended up with
160 points in the event.
The top finisher for the Pirates
was Mike McGeehee. who finish-
ed in the 23rd position, as he
posted a time of 28.08 over the 5
See X-COL NTRY, page 15
(Bowens and James) are ready to
play and they go out there in
practice and prepare themselves
just as I do. Just being around
those guys makes me try harder
Simpson, who is the Pirates
leader rusher returning from last
year (488 yards on 119 carries),
says that his goal for the football
team this season is for them to be
winners.
Although last year at this point
in the season ECU was 2-0, Simp-
son still feels that this year's team
is better than last year's.
capable of and what I'm asked to
do and I remind the guys to do
the same stated Simpson.
Simpson had praise for the
Pirates freshman quaterback
Charlie Libretto, whom he said
he also tries to help to keep a cool
head in games when the going
gets tough.
"I tell Charlie in the huddle
'just keep your poise and do what
you've been doing stated
Simpson.
Simpson said that the West
Virginia game really hurt him and
"Knowing what we did against
West Virginia helps us to prepare
better for Auburn Simpson
said.
Simpson expresses the main
goal for his life is to be successful
at whatever he does. When asked
if he had dreams to play in the
NFL, Simpson said he wouldn't
mind playing if the opportunity
ever arose.
Simpson listed short term goals
as graduating from ECU "and
hopefully contributing to a winn-
ing Pirate football team.
"Anthony is an unselfish team player and he is
really starting to assume a leadership role on this
team
�Art Baker
"I think we are better this year the other players, but now it is
than last year because there is time to look to the future
more team unity this year, com- "It (the West Virginia loss)
rnented Simpson. "Right now we really hurt us commented
know what we are capable of, Simpson. "Knowing that we were
we ve just got to start winning that close to winning and not do-
Simpson, who started seven of ing it really got us down. But
the last eight games for ECU last now it is time to put that game
season, when asked about being a behind us and get ready for the
team leader said that he just tries next game (against Auburn)
try to keep everybody thinking
positively and do what is suppos- Although ECU lost the game in
ed to be done heartbreaking fashion Saturday
As far as being a team leader, night, Simpson felt that the team
spht t,me Simpson said. "They I just try to do the things that I'm had leameeat deaT
Sports Fact
Tues. Sept. 16, 1930
St. Louis Cardinals pitcher
Flint Rhem earns the best-
excuse- for-missing-cur few-
award. Staggering into the
team hotel late and drunk,
Rhem claims he was kidnapped
by Brooklyn Dodger fans and
forced to consume large
Iamounts of alcohol so he'd be
unable to pitch the next dav
fThis actually happens to be a
serious problem for the sports
department at the East Caroli-
nian on pre-production days
from time to time. However
JneVe learned to take special
Iprecautions to try to control
this type of reader-retaliation ,
I 0 g �rt �-i-r �)��





14
JTHEEAST CAROLINIAN

SEPTFMBER 16, 1986
INDT
Pant.onj a f available t� Industrial
technology maiors with maior manutactur
"g corporations (or spr.ng in; Exc�tl�n'
� np�r,enc. gooo salary ana poss.blr
academic cr-�ji� Contact p Barrett cooc
Educ 313 Raw!
NORTHERN TELECOM
S'udentj nteres'ea in CO op.ng a' Nor
them Telecom Research Tr,angle Park
shoulo contact coop Eouc is soon as poss
ble Positions tor CSCI INDT DSC I MKTC.
and Technical Writing rnaiors with a ?�
G P A For more info, contact Cnoperat'v
Education 313 Rawl
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Will be holoing ts secono meeting on Sep'
17 at 3 p m in Rawi 302 All business ana
business eaucat.on maiors (ana those in
'ere�ted in business) are invited to atteno
NCSTUDENT
LEGISLATURE
Vo.ce your op n.on' The East Carolina
Delegation to NCSl will hole weeki,
meetings or won at 7 p rn Room 212
Menoenha1 Newcomers very welcome1
Questions or information call Cora on a'
S 63�2 The Campus vo.ee
MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR
ANNATEDJADINATA,
There will be a memorial Service on vn
Sept 22 at 4 p m n Room 244 of Menoenha
in honor of Anna Tea:aOinata who oec n
Greenville on June 12 i�8� ��a �JS -
terna'ionai tfudcnl from i naones a ma Or nu
�n Account,ng Students faculty staff anc
frienas are nv.tpo 'c s'V-1
SOCIAL WORK CRIMINAL
JUSTICE
A' persons
members of NASA Of
afteno a mPe g of I
p m The meet ig r
'OCiby 0 Menoenhfl. ft
ea maiors are n 'ec I
e s tea
CORSO sr
' pi Srr'
rVa �s
ntena
SCUBA DIVERS
Ail n�ere5ed -c, v aua s are encouraaec
�o attena F nai nominations ana .��.� ng
win take place Future dives a � � .
aiscusseo Please atvc Tt rs iepl 18 n
Brewster 1st floor "B W.nq at 3 30pm
PRIME TIME
Sponsored by Campus Crusafl
We get ?ogetH�' every Thura a
B'ewster Roorr iqj g Three
"ave fun te'Owsh c a-c
'eaching See you there
METHODIST
M . PRESBYTERIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Come to the Method s' Student C entei SOI
E 5th st across from Ga"e" Sorm �� v
Wed - g'aMp " anoeverrWed night � �
a Oei cous a- you can ea' home
mea; w th a short program at'erwa-as Tti s
week V ke Mamer w speak abou' W ��ips
for Peace ana the N caagua s tuat on
Meais 11 50 witti 'eserva' or J2 a' 'he ooor
Can 75 2030 tor reservations Sponsored D�
Presoy'er an ana We'hocis' ChPlS
Ministries
WITNESS FOR PEACE
Mike Hamer a recent memper of a
Witness tor Peace team tha� went to
Nicaragua will share his experience ana
views as the program tor the wea Supper a-
'he Me'hoa.st S'uoen' Ctr (501 E 5tn S'
across from Garrett aormi 5 p m Mea s
II 50 with a reservation (758 2030) or J3 00 ��
the aoor
ALTERNATIVES
SCRUPLES
Looking for something afferent to ao on
Friday nights? The Met hoe is' Stuaen' C'r s
sponsoring "alternatives" to the bar scene
This week we will challenge our consciences
with the new game. "Scruples " Do you have
any? Come ana fna out F" 6 30 Methodis'
Student Ctr . 501 E Fifth st across from
Garrett dorm
ECU AMBASSADORS
There win be a general meeting for an am
bassadors on Wed . Sept 14 at 5 15 ,n the
Multipurpose room of Menaenhaii
POWIA
The ECU Veterans Club will sponsor a
candlelight vigil m front of Joyner Library n
Natl POWMiA Recognition Day. Sept 19
!� at 7 p m The purpose of the vigil is to
focus attention towards the 2.434 men ana
women still unaccountea for In Southeast
Asia smce the ena of the Vietnam War
Through the pers'Stant eaucation of the
American public on this topic we will bring
this almost forgotten issue to a satisfactory
resolution The ceremony will consist of the
lowering of the POWV ' flag at sunset
sounaing Taps, ana reading the names of the
11 North Carolinians who are St.11 hstea as
POWWlAv Any person or group who would
like to enhance this ceremony m any way
should contact j.m Reid at 75 0333 after 6
p.m. or Mike White at 752 2051 after 5pm
Everyone is invited to attend Bring candles
and a friend
ECU FACULTY
STAFF CLUB
Applications art now being accepted for
any permanently employees faculty or staff
member of at least part time status to join
the ECU Faculty and Staff Club Activities
include receptions, dinners, cookouts
tailgate parties, recreational activities and
morel Call Linda Barkand at 6454 for an ap
plication form For all members - there w.H
be a tailgate party this Saturday before the
ECU vi West Virginia game
ASSERT! VEN ESS TRAINING
A three part workshop ottered to students
at NO cost by the University Counseling Ctr
Thurs , Sept 25. Oct 2 and All three ses
s.ons will be conducted from 3 p m 4pm
in 312 Wright (7576441) The workshop will
focus on helping members distinguish bet
ween their assertive and nonassertive
behaviors. Participants can learn how to ex
press themselves directly ano jpenly, and
respond to Interpersonal situations in a man
nr which neither comprimlses individual
beliefs nor offends others PLEASE CALL
COUNSELING CTR FOR REGISTRATION
(757-4441)
' r.
Announcements
NAACP
e it
Thpr t- a
Thurs Sep' 18
721 Menaenhaii
quested
� eel ng n the naacp or,
98 at 5 00 p m in Room
V Out attendant � s re
2ND ANNUAL L'FE'S
A HEALTH AFFAIR
A be held Wed Sept 17 from 36pm at
Menaenhaii Special giveaways wii be
ava .ibip Sponsor ea by the West Area
Resiaence Council Stuoent Health Ctr ami
�� amul a Ret reat.onai Ser vt es
FORENSIC SOCIETY
There will In- a' If gei �' ' �� a � � � '
Ac! Sept 17 r Room j4 , ,t�, ji
Arts BlOy Ah those interested I let a
public speaking or .nterpretat
P'antoa'tena Our t.rst tournamr"
ea for West Virg.n.a It you i�,e a dues
t'ons, i an Jan.ce SCinihfi at 35S 71�i
Star y Stroupe a' 'S8 884A jo.n the
where trave and npetil hand n
hand
CAPP
Central Amercan �ea � � ectw
Wed Sept 17 at 7 p �� at 109 N ia- .
���� ested pei s � - sf � id atte 6
� � v ��� Hamet at (30 0349
ROTARY INTERNATIONAL
� " � North Ca a
' � ' icand ��� s for an an expensj �
Stralia I i a- I f . � . n �
week! �� : ants must b
less nai w � betwet ���.�� � �
ay not be ret a
' ' ' ' � st have s: �
'� � � � � � a � -
ilia the g 11 .
" ' ' ' � 1 ind ' ���
� �� �
pose ol � .
. �
"� '� � 11 st should
' � ' � � � 209 W �� � - �
� '� � � N( 27858 lay pi 1 '58 U t
EDUCATION MAJORS
� net 'sit haptet � �. g its
bershii drive and � , �
ei ' g Thurs Sep' 18 4 0C c
129 All s'ude's nterested
� fed 1 attet : . tost
� .�fl . s v�A, 1 . . j . . . ,
a- � � - � � � �
� � � ibie at this 1
PHI ETA SIGMA
� - r. �
1 14at tp n
A � �
you a
ECU SJ �
PRICES EFFECTIVE 1
WE RtSERVE THE R4
SAV A CENTER IN GREENVI1 I t
(See store for details;
Double Coupons
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat�Preduce, Deli, Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current Week Food
Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality.
jP
CHUNK LIGHT IN OIL OR WATER
�Tuna
��n"
Mr
M:
vtuoie 11
6.5
02. can
48
c
LIMIT rVO WITH ADDITIONAL SiOXX) OR MORE PURCHASE
Fryer Breast

LY PACK � FRESh
JUICY FRESH
Dole Lemons
t&Q
TOWf IS,
k&JH
per Towels
I
LIMr ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
$10 00 OR MORE PURCHASE
REGULAR-BUTTER
Crisco Shortening
3 ,b 168
can �
LIMIT ONE OF YOUR CHOICE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVtRYDAY LtW-PRlCf
LAR-LIGHT
Stroh's Beer
499
ctn. of
15
ASSORTED
Pepsi Cote
2 it.
Almos
B DIMSr KUMfM
ia i.
"Aimo! Anvthinj I
come a n d .
Debuting �
1986. ove �-
and !j"
of mx f
event-
for exa
possible �
tame
Via. ktr- c
Ba
pion?
-V mstead renninata
tail �
� Champ:
;of 31 :
: though, m Mnk;�
. final
i Scott often
: a score I 2f
mine li
tie break
the Bank W d,�
One The Other �in
and �
p 11 r - a'
Tr-
dav a
and
dec Mm i nvt
GoeA
t ucir
The Yinkies (kftl took second-
(hght finished in third-plait M
m
OPEN SUNDAY 7 A.M.�11 RM. SS'S;1VrS: 703 GREENVILLE BIVD. � OPEN 24 HOURS





I �
bleC
urrent Week Food
lit
A!�st �ythin8 Goes Champions
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 16. 19M 15
ByDENISECROMER
�HMTWMhi
Almost Anything Goes" has
:ome and gone once again.
Debuting this past Wed Sept 3
1986, over 160 students, faculty
and staff enjoyed a funfilled day
of mx (6) different and unusual
events. The blindfolded keg roll,
m example, which was made
possible by Bud I ight represen-
'ame I eigh Jeffreys and Chris
Via, kept everyone in stitches.
Back again for a repeat perfor-
mance were the defending cham
pions from last vear, the
I instead Terminators Thev re
:ained their title as All Campus
Champions b compiling a total
oi 51 points. In close second
though, were the Vankies with a
nal score of 28 points.
Scot! C'otten finished third with
i score of 25 points. To deter-
mine the fourth-place finisher a
:ie breaker was needed between
he Bank Walkers and the Other
Ones The Other Ones prevailed
jnd finished the das with 22
points and a fourth-place finish.
The fun and excitement of the
da) was shared b participants
and spectators alike. T-shirts
decorated bv "Almost Anything
(,oes" were given to all par
ucipating teams. All trophies and
t-shirts as well as some equipment
for events were compliments of
Jeffreys Beer and Wine Company
and Bud Light.
Are you interested in com-
peting with other colleges in
various sports activities on a non
varsity level? If so, we have what
you've been looking for � Club
Sports! The Racquetball Club
will be holding an organizational
meeting for anyone interested.
Please call for additional infor-
mation. Maybe canoeing is more
along your lines. The Paddeling
Club will hold an organizational
meeting on Sept. 17 at 5:00 p.m.
in room 105-C Memorial Gym. If
vou're the type that enjoys
organized weight training you'll
be glad to hear that the Weight
Lifting-Training Club will meet
on Thurs. Sept. 18, at 7:00 p.m.
in room 105-C Memorial Gvm.
Club Soccer is kicking off
another great season. All women
interested in playing should meet
at the fields behind the Allied
Health and Social Professions
building at 6:00 p.m. Mon.
Thurs. If you have any questions
about Club Soccer, feel free to
contact Renee Flassette at
758-9997. All enthusiasts as well
as those interested in learning
about these sports are welcome!
Alpha Sigma Phi vs Zeta Beta
Tau
John Naughton, the Alpha Sig.
quarterback, threw a beautiful
35-yard touchdown pass to Scott
Gibbs for the first score of the
game. The Alpha Sigs scored
again when Scott Bowen in-
tercepted a pass from the ZBT's
and went the distance for the se-
cond score of the game. The final
score was Alpha Sig. 28 � ZBT
O.
Kappa Sig. vs Sig Tau Gamma
Quarterback Rusty Willey of
the Kappa Sigs connected with
Johnny Rodnquez for the first
touchdown of the game. Then, he
again connected this time with
Kurt Kolesher for one more T.D.
In the second half. Willey took
the ball himself 35 yards to put
the game to rest with a Kappa
Sig. victory 18 to zero.
Kappa Alpha'B' vs Sigma Phi
Kpsilon B
Unbelievable defense on both
teams parts made for a very ex-
citing game. But, finally, in the
second half the Sig. Ep's scored
on a satetv to leave the K.As
shut out 2 to nothing.
Watch this column for results of
your favorite team!
The Yankies (left) took second-place in the Almost Anvthin. r
(right, finished in third-place 1,h a scor of 25 pcWn K eVent M P�ints �M tt Gotten
Now Hear This! Each
residence hall team may include a
maximum of two (2) non -
reidents for volleyball, flag foot-
ball, softball and not more than
one (1) non-resident for all other
team sports.
A non-resident is defined as
any player who resides either off
campus or in another residence
hall. Residence hall students may
participate within the indepen-
dent division or the Fraternity or
Sorority divisions.
In an attempt to provide the
programs and services that you
want, the Department of
Intamural-Recreational Services
has developed a comprehensive
representative structure. In order
for this communication network
to become effective, we need
some dynamic sports-minded in-
dividuals who want to know the
inside scoop of what's happening
in our Department.
As a representative, you will
serve as the vital link between our
Department and your organiza-
tion; having the unique oppor-
tunity to voice your concerns, ad-
vocate policy revision and imple-
ment new programming.
Representatives are needed from
the following areas: Men's and
women's residence halls, co-ed
residence halls, men's and
women's independents, frater-
nities, sororities, medical
students and faculty-staff.
In addition, the Advisory
Council, which serves the depart-
ment as a policy procedure and
protest board, has serveral vacan-
cies for new officers. For applica-
tions and additional information,
please drop by the main office in
204 Memorial Gymnasium.
For all who putter around, if
vou really want to tee-off, our
putt-putt tournament is for you.
This year, putt-putt will be a
special event rather than a major
team sport. Registration will be
Mon Sept. 29, with the team
captain's meeting on Tues Sept.
i '��
30, 5:30 p.m. in Brewster C-103.
First day of play is Mon Oct. 6.
See you on the greens!
Splash into the intramural
Swim Meet! Registration is
Mon Sept. 29. Team Captain -
Individual participant meeting is
Tues Sept. 30, 6:30 p.m. in
Brewster B-102. Events consist of
the following: 50 vard: freestvle.
backstroke, butterfly, breastroke
100 yard: freestyle,
backstroke, butterfly,
breaststroke, t-shirt relay, inner-
tube relay, individual medley
200 yard: medley relay,
freestyle relay.
Trying to maintain their titles
as both All Campus and
Fraternity-Sorority Champions
will be Lambda Chi Omega and
Zeta Tau Alpha.
The Steak That Made Us
FAMOUS!
AtAme- i N - teakhouse
the steaks are cut fresh daily Ou'
No rfoM sagenerous tender
�.�� ten beef Flame t�
exclu � Seneawnot
brea I I ikedpotatt ��� �
Half Price Special SI. 99
Tuesday, September 16th
'10
LB
mmm
t-CII
I
I
9
99j

LUNCHEON MEAT
li'Ji� 1 � Ml
1202. i�ITT iTij i � � i , a
I'miU' 'fVJ
fc
tage Cheese
t2 02
ctn.
FLAV-O-fUCN
79
e Cream
WA
OPEN 24 HOURS
at East Carolina
Recipient of the East Carolina Greek Scholarship
A ward for the last two years.
TKE at East Carolina was awarded the Most Improved
Tau Kappa Epsilon chapter in the nation for 1986.
RUSH
IT
Located at the bottom of College Hill
The House With The Purple and Gold Tree
TKE
BE A PART OF IT
Call 757-3042 for Info





16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 16. 1986
Miscues Cost Bucs
Continued from page 13
doom for the Bucs.
"We had so many oppor-
tunities for us to have won, it
shouldn't have come down to
that last play Baker said. "We
just turned the ball over and
dropped passes � and you can't
do that.
"They're (the players) heart-
broken and I am too Baker
said after the game. "I thought
they played great and I'm really
proud of them
In additon to the turnovers, the
Pirates failed to convert on three
straight third-and-short situa-
tions in the second half.
"The one thing that disap-
points me more than anything is
the third-and-short situations
that we missed Baker explain-
ed. "Those are the situations you
want to be in offensively and we
just failed to convert. We gave
them the ball for too much time
in the third and fourth quarters
Defensively, the Pirates held
the Moutaineers to 197 yards on
54 rushing attempts, an average
of 3.6 yards per carry. Senior
linebacker Bubba Waters led the
way with 15 stops (12 unassisted).
Junior Vinson Smith had 11
tackles as free safety Ellis
Dillahunt made nine stops.
Defensive tackle Walter Bryant
added eight tackles (six
unassisted and two tackles for
loss) as John Williamson, Essray
Taliaferro, Medrick Rainbow
and Roswell Streeter made six
tackles apiece.
Although the Pirates lost the
battle, coach Baker was pleased
with the play of his team, their
never-say-die attitude and the
home-field crowd support.
"I really appreciate our
players' attitude Baker said in
the lockerroom. "They were real-
ly in a good frame of mind. We'll
try to regroup and pick up where
we left off
"I hardly ever notice the
crowd, but that was the most
noise I've heard in Ficklen
Stadium since I've been here
Baker acknowldged. "People en-
joy seeing football like it was
played Saturday night, and we're
going to try to play that way
every time
The next game for the Pirates
will be this Saturday, when ECU
travels to Jordan-Hare Stadium
to face Auburn University.
X-Country Seventh
Listen for Pirate Talk on WZMB 91.3 FM for the
latest word in ECU football as well a look at other
college and professional gridiron happenings.
Hosted by WZMB's Mike McVey with guests Scott
Cooper and Rick McCormac.
Sunday mornings at 11:50 am
New
All-American Food Baism
Meats
Salads
Hot Vegetables
Breads
Desserts
All For Only
$3.89
Dozens of delicious choices.
Fill your platter and come
back for more as often as you
likeThe All-American Food
Barsm�loaded with everyone's
favorite foods.
Quality meats, all-natural salad
selections, hot vegetables, hot
breads, tempting desserts. The
All-American Food Barsm�now
there's even more to enjoy at
Western Steer.�
Because You Want An
All-American Family Meal
sm
Z
IWestern Steer
Family
STSAKKOUSE
�1986 Wjstern Steer-Mom 'vt Pbfs, Inc.
3005 East 10th Street
Greenville, N.C.
Willie Powell (�bove) s�cks WV�S Mike Timko as Waiter Bryant
(below) wraps up a Mountaineer back while Vinson Smith (44) Ken
Portis (93) and Gary London (7) converge.
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED HELP?
Why not coma by tha REAL Crtala Irttarvantton Cantar 312 E
10th St; or call 7W-NELP, For Fraa Confidential Counseling or Aa-
alatan
Our Volunteers and Staff are on duty 24 hrs. a day, year around
In order to assist you In virtually any problem area you might have
Our longstanding goal has always been to preserve end enhance
the quality of life for you and our community.
LICMtMd And Accredited By The State ot North Carolina
Continued from page 13
kilometer (just over 8 miles)
course.
Milton Matheny, the top
finisher for the Pirates last week
in the Campbell College Invita-
tional, was right behind
McGeehee with a time of 28.08 to
capture the 24th spot.
Matt Schweitzer was next for
ECU, in 38th place, with a time
of 28.45. Rob Rice's time of
28.55 was good for 41st, while
Russell Williams, who finished
54th, rounded out the scoring for
the Pirate runners with his time
of 30.29.
The men took a total of seven
runners to the event, however,
two of the runners were unof-
ficial and there scores did not
count.
Those runners were Pete Hig-
gins and Scott Johnson. Higgins
finished with a time of 29.55,
which would have been good
enough for fifth among the
Pirates scores had it been official.
Johnson finished the event with a
time of 3 .13.
Coach Welborn said that he
was very pleased with both the
men's and the women's teams in
the event.
"The men's team is continually
improving and we have a good
nucleus to build on said
Welborn. "The women also did
an outstanding job. I didn't see
any way (before the meet) that we
could finish that well
Welborn went on to talk about
the outstanding performance that
Burton, a senior, turned in for
the women's team.
"It was unbelievable that she
could run that well against girls
from other schools that have
scholarship programs stated
Welborn.
For Burton it was her first
competition ever in cross country
according to Welborn. "She has
never ran cross country in college
or in high school said Welborn.
Welborn went on to praise his
assistant coach Steve Thomas for
his work with the team.
"He has done an outstanding
job with the team said
Welborn. "He came here (ECU)
after coaching cross country at
Greenville Rose High School and
is doing a fine job
The next meet for men's and
women's teams will be this Sat
Sept. 13,attheUNC-Wilmington
Cross Country Invitational. The
distance for the event will be
eight kilometers for men and five
kilometers for the women.
Look What Surfaced
A f
Ham & Cheese
Bologna & Cheese
Ham, Salami &. Cheese
Every Tuesday Is
College Night
7 p.mU p.m
99C SUBS
Your Choice of
Not Valid On Deliveries
60 Oz. Pitchers $1.99
11 a.mll p.m. 752-2183
Pepperoiu, Salami & Cheese
Turkes & Cheese
Ham, Turkey & Cheese
itlmtn in
215 E. 4th St.
WIN
Register To � V I II
Pirate Football Tickets
2 Pairs To Be Given Awai
For Each Home Game Registei
Register To WW I W
Pirate Football Tickets
2 Pairs To Be Given Away
For Each Home Game Register Now!
Register To WW III
Pirate Football Tickets
2 Pairs To Be Given Away
For Each Home Game Register Now!
KROGER ALL MEAT OR
All Beef
Weiners
12
Oz.
Pkg.
KROGER 2 LOWFAT
OR HOMOGENIZED
Whole
Milk
Qt.
Ctn.
DIET PEPSI.
PEPSI FREE OR.
Pepsi
Cola
Ltr.
NRB.
NATURAL LIGHT
Beer
612 02 cans
$2�
SPRINGDALE CHOCOLATE
DRINK (1 GAL), OR
Kroger
Orange Juice
USDA CHOICE
BONELESS WHOLE
Gal
Ctn
QQO Sirloin Tip
Lb
$128
WISE
Potato
Chips
6V2 oz bag
99C
MILLER LITE
Beer
24pk12ozcans
$
9
95
Lb.
Bag
NEW CROP
RED OR GOLDEN
Delicious
Apples
99
STOKELY PEAS
Green Beans
or Corn
WHITE MOUNTAIN
Wine Cooler
3
16
Oz.
Cans
$
1
COUNTRY CLUB
4pk
$
2
29
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised
items is required to be
readily available for sale In
each Kroger Savon except
as specifically noted In this
ad. If we do run out of an
Item we win offer you your
choice of a comparable
item when available
reflecting the same sav-
ings or a ralncheck which
will entitle you to pur
chase the advertised item
at the advertised price
within SO days Only one
vendor coupon will be ac
cepted per item
Go Krogering
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
Copyright 1�M
Kroger sav-On
Ouanoty Moms �ewrvte
None som To Dwwrt
�on
� �
aetofc�i�e �m�mt fc .rsr-mvmmi,m � �
J





Title
The East Carolinian, September 16, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 16, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.492
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy