The East Carolinian, September 11, 1986







�hE
(Earoliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.61 N0.5
Thursday, September 11,1986
Greenville, N.C.
18 Pages
Circulatioa 12,000
ECU Football Team Placed On Probation
By SCOTT COOPER
l .v ywrlt KdJtor
The East Carolina football
program has been placed on pro-
bation by the NCAA for one year
because of rules violations that
occurred during former head
coach Ed Emory's tenure.
However, the team does not
face any sanctions during the
probationary period.
The probation penalty, which
began Sept. 4, is no more than a
simple 'slap on the wrist
Basically it is a public reprimand
and censure toward the program.
There will be no restrictions on
scholarships, recruiting, televi-
sion appearances (the game
against Miami, Fla. will be
televised nationally on WTBS) or
post-season contests, according
to ECU Chancellor John How ell.
The NCAA required that ECU
develop a rules-education pro-
gram for athletic department
employees, and submit a progress
report to the NCAA bv Jan. 1,
1987.
"When 1 first saw evidence of
what had happened, I had a sink-
ing feeling at the pit of my
stomach Howell said. "I was
not sure of the seriousness of it
all. But when 1 saw they were
minor infractions, I was
relieved
The penalty, which Howell
called, "as mild as they (NCAA)
could make it in today's athletic
climate
The infractions occurred from
1979-84 under former coach
Emory, who was abruptly
dismissed in December of 1984
for unspecified reasons. In
�XMwtfc� Baaory yrowiAadl the
following March to file a $1.4
million suit against the universi-
ty, Howell and Athletic Director
Ken Karr � claiming breech of
contract.
Emory later settled the suit out
of court for $139,000.
The ECU report submitted to
the NCAA showed the following
violations:
�Three checking accounts were
maintained for the football pro-
gram that were not authorized by
the university.
�A freshman football player
was allowed to participate in a
junior varsity game under an
assumed name so he would not
lose a year of eligibility.
�Graduate assistant coaches
were used to recruit off campus.
�An athlete's bill for a written
examination was paid for by
Emory's account.
�A payment was guaranteed
for several athletes' tuition bills.
�The arranged purchase (on
credit) of two golf shirts, a jacket
and hat for 60 members of the
football team at a sporting goods
store in Wilson. To date, 30 of
these have not been paid for.
Emory had denied the allega-
tions in a report, which the
university submitted to the
NCAA last April.
Howell said ECU told the
NCAA of its investigation and
then met with officials of the
NCAA in Kansas. The NCAA re-
quested a revised report to be sent
to the committee. The report was
completed in January.
A hearing was held in Col-
orado Springs, Colo in August,
with both the NCAA and ECU
officials agreeing that a small
number, of "minor, technical
violations of NCAA Legislation
had in fact occurred Howell
said.
Howell stated thai the NCAA
informed him of the penalties on
Sept. 3, and that he told the
See NCAA page 15.
Before and After
J � NUMIItT - TH1 .AST CA�OL
INIAM
During his reign at ECU, former coach Ed Emory (left) committed plays its first Home game Saturday against the West Virginia Moo-
numerous miniscule rules violations, causing the NCAA to put the taineers at 7 p.m. Tickets are available at MendenhaD Student
ECU program on a one-year probation as second-year head coach Center and Minges Colliseum.
Art Baker (right) and his Pirates begin their 1986 season. The team
Job Placements
Center Assists In Future Careers
Cunanan Lobbies For
Student Financial Aid
By PATTI KEMMIS
News Editor
According to Steve Cunanan,
SGA president, approximately 75
percent of the students at ECU
would not be able to afford the
education they are now receiving
if it were not for financial aid.
Cunanan and 15 other SGA
presidents from the UNC system
are now in Washington, D.C.
lobbying for financial aid.
"The purpose of our trip will
be to voice our concerns about
the mounting problems within
financial aid Cunanan said in a
press conference Wednesday.
Cunanan is meeting with the
Secretary of Education, William
Bennett, Senators Jim Broyhill
and Jesse Helms, and all of the
N.C. Congressmen.
"We hope they will remember
our visit next time a vote comes
up said Cunanan, "We want
them to be aware that what they
are doing is affecting the
students
Cunanan commented that he
felt ECU's Financial Aid Office
has been doing an excellent job.
The backup in the financial aid
process this semester has been
blamed on a new process of veri-
fying applications.
"The Federal Government has
consistently altered the regula-
tions that this office (Financial
Aid) must follow and has created
unnecessary delays by changing
the rules after the game has
startedCunanan said.
He added, "students are
frustrated, they need their
money
According to Cunanan, the
campaign to simplify the finan-
cial aid process will not stop with
the trip to Washington.
"A lot of people aren't sure
this is something we should be
lobbying against because it is a
political issue said Cunanan,
"Education is not a political issue
� it's an investment
By CAROLYN DR1SCOLL
Assistant News Editor
Now is the time for seniors and
graduating seniors to register at
the Career, Planning and Place-
ment Service, according to
Furney James, director.
"The biggest question with
seniors he said, "Is 'What do
we do now?' If they come over
here, we'll tell them what to do
and how to register with us
The services offered by CP&P
are free. To register, students can
pick up a packet at Bloxton
House, fill out the information
and return it. The packet includes
a resume (either a form resume or
your own) and three forms of
faculty references.
Once registered, students are
on a mailing list and will receive
information on firms who will be
coming to ECU to interview
seniors, beginning October 7.
Their resumes, once on file, may
also be sent by CP&P to
employers who contact them
seeking information on
graduating seniors.
Record Enrollment
By DEANNE COOPER
Starf Writer
For the 1986 fall semester,
ECU has a record enrollment,
14,464 students.
According to J. Gilbert Moore,
registrar, this total includes
12,058 undergraduate and 2,406
graduate students. The total
number translates to 6,232 male
students and 8,232 female
students.
There are several good reasons
why students are choosing ECU.
"East Carolina's reputation is
getting better said John M.
HoweU, ECU Chancellor, "East
Carolina has been ranked seventh
out of 158 comprehensive univer-
sities in the South
Charles Seeley, director of
undergraduate admissions, said
he thinks students are staying in
school longer and working harder
t their education.
"Twenty years ago if you
didn't graduate in four years, you
were nuts Mr. Seeley com-
mented But, this is no longer
the case
Although there are more
students on campus, the
egistrar's office is not having
problems with excessive paper-
work. Mr. Moore said this is
because computers are more
widely used.
This year, some students may
have experienced difficulty with
class scheduling. However, the
problem is not within the
registrar's office, it is because of
limited classroom space. Next fall
the problem of limited seating
will be somewhat alleviated when
the new classroom building is
scheduled to open.
Some students also had dif-
ficulty being placed in dorms.
This problem was mostly en-
countered by male students since
women's housing outnumbers
that of men's.
No plans are currently being
implemented to build more hous-
ing because off-campus housing
arrangements seem to off-set on-
c am pus placements, said Mr.
Dan Wooten, director of housing
operations. There will, however,
be a change in the ratio of men's
beds to women's.
ECU is the third largest univer-
sity in North Carolina in terms of
enrollment, making it an attrac-
tion for many students.
James notes, "Many firms
recruit in the fall but do not come
back in the spring because
they've already interviewed
enough applicants
Recruiters, he said, come from
many different fields. Among
some of the firms whose
representatives will be on campus
in October are Burlington In-
dustries, Electronic Data Systems
(EDS), Price Waterhouse,
Deloitte Haskins and Sells, and
Sherwin Williams.
According to James, on the
average, of all of the students
who use the services at CP&P,
70-75 percent find job placement.
"Getting people motivated on
this is the main problem. Our ad-
vice to the students is � for your
own benefit, don't procrastinate,
don't put it off - start now said
Jim Westmoreland, assistant
director of CP&P.
The importance of registering
on time is echoed by Laura
Cobb, who graduated in May
1986 with a degree in
mathematics.
She saidI have been looking
for a job, but I can't get past the
receptionists in the offices I've
been to
Cobb, who graduated with a
3.9 GPA continued, "I never
bothered to fill out the forms
here (at CP&P); I figured I'd be
able to get a job as soon as I
started looking. But now I'm
hoping I can get some help here
On the other hand, her hus-
band Scott, who graduated in
May with a degree in industrial
technology and a minor in
business, is employed at a job he
got through an interview at
CP&P.
He said, "I never realized how
easy I had it while I was here,
with CP&P setting up interviews,
and offering workshops. I watch-
ed a lot of people sit back and do
nothing, but I had a job when I
walked out of the graduation
ceremony
He added, "You have got to
take advantage of it while you're
here, because you don't realize
now how tough it is once you get
out
We cannot say it enough, the
year goes so quickly. Seniors do
not have that much time left,
James said.
Westmoreland said, "We want
to make this enjoyable. If we can
help students get started, they'll
realize that there are a lot of op-
portunities out there. We en-
courage students to come in and
take a look at the materials we
have. If they have questions, we
want them to feel free to stop in,
although sometimes an appoint-
ment is a good idea
In the upcoming weeks, CP&P
wll be holding workshops for
writing resumes and going on job
interviews. The times of the
workshops will be posted around
campus as well as in Bloxton
House.
In addition to helping seniors
and graduating seniors, CP&P
offers information that may be of
interest to underclassmen, said
James.
"We have a lot of career infor-
mation that has been useful in the
past in helping students decide on
a major or field of study he
said.
Bloxton House is located between
Greene Dorm and Mendenhall
Student Center.
Illegal Cablevision Offenders
Could Face A Serious Penalty
By LESLEY DEES
Start Writer
The illegal hookup of cablevi-
sion by off-campus students liv-
ing in apartments is "becoming
quite a problem according to
John Pait, general manager of
Greenville Cable TV.
Although students are not the
only lawbreakers, they make up a
large percentage of the offenders,
according to Pait.
Cablevision theft, which is a
state and federal offense, carries
a serious penalty.
"For the first offense, we
usually go back and disconnect
the cable said Pait. But he
adds, "We have prosecuted a
few. The second offense is handl-
ed by the courts and the offender
could be sentenced to jail and
have a permanent criminal
record
Greenville Cable TV is now us-
ing equipment that can detect an
unlawful hookup without having
to make periodic checks at apart-
ment complexes.
Illegal cablevision hookups are
not only detrimental to the of-
fender, but also to other cablevi-
sion users.
"It interferes with the picture
and signal levels of other
subscribers' cable explained
Pait.
The rate for basic cablevision,
which is channels 2-13 is $13.05
per month.
One person using cablevision
illegally for a year adds up to
$156.60. All of the illicit hookups
make up a tremendous loss by the
cable companies.
In order to make restitution for
the loss, rates are increased for
the paying customer.
"Anytime someone is doing
something illegally like that, it
always pushes the rates up for
our paying viewers Pait said.
Pait feels that the idea of "get-
ting something for nothing" is
extremely unfair to those who are
paying for their cablevision.
Pait said, "They think they're
getting over on us (cable com-
pany) but we know what's hap-
pening
ON THE INSIDE
Editorials.
Features
4 �Students offered ski trip,
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.15 �Ecsteni power West Virvtek ia.
H ades FkUca Sta4aai Sa
.13 for ECU'a hoaae
SPORTS page 15.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 11, 1986
Sept. 2, 1986
2:35 a.m. - Three Slay dorm
students and one Tyler dorm stu-
dent were observed with posses-
sion of marijuana, drug
paraphernalia and beer, in Slay-
Dorm.
10:50 a.m. - A room in Memorial
Gym was reported broken into
and the larceny of property from,
by unknown person.
10:50 a.m. - A Greenville resident
reported the breaking and enter-
ing and larceny of property from
her vehicle, while parked in the
commuter lot east of College Hill
Drive.
2:30 p.m. - A Greenville resident
reported the breaking and enter-
ing and larceny of property from
his vehicle, while parked in the
commuter lot east of College Hill
Drive.
11:10 p.m. - A Greenville resident
was arrested for intoxicated and
disruptive behavior and for
trespassing north of Greene
Dorm.
Sept. 3, 1986
12:08 a.m. - Two males from
Benson, N.C. were banned from
campus for being unescorted in
White Dorm.
8:03 a.m. - A Fleming Dorm resi-
dent reported the larceny of a
watch from her vehicle parked
north of Jenkins Art building.
2:30 p.m. - A Belk dorm resident
reported the larceny of his bike
from the bike rack north of
Aycock Hall.
2:30 p.m. - A Jarvis resident
reported the breaking and enter-
ing and larceny of items from her
vehicle which was parked in resi-
dent lot north of Jenkins Art
building.
3:35 p.m. - Two Slay Hall
residents reported being harass-
ed by an unidentified white male
in their dorm room.
5:00 p.m. - An Umstead resident
reported the larceny of his front
licence plate.
8:10 p.m. - A Fleming resident
reported the breaking and enter-
ing and larceny from her vehicle
while parked northeast of Gar-
rett.
Sept. 4, 1986
12:30 a.m. - A PTA delivery man
reported the breaking and enter-
ing and the larceny of two pizzas
from his vehicle while parked
west of Aycock dorm.
1:26 a.m. - An Aycock resident
was observed in violation of the
alcoholic beverage policy south
of Fletcher hall.
1:15 p.m. - A room in Ragsdale
was reported broken into and
entered by an unknown person.
3:00 p.m. - A Jarvis resident
reported the breaking and enter-
ing of his vehicle while parked
north of Jenkins Art building.
10:50 p.m. - An Aycock resident
was observed consuming alcohol
under age on Mall Drive, south
of Fletcher Hall.
11:00 p.m. - Two Aycock
residents and a Garrett resident
were observed consuming mixed
drinks southwest of Gerrett
dorm.
11:45 p.m. - A Garrett dorm resi-
dent and friend were observed
consuming beer on Mall Drive,
south of Fletcher Dorm.
Sept. 5, 1986
10:45 a.m. - A Belk dorm resi-
dent reported the larceny of his
wallet containing his bank card
and the unauthorized use of that
card at the bank machine at
Mendenhall Student Center.
10:40 p.m. - A Belk resident was
arrested for DWI and careless
and reckless driving. The student
was also written up for alcoholic
beverage violation after stating
that he had been consuming
spirituous liquor in his room
prior to driving.
Sept. 6, 1986
9:05 a.m. - A Clement dorm resi-
dent reported the breaking and
entering of her room by unknown
person.
8:30 a.m. - A Greenville resident
reported the larceny of bike
equipment and tools from her
bicycle located south of the
Health Science Library.
10:30 p.m. - A Greenville resident
was arrested for trespassing after
being banned and carrying a con-
cealed weapon.
10:45 p.m. - A Kingston Place
resident was charged with
careless and reckless driving in
connection with an incident on
College Hill Drive.
Sept. 7, 1986
12:34 a.m. - An Aycock resident
reported that there was a dead
copperhead snake in the 1st floor
east wing bathroom of Aycock
dorm.
2:14 a.m. - A Jones dorm resi-
dent was found to be in posses-
sion of and consuming an
alcoholic beverage while under
the age of 21 and possessing a
false ECU ID.
2:40 a.m. - An Aycock dorm resi-
dent reported the breaking, enter-
ing and tampering with of his
vehicle by known persons.
10:46 p.m. - A Slay resident was
charged with driving careless and
reckless causing damage to
another student's vehicle.
Sept. 8. 1986
3:15 p.m. - An Aycock resident
reported the breaking and enter-
ing and larceny of money from
his room.
5:25 p.m. - A White Hall resident
reported the larceny of her bike
from under the breezeway east of
the Biology Building.
Sept. 9, 1986
7:00 p.m. - An Umstead hall resi-
dent reported the breaking and
entering and larceny of his stereo
from his vehicle while parked at
the east end of the Ninth Street
parking lot.
7:50 p.m. - A Greenville resident
was arrested for intoxicated and
disruptive behavior. Six other
Greenville residents were banned
from campus due to an incident
that occured in the commuter lot
on College Hill Drive.
8:15 p.m. - A Garrett dorm resi-
dent reported the breaking and
entering and larceny from his
vehicle while parked in the Third
and Reade Street freshman lot.
Sept. 10, 1986
12:20 p.m. - Two Greenville
residents were in possession of
and consuming beer while being
under age.
Mendenhall Undergoes Summer Changes
ByLOL'ISE SMITH
Staff Writer
Mendenhall Student Center
was busy getting a new face this
summer as a result of a number
of changes that have taken place.
According to Rudolph Alex-
ander, Director of University
Unions, these changes were made
because it is "important for us to
provide the best service and the
best programs to the entire
University community
Most of the renovation occur-
red on the second floor of
Mendenhall. Because of the
amount of programs presented
and the number of people work-
ing on the events, the program
staff needed more space.
Therefore, the little-used
Music Listening Center was
transformed into new Program
Offices, and also provided a new
place for the Student Fund Ac-
counting Office. The Business
Office staff moved into the of-
fices vacated by the Program
staff, and the old Student Fund
Accounting rooms are now pro-
viding extra space for both the
SGA and the Student Union of-
fices.
The art gallery in the second
floor lobby is also being expand-
r i TlTnur,
ed. The north lobby wall will now
be available for display, which
enlarges the total display area by
nearly 50 percent. Also, the cor-
ridor on the south side of the lob-
by has been closed off for storage
space and a control center.
There will be someone on duty
during the Center's entire
operating hours to prevent theft
of art exhibits and run the Music
Listening Center. Music will now
be heard through headsets at sta-
tions in the upstairs lobby area.
Alexander said that the Stu-
dent Center staff is hopeful that
these changes will attract major
art shows and make the second
floor a more pleasant place for
students to read, study, or listen
to music.
On the first floor, changes
have been made in the Snack Bar.
ECU has contracted with a new
food service organization, Can-
teen Corporation. Although most
of the old staff has remained,
there are a few differences in the
Snack Bar, including a new Bake
Shoppe.
There has been some renova-
tion on the basement level, as
well. The areas on either side of
the large-screen TV viewing space
have been made into six small
rooms. These spaces were
RACK ROOM
SAVE UP TO
60
OPEN MON-SAT 10-9 except Niki �" & Reebok
SUNDAY 1-6
branded shoes
Greenville Buyers Market
Memorial Dive
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originally designed for foosball
and other table games, but use of
these areas had dwindled greatly.
The six new rooms, three on each
side, will be used for meetings
and recreational events such as
bridge and chess tournaments.
The rooms are separated by por-
table partitions which can be
removed to provide larger
meeting areas.
According to Alexander, all of
the construction done inside the
Student Center this year was paid
for with a special reserve fund.
This fund was set up when
Mendenhall was built, and is used
exclusively to cover renovations.
In addition to the physical
changes taking place at the Stu-
dent Center, there have been
some personnel changes, as well.
This year, the Program Office
will be occupied virtually by an
all new staff. Both John Curtis,
Assistant Program Director and
Coordinator of Publicity and
Promotion, and Linda Barkand,
Assistant Program Director and
Coordinator of Leisure Services,
have left the Student Center. Pro-
spective replacements are now be-
��ing interviewed.7 r-
Tequila Bar
a Weekly Specials
Sunrise Sunday: $2:oo per serve
Melo-Mondays: $2.25 per serve
Toasty-Tuesday; $2.25 per serve
Wednesday: $1.75 Pirates Cane Muitney
Tonic Thursday: SI. 75 per serve
Fried Friday: Get Fried Early at
our new Attitude Adjustment hour at
4:30; end the night upside down!
Saturday Night Specials
"House Drink" � Tequila Blues
(Look for our new "Lagoon " Bar)
Located Outside
109 E. 5th St.
752S936
1
nautilus
Eastern Carolina
Fitness Center
8,000 lbs. Olympic Weights
Private Nautilus Room
Sauna
Suntana Tanning Bed
Personalized Training Programs
1-on-l Instruction
New Extended Hours
Fall Student Special
$50.00 Semester
$120.00 Year
Limited Time Only
1002 Evans Street
758-9584
-� !�.
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i
Family
GREENVILLE - A gift of
46-and-one-haif acres from an
area family has provided Easi
Carolina University with iu firt
natural area.
The property, located one mile
west of Falkland, was donates b
Laurie and Rod EHis of Wiater-
ville and their son, Howard, of
San Diego, Calif.
"My husband and 1 have
always enjoyed in things of
nature said Mrs. Eats We
like the idea thai the property will
be preserved and wed for
study
The property i$ ideal for field
trips and research projects
because of its proximity to cam-
pus and untouched environmen-
tal diversity. "One spcciaJ beauty
of this property is thai it has been
logged selectively and at a
number of different times rather
than simply clear-cut said Dr
Vince Bellis, an ECU biologist.
"This gives students an oppor-
tunity to observe both young and
relatively mature forest en-
vironments within a short
distance of each other. They can
see everything from young ernes
on the edge of the property to
huge beech trees in the ravines
that arc 150 to 200 years old
Some of the most interesting
areas on the property are the
steep north-facing ravines with
their cool, moist environment.
"Because of the drainage, a
number of plants end animals
normally found only in the Pied-
mont and the mountams emeC'
Bellis said. "Galax, mountain
laurel and at leant one type of
salamander are several examples.
Peace
Group
Organized
By VIRGINIA LA LNGSTON
r�r
ville citizens met and formed the
Central American Peace Project.
The group was formed b Mike
Hamer and Ray Lee. Lee has
been involved in Central
American peace wodfc m Ohio
while Hamer spent six months in
Nicaragua in 19�4 working with
Witness for Peace
Both felt that now was the Dm
to form � tttxmm geeup to
educate the public about alter-
natives to the nxeseai admuusua-
tion's policy m Central America.
CAPP, as the group is known,
plans to accomplish this by pro-
viding films, speakers and
legislative informanftn to chur-
ches, a vie m��mmtnm end
other groups that wast te study
the Centiei Ammim situeuon.
It is possible thei the gesnp wiC
even mobitae �oi� rirjouii
disapproval.
CAPP will mejsi next Wedftm-
day, Sept. tt� eg 7 pjm eft the
home of 1 lamer on lerii Sueu.
For more inf emusm about the
Central Anserine Pence rnip�i
contact Hamer at 1304349 or
Lee at 830021.

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THEEASTCAROIINIAN
SEPTMEMBER11. 1986
ycock resident
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and
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758-9584

Family Gives Area To ECU As Gift
GRF.FNVII I F �;�? e ���. . J
GREENVILLE A gift of
46-and-onc-half acres from an
area family has provided East
Carolina Univ�r�ty witn its fun.
natural area.
The property, lace ted one mile
west of Falkland, was donated by
Laurie and Reid Elks of Wiater-
ville and their son, Howard, of
San Diego, Calif.
"My husband and I have
always enjoyed the things of
nature said Mrs. EHis. "We
like the idea thai the property will
be preserved an4 �cd for
study
The property is ideal for field
trips and research projects
because of its proximity to cam-
pus and untouched environmen-
tal diversity. "One special beauty
of this property is that it has been
logged selectively and at a
number of different times rather
than simply clear-cut said Dr.
Vince Bcllis, an ECU biologist.
'This gives students an oppor-
tunity to observe both young and
relatively mature forest en-
vironments within a short
distance of each other. They can
see everything from young pines
on the edge of the property to
huge beech trees in the ravines
that are 150 to 200 years old
Some of the most interesting
areas on the property are the
steep north-facing ravines with
their cool, moist environment.
"Because of the drainage, a
number of plants and animals
normally found only in the Pied-
mont and the mountains exist
Bellis said. "Galax, mountain
laurel and at leaat one type of
salamander are several examples.
Peace
Group
Organized
By VIRGINIA JJMNCSTOS
Staff fHilar
Last Tucsaa-y evemoc Gxflen-
ville citizens met and formed the
Central American Peace Project.
The group was fprtaed by Mike
Hamer and hay Lee. Lee has
been involved in Ctntral
American peace works i� Ohio
while Hamer spent six months in
Nicaragua in 1984 working with
Witness for Peace.
Both felt that now vuas the time
to form a dtiwu group to
educate the public about alter-
natives to the ereteai admirruttra
tion's policy in Central America.
CAPP, as the group is known,
plans to accomplish this by pro-
viding films, speakers and
legislative information to chur-
ches, civic orgamVcatioaa and
other groups that want te study
the Cenurai American situation.
It is possible that the group will
even mobilize to voice ci&iicm
disapproval.
CAPP will oet nun TftiillMi
day, Sept. 1?, at 1 fj. at the
home of Hatter on Jarrn Steed.
For more information atoottf fhe
Central Ajoericae Peace PuijuA,
contact Hamer at 830-3349 or
Lee at 830,0828.
of ECU's
and former
"The presence of these small
pockets of plants and animals
outside their normal range invites
some interesting scientific ques-
tions Bellis added. "How and
when did they first become
established here? Are these
populations genetically different
from those in the mountains and
Piedmont since they are physical-
ly separated?"
Many ECU professors are
already familiar with the proper-
ty; the university has been leasing
it from the Ellis family - at a
token rate of $1 per year - since
1966. The original agreement was
arranged by Dr. Joseph G.
Boyette, dean
Graduate School
biology professor.
"1 knew this piece of land
when I was a boy Boyette said.
"When 1 began to teach here, I
wanted to take some classes out
there. I called Reid and asked her
if it would be all right, and she
said it was. Later on she agreed to
lease it to us
The gift culminated a six-year
effort by Robert H. Franke.
director of ECU Sponsored Pro-
grams, who is also Mrs. Ellis'
Sunday school teacher. "I was
convinced by people like Joe
Boyette and Vince Bellis that this
was indeed a piece of valuable, ir-
replaceable property Franke
said. "It seemed a shame to not
try to do something about it, par-
ticularly when Miss Reid had
already shown that she was con-
scious of its importance to the
university by leasing it.
'As she got older and as more
and more land of comparative
significance was plowed up for
condominiums, it seemed all the
more important to nail down the
property
Prior to the gift, ECU was the
only major university in North
Carolina that didn't own a
natural area. The lack of such an
area presented difficulties for
faculty and graduate students
wanting to do research due to
uncertainties concerning future
use of any land they might select.
"With the guarantee of having
continuous access to it, people
will be less hesitant to start
research projects said Dr.
Charles E. Bland, chairman of
the Department of Biology. "I'm
sure there will be graduate
students who will be very in-
terested in studying the animals
and plants in the area
The Falkland tract will also be
used by other departments. The
School of Art has cited a need for
a natural area for on-site drawing
classes and as a demonstration
area for seminars on design and
the natural environment.
According to geology's Dr. Lee
J. Otte, field trips are essential
for classes in geomorphology,
sedimentary geology, geological
mapping and environmental
geology.
"Ideally, we should be taking
our students on field trips every
weekend Otte said. "If you
have to depend on private lan-
downers for access to a piece of
land, you don't know from day
to day if you'll get on or not
Dr. Robert C. Wendling,
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Leisure Systems Studies assistant
professor, said a natural area
would be used in his outdoor liv-
ing skills and resource manage-
ment classes.
"Last spring we did a recrea-
tion and parks master manage-
ment plan for Edgecombe Coun-
ty Wendling said. "The
students had to inventory the
fauna and flora and attempt to
identify the best use of the site
based on what tht management
objectives of the owner were. A
natural area will come in useful
for projects such as that
The Department of Science
Education offers several courses
which require outdoor settings.
In these classes students learn
how to measure such en-
vironmental factors as air
temperature, light intensity,
and barometric pressure
in microhabitats.
A natural area will also
enhance the environmental health
program. "This program trains
students in assessing the impact
of the development of land and in
evaluating sites that are suitable
for development said Dr. Ber
nard E. Kane, environmental
health professor. "This requires
field trips where students ma
sample and study soil types,
vegetation, landscape position
and drainage patterns
"We appreciate the gift very
much said Chancellor John M.
Howell. "The fact that there's
not much land left that is in a
natural state makes this gift in-
valuable to us
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QUr iEaflt (Earnltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
TOM LUVENDER, General Manager
Daniel Maurer. Managing ��
PATTI KEMMIS. News Editor STEVE FOLMAR, Director of Advertising
Scott Cooper, cmu e� Anthony Martin, abiwso�a Manage,
RlCK MCCORMAC, Co-sports Editor MEG NEEDHAM, Circulation Manager
John Shannon. sw, Shannon Short, production Manager
Pat Molloy, &.���.�� u DeChanile Johnson. An Director
September 11.1986
Opinion
Page 4
Financial Aid
Giving Government An Ear Full
Yesterday evening, SGA Presi-
dent Steve Cunanan and student
body presidents from 15 other UNC
system schools left for Washington
D. C. where they will express their
concern over that growing moun-
tain of bureaucratic red tape known
as financial aid.
They are taking this action in
response to the backlog difficulties
occuring at universities nationwide.
This semester financial aid offices
around the country have been
swamped by discontented students,
more so than usual. The lines have
grown longer, forms have become
more abundant, delays are the
norm and frustration abounds.
And it's all the federal governments
fault.
True, it seems the federal govern-
ment is a scape goat for most all of
our financial problems, but in this
case it's true. Backups in form pro-
cessing have been caused by a new
budget act passed by Congress.
Now, the government requires
that 50 percent of all aid applica-
tions and 100 percent of all
Guaranteed Student Loan applica-
tions must have the authenticity of
their information verified.
This results in the distribution of
new forms (which are mailed to
students and then back to the
university) to verify the old forms,
a very time consuming process.
What's worse is that students are
only receiving the proper forms
now.
Far be it from us to deny the
federal government the right to
weed out those who cheat the
system. Hey, more power to them.
But did they have to implement
such a dramatic change of policy
now, just as the fall semester is get-
ting underway? It looks like some
one on capital hill slept through one
logic class too many.
While in D.C the 16 student
body presidents will meet with
senior officials of the Department
of Education, both North Carolina
Senators and several members of
the House of Representatives.
Hopefully, Cunanan and company
can bend enough ears to get at least
one popularity-hungry politician to
pay attention.
The need for action in this matter
is apparent, just what type of action
to take is unclear. The federal
government could continue with
this new policy of verification and
plod on, hoping in vain that it will
get better with time, or it could
switch back to the old system.
Either way, delays will still be
unreasonably long and the students
will, in the end, be forced to deal
with some one else's mistake.
Let's hope the least this commit-
tee of student body presidents can
do is keep things from getting
worse.
�Campus Forum
BACCHUS Co-Presidents State
Views On New Drinking Age Law
Dear Editor:
As most ECU students know by now,
the legal drinking age has been raised at
ECU from 19 to 21 as of Aug. 1. Also,
the same drinking age was instituted
statewide Sept. 1. As Co-Presidents of
ECU'S chapter of BACCHUS (Boosting
Alcohol Consciousness Concerning the
Health of University Students), former-
ly the Campus Alcohol and Drug Pro-
gram, we would like to state our views
on this change.
Our organization has always stressed
the importance of drinking responsibly.
We are not, as many people think, an
anti-drinking group. Our group's main
purpose has always been to educate
ECU Students on Alcohol and Drug in-
formation. We have always had an im-
portant role in offering fellow students
individualized counseling and referrals
to professional services in our area.
The new drinking age has put our
group in a somewhat difficult position
because now over 90 percent of ECU
students are unable to drink legally.
Therefore, it appears that our theme of
responsibility can only extend to 10 per-
cent of the student body as far as legal
alcohol consumption is concerned.
While we all know that the new law is
not going to stop all underage people
from drinking alcohol, our group is go-
ing to be faced with the dilemma of
responding to the problems that our
fellow students encounter due to viola-
tions of this law.
We take no specific position on the
new age change. Our group does not get
into politics, but we pre sympathetic to
the problems created Dy the law change.
BACCHUS is concerned about the
welfare of ECU students in reference to
their alcohol use. We are certain that
there are many of you who will continue
to drink despite the loss of our legal
right to do so. However, we live in a
democratic society and we must abide
by the law and work positively to try to
make necessary changes.
We at BACCHUS are here to provide
information about alcohol and drugs
hopefully to prevent a problem before it
becomes one. If you are interested in
finding out more about our group,
come by our office at 301 Erwin or
come to our meeting in Mendenhall
room 242 on Sept. 11 at 6 p.m.
Keith Kaut and,
Karen Palmer,
Co-presidents.
XSN'T THERE 3�L MM CfN
Tr15 ON GftDDftFl"
BLftME.
SQfUloOK VS
Tax
Film Tells Of Russian Starvation
Twenty Questions time
� It happened in 1932-1933 and there
were approximately 10 million victims.
� Russia. Well, sort of: the Ukraine.
� Of starvation.
� No, not drought: cultivated starva-
tion. You know, where there is actually
food, but the people one intends to
On The Right
By WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY
sTaearenpennitteatornove to where
the food is, and the food is not permit-
ted to be moved to where the people who
are supposed to starve are.
Well, the implied questions and the
explicit answers give it away, but giving
it away is precisely the problem. Not
many people know that between 1932
and 1933, Josef Stalin decided to crush
the people of the Ukraine.
The neatest way to effect this was to
starve them to death. This was done by
going in and removing the wheat � not
an easy project. It's something like go-
ing into Iowa and removing all the
wheat, and then moving in a division or
two whose responsibility is to keep the
borders, in this case the borders of the
Ukraine (which by the way is the largest
state in Europe, incorporated by force
into the Union of Soviet Socialist
Republics), locked tight in order to pre-
vent people from moving out or food
from getting in.
A good year for old Joe. He managed
in that one episode to kill more people
than Hitler killed in his slaughterhouses.
In fact, he killed more people than were
killed on all the battlefronts of World
War I, up until then the heaviest hitter
of any war in history.
Comes now the story of a small Cana-
dian company that resolved to com-
memorate this spectacular act of
genocide, on its 50th anniversary. That
was 1983, when "Harvest of Despair"
was produced. Initiatives were instantly
taken to sell the one-hour documentary
to the networks, but neither CBS nor
NBC nor ABC was interested, not-
withstanding that the documentary was
winning prizes abroad.
And here we pause in our narrative,
having just viewed the documentary: It
is not pleasant viewing. A camera can
show the emaciated corpses of children
for only so long before causing the
viewer to feel a certain itch, not entirely
unlike the kind of itch one feels inspec-
ting, oh, the torture room at the
Chateau at Chinon, or the collection in
Leningrad at the Museum of the History
of Religion and Atheism � a collection
of torture instruments used during the
Inquisition,and serving, one supposes,
as prototypes for use in the Lubyanka
and throughout Gulag.
But one views such things � for in-
stance, long accounts of life in Hitler's
elimination centers � not for pleasure
but for instruction. And it was the naive
assumption of the producers of
"Harvest of Despair" that there would
be a lively interest in the West to see the
evidence of one of the most spectacular
acts of human cruelty in history.
Moreover, not something entirely irrele-
vant to a continuing understanding of
the Soviet Union and its policies.
Why is thatBecause official Soviet
history simply denies that the famine
ever took place � denies it quite
categorically.
When Prime Minister Brian Mulroney
of Canada made a pious reference to the
Ukrainian famine on its 50th anniver-
sary, he received a tongue-lashing from
the Soviet ambassador � an official
protest, as though a reference to the
Ukrainian massacre was on the ordc
a reference to the Protocols of the
Learned Elders of Zion � a forgers.
Mikhail Gorbachev, profiled a season
ago by Time magazine, is thus referred
to: "Gorbachev looks well tanned, just a
bit ruddy in the cheekHe laughs easi-
ly(His eyes) are an intense, dark
brownThe voice is extraordinai.
deep but also quite softlow and
melodious
He voiced his concern to Time ovei
the "hundreds of millions of people go-
ing hungryWe, all of us, just hac i
right to ignore the situation
Well, planned starvation isn't on! a
historical memory. It has been going on
in Ethiopia on a pretty grand scale, and
Ethiopia is for all intents and purposes j
satellite state of the Soviet Union.
Mr. Gorbachev can't begin to fight
hunger by encouraging starvation. And
if he is against ignoring hunger, then he Al
should be against ignoring the hunger f
and starvation effected b ifte pnm:ipa
figure in the development of the So te-
state, Papa Stalin. A continuing failure
by the Soviet state to acknowledge the
atrocity of 1932-1933 is, in effect, a con-
tinuing ratification of that atrocity.
The documentary will be shown on
network by PBS on Sept. 24, and there is
no way to avoid mentioning that it will
be shown as part of a two-hour "Firing
Line" program, of which I act as the
host. I can't really recommend that you
watch it, for reasons listed above. But it
is important that you not forget that
harvest of despair, that it live in the
memory � like the Nazi Holocaust � as
evidence of man's long bestial reach in
our time.
What To Expect From Tax Reform
COUEGt P�SS SffiVtCt
�fc-�W5t JfcDWVU'
By MICHAEL KINSLEY
TV New Republic
Stifle those second thoughts about tax reform.
Now that passage of tax reform seems inevitable, the
doubters are getting one last say. They would have you
believe America is about to wake up with a head-splitting
hangover and the horrifying discovery that during the
previous night's festivities it got married to a gorilla.
In econometric laboratories across the nation, hugh com-
puter models churn out their ludicrously precise prognoses
(growth down 0.3 percent, predicts Wharton Econometrics).
Journalists round up the usual quotable suspects: Allen Sinai
of Shearson Lehman Brothers (the chance of a recession has
doubled), former Council of Economic Advisers Chairman
Murray Weidenbaum (unemployment up half a percent),
Lawrence Chimerine of Chase Econometrics (no likely effect
over ten years), Edward Yardeni of Prudential-Bache
Securities ("This is the wrong time").
These people make a fine living as consultants to business.
Do they believe in capitalism? The philosophy of this reform
is to get the government out of the way and let capitalism do
its thing by taxing all types of economic activity more equally.
If you believe in capitalism, how can that be bad?
The economic landscape will change, of course. Near my
office in Washington is the notorious "hotel corner where
three large luxury hotels have popped up in a year. Trouble is,
there aren't enough customers. Those hotels never would
have been built except for the "incentives" this tax reform
eliminates. But how do empty hotel rooms add to our na-
tional prosperity? In the future, hotel builders will look for
customers first.
Wall Street's takeover mania also will cool. The misguided
1981 tax act gave huge depreciation write-offs to new pur-
chasers of business assets. This has had the perverse effect of
making any company that hasn't changed hands for a couple
of years more valuable to outsiders than to its current owners
(who have used up the best part of their write-offs). Reform
will slow the pointless churning of assets. Businesses will be
more likely to stay put in the hands of those who can run
them most productively.
Heavy industry is moaning the loss of the investment tax
credit for machinery. Yet study after study showed that this
credit cost the government more in lost revenue than it added
to business investment (since most investments that got the
credit would have been made anyway).
Venture capitalists, meanwhile � belying their self-image
as business buccaneers � whine that they will have to pay the
same 28 percent top rate on their capital gains that other in-
vestors pay on dividends and interest. But why should the
government favor one form of investment over another?
What upsets the business community most is the five-year,
$120 billion shift in the tax burden from individuals to cor-
porations. Even this, though, can be defended on pure
capitalist grounds. It's true, as the business mantra has it,
that "corporations don't pay taxes, only people pay taxes
But this doesn't mean that corporate profits shouldn't be tax
ed, in one way or another.
Corporate profits are a form of return to capital, and
there's no reason people � corporate stockholders �
shouldn't be taxed on the return to capital. In recent years,
the share of revenue coming from the corporate income tax
has plummeted, the capital gains loophole has been expand-
ed, and the estate tax has been virtually abolished.
Meanwhile, inflation has pushed working people into
higher brackets, and the Social Security payroll tax has con-
tinued its relentless climb. As an overall result, more and
more of the tax burden has shifted from capital to labor �
that is, salary and wages.
The current reforms merely push the process back a bit.
Fairness alone would justify this shift. But economic efficien-
cy also dictates that labor shouldn't bear a disproportionate
share of the tax burden.
By raising taxes on labor and reducing taxes on capital, the
government has been encouraging businesses to replace peo-
ple with machines. This makes no more sense than using the
tax code to promote one form of investment over another.
Tax reform will reduce this inefficiency.
Ah, but what about the $11 billion extra that this supposed-
ly revenue-neutral bill will draw from the economy next year ?
Won't that risk pushing us into recession?
The answer is that anyone who thinks $11 billion one way
or another can dramatically affect a $4.5 trillion economy
must have a heart attack every time he opens the newspaper
Responsible estimates of next year's deficit have varied far
more than $11 billion over the past few weeks. The runawa
farm program along will be adding an unexpected $15 billion
to the deficit next year. So relax.
Butbutbutisn't this radical experiment just too riskv
at a moment when we're tottering on the brink of a recession
anyway? Shouldn't we put it off?
Answer: till when? In political reality, it's now or never
Anyway, like the fellow who's going to stop smoking right
after Christmas, there'll always be another excuse. Like th
cure for any addiction, tax reform will bring some withdrawa
symptoms. But pretty soon we're gonna feel great.
Mr. Michael Kinsley is the editor of the New RenuhT
magazine, excerpts from which can occasionally be found'
these pages.
WASHINGTON, DC. (CPS) -
The tax reform bill now before
Congress will have an "almost
vindictive" effect on colleges if it
is passed, educators say.
The bill�which many
observers expect to pass both the
House and Senate this mon-
th�would cripple many campus j
fundraising efforts and require rl
some students to pay taxes on
money they get through financial
aid.
Others say it effectively would
make diplomas about 15 percent
more expensive than they are I
now.
Observers fret tax reform will
ignite a chain reaction of cost in-
creases that cut donations to col- s
leges, drive up tuition, increase d
students' debt burden, take a big-
ger tax bite out of students after
they graduate, make Dnvate col-
leges vastly more expensive than
public colleges, and even drive
some students out of college
altogether.
It "will seriously compromise
the vitality of American colleges n
and universities states Bill
Kroger of the American Council
on Education (ACE). "It will im-
pose serious financial hardships
on both colleges and students
Educators most fear two provi-
sions of the bill:
One provision affects how
private colleges can raise money
by selling tax exempt bonds.
When colleges sell, say, a $500
bond, plus interest, to the buyer
quarterly. Since the interest
payment�which is profit to the
buyer�is tax exempt, the bond i
U.S. Corn
MOSCOW (UPl) � U.S. News
and World Report correspondent
Nicholas Daniloff has been
charged with three counts of es-
pionage, his wife said today. But
he still believes the case will be
solved diplomatically before it
comes to trial.
Mrs. Daruloif visited her hus-
band in his cefl in Moscow's
Lefortovo prison Tuesday where
he has been held since his arrest til
Aug. 30.
After reviewing the notes she b�
had taken during her visit, she w
told reporters today that her hus-
band said the formal indictment
mentioned three specific charges.
She said one charge against her j
husband was that he "used his
status as a foreign journalist to ch
Bell Towe
By SEAN HERRING
SUff Writer
The ECU Faculty Facilities
Committee met last Thursday
and approved the Senior Bell
Tower.
The proposal for the tower was
made last year, by Kirk Shelley,
the 1985-86 Senior Class presi-
dent.
The idea prompted a design
contest for the project. Greg
Jackson's design was chosen by
the students through an East
Carolinian poll.
The project now has a design
and moral support, but it needs
financial support.
According to Steve Cunanan,
SGA president, the tower will
cost approximately $110,000.
When asked if the new monu-
ment will cause a tuition hike,
Cunanan said, "No. This is
strictly a senior class project. The
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 11, 1986
yw
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tarvation
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I
urpv
win
I
begin to :
ng staration. And
gainst ignoring hunger, then he
-e against ignoring the hunger
anon effected hs the principal
-merit of the So iei
pa Stalin continuing failure
oie' ,� acknowledge the
)f 1932-1933 is, in effect, a con-
� ' I hat atrocity.
documentary will he shown
work by PBS on Sept. 24, and there is
way to avoid mentioning that it will
shown as part of a two-hour "Firing
i e ' program, of which 1 act as the
t. I can't really recommend that you
latch it, for reasons listed above. Bui il
important that you not forget tl
ev! of despair, that it live in the
lemory � like the Nazi Holocaust - a
ice of man's long bestial reach in
ne.
ax Reform
community most is the five-year,
he tax burden from individuals to al-
though, can be defended on pure
s true, as the business mantra has it,
jn't pay taxes, only people pay taxes
that corporate profits shouldn't be tax
)ther.
are a form of return to capital, and
people � corporate stockholders
the return to capital. In recent years,
looming from the corporate income tax
lapital gains loophole has been expand-
has been virtually abolished.
n has pushed working people into
pe Social Security payroll tax has con-
limb. As an overall result, more and
;n has shifted from capital to labor �
fees.
Is merely push the process back a bit.
Justify this shift. But economic efficien-
ibor shouldn't bear a disproportionate
fcn.
labor and reducing taxes on capital, the
encouraging businesses to replace peo-
is makes no more sense than using the
me form of investment over another,
this inefficiency.
Ithe $11 billion extra that this supposed-
wi!l draw from the economy next year0
ig us into recession?
myone who thinks $11 billion one way
itically affect a $4.5 trillion economy
ck every time he opens the newspaper.
of next year's deficit have varied far
lover the past few weeks. The runaway
ill be adding an unexpected $15 billion
So relax.
I't this radical experiment just too nsk
re tottering on the brink of a recession
put it off?
In political reality, it's now or never
hv who's going to stop smoking righ;
rll always be another excuse. Like the
! tax reform will bring some withdrawal
soon we're gonna feel great.
is the editor of the New Repuhlk
which can occasionally be found in
Tax Bill Could Hurt Universities
WASHINGTON, D.C. (CPS) -
The tax reform bill now before
Congress will have an "almost
vindictive" effect on colleges if it
is passed, educators say.
The bill�which many
observers expect to pass both the
House and Senate this mon-
th�would cripple many campus
fundraising efforts and require
some students to pay taxes on
money they get through financial
aid.
Others say it effectively would
make diplomas about 15 percent
more expensive than they are
now.
Observers fret tax reform will
ignite a chain reaction of cost in-
creases that cut donations to col-
leges, drive up tuition, increase
students' debt burden, take a big-
ger tax bite out of students after
they graduate, make private col-
leges vastly more expensive than
public colleges, and even drive
some students out of college
altogether.
It "will seriously compromise
the vitality of American colleges
and universities states Bill
Kroger of the American Council
on Education (ACE). "It will im-
pose serious financial hardships
on both colleges and students
Educators most fear two provi-
sions of the bill:
One provision affects how
private colleges can raise money
by selling tax exempt bonds.
When colleges sell, say, a $500
bond, plus interest, to the buyer
quarterly. Since the interest
payment�which is profit to the
buyer�is tax exempt, the bond
buyer gets a break on his taxes
while the college gets to use the
buyer's $500 for a while.
But with tax reform, private
colleges can't have more than
$150 million in tax exempt bonds
out at any one time.
The other provision makes
large private donations of stock,
real estate or other appreciable
property subject to a minimum
tax.
Since both measures would
change the major tax breaks peo-
ple get for donating to colleges,
the colleges are worried people
will stop giving.
While the bond limits will af-
fect only 20 to 25 top private
schools, "those are the ones that
do the lion's share of research
Kroger explains.
"It will keep them from raising
money in that fashion. One top
university already has nearly $200
million in bonds outstanding,
and they can't issue any more un-
til they knock down that total
The school, Boston University,
needs at least another $50 million
in bond money to complete some
new buildings.
"It seems almost vindictive on
the part of those who wrote the
bill says Stanford spokesman
Larry Horton.
The measure could force some
schools to raise tuition to get the
money they'd ordinarily get by
selling bonds, he adds.
At private colleges, "tuition
rates and overhead usually are
higher than at public schools
Horton says. "This measure will
force that gap to increase, mak-
ing it increasingly difficult for
private universities to be truly
competitive with public univer-
sities
But the law also will hurt col-
leges that don't care about tax ex-
empt bonds.
A reform provision to change
the way donors figure out the tax
they owe on the things they give
to colleges could cost higher
education as much as $1.2 billion
annually in charitable receipts.
"It will cut donations because
it will be more difficult for people
to donate property and other
gifts Kroger says.
"Most major gifts to colleges
are appreciable assets like stock
and real estate Stanford's Hor-
ton explains. "It's very rare for
someone to write a sizable check
for a cash donation
But the bill would limit tax-
payer deductions for those stock
and real estate gifts to the price
the taxpayer originally paid for
the gifts.
For example, a donor buys a
house in 1975 for $50,000. Since
then, the house has appreciated
in value to $75,000. Under cur-
rant law, the donor could deduct
$75,000 from his or her taxes.
Under the tax reform bill, the
donor could deduct only the
$50,000 he or she originally paid
for the house. He or she would
have to pay taxes on the other
$25,000.
In general, schools that depend
on donations to keep their en-
dowment coffers growing will
U.S. Correspondent Charged
MOSCOW (UPI) � U.S. News
and World Report correspondent
Nicholas Daniloff has been
charged with three counts of es-
pionage, his wife said today. But
he still believes the case will be
solved diplomatically before it
comes to trial.
Mrs. Daniloff visited her hus-
band in his cell in MoscoW's
Lefortovo prison Tuesday where
he has been held since his arrest
Aug. 30.
After reviewing the notes she
had taken during her visit, she
told reporters today that her hus-
band said the formal indictment
mentioned three specific charges.
She said one charge against her
husband was that he "used his
status as a foreign journalist to
convey to the U.S. Central In-
telligence Agency and Special
Services of the U.S.A informa-
tion harmful to the security of the
Soviet Union between 1982 and
1986
She said the second court ac-
cused Daniloff of working with
the CIA. tp "enlist or recruit" a
Soviet citizen to spy' against Ms
country. The citizen was iden-
tified only as "Ramon
Mrs. Daniloff said her hus-
band had indeed met "Ramon
who was posing as a Russiani Or-
thodox priest about two years
ago, but broke off contact after
he suspected Ramon was a KGB
informant.
"The third count is the cat-
chall. It is so vague it is mean-
ingless she said.
"He believes all these legalities
are irrelevant. He does not want
legal help. This is a political case
not a legal one she said.
The Izvestia newspaper Mon-
day said that a Soviet citizen,
"Ramon had received a letter
from U.S. Embassy Second
Secretary Paul Stombaugh, who
was expelled in June 1985 for
spying, The letter mentioned con-
tacts with a journalist who was
not identified. Izvestia said the
journalist haas Daniloff.
"Nick still believes it will be
resolved diplomatically Mrs.
Daniloff said. "The Soviets
basically are preparing this in-
dictment against him in case all
else fails
Bell Tower Needs Funding
By SEAN HERRING
Staff Writer
The ECU Faculty Facilities
Committee met last Thursday
and approved the Senior Bell
Tower.
The proposal for the tower was
made last year, by Kirk Shelley,
the 1985-86 Senior Class presi-
dent.
The idea prompted a design
contest for the project. Greg
Jackson's design was chosen by
the students through an East
Carolinian poll.
The project now has a design
and moral support, but it needs
financial support.
According to Steve Cunanan,
SGA president, the tower will
cost approximately $110,000.
When asked if the new monu-
ment will cause a tuition hike,
Cunanan said, "No. This is
strictly a senior class project. The
plan to raise money will involve
different groups, like the 1986
alumni and future alumni. As of
yet, no specific groups have been
selected, but I should have
something more concrete, by the
end of September
He added, "I would like to
give credit to Cindy Kittrell of the
ECU Alumni Center, and Kirk
Shelley. They are responsible for
the fund raising idea
According to Cunanan, the
money will not be easy to raise.
He said, "Unless someone
unexpectedly donates a sizeable
amount of money, it will be at
least another five years before the
location is chosen, or any ground
is broken
Cunanan added, "The 1987
Senior Class is eager to start this
project. ECU has no monumen-
tal focal point as a whole.
Hopefully, the Bell Tower will
provide something like this for
niversity
Riggan Shoe Repair
111 West 4th St.
Downtown Greenville
"Shue Repatr Ai The Iti Best"
758-0204
suffer the most.
"We're not in the tax exempt
bond business says James
Sankovitz, Marquette
University's vice president of
government affairs. "But we're
capital fundraisers, and the bill
will have a major adverse impact
on large donations of appreciated
property
Sankovitz says the bill won't
affect donors of smaller
monetary gifts, "but for others it
will destroy the economic incen-
tive factor of giving when they
lose the advantage of deductabili -
ty for gifts
Students with graduate grants
to cover living costs will end ud
THE WASH HOUSE
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Visit our convenient location on uthSt.
8 AM-12 Midnight
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paying taxes on any aid not ear-
marked specifically for education
needs. Some experts claim such
taxation could raise the cost of a
diploma as much as 15 percent.
"Graduate students, as a rule,
are frugal Sankovitz says.
"Imposing this tax is too much to
ask. And it will economically in-
fluence a student's decision of
where to go to school. Students
won't want to go to higher tuition
schools
And after graduation, students
would find the interest on their
student loans is no longer tax-
deductible. Currently, nearly half
of all college students use some
type of loan to finance their
educations. Some graduate owing
$10,000 or more in education
loans.
"These provisions will cut
alumni gifts because the large
debt burdens and the taxable in-
terest will make alums feel if they
manage to pay off the loans, that
will be enough of a gift to their
alma mater Sankovitz says.
The ACE's Kroger asserts,
"the only (way) to help schools
make up lost income from bonds
and donations will be higher tui-
tion. And with tuition going up
and federal aid going down,
students who can't afford an
education will be further squeez-
ed out
Presents
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�THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 11. 1986
Drug A buse Questioned By A dministrators I Dau8hter
(CPS) Duke students returned
to campus last week to find their
administrators may soon ask
them to prove they don't abuse
drugs.
At the same time, a Texas
school district announced it
would test all students involved in
extracurricular activities for the
presence of illicit drugs in their
systems.
And the U.S. House of
Representatives voted to em-
power the U.S. Dept. of Educa-
tion to withhold federal funds
from colleges that don't have
drug abuse prevention programs.
The much-ballyhooed "war on
drugs in short, seemed to be
closing in on every collegian in
the U.S. in recent weeks.
Colleges have been adopting
tough new sanctions to discipline
students caught using illicit
drugs, and looking into ways to
catch the students in the first
place.
Freshmen at Mount St. Mary
College in New York, for exam-
ple, are being greeted by a drug
education program at orienta-
tion, while the presidents of Ohio
Wesleyan, Newberry College and
Westminister College (Mo.) sent
letters to their students warning
of tough new drug policies this
year.
Athletes have been facing such
sanctions for a while now.
About 100 colleges now
regularly screen their athletes for
drug use, the American Council
on Education (ACE) estimated
last week, adding the practice is
spreading.
The National Collegiate
Athletic Association (NCAA)
will start giving athletes in NCAA
championship events drug tests
this school year.
Close scrutiny of students now
may spread beyond athletic
departments into the general stu-
dent body, too, thanks to a recent
House Education and Labor
Committee vote to send $350
million to states to help fight stu-
dent drug abuse and a White
House announcement that it
might favor spending $100
million to eradicate abuse in the
nation's schools.
And if a different drug bill now
in Congress passes, colleges will
have to have some sort of drug
abuse prevention program to re-
main eligible to receive other
kinds of federal student aid and
college funding.
While federal officials swear
they won't start testing the entire
American student body, Duke's
flirtation with a cam pus wide
drug program affecting all
students started with the same
kind of athletic department pro-
gram scores of schools have
adopted.
Duke doesn't test its athletes,
Butters explains, but requires
those who fear they have a pro-
blem to report it "to someone
who will make sure that student is
cared for
"The coach will not know. The
team will not know. The parents
will not know. But, if the pro-
blem is not self-reported, that
athlete is gone with no second
chance
Such programs already have
taken a radical turn through the
general student population in the
Hawkins Independent School
District in Texas, where all
students involved in extracur-
ricular activities started taking
mandatory drug tests last week.
Student council members,
cheerleaders and athletes are all
being tested, says Superintedn-
dent Coleman Stanfield.
Stanfield adds testing will be
"random, at regular intervals
throughout the school year
Few foresee testing college stu-
dent government officers,
however, and few officials out-
side athletic departments support
applying drug programs to
nonathlete students.
"I'm personally not comfor-
table with it says Suzanne
Wasiolek, Duke's dean for stu-
dent life.
"We're being asked to solve a
problem that may have started in
seventh grade Butters says.
The publicity and pressure now
building to mount anti-drug cam-
paigns tend to create a false im-
pression that schools "can solve
the problem alone adds Robert
Atwell, president of the
American Council on Education
(ACE).
Besides, college officials are
unsure such programs are
workable.
"It must be remembered that
two-thirds of the more that seven
million full-time students live off
campus Atwell points out.
Most students, moreover, are
adults. "More than half of all
college students are 22 years of
age and older, and more than a
third are 25 and older Atwell
notes.
But students, used to adult
responsibilities in other parts of
their lives, may not have the right
to escape drug programs that
presume them guilty or threaten
to expell them, administrators
say.
"By attending Duke Wasiol-
ed contends, "students agree a
person's rights are defined by the
rules and regulations of the
university
Workable or not, Wasiolek
believes finding a university
without a program of some sort
may soon be "difficult though
"I don't think most will move in
the direction of mandatory
testing" even with the threat of a
cut-off of federal aid hanging
over them.
Federal Judge Faces Impeachment
cheson?s
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WASHINGTON (UPI) A
special impeachment committee
is ready to hear arguments today
on House motions alleging im-
prisoned federal Judge Harry
Claiborne should be kicked off
the bench without another trial.
House documents filed August
20 and made public Tuesday
alleged Clairborne has had his
"day in court" and his tax eva-
sion convictions are reason
enough for the Senate to remove
him from office.
Claiborne is scheduled stand
trial before the full Senate Sept.
29, after the committee gathers
evidence and hears testimony of
witnesses next week. Only the
Senate can remove a federal
judge from office, and its pro-
cedures are independent of the
courts. Pretrial motions filed by-
nine members named to act as
prosecutors asked the Senate to
treat Claiborne's tax convictions
as established fact and to find
him guilty of misbehavior and
high crimes in office, thereby
avoiding the trial.
The House said that since a
court jury found Claiborne guilty
of a felony offense there is no
need to present further evidence.
If the Senate were to decide
Claiborne was not guilty of such
misconduct, it "would under-
mine both the judicial and the im-
peachment process the House
motion said.
"Recognition of the conviction
by the Senate will not cause any
injustice to Judge Claiborne. He
has had a full day in court the
document said.
Claiborne is the first Federal
Judge in 50 years to face an im-
peachment trial, and the commit-
tee is the first ever formed to hear
impeachment evidence.
Sen. Charles Mathias, R-Md
the committee chairman, said he
would rule on the motions after
the panel hears arguments.
"We are dealing with a new
procedure Mathias said, "The
committee of 12 will make a
record (to be) available to the full
Senate
Mathias said it was "more effi-
cient to do this by committee"
than take up the Senate's time
during the rush toward adjourn-
ment.
Claiborne, 69, chief judge of
the U.S. District Court for
Nevada, is serving a two year
sentence at Maxwell Air Force
Base for failing to report nearly
$107,000 on his 1979 and, 1980
tax returns.
He refused to suit the bench or
give up his annual $78,700
judicial salary, leading the House
to impeach him - a procedure
similar to indictment - on four ar-
ticles passed in July charging tax
convictions, misbehavior, high
crimes, and bringing disrepute
upon the judiciary.
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LOS ANGELES (UPI) - An
eleven year old girl turned in her
parents for growing marijuana in
their backyard, saying a police
anti-drug program and a similar
action by a teenager last nv
inspired her to go to authorr
The girl was taken into pr
ttve custody at her school T -
day, and police confiscated a 3
1 2-foot marijuana plant bu;
not arrest the parents pen
'urther investigation off:
�aid.
The incident was the second
-ummer in which a young .
went to the authority i
accusations against her pare
In the earlier incident a 13-
old Orange County girl turner
her parents for allege
Con Artis
Taking Mo
NEW YORK (UPIi - ��
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times, fathered J
left a trail of brol
well as empt.
the target I
Louis Car! . 42 eet-
talked his way into th
women from Long Island
George and
throughout the count
John Kelly, commander I
Special Frauds I �
'Hegoe� after then gsac-
counts, credit card
anything else is i
benefitKelly sa:j V
Don Juan me $50,00
said.
Police believe Carlua
has operated under a nurr-v I
aliases, is back in
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For information, a
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�EEASTJCAROUN1ANSEPI 7
istrators
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Wo kabie 01 not, Wasiolek
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Daughter Turns Parents In
I-OS ANGELES (UP1) - An
eleven year old girl turned in her
parents for growing marijuana in
their backyard, saying a police
anti-drug program and a similar
action by a teenager last month
inspired her to go to authorities.
The girl was taken into protec-
tive custody at her school Tues-
day, and police confiscated a 3
1 2-foot marijuana plant but did
not arrest the parents pending
further investigation officers
said.
The incident was the second
this summer in which a young girl
went to the authorities with drug
accusations against her parents.
In the earlier incident a 13-year
old Orange County girl turned in
her parents for alleged cocaine
use after attending an anti-drug
lecture at a church. She is being
allowed to remain at home pen-
ding the outcome of drug posses-
sion charges against her parents.
The unidentified Los Angeles
girl said she discovered that the
plant growing in her yard was
marijuana after officers from the
police department's DARE (Drug
Abuse Resistance Education)
Program talked to her grammar
school class about the dangers of
drug use, Sgt. Nate Atkins said.
She told her principal she did
not want to live in a house where
marijuana has being grown and
called. The girl will remain in
protective custody pending a
hearing by the County Depart-
ment of Public Social Services,
Atkins said.
Officers said the girl indicated
she was inspired by news reports
of the case of Deanna Young, 18,
who reported her mother and
father to police in Tustin, Calif
last month.
Bobby and Judith Young were
arrested after their daughter car-
ried a trash bag containing about
$2,800 in cocaine into police
headquarters.
The story caught the national
interest, including that of the first
lady Nancy Reagan.
The Youngs were cleared Mon-
day of charges they were unfit
parents, but they still face court
proceedings for drug violations.
Con Artist Wanted For
Taking Money From Wives
NEW YORK (I PI) - A burl
con artisl who married nine
time lathered 35 children and
left a trail of broken hearts - as
well as empty pocketbooks - is
the target of a police manhunt.
1 ouis Carlucci, 42, has sweet-
talked his wa into the lives of 15
women from 1 ong Island to I ake
George and possibly many more
throughout the country, said 1 ;
John Kelly, commander of the
Special Frauds I nit.
"He goes after their sav mgs ac-
counts, credit cards, and
anything eUe is a fringe
benefitKelly said Monday. The
Don Juan ol some $50,000 he
said
Police beliee Carlucci, who
has operated under a number of
aliases, is back in town, after
"going under" in 1984.
Carlucci, 5 feet 11 inches tall
and weighing 240 pounds, has
fathered 35 children and married
at least nine times, police said.
"Carlucci, is a very, very
smooth talker, capitalizing on
other people's weaknesses Kel-
ly said. "A lonely woman look-
ing for companionship was ripe
for this guy
Passing himself off as an en-
treprenuer, Carlucci met women
through dating services, often
marrying them and then per-
suading them to fork over their
life savings to help him in a
business venture.
He conned a 42- year- old
Queen's woman into paying for
their honeymoon in 1981, ex-
plaining that his own funds were
"tied up
The honeymoon was really
over when the couple returned
and moved to a Bronx apart-
ment, where Carlucci allegedly
kept the woman a prisoner for
four weeks. After he cleaned
$20,000 from her bank account,
he disappeared. Even then, the
woman hesitated before contac-
ting police.
L,The woman's reactions rang-
ed from embarrassment to
despair, to a sense of having been
taken, to absolute anger Kelly
said.
The lieutenant said his Special
Frauds Unit now has six com-
plaints reporting losses of more
than $50,000. He would not iden-
tify anv of the women.
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September 16, Rush Party, Delta Sigma Theta, Coffee
House, 7:00
September 17, Rush Party, Zeta Phi Beta, Coffee
House, 7:00
September 18, Rush Party, Sigma Gamma Rho,
Coffee House, 7:00
September 19, Social, TBA
September 22, Rush Party, Alpah Kappa Alpha,
Coffee House, 7:00
September 23, Rush Party, Delta Sigma Theta, Coffee
House, 7:00
September 24, Rush Party, Zeta Phi Beta, Coffee
House, 7.00
September 25, Rush Party, Sigma Gamma Rho,
Coffee House, 7:00
k
"I

t





I
THE EAST CARQ1INIAN
SEPTEMBER 11, 1986
Disaster
ANAHEIM, CALIF. (UPI) �
Nearly one million people may
develop cancer and more than
half of them may die as a result
of radiation released from the
Chernobyl nuclear disaster, a
scientist said.
Speaking at the 192nd annual
meeting of the American
Chemical Society, Dr. John Gof-
man of the University of Califor-
nia at Berkeley said Tuesday that
500,000 people will develop fatal
malignances and an additional
470,000 will develop cancers that
can be effectively treated.
Gofman said he is not op-
timistic about the future of peo-
ple affected by Chernobyl's
fallout, saying the lowest possible
number of cancer cases caused by
Chernobyl would be 600,000.
"The number of 600,000 is
staggering Gofman said. "But
it is actually a lower limit on the
consequences because I have ex-
cluded the doses from (many of
the radioactive elements).
"It's futile to hope for a safe
dose of radiation that will not in-
duce cancer in humans he said.
Gofman's estimates of the
amount of radiation released
when the Soviet reactor caught
fire and exploded April 26 show
the number of cancer and
leukemia cases will exceed the
number estimated by Dr. Robert
Gale, a UCLA bone marrow
specialist who treated Chernobyl
victims within days of the
disaster.
Gale estimated that no more
than 200,000 cases of cancer will
develop in people affected by
fallout from the accident. He said
it would take 20 years for many
cases to appear.
Of Cancer
��i
'I would like to say that I
respect Dr. Gale highly as a bone
marrow transplant surgeon and I
am aware of no qualifications he
has to speak to the issue of radia-
tion induction in cancer Gof-
man said.
He said he disagreed with data
Gale used to calculate how much
radiation it would take to cause a
person to develop cancer.
Gofman said his estimate of
600,000 cancer cases as a direct
result of Chernobyl is at the
lower end of a scale of
possibilities because that number
omits cases of thyroid cancer,
which "are less life-threatening
than other types of cancer
Gale, who recently returned
from the Soviet Union, where he
conferred with doctors about
developing a major
epidemiological study of Cher-
Gofman said because radiation
from the reactor was carried by
the wind across Europe and
throughout the world, cancer
may occur as a direct result of
Chernobyl in at least 20 coun-
tries, including the United States,
where a radioactive cloud passed
over the Pacific Northwest.
The Soviet Union has predicted
26,500 deaths from the Cher-
nobyl accident in the next 70
years, according to Western ex-
perts.
The latest death toll from the
accident stood at 31.
nobyl victims, said Gofman's
figures probably illustrate the
worst that could happen.
"We used the data from
Hiroshima and Nagasaki to
calculate the likelihood of any
dose of radiation causing
cancer Gale said.
R
U
S
H
LAMBDA CHI
ALPHA
sept
700-1100
Israeli Warplanes Drop Bombs
SIDON, Lebenon (UPI) �
Israeli warplanes and gunedats
attacked suspected Palestinian
targets near the southern cities of
Gidon and Tyre, dropping
dozens of bombs and bombar-
ding a refugee camp, Lebanese
reports today.
Hospital souces in Sidon, 24
miles south of Beirut, said three
people, including two Palestinian
guerrillas, were killed and 19 peo-
ple, including guerrillas and
civilians, were wounded in the
raid early today. The attack also
destroyed and set ablaze several
buildings and depots.
There were no immediate
reports of casualties in the Tyre
area, 46 miles south of the
capital, where Lebanese sources
said a refugee camp came under
fire at dusk Tuesday.
Israel confirmed the Sidon at-
tack but not the attack in the
Tyre area.
The planes struck a mile north
of the southern Lebanese port of
Sidon at dawn, making two bom-
bing runs on what the Israeli
military termed 'a terrorist
base" of the pro-Syrian Popular
Struggle Front
Palestinian and Moslem militia
gunners, using jeep mounted
guns and heavy anti-aircraft bat-
teries, opened fire on the
warplanes and the gunboats,
witnesses said.
"The target was used as a
departure base for the PSF and
an arms and ammunition
dump said a spokesman for the
Israeli Defense Forces in Tel
Aviv, "All planes returned safely
to base and reported accurate
hits
A witness said the jets "drop-
ped dozens of bombs" on the
base, which was used by the PSF
and other Palestinian groups and
was in the industrial area of
Sidon.
The air strike came just four
days after two Arabs tossed hand
grenades and opened fire on wor-
shippers at a synagogue in the
Turkish city of Istanbul, killing
21 Jews and themselves.
Israeli leaders have vowed to
avenge that attack, but the IDF
said today's raid was "in direct
retaliation" for a foiled PSF at-
tempt to send guerrillas from the
same base into Israel by sea dur-
ing the night.
The military said four guer-
rillas left the Sidon base in a rub-
ber dinghy and headed
southward under cover of
darkness but were caught be an
Israeli patrol boat on a routine
sweep south of Sidon.
The patrol boat fired on the
dinghy and hit it, forcing the
guerrillas on the shore. The IDF
said at least one of them was
wounded but declined to give
details on the fate of the other
three.
XHJL-FtAin
&
THE
DECC
500 ELIZABETH ST 757 1897
3
&b
If you didn't get your copies at
KINKO'S
you paid too much
enel Ion
Benetton
638B Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, NC
355-7473
Store Hours
10-6 M-T-W
10-9 Th-F
10-6 Sat
Monday - Friday
7:00am -10:00pm
321E 10th St Saturday
752-0875 9:00am - 6:00pm
GO PIRATES
After you've tackled West Virginia, come
tackle a juicy hamburger at Wendy's. Drop
back for Crispy Chicken Nuggets. Go long for
a Garden Fresh Salad. Or go for two with a
Chili and a Frosty.
Come see us before or after the game at any
of our convenient locations.
Come score with winners, Wendy's and
Pirates!
f
502 E. Tenth St
103 Greenville Blvd.
624 S. Memorial Dr.
Open 'til Midnight
Friday and Saturday
11 p.m. Sunday-Thurs.
rm f ast auoi
Cartoon.
Lives O
B MIC AH HARRIS
On August 26,
American comediai l
entertained world-side i 1
for nearly lift) years passe
in general obscurity. Few
whom he made laugh r
his name and ev A
recognize his fa
He was Fred A
preferred the nicl
and had a har
Mich celehritie- as , .
Daffj Ducky, and I
well as playing ra
Oscar-winning i
n.
Over the decade . 1- . a
brand of cartooi
a. distinguish:
Several recurring I
account for 'his. For exampk
had a fondness I
fions of figure ol spei
In "The Shooting i
McGoo" the villain
as looking "like a man wii
foot in the grave Sure em
he is limping i
wuck in ad I
with tombstone and hi v.
A v-rtual org ol
puns as "Symphony in Sia
wherein the entire sto-
HPERS
B JOHN SHANNON
W hile mos:
to stay cool, sonit a
enthusiasts are getting theii � i
coasted. They "re con:
siiiprcwcdejiiiLcl gjui .
not one but mo ski trips arc be-
ing offered bv ECU this ear
The Department of He.
Physical Education, keeu
and Safetv (HPERS) ha
sponsoring a class m snow skiing
for 18 vears now. Stude
want to satistv their P.E. � .
ment without running t
lap or waiting in line . a
bow and arrow can choose
stead to travel to Steamtx
ings, Colorado
action on the ski slopes
course it costs a little more -
trip to Colorado, r ed
spring break. March 9
16, runs $500 � but m
students who have taker, the rj
think it's worth it, according I
coordinator Karen Israel.
"The difference between
trip and the one ottered bj the
Student Union is that out trip
tied in with a course said Israel
o
�l
fp
Brice Street can be
Greenville audiences
Saturday
many other I
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s
H
BDA CHI
LPHA
700-1 100
L-HAin
&
( c
S)
Br I'M ST 757 1897
t get your copies at
NKO'S
u paid too much
321 E 10th St
752-0375
" riday-Friday
7:00am- 10:00pm
Saturday
9.00am - 6:00pm
TM
I
ien 'til Midnight
lay and Saturday
L Sunday-Thurs.
THFEASTCAROIINIAN
Entertainment
SEPTEMBER II. 1986 Page 9
Cartoonist Had Hand In The
Lives Of Famed Characters
By MICAH HARRIS
On August 26, 1980, an
American comedian who had
entertained world-side audiences
for nearly fifty years passed away
in general obscurity. Few of those
w horn he made laugh even knew
his name and even less would
recognize his face.
He was Fred Avery, but he
preferred the nickname "Tex"
and had a hand in the careers of
such celebrities as Porky Pig,
Daffv Duck, and Droopy, as
well as playing mid-wife to that
Oscar-winning rabbit. Bugs Bun
nv.
0er the decades, Tex Averv's
brand of cartoons has remained
as distinguishable as a signature.
Several recurring types of gags
account for this. For example, he
had a fondness for literal depic-
tions o figures of speech.
In "The Shooting of Dan
McGoo" the villain is described
as looking "like a man with one
foot in the grave Sure enough,
he is limping along with one foot
s uck in a clod o' earth complete
with tombstone and lily.
A virtual orgy of such visual
puns was "Symphony in Slang"
wherein the entire storv is a series
of literal translations oi such
phrases as "down in the dumps
"raining cats and dogs "fed
her a line etc etc.
The producers of Airplane and
Airplane II scored success by
employing this seemingly original
approach. But in fact, Avery had
been doing such stuff decades
earlier
Another Aery trademark was
his cartoon cast's full awareness
that they were animated drawings
and in an animated movie. So, it
was not unusual for two
characters in pursuit of another
to suddenly find themselves and
their surroundings in black and
white. Retracing their steps, they
find a sign reading "Technicolor
Ends Here
In the "Screwy Truant the
cartoon is disrupted by a wolf
pursuing Red Riding Hood.
Screwball Squirrel, the cartoon's
star, called the wolf aside and
proved to him he's in the wrong
cartoon by pulling down, shade-
like from thin air, the opening
credits depicting Screwy's face,
logo, and the legend, "Directed
bv Tex A . er
But perhaps Avery's most
stunning gag of this type is in the
"Magical Maestro We've all
laughed at a twitching hair
shadow which gets projected on
the screen along with the film.
Avery intentionaly had a hair
animated into the film with
typical spasmodic movement
until one ofthe characters grabs it
and throws it out of the scene!
The animated hair was so realistic
that projectionists were trying to
blow it out of the projector gate.
Avery, like many successful ar-
tists, created to please himself.
Subsequently, his cartoons were
adult oriented. His sexy, show-
girl character, Red, was the
epitomy of licentiousness.
She appeared under aliases of
Red Hot Riding Hood, Little Eva
and the lady known as Lou in
various cartoons, always
stimulating Avery's an-
thropomorphic wolves to new
heights of self-inflicted abuse:
eating their fingers, detaching
their heads and banging them on
the table, or burning their snouts
off with a cigarette.
Red was capable of sending
even lethargic Droopy into
ecstatic fits. Her debut in "Red
Hot Riding Hood" was so
popular with the World War II
military audiences that her se-
cond appearance in "The
Shooting of Dan McGoo" was
See ARTIST'S, Page 11
HPERS Offers Ski Vacation
B JOHN SHANNON
Vilr Idilut
While most of us are struggling
to stay cool, some snow skiing
enthusiasts are getting their skis
czossed. They're confused by an
uiipto�ede,iit�d glut oj choice �
not one but two ski trips arc be-
ing offered by ECU this year.
The Department of Health,
Physical Education, Recreation
and Safety (HPERS) has been
sponsoring a class in snow skiing
for 18 years now. Students who
want to satisfy their P E. require-
ment without running endless
laps or waiting in line to use a
bow and arrow can choose in-
stead to travel to Steamboat Spr-
ings, Colorado, for eight days of
action on the ski slopes. Of
course it costs a little more � the
trip to Colorado, planned for
spring break, March 9 through
16, runs $500 � but most
students who have taken the trips
think it's worth it, according to
coordinator Karen Israel.
"The difference between this
trip and the one offered by the
Student Union is that our trip is
tied in with a course said Israel.
Students can take beginning, in-
termediate or advanced snow ski
ing � PHVE 1150, 1151 or 1152
� and receive credit tot it.
The class meets on campus
about ten times, and covers the
history, fundamentals, clothing
and equipment necessary for
snow skiing. Preparation for the
trip also includes physical condi-
tioning with specialized exercises.
The course is finished when the
trip is over, immediately after
spring break.
"1 think this is the first time
ever for a ski trip out West said
Israel. Usually the class stays
closer to home; for instance, this
semester a trip is being offered to
Snowshoe in West Virginia. This
trip traditionally takes place over
Christmas break, and there are
still a few spaces left although it's
too late to add the class for
credit. Interested faculty, staff
members and students can con-
tact Israel at home at 355-6215.
Those who want to forego the
structure of a class-related trip
can wing it to Keystone with the
Student Union Travel Commit-
tee's Colorado Ski Trip, also
planned for spring break, March
7 through 12 Featured locations
on this trip are Keystone Moun-
tain, North Peak and Arapahoe
Basin.
The Colorado Ski Trip has
room for 40 skiers, eight to a con-
dominium. A fee of $550 in-
cludesround trip airfare on Pied-
mont, from Kinston to Denver
and back; transfer transportation
while in Colorado; full ac-
comodations and four days'
worth of lift tickets.
According to Liz D upree, Stu-
dent Union President, tickets are
already selling. "Go ahead and
start signing up said Deupree,
"even though the deadline for the
full balance is not until January
30 Students can get more infor-
mation by contacting the office
of the Student Union in
Mendenhall.
Surely any confusion resulting
from the multiple ski trip offer-
ings has been cleared up by now.
All that remains is to choose your
ride and hope for heavy snow.
Brice Street
Brice Street can be seen Saturday ��!� � The Attic. They have played their distinct brand of rock for
Greenville audiences oa many other occasions.
Jagged Edge
Hank Williams Jr. Expounds On His Life
And Reflects On His Long Career
NASHVILI E, Tenn. (UPI) -
Hank Williams Jr s hallmark is
to live out the sonc- he sings
These days, both Hank Jr. and
his songs are laid back, and his
legion of fans, particularly young
ones, love it.
In a capsule, Hank Williams
Jr. is at the top of his profession
and a case could be made that he
is currenth one o the top two or
three acts in country music.
In fact, he has had one more
No 1 chan singles than his legen-
dary father, who registeied seven
in his short career, and has 11
albums certified gold after selling
500,000 or more copies. Between
Oct 23. 1982 and Oct. 30, 1982
Hank Williams Jr. had nine
albums on The Billboard charts �
a feat unmatched by any other
living artist.
He hardly ever gives inter-
views. "I just go click when
somebody asks 'How's your dad-
dy getting along he explains.
Hank Williams died Jan. 1, 1953
Hank Jr. has homes in Mon
tana and Paris, Tenn the latter
being where his entire business
operation is located.
It is not by accident that Paris
is near Kentucky Lake, a paradise
for fishermen and hunters. And
that may be the secret for Hank
Jrs success. When he does
music, it's flat out music. When
he's hunting or fishing it's fiat
out hunting and fishing.
Williams was asked about his
success in drawing young people
to his concerts and in buying his
records.
He explained it thi �. iy
"I think all you ha e to do is
listen to the music. How many
hillbillies record with Huev
Lewis, Tom Petty, Dickie Belts
and John lee Hooker? It's as
simple as that. That's the nottom
line. When the (young people)
listen to mv albums thev don't get
a bunch of songs about I'm
drunk again and mv dain's
gone
"In fact thev doi- ce" a single
one like that. I made a conscious
decision not to do those songs a
long time ago when 1 kiot serious
about mv music I'm going to try
to make happv songs ,�r some
political songs, like 'A Country
Boy Can Survive � something
people can get excited about
Williams' love of the outdoors
is obvious. A case in point is his
latest single, "Country State of
Mind It appears headed to be
his ninth No. 1 single.
It's about being hot in the sum-
mer sun, gnawing a hickory twig,
fishing on a creek bank, sipping
that homemade wine and if the
sun doesn't come up tomorrow,
"people, 1 have had a good
time
The song itself is a story.
Williams redid an unsolicited
tape he received in the mail � a
very rare event in the music
business. He gave the amateur
writer credit on the song
Williams said he recently came
into contact with a couple of
"older" ladies who told him thev
like such things a- '�Am
Misbehavm a No. 1 song for
him earlier this vear
"That's all well and good but
neither one of them have pre
bably bought a record in 20 or 30
vears. It's a good thing I make ail
them other kinds of records for
those young kids William
said.
In most of his more recent
albums, the 3" vear-oid singe'
musician has included songs iike
"Ain't Misbehavm "Harvest
Moon" and other standards
"When my kids hear that the
say, 'That's a nice one. He wrott
that one Todav's generation has
never heard Harvest Moon St
Louis Blues' and aii those othei
great sTmgs:TDuirrTe WafFm
the fast-paced '80s world here
and I like to do those song
they've never heard. There's go
ing to be a lot more of them
"But they want to hear them
from the right kind of person
Thev want to be cool. The; are
not going to go hear them from
Johnny Mathis. that's for sure
These are great things and
thev've never heard them
Reflecting a bit on his career,
Williams said he started earlv and
saw everyone else make mistakes
"And then 1 nearly more or less
killed myself in a mountain fall if
Montana. You've got to take
control. That's the bottom line "
Williams was catapulted 500 feet
down the mountain The mishap
required a long period of physical
rehabilitation.
From The Not So flight
On Getting Lost At State
By PAT MOLLOY
tatmmumrmt txlitor
It was a lost weekend. We lost
the game. I lost control. And
everybody else was just lost.
Life, no matter how cruel,
trudges on.
In retrospect, I still had an
amazingly good time. Last
weekend in Raleigh was high on
the list of contenders for
"weekends I won't forget
Not surprisingly, it's also a
weekend I can't remember.
It ail started on Saturday
morning when some friends
decided to play Rambo and take
out my bedroom door with an
Uzi � well, it wasn't really an
Uzi, but at 10 on a Saturday
morning, (which traditionally
follows a Friday night),
knuckles on wood is an
awesome simulation,
i "Wake up, Pat. We have to
go to Raleigh Obviously my
friends and I were experiencing
a breakdown in communica-
tions. "Toajwefpo I mumbl-
ed. Which, when loosely
translated means "leave me
alone, or I will give you a
lobotomy
No chance. Stephen initiated
a conversation, not noticing I
was asleep � which is usually
how I hold a conversation with
him anyway.
The other Steve (they like to
keep their names simple so as
not to confuse each other) was
playing dirty. He simply popped
the top to a Pepsi and held it
under my nose � which, at that
point was located where my
chin should have been � it was
a long, hard night.
Anybody who has gone out,
drunken enough beer to own
stock in Anheuser Busch, and
WAHEURPHT.
vfcSdrm cpTof
RRlEXlH jklA�
lived to tell about it knows how
good that Pepsi tastes in the
morning. I got out of bed.
Being the gracious dudes they
are, they fed me (cold
McDonald's fries) and dressed
me (underwear and tennis
shoes); they even brushed my
teeth (with hot, stale beer).
And then we were cruisin
Road trips are always fun.
They give friends time to learn
something new about each
other. Thev also give you a few
hours in a car with a bong. Now
1 may have dreamed this, but
I'm pretty sure we plowed a
whole new passing lane onto
264 West. Never before have so
few smoked so much in such a
short span.
By game time, things were
really happening. We had mov-
ed the party to the Carter -Finley
parking lot � which is about a
light year away from the
stadium. It was a grusome
scene. Gone was a fifth of rum,
two cases of Budweiser, a half-
gallon of vodka, and everyone's
sense of coordination
Bill had taken to introducing
himself to anything that
salivated. This included a
shitkicker State fan who snottily
explained that he attended a
classier university than ECU �
all the while this same Skoal
sucker was relieving himself on
a Cadillac.
I guess it's good ettiquette at
State not to piss on anything
less than twenty grand.
From here, I could go into the
game, but it's been done far too
many times. I think I'll just go
straight to the after-the-game
activities.
Leaving the game was cer
See HAVING, Pate 11
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10
THEEAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER II. 1986
Digging Up Things To Do In Greenville
By DALE SWANSON
�rif Writer
You know, having become
something of a permanent fixture
of quiet sophistication here in
General Greene's town, 1 am con-
stantly stopped around town for
the latest news in what's-to-do.
And, with the dawning of a new
prohibition, I've become
swamped with the echoing ques-
tion, "Hey, Delbert, like what do
we do now? We can't go
downtown anymore, and like,
dorm rooms are just total bum-
mers. So, what do we do?
Study?"
Well, in most cases, studying
probably wouldn't be all that bad
an idea. But, you see what hap-
pens when the academic pressure
to overperform is too great? Just
look at the recent demonstration
of pent-up frustrations that near-
ly leveled that small town west of
Raleigh (you know the place I'm
talking about).
Such an outburst would be ex-
tremely detrimental to our fine
reputation as students with a pro-
fessional attitude toward socializ-
ing. We know the value of an en-
joyable evening out in maintain
ing an equilibrium between mind-
warping study and over-
indulgence.
So, what to do?
Did any of you know that there
are other theaters on this campus
other than Hendrix (Free Flix)?
It's true. And contrary to
popular belief, I found that live
performances at ECU are an
awful lot better than they're
cracked-down to be. Have you
ever really given a live play or an
orchestra a fair chance?
I was hauled down to McGin-
nis Theater by a lovely young
thang early this past summer. She
payed for the tickets and, with a
gleam in her sparkling blue eyes,
promised a full evening of enter-
tainment. How could I refuse
The play, as it turned out, was
first-class. Michael Learned, of
"The Waltons" fame, starred in
the Off-Broadway play, Ladies
In Retirement. The last time I'd
seen a live production like that
was as a youngster growing up in
a large northern city. This ECU
production wasn't the most
memorable experience of my life,
but the re-introduction really
turned my head. I ended up at-
tending the rest of the Summer
Theater shows and look forward
to the up-coming performances
there. By the way, Miss Blue-
Eyes was duly shown apprecia-
tion for exposing me to this new
form of entertainment.
If your interest has been pi-
qued, then you're really in for a
treat with the top-notch enter-
tainment that's been lined up for
the newly renovated Wright
Auditorium.
Then, if that doesn't sound all
that great, (and if it doesn't then
you deserve those impure white
powders,) there are a few other
things any of you newly under-
age people can do.
The Elbo Room is still allowing
eighteen-year-olds and so are The
Attic and The New Deli. My
highest recommendation goes to
The New Deli, however. Live
music in North Carolina, at least
on the small club circuit, is
among the best in the nation
If you like big, slick,productions,
maybe the Attic is the place for
you, though you'll have to get a
membership if you don't want to
pay through the nose everytime
you go in the door.
Sororities Contribute To Life
By KAREN HEIM
M�f f Writer
Sorority Rush Sign Up. You
heard these four words buzzing
across campus last week. And not
really knowing what you were
"rushing" for, you signed up any
way.
By now you've already begun
formal rushing, going to all the
sororities and meeting so many-
girls that your head is still spinn-
ing in the morning.
Because it is still the beginning
of the week you may have many
unanswered questions about
what being in a sorority really
means.
Joining a sorority can be lots
of fun but it also involves respon-
sibility and obligation. Laura
Sweet, Panhellenic advisor at
ECU, says that before you make
this commitment you should talk
to your parents and share the
literature you receive during
rush. You and your parents
should be aware of the respon-
sibilities and expectations you
will have as a sorority member.
Although each house may vary
on certain expectations, they all
ask that you be responsible in
three ways: financially, by paying
chapter dues and assessments on
time; academically, by maintain-
ing an average to above average
g.p.a. (some sororities have study
hours to this end) and finally by
being an active member of the
sorority.
Being an active member of any
organization requires time
management skills. Being an ac-
tive member of a sorority, as one
girl put it, "is a commitment
hard work, yet very rewarding
Sororities can help you to
decide what your priorities
should be while in college, and
how to put these priorities into
effect. Many members are active-
ly involved within their own
group and in other campus ac-
tivities while still maintaining
their grades and holding a job on
the side. No, they are not your
sorority superwomen � they mav
be found in many sororities.
Sorority members have often
been asked what sororities are
for. The answer is. not to party
with the fraternities. Each sorori-
ty has a philanthropy (a charity
group) that they support through
various fundraisers and in any
other way they can. Laura Sweet
noted that the sororities were
very busy working on charity
projects last year, almost on a
weekly basis.
Although they work hard on
their own, sororities also pull
together to tackle big projects.
Some of these include a campus
cleanup, working for the ECU
Alumni Telethon, baking cakes
on faculty anpieciation day, and
holding an Easter egg hunt for
the faculty and staff's children.
Panhellenic is the nucleus that
holds the sororities together. A
few representatives from each of
the twelve sororities comprise
Panhellenic under the guidance
and dedication of Laura Sweet.
She explains that "Panhellenic is
like a small tamily within itself,
and although sororities are
naturally competitive during
rush, after rush they are all very
compatible with each other
Two scholarships are given by
Panhellenic each year. One is
awarded to the greek woman with
the highest GPA and another to
the greek pledge with the highest
GPA.
Vice Chancellor of Student
Life, Dr. Meyers, feels that
"sororities add to the quality of
life on the ECU campus by stress-
ing academics, participating in
campus activities and by being
active members in the ECU com-
munity He also thinks
sororities give girls opportunities
to develop leadership skills and
teach girls how to get along in a
group.
One sorority member said,
"being in a sorority gives you a
sense of belonging. When I was
getting ready to come back this
semester I felt like I was coming
home instead of coming back to
school, because to me my sorori-
ty is a home
Being in a sorority doesn't end
when your college career does.
Membership, once initiated, is
for life through alumni status.
Dedicated alumni with extra time
can become chapter advisors to
collegiate members.
As another sorority girl put it,
"Sorority membership means
friendships and close bonds that
last long after your college career
has ended
Explore the freedom and pleasure of dance
Down East Dance has a creative ann
positive approach to cance making II i
total and fun experience Each class is
more man just another lesson
it's a gratifying adventure
sharec through movement
- :
m baiiel
are avaiiaoie (also availaDle for child
Call now for more mh rrr
down cwst
dance
419 Evans St. Mai
758 8198
Within walking distance from campus
HAWAIIAN BASH!
Don H Miss The Last Great Bash Of The Summer
Grab your jams and come to the Delta Sigma PhiDelta 'zeta Beach Da7t7m
Memorial Gymnasium after the West Virginia Game. The Blow Out starts at
10:00 p.m. There will be contests and prizes given! Tickets will be sold outside the
Student Store, at the game and at the door so be sure to be there!
Sponsored by Coca-Cola and Marsh's Surf-N-Sea
t$00tmmii&xr �tf
,n0,mmm�,0inmm&i1� m
'He
ECU's
Shares
fX N�v�t ttAI
Although Georgia arust Cherv!
Goldsleger is several hours from
her home base in Athens, she is
excited about parucipaung �
ECU's artist in residence pro-
gram. She describes her par
ucipation as good experience for
herself and her students
"In any teaching situation
when you are dealing with new
people, you constantly get new
insights and ideas Goldsleger
said. "It is a different kind of
feedback
Goldsleger believes that her
work will help to enrich her
students as well. "1 try to work
with students to develop their
own ideas and styles. I don't ad-
vocate one style over another,
especially mine
A selection of Goldsleger-
work will be on exhibit at Gray
Gallery until Saturday, Sept. 2
In addition, Goldsleger will pre-
sent a lecture on Monday, Sep-
15, at 7:30 p.m. in the Jenkins
Auditorium. She will explain how
her work has developed into the
Artist's Infiu
Continued From Page 9
played as a U.S.O. performance
With all the recent restrictions
on "violent" cartoon-
"cute" character, always a part
of the animation stable, has
become dominant. Such
characters are considered safe bur-
only if you discount their ability
to sicken.
They sickened Avery, too.
What a vicarious thrill, then, is
the opening of "Screwball Squir-
rel A cutesy, Disney-type
Having A Mi
And Complex
Continued From Page 9
tamly a tnck. Not only d� we
have to endure 57,000 loud-
mouthed drunks, who stomped
our collective asses, we had one
in the car.
Please believe, folks that one
State fan in the car is worth a
million in an open field.
Stephanie, Stephen's sister (sim-
ple minds, simple names) was
about as happy as a "hog in
slop as people from Raleigh
say.
"Hey, hey, EC, you don't
look so good to me Yeah,
babe. Hows about I reach
around and scatter your frontal
obe a bit, then everything will
ook just ducky. No offense, of
ATTIC
THUR "
Kasha Syx
l
ECU Adm.
$ 1 00 wcoupon
ECU Adm.
wcoupon
i
$1 50
V





ville
enter-
fup for
right
bid all
f! then
white
vMher
.der
I - ing
re The
Attic and The New Deli. My
higher recommendation goes to
The New Deli, however. Live
music in North Carolina, at least
on the small club circuit, is
among the best in the nation .
1 you like big, slick,productions,
mavbe the Attic is the place for
sou, though you'll hae to get a
membership if you don't want to
pa through the nose evervtime
ou go in the door.
Ml.
( '
419 Evans St. Mai!
758 8198
i stance from campus.
?
rff
U
fcir
I
'h party in
ut starts at
'd outside the
ere!
i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 11,1986
11
ECU's Artist In Residence
Shares Her Experiences
ECT NEWS BUREAU
Although Georgia artist Cheryl
Goldsleger is several hours from
her home base in Athens, she is
excited about participating in
ECU's artist in residence pro-
gram. She describes her par-
ticipation as good experience for
herself and her students.
"In any teaching situation
when you are dealing with new
people, you constantly get new
insights and ideas Goldsleger
said. "It is a different kind of
feedback
Goldsleger believes that her
work will help to enrich her
students as well. "I try to work
with students to develop their
own ideas and styles. I don't ad-
vocate one style over another,
especially mine
A selection of Goldsleger's
work will be on exhibit at Gray
Gallery until Saturday, Sept. 27.
In addition, Goldsleger will pre-
sent a lecture on Monday, Sept.
15, at 7:30 p.m. in the Jenkins
Auditorium. She will explain how
her work has developed into the
encaustic style.
The Greeks first used this form
of art to incorporate heated
waxes and oil paints in their pain-
tings. It was not until the 17th
century that an effort was made
to revive the technique. Today,
most artists view this art form as
too burdensome.
The creative ideas for
Goldsleger's work come strictly
from her imagination. There is a
constant thematic presence of
folding chairs in her drawings.
"Most of my work has the feel-
ing of an interior. Even the ex-
terior views have been opened up,
roofs removed for inspection.
Populated densely or sometimes
sparsely with chairs, my pieces
refer to human presence and
absence Goldsleger said. "My
interests lie in how we conceive
ideas and relationships and also
in the many alternative ways
these things could be conceived
An Atlanta reviewer compares
Goldsleger with French artist
Duchamp, who took otdinarv
objects and gave them meaning.
A New York reviewer describ-
ed Goldsleger's work as "ar-
chitectural fantasies � like
something done by Piranesi with
a fondness for folding chairs
"The architecture is viewed
conceptually incorporating what
we can know about space verses
what we can actually see if we are
in it Goldsleger said. "Similar
in many respects to Eastern art,
there is not one location from
which the whole is viewed. The
viewer must visually walk around
the buildings, rooms, and walls
to take in the total image
Goldsleger, who is teaching
three classes at ECU, finds that
the School of Art has an excellent
program.
"ECU students are serious
producing artists. They are well
informed and have a grasp of
what art is. This is a credit to the
students and the faculty
At the end of the semester,
Goldsleger will return to Athens
to prepare for a show in January
at the Bertha Urdang Gallery in
New York.
RUSH
SIGMA PHI
EPSILON
Artist's Influence Still Felt In Eighties
Continued From Page 9
played as a U.S.O. performance.
With all the recent restrictions
� n "violent" cartoons, the
"cute" character, always a part
of the animation stable, has
become dominant. Such
characters are considered safe but
only if you discount their ability
to sicken.
They sickened Avery, too.
What a vicarious thrill, then, is
the opening of "Screwball Squir-
rel A cutesy, Disney-type
squirel is skipping through the
woods, gathering acorns in his
itty-bitty basket.
Then he encounters Screw
who asks, "What's this cartoon
going to be about?" The squirrel
replies, "About me and all my
forest friends: Charlie Chip-
munk, Wallace Woodchuck,
Barney Bear
"Oh no! Not that Screwy
moans, then leads the little squir-
rel behind a tree, and promptly
beats the snot out of him.
Avery's influence on the
animation industry cannot be
over estimated. His cartoons
remaim colorful and fresh in the
1980s. Perhaps no better epitaph
could rest on Tex Avery's
gravestone than his own surname
which is derived from an Anglo-
Saxon word meaning "king of
the elves His "enchanted draw-
ngs" will continue to work their
special magic for years to come.
LIFETIME
EXPERIENCE
September 15-17
7:00-11:00 p.m.
Need A Ride?
Contact the Sig Ep House
505 E. 5th St. (Across from Garrett Dorm)
757-0487
Having A Memorable Time At State
And Completely Forgetting About It
Continued From Page 9
tainly a trick. Not only did we
have to endure 57,000 loud-
mouthed drunks, who stomped
our collective asses, we had one
in the car.
Please believe, folks that one
State fan in the car is worth a
million in an open field.
Stephanie, Stephen's sister (sim-
ple minds, simple names) was
about as happy as a "hog in
slop as people from Raleigh
say.
"Hey, hey, EC, you don't
look so good to me Yeah,
babe. Hows about I reach
around and scatter your frontal
obe a bit, then everything will
ook just ducky. No offense, of
course � it's only a game.
I think I'll end this article
here. I'm getting a little worked
up. It's just that I'm ashamed to
admit that people from NC
State can get on my nerves like
they do.
Afterall, who wants to I6se a
football game to a student body
who categorizes chewing tobac-
co as one of the four food
groups? Not me, dude.
�ew ' �
KAPPA ALPHA
ATTIC
THUR " 1
Kasha Syx j
1
ECUAdm. !
$ II 00 wcoupon
THE HOME OF SOUTHERN GENTLEMEN
ECUAdm.
wcoupon
i
$1 50
MONDAY
Seafood night with shrimp
and oysters on the halfshell
TUESDAY
"THE PLAAD" ?9k
Battle of the Bands
Champions
Tri-Sig Sorority Night
WEDNESDAY
"WAX IMAGES"
Chapel Hill's hottest new
band.
THURSDAY
Char-broiled Chicken Pick in
For ridet and information pleos� coll 757-0128 or 752-2124 and wo ore located at 500 East 11th St
� i�i � mmm ii ji m in � tm mi
�fci
4miim m mhui"
tLi w
iftft
�.4





12
JMjASTCAROLINlAN SEPTEMBER 11.
1986
Kappa Sigma Rush
For Those Exceptional Gentlemen Serious About A Lifetime Committment To Excellence
What Is Kappa Sigma?
Kappa Sigma is one of the oldest
and largest college fraternities.
Presently there are 201
Undergraduate Chapters and
Colonies at leading colleges and
universities throughout the United
States and Canada.
What Is The Purpose Of
Kappa Sigma?
Kappa Sigma is basically a
college social fraternity. Its goals
are many, but all center on the
promotion of friendship, loyalty,
and brotherly feeling.
� "� . s: �

Famous Kappa Sigmas
Robert Redford Lanny Wadkins
Rick Barry William Hewlett
Jimmy Buffett Willard F. Rockwell
Sen. Robert Dole Gen. Samuel Phillips
Richard Crenna
What Does Kappa Sigma
Offer Its Members?
) Introduction to new people
2. Development of a man's
organizational ability.
J. Job references from alumni
4 Assistance in or out of school
5. Leadership in school
6. Social in -Jvement
7. Lifetime friendships
8. Sense of identity through
group experience
V. Added motivation to remain
n school
10. Sense of unity through
common ideals
RUSH SCHEDULE
MONDAY, SEPT 15-7-11 PM
Monday Night Pigskin Pizza Bust
Pre-Game Warmup: ECU GOLDEN GIRLS
PTA Pizza
8 ft. TV for the Game
TUESDAY, SEPT 16-7-11 PM
Rock-N-Roll Rush Blowout
With THE USUALS
All your favorite snacksbeverages
WEDNESDAY, SEPT 17-7-11 PM
Formal Rush Night
EEE Sorority will be present to assist with Rush
Address
700 EAST 10th STREET
(Beside Darryl's)
If you need more info or a ride
Call 752-5543
'
m �-
� � "�����-��i" " m i� m j�. tt ii�i�ixhii

i
When You Strive For Excellence . .
Strive for Kappa Sigma
Beac
B MKHKI I ESHEE
Go! the back to schoc
Need a break from w �
ing for a good nme'1
answer is yes, thai
first "Fall Fest 86" a:
port the Arthritis I
The Fall Fest will
of the hottest he
OMEGA PSi P.
� e� � � -
s tMraavMa, a r � � �
AM aracaaai m
�ff
IMaa '0 r� .
our OMEGA ESSEN E
Su" Sec" ��
Par �ore - �
NCSTUDENT LEG S aU
n:on rnE�i
NCS
' or a mmn
It Menoera �- �
'ffj'fc amm tl
Ques' ana. t�
��5631 aJCSl - -
INTERNATIONAL !
ORGANIZATION
Te ��
��MM �t ' � - .
M De f er Or .
Jj- 4 pen
HONOR BOARD
Sep'e oe- lit ��
�e"or-s
PRIME TIME
D- e t � f sc � - -
Cru�oe for Ckr �� a-
T-Hjrvia, �� x pan i lm
1MB Tre( 'tjsors ��
anc sooc BtOi See ya
ALPHA PHI ALPHA
The 0'S' "d. �ec �-
C'ap'er of Aipna pti Alpha - -
ceesec �o announce ma r a w�e�-
m�l im�r A nil eilaU . .
encouraoec aryj n� tag � � �
oorougni, mrwii Sunday Sec-
7 pm ,n m� caoori.a �� ,� I
Cultural center Orra to .rnpre�� w
"rt
PHI SIGMA PI
IS your GPA 3 3 or Dee- I
W 3 anc �� ccd . howrV
S QTl P 5 NMJ MOTOr C-e
fWiowuc mee g 'or a ntareste
'� oe heio a' 5 c or Sec I
See ,x -fc
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
nm firjr -nee- � .
Reput ca-s � a a a -
25' Menoer-a ntaraataa
v 'eo c a"eo
ECU SURPING
The HrtM Marl imj ���-
Mroea Tfce'ea� �
��� Sec a- af a, , ,
tt� -nee-� I yaj wanf I
�m- m unawa �: �- - . - .
or Cee a 'Si �� i s.
vc a fwncl or � M� ItK
Georseto- Ac-i gcuj
1��3 a"c ��5 � oce � � bwcf
Birl� �ovj ca- s - �- -
New "ifoe-j �e com) j.
2ND ANNUALLIFE S A
HEALTH AFFAIR
The ?ho aii-j Lrles a Naarrh Att
be heic fVeo Sec" D ?-or- ie a
��erioeraii Spec a srea. �
� v�il�)t�e Sporjorec r. �e es a-
RetJOerice Cowc S'oe �M � �,
I'M irtrmt' Qeca'ora S'
�APTIST STUDENT UNION
The Bac �� Maaaal unam hat � s. v.
Or M onoa v s a"c a - -for�a worsf r se .
an Thurvaav ca 'ec ��. SE Dc
�W' S arKJ iO' -
MINORITY ARTS
COMMITTEE
The AAirxr ry a-j ce� taaaai
�r"�o a recepf or - - anarol hi mil
�t fhe ieaon.a S ft- i" MrajAiHat a
CMi'urai Cf'tr or P' Sec- ' from J
���' ECU t'uder-hi a-c ��� �� � � - ec
same ano afvjre �� shf-
MINORITY ARTS
COMMITTEE
The Minority a,rrt Co�- - � e S
a��t union � not actec" �� soc � anara
�� rn�moer� Members" r ope-
�Raaenri of a mirortv o'Ouc a
�jraatad oersori ahooio stop an e sc3e-
OHice in Menoena :� �r y'a
0W�ri�Y for ar ape ca on
YOU'
re
TJ �
Showdate
(ptember 11-1
8:00 p.m.
lendrix Theatre!





13
-
Beach Band To Play At Festival
Hx Mil MM I I- SHI K N
I

i a
0RG4
Alpha phi t
V-
- -
PHI SIGW
COLLEGE REPUB
ECU SURF
2ND ANNUAL L
HEALTH AFP,
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION
-
s
MINORITY ARTS
COMMITTEE
MINORITY ARTS
COMMITTEE
Mr B . ' . �

� �- . , � V .
, A' r V- ' �
i s
mnt
n 1 to

i iced
Rok Mount is the home ol this
band, which formed five years
Breeze has released several
songs, "Hello, Goodbye being
one ol their top hits
North lower, which was form-
ed in 1975, is from Raleigh
North lower originated as a
barbershop quartet at UNC.
Since then North Tower has
soared in popularity. This band
specializes in top fort) bea I
musk
Finally, the Embers vull he pre-
sent at the Fall Pest Some
this band originated bea h m .
in Raleigh The are one ol the
more popular beach bands
around. Among the Emb
singers are Jackie (.ore and H I
by Tomlinson.
Announcements
w
i)
Hai

9

t
Save your breath
Plant a tree to make
more oxygen
WHN A MURDf R CAS
tt THtS SHOCKIMC
iVMKW DO rOU TRlTST
rOW EMOTIONS
OR YOUR FVIDf MCI7
rr
R
EDGE
Q
Showdate
September 11-14
8:00 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
ECHO
a�r Srp'
� � ' g � f as
. � v. � f �� f � T
�� f h-�- � . . j� Ra Rim
Honor; ��r
�� � . ig jrri 5
�. � � � . � u � h . .
XJ � � . - I . . . � ?, �
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
EATING DISORDERS
SUPPORT GROUP

eld ever . ���- r . �
.
(S4
��� . � � �
LSS SOCIETY
COPING WITH STRESS
� . � �.� - � s. M �
NURSING STUDENTS
METHODIST STUDENT
CENTER
jnt 6 30
� � ' . ' A �
in . � �
� � a � . .

V Jt, �
e it$2.00 t.eryddy Til S 30 PM
H. RI HI RS
R
h Iirtv
. B V K i
S 1 IO if
Starts I umnrrov





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER II, 1986
13
S
?:
ilU
hutpii Sigrna
Members?
Mi
�ol
. n
- . .
Beach Band To Play At Festival
By MICHELLE SHEER AN
�M Writer
Got the back to school blues?
Need a break from work? Look-
ing for a good time? If your
answer is yes, then come to the
first "Fall Fest 86" and help sup-
port the Arthritis Foundation.
The Fall Fest will feature three
of the hottest beach music bands
in Eastern North Carolina. So try
to make it out to the Pitt County
Fairgrounds on Sunday from 1 to
7 p.m. The rain location will be at
T.Ws Nitelife.
Gates will open at 11 a.m.
Tickets are only $8 in advance
and $10 at the door. Advanced
tickets are already selling well.
The first band is called Breeze.
and they play beach music
Rocky Mount is the home of this
band, which formed five years
ago. Breeze has released several
songs, "Hello, Goodbye being
one of their top hits.
North Tower, which was form-
ed in 1975, is from Raleigh.
North Tower originated as a
barbershop quartet at UNC.
Since then North Tower has
soared in popularity. This band
specializes in top fortybeach
music.
Finally, the Embers will be pre-
sent at the Fall Fest. Some say
this band originated beach music
in Raleigh. They are one of the
more popular beach bands
around. Among the Embers'
singers are Jackie Gore and Bob-
by Tomlinson.
NC STUDENT LEGISLATURE
If you really care, then VOICE YOUR OPi
NIONI The East Carolina Delegation to the
NCSL will hold a fall semester organna
tional meeting on Monday at 7 pm. Room
212. Mendenhall Veteran Legislators ana In
ferested new students make plans to attend
Questions or information, call Gordon at
754-631 NCSL The Campus Voice!
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT
ORGANIZATION
The international Student Association
would like to inform all members that there
W'H be elections on Sat at Menoenhaii room
212 at 4 pm
HONOR BOARD
Attention all members Just a reminder
that we have a case tonight Thursday
September 11th at 5 30 in room 241
Men den hall
PRIME TIME
Prime Time is sponsored by Campus
Crusade for Christ We get together every
Thursday at 730 pm in Brewster Room
102 B Three reasons to have fun. fellowship
and good Bible teaching See you there
ALPHA PHI ALPHA
The distinguished men of the Eta Nu
Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity are
pleased to announce ther fall semester for
msi smoker AH interested young men are
encouraged and invited to attend You will
be thoroughly impressed Sunday. Sept 14 at
7 pm m the Ledonia Wright Alro-�merican
Cultural Center Dress to imprni. see you
there 0
PHI SIGMA PI
IS your GPA 3 3 or better ana do you have
between 3 and 96 credit hours? Then Ph,
Sigma Pi is the Honor Fraternity tor you! A
foiiowup meeting for an interested students
will be held at 5 pm on Sept 11 in Austin 13
See you there!
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
The first meeting of tte ECU College
Republicans will be held on Tues Sept 16 m
221 Mendenhall Interested students are .n
vited to attend
ECU SURFING
The first meeting if tonight at 8 pm m 221
Mendenhall The team tryouts will be Sun
day. Sept 21 at Matteras You must attend
the meeting if you want to tryout for the
team if unable to atend call Blair at 7S8 8393
or Cree at 758 9627 A special nocturnal
social function will follow the meeting at
Georgetown Apts ECU'S club of the year ,n
1983 and 1985 is open to all beach lovers (yes
girls, you can join the club if you don't surf)
New members welcome Be there!
2ND ANNUAL LIFE'S A
HEALTH AFFAIR
The 2nd Annual Life's A Health Affair will
be held Wed Sept 17 from 3-6 pm at
Mendenhall Special give-aways will be
available. Sponsored by the West Area
Residence Council. Student Health Center,
and intramural Recretional Services
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION
The Baptist Student Union has at S2 supper
on Mondays and an informal worship service
on Thursdays called PAUSE Drop by 511 E
10th St and loin Inl
MINORITY ARTS
COMMITTEE
The Minority Arts Committee will be spon
soring a recaption in honor of the renovation
y the Ledonia S. Wright Afro-American
Cultural Center on Fri, Sept 1 from 5 7 pm
Mi ECU students and faculty are invited to
:ome and share this event.
MINORITY ARTS
COMMITTEE
The Minority Arts Committee o� the Stu
lent union is now accepting applications for
iew members Membership is open to
students of all minority groups. All in
terested persons should stop by the Student
Union office in Mendenhall 234 or contact
for an application.
Announcements
The "Fest of 86" should be
lots of fun with music and danc-
ing. Organizer Ben Bunch said,
"We are happy to undertake this
event in Greenville, and I am
counting on the ECU students'
support
Dominos Pizza, WDLX 93
Pepsi, T.Ws Nitelife and
Hardee's are only a few of the
many sponsors for the first "Fall
Fest Net proceeds from the fest
go to the Arthritis Foundation.
Save your breath.
Want a tree to make
more oxygen.
OMEGA PSI PHI
The brothers of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity
I throwing a party tonight from 10 pm until
All proceeds will go to our 3rd Annual
Achievement Week program We would also
like to invite all interested ladies to attend
our OMEGA ESSENCE interest meeting oo
Sun , Sept 14 at 8 pm ,r Room 4 Mendenhall
For more irtfor contact any member of the
"a'ernity
Showdate
September 11-14
8:00 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
GRADUATING?
Seniors and Graduate Students are en
couraged to pick up a REGISTRATION
PACKET at the Career Planning and Place
ment Service You are able to leave a
resume with us ana establish a place to put
letters of reference on file You will be able
to interview on campus if you meet the
qualifications of the employers who come to
campus between October and April. Those
who wait will miss the chance to interview on
the 40 already scheduled interviewing per
sons commg m October You need to return
the cards and resumes in the REGISTRA
TION PACKET as soon as possible Recom
mended that it be in for those interviews by
mid Sept
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
Alpha Phi Omega serv.ce fraternity will
be having rusn on Sept 22 24 We invite all
students to rush this coed fraternity that
believes in service to campus, community,
ano the nation An information booth will be
run the 16 19 of Sept m front of the student
store or m Mendenhall Come by and join us
today'
ECHO
The first meeting of East Carolina Honors
Organization will be held on Thursday. Sept.
11 at 5:00 in the Honors Lounge Rawl Rm.
200 Anyone currently taking Honors classes
or anyone with an interest In the program Is
invited to attend. Contact Brian Burke
752 4999 for information or if you cannot at-
tend
INTER-VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
You don't have to be an athlete to loin us
for fun and fellowship tnery Wednesday
night at 7 pm in Rawl 130. Come check us
out!
LSSSOCIETY
LSS Society meeting 7:30 Thursday, Sept.
11 at Cubbies.
COPING WITH STRESS
A free mini class offered by the East
Carolina Counseling Center for students
You can: identify sources of stress, make
positive changes, manage your response to
stressful situations, leam to relax and Im-
prove self confidence. Sept. 15,17,It,22
EATING DISORDERS
SUPPORT GROUP
The Eating Disorders Support Group is
held every Wednesday from 5-4 pm in Room
10 at the Student Health Center For more in
formation contact Judith Yongue, MO at
757 4841
NURSING STUDENTS
Fall Graduates: in order to receive your
Nursing Pin in December, orders must be
placed in the Student Store. Wright Building
no later than September 19, 19M. Orders
should be placed at the Jewelry Counter
Orders must be paid in full when the order is
placed.
METHODIST STUDENT
CENTER
Friday night, 6:30 pm, we are painting the
beach mural downstairs Wear old clothes
and come for an evening of fellowship, pizza,
and hard work. Everyone is welcome The
Center is located at 501 E. 5th St across from
Garretf dorm. 758-2030 Sponsored by
Presbyterian and Methodist Campus
Ministries.
SSSSSSSSSSSSSSI
onsoiidafld
Tmiairfs
All Seats $2.00 Everyday Til 5:30 PM
BUCCANEER MOVIES
SfcliO (aHsi Sif.ua. Sh(M C
- ,
2:00-4:30-7:00-9:15
HEARTBURN
Ends Today! � R �
1:00-3:00-5:00-7.00-9:00
Killer Party
Ends Today! � R
hi
BACK TO
SCHOOL
; 13-3 13-3
PfcU
"V�-�
Starts Tomorrow
"It may be one of the best
horror films of the last decade � Philip Sulman
ssssa
J
'���i�i ����j-i Kumnjim mm
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14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 11. 1986
BLOOM COUNTY
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Sid Fruik. proprietor of ;hi bar -ih. a
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MARTIAN WOMAN
RAISED BY WOLVES
GIVES BIRTH TO
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By Jeff Parker
Photo by Daniel Maurer
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Campus Comics
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ACROSS
1 Mongrel
4 Epiclike
narratives
9 Timid
12 Beverage
13 Around
14 Garden tool
15 Coveted
17 Forays
19 Mountains of
Europe
20 Ripped
21 Tibetan priest
23 Coming in best
time
27 Forebodings
29 Precious metal
30 Either's partner
31 Footlike part
32 Self-esteem
34 Slender finial
35 Printer's
measure
36 Cure
37 Monster
39 Pennant
42 Extremely
terrible
43 Wooden vessels
44 Landed
46 Dwell
48 Speech
Impediment
51 Firearm
52 Ceremonies
54 Greek letter
56 Bitter vetch
56 Shatter
57 Condensed
moisture
DOWN
1 Uncouth person
2 Rubber tree
3 Recommences
4 Girl's name
5 White poplar
6 Deity
7 Symbol for gold
6 Walked leisurely
9 Glisten
10 Brick-carrying
device
11 Affirmative
16 Country of Asia
18 Dry
20 Walked on
21 Runs easily
22 Catkin
24 Nimble
25 Deep sleep
26 Threefold
28 Orators
33 Male sheep: pi.
34 Sent forth
36 Flock
38 Prepare for
print
40 Showers
41 Evaluates
45 Extravagant
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47 Prickly envelope
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written
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"summer'
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Nehlen's troops nill b� read
ECU Fi
B RICK McCORViAC
The ECU Athletic Marl
Department, in conjunction w
local merchants, will once
sponsor a number of prom 1
this football season. I
The first of the promo J
oe held at this Saturday' (
against West Virginia. K;
Fried Chicken is spor 1
Pom-Pon Day. with 6,000 P J
and Gold Pom-Pon� 4
distributed as fans enter the J
test.
The Pom-Pon gieaa wi
coincide with the tradu
tailgating parties that are a j
of even, football Satin
ECU.
In addition to supplying
Pom-Pons. KFCii
$1 from the purchase of ea
Pirate Tailgate Special
ECU Scholarship Fund
program will be in effc
every Pirate home game.
Other promotions - a
the upcoming season incluck 1
"Ain't It Great To 1
promotion, which a p acJ
for the Southwestern L .
gwrie. The grand-prize wi j
will receive a trip for four
Miami from Delta Airli
Nehlen
By SPORTS ST AH
Although Vev:
University partisans m j
pecting an easy time
day on the basis ol ECl 's
season-opening loss, the I
think twice, warns
knowledgeable Mountaineei
COach Don Nehlen.
irS
i
Virfiaia coach Dob Nehlen, w
bwt week, dosefl't nnderestiniai





By PARKER
THfc EASTCAROI INI AN
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Sports
SEPTEMBER 11, 1986 Page 15
Although Shelton Bryant's illustration depicts a sluggish West Virginia Mountaineer, you can bet Don
Nehlen's troops will be read to pla on Saturday night. But, so will Art Baker's Pirates!
ECU Football Promotions
By BRYANT
m
olinian
B RICK McCORMAC
Co.Sports Ldltoc
The ECU Athletic Marketing
Department, in conjunction with
iocal merchants, will once again
sponsor a number of promotions
this football season.
The first of the promotions will
be held at this Saturday's game
against West Virginia. Kentucky
Fried Chicken is sponsoring
Pom-Pon Day, with 6,000 Purple
and Gold Pom-Pons to be
distributed as fans enter the con-
test.
The Pom-Pon giveaway will
coincide with the traditional
tailgating parties that are a pan
of every football Saturday at
ECU.
In addition to supplying the
Pom-Pons, KFC will also donate
$1 from the purchase of each
Pirate Tailgate Special to the
ECU Scholarship Fund. This
program will be in effect for
every Pirate home game.
Other promotions slated for
the upcoming season include the
"Ain't It Great To Tailgate"
promotion, which will take place
for the Southwestern Louisiana
game. The grand-prize winner
will receive a trip for four to
Miami from Delta Airlines, five
days and four nights at the
Sheraton Bal-Harbor, four
tickets to the ECU-Miami game
on Thanksgiving Day, and com-
plimentary passes to a number of
local tourist attractions.
The third promotion will take
place during the Georgia
Southern game, which will also
be Homecoming. In addition to
the traditional Homecoming ac-
tivities, Coca-Cola and BB&T
will sponsor youth-jersey day,
giving away 1,250 jerseys.
Domino's Pizza will sponsor
Seat Cushion Day during the
Southern Miss game, while the
Cincinnati game will close the
season with Senior Day and
Scout Day.
As usual, the marketing
department has tried to provide a
number of different events to
promote interest not only among
the student body but to people of
all ages.
"We've tried to have promo-
tions that will attract not only the
students but all members of the
family as well ECU Marketing
Director Lee Workman said.
"This is going to be another good
vear for promotions and we're
really looking forward to the
season and all of the festivities
that go along with Pirate foot-
Nehlen Expects Tough Game
The Pirates were topped 38-10
hv North Carolina State last
weekend but Nehlen feels the
score was a bit misleading.
"They fell apart for some
reason or other in the fourth
quarter Nehlen said Monday.
"There was a fumble, they
dropped a punt and they threw an
interception. They just did some
dumb things and, boom, North
ball
Marketing Assistant John
Althoff praised the ECU students
for making the promotion so suc-
cessful in the past.
"We have one of the best stu-
dent body's in the country
Althoff said. "I know they will
come out and support us just as
they have in the past � and we
appreciate it
Althoff also mentioned the
Tri-Sigs and Gamma Sigma
Sigma as being "instrumental" in
conducting the many promo-
tions, saying that he and the
whole marketing department
would like to express their
"sincere appreciation for all of
the help these two sororities have
given
There will be an auction at the
Pirate Club Building Friday night
at 8pm. Among the items to be
auctioned off are: An Ernest
Byner jersey, two ECU football
helmets, anlndependence Bowl
jersey, an autograph football, a
pick-up truck, a VCR, a set of
tires and a number of gift cer-
tificates. All people are encourag-
ed to attend, and proceeds will go
to the ECU Scholarship Fund.
Carolina State had two or three
touchdowns just like that
Nehlen figues his team should
improve in certain areas in its
first road game, set for Saturday
in the confines of Ficklen
Stadium.
"If we don't (watch out for
them), then we're not concen-
tating as players and not doing
our jobs as coaches he said.
The Moutaineers launched the
new campaign with a 47-14
thrashing of Northern Illinois at
Mountaineer Field.
After viewing game films of
the victory over the Huskies,
Nehlen said he was pleased that
the Mountaineers were penalized
only four times. All on the
defense.
"That's encouraging the
seventh year coach said, "Maybe
we didn't execute as well as we'd
like, but we at least didn't have
any confusion where to go and
when to go
Nehlen also was happy with his
offense averaging eight yards per
play and a 19-point splurge near
the end of the first half. "Those
were things I really liked he
said.
Senior tailback John Holifield,
who led the team with 11 rushes
for 98 yards and two
touchdowns, was named offen-
sive champion of the game.
Holifield played only the first
half because of a sore knee.
Senior defensive tackle Jeff
Lucas was named defensive
champion with seven solo tackles
and two assists.
Despite the competitive
schedule that Nehlen's Moun-
taineers face, he insists his troops
aren't looking past the Pirates.
"I hope our bovs are ready for
ECU he said, "heck, I know
they have talent and they have
one of the toughest schedules
around
Ficklen Home Opener
Mountaineers Invade
By SCOTT COOPER
& RICK McCORMAC
Sparta E4Hart
A powerful West Virginia
Mountaineer team, under the
direction of seventh-year head
coach Don Nehlen, visits Ficklen
Stadium Saturday for ECU's
1986 home opener. West
Virginia's trip to Greenville
marks their first arrival since
1970, when they upended the
Pirates 28-14.
The Mountaineers finished
their 1985 campaign with an im-
pressive 7-3-1 record, including
victories in their final three games
of the season. However, the
seven wins were not enough to
earn West Virginia a post-season
bowl bid.
Nehlen has turned the Moun-
taineers into an Eastern power,
after inheriting a squad that suf-
fered through four-consecutive
losing seasons. The seven wins
last year were the fewest under
Nehlen since his inaugural 6-6
campaign.
After last week's 47-14 maul-
ing of Northern Illinois, the
Mountaineers will hope to use
their aggressive, overpowering
style against ECU. Coach Art
Baker ranks the West Virgina
program among some of the na-
tion's best.
"They are in a class with Penn
State and Auburn Baker said.
"They are a nasty, rough,
agressive, hard-nosed football
team
West Virginia offensively runs
the Multiple "I but basically
tries to dominate their opponents
physically with their running
game.
"West Virginia is the type of
team that runs the ball right at
"They are in a class
with Penn State and
Auburn. They are a
nasty, rough, ag-
gressive, hard-nosed
football team
�Art Baker
you assistant coach Paul
Anderson said at Monday's press
conference. "It's not that they
can't pass the ball, but they have
been successful in the past � just
overpowering people
physically
Replacing NFL first-round
draft pick Brian Jozwiak and
Chuck Joliff at the tackle posi-
tions will be the biggest hole to
fill on the offense. Center Brian
Smider earned a letter last year
along with Milton Redwine (both
at 285).
Running behind the mammoth
offensive line will be senior
tailback John Hollifield and
fullback Chris Peccon. Hollifield
rushed for 98 yards on just 11
carries and his backup Pat Ran-
dolph gained 88 yards on just
three carries against Northern Il-
linois last Saturday.
Quarterback Mike Timko v.a
less than impressive last week
completing just six of 19 passes
with one interception. However,
he did throw for 112 yards and
one touchdown. Last year's QB.
John Talley, was the leading
receiver in the opener with two
catches for 30 yards, including a
score.
Defensively, the Mountaineers
boast four All-America can-
didates. Defensive end Matt
Smith, who led the team in
tackles in '85, returns along with
Jeff Lucas, who had nine stops
from his tackle position.
Noseguard David Grant (6-4.
280) is another candidate for
post-season honors and had six
tackles in the Mountaineer
opener. The final candidate is
free safety Travis Curtis, who led
the team in interceptions, is
known as one of the team's most
See DEFENSE, page 17
NCAA Rules; Ho well Reacts
Continued from page 1
NCAA the following day that
ECU would not appeal.
Howell said the NCAA was
mostly interested in the bank ac-
counts and according to officials,
the accounts were not authorized
by the university and that they
(the accounts) were used for
"permissible purposes
Chairman of the NCAA In-
fractions Committee, Frank
Remington, told UPI wire service
that the accounts were "not used
with the intention to provide im-
proper payments or financial aid
to prospective or enrolled
student-athletes.
"Instead, the account was used
to pay costs incurred in operating
the football program that either
were unbudgeted or unauthorized
by athletics administrators
Remington added.
Remington went on to say that
the one-year probationary period
and an institutional rules-
education program were ad-
ministered to ECU to ensure that
the university maintains a clean
football program.
Contributing a great deal to this
story was Rick McCormac and
Tim Chandler.
The following is a Tuesday
release from the office of the
chancellor concerning ECU's
newly obtained probation.
am pleased to announce that
East Carolina University has con-
cluded its cooperative efforts
with the NCAA to bring a final
resolve to questions that were
raised regarding the conduct of
the ECU Football Program from
1979-1984.
On Apr. 23, 1985, I issued a
letter of self-report to the NCAA
which contained a number of
suspected violations of unknown
magnitude. This self-report was
immidiately followed with a
meeting in Kansas between ECU
and NCAA officials to determine
the course of action to be follow-
ed. The NCAA directed ECU,to
conduct a self-investigation and
report its findings for review by
the NCAA Enforcement and
Compliance Services. An exten-
sive investigation was conducted
over the next several months and
on Jan. 21, 1986, I filed the in-
vestigation findings, including
the supporting documentation,
with the NCAA.
The NCAA Enforcement and
Compliance Services performed
their investigation and verifica-
tion work over the next several
months and issued an Official
Letter of Inquiry on June 20,
1986.
In accordance with NCAA
procedures, ECU prepared and
filed its response with the NCAA
Committee on Infractions to
establish the issues to be
deliberated at the official hearing
which was scheduled and held at
Colorado Springs, Colo on
Aug. 17, 1986. A brief, friendly-
meeting was begun and conclud-
ed with substantial agreement
between ECU officials and
NCAA enforcement represen-
tatives, that a small number of
minor, technical violations of
NCAA Legislaton had in fact oc-
curred.
Frank J. Remington, Chair-
man of the NCAA Committee on
Infractions, informed me and the
other institutional represen-
tatives, that the Committee fin-
dings and any resulting penalties
would be sent to me as Chief Ex-
ecutive Officer within two weeks.
The confidential letter and
report were received on Sept. 3,
1986 and on Sept. 4, 1986, I ad-
vised Walter Byers, NCAA Ex-
ecutive Director, and Frank J.
Remington, that ECU would not
exercise its right to appeal any of
the findings or penalties of the
confidential report. In the fin-
dings there were seven incidents
of Institutional violations of
NCAA legislation which fall into
the classification of minor infrac-
tions which did not afford East
Carolina University a competitive
advantage.
The penalties were: a public
reprimand and censure will be
issued by the NCAA and the In-
stituion will be placed on proba-
tion for one year.
The reqirement to be met dur-
ing probation is that we develop
and implement a rules education
program for Athletic Department
staff members and report our
progress to the SCAA on or
before Jan. 1, 1987.
It is particularly noteworthy
that no additional penalties wen
levied against the Institution, in-
dividual sports progams, or any
Athletic Department personnel.
ECU is not restricted for post-
season competition, Tl' ex-
posure, recruiting, or personnel
duties.
Sports Fact
Thur. Sept. 11, 1959
Pittsburgh relief pitcher
Elroy Face ends a personal
two-season 22-game winning
streak when the Pirates lose to
the Los Angeles Dodgers, 5-4.
The w inning pitcher in relief of
starter Sandy Koufax is Chuck
Chum, who scores his third and
final major league victory
Face finishes the 1959 season
with an 18-1 record.
ECU Chancellor John Howell is pleased that the university has con-
cluded ill efforts to resolve the NCAA sanctions.
v�'Wi�i.i.
� a it -�. - �����?-��?�
�.�����imh wai
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16
THEEAST CAROLINIANSEPTEMBER 11, 1986
7
Classifieds
Welcome Back Pirates
CHI OMEGA: This Friday night we
are all mentally and physicall
prepared tor an evening of intense
enjoyment We hope you are ready
for the same Remember if you
can't hang, drink Tang See you at
11 p.m. The Sig Eps PS Watch out
for a mad dawg running around in
his birthday suit
AOTT CAR WASH: Come to
Hardee's on loth St. between 10 and 2
on Saturday and let the AOTT's
wash your car! YOU KNOW that you
want a clean car to tailgate in at the
WVU game!
PI KAPPA PHI. Car wash, Friday
at i at the Shell Station in front of
Farm Fresh. Also, house cleanup
Sunday at 2 Both events are man
aatory
ALL SORORITIES: The brothers of
Pi Kappa Phi would like to wish
everyone good luck during rush
STRATTON: Where in the hell is
Johnny Paycheck? I'm 37 years old.
Amen The Pro Cooler Player.
SIGMA NU: The Knights of Sigma
Nu will be having their Fall Rush
next week. The parties will be held
Mon Thurs in Jones Cafeteria from
8 11 pm. We encourage all males on
campus that are serious about being
Greek to attend! For info call
758 0870 and ask for Gene, Dave or
Cheeto.
SIGMA NU B R OT HER sTA IT L
SISTERS: Remember to wear your
togas for Saturday's game and the
festivities afterwards. Remember
Cheeto says, "If you can't wear your
togas wear nothing at all
FOUND: Ladies' watch. Call
757 6324 to identify and claim.
HOMEMADE HOT WAFFLE
CONESMI: We'll fill'em with your
favorite HOMEMADE ICE CREAM,
�op it with HOT FUDGE, tne CAN
3Y, real WHIPPED CREAM, and a
CHERRY Utterly Delicious
FOR SALE: Is it true you can buy
jeeps for U4 through the U.S.
government? Get the facts today!
Call 1 312 742 1142, ext. 5271 A.
WANTED
� i
ATTENTION: Tutor needed for In
tro. to Logic 1500 immediately.
Please call David at 752 1182.
WANTED: Need dependable person
to answer telephones. Light typing.
Hours 8:30 12:30 Mon. Fri. Call Pam
at 758 6200
TYPING: Professional service at
low rates includes: proofreading,
spelling and grammatical correc
tions; 12 yrs. experience; familiar
with all university formats. Cindy:
757-0398 anytime after 6 p.m.
THIS PICTURE'S BEEN
MISSING SOMETHING
�����-��
NEED A D.J.?: Are you having a
party and need a D.J.?: For the best
in top 40, beach and dance call
Morgan at 758 7967. Reasonable
rates. References on request.
WANTED: MALE DIVERS FOR
THE ECU DIVING TEAM. An ex
cellent opportunity to be a varsity
athlete. Call John Rose or Rick
Kobe at 757 6490
CLAUDIA: Congratulations, little
sis! You made it to sisterhood! Love,
Amy (YBS)
HANKS HOMEMADE ICE
CREAM: Coupon in Sept 9 issue ex
pires Mday, Sept 15, 1986
WANTED: Female student to assist
housewife with house cleaning and
child care in exchange for room and
board. Near campus. 757 1798.
RUSH PHI TAU: Sept 15 17, 7 p.m.
Do it) Mother would want you to!
ALPHA SIGS: We hope you and the
Alpha Sigs from ACC are as psyched
as we are about Friday night! Looks
like it's going to be an all-nighter
Love, the AOTTs.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female
roommate wanted to share two
bedroom apt. $97.50month and Vi
utilities. Close to campus. Student
preferred. Call ater 5, 758 3205.
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER-
VICE: Word processing. The
Dataworks specializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertions,
theses, resume's and more. All work
is computer checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary. Rates
are as low as $1.75 per page, in-
cluding paper (call for spedific
rates.) Call Mark at 757 3440 after 7
p.m.
RUSH PHI KAPPA TAU: Rush Phi
Tau, Rush Phi Kappa Tau, Rush Phi
Tau. Rush Phi Kappa Tau, Rush Phi
Tau, Phi Kappa Rush Tau Confused
about RUSH? Check ou the res, but
NO DOUBT PHI KAPPA TAU IS
THE BESTIr
501, SURPRISE! SURPRISE! The
Dest REAL dream I've ever haa
Love, 105
AOTT: Congratulations to our new
sisters: Amy Campbell, Diane
Felton, Kim King, Claudia Wiles,
and Laura Wood. Welcome to
sisterhood! Love, your sisters
TO MY NEIGHBORS: Mel, Tobi,
Nancy and Suz. I support you all the
way with ZTA: Best wishes Love
ya'H, Eric Weninger (Happy Birth-
day)
LOST: Heavy gold braided bracelet
wheavy clasp. Of great sentimental
value. Reward of greater worth of
fered. Please call 752-3774 or
758 4809 Lost between central cam
pus and 3rd. St.
PROFESSIONAL WORD PRO
CESSING: All your typing needs 7
days a week on our State of the-Art
equipment which features a letter
quality IBM Printer. Pick-up and
delivery available. 355-7595.
It's You!
OPEN LATE SEPT 13th AFTER ECU vs.
WEST VA
Weekend Special
Your Choice of our three All You Can Eat
Specials just $12.95
Sunday Buffet $6.95
10 Off with ECU ID.
RUSH: Tonight and tomorrow only!
Little sister rush at the Sig Tau
house 8 30 until Call for hoes
757 0)27 Come party with us.
SPRING GRADUATES
more days!
Only 240
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 3
bedroom house. Ill N. Library St.
S150 a month plus utilities shared.
Wash, dryer and phone Steve Mit
chem 752 8519.
KATZ PERSONALIZED COM-
PUTER DATING SERVICE: Is Of
fering special low rates to students.
Call or write for more information,
355 7595 or P.O Box 8003, Green
ville, NC 27835.
FOR SALE: Dodge Colt, runs good.
Will take ANY reasonable offer. Call
now. 758 6680, Catherine.
ALPHA DELTA PI'S: Thefunstarts
at 12 so ou better be ready, 'cause
on Pref Night you'll party with Phi
Tau Freddie! A shot to get started
and a toast for all, loud music, danc
mg, we'll have a ball! It'll be great
there's no doubt, cause Friday night
we're gonna BLOW IT OUT!
PI KAPPA PHI RUSH INFO : P
kaopa Phi will have an information
table in front of the student store to
day and tomorrow Anyone in-
vested is invited to stop by.
ADPIs We'll sv with the short
hearo around the world Surfs up
Bring your bail money to pay the jail
keeper We'll party all night and
sleep all day. The sip'n grip crew
SIGMA TAU GAMMA: Brother rush
is Mon Thurs A fraternity where
you can be yourself
KA LITTLE SISTERS: Welcome
back! Our first meeting will be Sept.
14 at 7 pm. It's very important ou
attend. Mandatory! Let's make this
a GREAT semester.
FOUND: Black lab puppy around
3rd & 4th Streets, last Monday night,
Sept 1. Call 758 4019.
WANTED: 2 roommates to share
bedroom at Georgetown Apts.
Prefer non smokers. Call 757 3038
Rent S117month.
WANTED: Used scuba gear in good
condition and reasonable price.
Phone: 753 2245.
FOR SALE: O'Sullivan wood stereo
cabinet, 5 shelves with double smok
ed glass doors. $50. Call 758-7723.
Give a hoot.
Don't pollute.
Forest Service, 1 LS.D.A. �3
FOR SALE: Ross 10 speed bike, 2
yrs. old, like new. $85 includes
lockchain. Call Betsy at 752 4973 or
758 2874.
LIFE'S A HEALTH AFFAIR: Spend
a healthy afternoon with us at the
2nd Annual Life's A Health Affair,
Wed . Sept. 17 from 3-6 pm at
Menoenhall Student Center. Fun,
games, exhibits, free give a ways
Sponsored by the West Area
Residence Council, Student Health
Service and intramural Recrea
tional Services
HEY TKE'S: Better get some rest
cause Pref Night with Delta Zeta is
going to be the best! We love ya.
Delta Zeta
See CLASSIFIEDS, page 18
ABORTOSS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
1205 Abortion from 1? to 18 weeks a!
additional cost. Pregnant Test, Birth Control.
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For
further information, call 832-0535 (toll tree
number: 1-800-532-5384) between 9 am and 5
p m. weekdays. General anesthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
SIGMA NU: The Knights of Sigma
Nu W'H be meeting this Thurs night
at Pizza Hut on loth st at 8 pm We
will be tailgating before Saturday's
game in the parking lot at Rose High
School starting around 4 pm There
win be a post game party at Gene's
apt Wear our togas!
TO ALL THE WILD WOMEN AT
ECU: Kenny Bourgeois is out there
waiting for you! Room 216A Scott
Dorm, ph 758 7719
SIGMA NU: The Knights Of Sigma
Nu will be having their regular
meeting in Room 221 Mendenhali
Sunday night at 930 pm. Lil Sisters
are asked to meet upstairs in
Mendenhali at 830 on Sunday for a
special meeting.
MICHELLE E The trip on bus No
1 with SPE started out to fun indeed
Bacardi, Seagrams ana vodka in
hana. the trip to State promised to be
grand. But just outside Raleigh you
were such a sight, that Virginia
Gentleman did not do you right The
smell of VG all over the floor, made
all of bus no 1 run for the door
Thanks to everyone who watched
her ou guys were great,so Tara and
Barb could go watch NC. State.
SCOTT AVERY: I'm glad you can
play but please be carefulAnne
HEY NOW DEADHEADS: Miss the
DC shows? This Friday at 10 pm
we'll hear it on WZMB, 91 3 FM.
Every Friday night from 8 pm to
midnight is ROCK-OUTLET with
DEAD REDD Enjoy the show!
Jerry is OK !
SCUBA DIVERS: The Coral Ree.
Dive Club will hold the 1st meeting
of the semester at Hooters, Thurs.
911 at 10 pm. Nominations for club
officers will be taken. Please attend!
SCOTT AND TIM: Sorry youhad to
see me in such great shape at the
tailgate party, but next time you
great sportswriters lose your press
passes, come find me and let's par
ty! Love, Anne, the typesetter from
Jersev
NEW Try one of Hank's NEW
Treasure Chest Treats
Guaranteed to make your evening
complete
Scholarships for
medical and senior
pre-med students
Medical school costs are rising every day
They're climbing faster than many students can
handle without the right kind of financial help.
If you're a medical student, the Air Force may
have the best answer for you. We offer an excel-
lent scholarship program that can ease the finan-
cial strain of medical or osteopathy school and
allow you to concentrate on your studies. Par-
ticipation is based on competitive selection. Let
the Air Force make an investment in your profes-
sional future. For more information contact:
TSgt. McCullen
919-
856-4130
A great way of life
Tailgating Baskets
For 2 or More
Wine or imported heer
Ham & Cheese Cn issants
New York Cheesecake
Pepperoni, Cheese & Crackers
Pirates's Handful of Candy
Purple & Gold Jellybeans, etc.
Plates, Forks & Cups Included.
$24.99
Pick up Saturday before the game
Call ahead for your baskets
Greenville Square
iMM'HHMIMmiHHIIIIIIIimillMIIMIIIIIIIM.HMIH.HHIIHHIIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIg
TO THE OWNER OF THE BLUE
NISSAN PICKUP: State Tailgate
was a blast. Sorry we missed you
Potato salad was great, where are
you parking Saturday? The party
from 647 Ramada? Get it right Bill
YUM Homemade Oreo Ice
Cream with MSiM Cands blended
ir.to it. YUM Only at Hank's
Homemade Ice Cream (beside Wen
dy's). It can't be beat
SCOTT SNYDER: BrylCream, a lit-
tle dab will do ya! Use as directed
RRRRRR
Every Thursday Night Is
TACO NIGHT
Two Great Tacos for only. 99
60 oz. Pitchers $1.99
Offer Good From 7p.rnU p.m. - Not Valid on Deliveries
ALL DAY FRIDAY
32 oz. Bucket of Your Favorite Draft
THE VESSEL, THE BANDIT AND
SHAW CHEVETTE: Stop on the
highway for a piss. Girls OTR. Who
bled on the sheets? David needs nan
dy help. Run, Andrew run. Making
babies at A&P Get your foot out of
my back. Ricky and Helen get a cab. QQ� 1
Bill's escort service, we left your I � yr I
muffler in Raleigh. Continue this 215 " I,0"rth Street 752-2183 i
f aturday. miniumnunmin�tminimiiimimiiiiiiiimiiimmHiiiiimiimimmimiimHifi
I� �.
Kentucky Fried Chicken
$1 99
VP A � plus tax
FOR ONE COMPLETE
2-PIECE PACK
2 Pieces of Chicken
1 Small Mashed Potato and Gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
Expires Dec. 31, 1986
HowTo Improve
AtlheBeach
If you're finding your bathing suit
tighter than usual, nows a fitting time to
join The Spa. Students can join The Spa
on a monthly basis for only $25 per
month. That's $25 for 30-days without
any strings attached.
The Spa offers 52 aerobics work-
outs every week, exercise machines, free
weights, steam room, sauna and whirl-
pool. Plus, there are plenty of trained
instructors to help you shape up.
So. if your body is flunking the
beach test, call or dnp bv The Spa for
more information.
Impn �ving y �ur grades at the beach
simply requires a little home work.
Greenville's
best health club lvalue.
SOUTH PARK.SHOPPING CENTER
GRtENVILLE 756 7991
ounu
AH-Amreu, C .ndtdt.
est Virginia b
Lmcnca candidates
linebacker Matl 5
Ive back Travis .
Uard David Grai a
ickle Jef? 1 ttca men
on in numerou
lecklis!
efense
Continued from p�t- i�
icious hiti
Perhaps th
A a. defensive unii is the r
mg of the ei
le corner. Sta
enn Curei
lollev and at the
)ts.
"The'r
Highest, m
lefense! n the land
Oommented 'Tne-
fressive and i
(500
Standard
Dek
ROTAfO
,22
SZZy-
35,
ELECTRONIC SHOWROOM
Athletics .
a
Frorem.ry men e,
' Wh-te' ft ,tock r . p. . t
mtramtrots �e en
onore' n one sp 1
Social Life . . .
It never con be s
eno a gocxi soc : fe Ge �
different peoce -
kn ' group One se?
� oppcx hes � �
Events such Cb 3 � ��
some dJ -t
. �ne vea
Alpha Sigma Phi
. 422 vv 5- St
Number of Chapte
Dae one P oce jf F
N a e Un ve-s
I Nc' one He
F'ce' ty Cc rj �(
; PhiianX' c Qi - �
�" Assooatior
Who' one � � - -

' -cs a coec rroteT .
I Beta Theta Pi
I 210 Wh -
' Nun-ibe- of Chapters N
: Date and Place of F
: Mi0r-
Fratem ty Cc � - .
r PhilantvopiC Oc
. What makes 5 Frolem -
BroVs he . - -e's
Delta Sigma Phi �
510 E 5- 5-
Numte- of O
Date one P j. e
College c " J � t New
Nat'ona Mej v.
Indiana
Frote ty Co � .s
F lontfvopit
What makes -
The Fnotem ty of I
Kappa Alpha
500 E 111Si
Number c Chapte s v-
Dote and Place of ecv - . -
Washington one Lee
Nationo HeooquOp��
Georgia
FrQtem,tS Colors (
rh.ianthfop'C Orojontzol '�' � Dysl
What makes th,s F-atp � -
1st fratenn,t on Compus
Kappa Sigma
700 E 10 St
Numbe o Chapters Not 3e� 200
Date and Place a4 Founding Decembe 10
Universe Of V-rgmia
Naticnoi Headquarters La
Chylottesville Virginia
y Fratem,ty Colors Scarlet vv- �? 5 ee
l Philonthropic Organization W
J What mokes this Frate
Leadership
Lambda Chi Alpha
� E Ei.zooetf Si I
iNumber of Chopters Nationally Over 20C
Date ond Place of Founding Nove
Poston University
(National Headquarters Location inc
Indiana
Proierntty Cotors Purple Green Gold
Philonthrop�c Organization March ai
What makes this Fraternity Unique
Diversity
AX

.
I





Back Pirates
I RE'S BEEN
OMETHING
X
i.
ou!
13th AFTER ECU vs.
F
id Special
1 � You an Eat
$12.95
I fet $6.95
i
hoot.
ollute.

CA5101J5
Is Baskets
More
red beer
Croissants
?secake
?ese & Crackers
dful of Candy
ellybeans, etc.
i Cups Included.
.99
the name

(iretnilie Square
3
rove
. shapx
flunk- j ' i
p by T' 5pai
it the beach
I ttle home work
GreenvtUe's
health dub vabte.
PHNGCENTER
GREENVILLE 756-7991
Mountaineer Deft
All-Amreica Candidates
est Virginia boasts four All-
America candidates in 1986.
Linebacker Matt Smith, defen
�e back Travis Curtis, middle
guard David Grant and defensive
tackle Jeff Lucas received men-
tion in numerous preseason A-A
checklists.
Smith has quietly earned a
reputation as one of college foot-
ball's more outstanding player's.
The 6-3, 235-pound senior was in
on five tackles, four of them solo
stops, against Northern Illinois
and shows a career total of 139
solo tackles and 76 assists.
Curtis is one of the hardest hit-
Defense Paces WV
Continued from page IS
vicious hitters.
Perhaps the strong point in the
V Va. defensive unit is the retur-
ning of the entire secondary. At
the corners, Stacy Smith and
Benny Cureton return with Larry
Holley and Curtis at the safety
spots.
"They're probably one of the
toughest, most intimidating
defenses in the land Anderson
commented. "They are very ag-
gressive and won't back down
from anyone
Sophomore Charlie Bauman
retuns to handle the placekicking
duties. In his freshman season,
Bauman connected on 14 of 21
fieldgoal attempts while nailing
all of his PAT's. Lance Carion
returns to do the punting chores.
Carion is currently averaging
40.0 yards per punt.
The Moutnaineers own a 4-0
lead in the series between the two
schools as they topped ECU 30-3
in their last meeting in '83.
TJHNSTON International Ltd.
TELEPHONES
Great For Homes, Dorms,
Offices and Apartments.
A variable In:
Beige � White � Cocoa
Brown � Harvest Gold
(500)
Standard
Desk
ROTARY
(2200)
Trendline
Desk
U-TOUCH
(2500)
Standard
Desk
U-TOUCH
' Athletics
Fraternity men enoy on oct.ve athletic existence
Whether it be trocV meets" field events or
intramurals, we enjoy competing against one
another in one sport or another
Social Life
AZP
It never can be said that fraternity people don't
en(oy a good social life Getting to know many
different people is only natural among such a close
knit group One seems to fall into a wealth of
opportunities for things to do with his spare time
Events such as Greek Week is ust an example of
some of the activities that fraternities plan during
the year
Alpha Sigma Phi
422 W 5th St 757-3516
Number of Chapters Nationally Over 100
Date and Place of Founding: December 6, 1845
Yale University
National Headquarters Location Delaware, Ohio
Fraternity Colors Cardinal ond Stone
Philanthropic Organization American Lung
Association
What makes this fraternity unique
It was a coed fraternity at one time.
Ben
Beta Theta Pi
210Whichard 757 0351
Number of Chapters Nationally Over 100
Date and Place of Founding; August 8, 1839,
Miami, Ohio
Fraternity Colors Pmk and Blue
Philanthropic Organization
Whot makes this Fraternity Unique
Brothers helping Brothers
azo
Delta Sigma Phi
510 E 5th St 752 9608
Number of Chapters Nationally Over 100
Date and Place of Founding December 10, 1899,
College of the City of New York
National Headquarters Location Indianapolis,
Indiana
Fraternity Colors Nile Green, White
Philanthropic Organization March of Dimes
What makes this Fraternity Unique
The Fraternity of Engineered Leadership
Kappa Alpha l
500 E 11th St 752 1005
Number of Chapters Nationally Over 150
Date and Place of Founding: December 21, 1865,
Washington and Lee
National Headquarters Location Atlanta,
Georgia
Fraternity Colors: Crimson and Old Gold
Philanthropic Organization: Muscular Dystrophy
Whot makes this Fraternity Unique
1st fraternity on Compos
Kappa Sigma IX JL
700 E 10th St 752-5543
Number of Chapters Nationally Over 200
Dote and Ploce of Founding: December 10, 1869,
University of Virginia
National Headquarters Location.
Cnarlottesvilie, Virginia
Fraternity Colors: Scarlet, White, Green
Philanthropic Organization: Muscular Dystrophy
What makes this Fraternity Unique
Leadership
Lambda Chi Alpha
500 E ElizobethSt 752-6159
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 200
Dote ond Ploce of Founding November 2, 1909,
Boston University
National Headquarters Location: Indianapolis,
Indiana
Fraternity Colors: Purple, Green, Gold
Philanthropic Organization March of Dimes
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Diversity
ters to play the game. A starter
since the third game of his
freshman season, he came up
with two tackles and two assists
against the Huskies and has a
career total of 105 solo stops and
66 assists.
Grant, who was named to the
Football News freshman All-
America team in 1984, came up
with five solo tackles and an
assist, two of them for a loss, in
the Northern Ulinios game. He is
considered a sure-fire pro pro-
spect.
Lucas also has definite pro
potential; he registered seven
tackles and two assists against
NI. During his West Virginia
career, Lucas has come up with
48 solo tackles and 36 assists.
Other West Virginia Players
To Watch � Tailback John
Holifield turned in a solid perfor-
mance in the season opener with
98 yards on just 11 carries, scor-
ing two touchdowns. He also
snagged two passes for 21 yards.
Wide receiver John Tally ad-
justed to his new position in the
season opener. The former
quarterback caught two passes
for 30 yards and a touchdown,
and also completed one pass for
six yards and another score.
Tailback Undra Johnson also
turned in a good afternoon's
work with 70 yards rushing on 12
carries. Tailback Pat Randolph
established a new record for the
longest run from scrimmage with
a 96-yard TD scamper.
East Carolina Players To
Watch � The Pirates are led by
quarterback Charlie Libretto,
who completed 14 of 26 passes
for 169 yards with two intercep-
tions in the setback to North
Carolina state. Fullback Anthony
Simpson carried the ball 13 times
for 48 yards and a touchdown
against the Wolfpack, while
tailback Jarrod Moody caught
five passes for 55 yards. On
defense, linebacker Vinson Smith
was charted with 10 tackles and
defensive end Walter Bryant was
in on eight stops.
West Virginia-ECL � West
Virginia has started the season
2-0 each of the six previous
seasons under Coach Don
NehlenMike Timko brings a
4-0 record into the East Carolina
game as West Virginia's starting
quarterback. He led the Moun-
taineers to season-ending trium-
phs over Rutgers, Timple and
Syracuse in 1985 and engineered
last week's 47-14 victory over
Northern IllinoisArt Lewis (10
Years) and Ira Rodgers (nine
seasons) are the only coaches
with longer tenures than Don
Nehlen in WVU history East
Carolina returns 14 starters from
last season's 2-9 team West
Virginia and East Carolina face
two common opponents in Penn
State and Miami (Fla.) in
1986The Mountaineers and
Pirates meet again next season on
Oct. 3 at Mountaineer
FieldWVU returns to Ficklen
Stadium on Oct. 8, 1988Satur-
day's victory over Northern Il-
linois gave West Virginia a 30-7-1
record in Mountaineer Field since
the stadium opened in
1980Since the 1981 season,
WVU is 27-4-1 at homeAlso
since 1981, the Mountaineers oun
a 43-16-1 recordIncluding four
bowl games, West Virginia has
played on the road 34 times under
Don Nehlen, owning a 19-15
recordWest Virginia returns
home next week to host rival
Maryland while the Pirates travel
to Auburn.
FROM COLLEGE TO THE ARMY
WITHOUT MISSING A BEAT.
Hie hardest thing about break
ing into professional
music is-well, break-
ing into professional
music. So if you're
looking for an oppor-
tunirv to turn your
musical talent into
a full-time perform-
ing career, take a
good look .it th
Army.
It s not
all parades
and John Philip
Sousa. Army
bands nxrk.
waltz and boogie
as well as march,
and they perform
before concert au-
diences as well
as spectators
W ith an average
of 40 performances a month, there's
also the opportunity tor travel -
not only across Amenca, but possibly
abroad.
Most important, you can
expect a first-rate pro-
fessional environment
from your instructors,
facilities and fellow
musicians. The Army
has educational
programs that
an help you
pavfororf-
dutv lnsrruc-
t tion. and it
you qual-
ity, even
help you
repay
your
federally-insured
student loans
If you can sight -
read music, performing in the Army
could be your big break Write:
Chief. Army Bands Office, Fort
Benjamin Harrwn IN 421o-VA;
Or call toll tree 1-800-1 ISA-ARMY
ARMY BAND.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE
winterIfratcrmtv (tuuuctl
September 1986
Welcome New Male Students:
On behalf of the Inter-Fraternity Council, it is my privilege to
welcome you to East Carolina University. I would like to take this op-
portunity to inform you of our fraternity system's official recruit-
ment period, "RUSH This is the time set aside to let the fraternity
system at East Carolina demonstrate the many positive attributes that
can enhance one's college experience.
The fraternity system at East Carolina has much to offer the am-
bitious college man. Opportunities exist in leadership, fellowship,
academic achievement, community service, campus involvement, in-
tense athletic competition, and numerous other areas which can help
one attain personal achievement goals. A greater number of men are
realizing these benefits as fraternity membership climbs at East
Carolina, as well as nationwide.
Beginning the week of September 11, many fraternities will be hav-
ing "open" rush parties foi all interested men wishing to affiliate with
a fraternity. An opportunity is being provided for you to visit all the
fraternity houses in search for the group that best suits you. To aid
you in your search, buses will be running to all the fraternity houses
from the College Hill bus stop. We ask that you please take advantage
of this service.
Sincerely,
ft ill fraternities hurt my grades!
� No. meres every evidence m0r (o.n,ng c
fraternity improves your chonces of graduating
� 33 of men on campus without fratem,ties ��
graduate, and
� 65 of all frafemrv -e- 5-2CKjC.e
� Scholarship programs of fratcm � es �oduce
greater academy success, a-d bee' ac- eve-e
for yOu
Fraternity Life . . .
To be m a fraternity lS r�ot merely to be .n a social
dub Fraternities are a way of life We share
expenses as well as exper.ences and we are
responsible to each other for ou' own actions We
live off campus for the most pet ve? we are ery
active on compus We en0 a good 'eiat.onship
with our university s admin,strati or Qnd W me pas'
few decodes, have become a ma(or pan- of me
university's student life
Sigma Phi Epsilon
ITT
David Dupree
1FC President
505 E 5th St 752 294
Number of Chapters Nationally Almost 300
Date and Place of Founding Novembe' 1 190!
University of Richmond Vrgm a
National Heodquarters Location Rc-y
Virginia
Fraternity Colors Purple Red
Philanthropic Organization Heart Fund
What makes this Fraternity Unique
Diversify
Sigma Tau Gamma
506 W 5th St
Number of Chapters Nationally CXer
Date and Place of Founding June 28 1920
Central Missouri State Teachers College
National Heodquarters Locatior Waer-s&urg
Missouri
Fatemity Colors Blue ond White
Philanthropic Organization Greenv e Boss Cub
What makes this Fraternity Unique
Academics
Tau Kappa Epsilon
757)! 2!
00
TKE
210 �HICHAD II DO �
�AST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
!�) ?5?-114UlJ
� CKEENVILLF. M C 2'IJ4
dkt
AXA
Phi Kappa Tau
409 Elizabeth St. 752-4379
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 100
Date and Ploce of Founding: March 17, 1906,
Miami University
National Headquarters Location: Oxford, Ohio
Fraternity Colors: Havod Red and Old Gold
Philanthropic Organization: CARE
What makes this Fraternity Unique.
Encourage Brothers to be involved in campus
functions.
Pi Kappa Alpha
210Whichard
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 150
Date and Place of Founding: March 1, 1868,
University of Virginia
National Headquarters Location. Memphis,
Tennessee
Fraternity Colors: Garnet and Gold
Philanthropic Organization:
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Group effort in reaching goals
nKO
riKA
Pi Kappa Phi
803 Hooker Rood 756-3540
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 120
Date ond Ploce of Founding: December 10, 1904,
College of Charleston, SC
Notional Heodquarters Location: Chorlotte, North
Carolina
Fraternity Colors: Gold, White, Blue
Philanthropic Organization: PUSH
(Play Units for the Severly Handicapped)
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Strongest Alumni Association
Sigma Nu 2 N
1301 CotoncheSt. 758-7640
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 200
Date ond Ploce of Founding: January 1, 1864,
Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, Virginia
National Heodquarters Location. Lexington,
Virginia
Fraternity Colors: Black, Gold, White
Philanthropic Organization: Kidney Foundation
What mokes this Fraternity Unique:
Founded against hazing
951 E 10th St 758 8222
Number of Chapters NationaMv Csc 200
Date and Place of Founding January 10. 1899
Illinois Wesleyon University
National Headquarters Location Indianapolis.
Indiana
Fraternity Colors Cherry Gray
Philanthrope Organization St Judes Children's
Hospital
What makes this Fraternity Unique
Diversity and Teamwork
Theta Chi
210 Whtchard
Number of Chapters Nationally l55
Date ond Ploce of Founding 1856, Norwich
University, Norwich, Vermont
National Headquarters Location Trenton New
Jersey
Fraternity Colors Red ond While
Philanthropic Organ izottons
What makes this Fraternity Unique
Personal development ond service to Alma
ex
ZBT
Mpnday (15th) thru Thursday (18th)
7:00-11:00
Zeta Beta Tau
2ipWh�chard
Number of Chapters Nationally Over 150
Date ond Place of Founding 1898, Cork College
New York City
National Headquarters Location New York City
Fraternity Colors: Blue, White
Philanthropic Organfeotion
Whot mokes this Fro�nitty Unique
Stress Scholastics, Oose-kmt members
'�"����� - � -
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18
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 11.1966
New CAA Coaches Get Wins
Classifieds
The Colonial's two new head
coaches made debuts last week.
James Madison blanked Robert
Morris 5-0 for Tom Martin, and
UNC-Wilmington stumped Bap-
tist College 3-0 for Jackie
Blackmore.
It was Martins's 120th win as a
college coach (he was previously
head coach at West Virginia
Wesleyan for eight season and at
Tri State Uinversity for one
year).
Balckmore's win was his first a
College helm; he was UNCW's
assistant coach last season.
George Mason's high-scoring
Sam Sumo made hes first game
of the season a good one, scoring
twice to lead the Patriots past
Howard 3-0. Sumo, a
sophomore, issed GMU's first
two games, both losses, when he
could not travel from his home in
Liberia to the U.S. He arrived at
GMU in the middle of last week.
Working It!
Double Plays: Chris Clay and
Mike Dee scored twice each in
Navy's 4-0 win over St. John's.
Kurt Leudy tallied twice in James
Madison's 5-0 triumph over
Robert Morris. Ron Raab netted
a pair in William&Mary's 5-1 vic-
tory over Mary Washington, and
Ricky Dahan scored twice in the
Tribe's 5-3 overtime loss to
Loyola. Sam Sumo got two goals
in George Mason's 3-0 decision
over Howard. Jamie Reibel kick-
ed in a pair in East Carolina's 3-0
win over Francis Marion.
American took runner-up
honors in the Oneonta State
"Mayor's Cup" tournament last
weekend. The Eagles fell to
Evansville 3-0 in the title match.
William & Mary senior captain
Scott Bell will set a school career
record with his next goal. He's
currently tied for the lead at 36.
Freshman Tim Leahy plays
defense for Richmond, but he's
one of the team's scoring leaders
with a goal and assist in two
games.
James Madison's season-
opening win over Robert Morris
was the Dukes seventh-straight
season-opening win.
William & Mary has already
played and lost two overtime
games: 2-0 at Connecticut and
5-3 to Loyola. The Tribe led
Loyola 3-1 before the
Greyhounds scored twice in the
last five minutes of regulation.
In James Madison's 1-0 win
over Georgetown, junior Eric
Miller scored the only goal, his
first in college play.
American was ranked 18th,
George Mason 20th in Soccer
America magazine's pre-season
Division I poll.
Continued from page 16
NEED A DE JAYET: Are you hav
ing a party and need a D.J.? For the
choice in rock, bop, mid-60's, beach,
funk, rap, soul, dance, saving and
oldies. Contact the TRASHMAN at
752 3587. Best rates in the south.
FOR SALE: Burndt orange carpet,
IV x 12 great for dorm rooms! Us
ed only i semester, excellent condi
tion, vacuumed often, a real bargain
for 150, or make offer Call Mark at
758 9414
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SERVICES: Typ
ing resumes, term papers, thesis
papers. Call SDF Professional Com
puter Services Inc 106 E. 5th St
(near Cubbies) Greenville. 752 3694
TYPING ALL KINDS: SI 25
page. Call 752 2100 after 6 p.m.
per
FOR SALE: Living room furniture
couch, chair, ottoman, coffe and 2
end tables. Excellent condition, S400
Call 752-1446 daily or 758-9122 nights.
YARD SALE: Corner of Lawerance
St. and 11th St. One block up from
Wendy's on 10th St. Saturday the
13th. 8-2.
WATERBED FOR SALE: King size
waterbed ro sale. Semi waveless,
heater included. Less than 6 months
old Headboard included. $250 Call
758 9768 after 12 noon. Ask for Craig
IBM-XT CO MPUTER: 2 360k
FLOPPIES, 640 K ON SYSTEM
BOARD, COLOR GRAPHICS
CARD, AMBER MONITOR, PRO
PRINTER AND SOFTWARE
SETUP. 11 MONTHS OLD
S2,450NEG CALL 752 0735 NOW
FOR SALE: Alvarez guitar wcase
S395 Bundy Saxophone wcase 1175
Dunlop Max 200 G Tennis Racket
$80 Can 758 0559
FOR RENT: 3 blocks from ECUT
bedroom upstairs apt Large v ng
room, bath and kitchen stove 8no
refrigerator furmshed Screeneo ,n
porch, ver n.ce $250month r�n
758 1274 after 6 p m
FOR RENT: 3 blocks from ECU 1
bedroom with private entrance
Utilities paid $160month can
758 1274 after 6pm
FOR SALE: Brother Electric
typewriter, built in correction, pica
and script ball elements, carrying
case. Good condition, $35. Call Bet
sy. 752 4973 or 758 2874.
FOR SALE: 1984 Camaro, V 6,
5 speed, t tops, AMFM auto reverse
cassette deck, low miles, excellent
condition, MUST SEE. $6,500 FIRM
756 6805
FOR SALE: 1984 Mazaa Rx 7 jet
Black, 20.000 miles, all the exVas
$10,400 firm! 758 4341 evenings anc
weekends
APARTMENT FOR SUBLET:
Everything furnished Rmggod
Towers room 103 '1 350 Call
7 58 V459
McCrady Renamed
Bern McCrady, a junior from
Greensboro, N.C has been re-
named to the North Carolina
Amateur Sports rowing team last
week.
McCrady, a political science
major, says he was unable to
compete in the Amateur games
because of personal problems this
summer. However, McCrady
feels he is well prepared for the
upcoming competition and is op-
timistic.
"Well, 1 feel like I'm in the
best shape of my life right now
McCrady said after a morning
workout. "If everything goes
well, I hope to be very com-
petitive in my next outing. I've
been working hard and I feel
something good is going to hap-
pen.
The next competition for Mc-
Crady is the Junior Challenge at
Lake Hyco in Person County in
mid December.
Cleansweep Sale
12 Price On All
Summer Merchandise
Tom Togs Factory Outlet
1900 Dickinson Ave, Greenville
EVERYTHING DIRECT FROM FACTORY
HUGE SAVINGS ON CALCULATORS
Wfcri
Hmmm Names That Wo Cannot Menttcm
TROCADERQ
cssani
X For An All-American Family Meal
SUMMER, FALL, AND WINTER MERCHANDISE
HOURS:
MON-SAT 10:00-6:00
Located In H� WKoUmU Aim
Jn Hm rtar ot ft builtf ng
MEN'S, LADIES, CHILDREN'S, AND INFANTS WEAR
New
All-American Food Bar
Meats
Salads
1
Hot Vegetables
Breads
Desserts
� Boat
moac
a a a c2 r'
BoonoS
E0 3 030000C
EL 5400 Special Price
EL 5500IISoentrfic
CE 126P Thermal Print'
iEr29PThrrnj(Pnntf
EL 506P Sontifc
EL 512P Scientific
EL 5510 Financial
EL 5520 Scientific
EL S15SScJ�'SontiTic
$35 00
70 00
55 00
. 7000
'500
26 00
70 00
70 00
1900
Texas
Instruments
Tl 36 SLR Solar Scientific
Tl 74 serf Basic Programmable
PC 324 Thermal Printer
Tl 55 ill Scientific
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$'800
94 00
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8500
30 0C
K HEWLETT
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HP 1 'C Scemif:
HP '2CF,nanciai
HP 15C Scient.f
HP-iec Programmer
HP-18C Nem BuemeasConeunant
hP-4'Cv Aavenceo P'ogr�mmati
hp-4'Cx Aenc�G Progfmmac�e
82 KMACa-d Reader
82!53AOct Wan3
82'43A T��erma Pnte
$4100
T2O0
72 00
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9' 00
27500
Ft '5M Scientific
c "OOOGGrmofticDii
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F x 90 C -edit Caro Scientific
c � 995 Soar Scemif
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e" � c P'ogrammer
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54 30
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21 00
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aALL Eta Mgggggaag
655 7 N L11
(312631 7800
Chicago IL bOt4-j
(312)677 7660
CO KROGERINC FOR ALL YOUR
Tailgate Party
Needs!
Register lo Wfflll
Pirate Football Tickets
2 Pairs To Be Owen Away
For Each Home Game Register Now!
All For Only
$3.89
Dozens of delicious choices.
Fill your platter and come
back for more as often as you
likeThe All-American Food
Barsm�loaded with everyone's
favorite foods.
Quality meats, all-natural salad
selections, hot vegetables, hot
breads, tempting desserts. The
All-American Food Barsra�now
there's even more to enjoy at
Western Steer.�
Because You Want An
All-American Family Meal
sm
ASSORTED TOPPINGS
Jeno's Pizza
10
Oz.
Pkg.
69
LIMIT 2 WITH
S10 ADD L
PURCHASE
6.5
Oz
Bag
WISE NATURAL
RIDGES OR
Potato
Chips
99
Ltr
NRB
DIET PEPSI.
PEPSI FREE OR.
Pepsi
Cola
99
GRIND IT
FRESH
Spotlight
Bean Coffee
1
Lb.
Bag
KRAFT
$199
W LIMIT
1 WITH
HO ADO L
PURCHASE
Magic Tree
Orange Juice
Gal
Ctn.
99
KROGER
OLD FASHION
White
Bread . .
16
Oz.
Loaf
25
TASTY
Western Steer
1
Family
STEAKHOVSE
�1986 Wistern Steer-Mom 'if Itars, Inc.
3005 East 10th Street
Greenville, N.C.
Weiners
79
JUMBO SUPER SWEET
Honeydew
Melons
OFF LABEL
Close Up
Toothpaste
$
4-6
Oz.
Tube
�J03
�129
ALL VARIETIES
WHITE MOUNTAIN
Wine
Coolers
VHS Video Movie Rentals
$
12-Oz
Btls
ALL FLAVORS
KROGER
Hundreds of favorite movfom
to efiooee troml
Natural Flavor
Ice Cream
is
Gal
Ctn.
199
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised
Items Is required to be
readily available for sale In
each Kroger sav-on except
as specifically noteo In this
ad. if we do run out of an
Item we will offer you your
choice of a comparable
item when available,
reflecting the same sav-
ings or a ralncheck which
will entitle you to pur-
chase the advertised item
at the advertised price
within M days. Only one
vendor coupon win be ac-
cepted per Kern.
Go Krogering
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
COOyrignt 1
�T�e Sav-On
Ouanrry eigrm wwnw
loot sow to setter
on
- �.






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Hardee's new
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Canadian Sunrise Biscuit.
Start your day right with the new Canadian Sunrise Biscuit from Hardee's. We sandwich egg,
cheese and two kinds of bacon between our famous Rise and Shine" buttermilk biscuit. And
serve it up hot for a truly unique homemade taste. Try our new Canadian Sunrise Biscuit. It's
worth getting up for every morning.
Hardee's Recipe for our new Canadian Sunrise Biscuit.
A thick slice of Canadian bacon
Three crisp strips of hickory-smoked bacon
Farm-fresh, Grade A egg
Real American cheese
All sandwiched in a Rise and Shine
buttermilk biscuit
Hardee's quality It's no secret.
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REGULAR ROAST BEEF
SANDWICH, LARGE FRIES AND
MEDIUM SOFT DRINK $2.29
2ria,pa!ICipa,in9 restaurants. Please present coupon
Svnv
pay any sales tax aue Coupon not
goop in compmation with any other
offers Cash value 1100 of V Offer
good after regular breakfast hours
through September 24,1986
1"?86 "ar dees Food Systems, inc
Vbrdegr
FREE
REGULAR COFFEE WITH
PURCHASE OF CANADIAN SUNRISE
BISCUIT AND HASH ROUNDS POTATOES
Offer good at participating Hardees restaurants. Please present coupon
oetoreordering Onecouponpercustomer.perorder.please Customermust
pay any sales tax due Coupon not
good m combination with any other � If
offers Cash value 1100 of 1: Offer ����� A�. �
goodduringregutarbreoicfasthours f f?
through September 24.1986 lCJIlUlCrllaJb
1?86 Hardees r-ooa Systems inc
BIG DELUXE BURGER,
REGULAR FRIES AND
LARGE SOFT DRINK $2.39
22MiCipat,n� Hardees restaurants Please present coupon
pay any sales tax due Coupon not
good in combination with any other Ml � p
offers Cash value 1100 of 1C Offer Umci JMkM
Sood after regular breakfast hours �Ml Ifir
irough September 24.1986 1 ICJIUICSnJk
E "86 Hardees Food Systems, inc
-

TWO REGULAR ROAST BEEF
SANDWICHES $2.39
Offer good at participating Hardees restaurants Please present coupon
PaSZfnTS?0mer perorder p,easCustome?must
pay any sales tax due Coupon not
good m combination with any other
offers Cash value 1100 of 1: Offer
good after regular breakfast hours
Sept 25-Oct.8,1986
"86 -iOfdee5cooaSyst�
Vfardeer
FREE REGULAR COFFEE WITH
PURCHASE OF CANADIAN SUNRISE
BISCUIT AND HASH ROUNDS POTATOES
3upon no
good m combination with any otne
offers Cash value 1 i00of 1� Offer
good during regular breakfast hours
Sept.25-Oct.8,1986.
must
Harder
4-
24 LB: CHEESEBURGER,
REGULAR FRIES AND
LARGE SOFT DRINK $2.19
2T�r 2��? afPalc'Paf'ng Hardees restaurants Please present coupon
Sn�S Onecoupon percustomer. perorder pease Customermust
pay any sales tax due Coupon not
good m combination with any other
offers Cash value 1100 of 1: Offer
good after regular breakfast hours
Sept. 25-Oct. 8,1986
1386 HaraeesFooa Systems x:
Pre cooked weight
Vfardeer
EEEE ORANGE
JUICE WITH
PURCHASE OF CANADIAN
BISCUIT AND HASH ROUNDS POTATOES
w2i,tiClt,n9Hardeesres,aurantsPleasepresentcoupon
good in combination with any other MB � m
offers Cash value 1100 of 1C Offer Wl Mm!m
I �86. MardeesFoodSystems inc ,���.
FREE ORANGE JUICE WITH
PURCHASE OF CANADIAN SUNRISE
BISCUIT AND HASH ROUNDS POTATOES
pay any sales tax due Coupon not
good in combination with any other
offers Cash value 1100 of 1" Offer
good during regular breakfast hours
Sept. 25-Oct. 8,1986.
1986 Hardees food Systems nc
Hardear





Title
The East Carolinian, September 11, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 11, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.491
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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