The East Carolinian, September 9, 1986






Qtoe
QIaruluitan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.61 No.4
Tuesday, September 9,1986
Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 12,000
14 Pages
Summer Rapes Prompt
Advice From Police
By LYNN WEAVER
Staff Writer
According to the official
Greenville Police Tally Sheet,
there were 14 reported rapes from
the beginning of June to the pre-
sent time. In eleven of these rapes
the suspect was apprehended.
The victims' ages range from
early teens to 55 years of age.
There were six college age women
raped and two were known to be
ECU students.
Due to this information, many
feel that students should be advis-
ed how to act and what to do in a
rape or assault situation.
Recent studies by the
Behavioral Science Unit of the
FBI Academy in Virginia, made
it clear that there is no valid in-
formation about what women
can do to defend themselves dur-
ing a sexual attack. Doctors inter-
viewed men who had raped ten or
more women and the results were
not only surprising, but also con-
tradictory.
The rapists' advice to women
was so different that the doctors
decided it could be hazardous to
offer any advice at all.
Although the results of the
study seemed negative, Capt.
Keith Knox, Crime Prevention
officer of ECU Public Safety
Department and Officer James
Tripp, Juvenile Division of the
Greenville Police Department,
both feel there are some actions
that can be taken.
For example, they agree that
using general caution and staying
alert can help prevent the risk of
being attacked.
Considering the above
statistics of rapes in Greenville,
women are advised to keep alert
to where the rapes have taken
place and use extreme caution in
these areas.
Knox and Tripp advise women
to use regular safety tips such as;
don't travel alone at night and
keep doors and windows locked.
They stress to stay alert when out
at night.
Another tip they add is to keep
keys in hand when walking,
because if needed they could be
used as a weapon in self-defense.
Even when women use extreme
caution, there is still the chance
that they could be attacked. Na-
tional studies show that one out
of every three women is sexually
assaulted.
According to May Hystead,
chief of the National Center for
the Prevention and Control of
Rape, there is little truth to the
myth that resistance will increase
a woman's risk of being injured.
Hystead states, "Two new
studies found that women who
resisted an attack were more like-
ly to escape, with only slight
bodily injury
She added that women who
acted passively and cried made
themselves look unapppealing
and defenseless, making their at-
tackers seem more powerful. In
short, submissive victims art
more likely to be raped and the
resistant victims were more likely
to escape.
Although the FBI's studies are
contradictory, they have to be
taken into account. The men who
had raped mass amounts of
women proved to have many dif-
ferent motives and ideas about
the rapes and the victims.
"Some of the rapists saidTell
them to scream, fight and claw
like hell but others saidTel!
women to give in , because the
guy is going to rape her no matter
what he has to do " states the
FBI report.
Knox explained that there are
many different factors involved
with each situation. Specific ad-
vice can not be given to women
unless a specific situation can be
made.
Victims should try to figure out
the rapist's motives and then
decide which approach to take,
whether it be resistance or sub-
mission.
When followed, the above ad-
vice and information could help
prevent or survive a sexual at-
tack.
Surviving a sexual attack is the
most important thing to
remember.
Time Out
ION JOBOAN � TUB PHOTO LAM
When the Intramurals Department held their "Anything Goes"
event last week, many students took time out from studying to try
new, and some impossible looking, stunts.
Results Indicate
Little Difference
Students Vote On
Representatives
By THERESA ROSINSKI
Staff Writer
The Student Government
Association is holding elections
for class and dorm represen-
tatives and day student represen-
tatives on Wednesday, September
24 from 9 a.m. till 6 p.m.
Anyone wishing to run for an
office may file an application at
the SGA offices in 228
Mendenhall. The last day to file
is Friday, Sept. 12.
Any student willing to run a
campaign must have a 2.0 grade
point average to be eligible to run
for an office. A $10 refundable
fee is also required for the clean-
up of their campaign literature.
"It's a great opportunity to be
involved in SGA. Students get a
feel for public speaking and
responsibility said Steve
Cunanan, SGA president.
See SGA page 5
ECU News Bureau
A study at East Carolina
University to provide insights in-
to student perceptions of and in-
tentions about the state's new 21
years drinking age law shows that
70 percent of students under 21
intend only to change where they
drink alcoholic beverages.
Of a representative sample of
440 students, 61 percent said
there would be "more
hypocrisy" about alcohol use.
Thirty-four percent said they will
use more alcohol. Twenty-two
percent said they would use more
of other drugs.
ECU professor Jerry F. Lot-
terhos, chairman of the Depart-
mant of Community Health and
director of the Alcohol-Drug
Program at ECU since 1972, said
he collected data in a research
survey of the ECU student body
which, he said, provides "signifi-
cant insight" into student percep-
tions and intentions regarding the
new law which became effective
Sept. 1.
"These findings raise several
concerns about the new age law
Lotterhos said. "First, 85 per-
cent of the students are already
alcohol users by the time they are
18 and 60 percent by age 17. This
is true in spite of the fact that we
have previously had age laws set
at ages 18 and 19 for beer and
wine.
"Why do we assume that our
young people will now wait until
they are 21?" Lotterhos said.
"Students do not, in general,
intend to stop dinking Lot-
terhos said.
"They indicate that they will
continue to drink, will change the
location of their drinking, and
some will increase their use of
other drugs he said. "This
seems to be in accord with past
prohibition efforts in our society
which resulted in a vast
underground activity relative to
alcohol manufacture, sales and
use
Lotterhos said the data for his
study was collected last April as
part of a long-term study of three
to five years to determine the im-
pact of the new 21-year age limit
on students' alcohol-drug use.
Of the 440 students surveyed,
77 percent were age 18-19, 10.5
percent age 20 and 12.6 percent
21 or older. Eighty-four percent
were white and 14.5 percent
black. Forty-seven percent were
male and 53 percent female.
Among findings in the Lot-
terhos study:
�Ninety percent of the students
use alcohol with about 14 percent
using alcohol on a daily basis.
�Eighty-five percent began
regular use of alcohol by age 18,
60 percent by age 17 and 32 per-
cent by age 16.
Asked to identify their primary
location for alcohol use, 46 per-
cent said they drink at home,
which means dormitory, apart-
ment or other domicile. Twenty-
seven percent said they drink
mostly in public bars and 20 per-
cent at parties.
In response to a question regar-
ding the new 21-year drinking age
law in North Carolina, 80 percent
said they disagree with the law.
Twenty percent agreed with it.
Students were asked what they
felt the beginning legal drinking
age should be. Thirty-six percent
said 18, 33 percent said 19 and
only 14 percent said 21 or older.
Other response data showed 1.1
percent favored 16 years or less,
two percent 17 years, seven per-
cent said age 20 and 2.8 percent
said there should be no age laws
Only 1.8 percent said people
should not be allowed to drink at
any age.
Students were asked how they
thought the law would impact the
behavior of the average ECU stu-
dent. Eighty-six percent said they
would change the location of
their drinking. Sixty percent said
the students would use more of
other drugs. Twenty-one per cent
said they will use less alcohol.
Thirty-four percent said they
would use more alcohol.
Asked what their personal in-
tentions are relative to the new
legal drinking age, only six per-
cent said they would stop drink-
ing. Seventy-three percent said
there would be no change in their
drinking. Twenty-one percent
said they would drink less; 9.5
percent said they would drink
more. Twenty-two percent said
they would use more of other
See RESULTS page 3
University Supplies Available Terminals
By CAROLYN DRISCOLL
Assistant News Editor
There are currently nine loca-
tions on campus housing com-
puter resources that are available
to students, according to Ernie
Marshburn, manager of
Academic Computing at ECU.
"Many students are not aware
of the facilities that are available
because they have not been open
in the past Marshburn said.
These facilities are located in
Speight, Ravi, the Physics
Building, joyner Library,
Austin, Brewster, Clement
Dorm, Scott Dorm, and Cotten
Dorm.
"ECU is now coming into its
own in terms of computer
resources, and we are trying to
provide the cutting edge for
faculty, staff and students at the
university Marshburn said.
He added that since last
August the number of terminals
available for general use has gone
from 20 to 100.
According to Marshburn, last
year in the Joyner Library loca-
tion alone, the machines were us-
ed bv 5000-6000 people, citing
this as an example of the needs of
faculty and staff that the univer-
sity is trying to meet.
This expansion now allows
students to go to another room if
all of the terminals are being used
at once, Marshburn said.
Looking toward the future,
both Marshburn and Janice
Evans, assistant manager of
Academic Computing, see even
greater expansion, depending on
the needs of the university.
"The faculty won't ask
students to do the work if the
resources aren't there. We're try-
ing to provide those resources so
that the teachers can upgrade the
quality of their classes. As their
needs grow, we will try to provide
the equipment said Mar-
shburn.
Evans said, "We're trying to
get departments which would not
normally use computers to use
them
For example, said Mashburn,
many of the teachers seem to
need a graphics package, so this
year, we will be making one
available.
The expansion also includes
more facilities in the dorms,
ON THE INSIDE
Editorials �Summer releases from R.E.M.
Features� Bd T" Smiths reviewed � see
ComksW FEATURES page S.
SportoH Art l1" commeats on Satur-
Classifleds12 d'8 ��� � �� SPORTS page
Announcements12 11.
depending on how well the pre-
sent dorm situation goes, accor-
ding to Evans. The terminals
have been in three dorms since
the second session of summer
school. Since then the hours have
been extended from 8 a.m. to 1
a.m she said.
"If they (the machines) hold
up well, if they don't end up with
beer cans smashed through the
front of them, we will be expan-
ding the project to other dorms
said Marshburn.
"It is important for students to
know what type of machine they
need to use before going to one of
the locations of campus said
Marshburn, "This is because dif-
ferent types of computers are
available at different places
While microcomputers can be
used as terminals for a main-
frame, they are used by most
students for software packages,
such as DisplayWrite, Multiplan
and dbase.
These machines can be found
in room 135, Rawl; Joyner
Library Micro Lab; room D-214,
Brewster; room E-210, Science
Complex; room 208, Austin; and
room 241 Speight.
Terminals, on the other hand,
are used mostly to program in
computer language as well as to
gain access to particular net-
works. They are not for software
use.
These machines are located in
room 106 and 10S, Austin; room
D-213, Brewster; room 241
Speight; and in Cement, Scott
and Cotten dormitories.
According to Evans, there will
be someone supervising each of
the locations during operating
hours who will be able to offer
general information; however,
they are not all consultants and
will not all be able to teach
students to use the machines.
"They are not there to do your
homework for you. Students
need to know how to use the
machines before they come in
Evans said.
She added that several of the
software packages have "help
disks" that students can use to
guide them.
Hours for general use are
posted outside the door at each
location.
BIXIM MMMtV - Tte� Bait CirrtMw
Pirate Fans
Pirate faas got the season's first taste of taUgattng at ECU's opening game in Raleigh Saturday.
Carter-FInley Stadium played host to 58,650 faas � the largest attendance ever at a football game in
N.C. This year's attendance broke last year's ECU � State record attendance.
T M
- � - -4,
j





Longtime University Activist Dies At 66
GREENSBORO, N.C. (UPI) �
Hargrove "Skipper" Bowles Jr
longtime university activist and
one-time Democratic nominee
for governor, died Sunday after a
long battle with Lou Gehrig's
disease. He was 66.
Bowles, a native of Monroe
and a Greensboro investment
banker, died about 6:30 p.m
said his wife, Deziree. "He was
sick a couple of years. It was just
a long illness she said Monday.
A spokesman for Hanes-
Lineberry Funeral Home said ser-
vices would be held at 11 a.m.
Wednesday at the West Market
Street United Methodist Church
in Greensboro, with burial at
New Garden Friends Cemetery.
Teachers
Return To
Classrooms
(UPI)Teachers ended their strikes
and returned to class in four
school districts in New Jersey, Il-
linois, Pennsylvania and Ohio
but labor disputes in 25 other
districts nationwide and two col-
leges locked out nearly 130.000
students.
Strikes disrupted classes for
17,600 students in Illinois, 5,800
in Massachusetts, 21,635 in
Michigan, 4,100 in Ohio, 45,496
in Pennsylvania, 1,900 in Rhode
Island and 6,650 in Washington
state.
At the college level, walkouts
by professors in Illinois and New
Jersey have left 24,000 students
without regular instructors.
In Newton Falls, Ohio, 100
public school teachers ratified a
new contract Sunday night and
returned classrooms today, en-
ding a four-day strike, said a
spokesman for the Newton Falls
Classroom Teachers Association.
In Mount laurel and in
See STRIKING page 6
Bowles ran in 1972 as the
Democratic Party's choice for
governor, but was defeated by
Jim Holshouser, who became the
first Republican governor this
century. A bitter runoff primary
between Bowles and then-Lt.
Gov. Pat Taylor has been partial-
ly blamed for Bowies' defeat in
the general election.
Bowles also served in the state
House from 1967-69 and in the
Senate from 1969-71 before step-
ping down to run for governor.
Former Gov. Terry Sanford
described Bowles as an "absolute
foe of injustice and personal in-
dignities and the suppression of
human rights
"There just never has been
anybody else like Skipper Bowles
� full of energy and vision and
faith in people, exuberant in
everything he ever undertook
said Sanford, in whose ad-
ministration Bowles worked as
chairman of. the Board of Con-
servation and Development. "He
swept along with him all who
might be associated with him in
any enterprise
"He attracted new business to
North Carolina with enthusiasm
and self assurance and belief in
the wonders of his native state
Sanford said. "And he led North
Carolina during my administra-
tion to new records of new jobs
and new investments and new in-
dustry
Bowles, long active in the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, was chairman of the
school's steering committee that
raised more than $38 million to
build the new Dean E. Smith Ac-
tivities Center, the largest drive in
the history of collegiate athletics.
Among the honors bestowed
upon Bowles, who was a member
of the university's Board of
Trustees from 1973-1981 and
chairman from 1980-81, was the
1985 William R. Davie Award,
the highest award given by the
Chapel Hill campus. He also
received in 1983 the UNC Board
of Governor's University Award,
the highest honor given by the
university system.
"His dedicated work on behalf
of the university is well known
said William Friday, former
UNC system president.
"I also would pay tribute to
him for his great leadership on
behalf of underprivileged people,
including those who suffer from
alcoholism and those who are in
need. Those efforts marked him
as a man of great compassion and
deep human understanding
Sen. Marshall Rauch,
D-Gastonia, served with Bowles
in the state Senate and described
him as a "wonderful, wonderful
man
"Skipper was one of the finest,
kindest gentlemen I've known in
my life Rauch said.
"He was completely dedicated
to North Carolina. He was an
outstanding senator. He was a
Democratic nominee for gover-
nor, and I still feel, had he been
elected, he might have been the
greatest governor we ever had
"By his service and devotion to
his state said former Gov. Bob
Scott, "he left an imprint that
will last through the years. Skip-
per Bowles loved his state and
devoted a large measure of his
time and expertise to building
it
DIRT
CHEAP
5
Inc.
Why Rent When You Can Buy!
We Can Save You Money!
FURNITURE APPLIANCES
2 Pc SET Mattress
Foundations
Single $136"
Regular $149"
Queen $199"
Z
3 pc DINING ROOM
Set$12900
5 pc DINING ROOM
Set $18900
3 pc LIVING ROOM SET
SOFA, CHAIR, & ROCKER
ONLY
$299"
758-1707
BUY-SELL.m2 N Greene S Greenville NEW - USED
The Rebel
East Carolina's National Award Winning
Literary-Art Magazine
is now accepting applications for the
following positions:
Poetry Editor
Prose Editor
Art Director
Applications may be obtained in the
Media Board Office and The Rebel
Office. Applications should be turned in
to the Media Board Secretary
Publications Bldg) no later than Friday,
Sept. 12,5:00 p.m.
COMING ATTRACTIONS
Recreation Co nmittee:
BingoIce Cream
Party
7:00 p.m. Tuesday Sept. 9th
MSU Multi-purpose Room
25 Admission
Films Committee:
Journey of
Natty Gann M
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Sept. 10th
Jagged Edge M
Thur Fri Sat Sun.
Sept. 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th
8:00 p.m.
We 're still taking Committee
Members for all Committees
1UHS
gathering place
��'�
! MA1Y-ELESHA ADAMS
Can caffeine be harmful to your
health?
Caffeine, ingest in moderate
amounts, is generally considered
safe for most people. However,
more research about the effects
of caffeine on the human bod.
needed. The average American
drinks or eats about 200 mg of
caffeine a day through coffee, ic-
ed or hot tea, chocolate, and
colas. Some prescription and
over-the-counter medicines con-
tain caffeine as well. Cold
tablets, certain aspirin compound
pain killers, menstrual drugs and
stimulants may contain 30 to 200
mg of caffeine.
Drinking two cups of coffee
(85-250 mg of caffeine) increases
alertness and reduces drowsiness
and fatigue, just the effects one
wants in that morning "p-ck-me-
fe
sit
otl
Svi
a'l
inc
I
nei
Terroris
ISTANBUL, TURKEY (UPI; -
Witnesses of the machine-gun at-
tack on a synagogue that killed 22
worshipers have disputed the
governments report that all of the
gunmen were killed in a grenade
explosion.
Members of Istanbul's Jewish
community, meanwhile, decided
to hold the funeral for the vic-
tims in the Neve Shalon
Synagogue where they were kill-
ed, if the temple is not in danger
of collapsing, a spokeswoman
said Sunday.
The attackers sprayed
machine-gun fire and threw
grenades Saturday at worshipers
as morning prayers were under
way in the synagogue, reopened
for the Sabath prayers after a
restoration.
Witnesses and Israeli officials
said the gunmen then poured
gasoline on their victims and set
them ablaze.
The authorities have not said
which group they suspect carried
out the attack.
Three Arab groups have claim-
ed responsibility for the attack,
and Israeli Prime Minister
Shimon Peres vowed that Israel
would retaliate, saying, "The
Jewish People are determined to
strike the murderous hand
The groups claiming respon-
sibility for the attack were the
Lebanon-based fundamentalist
Is!
� � �
P
M
ilia
I
sN
1st
&&
?
9
B
A
R
M
Best Tan
Thurs
Contestants be
Sign up
Tequila Bar 7!
t





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTMEMBER9. 1986
At 66
behalf
? WTO
rmer
itc to
ip on
pie,
r from
.ire in
him
my life Rauch said.
"He was completely dedicated
to North Carolina. He was an
outstanding senator. He was a
Democratic nominee for gover-
nor, and 1 still feel, had he been
elected, he might have been the
greatest governor we ever had
"B his service and devotion to
his state said former Gov. Bob
Scott, he left an imprint that
will last through the years. Skip-
per Bowles loved his state and
deoted a large measure of his
time and expertise to building
G ROOM SET
IR, & ROCKER
LY
199"
1
USED
CTIONS
earn
jay Sept. 9th
Room
f
Sept. 10th
I� m
un.
h, 14th
mittee
littees
Results of Survey
Reveal Attitudes
ADAMS
Can caffeine be harmful to your
health?
Caffeine, ingested in moderate
amounts, is generally considered
safe for most people. However,
more research about the effects
of caffeine on the human body is
needed. The average American
drinks or eats about 200 mg of
caffeine a day through coffee, ic-
ed or hot tea, chocolate, and
colas. Some prescription and
over-the-counter medicines con-
tain caffeine as well. Cold
tablets, certain aspirin compound
pain killers, menstrual drugs and
stimulants may contain 30 to 200
mg of caffeine.
Drinking two cups of coffee
(85-250 mg of caffeine) increases
alertness and reduces drowsiness
and fatigue, just the effects one
wants in that morning "pick-me-
up However, as the amount of
caffeine rises above 250 mg so do
the chances of becoming more
nervous and developing tremors
(the caffeine shakes). Insomnia,
restlessness, and increased urina-
tion and bowel movements may
also occur.
The possibility that caffeine in-
take is related to heart attacks,
fibrocystic breast disease (lumpy
or knotty breasts), and cancer of
the kidney and urinary tract has
been studied. Some researchers
feel that caffeine may be respon-
sible for these conditions while
others do not.
It's possible to experience
withdrawal effects from caffeine.
Symptoms may occur 18 hours
after the last caffeine intake and
include a feeling of fullness in the
head followed by a throbbing
headache, yawning, fatigue, ir-
ritability, runny nose, and
nausea.
Continued From Page 1.
drugs and 70 percent said they
would change where they drink.
Students were asked how they
would get alcohol if they were
underage and intended to con-
tinue to drink alcohol. Seventy
percent said friends would buy it.
Twenty-one percent said they
would use borrowed or false in-
dentifi cation.
Only half of one percent said
they would steal to obtain
alcohol; 4.3 percent said relatives
or parents would buy it
themselves.
In commenting on the study's
findings, Lotterhos said he felt
that students might actually now
be drinking in locations with
more implied danger than the
dormitory, apartment or public
bar, such as in the car, to escape
detection.
"Of course, student intentions
to 'use more other drugs' is an
alarming finding he said.
"Some students in the study
volunteered that it might be
easier to hide a little pot (mari-
juana) or coke (cocaine) in your
room than a six-pack of beer "
Of the findings that students
will obtain alcohol through older
friends, use a borrowed or false
ID, or obtain it through their
parents or other relatives, Lot-
terhos said, "These intentions
clearly imply problems for
alcohol retailers, public bars,
etc
"Overall, the basic question
seems to be whether we are solv-
ing problems or perhaps
generating worse ones Lot-
terhos said. "Drinking ages
have officially changed many
times in our society. It is ques-
tionable whether these type laws
actually result in a change in
drinking behavior.
"Perhaps we need to realize
that we are dealing with very
complex patterns of behavior
which are woven into the cultural
fabric of our country he said.
'These are behaviors which do
not respond readily to simplistic
answers such as law changes
jNatoB'hHiina5
IV
Loves Greeks !
0 i0 sonorities and" .
fr&f erniTies! A
Rush V
Terrorists Attack Worshippers
yai-&7-
SPORTSWORLD
��"ifflpgy

COLLEGE NITE
Every Tuesday Nite
8:00-11:00
$1.00wCollegel.D.
104 E. Red Banks Road
Greenville, NC
756-6000
ISTANBUL, TURKEY (UPI) -
Witnesses of the machine-gun at-
tack on a synagogue that killed 22
worshipers have disputed the
governments report that all of the
gunmen were killed in a grenade
explosion.
Members of Istanbul's Jewish
community, meanwhile, decided
to hold the funeral for the vic-
tims in the Neve Shalon
Synagogue where they were kill-
ed, if the temple is not in danger
of collapsing, a spokeswoman
said Sunday.
The attackers sprayed
machine-gun fire and threw
grenades Saturday at worshipers
as morning prayers were under
way Lnthe synagoguej reopened
for the Sabath prayers after a
restoration.
Witnesses and Israeli officials
said the gunmen then poured
gasoline on their victims and set
them ablaze.
The authorities have not said
which group they suspect carried
out the attack.
Three Arab groups have claim-
ed responsibility for the attack,
and Israeli Prime Minister
Shimon Peres vowed that Israel
would retaliate, saying, "The
Jewish People are determined to
strike the murderous hand
The groups claiming respon-
sibility for the attack were the
Lebanon-based fundamentalist
Islamic Jihad, the Interna-
tionalist Fighters Front and the
Palestinian Revenge Organiza-
tion.
Interior Minister Yilderim
Akdulut said the attack was most
likely carried out by two uniden-
tified gunmen who were killed in
the synagogue when their
grenades exploded.
But the witnesses disputed the
report.
"There were four terrorists
said Gabriel Saul, 16, whose
father was killed in the attack.
"One of them was about 22 to 23
years old, of medium height,
wore sunglasses and seemed very
nervous. I saw him running away
from the synagogue after the at-
tack
Gal Esin, an employee of a
shop opposite the syngog in
Istanbul's Jewish sector said, "I
saw two men running away on
foot
Turkish journalists said the
government version of the
massacre might be a ploy to put
off guard any gunmen who fled
by not confirming they are sear-
IIUIIU
ching for them.
"Police either think this will
help them apprehend the culprits,
or they are hiding their in-
competence said the editor of
an Istanbul daily newspaper.
UIM
Tj -w CLIFF � � rr
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
A Washington Highway (N.C. 33 Ext.) Greenv.lle. North Carolina '
Phone 752-317?
(Past RiverblitffApts.)
25
Flounder
Popcorn Shrimp
Hours 4:30-9:30 Mon. Sat.
-NEWLY REMODELED -
For your Capezio Dancewear, tap shoes,
ballet shoes, jazz shoes, let our
experienced shoe fitters help you.
The Plaza only.
YOiTRE A STAR IN CAPEZIO �
If you didn't get your copies at
KINKO'S
you paid too much
EMCmIkUmm,
321 E 10th St
752-0375
Monday - Fxiciay
7:00am- 10:00pm
Saturday
9.00am - 6:00pm
A ward Winning Ice Cream
Comes To Greenville!
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
$
Wt Wa TMt
321 Tenth St. (near Wendy's)
Picked as one of the Top Five Ice Creams in the Nation two years in a row!
Featured on PM Magazine
Selected for inclusion in "The Very Best Ice Cream" by Warner Books
HjT



�ft



�ft
ft
� "The Store's Strawberry Ice Cream was the wiener Akron Beacon Journal J
the kinds of frozen desserts that people breve blizzards for Carol Robbins X
and Herbert Wolff, authors of "The Very Best Ice Cream" S
Best Tan � Bikini Contest
Thursday September 4
Contestants be at Tequila Bar 9-4-86 9:00 PM
Sign up or call for more information:
Tequila Bar 752-S926 WRQR 8304943





�-




f
lj� In 1984 and 1985. Hank's participated in the National Ice Cream contest sponsored by the National ke Cream Retailen
� Association. Both years Hank's was selected as one of the top five ice creams in the U.S.
g Hank's uses a custom built ice cream machine to make itt delirious deasem. Modern ice cream machiiio
T quickly which puts a lot of air in the ice cream. Many of the ke creams you buy are half air. We had our ice cream freezer
!1J� specially built to turn the dasher at the speed of the old fashioned hand-cranked freezers so we can get the same rich pure
;� flavors.
l� A speciality at Hank's is the BLEND-IN. You pick your favorite ke cream flavor, and your favorite fruit or candy and then
Ef we Put them m our sPed1 blend-in machine and combine them into your own personal flavor. The blend-in machine breaks up
1�� the candy or fruit into small pieces and mixes it into the icecream. It tastes great becauoc the caiidy or fruit doesn't get frozen 4�
�W an it atill haa �� full ��, -All. �v a Z
�ft
�ft

�ft

�ft

4
�ft
�ft
Patricia "Hank" Steele, the founder of Hank's Homemade
Ice Cream is bringing her nationally acclaimed flavors
to Greenville
Old Fashioned hard ice cream made right in the store.
The very best ice cream, using the very best Ingredients.
�ft
�ft
�ft
�ft
�ft
�ft
�ft
�ft
�ft
�ft

�ft
�ft
�ft
laV so it still has its full flavor while the ice cream stays frozen, so you get the best of both
A Hanks will ke open from 11 a.a. to 12 aktalfht, Monday throng. Sotarday, mU 12 �
w
Special Introductory Offer
2 We want you to Had oat for yourself bow
W good Ice cream caa be. So Mag a Mead
t�� and come oa down to Haak's and take
L advantage of oar introductory coapoa of -
-a. fer(we're oa 10th Street �
� McDonalds and Weady't.).



toll
I
HOURS:
11:00 aa12Ai
MoaSat.
NooB-MldnifBtSaa.
� Hank's Homemade i
! 1 Ice Cream �
v 321E.10tfcSt.(aeittoWeady'i) J
BUY 1 Sundae or Blend-In ,
I GetOne
FREE !
���
m �nyrii m u M0�0nmm
U - - " ' 'm - g� fcggfc
J





Qtfte �ast fflarnlmten
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender. w Manatr
Daniel Maurer, ���� ��w
Patti Kemmis, mm �. steve Folmar. m,
Scott Cooper, o.JP�v� a Anthony Martin, busc, ���,
Rick McCormac, r� a meg Needham, or,�, m
John Shannon, ��, Shannon Short, mm �,�
Pat Molloy. �� hi i ���ar DeChanile Johnson, ����
September 4, 1986
Opinion
Page 4
Procrastinators
They Hurt More Than Themselves
dxJdim
Question: You're the president,
chairperson, or general manager of
a student organization or publica-
tion. A senior, perhaps even a
graduating senior, walks into your
modest office and hands you a job
application. The queries have been
answered with one, maybe two,
word sentences (if such an animal
does exist). The request for faculty
references has been left blank, as
blank as the look on the applicant's
face.
"I'd like a position on your
staff the student says. "I'm try-
ing to get some experience in my
field
What do you do?
Do you (a) laugh in the student's
face for asking the impossible (after
all, "experience in my field" can-
not be found in fifteen weeks); (b)
say nothing and offer whatever
menial task you have available, or
(c) offer the student a position that
you know heshe probably can't
handle and one you really can't af-
ford to give to an untried staff
member?
More often than not, lack of stu-
dent interest, which leads to insuffi-
cient membership in some organiza-
tions, forces the hand of manage-
ment to choose the third and most
unappealing option. The real ques-
tion, however, is who are these peo-
ple and where have they been
hiding?
These late comers are what we
like to call "resume writers They
are nothing more than pro-
crastinating seniors (sometimes late
juniors) frantically searching for
ways to pad their resumes.
For years they have carefully
balanced their time between the
classsroom and the downtown
nightclubs. Now, something (God
only knows what) has caused them
to realize, "Hey, I'm graduating
soon. I need something to put on
my resume
Unfortunately, these people are
seldom interested in gaining ex-
perience. Instead, what they're
looking for is something, anything,
to put on that blank page they call a
resume.
This looks-good-on-the-rez at-
titude can, and often does, hurt
many organizations. Due to person-
nel shortages, the resume writer is
assigned a position of responsiblity.
Quite often, they blow it. More
often, they just don't know how to
do it.
In many cases they just don't
care. They assume a prospective
employer won't bother checking
their past performance in an activi-
ty that doesn't directly relate to the
job they're applying for. Therefore,
in the final analysis, they do a poor
J0b. - tmttmmm � � �
C3o$CoWHAS
DETUNED FOR POSSSIE EOtfAGfe.
Rmracrea?.
DOO
Americans Have Blurred Vission?
If students would just realize the
importance of practical experience
early on in their college careers,
then both they and campus
organizations would benefit.
50RW5HULTZ IS HAVW6 A MAl�$S�At85f 6 gfflNG A
gjgjjgi w n$ WEWK86SB m w WE mmm
By MICHAEL KINSLEY
The art of Reagan hagiography has
reached its baroque stage. For In-
dependence Day, Time magazine's cover
featured the president against a
background of fireworks: a national
icon to rival Miss Liberty herself. The
theme of the current gush is that
Reagan's triumph is one of vision, and
cannot be dismissed as a matter of per-
sonal magic or luck.
In a swoony full-page editorial July 14
heralding "the onset of an era the
Wall Street Journal declared that "what
has been going on the past six years" is
not a peculiar accident of one man's
unique political personality Rather,
"Mr. Reagan has been successful
precisely because he is a president
operating from an agenda
The case being made is that Reagan
has gone beyond mere political success
and legislative victories. In various
areas, he (1) began with a clear vision;
(2) turned it into action over the opposi-
tion of skeptics; (3) saw the action suc-
oggjMMJ (permanently changed the
�pWlflcWlandSWpe.
Time: ,4Just as Franklin Roosevelt's
ideas set the style that would dominate
the next four decades of American
politics so may Reagan's.
The Wall Street Journal. "Like FDR,
Ronald Reagan is remolding the coun-
try's primary institutions and the prin-
ciples of its economic life
Oh, yeah? Let's take a f'rinstance.
How about tax reform? According to a
distinguished political columnist, it's "a
political triumph for President Reagan,
a landmark in the piecemeal destruction
of the New Deal philosophy
The Journal says the bill now in con-
ference is the culmination of Reagan's
visionary campaign to curtail "the
economic destructiveness of a steeply
progressive tax system
This is truly revisionist history. Far
from the culmination of Reagan's ef-
forts, the current tax reform is in impor-
tant ways a direct repudiation of his
1981 tax bill. That bill expanded
loopholes and tax shelters, and shifted
the tax burden from corporations to in-
dividuals.
This bill does the opposite. In fact, it
was the revelation that many corpora-
tions and rich individuals were paying
no taxes at all, thanks to the 1981 boon-
doggle, that created the political
momentum for genuine reform.
Reagan's idea was never tax reform as
such. In his mind lower tax rates were
supposed to pay for themselves through
the Laffer-Curve free lunch, or be paid
for through spending cuts he never
made.
Reagan's first public reference to tax
reform was an attempt to get it off the
agenda. In his 1984 State of the Union
address, fearing that Democrats would
make an issue of well-publicized abuses,
he announced a Treasury study to be
concluded conveniently after the elec-
tion.
Tax reform only became Reagan's
"top domestic priority" when it looked
like a winner. He never has invested
much of his copious political capital in
it.
As for the Journal's lofty notion that
tax reform reflects a philosophical vic-
tory over the discredited concept of
"progressivity this reform (unlike the
1981 bill) will make the tax code more
progressive than the current system.
That, in fact, is why it's going to pass.
The state of the economy is most
responsible for Reagan's standing with
the public. Yet on the economy, all four
elements of the new Reagan myth are
open to challenge. Reagan's economic
vision in 1980 was balancing the budget
and cutting government spending.
Whatever may have happened since
then, that is not it.
This year's deficit looks to be a new
record of $220 billion. Federal spending
is 24 percent of the GNP, also a record.
Even social welfare spending is down
only 9 percent from what it would have
been under pre-Reagan policies.
Far from reversing the heritage of
FDR and "testing the lower limits" of
"what government could do for the in-
dividual as Time would fancifully
have it, Reagan hasn't even attempted to
ask citizens to demand less from their
government, except for citizens who are
poor.
The gross national product increased
12.6 percent in real terms from 1981
through 1985. During the previous five
years, under the hapless Ford and the
feckless Carter, it increased 23.2 percent
� almost double.
Seen without rose-colored glasses, the
future looks grayish, too. At a moment
when everything seems to be going our
way � lower energy prices, lower dollar,
lower interest rates � we putter along at
a wan 2-percent annual growth rate and
a record $150 billion annual trade
deficit.
At best, we'll be paying the bills for
our Reagan-era consumption orgy for
years to come. At worst, Reagan's in-
cumbency may be seen as the beginning
of a British-style long imperial decline.
This is a tendentious analysis. But it ft
less tendentious than the analysis that
sees Reagan's economy as a grand vision
grandly fulfilled.
Equally skeptical and equally plausi-
ble analyses are available of Reagan's
foreign and military record. He's had
many successes, some failures, much
charm, much luck, some skill, a bit of
idealism, a bit of opportunism.
Weigh them as you wish, but for
heaven's sake get a grip on yourself: The
past five years have not been anything as
boring and uncomplicated as a trium-
phal procession from ideal through ac-
complishment and into the kingdom of
heaven.
Mr. Michael Kinsley is the editor of
the New Republic, excerpts from which
can occasionally be found on these
pages.
In Crisis: Losing Sight Of Minority Heritage
By CHRYSTAL FRAY
dai To Tb East Cmnimm
(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the second
installment of a two part article on blacks
at white colleges. This article was original-
ly published in The Idiom in July of this
year. See the Sept. 4 issue of The East
Carolinian for the first installment.)
The trend of college students in the
1980s toward apathy and non-
involvement is not limited to black
students, but it does represent a dramatic
change from the black students of the 60s
and 70s.
Most, unlike their counterparts of
previous decades, attended predominately
white high schools and have participated
in integrated sports and extracurricular
activities. Therefore, they are less likely to
support traditionally "black" organiza-
tions I or identify with traditionally
"black" issues.
In an article written for the Journal of
College Student Personnel Charles A.
Taylor, dean of students at Loyola
University in Chicago says "On political
issues the majority of today's black col-
lege students on predominately white
campuses do not truly understand the
issues facing the black community or
understand the effects of certain political
awareness. Many black students are
uninterested, not upset, and not angry
Taylor's profile of a black student on a
predominately white campus, although
not representative of all black students,
aids in explaining the current attitude of
many students and the reason for their
apathy.
Today's white colleges have moved
beyond integration, the primary focus of
the 1960s and 1970s, to assimilation where
all students attempt to become culturally
alike.
Assimilation for the black student
means the denial of his culture or
heritage. The student can no longer
"Think black, act black, talk black or
look black according to Taylor.
During this process, a white student
must deny nothing, and therefore, all that
is lost, is lost by the black student.
Taylor's profile states:
"Being black is to agree with whites
who tell me to forget about the dif-
ferences between the races and accept
people as people. I don't see color, just
people. That is why I do not join any of
these black organizations on campus.
What is 'black pride' anyway?"
What determines why many black
students leave, yet certain students remain
at predominately white colleges?
While conducting a survey for the
Research Triangle Institute, I asked 15
black freshmen (or students with less than
32 credit hours) why they chose a
predominately white institution.
Twelve listed among their reasons the
prestige associated with attending a white
school along with the idea that white
schools offer a better education and better
jobs after graduation.
This finding correlates to findings of a
study conducted in 1984 which found that
"Blacks are generally satisfied with the
academic quality and prestige of white in-
stitutions, although they recognize the
high psychic costs (Harold Cheatham:
Equal Acess; Progress or Retrogression)
These high psychic costs include the
development of low self-esteem, interper-
sonal conflict, and confused self-identity.
Many reseachers, including Taylor
himself, have been quick to blame the
problems encountered by blacks on the
students themselves. Doris Wright, a
counselor at the University of Texas at
Austin, writes in her article,
"Misrepresenting the Black Student Ex-
perience Again: A Rejoiner that many
people neglect the role student affairs ad-
visors and educators play in creating a
climate that is unsupportive of black
students. However, the blame cannot be
totally placed here either.
At ECU the University-established
black student organizations exist for the
benefit of black students, culturally,
socially, and academically. The Minority
Arts Committee exists to promote minori-
ty cultural activities, and each year spon-
sors several events during Black History
Month in February.
Unfortunately, very few blacks serve on
the committee or attend the programs.
The minority student publication exists as
a vehicle for minority student expression,
but has not been utilized to its fullest
potential.
How can university officials be ex-
pected to address black problems without
direct student input?
A major problem for black students is
the feeling of alienation; that they have no
one to turn to. The feeling of alienation is
constantly reinforced when black students
refuse to be supportive of each other.
They refuse to join campus organizatiosn,
black or white, in any measurable
numbers.
They don't support efforts made by
other black students, be it voting for
black candidates in campus elections or
attending programs sponsored by black
student organizations.
Black students often have the feeling
there is nothing on campus they can iden-
tify with. Taylor's profile of a black stu-
dent in the 1980s illustrated how blacks
sometimes have difficulty identifying with
each other.
"Being black means to walk across
campus on my first day of class and see a
few other black students, but they look up
at the sky, turn their heads, or look me
straight in the eye and do not speak
Alvin Sumter, a student at N.C. State
University in Raleigh, feels that blacks en-
counter less problems when they create a
support network among themselves.
Alvin feels that attending a predominately
white school is good for black students
because the atmosphere more closely
reflects the situation in today's world. He
adds that black students should learn to
become more self-reliant.
He says "instead of looking to others
for leadership, black students should
learn to rely on themselves and each other
for support services and leadership
Chrystal Fray is a graduating senior
majoring in English and the former
features editor of Expressions magazine.
Ki
EL PASO. TX (UPI) - Prl
secuters plan to seek the dea
penalty against Henry Lee Luc
for the ax slaying of an eldei
woman in what some say may L
the serial killer's last court a
pearance.
A final round of pre-trial r
tions in Lucas' trial in the Mi
27, 1983, slaymg of Librae
Apocada, 72 is to begin today
Assistant District Attorney Bi
Moody said the state's a
against Lucas is the strongest
date, even though Lucas ru
recanted his confessiou
Although Lucas already is undt
one death sentence, Moody sai
officers want another to be cei
tain of keeping Lucas off 1
streets.
"This may be the last Luc
trial Moody said, "We're g
ing for the death penalty
Defense lawyers say thev ai
confident they will be able to suj
n
Ea:
Fi
8,000
Pri
Sw
1002 Ev aas St

ijy





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 9. 1986
;KlCAN HRSBttM
Vission?
�n under pre-Reagan policies.
Far from reversing the heritage of
DR and "testing the lower limits" of
h hat government could do for the in-
�vidual as Time would fancifully
a eit, Reagan hasn't even attempted to
. citizens to demand less from their
ernment, except for citizens who are
i r
the gross national product increased
6 percent in real terms from 1981
irough 1985. During the previous five
pars, under the hapless Ford and the
:kless Carter, it increased 23.2 percent
almost double.
Neen without rose-colored glasses, the
bure looks grayish, too. At a moment
Ihen everything seems to be going our
lav � lower energy prices, lower dollar,
jwer interest rates � we putter along at
jwan 2-percent annual growth rate and
record Si50 billion annual trade
tficit.
A: best, we'll be paying the bills for
it Reagan-era consumption orgy for
Jars to come. At worst, Reagan's in-
lbency may be seen as the beginning
a British-style long imperial decline.
This s a tendentious analysis. But it &
Jss tendentious than the analysis that
Reagan's economy as a grand vision
�andly fulfilled.
Equally skeptical and equally plausi-
le analyses are available of Reagan's
Veign and military record. He's had
lany successes, some failures, much
arm, much luck, some skill, a bit of
:alism, a bit of opportunism.
Weigh them as you wish, but for
aven's sake get a grip on yourself: The
st five years have not been anything as
king and uncomplicated as a trium-
aJ procession from ideal through ac-
lplishment and into the kingdom of
iven.
Vfr Michael Kinsley is the editor of
Neu Republic, excerpts from which
occasionally be found on these
tes.
eritage
reinforced when black students
jbe supporive of each other.
je to join campus organizatiosn,
white, in any measurable
n't support efforts made by
fck students, be it voting for
lidates in campus elections or
programs sponsored by black
?anizations.
udents often have the feeling
thing on campus they can iden-
"aylor's profile of a black stu-
1980s illustrated how blacks
I have difficulty identifying with
I black means to walk across
my first day of class and see a
)lack students, but they look up
turn their heads, or look me
Ithe eye and do not speak
kmter, a student at N.C. State
lin Raleigh, feels that blacks en-
Is problems when they create a
letwork among themselves,
that attending a predominately
pi is good for black students
ie atmosphere more closely
situation in today's world. He
)lack students should learn to
ke self-reliant.
"instead of looking to others
)hip, black students should
! on themselves and each other
services and leadership
Fray is a graduating senior
English and the former
tor of Expressions magazine.
Ax Murderer On Trfql
EL PASO, TX (UPI) - Pro-
secuters plan to seek the death
penalty against Henry Lee Lucas
for the ax slaying of an elderly
woman in what some say may be
the serial killer's last court ap-
pearance.
A final round of pre-trial mo-
tions in Lucas trial in the May
27, 1983, slaying of Librada
Apocada, 72 is to begin today.
Assistant District Attorney Bill
Moody said the state's case
against Lucas is the strongest to
date, even though Lucas has
recanted his confession.
Although Lucas already is under
one death sentence, Moody said
officers want another to be cer-
tain of keeping Lucas off the
streets.
"This may be the last Lucas
trial Moody said, "We're go-
ing for the death penalty
Defense lawyers say they are
confident they will be able to sup-
Killer May Face Death
press Lucas' confession with the
motion filed with State District
Judge Brunson Moore. The hear-
ing on the pre-trial motion is ex-
pected to last six to eight weeks
and involve 350 defense and pro-
secution witnesses.
The state's case is based on the
confession and other evidence,
including the Apodaca home and
sold by a suspect who witnesses
have said resembled Lucas.
The defense says the 49-year
old drifter, who once confessed
to killing as many as 600 people,
was not in El Paso when
Apodaca was slain.
El Paso prosecuters way they
believe Lucas murdered the elder-
ly woman, who was beaten, sex-
ually abused and killed with an ax
in her home in southeast El Paso.
The case took a twist last
month when an El Paso detective
testified in a sworn statement that
he was present when two Juarez,
Mexico, policemen, identified
only as Reyes and Calanche, held
an electric cattle prod against the
genitals of a Juarez man until he
confessed that he killed Apodaca.
The suspect, Oeovany Chavez,
later repudiated his confession.
The detective, Jimmy
Apodaca, nephew of the victim,
said Chavez was a suspect in the
murder.
Blood and semen samples were
taken from Chavez, but during
the deposition, Apodaca was told
not to answer when asked if they
matched blood and semen found
in the body.
Apodaca said in the deposition
that he thought there was more
than one suspect involved in the
murder. He said Department of
Public Saftey lab reports in-
dicated Lucas's blood type- was
different from that found on the
victim.
I WANT YOU
DATE SEPT 15-17 TIME Ml PM
Pt-ACal40S ELIZABETH WT.
Eastern Carolina
Fitness Center
8,000 lbs. Olympic Weights
Private Nautilus Room
Sauna
Suntana Tanning Bed
Fall Student Special
Semester $70.00
Year $150.00
CLIP COUPON
1002EvmiSI
75S-9SM
SGA Holds
Elections
Continued From Page 1.
Five polling places will be set
up this year across campus.
Students may vote at the Student
Store. Croatan, College Hill,
Mendenhall, and on West Cam-
pus.
Once elected, representatives
are required to attend a meeting
every Monday at 5 p.m. and will
be responsible for a committee
assignment.
"Everyone is encouraged to get
involved. It's a chance for
students to know what's happen
ing on campus. By getting involv-
ed you learn about the issues, the
problems, and the solutions
added Cunanan. "Everyone
should take an active role in get
ytMMSs'titSlll
Look What surfaced
Every Tuesday Is
College Night
7 p.mll p.m.
99CSUBS
Your Choice of
Not Valid On Deliveries
60 Oe. Pitchers $1.99
11 a.mll p.m. 752-2183
Ham A Cheese
Bologna � Cheese
Ham. Salami ft Cheese
Pepperoni. Salami St. Cheese
Turkey A Cheese
Ham, Turkey & Cheese
215 E. 4th St.
BOND'S
Celebrates
RUSH
ECU
13 OFF 15 OFF
COUPON
15 OFF
15 OFF
�.������(
� KIMIItailllMHMMIIIKll
Sorority & Frat Jerseys
Sweats And A Whole Lot More
.
OLPRE
WORTH
GOLD
�at?
w
$35 OFF OR
A FREE $50 NECKLACE
WHEN YOU BUY 14K GOLD
Reward yourself with a 14K gold ArtCarved ring,
and we'll take $35 off its price
or give you a $50 necklace, free.
Our Representative is on campus with distinguished
traditional and contemporary styles-
each backed by a Full Lifetime Warranty.
ylKIUIRVED
V. CLASS RINGS
Representative will be at the Student Store
September 4th, 5th, 8th, 9th, and 10th
�� from 9:00 a.m4:00 p.m.
AnCanwdQaKRngs
h
�"��' � �? -���
� it T �� �� �
� mtSi r�o.yfc.i� ��.� t �,n(�� '� ��� fc ,
r v
frimmmmmm,
Ai jt2M





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 9, 1986
US Reporter Stands Trial In Russia
WASHINGTON (UPI) � The
case of an American reporter for-
mally charged with espionage by
the Soviet Union should not im-
pede plans for a summit or hinder
efforts for his release, to U.S. of-
ficials say.
Nicholas Daniloff, 52, a U.S.
News World Report correspon-
dent held in a KGB prison since
Aug. 30 on what U.S. officials
call "trumped-up charges was
formally accused of spying Sun-
day, a magazine spokesman in
Moscow said.
However, U.S. News chairman
Mortimer Zuckerman, said he
believed some "face-saving" can
be found to head off a Soviet trial
for Daniloff, who he described as
a hostage.
Michael Armacost, under-
secretary of state for political af-
fairs, said that sending Daniloff
to trial would "complicate" the
"resolution of this case
When asked Sunday on NBC's
"Meet the Press" if a trial would
rule out a superpower summit
now in the planning stages, Ar-
macost replied, "We haven't said
that
The revelation of the formal
charge came less than 24 hours
after White House officials con-
firmed that President Reagan ap-
pealed to Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev for Daniloff's release.
In a letter to Gorbachev,
Reagan gave his personal
assurance the reporter is not a
spy, aides said.
In Los Angeles Sundaywhere
Reagan was campaigning for
Republican candidates, White
House spokesman Larry Speakes
repeated the administration's
profession of Daniloff's in-
nocence.
But Speakes added, "There
will be no trade" � a reference
to a proposal for an arrangement
linking Daniloff's freedom to the
case of a Soviet U.N. employee,
Gennadi Zakharov, arrested one
week before Daniloff and now
jailed in New York without bond
on spy charges.
Speakes also said no change
has been made in plans for the
Sept. 19 meetings between
Secretary of State George Shultz
and Soviet Foreign Minister
Eduard Shevardnadze.
"We will continue to review
our options � what we can do to
influence events and impress on
the Soviets it is indeed a matter of
utmost seriousness to the United
States he said. The Kremlin has
been told that Reagan "is per-
sonally involved in the matter
and that he regards it as serious
he said.
U.S. officials have said,
however, something other than a
trade � for instance, Daniloff's
release and a new U.S. considera-
tion of a request for Zakharov to
be released into the custody of
the Soviet ambassador � has
been suggested to the Kremlin
ICE CREAM
PARLOR
Pitt Plaza
31 Flavors
Mon-Sat 40:00-9:00
Sun 12:30-6:00
One Scoop Sundae 85C
Offer Expires 9-30-86
Nomination Debated
WASHINGTON (UPI) �
Democrats opposed to William
Rehnquist being confirmed chief
justice have some new ammuni-
tion that will likely be presented
this week when the Senate begins
debate over his nomination.
Civil rights leaders charged
Saturday that Rehnquist drafted
a constitutional amendment in
1970 that would have permitted
racially segregated schools.
William Taylor, an official
with the Leadership Conference
on Civil Rights, said Rehnquist's
1970 proposal "would have
sharply curtailed the powers of
federal courts to remedy
unlawful segregaton of the public
schools
The proposal, made available
to United Press International,
calls for a 26th amendment to the
Constitution to "validate
freedom of choice and
neighborhood schools
In a statement, Sen. Edward
Kennedy, D-Mass said the
memos "represent significant ad-
ditional evidence of Mr. Rehn-
quist's continuing support for
racially segregated schools. Mr.
Rehnquist is an arch enemy of
civil rights and is unfit to be chief
justice of the United States
Sunday, the American Civil
Liberties Union released reports
based on the voting records of
both Rehnquist and appeals
Judge Antonin Scalia, President
Reagan's choice to replace Rehn-
quist as associate justice.
The Senate is expected to take
up the nominations of Rehnquist,
61, as the nation's 16th chief
justice, and Scalia, 50, this week.
Approval of both men is expected
despite Democratic objections to
Rehnquist's civil rights record.
The organization said,
"Justice Rehnquist's view is in-
consistent with the functional
purpose of the Bill of Rights and
the generally accepted role of the
federal courts in enforcing it
Scalia was named by Reagan in
Striking Teachers
Return to Work
Continued from page 2
Bellmawr, N.J classes for 3,400
students resumed today.
Negotiators reached an agree-
ment on a three-year contract
Saturday after an all-night
bargaining session, said Miriam
Burdette, a school spokeswoman.
In Okawville, the West
Washington Unit 10 school
district board and the Okawville
Education AssociationVreached a
tentative contract agreement at 6
a.m. today after 14 hours of
bargaining.
A three-day strike by 33
teachers in Lewistown, III near
Pegria, ended early Saturday and
classes resumed today for 590
pupils.
Pa also agreed Saturday to a
new tentative contract, clearing
the way for classes to resume to-
day.
The Athens settlement and a
settlement Friday in Penn-
sylvania's Spring Grove District
leave the state with teachers
strikes in 12 other districts, affec-
ting more than 45,000 students.
At Fairleigh Dickinson Univer-
sity in New Jersey, striking facul-
ty voted Sunday to continue their
walkout for another day.
The nation's other college
strike, at Thornton Community
College in South Holland, 111
has canceled classes for about
i01QQQsiudentsJ most of them
Pilot Pen
has something
even smoother
than this.
PILOT
ROLLING BALL PEN
A feeling beyond smoothness.
Pilot's new Brougham is
smoother and more comfortable than
any rolling ball pen you've ever used.
A gutsy claim but true. Buy a new Pilot
Brougham and prove it to yourself Send us
the coupon, proof-of-purchase (a receipt
will do) and $4.95. Check or money order
only. You'll get a "What's Smoother" tee
shirt (an $11.00 value) and a FREE Pilot
Spotliter highlighting marker A total value of $11 79
for only $4.95. Allow 4 to 6 weeks for delivery.
Pilotlt� ShM Otter,
PAS 4710,
CT067O4
Nun
ve enclosed a check
for$
for(no.)
Add-ess
City
I
I
Yes. I want to prove it
I
I
I tee shirt(s) and
free Spotmer(s)
I
SIM.
z.
CoMp.
- M6DWM C LARGE Z EXTRA-LARGE
1982 to the U.S. Court of Ap-
peals for the District of Columbia
� the most influential federal ap-
peals court in the nation. In his
opinions, Scalia has frequently
sided with the administration.
The report said that during his
tenure on the appeals court,
Scalia "has almost always voted
to restrict individual liberties
To support its findings on
Rehnquist, the ACLU cited ex-
amples of his stated philosophy:
The primary responsibility of
the court is to uphold the right of
the majority to enact laws it feels
are necessary.
It is far worse for the court to
strike down a statute that may be
constitutional than to deny an in-
dividual a right to which he or she
mav be entitled.
Presents
RAFT NITE
Tuesday & Thursday
Admission $2.00 Guys
Sept. 9 & 11, 1986
$1.00 Ladies
9:00-2:00 a.m.
$2.00 Under 21
10 Draft All Nite
&TKO
Present
AFT NITE
Wednesday Sept. 10, 1986
Admission $2.00 Guys
$1.00 Ladies
9:00-2:00 a.m.
S2.00 Under 21
10 Draft All Nite
CO KROCERINC FOR ALL YOUR
Tailgate Party
Needs!
Register To 11 I mm
Pirate Football Tickets
2 Pairs To Be Given Away
For rach Home Game Reglater Now!
ASSORTED TOPPINGS
Jeno's Pizza
10
Oz.
PWg.
69
LIMIT 2 WITH
$10 ADD L
PURCHASE
�&
6.5
Oz.
Bag
WISE NATURAL
RIDGES OR
Potato
Chips
99
Ltr.
NRB
DIET PEPSI.
PEPSI FREE OR.
Pepsi
Cola
99
GRIND IT
FRESH'
Spotlight
Bean Coffee .
1
Lb.
Bag
$199
� LIMIT
TASTY
Serve 'n
Weiners
1 WITH
S10 AOO L
PURCHASE
KRAFT
Magic Tree
Orange Juice
V2
Gal
Ctn.
990
KROGER
OLD FASHION
White
Bread . .
16
Oz.
Loaf
25�
79
JUMBO SUPER SWEET
Honeydew
Melons
' 21 �
OFF LABEL
Close Up
Toothpaste
$
4-6
Oz.
Tube
������
�03
�(29
ALL VARIETIES
WHITE MOUNTAIN
Wine
Coolers
VMS Video Movie Rentals
ALL FLAVORS
KROGER
Natural Flavor
Ice Cream
$
�f99
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised
items Is required to be
readily available for sale in
eacti Kroger Sav-on. except
as specifically noted In this
ad. if we do run out of an
Item we will offer you your
choice of a comparable
Item when available
reflecting the same sav-
ings or a ralncheck which
will entitle you to pur
chase the advertised Item
at the advertised price
within SO days. Only one
vendor coupon will be ac-
cepted per Item.

Go Krogering
(
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. � Greenville
copyright '986
Kroger ttv-On
OuantKy Mgnts kwvm
None Som to oeaiert
on
This
Be
ROLL
nooc
FREE'
- ' '
tAS
? S
e�-
$i.o
ANY
PO!
Limit One Coui
Void
10
OFF
M-
m fQ Taste the difft r j
I U O of cheese, m
OFF
$1.01
ALL
SH
iLimit One Coui
Void
� $2.00 Off All hi
� 10 Off All Si
� 10 Expressfan
Operated b i
SUSAN BRINKLEY
VICKY OWENS
VICKY REISEMEN
$1.01
Al
SWEA
Limit One Coui
Void
-





THE EAST CAROLINIAN SFPTFMhpp 9 1986
E CREAM
PARLOR
iza
rs
0-9:00
kvoo
Scoop Sundae 85C
r Expires 9-30-86
resents
TNITE
, 1986
adi
9:00-2:00 a.m.
$2.00 Under 21
411 Nite
TKO
esent
NITE
.ddies
9:00-2:00 a.m.
S2.00 Under 21
I Nite
f
Register To WW I ll
Pirate Football Tickets
2 Pairs To Be Given Away
For Each Home Game Register Now!
.yAyay.y
IP
I I I I iYj
Ltr.
NRB
DIET PEPSI.
PEPSI FREE OR.
Pepsi
Cola
99
KROGER
OLD FASHION
White
Bread . .
16
Oz
Loaf
ALL VARIETIES
WHITE MOUNTAIN
Wine
Coolers
$
2-Oz
Btls
ALL FLAVORS
KROGER
Natural Flavor
Ice Cream
$
Gal
Ctn
-J99
9�
cooyrtgnt 19�S
KrpQf �v-On
OuVHAV MQRtS RVMTVCd
monc sow) To 1�H
on
This Space Could
Be Working For
You!
itfjP$
J
201 EAST 5th STREET
CREENVILLE, NC 27834
WALK IN OR
CALL FOR AN
APPOINTMENT
757-1488
CALL: VALINDA or
KATHERINE
PRECISION CUTS
WE LISTEN BEFORE WE CUT.
$5.00 OFF
PERM
(Please Present Coupon)
Offer Expires Nov. I, 1986
American Wolff
Tanning Bed
$2.00 OFF
Single Session
or
$6.00 OFF
Package Deal
(Call For More Details
Offer Expires No 1, 19H6
$2.00 OFF
Shampoo-Cut-Style
GREENVILLE,
II
II
II
�"�'s Your SUPER TASTE TRIP TICKET! I I
I I
I
I
XTC
STATION
CAROLINA EAST MALL (Across from KERR DRUGS)
TryJl Once�JfouWChjgJtekForMore!
$1.00 OFF
ANY ROLLED
POSTER
Limit One Coupon Per Customer
Void 9-15-86
Kentucky Pried Chicken &
$1.99 v
plus tax
FOR ONE COMPLETE
2-PIECE PACK
2 Pieces of Chicken
1 Small Mashed Potato and Gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
Expires Dec. 31, 1986
I
I I
I I
I I
I I
I I
I I
I I
$1.00 OFF
ALL T-SHIRTS
S. COTANCIIE
illEENVILLE. N.C.
j Limit One Coupon Per Customer
Void 9-15-86
10
OFF
CLIP COUPON-


See-
0es
10
OFF
10
OFF
New To The Area
SPECIAL SANDWICHES
MARYLAND CRAB PHILLEY STEAK
CORN BEEF 6 oz HAMBURGER
Taste the difference in our cold cut subs � 20 slices of meat & 4 slices
of cheese. HSe also have pizzas with a northern flavor 10
OFF
CLIP COUPON
I I
I I
I I
I I
I I
H r
I I
I I
I I
I I
I I
I I
JJTHUR
i I
I I
I I
l l
l l
I l
II $
-4 I
516 S. COTANCIIE V
GREENVILLE. N.C J� "
1




t


'
ATTIC
1
Kasha
Syx
ECU Adm.
wcoupon
00
FRI
T
ECU Adm.
wcoupon
i
$1 50
SAT
ECU Adm.
wcoupon
1
$1 50
$1.00 OFF
ALL GYM
SHORTS
iLimit One Coupon Per Customer HH"SJI
Void 9-15-86
COTANCIIE
OHEENVILLE. N.C.
i i
11
I I
II
11
I l
II
I I
I I
I I
I l
M
I l Limit One Coupon Per Customer
l l
I I
$1.00 OFF
ALL �
SWEATSHIRTS
� Void 9-15-86
U.B.EM
16 S. COTANCIIE T
OHEENVILLE. N.C
JVztu 2,
�U7 -�-JaU72
The Talk of the Town"
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
Walk-Ins Welcome
� $2.00 Off All Haircuts
� 10 Off All Services and Products
� 10 Expresstan Sun Capsule Visits For $35.00
Operated by:
SUSAN BRINKLEY
VICKY OWENS
VICKY REISEMEN
Mon-Fri 9-until
Sat 9-1
3101 E. 10th Street
Rivergate Shopping Center
Phone 757-0207
I I
I I
I I
II
II
II
II
II
i
Drop by and see
our beautiful new shop . . .
Greenville's Newest, Most Unique
Beauty Center!
Stylists:
Petey Hathaway Trudy Barber
Lisa Brann Kay Pase
Lisa Wright Burns Denise Hinnant
Tina Getsinger Mercedes River,
Show Your Student ID & Get A
10 Discount
On All Services & Products!
Offer good until Sept. 30, 1986
PARADISE
$1.00 OFF
ALL
SWEATPANTS
Limit One Coupon Per Customer
Void 9-15-86
H f
Step into Paradise
Step Out in St
329 Arlington Blvd. Greenville 756-V
U.B.E
516 S. COTANCIIE
GIIEENVILLE. N.C.
$5.00 OFF
ALL RUGBY
SHIRTS
Limit One Coupon Per Customer .StSJs;
Void 9-15-86 g-knviile. N.c

���?
j
0m0m0fpmtmttm mim.iminnm �� -
m� iw m . 11' t
mmi m �' �� iii minimi.
mm�mm �� m imntomfc�.� � ��(� .�
m
V ' ,ii. �
f
asMjEii





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
SEPTEMBER 9. I9t6 Pace g
Artist Blends Real And Imagined Cultures
B JOHN SHANNON
Supposed) built around 3000
B C. b a civilization called the
Apasht, "The EtanicuilahMonu-
ment" depicts a female and a
male figure on either side of a
large mushroom, their mouths
poised at its rim. In the
mushrooom's stem lies an an-
drogynous figure fetally curled,
gi ing birth.
The monument � or rather,
since it has fallen into ruin, its
documentation from fragments
is itself but a fragment of
Beauvais Lvons' "Excavation of
the Apasht an exhibit now on
displav in Gray Art Gallery. The
title of this monument, which
depicts the Apasht's creation
myth, serve- as a clue to what
1 yons is ing to accomplish in
his work.
"In the process of documen-
The Review
ting something you transform
it said Lyons in a lecture he
gave on the genre of "ar-
cheologicaJ fiction the genre in
which he places his own work.
"Etanicullah" � "hallucinate"
backwards � is a supposedly fac-
tual monument, but Lyons never
lets the viewer forget that the
monument is being seen through
the eyes of a scholar, and that the
picture reconstructed from what
fragments remained "circa 1922"
may be a distorted perception, a
"hallucination" of sorts.
"On one level, by using a
documentary format to create a
fiction, I want to call into ques-
tion the authenticity of anything
else supposedly 'authentic said
Lyons. "Who does Ted Koppel
interview on 'Nightline' but sup-
posed 'experts'? Who's to say if
their information is really cor-
rect? I hope one result of my
work will be to force the viewer
to be more skeptical in "real" archaeology, Lyons is
Although he believes that there quick to point out that his Dur-
is indeed a fictional element even pose is not to downgrade that
J. t. HUMIIIT - The last Carolinian
Beauvais Lyons' Excavation of the Apasht' is on display in Gray
Oallery.
Rock Is Alive Both Here And In U.K.
B D.A.SWANSON
si.ft � nlfr
R.E.M. - ife's Rich Pageant
tl.K.S. Inc.)
The Smiths � The Queen Is
Dead
(Sire Records Co.)
us is w here we walked
I : .us is .i here we swam 1 1, Danced, Sane ike c picture here
1 tkt a � u enir, R.E.M "Cuyahoga" fe's Rich Pageant
i : a summer nearly devoid of
the traditional blockbusting
album or two, small pictures and
souvenirs are about the only
things left from the drought of
'86 Bui what gems those few ar-
ifacts were.
So, just in case vou were too
busy doing the things college
students do during the long sum-
mer months I'd like to use this
first edition of "The Review" to
look back at two of the best
albums from the already lost
summer.
Once again those prolific boys
from Athens, Ga. (the ones who
call themselves R.E.M) have put
together an album of impeccable
pacing and clarity with just
enough regional vision for depth
without becoming presumptuous.
Maybe I'm being a bit biased, but
these guys just keep on producing
great albums. The kind of songs
you feel just as comfortable with
at a rocking party or late on a
Tuesday night as an after-study
nightcap.
Compared with their earlier
albums Life's Rich Pageant
marks an important advancement
in both musical themes and
Michael Stipes' (songwriter)
poetic renderings. Of course
there is still the traditional
R.E.M. sound driving the body
of this new collection, but there
are some new twists here and
there that really turned my head.
Especially representative of these
new shifts is "Under The
Bunker a song heavy in
mariachi styling that lends a
wonderful 'south-of-the-border'
air to the rest of the album's cen-
tral theme of people trying to live
peacably in a world at conflict.
Stipe's melancholic mood with
the themes of war is right on base
as he weaves in and out of the
Mexican twinings from the band.
Following in this theme is
"The Flowers Of -GuJtemair�
The title may ne!teatea'politicel
message more foreign to R.E.M.
than their more standard social
statements and regional pic-
torials, but Stipes croons entic-
ingly of the beauty of nature and
the people in it: "The people here
are friendly The flowers often
bloom at night The flowers
cover everything Has Stipes
been studying the literary likes of
John Ransom, Robert Penn War-
ren and the other Nashville
Agrarians of the 1920s and 30s?
Or is the south-eastern regionalist
background of Stipes simply
coming of age? One way or
another, the pictures drawn both
through music and lyric in "The
Flowers and other songs such
as "Cuyahoga "Swan, Swan,
Hummingbird and "Fall On
Me indicate a new sensitivity,
though rough edged in places,
toward the roots of an agrarian
concept of man in harmony with
his land.
Of course, if all of these
The Roving Eye
Local Pup Likes The Good Things In Life
B ROB BELL
s��ff Wntfr
Her name is Ripple and she can
usually be found almost
any where in Greenville. Recently,
she took a break from her social
By HUGH CARROLL
Campus shepard Ripple
schedule to answer some personal
questions. Luckily for The East
Carolinian, owners Rob Frayser
and Shane Pinks ton were present
for translations.
Where did you find Ripple?
"I bought her from some man
for five dollars. I was walking out
to my car to get something and
this guy walks up holding her by
the neck. He said, 'Wanna buy
this dog?' and I thought he was
joking, but as it turned out I gave
him five dollars for her and she's
been here ever since then.
Everybody in the whole
neighborhood knows who she is
and loves her. She's kind of like
everybody's dog
What are Ripple's main interests?
"The beach, the mountains,
the river. The good things in life.
She is very partial to the Grateful
Dead. She barks if we put
anything else on besides the
Dead. I also think that she likes
trips. She likes going on road
trips with the girls to the moun-
tains
How did Ripple get her name?
"Well, mainly because of a
song by the Dead called
"Ripple It is a pretty song, and
I heard it the night that I got her.
So, I had it on tape and I said
Ripple and it kind of clicked
notice her hanging around
school a great deal. Why?
"I think she is just kind of a
drop out. She doesn't really like
school that much. She likes to
just hang around and meet peo-
ple and learn a lot about things.
She was going a little overboard
on the partying scene when she
first got here
Are you saying that there are
times when Ripple consumes
alcoholic beverages?
"Well, first she was kind of
hesitant on the alcohol scene. She
was just trying to keep cool and
keep a low profile, but just
recently she's been exploring, fin-
ding out new things. She has had
a few bouts with catnip
Do you think that there is a
chance of Ripple developing an
alcohol habit?
See A DOG'S, page 10
Anthology Series In Trouble
B MICAH HARRIS
Staff Writer
Anthology. The word conjures
up visions of English textbooks
thick as the New York phone
directory and just as interesting
to read. It's safe to say most
students would rather watch TV
than curl up with anything with
"Norton" on it.
TV offered little sanctuary in
its Golden Age, for those were
the days of anthology programs:
"Hallmark Hall of Fame
"Suspense and "Kraft Televi-
sion Theater" to name a few. But
"anthology" should connote
"variety" as in spice of life and
not "dry" as in dust.
In an anthology TV series there
are no continuing characters or
plots. Story is the thing, not how
many cars the Duke boys can pile
up per episode.
Eventually, the Golden Age of
the anthology series came to an
end as audiences decided they
were more interested in continu-
ing characters even without con-
tinuity between stories. Situation
comedies, westerns, and detective
shows began to dominate the lit-
tle screen.
Anthologies made an occa-
sional resurrection attempt. The
early seventies saw the anthology
king, Rod Serling, open his
"Night Gallery It closed down
pretty quickly. And in the early
eighties you may have seen a
show called "Dark Room" if you
didn't blink.
Never before has there been
such a concentrated attempt to
return the anthology series to
glory than in the fall of 1985.
"Alfred Hitchcock Presents"
and "The Twilight Zone" return-
ed and Spielberg's "Amazing
Stories" debuted in the wake of a
media blitz promising "It's Com-
ing
"It's Going seems to be the
latest word for not only "Amaz-
ing Stories" but the others as
well. "Alfred Hitchcock" was
cancelled, "Twilight Zone"
escaped by the skin of its teeth,
and "Amazing Stories" had bad
reviews but the saving grace of a
two-year contract.
Why the failures?
"Hitchcock" producers made the
mistake of simply remaking the
original stories while said stories
are still visible in syndication,
specifically on cable's widely ac-
See UPCOMING, page 9
thematic undertones don't mean
a crock to you this is still an
album worth listening to simply
for R.E.Ms now happy, now
melancholic musical shifts. That
same old sound we've all come to
appreciate is still there, though
some may say that overproduc-
tion in the studio has taken away
from the band's original slightly
edged quality. Well, that argu-
ment may hold some truth, but as
far as I'm concerned higher
quality production has opened up
an awful lot of musical vaults for
Stipes and Co. Besides, it's kind
of nice to actually understand the
words for a change.
Possibly the only thing I really
miss from R.E.M. is in the con-
tinued reduction in importance of
Mike Peters' usually well placed
bass lines. What was once an
even dose of Peter Buck's guitar
and Peter's bass has shifted over
the past few albums to one of
twangy guitar domination. But
that's what happens when an
Englishmen (Don Gehman) pro-
duces for an American band.
Watching this local band grow-
over the past few years to one of
the most influential bands in pro-
gressive music has really been ex-
citing. And this latest effort
marks an increasing maturity in
both their song-by-song pacing
and lyrical vision. I'll wager that
in twenty years music critics will
rank Life's Great Passion second
only to their first full length
album, Murmer. If you're an ig-
norant Yankee who still hasn't
discovered the clear and
sometimes raw music of R.E.M.
this is the perfect album to start
with. Then go back and pick up
their first E.P Chronic Town.
These Southern boys are good for
your soul.
Next in line, following up one
of the most critically acclaimed
albums of last year, The Smiths
returned this summer with their
skillfully crafted progressive rock
anthems under the title The
Queen Is Dead. Despite all of the
hype that this band has produced
in the world of progressive music
I still don't know just how to
react to them. The music is driv-
ing and the popping bass line can
be very effective, but I keep on
feeling like I've heard all of this
before.
Sec SUMMER, page 9
profession. Rather, "I'm
creating a work in tribute to ar-
chaeology he said. "I'm
underscoring what is beautiful in
that world. The social sciences
are really speculative endeavors.
"Even the physical sciences
he continued, "may be more
speculative than they appear. A
culture has a paradigm that in
some sense is overturned, and
then what has reigned as scien-
tific truth is no longer valid
According to Lyons, the situa-
tion with art is a bit different. Art
has not changed in major ways,
although "Art in previous
cultures served roles that art in
current cultures doesn't � it was
more magical. At the same time,
what used to be seen as craft, and
is seen by archaeology as artifact.
we perceive as art
Lyons stresses that casual
viewers shouldn't be intimidated
by the ideas in his work. He in-
tends his mock excavation to be
"almost like a novel in a
historical setting, or a movie �
something everyone can relate to.
Hopefully it will speak directly to
them
In response to objections that
his work is too painstakingly
meticulous, that it lurches toward
simple statement by a circuitous
route, Lyons says: "I'm simply
trying to create fiction that allows
a viewer to suspend his disbelief.
One way to do this is to use more
believable artifacts Sometimes
people are attracted to things just
because they are old
Ironically, many of the ar-
tifacts o( "Excavation of the
Apasht" don't look old at all. No
one could believe that the wall
mounted fragments of "The
Etanicullah Monument" were the
genuine article; thev would be
much too heav, tot one thing.
But the vacuum-molded plastk
artifacts are obvious!) intended
to be perceived as reproductions
The originals arc stored in .1
museum overseas
"I'm interested 111 creating .1
scenario in which a 'real' cull
has translated the Apashi crea-
tion myth said I � ons m
reference to a "Vedic" poem
eluded in the show. l he state
ment is equally relevant to
Etanicullah fragment and indeed
to the whole exhibit Hie mix 1
of real and imaginary cultun
one of the most conspk ,
acomplishmen's ol 'Exca' ition
of the Apasht
Lyons said he has a strong,
ongoing commitment to keep
working in the area ol "artifac-
tual fiction
"I'm inventing anothei
culture, which will probabh take
five years he said "I'm g
to invent a temple, and c
trate on portraying the culture's
daily life � food, clothii
garlic, beer, herbal medecines
toward the idea that an and life
are inseparable
"One day said Lyons in his
lecture in Jenkins Auditorium, "1
in'end, in 'he Bmc �
tion, to walk into a libra �
insert the portfolio (ol n
concerning the Apasht Excava-
tion) in the appropriate
with an appropriate Library ol
Congress number, and on ap
propnatelv sized index card
sert cross references - rhu gs k
Hindoo Kush, Persian
Afghanistan. Twins, H t
maphrodite
Lyons is well on his u
joining the two, art mA ' 11
Dining Out
Chico's Satisfies
By BECKY TOY
Stiff Writer
Chico's Mexican Resturant.
located on Cotanche street in
Downtown Greenville, offers
some excellent culinary surprises
as well as an updated at-
mosphere. Over the summer,
owner Juan Martinez designed
and decorated a whole new addi-
tion to his dining room, and redid
the original bar and dining room
to match.
All the decor is authentic Mex-
ican arts and crafts, with the
notable exception of the tropical
mural in the bar, done by former
ECU art student Dwight
Touchberry. The new addition,
decked out in brilliant blues,
greens and pinks, offers a bright
and airy atmosphere to an addi-
tional 80 people, dining on
Chico's superb Mexican cuisine.
The food, ah the food! Chico's
has some of the most beautiful
kitchen facilities I've seen in a
long time � is it any wonder their
food is so good, when they make
all their tacos, tortillas and shells
fresh every day. Everyhing they
serve is prepared daily on the
premises � very little is boxed,
canned or frozen. Chico's also
has a walk-in cooler devoted to
beer, to guarantee top flavor and
satisfaction.
Starting with the appetizers,
which run the gamut from the
standard Nachos and Queso Fun-
dido (cheese dip to you novices)
to the more exotic Mexican Pizza
and Potatoe Skins, the prices
average $2.95 to $4.25, and the
servings are ample, nicely
displayed. The potato skins arc
not the standard bacon ind
cheese variety; rather, a south ol
the border concoction, replete
with lettuce, tomato, sour cream
and guacamole.
Chico's also otters severa
soups, including the standan
Gazpacho ($2.95), And som
wonderful salads, including tl
ever-popular Taco Salad ($4 25
and a chicken varietv. Ensa
Con Polio ($4.25)
Under entrees, the Usl .
endless. (It was virtually imposs
ble to pick just one to ordei
Anything from combinatio
plates of tacos, enchiladas, and
chile rellenos ($3.95 to S 50),
fajitas San Antonio foi two-tc
four people ($11.95 0 $21)
chimichangas, chicken llautas
burritos, and omelettes,
prices ranging from $3.95
S6.95. Chico's also otters rvera
seafood entrees, like the camaroi
ranchero, a shrimp dish, as wel
as fish and seafood combina
tions.
For dessert, there are flan
(SI.25), a delicate custard
sopapillas and empanadas (il.2v
to SI.95), fried dough, wit
honey and cinnamon, or tropica
fruit; or peaches amarett
($1.25), peaches, amaretto an
whipped cream in a tried shell.
Chico's offers a ide vat iet ol
traditional and innovative Mev
ican cuisine, served in a contem
porary, but authenjjjK Mexican a'
mosphere. The prices are n
bad, the food is wonderful, an
with a full bar, the right cotnpan.
� it's a sure win as a great place
to kick back, throw down an
mellow out.
aSST�-SSiSSS5:
Upco
Continued From Page 8.
cessible USA channel. Also, th4
"twist" endings tended to
highly predictable even il
voi
hadn't seen the ong-nals.
"Amazing Stories" on thJ
other hand, did not take the twisl
ending approach but rather th(
I "punch line" approach. Man
episodes were actually "jokes'l
; of the "Jake the talking snakj
and the lever that will end thi
Summer
Both Sidl
Continued From Page 8-
But, English bands are like th
and, besides, just abo
everything has been done alreaa
in rock music. All thafs left ar
variations on the thirty years o.
roots. And that sounds like exact
ly what these fellows have beet
doing. There is a distinctive
Beatles influence on certain songs1
like "Frankly, Mr. Shankly" an
"Never Had No One Ever
In other places the heav if
fluence comes from the earl) 70
or other English bands of rece-j
history such as Soft Cell and Tn
Fabulous Poodles. The heaviest
influence though, comes from th
South-Eastern U.S. and
sound developed by bands 1
the Dixie Dregs, .Arrogance, Th
db's, R.E.M. and most rece- I
The Connells.
I don't know, I guess that's tbj
V.
All-Amerit
Mi
S
HotV(
Br
De
AllForOnl'
Dozens or del
Fill your platd
back for morel
like. The All-
Bar4'�loaded I
favorite food'
Qualitv meat:
selections. ho
breads tempt
All-Ajnericanl
there s even
Western Steerj
Because
All-America:

1986 Western Stl
3005 Eaj
Greet
itMHHMM �"
,y. .
s3, j. aa. a t,�
I





HI I ASIAROI ISIAS
Si P7I MB1 k i I98C
ultures
Ks
s Satisfies
pi
,
HlfNMutPMY Th�Eiri
Ireen'ille has reienth remo.i, I
coming Season To Decide Fate Of
i onlinued From Page g
.essihle USA channel. Also, the
"twist" endings tended to be
highly predictable even if you
hadn't seen the originals.
Amazing Stones" on the
other hand, did not take the twist
tending approach but rather the
'punch line" approach. Many
episodes were actually "jokes"
of the "Jake the talking snake
and the lever that will end the
towards Jake, then to the lever,
etc etc. Will it kill the world's
only talking sname or throw the
lever that will end the world?
Smush! Jake is imprinted with
sundry tire treads.
The moral (get ready to
groan)? Better snake than lever.
"Amazing Stories" more times
than naught has given us an ex-
tended set-up which the punch
line does not live up to. The best
world" variety.
You know � the type of joke
where the punch line comes after
a long, nerve-racking story. And,
when you finally hear the punch
line, you want to punch the guy
telling the joke. I'll spare you the
build up for "Jake the talking
snake and the lever that will end
the world but the joke reaches
its climax as an eighteen wheeler
barrels out of control, first
Summer Releases Strong On
J Both Sides Of The Atlantic
l ontinued From Page 8.
But, English bands are like that
and, besides, just about
merything has been done already
:n rock music. All that's left are
anations on the thirty years old
roots. And that sounds likeexact-
1 what these fellows have been
joing. There is a distinctive
Beatles influence on certain songs
like "Frankly, Mr. Shankly" and
Never Had No One Ever
In other places the heaviest in-
rluence comes from the early 70s
or other English bands of recent
mstory such as Soft Cell and The
Fabulous Poodles. The heaviest
influent though, comes from the
outh-Eastern U.S. and the
sound developed by bands like
the Dixie Dregs, Arrogance, The
Jb's. R.E.M. and most recently
The Connells.
1 don't know, I guess that's the
musical trend these days and to
be honest, these guys are really
very good at the style. The mood
is consistantly upbeat except in
"I Know It's Over" where
singersongwriter Morrissey
croons the rather juvenile line,
"Mother, I can feel the soil fall-
ing over my head
In fact, the tendency of the
lyric toward a sometimes obnox-
ious adolescence is the only real
drawback to this musically sound
album. If you can listen past self-
indulgent lines like "So I meet
you at the ccmetary gates Keats
and Yeats are on your side
Behind the hatred there lies A
murderous desire for love" (The
Boy With), the crisp guitars
and comfortably driving drums
are really very good.
Compared to their first major
album, this new effort reveals
For An All-American Famih' MeaT"
New
All-American Food Bafm
Meats
Salads
Hot Vegetables
Breads
Desserts
All For Only
$3.89
Dozens of delicious choices.
Fill your platter and come
back for more as often as you
likeThe All-American Food
Barim�loaded with everyone's
favorite foods.
Quality meats, all-natural salad
selections, hot vegetables, hot
breads, tempting desserts. The
All-American Food Barsm�now
there's even more to enjoy at
Western Steer.�
Because You Want An
All-American Family Meal
sm
lATvswrn Steer
Family
STEAKHOUSE
� 1986 Western Steer-Mom 'n' Pop's, Inc
3005 East 10th Street
Greenville, N.C.
significant sophistication in pro-
duction and comes off much
cleaner and slicker than the
coarser � and better � Meat Is
Murder. This is not a bad album
for a band still experimenting and
looking for its niche in the world
of bigtime recording. Maybe the
swelling of their heads will soon
go down from the success of that
first release and they'll get down
to work on some really good,
lasting music.
That's it for this week. Look
for "The Review" again next
Tuesday with the very latest in
both popular and progressive
music. And, don't forget to listen
to WZMB on Monday nights for
"Adventures In Modern Recor-
ding" with selected cuts and com-
ments from the record presses of
the world.
Riggan Shoe Repair
HI West 4th St.
Downtown Greenville
' 'Shoe Repair At The V en Ben
758-0204
(worst?) example was an hour
long episode, directed by
Speilberg, in which a World War
II fighting plane loses its wheels,
and a crew member, who hap-
pens to want to animate for the
Disney Studio, is trapped in the
bottom of the plane.
The plane must land but
without wheels which means the
artist-crew member must die. His
buddies agonize for an hour and
then have to land anyway. Not to
worry � the trapped crew
member draws up some nifty
animated wheels which pop up on
the plane's underside. Had vou
going there, huh?
This brings us to the new
"Twilight Zone Now, what
most folks remember and expect
of the "Twilight Zone" is those
crazy twisted endings. Well, both
old and new versions have their
share but that is only one aspect
of the show. "The Twilight
Zone" has always explored the
human condition. The fantasy
elements are merely catalysts for
the human drama.
Look at some of the more
notable TZ episodes of the pa-t
season: "Paladin of the Lost
Hour" � A pocketwatch which
holds the unnerse's last hour is
the instrument in helping a Viet
Nam et come to terms with his
guilt over an unknown soldier
who died for him. "One Life
Furnished in Early Poverty" �
an unhappy man goes back to his
own childhood to learn where
everything went wrong and
discovers that every man is
responsible for his own choices.
"Little Boy Lost" � a woman
choosing between immediate
marriage and her career meets the
child she could have had.
The "Twilight Zone" has had
its share of failures just as
'Alfred Hitchcock" and
"Amazing Stones" have scored
an occasional success. But the la:
ter two programs are flawed
an attitude which is general
throughout the -ee The
failures of "The Twiligl � Zone"
are due to specific short-comings
in story, actor directors,
but the general attitude, the goal
which l- reached for. is laudal
The "Twilight Zone" will be
back with new episodes this I
and Spielberg is promising bet!
things for "Amazing Stories
At one time, there was talk
revival o "The Outer Limit
although the producer- are tali
the Hitchcock ap
remaking the old episodes I
fate of anthology �
to come may be determined tl
television season. So.
tuned
V
Caterers
Simply Elegant
Catering � Restaurant � Tavern
(TAILGATE PARTY GATHERING!
Oven Fried Chicken
Stuffed Pita
(Choice of Chicken, Hum, or Shrimp
Make a Sandwich Bar
And Much More (Two Day Notice)
Call For More Information 757-1227
OVEBTONS
Fast Friendly Service Qlfifflttrffflw
Just 2 blocks from ECU! Oif he
Where the Pirates Shop For Price, Quality & Convenience
Tail-Gate With
Overton 's &
The Pirates
"Greenville's Freshest Salad Bar9
It's cool, crisp, & satisfying! Have a snack or make a meal
All for only
Choose from over 60 rotating salad items JnclJdingThe freshest 1 99
fruits meats, & vegetables; cheeses, tasty dressings (regular & W I
lo-cal), plus pasta salads, & more!
Now Featuring Hot Foods Daily!
Your Choice of Entree, Soup, or Side Dish
TAKE OUT ONLY!
Call our salad bar to reserve a fruit, meat, or vegetable tray'
752-5025
Regular or Diet
Coca-Cola
per lb.
2 liter bottle
No Limit!
NATURAL LIGHT BEER
6 pack � 12 oz cans
�,
CASE PRICE
i
rf
V
&


We Have
Flasks!
OVERTQNS
j
211 Jarvis Street
Just 2 blocks from ECU
Overton's Shopping Center
Home of Overton's Supermarket, Kerr Drugs,
and Overton's University Econo-Wash
Supem
Inc
PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH SA TURDA Y. SEPTEMBER 13
�i
I I






Cultures
s Satisfies

a
ILLINMU��my . rxt fit) Cj
reenville ha recenfh rem
X
THEEASTCAROI INI AN
SEPTEMBER 9. 1986
Upcoming Season To Decide Fate Of
( ontinued From Page 8.
cessible USA channel. Also, the
"twist" endings tended to be
highly predictable even if you
hadn't seen the originals.
Amazing Stories" on the
other hand, did not take the twist
ending approach but rather the
"punch line" approach. Many
episodes were actually "jokes"
of the "Jake the talking snake
and the lever that will end the
towards Jake, then to the lever,
etc etc. Will it kill the world's
only talking sname or throw the
lever that will end the world?
Smush! Jake is imprinted with
sundry tire treads.
The moral (get ready to
groan)? Better snake than lever.
"Amazing Stories" more times
than naught has given us an ex-
tended set-up which the punch
line does not live up to. The best
world" variety.
You know � the type of joke
where the punch line comes after
a long, nerve-racking story. And,
when you finally hear the punch
line, you want to punch the guy
telling the joke. I'll spare you the
build up for "Jake the talking
snake and the lever that will end
the world but the joke reaches
its climax as an eighteen wheeler
barrels out of control, first
Summer Releases Strong On
Both Sides Of The Atlantic
(ontinued From Page 8-
But, English bands are like that
and. besides, just about
everything has been done already
in rock music. All that's left are
variations on the thirty years old
roots. And that sounds likeexact-
l what these fellows have been
doing. There is a distinctive
Beatles influence on certain songs
like "Frankly, Mr. Shankly" and
"Never Had No One Ever
In other places the heaviest in-
fluence comes from the early 70s
or other English bands of recent
history such as Soft Cell and The
Fabulous Poodles. The heaviest
influence though, comes from the
South-Eastern U.S. and the
sound developed by bands like
the Dixie Dregs, Arrogance, The
db's. R.E.M. and most recently
The Connells.
I don't know. I guess that's the
musical trend these days and to
be honest, these guys are really
very- good at the style. The mood
is consistantly upbeat except in
"I Know It's Over" where
singersongwriter Morrissey
croons the rather juvenile line,
"Mother, I can feel the soil fall-
ing over my head
In fact, the tendency of the
lyric toward a sometimes obnox-
ious adolescence is the only real
drawback to this musically sound
album. If you can listen past self-
indulgent lines like "So I meet
you at the cemetary gates Keats
and Yeats are on your side
Behind the hatred there lies A
murderous desire for love" (The
Boy With), the crisp guitars
and comfortably driving drums
are really very good.
Compared to their first major
album, this new effort reveals
For An All American Family MeaFJ
New
All-Amehcan Food Bar
sm
Meats
Salads
Hot Vegetables
Breads
Desserts
All For Only
$3.89
Dozens of delicious choices.
Fill your platter and come
back for more as often as you
likeThe All-American Food
Barsm�loaded with everyone's
favorite foods.
Quality meats, all-natural salad
selections, hot vegetables, hot
breads, tempting desserts. The
All-American Food Bar�now
there's even more to enjoy at
Western Steer.�
Because You Want An
All-Amehcan Family Meal
sm
IrVc stern Steer
Family
STEAKHOUSE
� 1986 Western Steer-Mom n' Pop's, Inc.
3005 East 10th Street
Greenville, N.C.
significant sophistication in pro-
duction and comes off much
cleaner and slicker than the
coarser � and better � Meat Is
Murder. This is not a bad album
for a band still experimenting and
looking for its niche in the world
of bigtime recording. Maybe the
swelling of their heads will soon
go down from the success of that
first release and they'll get down
to work on some really good,
lasting music.
That's it for this week. Look
for "The Review" again next
Tuesday with the very latest in
both popular and progressive
music. And, don't forget to listen
to WZMB on Monday nights for
"Adventures In Modern Recor-
ding" with selected cuts and com-
ments from the record presses of
the world.
Riggan Shoe Repair
111 West 4th St.
Downtown Greenville
"Shoe Repair At The er Best"
758-0204
(worst?) example was an hour
long episode, directed by
Speilberg, in which a World War
II fighting plane loses its wheels,
and a crew member, who hap-
pens to want to animate for the
Disney Studio, is trapped in the
bottom of the plane.
The plane must land but
without wheels which means the
artist-crew member must die. His
buddies agonize for an hour and
then have to land anyway. Not to
worry � the trapped crew
member draws up some nifty
animated wheels which pop up on
the plane's underside. Had you
going there, huh?
This brings us to the new
"Twilight Zone Now, what
most folks remember and expect
of the "Twilight Zone" is those
crazy twisted endings. Well, both
old and new versions have their
share but that is only one aspect
of the show. "The Twilight
Zone" has always explored the
human condition. The fantasy
elements are merely catalysts for
the human drama.
Look at some of the more
notable TZ episodes of the past
season: "Paladin of the Lost
Hour" � A pocketwatch which
holds the universe's last hour is
the instrument in helping a Viet
Nam vet come to terms with his
guilt over an unknown soldier
who died for him. "One Life
Furnished in Early Poverty" �
an unhappy man goes back to his
own childhood to learn where
everything went wrong and
discovers that every man is
responsible for his own choices.
"Little Boy Lost" � a woman
choosing between immediate
marriage and her career meets the
child she could have had.
The "Twilight Zone" has had
its share of failures just as
"Alfred Hitchcock" and
"Amazing Stories" have scored
an occasional success. But the lat-
ter two programs are flawed K
an attitude which is genera!
throughout the series. The
failures of "The Twilight Zone"
are due to specific short-comings
in story, actors, directors, etc.
but the general attitude, the goal
which is reached for, is laudable.
The "Twilight Zone" will be
back with new episodes this fall
and Spielberg is promising better
things for "Amaing Stones
At one time, there was talk of a
revival of "The Ouier Limits"
although the producers are taking
the Hitchcock approach of
remaking the old episodes. The
fate of anthology series for years
to come may be determined this
television season. So, sta
tuned
Caterers
Simply Elegant
Catering � Restaurant � Tavern
(TAILGATE PARTY GATHERING
Oven Fried Chicken
Stuffed Pita
(Choice of Chicken, Ham, or Shrimp
Make a Sandwich Bar
And Much More (Two Day Notice)
Call For More Information 757-1227
OVERTON'S
Sujw&te
Fast Friendly Service
Just 2 blocks from ECU!
Where the Pirates Shop For Price, Quality & Coma
Tail-Gate With
Overton 's &
The Pirates
All for only
$99
B
"Greenville's Freshest Salad Bar"
It's cool, crisp, & satisfying! Have a snack or make a meal'
Choose from over 60 rotating salad items, including the freshest
fruits, meats, & vegetables; cheeses, tasty dressings (regular &
lo-cal), plus pasta salads, & more!
Now Featuring Hot Foods Daily!
Your Choice of Entree, Soup, or Side Dish
TAKE OUT ONLY!
Call our salad bar to reserve a fruit, meat, or vegetable tray!
752-5025
Regular or Diet
Coca-Cola
2 liter bottle

No Limit!
NATURAL LIGHT BEER
$229
6 pack � 12 oz. cans
,
CASE PRICE


A
g



We Have
Flasks!
OVERTON'S
211 Jarvis Street
Just 2 blocks from ECU
Overtons Shopping Center
Home of Overton's Supermarket, Kerr Drugs,
and Overton's University Econo-Wash
Supem
Inc
tu
. PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH SA TURDA Y. SEPTEMBER 13
��� i
mm
' ��� �t�� �? � �� vvi






1
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 9. 1986
A Dog's Life Is Just Fine For Ripple
Continued From Pace 8. �ithini,chc�.�r.i � M Mr
Continued From Page 8
"She knows her pace and she
knows what she can handle. I
think she's just going to take it
easy and just handle what she
herself can take, and mainly en-
joy the good atmosphere and the
nice people
Well, do you see any big plans for
Ripple's future?
"We heard they were re-
making Rin-Tin-Tin and they
called us, but we don't want to
seem anxious. So, we'll wait and
see what happens. We also want
to make sure that Ripple has time
to develop at her own pace
Does Ripple have any current
love interests?
"A few platonic
relationships
So, she really has not settled
down to one dog yet?
BLOOM COUNTY
"I think she's just sort of play-
ing the field. She does like a dog
in the neighborhood called Big
Head. He is kind of the
stereotypical masculine dog. She
also went out with a punk dog
named Spike. He wears a spiked
collar and has a mohawk with a
purple tuft on his head
Are you concerned about Ripple
dating such a rough character?
"Oh, Ripple is not that way
herself. It is just an association,
and she does know how to handle
herself well
One time last summer I noticed
that she had two big bandages on
her feet
"That was just an accident.
She was lying under a car and a
friend backed over her while go-
ing to work. It sprained both of
her feet, so we took her to the vet
and she had to wear these little
light boxing gloves. She couldn't
walk at first, and she would just
sit there
Do you know anything about her
parents, or was she just a mutt?
"They were killed in a plane
crash in Peru. It's a rather sad
story. It's token her awhile to get
over it. She has inherited
millions, but she can't start spen-
ding it until she is 21
So, you think that she's finally
gotten over the accident?
"Actually, she was pretty
young. It scarred her younger
days, and there are times when
she can still feel the barks and the
screams. Sometimes she wakes up
barking and sweating. It's horri-
ble at times. But, we try to take
good care of her
by Berke Breathed
What do you think her growling
means?
"Well, we think that she has
recollections of the accident, the
plane, and she wakes up in a state
of shock. She is just striking out
at anybody around her at the
time
How old is Ripple?
"Ripple is now about nine
months old
What kind of dog is Ripple?
"Belgian Shepherd
Is there anything else that you
would like to say?
"Well, she loves people. She
loves to meet people. She's just a
great dog. She's the best dog in
the world, and I think that she's
only going to grow to be a better
dog
204 East 5th St
tAppfa Ppcofids
Phona 758- U27
Mon-Thur 10 AM-t PM
Fri-Sat 10 AM- 10 PM
SunUrM
Albums & Cassettes
On Sale $6.99 thru 915
Lionel Richie
Vinnie Vincent
Queensryche
BonJovi
Double
David Lee Roth
�onnle Rait
"Invasion"
"Rooe tor Onier"
"Peier Cetera"
"Double"
"let'em and SmUe"
"Nine Lives
Many Compact Discs Arriving
Daily � Check Out Our Selection
STUDENT STORES
WROSIHT DUB LIB DNS
SATO USB TO 43S
OFF NORMAL RETAIL PRICES
ON IBM AND APPLE PERSONAL COMPUTER PRODUCTS
"Products manufactured by IBM and Apple
Through our Educational Purchase Program we are able to offer to
Full-Time ECU FacultyStaff members & to currently enrolled ECU
students a substantial savings on these personal computers
C&fiVNo a Comc Strip
smr th&� �� 'Menem cm
Of A 5�RI0VS WRITERS BLOCK
TH�k
TUK
rvm
m i
i cant pc rr
ICANTThfnrX
Of AKYWINtj
FUNNY

n
�����.
J3
-rrlF
i � ii
ICAHTTHHK
STjff
�I Strfp
A
7 SeCONPS
TO pewuNe.

moN
A ROW r�
jC
� H
Stripper
����.
i ST. GEORGE'S UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
cm nada west moss
Si Georges University School of Medicine with more than 1050 graduates licensed
in 33 states offers a rigorous nmesemester program leading to the deqree o
Doctor ot Medicme
In January 1985 The Journal ot the American Medical Association pub
iished a report which ranned St Georges number one of all maior foreign medical
schools m the mitial pass rate on the ECFMG Exam
'0 medical schools m the United States have accepted over 630 St Georges
students with advanced standing
St Georges has received probationary approval to conduct clinical clerkships m
New Jersey subiect to regulations of the State Board of Examiners
A Loan Program tor Entering Students has been instituted for a limited number
of qualified applicants
For in'cmation please contact the Office ot Admissions
St. George s University School ot Medicine
. The Foreign Medical School Services Corporation
One East Main Street. Bay Shore. NY. 11706, Deot C-2
(516) 665-8500
GJM�DY ONE
DO YOU WANT TO WORK
�Secretariat
�OtflceCltrlcal
��Free word processing
training for typists
�Factory Workers
�Data Entry
Full and Part-time temporary
work � Perfect for students.
KELLY
SERVICES
The K!iy Girl
304 E. Arlington Blvd.
Arlington Centre Office Complex
Greenville. NC 27134
IBM
PC 256K 2 Disk Drives999 00
XT512K20MH0. 1 Drv$21 46.00
AT 256K I 2M Drive $296100
Portable 2 Drives S 1595.00
Convertible 1479.00
HPPLE
512K Macintosh $123500
Macintosh Plus 1770.00
� rV
Not an agency- Never a fee
EOE MFN
Come in for a demonstration and see how a personal computer
can help you with your educational, recreational, and personal
needs. We also carry a full line of accessories, peripherals,
software, and supplies for these computers, as well as others
East Carolina University
THIS WEDNESDAY AND EVERY
WEDNESDAY WE WILL NOW BE
ADMITTING AGES 18 AND UP.
ADMISSION SPECIAL
ONLY $2.00 UNTIL 9:30

BRING A FRIEND IN FOR FREE
UNTIL 9:30
Black Sororities
Host
Don't Dne Call the I iberty Ride "
tor tore Into (all 75-557fl
A Fall Rush
Black Sorority Informal Fall Rush
September 14, Registration $1.00 and Reception
7:00 Mendenhall Multi-purpose Room
September 15, Rush Party, Alpha Kappa Alpha,
Coffee House, 7:00
September 16, Rush Party, Delta Sigma Theta, Coffee
House, 7:00
September 17, Rush Party, Zcta Phi Beta, Coffee
House, 7:00
September 18, Rush Party, Sigma Gamma Rho,
Coffee House, 7:00
September 19, Social, TBA
September 22, Rush Party, Alpah Kappa Alpha,
Coffee House, 7:00
September 23, Rush Party, Delta Sigma Theta, Coffee
House, 7:00
September 24, Rush Party, Zeta Phi Beta, Coffee
House, 7:00
September 25. Rush Party. Sigma Gamma Rho,
Coffee House, 7:00
THt
i �


V
,�ir
junior Ron Jones, who started
$tate, takes the handoff here frol
� r
Men's Croi
jDoes Well
By RICK MeCORMAC
( o-ipon� hdtior
X
Z The ECU men's cross con: !
jeam competed in their first rr.ee"
f the season over the weekend,
finishing sixth out of 11 tearr
: The meet, The Campbell Col-
lege Invitational in Buies Cree,
Sas won by St. Augustmes with i
rtal of 56 points. PembroK
tate finished second with 6i
points, while Virginia Com-
monwealth was third with "51
points. ECU ended up with
roints in the event.
The top finisher for the Pirate I
$as Milton Matheny, who placed!
7th overall, negotiating thel
lour-mile course in a time of 211
minutes and 41 seconds.
Matt Schweitzer was ne' Fo
he Pirates, in 25th place with
ime of 22.20. Mike McGehee'
lime of 22.31 was good for 28th
while teammate Rob Rice cap-
tured 31st place with a time : I
12.41.
Rounding out the scoring f
the Pirate runners was Russe j
JVilliams, who finished 51st withl
ft time of 24.20. Vincent Williams!
finished right behind Rice with al
ime of 24.30, however, in cros
prody's
Season

By GEORGE OSBORNE
HI s�on. Mnitn
The ECU soccer team go: oil
to a good start this weekend, u in
ning their first two games of the
Reason.
The Pirates traveled to St. Ar
Ticket !
Policy
Outlined
Student tickets for the West
Virginia football game can be
picked up on Tues Wed or
Thurs of this week from 8:30
am to 4:30 pm at the Minges
Coliseum Ticket Office.
Tickets will also be available on
Tues Wed and Thurs from
11am to 6pm at Mendenhall
Student Center.
In order to pick up tickets,
students most present a valid
ECU ID and Student Activity
Card. That will enable the stu-
dent to obtain one free ticket,
one half-price ticket and as
many regular price tickets as
desired. Students may also pre-
sent another student's ID and
get the ame number of tickets
with that one.
1 f
-40 � ��. a� � a. a.
- -� �-��
1 �'���H �ftWl�ilIMWP�WWW�W�l��liipW�Wfc�W�'���'
"1 '����





'ccoftds
Phone 758-1427
M-9 PM
10 PM
issettes
thru 915
"Oonclng on tile Colling"
"Invasion"
'Ra�e for Older"
Peter Cetera"
Slippery When Wet"
"Double"
"Eat 'em end Smile"
'Nine Lives
Uses Arriving
i Our Selection
�3
900
i
ER PRODUCTS
ire oble to offer to
wtly enrolled ECU
il computers:
tO$h $1235 00
PIUS $1770 00
ionol computer
II and personal
peripherals,
well as others
formal Fall Rush
Si 00 and Reception
lulti-purpose Room
lAipha Kappa Alpha,
pelta Sigma Theta, Coffee
'eta Phi Beta, Coffee
iigma Gamma Rho,
ilpah Kappa Alpha,
:lta Sigma Theta, Coffee
:ta Phi Beta, Coffee
wgma Gamma Rho,

-
I
tr of
r" of
r in-
ifully
ed to
their
0 are
aased
1981
i five
$ the
rcent
j, the
ffient
our
Jllar,
ng at
s and
lade
! for
' for
t in-
king
hie.
kit rs
rhar
ision
ausi-
an's
had
luch
it of
for
The
gas
um-
ac-
li of
tof
kich
hese
�g
:s
th
s
la
vm
Id
V
THE EAST CAROl INI AN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 9. 1986 Page 11
Wolf pack Defeats
Pirates In Opener
JON JORDAN - 1CU PHOTO LA�
Junior Ron Jones, who started at quarterback last year against N.C.
State, takes the handoff here from his newly acquired receiver spot.
Men's Cross Country
Does Well In Opener
By RICK McCORMAC
Co-Sporti Editor
The ECU men's cross country
team competed in their first meet
bf the season over the weekend,
inishing sixth out of 11 teams.
The meet, The Campbell Col-
lege Invitational in Buies Creek,
mms won by St. Augustines with a
�ta of 56 points. Pembroke
State finished second with 68
points, while Virginia Com-
monwealth was third with 75
points. ECU ended up with 152
Joints in the event.
The top finisher for the Pirates
as Milton Matheny, who placed
17th overall, negotiating the
four-mile course in a time of 21
minutes and 41 seconds.
i Matt Schweitzer was next for
the Pirates, in 25th place with a
lime of 22.20. Mike McGehee's
time of 22.31 was good for 28th,
while teammate Rob Rice cap-
tured 31st place with a time of
22.41.
Rounding out the scoring for
the Pirate runners was Russel
Williams, who finished 51st with
a time of 24.20. Vincent Williams
finished right behind Rice with a
time of 24.30, however, in cross
country only the top-five
finishers count toward the team
score.
Pirate coach John Welborn
was happy with his team's perfor-
mance in their first meet of the
season.
"I was very pleased to finish
right about in the middle of the
standings Welborn said. "We
did better than we thought I
would considering it was our first
meet of the year
In a sense, this fall marks the
return of cross country to ECU
since the days when the Pirates
were in the Southern Conference.
Although ECU ran in one meet
each of the past two years, the
NCAA requires teams to par-
ticipate in at least five events a
year to be considered an official
sport.
The next meet for the Pirates
will be Saturday Sept. 13, when
both the men's and women's
teams will compete in the Pem-
broke Invitational. The distance
for this event and the remainder
of the races the Pirates will enter
will be eight kilometers (five
miles).
By SPORTS STAFF
RALEIGH � Under first-year
coach Dick Sheridan, N.C. State
University soundly defeated ECU
38-10 with an impressive 32-point
second-half comeback, avenging
last season's opening-game loss
to the Pirates.
The contest was close, with the
Pirates leading 10-6 at the half,
before five second-half turnovers
spelled doom for the Bucs.
Once again, the game marked a
new attendance record for the
state of North Carolina as 58,650
witnessed the season opener for
both squads.
Although the Pirates lost the
battle, ECU coach Art Baker was
unhappy, but did find kind com-
ments.
"Obviously we were diap-
pointed to come out and lose our
first game in the manner we did. I
certainly have to congratulate
Dick (Sheridan) and his first win
(at N.C. State) Baker said at
his weekly press conference
yesterday. "1 can honestly say we
cannot fault our players for a
lack of effort.
"My first impression after the
game, is that we are younger and
more inexperienced than I
thought Baker added. "We're
playing young players and we're
not playing them just to have an
excuse � they're the best we
have
The Wolfpack was led by
senior quarterback Erik Kramer,
who was seven of 18 for yards
while rushing four times for 67
yards (including a 45-yard run).
ECU's freshman Charlie Libretto
was equally as impressive in his
debut as he connected on 14 of 26
tosses for 169 yards � better
than any mark achieved by a
Pirate signal-caller last year.
"I thought Charlie (Libretto)
did a pretty good job. He ex-
ecuted the things he was suppos-
ed to do Baker said. "Charlie
read the defenses as well as a
junior quarterback (would).
Sports Fact
Tues. Sept. 9,1948
Rex Barney of the Brooklyn
Dodgers pitches a no-hitter
against the New York Giants.
Barney has great stuff, but he
tends to be so wild that the
Dodgers send him to a
psychiatrist in hopes that
therapy will improve his self-
control. The more visits Barney
makes to the shrinks, however,
the more the strike zone
shrinks, and Barney is out of
baseball by 1950.
However, he didn't do a very
good job carrying out fakes. The
pressure finally got to him (late in
the game). But he did do some
very mature things out there
Baker cited two early second-
half miscues as turning the
momentum to the Wolfpack's
favor. An inopportune dropped
pass on a crucial third down
(while driving to the State 45) and
a fumbled punt near midfield
killed the Pirates' chances, accor-
ding to Baker.
"The kicking game killed us
and the fumbled punt (also
hurt) Baker explained. "We
dropped a pass and then our
defense held them. They punted
and we fumbled and that was the
moment the game turned around.
We didn't execute from that
point on
The Pirates came out smoking
as ECU scored twice off of two
Pack interceptions. Pirate safety
Gary London picked off a
Kramer pass at the Wolfpack 48
and returned to the 28. However,
the Pirate offense sputtered on a
third-and-one situation at the
State 19. Junior Chuck Berleth
then nailed his first major college
field goal from 37 yards with 8:01
left in the opening period, giving
the Bucs an early 3-0 lead.
Following the ensuing kickoff,
junior Flint McCallum got his
first career interception � retur-
ning it 12 yards to the Pirate 43.
Libretto then directed a nine-play
53-yard scoring drive. After three
pass completions, the Bucs had
the ball on the Pack 15. Three
consecutive carries by junior
fullback Anthony Simpson net-
ted paydirt with 1:40 left in the
quarter, giving ECU a 10-0 ad-
vantage.
The Wolfpack scored their first
touchdown in a controversial
manner. The old42-men-on-the-
field" routine ended up in a
19-yard scoring pass from
Kramer to Nasrallah Worthen.
The extra point was missed by
Cofer as ECU led 10-6. The game
films clearly showed the
Wolfpack with two flankers, two
tight ends, two running backs
along with five linemen and the
quarterback for a total of 12
See MISTAKES, page 13
JON JORDAN - ECU HMOTO LAB
Head coach Art Baker gets ideas from assistants above as he intently
studies Saturday night's action.
ellkn mumt-nr � tm� east Carolinian
Junior free safety Ellis Dillahunt (19), who had five tackles Saturday,
can only watch the action here as an unidentified teamate makes the
stop.
ECU-NCSU A CTION
Separation Stifles Staffers
Brody's Soccer Squad Opens
Season With Pair Of Wins
By GEORGE OSBORNE
KI Sports laf oraattoa
The ECU soccer team got off
to a good start this weekend, win-
ning their first two games of the
season.
The Pirates traveled to St. An-
Ticket
Policy
Outlined
Student tickets for the West
Virginia football game can be
picked up on Tues Wed or
Thurs of this week from 8:30
am to 4:30 pm at the Minges
Coliseum Ticket Office.
Tickets will also be available on
Tues Wed and Thurs from
11am to 6pm at Men den hail
Student Center.
In order to pick up tickets,
students must present a valid
ECU ID and Student Activity
Card. That will enable the stu-
dent to obtain one free ticket,
one half-price ticket and as
many regular price tickets as
desired. Students may also pre-
sent another student's ID and
get the same number of tickets
with that one.
drews Saturday and won 1-0 with
a single goal by senior forward
Jamie Reibel. Mid fielder Scott
Lee assisted Reibel with the
game-winning goal.
The Pirate defense held
throughout the match allowing
St. Andrews only two shots at
goal with ECU goalie George
Podgorny deflecting both shots.
The Pirates struck hard offen-
sively, racking up 18 shots at
goal. Robert Larrison and Jamie
Reibel accounted for 8 of those
shots.
Pirates taking five shots and scor-
ing two goals. Palmier Grossi and
Roy Andersch assisted Reibel in
his efforts.
Freshman Frank Marsh scored
the third goal to cap it for the
Bucs. Once again, Podgorny and
the Pirate defense prevailed
allowing the Pats only one goal
from seven shots. ECU spent a
lot of time on the Francis Marion
side of the pitch accumulating 13
shots at goal for the day.
"It was a very tough and
physical match. They were big
By SCOTT COOPER
SorUE!�
TIM CHANDLER
Sports Writer
RALEIGH � It wasn't bad
enough that we lost to State
soundly, but being separated
from our pre-game party was
catastrophic.
After each of us chipped in our
$5.00 apiece for food and stuff,
we (about a dozen or so of us) set
out on a caravan for Carter
Finley. That's when the problems
started.
For some reason, we followed
a foursome of people that led us
astray and into the scenic lower-
class section of our state's
capital. Anyway, by the time we
figured out that the girl drivi.g
the car (ahead of us) really didn't
know a quickie shortcut and that
we had been separated from our
original crew, we got our heads
together and found the traffic
heading for the stadium.
We figured all was cool and
that we would just find the crew
easily � it was early about 4:15.
However, that assumption was
far from reality. After we park-
ed, we walked around for hours
(or so it seemed). Everyone was
having a killer time � with their
hibachi's, music and the ever-
present liquid beverages to keep
people in the right frame of
mind. Let's not get off the sub-
ject.
We ran into thousands (okay,
hundreds) of familiar ECU
backers, and to be honest, maybe
two or three didn't seem visually
impaired to us. (Living it up
Down East obviously moved 85
miles west). It was really great to
run into so many familiar faces,
but in reality, it was tough as the
parking lot seemingly got bigger
with every step we took.
It wouldn't be so bad, but our
press passes, along with
everything else, was in the other
car. Well, by about 6:30 or so, we
thought we might as well just try
to get in the gate and then
possibly try to get into the press
box. After explaining our situa-
tion to the old guy in the press
gate, we were directed to speak
with some guy in a nice red
jacket. He then told us to speak
with another Wolfpack crony. At
that moment, as fate would have
it, we ran into our boy Ice Mc-
Cormac.
Then Ice (Rick) led us to our
party (of friends), where we got
our passes and stuff as we were
easily able to enter the game.
It wasn't too bad, being that
we did run into some of our ECU
counterparts who aided us in our
search. We would like the chance
to thank these honorable in-
dividuals. Let's see, 'Gorgeous'
George the sports information
student assistant, Anne, the
typesetter from Jersey, Slick Don
and his girl and Graves and
Spider.
Also, Herman Gentry, Rox-
boro's Pirate Club President,
who thought it would be best if
we found Dr. Karr and seek help
from the higher powers. It was a
good thought and we are ap-
preciative.
Except for a few blisters on our
feet (well, we needed a workout
anyway) it wasn't all that bad.
"We played very well and created a lot of n� �
opportunities for ourselves. It was a very good "1111 lC � OOl DSlll NO ICS � � �
showing for our first match
�Steve Brody
RECORD
Head coach Steve Brody was
pleased with his team's first out-
ting.
"We played very well and
created a lot of opportunities for
ourselves Brody said. "It was a
very good showing for our first
match
The Pirates took to the road
Sunday also, to take on Francis
Marion College. ECU was a win-
ner for a second time defeating
the Patriots 3-1.
Reibel once again paced the
and very aggressive head coach
Steve Brody commented. "Again
we played very well, we kept our
composure and made things hap-
pen for us. This game is a very
good one to have under our belts,
it will help us a lot as the season
progresses
The Pirates are now 2-0 as they
prepare for their home opener
against conference rival William
& Mary. Match time is 3:30 p.m.
at the ECU soccer field adjacent
to Minges Coliseum.
ANOTHER
CROWD
Last Saturday night's crowd in
Carter-Finley Stadium in Raleigh
of 58,650 was the largest crowd
ever to see a football game in the
state of North Carolina. That
marked the second consecutive
year that the ECU-N.C. St itt
game has drawn a record crowd.
The 1985 crowd of 58,300 was the
state's previous high. It also
marked the third time since 1983
that the Pirate-Wolfpack game
has been seen by a record crowd.
In fact, seven of the top 10
crowds in Carter-Finley history
have been from the matchups
between the two in-state rivals.
ECU IN HOME OPENERS
The Pirates own a 20-6 record
in home openers since the 1960
season and are 17-6 since Ficklen
Stadium was dedicated in 1963.
The Pirates' first win in Ficklen
was a 20-10 defeat over Wake
Forest on Sept. 21, 1963.
ECU's only losses in home
openers are as follows:
1966: 21-14 to Northeast Loui-
siana
1969: 24-6 to Louisiana Tech
1970: 10-0 to East Tennessee
State
1971:45-0 to Toledo
1980: 27-21 to Southwestern
Louisiana
1984: 17-0 to Temple
ECU has won 12 of its last 14
home openers, including a 27-16
win over Southwest Texas State
in 1985.
LIBRETTO DEBUTS AS
PIRATES' QB
Charlie Libretto directed the
Pirate offense last Saturday night
in his first collegiate game and
made an immediate impact on the
Pirates' offensive fortunes. The
6-2, 195, native of Middleburg,
FL completed 14-of-26 passes
for 169 yards vs. the Wolfpack
after being named the starting
QB by head coach Art Baker just
See LIBRETTOS, page 13
i0mi0itgmwf
����u.
tmim�0 �






12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 9r 1986
Classifieds
PHI TAU NEW LITTLE SISTERS
Welcome to the family, induction is
wed. at 9:30. Be prepared to party
afterwards.
BETA OMEGA: Welcome to
brotherhood. It's good to have ya'll
artth us.
SIGMA NU: All bothers and little
sisters are invited to attend Pizza
Hut on loth St. Thursday night it
will be no fun unless you come.
Bl KAPPA PHI: Word your order
6 ready.
JENNIFER: You were a little
HARD on the Beaver last Thursday
Night.
DELTA ZETA: Congratulations to
our new sisters: Erma Dillander,
Melanie Gibson, Kristy Patterson,
Anna Scott, Nora Stevens. Ya'll are
great! Welcome to the sisterhood.
Love, Your Sisters.
PI KAPPA ALPHA: We would like
to welcome all you guys back and
wish you the best of luck during Fall
rush! Love, TTKA lil sisters.
TO THE MADONNA FAN: "Follow
youFollow Me It's not WRDU, but
you get the general ideaP.S. Boy,
do l love Pantana Bob's! Love, THE
BRUCE FAN.
PI KAPPA PHI: The Pi Kapps in
vite everyone to the Elbo Wednes-
day night. C-C-Catch the wave!
PI KAPPA PHI: Hey Wick, what's
that smell? B.O look out for the
speed bumpsl What kind out trooper
was he John? Lupton, invest In some
frult-of-the-looms. Don't they have
bathrooms In Minnesott? Mark,
didn t know you could spit fire. Matt
(KONG), get your paws off my
burger. Kurt, it's Waffle shop time.
Dillon, did you find the 10 Command
ments? Don't cry Poindexter, you'll
Wt your money. Mark (Big D) the
oung like it hotl Hey Greg, you're
'�ally cute. Well guys, it was a blast
Let's get a real driver next time.
Stacey.
DONNA SAN MARCO: You gave us
a surprise when the candle went
around 4 times we couldn't believe
our eyes! The moment of candle
Hght was special for all. We hope
Ben enjoyed our excitement and
love call. We love you very much
and so we'll end this with a sigh
We're glad that you are our sister
and President of Alpha Delta PI
J-ove, Your Sisters. P.s. Donna San
Marco, engaged Sept. 6, 1986
Raleigh.
ATTENTION KA LITTLE
SISTERS: Welcome backl Our first
meeting will be Sept. 14th at 7 p.m
It's very Important you attend,
MANDATORYl Let's make this a
GREAT semester.
w.
mm
.kll��
FOUND: Black lab puppy around
3rd and 4th Streets last Monday
night Sept. 1st. Call 758-4019
LIFE'S A HEALTH AFFAIR: Spend
a healthy afternoon with us at the
2nd Annual Life's A Health Affair
Wednesday, Sept. 17 from 3-6 p.m. at
Mendenhall Student Center. Fun,
games, exhibits, free give-aways
Sponsored by the West Area
Residence Council, Student Health
Service, and Intramural-
Recreational Services.
SOCCER COACHES NEEDED
Greenville Recreation and Parks
Dept. is recruiting 10-14 part-time
Soccer coaches for the fall soccer
program. Applicants must possess
some knowledge In soccer skills and
nave patience to work with youth
Applicants must be able to coach
young people, ages 6-15 In soccer
fundamentals. Hours approximately
3-7 p.m. Monday-Friday. Some night
and week-end coaching. Program
will extend from Sept. 8- to mid Nov
Salary rate, S3.44hour. Applicants
will be accepted August 20- Sept 12
Contact Ben James at 752-4137 Ext.
262.
LOST BEAGLE I: Hot pink collar
Missing since Aug. 10. Owner
HEART-BROKEN. Answers to
FLACA. Day 756-3440, evening
752-0577. v
ATTENTION: Tutor needed for In
tro. to Logic 1500 immediately
Please call David at 752 1182.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
STUDENTS: Gain valuable creden-
tials in part-time work to help you
land that job after graduation. Con-
tact Martha Jones or Wade Bryant
m the Biology Dept. either personal
ly (rooms SIM, S-407) or by phone
(757 6287, 757-6307).
WANTED: Need dependable person
to answer telephones. Light typing
Hours 8:30-12:30 Mon.Fri. Call Pam
at 758 6200.
SJfTS?" MALE DIVERS FOR
�,E ECU DIVING TEAM. An ex
eel lent opportunity to be a varsity
Kobe at 757 6490
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Male
.issr:to $hare r�nt �nJ
utilities at Tar River Estates. The
apt. Is completely furnished except
for your room. Call 758-2853.
WANTED: Female student to assist
?�'� with house cleaning and
child care In exchange for room and
ooard. Near campus. 757-1798.
PART-TIME HELP WANTED: At
Parkn�H,e,0pt'Cian8; Doctor's
Par' B,d8- �� Will work around stu-
l$Chedule' No experience
manger APP" ,n P"s�" to
ftAIf,
f.?,R RENT: 2 r�om furnished
apartment for rent. Lights and
752 12'UrnShed Ca" 7�-0"4 �r
T.�tR SET bedroom wprivate
S2LSK Christian couple. Front
and back entrance, heat and air con-
dition furnished. Call 752-7212.
feJoVJi1 IS if V�u can buy
leeps for $44 through the us
SlXI Get the � 'oday.
Call 1312 742 1142, ext. 5271-A.
22 andEothBeerd'mday ' hear
Jennifer 752X5fS �� Ca"
am. and p m SLfZ 8,�
Mm- Priced to move!
NEED A D.J.t: Are you having a
party and need a D.J.?: For the best
top 40, beach and dance call
Morgan at 758-7967. Reasonable
rates. References on request.
TYPING: Professional service at
low rates Includes: proofreading,
spelling and grammatical correc
tions; 12 yrs. experience; familiar
with all university formats. Cindy:
757-0398 anytime after 6 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1985 Pontlac Firebird
5speed, T-tops, cruise control tilt
wheel- electric windows,AMFM
cassette stereo, maroon wgray in
terior, AC. $500 down, and balance of
loan, $10,000. 5-year warranty Call
Tony 752-4225 or 752-8045.
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICE: Word processing. The
Dataworks specializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertions,
theses, resume's and more. All work
is computer-checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary. Rates
are as low as $1.75 per page, in
eluding paper (call for spedific
rates.) Call Mark at 757-3440 after 7
p.m.
NEED A D.J.?: Having a shinding,
wing ding, high dollar affair? Best in
mid 6Cs, beach, rock, etcContact
the TRASHMAN at 752 3587.
PROFESSIONAL WORD PRO-
CESSING: All your typing needs 7
days a week on our State-of-the-Art
equipment which features a letter
quality IBM Printer. Pick-up and
delivery available. 355-7595.
KATZ PERSONALIZED COM-
PUTER DATING SERVICE: Is of
fering special low rates to students
Call or write for more information
355 7595 or P.O. Box 8003, Green-
ville, NC 27835.
FOR SALE: Dodge Colt, runs good
Will take ANY reasonable offer Call
now. 758 6680, Catherine
FOR SALE: Ringgold Towers "A"
Unit for sale, "B" unit for rentsale
Fully furnished. 201 532 7913 day
(Celidonio) and 201 431-0768
nitewkd.
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc Call
Anne at 752 3015 and leave a
message.
FOR SALE: 1984 Camaro, V 6,
5 speed, t tops, AMFM auto reverse
cassette deck, low miles, excellent
condition, MUST SEE, $6,500 FIRM
756 6805
FOR SALE: Alvarez guitar wcase
$395 Bundy Saxophone wcase $175
Dunlop Max 200 G Tennis Racket
$80 Call 758 0559.
FOR RENT: 3 blocks from ECU 1
bedroom upstairs apt. Large living
room, bath and kitchen, stove ana
refrigerator furnished. Screened in
porch, very nice. S250month Call
758 1274 after 6 p.m
FOR RENT: 3 blocks from ECU
bedroom with private entrance
Utilities paid. $160month Cai
758 1274 after 6 p.m
3SSSSSSSSSS
Announcements
BETA KAPPA ALPHA: The finan-
cial management association will
hold its first meeting on Tue Sept
9th at 3:30 in room 221, Mendenhall
Guest speaker will be Mr. Nick
Camardo, Branch Manager of
Barclays American Financial All
interested Business Students are en-
couraged to attend.
ECU LACROSSE CLUB: Will be
having a fall practicemeeting �
Today, Tues. the 9th at 3:30 at the
bottom of college Hill. All interested
please attend or call John Rusk
7586692.
ECU KARATE CLUMi Will have its
first meeting and workout Thurs
Sept. nth, at 7:30 in Memorial in
room 108. This meeting is for anyone
ranked yellow belt or above, or any
other experience in the martial arts
Beginning classes will start at the
end of September.
2ND ANNUAL LIFE'S A HEALTH
AFFAIR: Will be held Wed Sept 17
from 3-6:00 pm at Mendenhall
Special give-aways will be
available. Sponsored by the West
Area Residence Council, Student
Health Center, and Intramural
Recreational Services.
COPING WITH STRESS: A free
mini class offered by the East
Carolina for students. You can iden-
tify Sources of Stress, Make Positive
Changes, Manage Your Response to
Stressful Situations, Learn to Relax
improve Self Confidence. Mon '
Sept. 15; Wed Sept. 17; Fri. Sept'
19, Mon Sept. 22 from 3-4 P m in
329 Wright Bldg. (Plan to attend all
four meetings). No advance
registration is required. Call or stop
by the Counseling Center for further
information. (316 Wright Bldg
757-6661). y
STUDENTS: Do you have a GPA of
3.3 or better and have between 32
and 96 semester hours' If so, then
Phi Sigma Pi wants you! There will
be an introductory meeting
(smoker) on Wed Sept. 10th at 7 30
pm in rocm 244 Mendenhall, to tell
you what Phi Sigma Pi is all about
Dress is semi-formal (dress and tie)
and refreshments will be served
afterwards. Don't miss out!
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS: An
nouncing first organizational
meeting. Anyone interested in get-
ting involved with the elections or
iust learning more about the issues
is invited to join. We meet on Tues
nights at 6:30 in 221 Mendenhall
Everyone is invited to join the best
party on campus.
INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP: You don't have to
be an athlete to join us for fun
fellowship every Wed. night at 700
p.m. in Rawl 130. Come check us
out!
ECU HONORS ORGANIZATION
(ECHO): The first meeting of the
year will be held on Thurs Sept. 11
at 5.00 in the Honors Lounge, Rawl,
room 220. Anyone currently taking
Honors classes or anyone with an in-
terest in the program is invited to at-
tend. Contact Brian Burke at
752-4999 for information or if you can
not attend.
COLLEGE REPUBLICAN: The
ECU College Republicans will meet
tonight, Tues. Sept. 8 at 6:30 p.m in
room 221 Mendenhall. Please attend.
This is an important meeting and
many items of concern will be
discussed. For more information
call 830-1298.
MINORITY ARTS COMMITTEE
The Minority Arts Com. of the Stu
dent union is now accepting applica-
tions for new members. Member-
ship is open to students of all minori-
ty groups. All interested persons
should come by the Student Union of-
fice in Mendenhall or contact Cedric
Adderley for an application.
LAW SOCIETY: There wil be an
organizational meeting Tues Sept.
9 at 8:00 p.m. in room 248
Mendenhall. Former members
should attend and new members are
welcome. Dues for the coming
semester will be $5.00. If you are in-
terested in law, law school or the
legal profession in general, this is
the club for you.
VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE: The
Student Union Visual Arts Commit-
tee is looking for new members
Anyone interested please contact
Steven Zakely at 752-8481 or stop by
room 234 Mendenhall.
FOOD FOR THOUGHT: Come to
the Methodist Student Center (501 E
5th St. across from Garrett dorm)
this Wed. night at 5 p.m. and every
Wed. night for a delicious, all-you-
can-eat home cooked meal with a
short program afterwards. This
week, a presentation by the 1986
Mexico work Team. Meals $1 50
with reservation, $2 at the door Call
758-2030 for reservations. Sponsored
by Presbyterian and Methodist
Campus Ministries. Bring old pain-
ting clothes if you want to help lay
the base for the mural.
ALPHA EPSILON DELTA: Atten-
tion AED members interested pre-
�nedical students. Dr. Dean Hyack,
assistant dean of admissions at the
ECU School of Medicine, will speak
about the process and preparations
of entering Medical School. Anyone '
interested is welcome. The meeting
is at 7:00 tonight in Flanagan 307.
EATING DISORDERS SUPPORT
GROUP: Held every Wed. from 5-6
p.m. in Room 120 at the Student
Health Center. For more informa-
tion contact Judith Yongue, M D at
757 -6841.
FORENSIC SOCIETY: A meeting
will be held for all those interested in
competing in public speaking and in-
terpretation. Come by room 211 of
the Theater Arts Bldg 7:30 pm on
Wed Sept. 10. This year we are
really going places � so plan to at-
tend and be involved.
ECU SURFING: Will hold it's first
meeting Thurs Sept. n at 8:00 in
room 221 Mendenhall. Topics will in-
clude contests, trips, and activities
for the upcoming year. A new video
will be shown and there will be a par-
ty after the meeting at Georgetown
Apts. Guys and girls are welcome
and any new students are urged to
attend. For more info call Blair at
738-8393 or Cree at 758 9627.
GRADUATE MANAGEMENT AD
MISSION TEST (GMAT): Will be Of
fered at ECU on Sat Oct. 18, 1986.
Application blanks are to be com-
pleted and mailed to GMAT, Educa-
tional Testing Service, Box 964 R,
Princeton, NJ 08540. Applications
must be postmarked no later than
Sept. 15, 1986. Applications may be
obtained from the ECU Testing
Center, Room 105, Speight Bldg,
Greenville, NC 27834.
?5L?NAL TEACHR EXAMINA-
TIONS - CORE BATTERY EX-
AMS: Will be offered at ECU on Sat,
pet. 25, 1986. Application blanks are
to be completed and mailed to the
9n�p i�?a' 7Mt,ng Serv,c�' Box
jm-R, Princeton, NJ 08541 to arrive
tlSSLZJSt APP'atlon, may
be obtained from the Testing Center,
Room 105, Speight Bldg ECU
LSS SOCIETY: Meeting on Thurs
Sept. nth at 7:30 at Cubbies.
See ANNOUNCEMENTS, page
SsSSSSSSS
Hundreds of posters have just
arrived from $3.50 to $10.98.
Poster frames also available.
Personalized Acrylic Items
Sorority & Fraternity Items
Open Monday-Saturday 10-9
�SSSSS-c-c-v-

Carolina east mall
greenvllle
LIGHT MAKERS' IS YOURS
FREE WITH ANY 950 OR
MORE PURCHASE OF CLINIQUE
Cimioue ught Makers bonus puts all you need to
look good at your tinge, ups �� trus collection ot
skin care and makeup travel-sue samplings
This exclusive gift includes Dramatically
Orlterent Motslunz;ng Lotion. Zero -A
Base Extra-Help Makeup rtarm A -
Glo� Creamy Blusher Exfoliating � ll T
Scrub Blush VKtet Re Moistunnng aZ t
Lipstick and a Omue Extra up 4?K sJT
brush tor perfectly defined lips Treat ajk'?
your skm (c me best care a.anabe
with the Qmique system ot treatments
makeups and fragrances
All CimKjue products are
allergy tested and tOCt
fragrance free One
bonus per customer
pease
MEXICO MISSION WORK TEAM
Each year, the Methodist and
Presbyterian Campus ministries
sponsor a two-week mission in Mex-
ico, usually helping a Mexican con-
gregation to repair or build a
church. The 1986 team will present
be.r experience as the program for
SuPP�r �t the Methodist
Student ctr. (501 E. 5th St. across
i��! G!Irett Dorm)' 5 P-m- ��� l�
S'2 � V reservatlon (758-2030) or
�2 at the door.
STRIVING FOR EXCELLENCE
Highest Fraternity GPA On Campus
2nd Runner-Up Chancellor's Cup
ENTERTHETRADITION . PIKAPPAALPHA
SEPTEMBER ,5-17 7:00 PM THEATC
Mistak
Continued from pajje II
men. Houeer. the discrepancy
went unnoticed b the ofl
The Piratex began their
possession of the openi
on their own 37 1 ibretto c
nected with freshman
Wilson for 17
ball at the Pack 46 w A -
maining He hit Wilson .
a gain to the State Zh Tim Ja
netted 12 more on a draw, pia
the 16. However. i �
tackled bel tre g
bounds as the
ran out. The �
there wa- :02 �
and Berie: .arc
field goal The attemp
blocked
Libretto's
Continued from pae ! 1
!fie days
�number
i 14 �'
than any
Pirate- last se .
game. He a
ing corj
with true
Wilson. Jl
Arms
9
Read the
week for

Ann
� 5
Continued from page 12
ALL NURSING STUDENTS
r GRADUATING FALL SEMESTER
n order i receive your Nursing P -
n December orders must be pla
- "e Student Stores a- ghi B
Stno :a?e' than Sec er-
shou d ce p azec a' the ,ee
.Coue- Oraers most oe ca -
when me oraer is piacea.
j DENTAL APTITUDE TEST
(DAT): a be offered 91 EC.
I Sat . oc !9M Ape ;?� -m
blanks are c oe ma ez - I e I
rece vec by the Divis on of Ec
tlonat Mease1? Airier
Dena Ass a m E as'
Chicago A,e C�i :ac: &0C"
Sept 15, -984 adc ca' ons a-
on'a nee from the Test nq Cee-
Roc-n 105, See ght EC.
PRE PROFESSIONAL HEALTH
ALLIANCE (PPHA) A
their first rree' ; for "e se-es'e-
Wee, SeDf- 10 n HAendenha
R-oo1 247 Members are urged �
Dr-ese"� A rtterested ce-s:s
invitea to a'tenc
PIG PICKIN You -e -e: : a'
afternoon ot Chr s' a- e v.s- p
Sa . Sept 13- 12 DC noon ?� Ja
Meo'a United Methodist Churcti
510 S. Aas ngtor $� Pig
Hustl Bfs S a Beas
Desse-s az ce 'ea A da
acceptec Coe on out az e
Christy- fur before the EC
ban game
Woodsy Owl says
No Noise Pollution Here!
East Carolina C
Corner 10th & Di
We Buy Gold
INSTANT CA!
$' All Transactions (
' Buy � Sell -
fe 752-03
Ho�rv �:��.m �
tS205 Aboi addiiional a and Problcn fun her in tor
4��
rA -number 1-W p � �eekda i
WgMl�Mlfc��nf m0mim.
�" � - - -
tfkMMhBriMMM
timi�a��i �mni�lti
B





I
mg a
e best
call
rabe
a
llQ(
Jrrec
iliar
KATZ PERSONALIZED COM-
PUTER DATING SERVICE: Is of
fenng special low rates to students.
Can or write for more information,
355 7595 or p.o Box 8003, Green-
ville, NC 27835.
FOR SALE: Dooge Colt, runs good.
W ii taKe ANY reasonable offer. Call
ow '58 6680 Catherine.
FOR SALE: Rmggold Towers "A"
J Unit for sale. "B" unit for rentsale
' Fv furnished 201532-7913 day
iCes.aonio) and
�e wkd
201 431 0768
iFR
ri f?
ce
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc. Call
Anne at 752 3015 and leave a
message
FOR SALE: 1984 Camaro, V-6,
5 speec t tops AM FM auto reverse
lette deck, low miles, excellent
� ' Oil MUST SEE $6,500 FIRM
TS6 6805
FOR SALE. Aivarez guitar wcase-
$395 Bundy Saxophone wcase $175
op Max 200 G Tennis Ra-�. t-
Cal "58 0559
FOR RENT. 3 blocks from ECU. 1
airs apt. Large living
batti and kitchen. Stove and
r furn.shea. Screened in
very nice $250month Call
- after 6 p.m.
FOR RENT. 3 blocks from ECU. 1
bedroom tti private entrance.
' es pa.a $160 month Call
4 after 6 pm.
cklf$
f
posters have just
m S3.50 to SI0.98.
nes also available.
hied Acrylic Items
i Fraternity Items
i
iu
Z
iniiii(tt
CUMQUE
r4�1
:NCE
'PAALPHA
THE ATTIC
r
i
Mistakes Cost Pirates
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 9, 1986 13
Continued from page 11
men. However, the discrepancy
uent unnoticed by the officials.
The Pirates began their final
possession of the opening half,
on their own 37. Libretto con-
nected with freshman Walter
WiUon for 17 yards, placing the
hall at the Pack 46 with :49 re-
maining. He hit Wilson again for
a gain to the State 28. Tim James
netted 12 more on a draw play to
the 16. However, Libretto was
tackled before getting out of
bounds as the clock apparently
ran out. The officials ruled that
there was :02 left on the clock
and Berleth came on to attempt a
Field goal. The attempt was
blocked by the Wolfpack's
Nelson Jones.
Pirate miscues marred their
second-half play. The Wolf pack
was able to capitalize on the er-
rors as they scored one third-
quarter touchdown and 25
fourth-quarter points to win han-
dily, 38-10.
"Turnovers were crucial. They
led to us losing some of our inten-
sity Baker admitted. "They
(State) only made two mistakes
and we capitalized on both of
them. We gave them five short-
scoring drives and that was the
difference in the game
Baker did see some positive
things with his offensive unit and
especially the offensive line.
"I'm encouraged of what we
can do with the offense Baker
said. "I felt the offensive line
played really well, especially Cur-
tis Stryuk and Robert Alexander.
Alexander played his best game
at East Carolina, and that's say-
ing something because he's in his
fifth year
On defense, Baker praised
linebackers Bubba Waters and
Vinson Smith as well as safety
Ellis Dillahunt. Also defensive
ends John Williamson and Willie
Powell and tackle Walter Bryant
were singled out for their play.
"They took a beating and I
hope we learned a lot from it
Baker concluded, "yet our
players kept their composure
without losing their temper
despite the frustrating cir-
cumstances
Libretto's Debut Shows Promise
Continued from page 11
five days earlier. Libretto's
numbers in terms of completions
(14) and yards (169) wsere higher
than any passing total by the
Pirates last season in a single
game. He also had a fine receiv-
ing corps which was unveiled
with true freshman Walter
Wilson. JUCO transfer Jackie
Armstrong, last year's starting
quarterback-turned flanker Ron
Jones, and returnees Jarrod
Moody and Tony Smith.
MCKINNEY OFF AND RUN-
NING AGAIN
Sophomore Reggie McKinney
started the 1986 season as a
kickoff returner much like he
finished his freshman campaign a
year ago. The 5-10, 185, Mt.
Olive native ranked fourth in the
nation last season as a kick
returner with a 25.5 average per
return.
McKinney took N.C. State's
first kickoff last Saturday and
returned it 58 yards before being
brought down by the last man
between McKinney and the end-
zone. He also had a 20-yard
return later in the game to bring
his 1986 return average to 39.0
yards per return.
Read the Sports Section every I
week for the latest coverage.
Announcements
Continued from page 12
ALL NURSING STUDENTS
GRADUATING FALL SEMESTER:
In oraer to receive our Nursing Pin
in December, orders must be placed
in the Student Stores, Wright Bldg
i-no later than Sept. 19, 1986. Orders
"should be placed at the Jewelry
Counter Oraers must be paid in full
when the order is placed.
DENTAL APTITUDE TEST
(DAT): Will be offered at ECU on
Sat. Oct. n, 1986. Application
blanks are to be mailed in time to be
received by the Division of Educa-
tional Measurements, American
Dental Association, 211 East
Chicago Ave Chicago, IL 60011 by
Sept 15, 1986. Applications may be
obtained from the Testing Center
Room 105, Speight, ECU.
PRE PROFESSIONAL HEALTH
ALLIANCE (PPHA): Will have
their first meeting for the semester
Wee Sept. io in Mendenhall in
Room 247. Members are urged to be
present. All interested persons are
invited to attend.
PIG PICKIN: You're invited to an
afternoon of Christian fellowship.
Sat , Sept 13, 12:00 noon, at Jarvis
Memorial United Methodist Church,
510 S. Washington St. Menu: Pig!
Hush Puppies, Slaw, Beans
Desserts and Ice Tea. All donations
accepted. Come on out and enjoy
Christian fun before the ECU foot-
ball game.
GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINA-
TION (GRE): Will be offered at
ECU on Sat Oct. n, 1986. Applica-
tion blanks are to be completed and
mailed to Educational Testing Ser-
vice, Box 964 R, Princeton, NJ 08540
Applications must be postmarked no
later than Sept. n, i9W. Applica-
tions may be obtained from the ECU
Testing center. Room 105, Speight.
ECU VETERANS CLUB: Will have
first meeting on Tues Sept. 9 in
room 221, Mendenhall at 7:30 pm.
We will be discussing our plans for
the Fall semester. It's going to be a
big year, and participation is the
key. If you cannot make the meeting
but desire more information, call
Mike White at 752-2051 or Jim Reid
at 758 0333. Everyone is invited!
METHODIST STUDENT CENTER.
Fri. night, 6:30 p.m we are painting
the beach mural downstairs. Wear
old clothes and come for an evening
of fellowship, pizza, and hard work.
Everyone is welcome. The Center is
located at 501 5th St across from
Garrert dorm, 758-2030. Sponsored
by Presbyterian and Methodist
Campus Ministries.
NORTH CAROLINA STUDENT
LEGISLATURE: If you really care,
then VOICE YOUR OPINION! The
East Carolina Delegation to the
NCSL will hold a fall semester
organizational meeting on Monday
at 7:00 pm, Room 212, Mendenhall.
Veteran Legislators and interested
new students make plans to attend.
Questions or information, call Gor-
don at 756-6382. NCSL � The Cam-
pus Voice!
F
L
Woodsy Owl says
No Noise Pollution Here!
MACB
BRYANT t ASSOCIATES
The Financial Aid Finders
5 25 Sources Guaranteed
Scholarships, Grants & Loans
We can help you find the money you need
to meet college expenses. Three billion is
available yearly. Our computers will
guarantee 5-25 sources of aid. High school &
college eligible. Vocational and technical also
eligible. Call 757-0505 or 1-800-824-1164 ext.
184.
NATIONAL CENTER
FOR EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES
PO BOX 7092
GREENVILLE, NC 27834 7092
Scholarships, Grants & Loans
lor all colleges & technical vocational schools
The Pinto offensive line, which received . gre.t deal of credit from SXTTZTTT "�� �"�
ZS. Bour8ois 0�,he 8roud,�c" Thora"s ,57' - S��tT��Xi
Quality Mart
601 Greenville Bl vd.
756-1794
Ball Park Franks
Bay One Get One Free
Fix 'em the way you like 'em
Badwdaer 12 pack
S3.f?l!
Tide Deterg eat
regtizetftc
Free Med. Pepsi
w purcaajeof
Coke2Utr
DC
Si.4
HowTo Improve
�urGrades
AtTheBeach.
If you're finding your bathing suit
tighter than usual, now's a fitting time to
join The Spa. Students can join The Spa
on a monthly basis for only S25 per
month. That's $25 for 30-days without
any strings attached.
The Spa offers 52 aerobics work-
outs every week, exercise machines, free
weights, steam room, sauna and whirl-
pool. Plus, there are plentv of trained
instructors to help you shape up.
So. if your body is flunking the
beach test, call or drop by The Spa for
more information.
Improving your grades at the beach
simply requires a little home work.
Greenville's
best health club mlue.
SOUTH PARK SHOPPING CENTER
GREENVILLE 756 7991
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
Corner 10th & Dickinson Ave
We Buy Gold & Silver
' INSTANT CASH LOANS V
All Transactions Confidential A C
� C t
Buy � Sell � Trade
752-0322 �cC
" Hours: 9:00 a.m6:00 p.m Mon-S.i V
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
$205 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at
additional cost. Pregnancy Test, Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For
further information, call 832-0535 (toll free
number: 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5
p.m. weekdays. General anesthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
PIRATE
LACROSSE
CLUB
Practice - Meeting
Today � Tuesday 9th
3:30
Bottom of College Hill
All interested please attend
or contact John Rusk 758-6692
mm mmm .
� g � �"
�aw mm �jN�i,d��. i
,





14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBERS 1986
IRS Football Rules, Putt-Putt Tourney
Attention Male and female
independent and residence hall
flag football team captains.
Residence hall eligibility rules will
revert back to the same restric-
tions as were in effect last year.
Intramural
Column
1. Residence hall students may
participate either in residence hall
or independent division.
2. Teams within the residence
hall will be limited to having only
two (2) players from outside the
residence hall on their roster.
All Male and Female Residence
Hall and Independent Division
Teams: Captains Must Attend
the Re-registration Captains
Meeting and Submit a Team
Roster.
Re-registrationCaptain
Meeting is Wed. Sept. 10 at 9:00
p.m. in Biology, Room 103.
Tee-off with the intramurals
Putt-Putt tournament. Registra-
tion is i pproaching Monday,
Sept. 29. The team captains
meeting will be Tuesday, Sept.
30, 5:30 p.m. in Brewster, Room
C-103.
Dive into a great activity, the
intramural Swim Meet! Registra-
tion is Monday, Sept. 29, from
11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m Room
105-C, Memorial Gymnasium.
Team captains meeting is Tues-
day, Sept. 30, at 6:30 p.m. in
Brewster, Room B-102. Events
consist of the following:
50 yard: freestyle, backstroke,
butterfly, breaststroke
100 yard: freestyle,
backstroke, butterfly,
breaststroke, t-shirt relay, inner-
tube relay, individual medley
200 yard: medley relay,
freestyle relay.
Trying to ma��ain their titles
as both All Campus and Frater-
nitySorority Champions will be
Lambda Chi Omega and Zeta
Tau Alpha.
Run for the health of it! The
intramural Cross Campus Run
will be held on Saturday, Oct. 18,
homecoming weekend. Registra-
tion for the two and four mile run
will be 8:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m. the
morning of the race. The run will
begin at 8:45 a.m. so get those
feet in gear.
Regular particir: tion in the
Intramural-Recreational Services
aerobic classes can provide the
opportunity for personal reward
as well as a fun challenge.
Aerobic Challenge is an in-
dividualized self-directed pro-
gram in which participants may
earn a T-shirt award through ac-
cumulation of points from class
participation. Interested persons
may sign up during aerobic class
registration or may register
anytime at 204 Memorial Gym-
nasium. The program operates
IRS Hours
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial
Mon-Fri 7-8 am
Mon-Fri 11 am-1 pm
Minges
Mon-Fri 4-7 pm
Sat-Sun 1-5 pm
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
Mon-Thurs 11 am-7 pm
Fri llam-6pm
Sat 11 am-5 pm
Sun 12noon-5pm
Minges
Mon-Thurs 3-7 pm
OUTDOOR RECREATION
Mon l-5pm
Fri 1-5 pm
Sat 11 am-2pm
EQUIPMENT CHECK-OUT
(MG 115)
Mon-Thurs 11 am-7 pm
Fri 11 am-6 pm
Sat 11 am-5 pm
Sun 12 noon-5 pm
RACQUETBALL
RESERVATIONS
Mon-Fri 11:30 am-3 pm
Mon-Fri 12 noon- 3 pm
GYM FREE PLAY
Memorial
Mon-Thurs 11 am-7 pm
Fri 11 am-6 pm
Sat 11 am-5 pm
Sun 12 noon-5 pm
ECU
this semester from September 8
through December 5. More
specific program information can
be obtained in 204 Memorial
Gymnasium.
The Pepsi Physical Fitness
Club offers something for
everyone, whether just beginning
an exercise program or par-
ticipating on a regular basis. This
individual, self-directed program
offers five choices of exercise on
a challenge basis: jogging, swim-
ming, walking biking, and
pushing (wheelchairs). Par-
ticipants select their activity,
work out on their own, record
distances and receive an award
for successful completion of
goals. Registration and
mileageparticipation forms are
available in 204 Memorial Gym-
nasium.
Approximately twenty aerobic,
toning, and aquarobic classes are
taught each session throughout
the campus community. In-
dividuals may register for an en-
tire session, or may participate on
a drop-in basis for a nominal fee
with valid identification. Stop by
204 Memorial Gymnasium for a
complete class schedule.
Registration is September 2-5
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 204
Memorial Gym.
Session dates are September 8
through October 17 costing $10
for students and $20 for staff for
a session (12 classes) and costing
$1 for students and $2 for staff
per drop-in class.
Drop-in Classes in Memorial
Gym Beginning August 25:
Aerobics
4:00-5:00 pm MG 108
5:15-6:15 pm MG 108
11:00-12:00 noon MG 108
1:00-2:00 pm MG 108
1:00-2:00 pm MG 108
5:00-6:00 pm MG 108
Toning
5:30-6:30 pm MG 112
6:30-7:30 pm MG 108
Aquarobics
5:30-6:30 pm MG Pool
MonWedFri.
MonFriday
Sat.
Sat.
Sun.
Sun.
Tues. Thurs.
Mon. ' Wed.
Tues. Thurs.
SAV-A-CENTER EffS
MARKET
PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH SAT. SEPT. 13 AT SAV-A-CENTER IN GREENVILLE
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES
�SKS$�
Plus Double Coupons
(See store for details)
S WE Will MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli, Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current Week Food
Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality
S
mm
���
���





14
THE EAST CARPI inks SEPTEMBERS
198ft
;
IRS Football Rules, Putt-Putt Tourney
A ��I � k � t . .
Attention Male and female
independent and residence hall
flag football team captains
Residence hall eligibility rules will
revert back to the same restric-
tions as were in effect last ear.
Intramural
Column
1. Residence hall students may
participate either in residence hall
or independent division.
2. Teams within the residence
hall will be limited to having only
two (2) players from outside the
residence hall on their roster.
All Male and Female Residence
Hall and Independent Division
Teams: Captains Must Attend
the Re-registration Captains
Meeting and Submit a Team
Roster.
Re-registration Captain
Meeting is Wed. Sept. 10 at 9:00
p.m. in Biolog, Room 103.
Tee-off with the intramurals
Putt-Putt tournament. Registra-
tion is approaching Monday,
Sept. 29. The team captains
meeting will be Tuesdav. Sept.
30, 5:30 p.m. in Brewster, Room
C-103.
Due into a great activity, the
intramural Swim Meet! Registra-
tion is Monday, Sept. 29, from
11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m Room
105-C, Memorial Gymnasium.
Team captain meeting is I u
da. Sept. 30, at 6:30 p.m
Brevwer. Room B-102 Event
the following:
freestyle, backstroke,
breaststroke
a r d : free
backstroke, butterfly,
breaststroke. shirt rela, inner-
tube rela, individual med!e
200 yard: medley relay,
freestyle rela.
Trying to ma��ain their titles
a both All Campus and Frater-
nity Sororit Champions will be
lambda Chi Omega and Zeta
Tau Alpha.
Run for the health of it! The
intramural Cross Campus Run
v�.ill be held on Saturdav, Oct. 18,
homecoming weekend. Registra-
tion for the two and four milei
will be 8:00 a.m. - 8:30 a i
morning of the race. The run w
begin at 8:4 a.m. so get those
feet in nea
consisi
50 ��
butterfly
100
Regular participation, m the
Intramural-Recreational Ser ices
aerobic classes can provide the
opportunity for personal regard
as well as a fun challenge.
Aerobic Challenge is an in-
dividualized self-directed pro-
gram in which participants may
earn a T-shirt award through ac-
cumulation of points from class
participation. Interested persons
may sign up during aerobic class
registration or may register
anytime at 204 Memorial Gym-
nasium. The program operates
IRS Hours
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial
Mon-Fri 7-8 am
Mon-Fri 11 am-1 pm
Minges
Mon-Fri 4-7 pm
Sat-Sun 1-5 pm
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
Mon-Thurs 11 am-7 pm
Fri 11 am-6 pm
Sat 11 am-5 pm
Sun 12 noon-5 pm
Minges
Mon-Thurs 3-7 pm
OUTDOOR RECREATION
Mon 1 -5 pm
Fri 1-5 pm
Sat 11 am-2pm
EQUIPMENT CHECK-OUT
(MG115)
Mon-Thurs 11 am-7 pm
Fri 11 am-6 pm
Sat 11 am-5 pm
Sun 12 noon-5 pm
RACQUETBALL
RESERVATIONS
Mon-Fri 11:30 am-3 pm
Mon-Fri 12 noon-3 pm
GYM FREE PLAY
Memorial
Mon-Thurs 11 am-7 pm
Fri 11 am-6 pm
Sat 11 am-5 pm
Sun 12 noon-5 pm
ECU
this semester from September 8
through December 5. More
specific progtam information can
be obtained in 204 Memorial
iymnasiuitt.
I he Pepsi Phvsical Fitness
Club offers something for
eerone, whether just beginning
an exercise program or par-
ticipating on a regular basis. This
individual, self-directed program
otters five choices of exercise on
a challenge basis: jogging, swim-
ming, walking biking, and
pushing (wheelchairs). Par
ticipants select their activity,
work out on their own, record
distances and receive an award
for successful completion of
goals. Registration and
mileageparticipation forms are
available in 204 Memorial Gym-
nasium.
Approximately twenty aerobic,
toning, and aquarobic classes are
taught each session throughout
the campus community. In-
dividuals may register for an en
tire session, or may participate on
a drop-in basis for a nominal fee
with valid identification. Stop by
204 Memorial Gymnasium for a
complete class schedule.
Registration is September 2-5
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 204
Memorial Gym.
Session dates are September 8
through October 17 costing $10
for students and $20 for staff for
a session (12 classes) and costing
$1 tor students and $2 for staff
per drop-m class.
Drop-in Classes in Memorial
Gym Beginning August 25
Aerobics
4:00-5:00 pm MG 108
5:15-6:15 pm MG 108
11:00-12:00 noon MG 10
1:00-2:00 pm MG 108
1:00-2:00 pm MG 108
5:00-6:00 pm MG 108
Toning
5:30-6:30 pm MG 112
6:30-7:30 pm MG 108
Aquarobics
5:30-6:30 pm M(. Pool
MonWedFri
Mon -Friday
Sat.
Sat
Sun.
Sun.
Tues. Thurs
Mon. ' Wed.
Tues. Thup
PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH SAT SEPT 13 AT SAV ACE NITER INGREENVILl f-
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES
thc superset w- � fJJS
Plus Double Coupons
(See store for details
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli, Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current Week Food
Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality.
jf
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRESH FRYER
Breast Quarters
CHUNK LIGHT � IN OIL OR WATER
Double Tiii�
q Tuna


6.5
oz. can
LIMIT TWO WITH ADDITIONAL $10 00 OR MORE PURCHASE
MARKET FRESH
Ground Beef
5 LB OR
MORE lb.
RICH IN MINERALS
Broccoli
bunch
P&Q
Paper Towels
DUKES
v?
Mayonnaise
C3)
(Ut UO.L �
TOWtlS
� n�
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
$10.00 OR MORE PURCHASE
REGULAR-BUTTER
32 oz.
pr Crisco Shortening
feM 3 ib. 168
�j-iir 1 can I
&3
can
LIMIT ONE OF YOUR CHOICE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
UMTT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
REGULAR OR LIGHT BEER
ASSORTED
Pepsi Cola
i liter
bottle
OPEN SUNDAY 7 A.M11PM.
OPEN MON. 7 A.M.
CLOSE SAT. 11PM
703 GREENVILLE BLVD. � OPEN 24 HOURS







Your Choi
Famous Name Brand Products At A Low, Low Price
Lysol' Cling' toilet bowl
cleaner, 22 ounces
Lysol' BasinTubTile
Cleaner, 17 ounces
Fresh n Dry" Air Freshener,
4 5 ounces
Joy' Dishwashing Liquid,
22 ounces
Ajax' Laundry Detergent.
42 ounces
Niagara' Spray Starch, 28 o
Soft Scrub" Cleanser, 13 oz
Northern' Bathroom Tissue,
4 rolls per pack
Mott's" Apple Cider, 64 oz
White Rain' shampoo or con-
ditioner, 18 ounces each or
mousse, 5 ounces.
White Rain' aerosol hairspray
7 5 os or pump, 8 ozs
Armor All' protectant, 4 oz
Texamatic' Fluid Dexron' II
or Type F, 32 ounces each
Cutex" perfect care polish
remover in 6 ounce sie
Q-tips' , 170 count
Vaseline' Intensive Care'
bath beads, 15 ounces
Vaseline' pure petroleum
jelly, 3.75 ounces
� Aqua-Fresh' pump tooth-
paste, reg or kids 4 6 ozs
� Colgate' pump toothpaste.
regular or gel 4 5 ounces
� Oral-B' toothbrushes - sizes
60. 40, 35. 30 or 20
� Tussy" roll-on or stick
deodorant. 2'4 ounces each
� Tussy" solid or cream
deodorant, 2 ounces each
DOUAR
f
�-���
"3208631
RO&t S ADVVR1 �
Mt- HAHE A �
vm iii ��iiuBuaiiLUM�i
' PlTce for ThTBe
Sale Starts Mon Sept. 8th Sale Ends Sat Sept. 13th
Slcx-v Ou� To LOCJM Co�np�Miort
FOR
Covered trash barrel, G gal round
laundry basket or square laundry
basket. IV2 bu Available in asst. colors
VI , NETWT.lW3TtaA ly
FOR W Reg. 3.47
Cashew halves. Great for those special
events or parties. A perfect snack for
anytime. 11 ounce can Buy now & save!
O BARS I
BARS ' I
Jergens" soap. The lotion-mild soap
Each bar is 4 5 ounces. Shop Roses for
fantastic budget pleasing prices
5 FOR $1
FOR ' I Reg 36 Ea
6 strand DMC embroidery floss. Cl
from a variety ol I Olors ' - "iow for
all your cross stitcnmg proje ts
c
v1 P
�u"uimx c�uet c-
QUAKER
STATE
'
t
fPB'ljJL'tMptlW
MOTOR OIL
FOB BOTH GAlOUNf � .
ItUTOMOTIVt Olf �il f N0M��

See Store For Details On
Additional 2.40 Savings
m
� "� " '�
rl I p� ��i
(Cm FOR O Your Choice1
Downy' triple concentrate fabric soft-
ener 21.5 oz Top Job' 28oz. or
Carpet Fresh" in reg. or scent 14 oz.
.69
10 68 Our Sale Price on 12 Quarts
- 2.40 Less Mail In Rebate
Each Quart After Mail-In Rebate
Quaker State' Super Blend' 10W-30
or Deluxe' 10W-40 motor oil. Reg. 1.09
& 1.11, Sale .89 per qt. before rebate
iL SKEINS '1 Reg .88
Roses Creslan yarn. Made of acrylic
fiber Machine washable, non-allergenic
4 ply Choose from many colors 3 o?
BERCOn
2 FOR 57
Super Buy'
FOR f 72 x 90
Salem blankets. 100 polyester Great
warmth and comfort Sorry. No Rainchecks
102 x 90" Sale $7 (Each)





$11
Save 3.97
Reg. 14.97
Add a special touch to your wardrobe with a pair of
these ladies' leather crayons kilties. Available in an
array of popular colors to match any outfit Sizes 6-10
$15
� W Reg. 18.97
Warm and versatile jog suits for ladies Select from a
great assortment of styles and colors. Available in sizes
S-M-L. Buy now during our Dollar Days Sale
Reg. 9.97
Ladies' short sleeve silk and angora blend sweaters
Choose your favorite from a variety of exciting
fashionable colors. Available in sizes S-M-L
kNY WONDERFUL WAYS TO MA
THIS YOUR FAVORITE SEASON
Reg. 11.97
Ladies pull-on pants made of comfor-
Reg. 14.97
Ladies acrylic cardigan sweaters in
table polycotton blends. Many fall colors assorted styles and colors Sizes S-M-L
3 choose Sizes 8 to 18 Women's sizes 38 to 44. Sale si3
Reg. 12.97
Ladies' polycotton blend skirts in a
variety of fabulous fall colors. Always a fall
favorite. Available in sizes 8 to 18
$10
Reg. 12.97
Women's polyester blouse with a
matching bow. Compliments any outfit!
Many colors to choose. Sizes 38 to 44
Reg. 12.97
Women's poly poplin wrap skirt with
button closure and pleated front panel.
Assorted colors. Sizes 32 to 38
$7R
f Reg. 8.97
Attractive ladies' acrylic sweater vests.
Many fashion colors. Sizes S-M-L
Women's sizes 40 to 46. Sale s8
I"1
Not
Available
In All Stores
Reg. 12.97
Comfortable styled maternity tops in
bright plaids and solid colors. Tremen-
dous selection available in sizes 6 to 18
Reg. 12.97
Maternity jeans at a great savings to
you! Made of 100 cotton for easy-care
Available in sizes 6 to 16.
$6
Doll Sold Separately
Set
Reg. 7.97
Matching sleepwear for both you and
your doll. 100 polyester. Assorted col-
ors available in sizes 4-14. Great buy'
Reg. 11.97
Girls' fashion jeans. Choose from a
variety of stripes and prints for your fall
wardrobe. Available in sizes 7-14.
w Reg. 6.97
Your Choice! Toddler girls' oxford
shirts or printed jeans in a large variety
of dainty colors just for her. Sizes 2-4T
2
FOR I Reg. 4.97
Your Choice! Infant or toddler girls'
knit tops or corduroy pants. Choose in
fants sizes 12-24 mos. or toddlers' 2-4T
F Reg. 6.97 3 Rea 3 97 & 4 97 VX
men, o, dating 55X ,a, " JMt &?&��&$ "
Box
Reg.
Your Choice! Ladies' or girls' 1
cotton shaker knit sport socks.
pack. Ladies' sizes 9-11 or girls'
� I
00
3 pair
6-8V.
� W Req. 1
Reg. 16 97
Men s Wrangler- unwashed straight leg or boot cut
denim jeans. Made of comfortable 100'
denim Available in sizes 30-40
$9
Men s war
FASHION, ST
IT ALL A
I
rUHMAUUi'
I ��
Reg. 1.27
Wells Lamont' brown jersey work
gloves for men. Made of easy wearing
cotton blended jersey One size
SC Each
Reg. 3.97
Select your favorite fror
ment of novelty mesh b
fashion and Dasic co
'J0
�m FOR O �. FOR W Fru.tl
Men s Brut' fashion underwear. Men s pocket tee shirts
Choose from low rise or micro styles in a great selection of
variety of colors Sizes S-L 100� c cotton Sizes 5
2 FOP. $5
3 Pair Per Pack
Fruit of the Loom boxer shorts tor
men. Available in assorted patterns and
colors. Cotton blend fabric Sizes 32-44
63 Pair Per Pack
Sizes 28-44
Men s fashion briefs fromj
Loom" with a fly I
trim 100�-p cotton in fa I
?�.
$10
Your Choice!
Reg. 12.97
Men's or boys' In-Action low court
shoes. Men's sizes 7-12 or boys' 2v2-6
Youths' 12Vs-3, Reg. 12.97, Sale 9.88
9.88
Sizes 7
Reg 14 91
Men's popular style boat o
Boy's sizes 3" 2-6. youths
gents 8-12. Reg 9 97.
��. . Ml





H
4tJ

s y
� iters
KE
-
ylic sweater vests
4b Sale
Re
ft
r
�. FOR f
FOR f Reg 4.97
Infant or toddler girls
op 01 orduroy pants
-rz
A
spon,
i
ami �� -
S5
Reg 5.97
Ladies or girls 100�o
cotton shaker knit sport socks. 3 pair
: - idie zes 9-11 or girls' 6-8
stmk
m.w&

Reg 16.97
Men's Wrangler" unwashed straight leg or boot cut
denim jeans. Made ol comfortable IOO�i cotton
lenim Available . � I 40
�9
Reg 10 97
Men's warm up jacket featuring a nylon shell and a
flannel lining to keep in the warmth and keep out the
i hill Many popular colors to i hoose from Sizes S XL
Sfi Pair
W Reg 7.97
We've really turned on the savings on boys ski pa-
jamas. Select your favorite from in a tment of novi
ty prints in i vanetv I z I I I
FASHION, STYLING AND SAVINGS
IT ALL ADDS UP TO
Reg 1.27
Wells Lamont brown jersey work
gloves for men. Made ol easy wearing
otton blended jersey One size
� �
48fr
T&
Q C Each
J Reg. 3.97
Select your favorite from our assort
ment of novelty mesh back caps in
fashion and basic colors Adjustable
Reg. 3.97
Junior Boys polycotton football jersey
with numbers printed on front, back and
sleeve Available in sizes 4-7
�8
Set
Reg 9.97
Easy-moving fleece sets for junior boys
Made of 100� acrylic for easy-care
Available in sizes 4-7
iS�
' ?��
fft1Wteri3tattfL
wn
Men's Brut fashion underwear.
Ch � from low rise i micro styles in a
arietv : � i olors Sizes S-L
Men's pocket tee shirts. Available in a
great selection of colors in easy moving
100 cotton Sizes S-XL
PKGS
$7
3 Pair
Per Pack
Boy's Golden Blend tee
shirts or briefs. Made of comfortable
50� i, cotton500 u polyester Sizes 2-16
fft.
$6
W 3 Pair Per Pack
Fruit of the Loom boxer shorts for
men Available in assorted patterns and
colors Cotton blend fabric Sizes 32-44
$6
3 Pair Per Pack
Sizes 28-44
Men's fashion briefs from Fruit of the
Loom" with a fly front and contrasting
trim 100�o cotton in fashion colors
2
3 Pair Per Pack
Fruit of the Loom Fun Pals briefs
for boys Made of absorbent 100- cot'
Many fashion colors available Sizes 2-8
Sorry, Ni Rail checks
FOR f Reg. 4.97
Infant or toddler boys knit tops or cor-
duroy pants in a variety of colors Infants
sizes 12-24 months oi toddlers 2 4 1
$4
Reg 4 97
Your child will love these Watch Dogs
A small stuffed dog on a wrist band Lift
up his head and there is a watch under it
V
$10
( lion e
Reg 12.97
Men's or boys In-Actlon low court
shoes Men's sizes 7-12 or boys' ?'?-6
Youths 12'2-3. Reg 12.97, Sale 9.88
9.88
Sizes 7.12
Reg 14.97
Men's popular style boat oxfords
Boy's sizes 3V2-6. youths 12Vi-3 or
gents 8V2-12, Reg 9.97. Sale 7.88
$3
Reg. 3.97
Men's Fruit of the Loom" over the calf
socks or crew socks. 3 pairs per package
Make your selection from sizes 10-13
A ffc Slipei Buy '
W Reg 5.97
Men's Pickett Pack. 4 pairs of acrylic
tube socks in a handy carry all mesh
sport bag Available in sizes 10-13
I
I





POWER
WHEELSW
$119p
I I Reg. 139 97
Power Wheels " High Rider ' 4x4 or Coyote " 4x2 all
terrain vehicles Feature: lv forward pe Is with
eversi i I dual I itti � m recha :� i
G3 'Emerson.
i hie
Reg 79.97 & 99.97
Girls 20 Pacesetter ; Boys 20 Turbo 2X or
Monster bikes BM tyh frarm i finger leverbraki
i urbo i lei ha free whei a tl front 8 �� ir brak
$88
Model AR-502
Reg 99.97
Emerson 4 cu ft under the cabinet
microwave with tf minute timer - I
Mounting Brackets Reg. 12.97. Sale S
counter
lefi �
12
? v WHAT
WILL BUY FOR YOU AT ROSES
I � � �
WILL BUY FOR YOU AT Rfl�
$2
Reg. 2.99 & 4.97
Choose from an assort-
ment of household tools
or a 5 piece wrench set.
�m Reg. 2.88-4.97
Quartz digital clock, key
chain clock or auto com-
pass clock Super buy!
$2
ur Choi.
Regular and purse size
vent brushes. Shop
Roses for low. low prices
$4
Reg. 7.88 & 9.97
40 piece combination
socket set in SAE or
metric or hand riveter set.
$4
Reg. 5.97
Sonic" model Pro X ultra
lightweight mini head-
phones. Great value
$4
Reg. 4.97
Gemini T-120 VHS
blank video cassette
tape. Record your own
$2
Baker's Secret
Each. Reg. to 4.27
Cookie sheets, SML.
biscuitbrownie pan, cake
pans, oblong or pizza pans.
dm Buy'
Cheer" all temperature
laundry detergent. 42
ounce size. Stock up!
$2

aoQQQ
o a a a q
paaoQ
� � B P
Reg. 2.97
9 pair shoe rack. Choose
fiom almond oi chocolate
Sturdy and handy organize!
$4
Reg. 4.77
Daisy Door" Mat. Made of
Astro-Turt " Available in
cocoa or green. Shop now!
$4
Reg. 5.47
Table top ironing board
with silicone cover.
Perfect for dorm rooms'
S4
LJ
Your Choi
Electrasol" dish detergent.
50 oz or Bounce" fabric
softener, 40 count.
Your Choice!
Reg. 2.27 to 3.47
15 quart dish pan, 16
quart round or rectangular
pail or dish drainer set.
$2
��-�
Reg 5.97
Sharp model EL231B
calculator with extra ia
keys and readout

N
I
Plant n
Standard Size
Reg. 3.47
Foam-filled bed pillow.
Shop Roses and save on
all your bedding needs.
M14" x 50
Reg. 5.97
Wall or door mirror. PPG"
float-plate glass. Hardware
for hanging is included.
$A 81" x 96
mT Reg. 4.88
Poly-fil' traditional bat-
ting. 100 polyester and
hand washable White.
$4
Reg. 4.97
Walnut stain basket or
stand. Holds up to a U
inch hanging basket
$2
Super Buy!
Scott' napkins. 450
count package. Great sav
ings on a quality product!
$2
fc Your Choice!
Spray n Wash, 32 oz or
Lysol" disinfectant spray,
12 oz reg. or scent
$2
Your Choice!
Reg. 2.47
Krylon" interiorexterior
enamel spray paint or
Rust Magic paint. 12ozs.
$4
Vtauostf
Reg. 4.97
Foam soccer ball. Soft and
durable. Will give your child
hours of safe fun
$4
:e
Reg. 4.57
Mr. or Mrs. Potato Head
Each comes with their own
accessories Lots of fun
$4
Reg. 4.44
PLAY-DOH RAINBOW
PACK Includes 8 bri
colors Clean & non-to
$0 Your Choice!
Mm Reg. 3.57 & 3.97
Eight inch planters in
assorted colors. Styles
FD-8, CR-8 and CS-8.
Finger Wrestlers. Select
from 4 styles of the USA
wrestling team. 33�" tall.
Reg. 2.97
Fisher-Price Snap-Lock
beads. For children 6
months to 4 years old.
t Reg. 4.97
Rambo� UZI commando
sound pistol set with knife
and headband. Shop now!
$4
Your Choice!
Reg. 4.97 & 5.97
Panasonic� Superlite
with battery or Ray-O-Vac"
Lantern with battery.
$4
TT Super Buy!
Four piece value pack
brushes. Shop now while
the savings are fantastic
9
Prestone
C,iUCDNE
MlN
53
Prestone II wi
-
4 97, Sale A 50 :
FOR $3
STP carb spray cleaner
or STP engine degreas-
er. Reg 2.17 & 2.27
Roberk wiper Dlade
. I � .viper
blade refills
m

VAWC
$Q Each
O Reg. 3.97
Aluminum tea kettles.
Many colors from whii I I
choose � our
$3
Reg 3 97
Speedy sponge mop. cot
ton wet mop or speedy
broom
Hasi UasJL
Ooq L.51 Qgfe

$3
Reg. 3.97
5" round. 4 x 5'2
ovals or 8 Christmas
sock cross stitch kits
$Q 11 x 11
W Reg 3.88
Solid terry washcloths
Assorted solid colors
cotton 12 per pa i
Duroco
4 for 83 a
Roses all purpose ready
to use potting soil. Ster
ilized eight pound Dag
FOR vO 2?7
Water can with hand
controlled watering a
easy carrying 56 our �
$Q Each
W Reg. 3.96
SUPER POWERS action
figures. Choose from asst
heroes and villians
$3
Reg. 3.57
2
2 for $3 n 2
Nabia
strawi
newt
2
Foam football. Approx- For tt
imately 10" Safe, soft & choo;
grippable for lots of fun1 peani
1
I





cabtnelounter top
al
$4
$4
Reg. 4 97
del Pro X ultra Gemini T-120 VHS
ighl mini head- blank video cassette
hofif s tape. Record your own'
oaaaa
fi fi Q Q E3
oaaaa
�P maoQ
s4
Reg 5 47
$4
'op ironing board
lie one cover
Reg. 5.97
Sharp model EL231B
calculator with extra-large
and readout.
Plant NdlncluU-
$ 81 , 96 "
TF Reg 4 88
Poly-fn traditional bat-
ting
$4
Reg 4.97
Walnut stain basket on
stand. Holds up to a ten
hanging basket
Vauua;
Reg 4 57
Mr or Mrs Potato Head
$4
Reg. 4 44
PLAY DOH- RAINBOW
PACKIncludes 8 brigh:
colors Clean & non-toxic
Panasonic
kando
h knife
now'
$4
Reg. 4.97 & 5.97
Panasonic' Super lite
with battery or Ray-O-Vac
Lantern with battery
$d
T Super Buy!
Four piece value pack
brushes. Shop now while
the savings are fantastic.
Arj? s&& �
Prestone
ANTI FREE2T
ilUCONE
llUCATE
forflL
WARNING �
3
-i uu
Fnrh Gallon Alter Mail in Rebate
II winter anti-freezesummer coolant On
. � � " ,to k uf now while the savings last Req
bale 4 50 per gallon before rebate
Reg. 39.97
42 inch Royal Flush ceiling fan
LOOK
antique bra ,�
i bright bra i
eeds, reversible motor and are light adaptable
$44
Reg 49 97
filing fan m white with bnqhtbral j Emp.error F,usth Mount or Ser' 6000 ceiling fan
1 aue brass Schoolhou � l � kit includi I �� � �� �
� ea1 ��� ��: ;avei � ii imri er md ����
UU It'
s. 't N . � k � '
OU AT ROSES
jB M
U M ri
WILL BUY FOR YOIF AT �nccc
TP carb spray cleaner
f STP engine degreas-
r. Reg. 2.17 & 2.27
FOR 0 ?.e97
Roberk wiper blade with
one per pack or wiper
blade refills, 2 per pack
ok Up!
Extra strength Efferdent
denture tablets. 108
count bonus pack
Roses 1
gallon redwood stain or
redwood stain brush.
Reg. 9.88 & 9.97
11 piece wrench set m
SAE or metric or 3 inch
bench vise Shop & save.
FOR
$C Reg
J 3.97
7 piece
wood screwdriver set or
7 piece nut driver set
VMVl
53
Each
Reg. 3.97
luminum tea kettles.
my colors from which to
oose for your kitchen
$3
Reg. 3.97
Speedy sponge mop, cot-
ton wet mop or speedy
broom with free dustpan
$3
64 Ounces
Tide' liquid laundry
detergent. Gets your
whole wash clean
O Reg. 7.97
Wooden indoor dryer. Per
feet for your hand wash-
ables. Folds for storage
W Reg. 6.97 & 6.99
2V2 gallon
gas can or 10 gauge 12
foot booster cable.
2 FOR $5 3Re997
Fiberglass
or tubular hammer. Great
tools to have and use
SO Your Choice!
O Reg. 3.97
5 round, 4" x 5V2"
ovals or 8" Christmas
sock cross stitch kits.
$Q 11" x 11"
W Reg. 3.88
Solid terry washcloths.
Assorted solid colors. 100
cotton. 12 per package.
Chair pads. One inch
thick. Available in many
eye pleasing patterns
5"x7" or 8"x10" hard-
wood frames. Beveled cut
mat & full strength glass.
Reg. 7.99
Scandia vinyl window
shades. White or ivory
22" to 37VT x 6'
Reg. 7.97
Make your selection from
an assortment of hand
made wicker baskets.
for -o ?a-
Roses all purpose ready
to use potting soil. Ster
ihzed eight pound bag.
for "O 2ei97
Water can with handle for
controlled watering and
easy carrying. 56 ounces.
2F0R$3?e897 2for$53r,1?o 4
FOR O "2
Nabisco" fig, apple
strawberry or blueberry
newtons. 12 to 16 oz.
FOR VU 310
Milk crates. Choose from a
variety of colors. Great for
the kid's room.
5 00 Sa Ea.
-1.00 Mail In BaiMlfl
Cost After Rebate Ea.
Quickie" automatic
roller mop or sponge
mop. Reg. 6.97, 7.47
2 FOR $5
Your Che Tackle
cleaner, 64 oz or Clorox
2 bleach. 61 oz

v
$Q Each
W Reg. 3.96
SUPER POWERS" action
figures. Choose from asst.
heroes and villians.
O Reg. 3.57
Foam football. Approx-
imately 10 Safe, soft &
grippable for lots of fun!
2 FOR $3 20 oz $5
For that cnaial enak
FOR J20 oz
For that special snack,
choose this delicious
peanut brittle bonus box.
Each
Reg. 6.97
Panthor" or Battle Cat
For use with Masters Of
The Universe� figures.
$5
Your Choice!
Reg. 5.97
All Star Wrestlers Tag
Teams. Choose "Road
warriors" and more.
3 100 Count
Extra-Strength Tylenol �
caplets. Extra pam relief
that contains no aspirin
I






s
'&
: i '
'

�-�
I ulips Galore
l
TASTE
bV jp
6
MAKER.
stfJ)ens
I'
3 PIECE
TWIN SET
I tie Bed Set ' sheet sets.
1 Piece Full Set
4 Piece Queen Set
l Piece King Set
IS BUY'
Sale "12
Sale s17
Sale M9
78 Cotton22�o
Trevira Polyester
48 x 24 Peach. Slate
Reg 8.47 or Toast
Fireside unique homespun fabric pinch pleat cafe
48 x 36 Fireside Cafe. Reg. 8 97 Sa
x 45 Fireside Cafe. Reg 1 1 97
48
0
Reg. 39 88
This handsome bentwood rocker th cam
le b7 and back will be a lovely accent to any room in . .
Sale b9 home Some assembly required l"ak idvanta
x11 Matching valance. Reg 6.97 Sale "6 th�- grt �mj . i ,� .j . ;
E ADVANTAGE OF OUR LAYAWAY
PLAN DURING DOLLAR DAYS
Set
Reg 9 97
5 piece porcelain enamel bowl
set. Perfe t for ! erving and
. I 'atterns mav . u .
Save 6.97
Reg. 21.97
Wicker look ventilated hamper
Padded lid ! It irdy i onstru tion
�'�' natural oi whit�-
Vmyl Mini Blinds
Reg 10 88
it �� ,
fh � isi 23 ' v
i5 oi 36 � 6 I
Reg 29 97
Dining room chair , tl
: fi
ulon ' if -
tk tn � md h
at and : n -
$17
I f Reg 21 97
Unfinished ladderback chair
Ready t . : i
� � � I � . �
CANNON
0 30 x 60
Ecstasy extra large bath
sheets Absorbent 100
1 �'�. of I oloi
,rmk
I Jbbev
Ott(
I Each
Libbey s owl
with cork top, bell, ginger jar or
bean pot with cork lid
S I II Beautiful Drapes
I J Reg. 14.47 & 15.47
Choose Pilgrim blue or Emer-
son brown printed draperies
46" x 63" or 46" x 81 sie
Reg 29 97
Ice cream chair with contoured
hardwood frame and cane si �
Some assembly required
Reg. 12.97
30 inch bar stool tl ;
J seat and I i
strut tion Gold t la - � .
FOR f Each
Kitchen kaper wedge rugs
'�' ii , i olors and patterns
�vail ible Super buy!
Reg. 1.34
Waffle weave dishcloth. Size
13 x 13" Select from many di
ferent colors 3 per package
Sorry, No Rainchecks
FOR $1 RI9ach48
Washcloth assortment from
Cannon' Assorted colors to
choose from Slightly imperfect
Reg. 14.97
Pin up lamps. Choose from
assorted wood, glass, metal or
hobnail lamps Great buy!
Reg 12 97 8. 14 97
Choose from a variety of
boudoiraccent lamps
greal styles and populai
$OH 7 Piece Set
fc J Reg 29 97
Porcelain enamel cookware I
& IV2 qt covered saucepans A
qt dutch oven & 8V2" fry pan
2 FOR $1
Y ou 1 Choici
FOR V I Reg. to .77
Golden Harvest 16 ounce
drinking jar or 4 ounce mini
drinking jar with lid
$1
Yourhoii e!
Reg. 1.37 to 1 77
Peeler, egg whisk, pizza cutter,
pastry brush, can opener. 3 or
4 piece spoon set.
$7
Each
Reg. 8.57. 9.97
Hurricane candle lamps Select
from a variety ot globe styles all
with a walnut finished base
1 8 Each
Your Choice' pine trash bin or
pine taters and onions bin
Nice accent for your kitchen
$109
Model TR6 .
Reg 129
Aladdin 22 600 btu kero
buttr �
( . :�
LOW LOW
THREE CONVENIE
CASH, CHARC
M t.
Each
Reg 15 88
11 Popples "
ze for � in
Bars
F
Reg 26 97
My Buddy or Kid Sister
dolls
� '
Reg 24 9
Flex" 4x4 machine fi
wheel tra
ward and revi
Masters
tion fiquri
1 id j
Reg 39 96
High Energy battery
cold cranking am;
size GRABBED
4 FOR 53
Bra I
Snap gas treatment
lum " motor oil 0
Save 2 88
Reg 11 88
36 spoke wire wheel cover
Available in 13. 14 or 15 inch
sizes Triple chrome plated
$ 13
Car ramps
� �
veh






� '
YAWAY
1VQ
vvgco
s7
OSA
Reg 9 9;
s17
Reg 21 97
i ladderback c I
s10
USA
so inch bar si
If? �;

P
s10
Reg 12 9 & 14 97
m a variety of
�on accent lamps
Each
Pine trash bin or
P"ie taters and onions bin
; ent for youi kiti hen
� �' ' �. .
Model TR6000 Save 20.97 SOOO Savc 30-97
Reg 129 97 �- m
'n?q'nitonc?ILkeSr hea,e' Feaiures push Eme�orT Xel VmeiVhead. front load video
L9nd built taff&TuL S"0" ShUt0 fUel CaSSe"e reCOrder' Fea,ures wireless remole co�' 4
.event14 day programmable timer and 1 touch record
4.44
Reg.
8.88
Roses porch deck floor
paint or 8 year flat wall
paint. Asst colors 1 gal.
4.99
Reg
9.97
Choose Roses interior
semi-gloss or gloss house
paint. Many colors 1 gai
LOW LOW PRICES
HREE CONVENIENT WAYS TO PURCHASE
CASH, CHARGE OR LAYAWAY
Th Citicorp Card
�HOICE
VISA
Each
Reg. 15.88
Popples are just the right
�� for children to hug Each
nsforms into a furry ball.
VQ -M ���y. Mail- R :��
0 Final Cost After Rebate Ea
Barbie and The Rockers�.
Each doll has her own contem-
porary jewelry Reg. 9.86
Reg. 89.97
Flywheel bike. Welded steel
frame weighted flywheel, speed-
ometer odometer and timer
Reg. 59.97
DP incline leg liftleg curl
rowing exercise bench. Some
assembly required Buy now1
Reg. 26.97
My Buddy or Kid Sister
dolls are true friends Both
j removable clothes
3WJ$m. i
S S S $4 Maii-ln Heoate
�"� ��� Final Cost After Rebate
Crystal Castle� is the home of
She-Ra' Features elegant fur-
niture in every room. Reg. 29.97
Reg. 4.99
Roses interior latex flat wall
paint. Available in a vane,
exciting colors 1 gallon s :�
�quid stnpper
fast actmq
Super Value'
Power rower. Three function
rower with adjustable tension
Some assembly required.
Reg. 26.97
110 pound barbell dumbell
set with instruction booklet
Get in shape with Roses'
Reg 11 88
Kutzit paint & varnish remover
A liquid strippei Fast acting
One gallon s Z� Save 3.88
Reg. 24.97
Flex� 4x4 machine features
wheel transformation and for-
ward ajid reverse action
�njeWiqti?r
IfSUJmE&GiL
2?ri�
Maintenance
Free
Cost After Rebate On 2
Masters of the Universe" ac-
tion figures. Select your favor-
ite hero or villian. Reg. 4.86
Terrific Buy'
Reg. 11.97 & 12.97
ur Choice! Rowing action
exerciser with contoured rowing
pedals or Tummy toner.
ul Your Choice!
W Reg. 9.97
Push up bar. DP' 5 pound
ankle-wrist weights. 5-spring
chest pull or sit up fitness bar.
S10
1 Gallon
Reg. 11.99
Thompson's' water seal. Water
proofing protection for wood, con-
crete, canvas and much more
y
QAA )96
�m 7 Reg. 39.96
High Energy battery. 370
cold cranking amps Compact
size. GRABBER u handle.
J
Your Choice! Brake Fluid;
Snap' gas treatment; Prem-
ium- motor oil or oil spout.
Roses oil filters. Meets or ex
ceeds manufactures specifica-
tions for excellence.
-24 Our Sale Price
-s5 Mail-In Rebate
Final Cost After Rebate
Cabbage Patch Kidss are more
special than ever. Beautifully
detailed clothes that are durable
Reg. 12.97
Soft seats by Magnolia' . Dur-
able non-cling leather-grained
vinyl White, blue, bone or gold
�9
Save 2.88
Reg. 11.88
36 spoke wire wheel cover.
Available in 13. 14 or 15 inch
sizes Triple chrome plated
�13
Save 6.97
Pair
Reg. 19.97
Car ramps. One piece steel con-
struction. 6500 pounds gross
vehicle weight rating.
$2
Reg. 2.96
Roses air filters. Meets or ex-
ceeds manufactures specifica-
tions for excellence
S Each
f Reg. 7.97
Your Choice! Fisher-Price'
melody push chime roller or
corn popper. Ages 1 to 3 years
$7
Save to
Reg. 9.97
Bathroom scale by Counselor-
Easy to read numerals White
Digital Scale. Reg. 24.97, Sale $19
I
v
i





5Q Ech
Reg. 9.27
Huggies" disposable diapers. Choose from daytime
48 ct . toddler 33 ct newborn 66 ct or x-absorbent 40 ct
2$1
FOR I The Big Tough Towel
Brawny paper towels. Choose from designer or
assorted colors 73 square feet per roll, 2-ply durability
fi FOR I Your Choice!
Roses alcohol or peroxide. Both available in 16 ounce
sizes Quality products at affordable prices
����
2nd SET FREE!
For a limited time bring your film to
Rose's Photo Center for
QUALITY FILM DEVELOPING and receive
2 sets of prints for one low, low price!
Applies to 110. 126. 135 and Disc color print film
Shop Roses For
Quality Name
Brands At
Sensational
Savings!
Roses facial tissues. 175
count in white or yellow or
Roses cotton puffs in 100
or 300 count Great buy!
Personna disposable
razors. 5 per pack Big
Value1 Great for trips
Sorry. No Ramchecks.
FOR
Pantyhose in an array of
colors and assorted sizes
Slightly imperfect Sorry.
No Ramchecks
$1
Reg.
s1
FOR
Aida 100�o cotton cross-
stitch fabric. Available in
white or ivory. 12" x 12"
14 count. Stock up now!
$1 $1
Bowl Fresh deodorizer.
Fresh scent and long
lasting Choose from assort
ed colors. 3 ounces each
Reg. 1.49 to 1.97
Tubular hangers 10
count plastic clothespins
24 count or wooden
clothespins 40 count
Roses green or amber
mouthwash or dental
floss in waxed, unwaxed
or mint 100 yards each
Your
FOR vOcho,c
St. Ives" apricot scrub,
clay masque, collagen,
replenishing lotion,
shampoo or conditioner
Your Choi
Sweet N Low' . 250 ct
Grapefruit diet plan cap-
sules, 20 ct or Dex-a-diet
II capsules. 24 ct
Reg 1.39
Decorative wood spoons.
A unique country look craft
item Great to paint,
decorate or stencil
Reg. 9.88 to 12.97
8 pair shoe
shelf bag. dresssuit bag
or 4 drawer chest. Great
to organize your closet
Reg. 8.77, 8.97
12 pocket
shoe bag or 9 section
organizer with bouguet
print Great buy!
FOR I �e:
Regular envelopes, 50 or
100 ct security envelopes,
40 or 80 ct or writing
tablets, ruled or unruled
4 PKGS. '1 R889Ea
All occasion gift wrap
paper. 2 sheets per
package. Each sheet is 20
inches by 30 inches.
Your Choice!
Reg. 8.97
Rubbermaid' Rough-
neck" trash can or
Kelley' galvanized trash
can. 20 gallon size each.
FOR "C R99gEa.
Your Choice' Roses 10
count trash, 15 count tall
kitchen or 7 count trash
and lawn bags.
O Reg. 13.97
Your Choice! Garment
rack or overdoor shoe
rack. Great for organizing
your clothes and closet.
Reg. 2.97
Choice' Storage
box or underbed storage
box with attractive bouquet
print Great buy!
Microwave popcorn.
Choose from butter or
original flavors Twin
pack-2 servings per box
FOR "t ?.6g7Ea.
For that delicious buttery
taste, choose these Vik-
ing danish butter cookies.
Available in 1 pound tin.
Your Choice!
Reg. 2.07 & 2.27
Kodak film. Select
CA135, 12 exposure or
CL-110, 12 exposure for
those special pictures
FOR J 16x25
Kitchen towels. Mushroom,
pineapple or herb prints.
Dishcloth 13" x 13" or Pot
holder . Sale �1 (Each)
I Great Buy!
Beauty silk velvet look
bush assortment. Made
of polyester blend. Many
colors and styles available
Reg. 4.17
Pompeii pillow. Make
your selection from many
popular natural looks
Shop now for great prices
FOR " R789Ea
Your Choice! Shasta"
drinks. Choose cola, diet
cola, orange, grape, ginger
ale or lemon lime 2 liter
FOR V I R59Ea
Roses coffee filters. Fits
Mr. Coffee , West
Bend , Norelco and
most others 100 count
D Reg. 7.96
Basf bonus pack with four
90 minute cassettes and
travel case. A sensational
value from Roses!
Your Choice!
Reg. 3.27
Homelite� pre-diluted
engine oil, six V pints or
Chain-Lube bar & chain
oil, one gallon size.
Light bulbs. Choose 40,
60, 75 or 100 watt Four
bulbs per package. Great
value, great price!
FOR v 1 pla
Furnace filters. Available
in 16" x 20 16" x 25"
20" x 20" or 20" x 25
A tremendous buy'
I

� '
-





Title
The East Carolinian, September 9, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 09, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.490
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57845
Preferred Citation
Cite this item
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of ECU Libraries. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy