The East Carolinian, September 4, 1986






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(Uarnltmau
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.61 No.3
Thursday, September 4,1986
Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 12,000
22 Pages
State Gets Ready
Police Tighten Security
Go Pirates!
JON JORDAN � THl PHOTO LAB
This Saturday's game against NC State kicks off the season for both the Pirates and the Wolf pack.
The game begins at 7 p.m. at Carter-Finley Stadium in Raleigh.
Drinking Age Change To 21
Causes Riot In Chapel Hill Alcohol Program On Campus
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (UPI) � television crew that was working, About 145 police, sheriff's �r O mm � rw aj mf
By PATTIKEMMIS
News Editor
As N.C. State prepares for
Saturday's game with ECU, their
Public Saftey Department has
one thing on their mind, increas-
ing visible man-power.
"We want to make sure fans
are aware we are in the area
said Larry Liles, NCSU Public
Saftey, "in all areas
According to Liles, the depart-
ment is adding additional security
each day for the game.
No security from ECU will be
at the game, according to an em-
poyee at ECU Public Safety.
"We're hoping that being visi-
ble will act as a preventive
measure said Liles, "but we
will be ready to do anything
possible to control the crowd
Liles added there would be ex-
tra officers in the parking lot
both before and after the game to
control fights, abusive alcohol in-
take, fires, and anything else that
should happen.
Fans entering the gates will be
checked for alcoholic beverages
and glass containers. Neither are
allowed in the stadium.
"I think alcohol played a big
part in last year's incidents said
Liles, "in fact, I would say it was
probably the root of all of the
problems
According to a report filed by
NCSU's Public Safety, at last
year's game (58,400 in atten-
dance), between 7:27 p.m. and
"i think alcohol played a
big part in last years pro-
blems, in fact, I would say
it was probably the root of
all of the problems. �
Larry Liles.
11:38 p.m. there were 200 alcohol
violations, 15 fights, 20 people
injured, and $4,000 worth of
damage done.
At the 1984 game(57,300 in at-
tendance), there were 125 alcohol
violations, 12 fights, 7 injuries,
and $1,000 worth of vandalism
reported.
These figures top any other
game held in Carter-Finley
Stadium for those two years.
'I would like to see our
students act a good bit more
orderly said Chancellor John
Howell.
He added, "I appreciate the at-
titude ECU took about the
changing drinking age and the
manner they approached it with.
I hope they (ECU students) will
use that attitude as a model
Saturday instead of the Franklin
Street (Chapel Hill) model
According to Gary Mauney,
President of NCSU Student
Government, the competition
shifted from the field to the
stands at last year's game.
"I think a great rivalry is being
marred by conduct Muaney
said. "This is a good way to kick
off the year, we just hope fans
will remember to act responsibly
this year
Mauney also warned that there
would be Alcohol Enforcement
officers in the stadium, and with
the changed drinking age,
students heed to remember the
law.
"If everyone acts in the man-
ner they should act if they were
here, I think everything will be
okay said Steve Cunanan, SGA
president.
Area media reports suggesting a
"block party" to coincide with a
hike in the state's legal drinking
age helped create a riot by about
10,000 drunken protestors over
the Labor Day weekend. Chapel
Hill's police cif says.
More than a dozen people fac-
ed charges this week stemming
from the riot that came after the
legal age for drinking beer and
wine rose to 21 years midnight
Sunday, Chapel Hill Police Chief
Herman Stone said in an inter-
view Tuesday.
"1 never saw any flyers adver-
tising any party. I sincerely
believe that prior media reports
contributed to the crowd that
took over Franklin Street
Stone said.
Many of the protestors who set
fires in the street and smashed
windows, causing more than
$10,000 damage, appeared to be
playing up their violence for
television cameras recording the
action, Stone said. Much of the
property damage, totaling more
than $10,000, occured near a
he said.
Stone said he had received
criticism from downtown mer-
chants whose storefronts received
a total of more than $10,000
damage by bottles and other
debris hurled through windows.
They claimed police should have
moved in and swept the street
once the crowd became unruly,
he said.
"1 second-guessed myself all
weekend, but I honestly don't
think there was anything else we
could have done Stone said.
"What can you do with 8,000 to
10,000 people, all of who are
openly breaking the law0 Where
could we have put them if we ar-
rested them0"
"If all hell had broken loose,
we would have been in a lot of
trouble he said.
Local bars were jammed early
Sunday evening by young people,
many of whom were buying their
last legal drinks until they turn 21.
By 9 p.m crowds of drinkers
had spilled out into the streets,
local bar owners said.
SRA Holds Elections
By THERESA ROSINSKI
Staff Writer
The Student Residence
Association, an organization for
those students living in residence
halls, will be holding elections
next week.
SRA gives residents a chance to
voice their grievances and to pro-
mote their ideas, according to
Brian Lassiter, president of SRA.
Positions are available for
president and vice president on
west campus and on College Hill.
Secretary and treasury positions
are open for west and central
campus and College Hill.
Any student living in a
residence hall who has been in-
volved with their house council is
eligible to run for an office and
may sign up with their dorm
director.
The last day to file for an of-
fice is Thursday, September 4, at
5 p.m.
"It's an opportunity for
students to meet people and make
friends said Thomas Denton,
vice-president of SRA. "You get
to see things done and it's a way
to help others
The elections will take place in
the residence halls from 9 a.m.
until 4 p.m. Wednesday,
September 10. Residents will be
electing SRA officers and their
Area Council members.
"It's a chance for the residents
to get involved and do
something said Lassiter. "We
are an organization for the
students and if students get in-
volved then their opinions can be
heard
This fall, SRA is planning a
dance co-hosted with SGA, and
in February will be hosting a state
conference for the North
Carolina Association for
Residence Halls.
ON THE INSIDE
Editorials �Tom Hanks of the ATTIC is us-
Features e to tonga mt � Eater-
Comics16 tainmeat page 11.
.17
Sports
Classifieds� ECU � State rivalry examined
Announcements20 � see Sports page 17.
deputies, North carlina Highway
Patrol troopers. State Bureau of
Investigation agents and other
authorities were called in to
monitor the situation as the situa-
tion grew worse toward mid-
night, Stone said. They moved in
to arrest flagrant law-breakers
after midnight and did not make
c final sweep of the ssreets until
about 3:13 a.m.
"I think we handled it right to
keep serious injuries and proper-
ty damage to a minumum
Stone said. "We could have mov-
ed in (earlier), and maybe had so-
meone killed
"The besi thing was to keep it
undeicontrol, let the crowd die
down some and then move in to
See UNC page 3
By LESLEY DEES
Surf Writer
BACCHUS, formerly known
as the Campus Alcohol and Drug
Program, is kicking off its second
year as a member of a national
organization.
Boosting Alcohol Counseling
Concerning the Health of Univer-
sity Students, is a student run and
SGA supported program that is
designed to make students aware
of their drinking behavior.
"We're just trying to promote
responsible drinking among the
student body says Karen
Palmer, senior student and co-
president of BACCHUS.
If a student is caught in an
alcohol or drug related infrac-
tion, such as getting a DWI on
campus, damaging property, or
even pulling a fire alarm while
impaired, they are referred to
BACCHUS by Ronald Spcier,
the associate dean of student ser-
vices.
"This fs done fn lieu of, or In
addition to paying a fine said
Keith Kaut, co-president of BAC-
CHUS.
A workshop is held for the
students by BACCHUS, which
includes alcohol-education films
made by the national organiza-
tion, and questionnaires about
one's drinking habits.
In addition to the workshop,
BACCHUS offers a peer counsel-
ing program open to all students
who feel they may need help with
a drug or alcohol problem, or to
those who are just curious.
"We are not professionals; we
just feel that we're a little more
knowledgeable about drugs and
! just here ee
a resource, for the students to
come to us
Palmer said, "Our main objec-
tive in BACCHUS is if you do
drink, drink responsibly
BACCHUS will hold its first
meeting Thursday, September 4,
at 6 p.m. at Mendenhall Student
Center for all those interested.
New Food Service At ECU
By CAROLYN DRISCOLL
Assistant News Editor
Dining hall food is one of the
typical complaints among college
students; however, Canteen, the
new food service company on
campus, may be changing the
way ECU students think about
food at school, according to
Wayne Modney, director of Din-
ing Services.
One of Canteen's goals is to
"get away from all of the conve-
nience items that have been serv-
ed in the past said Modney,
"and go with the more 'home
cooking' type
"For example, instead of br-
inging in pre-cooked roast beef,
we are preparing it here he
said. "Our meatloaf, macaroni
and cheese and other dishes will
now be made on the premises
The only convenience fodd be-
ing used now is anything left in
the freezer from the former com-
pany, Service America.
Another benefit of the new
company, said Modney, is that
the menu is more varied.
Students will also find that
nutritional and caloric informa-
tion is available for menu items,
and that nuts, trail mix and dried
fruits are being sold at the stu-
dent center and at Mendenhall.
In addition to the changes Can-
teen has brought to ECU in the
way of menu, there is a new
system of checking in meal cards.
Whereas last year students car-
ried a paper card with boxes that
were manually checked off as
each meal was used, this year
students have a plastic card with
their photo and a magnetic strip
on it. The magnetic strip tells
whether the student's card has
been lost, how many meals the
student has left that week, and
whether he has already had that
meal at another dining hall that
day.
According to Janice Ellis, ad-
ministrative assistant to the direc-
tor, this new system serves two
basic purposes. First of all,
students can no longer go from
one dining hall to another during
the same meal time, and because
of the photos on the cards, they
cannot switch cards with their
friends.
"But this is good for the stu-
dent she said. "If he loses his
card, it can be easily replaced and
no one else will be able to use it
Using the cards, students can
tell exactly how many meals he
has left for that week. This
system is being used at all of the
dining halls on campus: the
Training Table, College Hill Din-
ing Hall at Jones Dorm, The
Galley, and Mendenhall Student
Center.
The College Hill DiningHall
will continue its all-you-can-eat
policy, while Mendenhall is
limited, The Galley will be open
from 7:30 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. for
its Late Night Snack, for which
students may use their meal
cards.
Dinner Is Served
V,
, the aew food service
dining halls.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBFR d
1986
Women's Studies Pro gram New To Campus
ECU News Bureau
A new Women's Studies pro-
gram at East Carolina University
has begun operations on campus
this fall, the culmination of five
years of development by ECU ad-
ministrators and faculty.
The program, to be directed by
Dr. Marie Farr, associate pro-
fessor of English, offers an
undergraduate minor concentra-
tion through the ECU College of
Arts and Sciences.
ECU's Women's Studies minor
is "interdisciplinary" - encom-
passing courses and seminars in
history, literature, sociology and
other fields. A newly-approved
philosophy course, "Women and
Religion has been recently ap-
proved and will be added to the
curriculum this year.
As a field of study, women's
studies is an "offspring of the
women's movement said Dr.
Farr. A major social and political
force, the current women's
liberation movement had its
beginnings nearly two decades
ago, before many of today's col-
lege students were born. Early
leaders in the movement demand-
ed full recognition of women's
abilities and contributions and an
end to policies which prevented
women from reaching their
fullest potential in public life.
"A recent Gallup poll showed
that most women interviewd
believe that the women's move-
ment has changed their lives for
the better said Dr. Farr.
"Women's studies looks at the
effects of this and other changes
on women
Also, women's studies pro-
vides "both contemporary and
historical perspectives on
women's contributions to
selfhood, to family and to socie-
ty she said, noting that the field
balances "traditional cultural
assumptions with women's
perspectives" and "encourages
discovery of knowledge" about
women, their lives and their
"humanity
Contrary to what some critics
have charged, women's studies is
not an "educational fad The
more than 500 undergraduate
and 75 graduate women's studies
programs already in place across
the nation "disprove that myth
Dr. Farr said.
It is significant that the
southeast, with its reverence for
traditional manners and tradi-
tional values, ideally embodied in
the Southern Belle and her
gallant male protector, has what
Dr. Farr terms the "most active
interest" in women's studies.
Dr. Farr observed that while
women's studies programs on the
nation's campuses are increasing
at the rate of 16 percent overall,
Co-Op OffersCareer Benefits
By TOBI FERGUSON
Staff Writer
ECU Cooperative Education
(Co-op) is a challenging program
in which undergraduate and
graduate students explore
employment opportunities in the
field of their major, gain valuable
work experience, earn money to
further their education and make
contacts for future jobs.
In 1906, co-op was founded at
the University of Cincinnati. This
program was established at ECU
in 1974.
Betsy Harper, director of
ECU's Co-op, has been involved
with the program from its begin-
ning. According to Harper, in the
first year of operation, co-op
placed 30 students in internships.
William Barrett, coordinator,
stated that "600 students were
placed in 1985-86 Harper add-
ed, "We hope to place 2000
students this year
Co-op offers many advantages
to participating students. Harper,
Barrett, and Beryl Waters, coor-
dinator, believe that the "ex-
perience" gained in co-op is
essential for the success of
today's graduate.
In co-op, students can alter-
nate semesters of classroom study
and work as an intern. Co-op
participants are paid during the
internships.
Conceivably, a student could
attend the university one
semester, intern the next, attend
both summer sessions, and still
graduate on time. Money earned
during the internship can greatly
deter college expenses.
According to Barrett, co-op
participants grossed over one
million dollars in the last fiscal
year. Although in the end, he
said, experience is more valuable
than money when applying for a
job.
Said Harper, this experience
facilitates entrance into the job
market at higher levels of field
placement, often with above-
entry salary. Employer evalua-
tions at the conclusion of one's
internship are beneficial at-
tributes for one's resume, she ad-
ded.
Many co-op students graduate
with a job offer from the firm in
which they interned.
Companies participating in the
ECU Co-op program include
Burroughs-Wellcome, Black n'
Decker, Wachovia Bank,
Virginia Power, Empire Brushes,
IBM, various Federal and State
agencies.
Interested students are en-
couraged to contact the ECU Co-
op offices in 313 Rawl from 8
a.m. to 5 p.m Monday through
Friday for further information.
The Rebel
East Carolina's National Award Winning
Literary-Art Magazine
is now accepting applications for the
following positions:
Poetry Editor
Prose Editor
Art Director
Applications may be obtained in the
Media Board Office and The Rebel
Office. Applications should be turned in
to the Media Board Secretary
Publications Bldg) no later than Friday,
Sept. 12, 5:00 p.m.
"
they are growing at the
"astonishing rate of 33 percent"
in the southeast.
"Students who have enjoyed
women's studies courses at other
colleges seem anxious to continue
that positive experience at
ECU she said.
According to Farr, interest in
women's studies at ECU arose
from a number of diverse chan-
nels - a series of career planning
workshops for faculty women
with ambitions to become ad-
ministrators, the "informal but
organized" lunch programs
sponsored by the University
Women's Network (chaired by
Farr herself), work by the
campus-wide Committee on the
Status of Women and the suppor-
tive encouragement given by
ECU Vice Chancellor Angelo A.
Volpe and by Arts and Sciences
Dean Eugene Ryan.
"Our women's studies pro-
gram has been several years in the
making, and I am delighted that
we are now able to offer it to the
students said Dr. Volpe.
Dr. Ryan termed the new cur-
riculum "a sound academic pro-
gram" that will "lead to a better
understanding of the role of
women in science, history and the
arts
"Women's studies is not for
women only Fair explained
Women students do account for
the vast majority of total increase
in college student enrollment in
the 1972-82 decade, she said, and
this trend is expected to continue,
especially with more and more
adult women returning to college
to continue their education.
NO NEWS
IS BAD NEWS
Catch the Wind
and Sun on a Sail
The Outer banks at Nags Head, NC are an excellent
location for a windsurfing outing offered by the
Department of Intramural-Recreational Services on
Saturday, September 13. This will be an all day
excursion with a three hour class in windsurfing offered
from 10:00 a.m. through 1:00 p.m. The cost will be
$37.50 per person covering transportation and the
class. Stop by Room 204 in Memorial prior to 4:00 p.m.
on Friday, September 5 to sign-up.
OUR BEST DEAL EVER
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EDUCATION PRICES Above features standard
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ECU Sales Rep: Jimmy Harrington
Automated Office Systems
3812-H Tarheel Drive
Raleigh, NC 27609 � Phone: 790-9960
First Repubi
Wo
RALIEGH, NC. (UPI)-Rhodi
Billings was sworn in Wednesday
as the first Republican chief
justice of the state Suprem
Court in 84 years, along with twoi
GOP associate justices, setting up
what observers call a pivotal
November judicial election.
"It most surely is pivotal
don't recall any election in m
memory with incumbents involv-
ed in reces for five contested sea:
on the state Suprem Court, said
state Attorney General
Thornburg.
Billings was appointed to fill
out the term of retired Chief!
Justice Joseph Branch, i
Democrat. Fellow Republican
Francis Parker was sworn :n to
finish the associate justice tern-
vacated by Billings and GOP
member Robert Browning toe
the oath to complete the term of
former Associate Justice Jame
Exum.
Exum, the senior justice c I
seven-member court a1
Branch's departure, vacatec
term to run as a Democra-
against Billings in the fall elec-
tion. Parker and Browing
face Democrats John Webb
Willis Whichard, respectively on
the November ballot.
Also in November, Democrat
Associate Justices Louis Meve-
and Harris Martin will face re
election challenges by GOP can
didates Art Donaldson arc
Donald Smith, repectiveh.
Thornburg said in an interview
he preferred North Carolina-
"existing system" of electing
judges by party. But other state
officials, including Repubhcar
Gov. Jim Martin and Democ:
Lt. Gov. Bob Jordan, indicates
they might favor filtering
UNC
Stages
1 I Riot
finish it he said. Stone said thatl
out-of-town visitors, notf
students, caused much of the
damage and started other violent
activities.
Monday morning's riot was the
worst local authorities have seer
Stone said. Mass demonstrations
following appearances in the
NCAA basketball tournamerr
the University of North Carolina
in 1977 and 198 had been bigger,
but better behaved.
"We've seen that type of
madness before. Those (19" and
198crowds were ones that
started out happy and might have
turned a bit ugly Stone said.
"Sunday was different. This
crowd was mean the whole way
Stone said he was concerned
about the Chapel Hill Police
Department's complement of 65
field officers ability to cope with
another violent demonstration.
"I'm not afraid, but I'm con-
cerned Stone said. "This pro-
blem is bigger than us
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Campus
hv the
tt "e on the
n r h�
Women's studies is not for
uomen only Farr explained.
W vinien students do account for
the ast majority of total increase
in college student enrollment in
the I9"2 82 decade, she said, and
this trend is expected to continue,
especiall) with more and more
adult women returning to college
to continue their education.
NO NEWS
IS BAD NEWS
he Wind
n on a Sail
NC are an excellent
luting offered by the
reational Services on
will be an all day
n windsurfing offered
.m. The cost will be
ansportation and the
xial prior to 4:00 p.m.
ip.
EVER
IRS.
;nts in the Education market,
lomated Office Systems. Present-
y-( R Personal Computers, AOS
Education market.
ftware. Extensive library of
)ie to 640k
md LED keys
drive
ible in the standard
m board, no slot required, with
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first Republican
JEEASTCAROLINIAN
SEPTMEMBER4. 1986
Woman Sworn In
RALIEGH, N.C. (UPI)-Rhoda
Billings was sworn in Wednesday
as the first Republican chief
justice of the state Supreme
Court in 84 years, along with two
GOP associate justices, setting up
what observers call a pivotal
November judicial election.
"It most surely is pivotal. I
don't recall any election in my
memory with incumbents involv-
ed in reces for five contested seats
poilitical affiliations
judicial election.
"The key to this situation is to
nave non-partisan
electionsMartin said. "It is the
feeling of lawyers and judges all
over this state that we ought not
to have partisan elections; yet it's
required by our state constitu-
tion
"In the past, the Democtratic
from Republicans and Democrats on
judicial seating options such as
merit selection, in which the state
Supreme
SJ, If, T C�Un' Said Party has a,ways 8�ne along with
state Attorney General Lacv
Thornburg.
Billings was appointed to fill
out the term of retired Chief
Justice Joseph Branch, a
Democrat. Fellow Republican
Francis Parker was sworn in to
finish the associate justice term
vacated by Billings and GOP
member Robert Browning took
the oath to complete the term of
former Associate Justice James
Exum.
Exum, the senior justice of the
seven-member court after
Branch's departure, vacated his
term to run as a Democrat
against Billings in the fall elec-
tion. Parker and Browing will
face Democrats John Webb and
Willis Whichard, respectively on
the November ballot.
Also in November, Democratic
Associate Justices Louis Meyer
and Harris Martin will face re-
election challenges by GOP can-
didates Art Donaldson and
Donald Smith, repectively.
Thornburg said in an interview
he preferred North Carolina's
"existing system" of electing
judges by party. But other state
officials, including Republican
Gov. Jim Martin and Democratic
Lt. Gov. Bob Jordan, indicated
they might favor filtering out
that system because it meant it
was always the Democrats who
won he said. "Now, we hope
more Republicans are going to be
elected and re-elected
Jordan said he was soliciting
opinions from Republicans and
Democrats on judicial seating op-
tions such as merit selection, in
which the state bar or a panel of
judges would nominate can-
didates to the bench.
But Jordan said he was
soliciting opinions frim
bar or a panel of judges would
nominate candidates ot the
bench.
But Jordan said he "can't
fathom right now what the effect
of the campaigns will have on the
selection Drocess
"The process we have now has
worked well in the past; yet
things are more unsettled now
Jordan said. "We've had more
confusion, more lawsuits, more
disruption on the court system
over the past 18 months than in
any like period I can remember.
It's changed the way judges will
be elected in the future
State law prohibits judicial
candidates from discussing how
they would rule on various issues
and from commenting on an op-
p o n e n t .
But Sam Wilson, staff at-
torney for Martin, said he
thought the differences between
Billings and Exum on applying
the state's death penalty statues
should be considered a compaign
issue.
"He (Exum) admits he's opp-
posed to it and it shows up in his
opinions Wilsin said.
Billings said she wanted to run
her campaign based on her in
cumbency and qualifications.
"Im going to campaign simply
on my record and
Stew hurting
the trees
l you love. .
qualifications she said.
Suzie Sharp, the first woman to
serve as Chief Justice of the
North Carolina Supreme Court,
Good Luck ECU
BEAT STATE
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u
UNC
Stages
Riot
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96
Coolpued frpnvjpagjti
finish it he said. Stone said that
out-of-town visitors, not
students, caused much of the
damage and started other violent
activities.
Monday morning's riot was the
worst local authorities have seen,
Stone said. Mass demonstrations
following appearances in the
NCAA basketball tournament by
the University of North Carolina
in 1977 and 198 had been bigger,
but better behaved.
"We've seen that type of
madness before. Those (1977 and
198crowds were ones that
started out happy and might have
turned a bit ugly Stone said.
"Sunday was different. This
crowd was mean the whole way
Stone said he was concerned
about the Chapel Hill Police
Department's complement of 65
field officers ability to cope with
another violent demonstration.
"I'm not afraid, but I'm con-
cerned Stone said. "This pro-
blem is bigger than us
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Sty �aat (Earnlinfem
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender. cmr,M,Vrr
Daniel Maurer, - j m
Patti Kemmis. �n� m Steve folmar. o� o ����,
Scott Cooper. � ,�� �. Anthony Martin, m�, ���,�
Rick McCormac, o, mm meg Needham. mm ���,�
John Shannon. w, �. Shannon Short. ���,
PAT? OLLOY. f .a ,u, DECHANILE JOHNSON. � w�.
September 4. 1986
Opinion
Page 4
What A Riot
Who's Calling The Kettle Black
Thousands of people gather in
the street to form an ugly mob.
They flock around bonfires that
burn in metal shopping carts and
toss illegal fireworks into the pre-
dawn sky. All the time they chant
slogans of protest at the surroun-
ding peace officers.
One young protestor, perhaps 19
or 20, takes a running start, and
with all his strength, heaves a bottle
through a store front window. The
glass explodes. Shards rain down
on merchandise, sidewalks and
onlookers.
Elsewhere, the senseless brawling
has left another young man injured.
He lies in the street unconscious
among the broken glass. Blood
streams from his nostrils. He is one
of at least 20 young people who will
be rushed to the hospital this night.
The cost of property damages
rises steadily throughout the night,
reaching eight, nine and finally
$10,000. 40 additional peace of-
ficers are called in to help quell the
I�Campus Forum
rioting. Each wears a helmet, riot
gear, and carries a nightstick. A few
rioters are pursued, wrestled to the
ground and cuffed, but there are
just too many.
As the night lingers on, more
bonfires are born. The chanting
becomes more abusive, and is often
punctuated by expletives. A young
girl running around one of the firey
shopping carts shouts above the
crowd. "These bonfires are here to
express the hatred of the new law
that's being passed
Somewhere, another window ex-
plodes in a rain of glass.
The ultimate question seems to
be where is this scene taking place?
Is it happening in Northern
Irland or South Africa? How about
the Phillipines? Perhaps it's a street
in downtown Lebanon?
No. It's downtown Chapel Hill,
home of the academically rich
UNC-CH. And they call ECU a
party school.
WELL, WELL, WHAT DO YOU
KNOW YOUR PELL 6RAHT
CHECK FINALL1 CHME n
1
The Great ECU Textbook Swindle
The Pirates vs. The Wolf pack
To The Editor:
The East Carolina vs. State football
game has developed into one of college
football's greatest rivalries. A quick
glance at single game attendance
records will quickly reveal that this
series has become the biggest game in
the state of North Carolina.
On Saturday night Coach Art Baker
and Coach Dick Sheridan will meet at
midfield to shake hands, renew their
longtime friendship, and wish one
another the best prior to competition.
These are two class gentlemen who want
to build a quality progam which will
reflect very positively on their respective
institutions.
Collegiate athletics creates maximum
visibility for a University. Today, col-
lege athletics is faced with an awesome
responsibility. The school, the athletes,
and even the fans, are very much in the
public eye and under scrutiny by the
media.
As we work hard at ECU and N.C.
State to project the image that would
best enhance our outstanding Univer-
sities, it is imperative that it be a collec-
tive effort. That means administrations,
faculty, coaches, players, fans, and stu-
dent bodies at both institutions be
cognizant of the great rivalry we have
developed and work at displaying their
enthusiam and spirit in the proper vein.
That does not necessitate a reduction
in the intensity of the competition, or
the noise level at the Kick-Off. It simply
calls for good judgment.
I urge the various constituencies of
both Universities to use good judgment.
Spectator misconduct, regardless of the
form, hurts the image of an exhilerating
rivalry.
We'll wear our "Beat State" buttons,
we'll be dressed in Purple and Gold,
and we'll be shouting "Hey, Hey,
E.Cbut we also wish Dick Sheridan
and N.C. State University the very best
as they prepare for the 1986 football
season.
I trust that all in attendance will con-
duct themselves with class and en-
thusiasm befitting such a great game.
Ken Kan-
Director of Athletics
Dear Editor:
With the coming of another school
year there also begins another football
season for both the Pirates of East
Carolina and the Wolfpack of N.C.
State. We wish each University the best
of luck throughout the season.
On Saturday, at 7 p.m fans will con-
verge on Carter-Finley Stadium in
Raleigh to rekindle a great and tradi-
tional rivalry between ECU and N.C.
State. In spite of the outstanding effort
put forth on the playing field, this con-
test has been marred by excessive spec-
tator misconduct. Alcohol abuse,
physical injuries and vandalism have in-
creased with each meeting. This can no
longer be tolerated by either of our in-
stitutions! Things must change if this
contest is to continue.
We, in no way, wish to diminish the
excitement, vigor and enthusiasm that is
associated with this great game; we only
wish that all participants act in a
responsible and mature manner.
So once again, enjoy yourselves and
let the future of this contest be decided
on the playing field and not in the
stands.
Steve Cunanan,
ECU Student Body President
Art Baker,
ECU Head Football Coach
Gary Mauney,
NCSU Student Body President
Dick Sheridan,
NCSU Head Football Coach
By TERRI ORE
Staff WrtUr
It's that time of year again. The time
students and their parents dig into their
pockets and shell out anywhere from $75
to $250 for books.
I don't know about you, but I could
think of much better things to do with
that much cash than spend it on tex-
tbooks. Whatever happened to the good
old high school days when everyone was
issued books and then they were
recollected at the end of the year?
I must admit though, the book dealers
in this town really have their system
polished. The students go in around
August, spend say, $25 on a book, take
it back in December to sell, and the store
gives you maybe a third of that price.
it dosen't look worn or hasn't been writ-
ten in, that is.
What really burns me up is when I
take an $18 book back to sell at the end
of the semester and I'm told, "We won't
be using this book anymore. Let's see,
the printer will give you, um $3.00 for
it
How disgusting. To think that we
spend hard earned cash on those books
and they take advantage of us like that!
So, what's a poor disgusted college
student like myself going to do about it ?
I could be really stubborn and refuse to
buy any more books but that wouldn't
get me anywhere. I could suggest that we
all get together and boycott the bloody
system but they would probably come
up with some way to FORCE us into
buying them.
My only sensible alternative would be
to sell the damn books back myself. I
could make up little signs announcing
the books I want to sell and my phone
number, get it xeroxed off and place it in
all the appropriate buildings, But that
seems like a hassle. I suppose the reality
of it all is that we are caught up in a no-
win situation.
Our professors require that we have a
textbook so we can follow along in class
and have something to study from when
it comes time for a test. We are caught
between getting an education and fork-
ing out an ungodly amount of monev for
books.
The ultimate annoyance to this situa-
tion is a matter of when we can get a full
refund for our textsbooks and when we
cannot. It does not seem logical to me
that Oct. 6 is our final day to drop a
class but Sept. 8 is the last day we can
return a book for a full refund.
What if I don't decide that I hate my
Biology class until after Sept. 8? The
answer to this question � TOO BAD. I
will have to take what meager sum they
decide to give me and accept it. Then
I'm out a specific amount of money
because I didn't decide to drop a class
before their cut-off date. What a crock.
Someone, somewhere must be
benefitting from this operation.
However, it's definitely not the students.
Oh, but how could I have been so
ungrateful? With the purchase of our
books, we are given FREE campus trial
packs.
Just what I need to start off every
semester � a trial bottle of Listerine
(gag), a disposable razor, and Alka
Seltzer Cold Medicine. Frankly, I'd
rather have something a bit more useful.
But just think, we have a new and big-
ger UBE to do all our shopping in. Isn't
it nice to know that they're doing
something constructive with our money?
Terri Ore is a Junior majoring in
English who harbors an intense dislike
for shelling out money for textbooks.
Minority In Crisis
Campus Spectrum
In addition to the "Campus
Forum" section of the Editorial
Page, The East Carolinian has re-
established the "Campus Spectrum
This is an opinion column featuring
guest writers from the student body
and faculty. The columns printed in
the "Campus Spectrum" will contain
current topics of concern to the cam-
pus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of
grammer and decency. Persons sub-
mitting columns must be willing to
accept "by-line" credit for their ef-
forts, as no entrys from ghost writers
will be published.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information may
contact Daniel Maurer, managing
editor of The East Carolinian at
757-6366. or stop by our offices on
the second floor of the Publications
Building.
Black Student Groups Struggling
By CHRYSTAL FRAY
ITaTWEMKvolMa
(EDTOR'S NOTE: This is the first instalment of a two
part article on blacks at white colleges. This article was
originally published in The Idiom in July of this year.)
This fall approximately 1,596 black students have enroll at
ECU amid a flurry of welcoming activity sponsored by the
administration, faculty, and student organizations. These
programs include parties, dormitory socials, academic infor-
mation sessions and pep rallys. They aim to insure that these
students settle comfortably into college life, academically and
socially, at this predominantly white institution
However, at least 23 percent of these students will not
return next year. Of the remaining black students, an even
larger percentage will not graduate.
What determines whether or not a student remains at
ECU? What has been done to keep black students a ECU and
at other predominantly white colleges across the nation?
75 percent of all black students attending institutions of
higher education this year attend predominantly white col-
leges, as opposed to less than 50 percent in 1970. Many
studies were published in the early '60s and '70s concerning
black students at white colleges following black student pro-
test and revolt.
These studies found that black and other minorities en-
countered more problems adapting academically and socially
on white campuses. Black students often felt alienated and
objects of overt racism. They felt that they were not fairly
represented in decisions made by the university adminstra-
tion.
These feelings of alienation and neglect resulted in the
famous campus explosions of the '60s and '70s. The relative
calm of black student populations in the '80s, therefore,
signals to many campus administrators that the black student
has settled peacefully into white college life, so that the con-
cerns of black students need not be addressed.
An article written by Charles A. Taylor, dean of students at
Loyola University in Chicago, asserts that more people
should be concerned about the changes in black students.
"Black students' issues are not in this year says Taylor.
Instead, "issues concerning adult students, handicapped
students, hispanic students, and female students are on the
current agendas of university administrators in the 1980s
The pressure, therefore, of meeting the needs of black
students has all too often shifted to student organizations,
which are sinking under the burden of supporting under-
motivated, apathetic students.
University officials often call on these organizations direct-
ly to act as minority representives for the university, leading
to the overuse of the same people.
"Black student organizations are struggling to maintain
their existence because of lack of participation and member-
ship says Taylor.
Black service organizations and sororities and fraternities
have been forced to shift their focus from political, educa-
tional, and social involvement to social programs that are
usually their most successful.
"Black organizations can get hundreds of blacks to a
dance, but only a handful for a study session, survival
workshop, or to hear a guest speaker on black
cultureTaylor adds.
This trend has been dramatically presented at ECU in re-
cent years. Black sorority and fraternity membership has suf-
fered. In the spring of '86, two sororities had less than five
members, one fraternity had only five members. NAACP and
MSO (Minority Student Organization) can not maintian a
large enough membership to operate effectively.
The minority publication has suffered visibly. The old
Ebony Herold newspaper which has since become the new Ex-
pressions magazine has consistently been criticized bv
students, both black and white, about the publication's quali-
ty, which, at times, has not been up to par. However, the
paper has sometimes operated with a staff of only two to five
people.
Nevertheless, these organizations have managed to sponsor
countless programs with good intentions, but with very little
student support.
The MSO sponsored a Minority Awareness Day in the spr-
ing of '86 with guest speakers on such topics as minorities in
Film and Literature, Minorities in the Arts, and Blacks in
Music.
Less than 50 students attended the day's events. Subse-
quently, MSO was denied funding for programs by the SGA
for not adequately serving all minorities at ECU.
Earlier in the year the MSO sponsored a program entitled
"Martin Luther King Speaks where tapes of Dr. King's
historic speeches were played in the oitesize Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center.
Students trickled in and out during the day, but in very in-
significant numbers. For many blacks in the United States,
this program should have been the best attended event of the
year, considering Dr. King is responsible for many of the
privileges enjoyed by black Americans today.
With the lack of support and constant struggle to raise
funds and maintain membership, black student organizations
are disbanding at an alarming rate. This year alone, many
organizations expect to experience the loss of their charters.
Who will act as representatives or the voice for black stu-
dent concerns if these groups are lost? Do the students con-
sider these groups important or necessary? The answers to
these questions can be answered only by the behavior of the
students in the months to come.
Chrystal Fray is a graduating senior majoring in English
and the former features editor of Expressions magazine.
Story Re lea.
NEWYORK(UPI)-Attheti
Yuri Ivanovich Nosenko was
biggest Russian fish the CIA
ever landed - a staff officer of,
KGB in Moscow - and he ci
with top secret details of pi
dent Kennedy's assassination
Nosenko first approached
CIA during the disarman
talks in Geneva in the 1960s
wanted to defect.
"I am a staff officer of the
cond chief director of the KG1
Moscow headquarters he si
"I am good catch for you. I,
you plenty of stuff Nosei
also had information about a
spy who had infiltrated the cj
But instead of trading sea
with the Soviet spy and treat
him to life in the wonderful Wl
the CIA put Nosenko in a spec!
ly built concrete bunker for th
years and tried to break him
The little known a
fascinating story of "Yi
Nosenko. KGB an agent whj
complex case shook the CIA
its core, will be presented
Home Box Office Sept
(10-11:30 pm EDT, and repeat
Sept. 11, 16, 24, and 29).
Filmed
in location
Washington, D.C and Genev
the 90-minute original preseni
tion stars Tommy Lee Jone
Steve QajevDseudnpym f
k
Save your breath.
Ptarrt a tree to make
more oxygen.
jiau
Fall Sti
$50J
$121
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J
yov
6RANT
N
s
ok Swindle
es:er - a trial bottle of Listerine
a disposable razor, and Alka-
zet Cold Medicine. Frankly, I'd
ha � e something a bit more useful.
Bui ust think, we have a new and big-
ger L BE to do all our shopping in. Isn't
it nice to know that they're doing
ing constructive with our money?
Tern Ore is a junior majoring in
iglish ho harbors an intense dislike
r shelling out money for textbooks.
Campus Spectrum
addition to the "Campus
section of the Editorial
Page, The East Carolinian has re-
established the "Campus Spectrum
s is an opinion column featuring
guesi writers from the student body
'acuity. The columns printed in
Campus Spectrum" will contain
current topics of concern to the cam-
p is, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
onl with regard to rules of
grammer and decency. Persons sub-
mitting columns must be willing to
accept "by-line" credit for their ef-
forts, as no cntrys from ghost writers
will be published.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information may
contact Daniel Maurer, managing
editor of The East Carolinian at
6366, or stop by our offices on
the second floor of the Publications
ng.
Struggling
pnizations and sororities and fraternities
' shift their focus from political, educa-
Involvement to social programs that are
luccessful.
Jtions can get hundreds of blacks to a
handful for a study session, survival
hear a guest speaker on black
s.
ben dramatically presented at ECU in re-
Irority and fraternity membership has suf-
1 of '86, two sororities had less than five
fnity had only five members. NAACP and
Went Organization) can not maintian a
lership to operate effectively,
plication has suffered visibly. The old
H-aper which has since become the new Ex-
has consistently been criticized by
and white, about the publication's quali-
has not been up to par. However, the
operated with a staff of only two to five
le organizations have managed to sponsor
Kith good intentions, but with very little
ed a Minority Awareness Day in the spr-
speakers on such topics as minorities in
Minorities in the Arts, and Blacks in
lents attended the day's events. Subse-
enied funding for programs by the SGA
irving ail minorities at ECU.
the MSO sponsored a program entitled
kg Speaks where tapes of Dr. King's
e played in the bitesize Ledonia Wright
and out during the day, but in very in-
For many blacks in the United States,
lave been the best attended event of the
. King is responsible for many of the
black Americans today,
kupport and constant struggle to raise
kembcrship, black student organizations
j alarming rate. This year alone, many
lo experience the loss of their charters,
frescntatives or the voice for black stu-
groups are lost? Do the students con-
portant or necessary? The answers to
answered only by the behavior of the
to come.
graduating senior majoring in English
editor of Expressions magazine.
Story ReleavoH
THE EAST CAROLINIAN EPTEMBEB j m
(
NEW VOW (UPD-At the time.
Yuri Ivanovich Nosenko was the
biggest Russian fish the CIA had
ever landed - a staff officer of the
KUB in Moscow - and he came
with top secret details of Presi-
dent Kennedy's assassination.
Nosenko first approached the
CIA during the disarmament
talks in Geneva in the 1960s. He
wanted to defect.
"I am a staff officer of the se-
cond chief director of the KGB in
Moscow headquarters he said.
I am good catch for you. I give
you plenty of stuff Nosenko
also had information about a top
spy who had infiltrated the CIA.
But instead of trading secrets
with the Soviet spy and treating
him to life in the wonderful West,
the CIA put Nosenko in a special-
ly built concrete bunker for three
years and tried to break him.
The little known and
fascinating story of "Yuri
Nosenko, KGB an agent whose
complex case shook the CIA to
its core, will be presented on
Home Box Office Sept. 7
(10-11:30 pm EDT, and repeated
Sept. II, 16, 24, and 29).
Filmed in location in
Washington, D.C and Geneva,
the 90-minute original presenta-
tion stars Tommy Lee Jones as
Vfaua T"� 1 �. . � �
Russian's Story to Air D�nan Visits JVC
t the finn� ���. . �. .
CIA Soviet Bloc deputy chief
who sought to prove Nosenko
wa.s. m an agent of
disinformation Oleg Rudnik
plays Nosenko.
Nosenko comes to the West
bearing gifts of espionage: he
tells the CIA that the KGB had
no file on Kennedy assasin Lee
Harvey Oswald, and that a high-
rMking CIA official code named
Sasha" was supplying secrets to
the KGB.
The FBI, conducting an in-
quiry into Kennedy's slaying
believes Nosenko is genuine!
Their own top-level KGB source
code-named "Fedora confirms
But some in the CIA, especially
Daley, believe Nosenko is lying
Another Soviet defector, Anatoli
Gohtsyn, would send "false
defectors" after him to discredit
his own disclosures to the CIA.
Daley decides to take drastic
action, and locks Nosenko into a
one-man CIA prison in Virginia,
where he is questioned for three
years. But before Nosenko
breaks, a new CIA regime enters
and the case is reassigned.
Nosenko is approved as a bone
fide defector and hired as a paid
consultant to the agency, while
Daley is reassigned to a low-
profile post in Rome.
Jones, with his stony face ex-
pressions, does the CIA agent
justice, and Rudnik is good at
Playing two roles with the same
face: he could be a spy, or he
could be a fake.
In one scene with the CIA
agent, Nosenko welcomes the
Western world with a warm em-
brace. He lusts after a nightclub
singer and wants to drink the
night away. The CIA even pays
for a prostitute, and then ques-
tions her.
But in the CIA tomb-like jail,
he comes off as hard as nails, and
cook under pressure - just the
qualities necessary to pull off the
KGB sting of the CIA.
The story raises all kinds of
questions: Was the FBI relying
on information from a double
agent? Has the CIA been
penetrated at its highest levels by
Russian KGB agents? Was
Nosenko a plant? Did the KGB
know something about the Ken-
nedy assassination?
"This is the story of a long and
complicated espionage case the
CIA agent warns in the beginning
of the story. "In real life, these
things have no neat conclusions
and no happy endings
RALEIGH, N.C. (UPI) - North
Carolina is making legislative
gains in labor issues but is "cry-
ing out" for union organization
and upgraded wage levels, AFL-
CIO Secretary-Treasurer Thomas
Donahue said Wednesday.
Donahue criticized the Reagan
administration's economic and
"free trade" policies, blaming
them for an influx of foreign
goods, a "wholesale destruction"
of America's manufacturing base
and the export of two million
jobs a year.
'We're in an economic war,
and we're losing it Donahue
told delegates at the North
Carolina AFL-CIO's annual con-
vention. "We're losing it because
of the Administration's infatua-
tion with the long-dead doctrine
of free trade "
During the five years tnat the
Reagan administration has pur-
sued its "free and open trade"
policies, unemployment has
never dipped below seven per-
cent, said Donahue, 57, adding
that in 1984, 2.3 million
American manufacturing jobs
were lost because of imports.
and proposals that would allow a
subminimum wage for youna
workers.
"We have won a few impor-
tant rounds and some more vic-
tories are within our reach
Donahue said. "But the asault on
wages and working conditions is
not going to end as long as
Imports "are flowing in by air miliionc nf 1� � lon
and sea as easily as if they were work Amencans m out of
being trucked in from the next 0l.r m.
county Donahue said, "And y ,� Wt Urgent goaJ to
they are driving American-made po, � 7h1! �nC $ided "
products out of American $ELS? J Causmg the
market. wnoiesale destruction of
Donahue praised labor's un- anST5 in�uf�unni base
successful attempts at seeking to mS-f "? the cxport of
override Reagan's veto of a b?U to T� J�bs a year
limit textile imports. We also said rt�ai,
labor has made progress in inMT UFged ddcgatcs to
thwarting the proposed federal CvQ� fT�m N�rth
taxation of non-wage benefits hm S lawmake"
Riggan Shoe Repair
111 West 4th St.
Downtown Greenville
"Shoe Repair At The I en Best"
758-0204
����i�
i $
422 Arlington Blvd.
enellori
Benetton
f - -��- Tel: 756-7202
Another horror thriller from
STEPHEN KING
careerVJnhr3 m�St ambit,0us book of �
career, Stephen K.ng gives us not only his most
"LT �f.h0rr0r bUt 3 s"Png -murTa
tion of the corridor where we pass from the brioht
mysteries of childhood to those of maturTty 9
Save your breath.
Plant a tree to make
more oxygen.
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THE EAST CAROL1N IAN
SEPTEMBER 4, 1986

'

August 22
12:20 a.mTwo Belk dorm
residents and a Tyler dorm resi-
dent were found in violation of
the ECU policy concerning
alcoholic beverages.
1 a.mA Greenville resident
reported that his vehicle had been
vandalized while parked south of
Joyner Library.
1:40 a.mA Garrett dorm resi-
dent reported that he had been
assaulted in his room by a black
male who was not a student.
11:00 p.mA Greensboro resi-
dent and a Washington resident
were found in violation of the
ECU policy on alcoholic
beverages. Both subjects were
banned from campus.
11:45 p.mTwo Cotton Dorm
residents were found in posses-
sion of alcoholic beverages which
violated the ECU policy of
alcoholic beverages.
August 23
2:30 a.mThree Greenville
residents were found in violation
of the ECU policy on alcoholic
beverages.
9:30 p.mTwo Scott dorm
residents were found in violation
of ECU policy of alcoholic
beverages.
9:50 p.mA Cotten dorm resi-
dent reported observing three
unidentified black males
unescorted and one black male
looking into a shower stall on the
1st floor.
10:5 p.mA Jones Dorm resi-
dent and a Scott dorm resident
were observed in violation of the
ECU alcoholic beverage policy
west of Jarvis Hall.
August 24
1:20 a.mA Greenville resident
was observed in violation of ECU
alcoholic beverage policy at the
east end of the mall.
1:33 a.mA Jones resident
reported 1st degree burglary of
her property and property of
roommate from their room, by
two unidentified white males.
1:35 a.mA Scott dorm resi-
dent was arrested for DW1 on
College Hill Drive.
2:00 a.mA Fleming dorm
resident and a Fletcher dorm resi-
dent were observed in violation
of ECU alcoholic beverage policy
north of Fleming dorm.
2:50 a.mA New York resident
was arrested on College Hill
Drive for DWI, transporting
spiritous liquor with a broken
seal, exceeding safe speed and a
stop sign violation.
10:15 p.mA Garrett dorm
resident was in violation of the
ECU alcoholic beverage policy
south of the Art Building.
11:45 p.mAn Umstead resi-
dent was found in violation of the
ECU alcoholic beverage policy.
11:55 p.mThree Greenville
residents were found in violation
of the ECU alcoholic beverage
policy.
August 25
1:55 a.mA New Bern resident
was banned from campus after
being observed in the area of
Mendenhall Student Center
shouting obscene language. The
male had been previously
escorted from Clement Dorm
after being found in violation of
the visitation regulations.
9:10 a.mThe larceny of a
telephone answering mach.ne
from Brody Building was
reported.
5:24 p.mA Greenville resident
reported the breaking and enter-
ing of her vehicle and the larceny
of an under-dash cassette player.
The vehicle was parked in the
commuter lot north of Jones
dorm.
5:50 p.mThe larceny of a
watch was reported from the 3rd
floor of Garrett dorm.
Aug. 27
12:05 a.m Three black males
were banned from campus, for
being unescorted in Clement
Dorm.
9:50 p.m A black male was ban-
ned from campus after being
found unescorted in Clement
Dorm.
10:55 p.m A Fletcher resident
reported the larceny of an
equalizer from her vehicle which
was parked east of Clement.
11:54 p.m A Domino's
employee reported the breaking
and entering of his vehicle parked
west of Scott Hall and the larceny
of a pizza by an unidentified
black male.
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Aug. 28
8:21 p.mA Scott Hall resident
was found in violation of the
ECU alcoholic beverage policy.
9:41 p.m A Greenville resident
reported being assaulted by four
white males east of the Jenkins
Art building.
9:45 p.m Two male Greenville
residents were observed looking
into dorm rooms with binoculars.
Aug. 29
1:15 a.mTwo Raleigh residents
were banned from campus for
ECU alcohol violation, posses-
sion of drug paraphenalia and a
weapon on campus.
9:00 a.m A Clement Hall resi-
dent reported the larceny of her
watch from her room by an
unknown person.
10:45 a.m A Clement Hall
resident reported the breaking
and entering of her vehicle while
parked in the Third and Reade
Street freshman lot. The larceny
of cassette tapes was also
reported.
5:00 p.mA Jones resident
reported the breaking and enter-
ing of his room and the larceny of
a sweat top and tennis balls from
his room.
10:40 p.m A Greenville resident
was found in violation of the
ECU alcoholic beverage policy.
11:10 p.mTwo Greenville
residents were found in violation
of the ECU policy of alcoholic
beverages.
Aug. 29
12:15 a.m Two males from
Raleigh were banned from cam-
pus after being found unescorted
on the 4th floor of White Dorm.
1:13 a.m A Scott dorm resident
and a male from Elizabeth City
were found in violation of the
ECU alcoholic beverage policy.
3:07 a.m Two males from
Kinston were banned from cam-
pus after being observed in the
area of a vehicle with a broken
window just after glass was heard
breaking.
10:15 a.mA Raleigh male was
found to be in possession of drug
paraphernalia north of Greene
dorm.
1:30 p.m A Scott Dorm resident
reported the larceny of his truck
bed cover while parked south of
Scott Dorm.
7:08 p.m A Greenville resident
reported that his bicycle has been
stolen from the east side of Gar-
rett dorm.
Aug. 31
12:20 a.m. An Aycock Dorm
resident was found in violation of
the ECU alcoholic beverage
policy.
12:35 a.mA resident of Ring-
gold Towers was arrested for
DWI and displaying a fictitious
driver's license.
1:30 a.m Two Aycock residents
were found to be in violation of
the ECU alcoholic beverage
policy.
2:40 a.m A Camp LeJeune resi-
dent was arrested for trespassing
in Tyler Dorm.
8:50 a.m A Garrett Hall resi-
dent reported the larceny of his
bicycle from the bike rack south
of Garrett.
10:50 a.m A Garrett Dorm resi-
dent and an Aycock Dorm resi-
dent were found to be in violation
of the ECU alcoholic beverage
policy.
11:00 p.m A Fletcher dorm resi-
dent was found in violation of the
ECU alcoholic beverage policy.
11:45 p.m A Farmville resident
was arrested at Jones Dorm for
being intoxicated and disruptive
and for underage possession of
alcoholic beverage.
Sept. 1
12:20 a.mA Ringgold Towers
resident was found to be in viola-
tion of the ECU alcoholic
beverage policy.
1:20 a.m A Greenville resident
was found to be in violation of
the ECU alcoholic beverage
policy.
8:58 p.m Property belonging to
a Clement dorm resident was
found, identified and returned.
The stolen property was found in
the men's bathroom in the lobby
of Clement Dorm.
,iy student being found in
.olation of the ECU alcoholic
beverage policy will either be ar-
rested or have a report written up
and the student will be referred to
Dr. Ron Speiers, associate dean
of student affairs.
�Typically, at the beginning of a
school year there is a rash of
automobile larcenies. A few tips
are check your vehicle between
classes to make sure that the vehi-
cle is secured and locked. Also,
do not leave items of value in the
car, lock any valuable property in
the trunk. Third, report any
suspicious activity to the ECU
Public Safety Department.
Leave
forests
and parks
clean.
The Counseling
Center Has
Moved
We are now located in the front of
Wright Building. For more information,
call 757-6661.
Open 8-5 Monday through Friday
Temporarily, enter by front door and follow signs.
Burning the midnight
oil may be necessary.
Burning the 2.00or 3:00
or 4:00 AM oil is absurd.
Especially when an HP calculator can get the
answers you want � in time to get a good night's
sleep.
For instance, our HP-15C Professional Scientific Calculator
has more built-in advanced math and statistical power than any
other calculator. Our HP-41 Advanced Scientific Calculators have
even more potential.
PG12602
That's because there are better than 2500 software packages
available for them - more than for anv other calculator
There's even a special plug-in software package (we call it the
Advantage Module) that's des.gned to handle the spec.fic problems
an engineering student has to solve in his. or her. course work
No wonder professionals in engineering and the physical sciences
widely regard HP calculators as the best vou can get
So check one out. Then, when your mother calls to ask if you're
getting enough sleep, you won't have to lie.
By the way. if you want more information, just give us a call
at 800-FOR-HPPC. Ask for Dept.658C. jnU.HEWLETT
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� .� -
"
� �
Tragic Ai
CERRITOS, Calif (UPI) - A
Piper Cherokee showed up on an
air traffic control radar screen at
Los Angeles International Air-
port, but probablv was not the J
plane an Aeromexico DC-9 was
warned of 75 seconds before a f
collision that killed at least 70
people and maybe as man as 85
The pilot of the Piper was
violating regulations b
through airspace usually
restricted to commercial
when he ran into Aeromexico
Flight 498, sending both plane
hurtling into a residen
neighborhood, a National
Transportation Safetv Board in-
vestigator said Tueda night
John Lauber of the NTSB sai ;
pilot William K. Kramer Failc
cntact air traffic controllers as re-
quired and request "a clearance
to operate" in the restricted zone
He said the radar information
available to air controllers -
not have given them the Piper's
altitude.
One minute and 1? secor
before the Piper slashed off
DC-9's tail and sent it plunf .
the ground, a controller had I
the jetliner's pilot. "Aeromej
498, traffic 10 o'clock. 1 -
northbound, altitude unknow-
"Roger, 498 the p
responded.
Lauber said the Aeromo :
pilot and co-piiot "did
acknowledge with am infora
tion that thev had spotter
traffic
Eastern Aii
Major Ei
MIAMI lUPIi - Easte-
Airlines said Tuesday it is f:r
1,500 employees later this m
as part of the troubled carrier's
plan io slash $160 mill
costs.
President Joseph B. Leonard
said all employee groups would
be affected � including manage-
ment, which would lose 44 peo-
ple.
Leonard said notices were be-
ing given Tuesday to the im-
pacted employees. He said the
company planned to provide ap-
propriate severance and employ-
ment counseling programs for the
1,500 employees.
Robert Callahan, president of 1
the flight attendants' union, and
Charles Bryan, president of the
machinists' union, scheduled a
:30 p.m. EDT news conference in
Miami to discuss the dismissals.
Eastern spokesman Glenn Par-
sons said many of the job reduc-
tions would occur in the Miami
area. Eastern employs 42.000
people, about 14,000 in south
Florida.
"These are not easy decisic
to make Leonard said, "but
they are vital to competing effec-
tively with aggressive, lower-cost
carriers hoping to strength
their own futures at Eastern's e-
pense j
Leonard said no immediate E;
route reductions were planned, to
though Eastern last month
anounced plans to suspend dailv 4,
round-trip flights between Miami
and London and reduced flight a'
Charlotte, N.C from 53 to 12, j
effective Oct. 1.
In all, Leonard said ar. inten-
sive two-month internal review to air
reduce expenses for the financial-
ly troubled earner produced an-
nual savings that will exceed Si60 rai
million.
He said two-thirds of that EaJ
amount would be realized ;he
through more efficient processes uo
and the trimming and elimination dkt
-
Annual
Summer Sal
All Summer
Merchandise, Selec
Jewelry & Accessoi
Some Fall & Win
Clothing
Sion-Sat 10:00-5:30
Wed Thurs. 10:00-8:1
919-A Red Banks Road







beverage
jorm resi-
lon of the
I policy.
resident
borm for
jisruptive
Ission of
Towers
in viola-
Icoholic
liesident
ition of
leverage
iging to
tnt was
nurned.
found in
le lobbv
ay student being found in
.olation of the ECU alcoholic
beverage policy will either be ar-
rested or have a report written up
and the student will be referred to
Dr. Ron Speiers, associate dean
of student affairs.
�Typically, at the beginning of a
school year there is a rash of
automobile larcenies. A few tips
are check your vehicle between
classes to make sure that the vehi-
cle is secured and locked. Also,
do not leave items of value in the
car, lock any valuable property in
the trunk. Third, report any
suspicious activity to the ECU
Public Safety Department.
Leave
forests
and parks
clean.
seling
Has
tt
the front of
re information,
1.
ugh Friday
and follow signs.
� r �
�&?
� F1,
am 1I
1 I �1 ;
f � �: iK. ;ik-
I !
i !1 j
&.&&&.�:� V

C?� " ' �
S&SHZ:
Iter than 2500 software packages
I for any other calculator.
n software package (we call it the
jned to handle the specific problems
solve in his. or her. course work.
ngineenng and the physical sciences
)s the best you can get.
tn your mother calls to ask if you're
ft have to lie.
information, just give us a call
f.658C. mmgm HEWLETT
mL'HM PACKARD
I
Air
CERRITOS, Calif. (UPI) � A
piper Cherokee showed up on an
air traffic control radar screen at
Los Angeles International Air-
port, but probably was not the
plane an Aeromexico DC-9 was
warned of 75 seconds before a
collision that killed at least 70
people and maybe as many as 85.
The pilot of the Piper was
violating regulations by flying
through airspace usually
restricted to commercial jets
when he ran into Aeromexico
Flight 498, sending both planes
hurtling into a residential
neighborhood, a National
Transportation Safety Board in-
vestigator said Tuesday night.
John Lauber of the NTSB said
pilot William K. Kramer failed to
cntact air traffic controllers as re-
quired and request "a clearance
to operate" in the restricted zone.
He said the radar information
available to air controllers would
not have given them the Piper's
altitude.
One minute and 15 seconds
before the Piper slashed off the
DC-9's tail and sent it plunging to
the ground, a controller had told
the jetliner's pilot, "Aeromexico
498, traffic 10 o'clock, 1 mile
northbound, altitude unknown
"Roger, 498 the pilot
responded.
Lauber said the Aeromexico
pilot and co-pilot "did not
acknowledge with any informa-
tion that they had spotted the
traffic
By "traffic the NTSB
spokesman said the controller
was referring to one aircraft, but
he said investigators determined
it was probably not the Piper.
Lauber said there were apparent-
ly three small planes above Cer-
titos � one about 3,000 feet
below the jetliner, the one ap-
proaching at 10 o'clock and the
Piper.
Asked why the controller did
not warn Flight 498 about the
Piper, Lauber said "Traffic ad-
visories of that kind are a discre-
tionary service provided by the
(controllers) He added that the
controller was probably "dealing
with communications with other
aircraft
The controller voluntarily sub-
mitted a urine sample for drug
analysis Tuesday and was to be
interviewed by NTSB in-
vestigators today. Lauber em-
phasized there was no evidence
the controller had taken drugs.
Lauber said investigators have
tracked the path of the Piper �
which carried Kramer, his wife
and a 26-year-old daughter �
from the point of the collision
back to the point where it entered
the restricted airspace.
He said the plane entered the
restricted area about two minutes
before the crash, and if he had
seen the jetliner "two minutes
would have been plenty of time"
to avoid a collision.
Thirteen of the 15 eyewitnesses
interviewed said neither plane ap-
peared to be taking evasive action
at the time of the collision,
Lauber said.
Recordings made of cockpit
conversations aboard the DC-9
are being analyzed in
Washington. Lauber said, "The
word that I have, there is usable
information on the cockpit voice
recorder tape
The official death toll from the
disaster remained at 70 � 64 on
the DC-9, three in the Piper and
three on the ground, but the
number of victims on the ground
could rise when the coroner's of-
fice finishes identifying the
mangled bodies.
Red Cross spokesman Sam
Schwartz said 15 people still had
not been accounted for.
Residents, meanwhile, could be
allowed back home today as the
on-site investigation concludes
and the wreckage is hauled away.
Coroner's spokesman Bill
Gold said an autopsy showed
Kramer, 53, suffered a heart at-
tack before he was decapitated
when his plane sheared off the
tail of the DC-9, sending the 64
passengers and crew on a horrify-
ing, upside-down death plunge
that ended in a ball of fire that
destroyed several houses.
But federal investigators were
not sure Kramer had a heart at-
tack, saying the massive blockage
of his coronary arteries did not
prove he suffered a "sudden, in-
capacitating event
EasternAirlinesHasPlansFor
Major Employee Cutbacks
MIAMI (UPI) - Eastern
Airlines said Tuesday it is firing
1,500 employees later this month
as part of the troubled carrier's
plan to slash $160 million in
costs.
President Joseph B. Leonard
said all employee groups would
be affected � including manage-
ment, which would lose 44 peo-
ple.
Leonard said notices were be-
ing given Tuesday to the im-
pacted employees. He said the
company planned to provide ap-
propriate severance and employ-
ment counseling programs for the
1,500 employees.
Robert Callahan, president of
the flight attendants' union, and
Charles Bryan, president of the
machinists' union, scheduled a
:30 p.m. EDT news conference in
Miami to discuss the dismissals.
Eastern spokesman Glenn Par-
sons said many of the job reduc-
tions would occur in the Miami
area. Eastern employs 42,000
people, about 14,000 in south
Florida.
"These are not easy decisions
to make Leonard :aid, "but
they are vital to competing effec-
tively with aggressive, lower-cost
carriers hoping to strengthen
their own futures at Eastern's ex-
pense
Leonard said no immediate
route reductions were planned,
though Eastern last month
anounced plans to suspend daily
round-trip flights between Miami
and London and reduced flight at
Charlotte, N.C from 53 to 12,
effective Oct. I.
In all, Leonard said an inten-
sive two-month internal review to
reduce expenses for the financial-
ly troubled carrier produced an-
nual savings that will exceed SI60
million.
He said two-thirds of that
amount would be realized
through more efficient processes
and the trimming and elimination
of a wide range of goods and ser-
vices the carrier purchases.
But he said the remainder �
$54 million � would come from
the staff cutbacks.
Eastern has been plagued by
one problem after another this
year � the latest coming last
week when the Department of
Transportation blocked its bid to
sell controllng interest in the car-
rier to Texas Air Corp.
The DOT said the planned
$676 million takeover would
damage competition in the busy
Northeast shuttle market.
Eastern earlier this year cut the
salaries of thousands of
employees by 20 percent in an ef-
fort to trim labor costs by50
million.
On July 31, Eastern posted a
second-quarter net loss of $44
million and Leonard said at the
time that some layoffs were in-
evitable. Eastern had posted a
record loss of $110.6 million in
the first quarter of the current
fiscal year.
The airline won major conces-
sions earlier this year from its
flight attendants and pilots
unions. But the machinists union
refused to grant any concessions.
The pilots and flight attendants
had threatened to strike before
the concessions were granted and
Eastern responded by threatening
to sell the company or go into
bankruptcy. The carrier, on Feb.
4, announced the planned sale to
Texas Air.
The turmoil drove travelers
away from the airline.
Embattled Eastern Chairman
Frank Borman retired from the
airline on July 31. Borinon was
constantly at odds with the
unions over cutbacks during the
past several years.
Also seriously harming
Eastern's status was a battle with
the Federal Aviation Administra-
tion over maintenance and recor-
dkeeping. In March, the FAA
Annual
Summer Sale
All Summer
Merchandise, Selected
Jewelry & Accessories,
Some Fall & Winter
Clothing
Mon-Sat 10:00-5:30
Wed Thurs. 10:00-8:00
919-A Red Banks Road
cited Eastern for 78,37 safety
violations.
Eastern rejected the FAA's
claims and is fighting the govern-
ment's attempt to collect $78.3
million in fines. But the airline's
attempt to catch up on
maintenance and recordkeeping
forced the cancellation of scores
of flights this summer and
Eastern's on-time record has
taken a beating.
DO YOU WANT TO WOftK
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training for typists
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Full and Part-tim� temporary
work � Perfect for students.
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SERVICES
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204 E. Arlington ftlvtf.
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Not an ogoncy-Novor a fee
EOE MFH
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SEPTEMBER 4 196
0M
HUMOROUS ACOUSTIC ROCK. COMEDY &
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E UND
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Sponsored by the Student Union
Coffeehouse Committee
Plus
IIIIIRELRV
Your Bank at ECU Mendenhall
BB&T offers ECU Convenience PLUS
FREE 24 HOUR BANKING
We never charge you for using our
BB&T 24 machine. You'll receive your
24 hour card when you open your
checking or savings account.
Other BB&T Greenville
Offices:
Main Office � Stantonsburg Road
BB&T 24
Downtown Office � Corner 3rd & Greene
301 Arlington Boulevard
BB&T 24
FREE PIRATE CHECKS
Just for ECU � Your FIRST PIRATE
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� Travel and Amusement Park Discounts
� $10,000 Accidental Death Insurance
. . . AND MORE
For Service or
Information Call
752-6889





8
JHE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 4.
1986
�LL1N MURPHY - THI BAST CAROLINIAN
Laid Back
The unusually cool weather has given dorm students a break this
summer and allowed them to kick back.
Tobacco Harvest
Brings Illness
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. (UPI)
- Each year's tobacco harvest br-
ings with it illness for manv
workers, but doctors say they still
are not sure whether the sickness
is caused by an allergic reaction
or a form of nicotine poisoning.
"You'll be laying in bed sick,
and you just can't move said J.
Gray Bullins, 18, who has work-
ed in the family tobacco fields
near Walnut Creek for five years.
"The whole room's spinning
Green tobacco sickness, long
known to tobacco farmers and
their doctors, was formally
recognized as an illness by North
Carolina's medical community 12
years ago.
Symptoms range from diz-
ziness and nausea to protracted
vomiting, prostration and
respiratory collapse, said Dr. C.
Gregory Smith, an environmental
epidemiologist with the state
Division of Health Services.
Headaches and an altered heart-
beat also are common.
Doctors said most susceptible
to the illness are young people,
like Bullins, who don't smoke or
chew tobacco. They report
research on the illness is scarce
and the sickness is little known
outside tobacco-growing areas.
Doctors also debate whether
the sickness is an allergic reaction
or a form of nicotine poisoning.
Dr. Barry Barker, a family
doctor in Madison who has
treated two patients for the
sickness this harvest, leans
toward the nicotine poisoning
theory. Barker said the symptoms
are similar to those suffered by a
few of his patients who have
mistakenly overdosed on nicotine
by misusing a gum containing
nicotine that is prescribed to help
people stop smoking.
Green-tobacco sickness, winch
lasts 12 hours to 24 hours, usually
occurs when the leaves are wet
from dew or rain. In a 14
study, Dr. Stephen Gehlbacl
reported the nicotine dissolve;
water and is more easily absorb
ed.
Gehlbach's study showed that
workers who wore raincoats
when fields were wet did not get
the sickness. Doctors and phar-
macists said medicines for mo-
tion sickness also help relieve the
symptoms, although thev saj
they are not sure win .
Barker said medication for
nausea, liquids to replace fluids
lost from vomiting and Tylenol,
are sufficient for treating green-
tobacco sickness. But foi some
people, like Bullins, the remedies
and precautions are not enough.
Bullins said that on very wet
days when he wears a raincoat
and takes Dramamine, a drug for
motion sickness, he still gets
"just a little sick
Thursday Night Is
TACO NIGHT
Two Great Tacos
for only 99-
60 oz. Pitchers $1.99
Offer Good From 7 p.m11 p.m.
Not Valid on Deliveries
ALL DAY FRID Y
32 oz. Bucket of Your Fav onte Draft
99C
215 E. Fourth Street
Video Pirates Fought
TORONTO (UPI)- Canadian
cable and pay-television com-
panies are battling video pirates
who import U.Smade
descrambleis to supply Cana-
dians wjth Home Box Office and
other major American pay-TV
services.
While there appear to be no set
rules, the method is believed to be
fraudulent because Canadian
viewers of HBO must supply a
U.S. address to have their
decoders activated.
Canadian companies could not
estimate losses, but 1984 statistics
showed thev were losing
thousands of potential
subscribers and millions of
dollars.
"It's a problem which has
emerged, and we're not able to
determine vet how serious it's go-
ing to be said Michael Hind-
Smith, president of the Canadian
Cable Television Association,
which represents 426 liscensed
Canadian Cable Companies and
four pay-television services.
He said there were at least six
companies that imported the
Videocipher II decoders, which
aie made bv M-A-Com Inc. of
Burlington, Mass and used to
receive U.S. services such as
HBO,inemax, the Movie Chan-
nel and Show time.
"A number Of oiganiations
have somehow found access to a
supplv and aie importing them
Hind-Smith said.
Canadians must pay $503 to
buy decoders in the United
States. They also pay a monthly
subscription charge of $19.95 and
supply HBO with a U.S. address.
The decoders can be turned off
bv remote control, so the viewers
must pas the monthly bills to
recieve the services; the company
cannot determine where the
boxes are located.
HBO, which began scrambling
in January to stop U.S. video
pirates, will not activate a
decode tt a c anadian address.
HBO, a Time Inc subsidiary, is
not supposed to broadcast in
Canada as many of its programs
are licensed to Canadian televi-
sion as well, Hind-Smith said.
The decoders are not sold in
Canada.
Before scrambling began, a
Canadian needed only a satelite
dish to receive U.S. programs.
That also cost Canadian pay ser-
vices, which are available in a
Package of three channels for the
equivalent of $11.48 a month.
Canadian companies asked
M-A-Com to help stop the supply
of the decoders to Canada.
Douglas Lindquist, assistant
vice president of marketing for
M-A-Com's video products
group, said his company told its
33 ditributors that decoders are
not to be supplied in Canada.
TYPESETTER
NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY
Contact Shannon
at the
EAST CAROLINIAN
Mondays and Wednesdays
between 2-4 p.m.
to set up an interview
7757-6367
ATTIC
Thi 5FRI
Producers and
ttfliC
free Glass of Champagne
for our 15th Annerar
6 SAT
PAIliC
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8 MON
Giants vs
Cowboys
an a Giant 15' Tl
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they re K th repre-
sented h the insignia you wear
as a member i t the Army Nurse
( a rps T he caduceus n the left
means you re part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are ther .
not the exception The gold h i �.
on the right means von command respect as an Army ofifk
earning a BSN, write Army Nurse- Opportunities PO Box 77H
Clifton. NJ 0701S Or call toll free 1-800-1 ISA ARMY
PAUL SIMON:
GRACELAND
America's premier songwriter is still
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INCLUDESTHE HIT, "YOU CAN CALL ME AL "
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Rock's most versatile musician takes
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Includes the hit, 'Touch the Night
Return this coupon and get f
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off any Cassette. Lp orComactdisc
$7 98 list price or higher sale items excluded �
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$2.00
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Sale prices good through Sept 14th
chol
The Clyda Woodard B.r
llemonai Scholarship Fund hi
been established a' East Cai
University by one of her f
gtudents, Allen G Hoyt and M -
�atton's husband, RE (Ed Ba
lor. Batton. a reti -
Hill resides in Smithfield.
Mrs. Batton, vsho die.
winter, graduated in 192' I
East Carolina Teacher O .
After teaching in pubiu
for seven years, she cond
private kindergarten in rx
Hoyt, a technical editor I
Environmental Prote
cy in the Ree.t
was a membe- I V
NC Cou
RALEIGH. S (
Court of A
Tuesday the e
conviction of Pera V
former North
quarterba.f -
no effect on I
term
Moorman a a
1985 of secon . .
fense, which carries a
prison sentence,
and entering
sentence The senten
with the l-ear sentei
were to be served
"The net effe
he's still looking ai ;
said Roger Smith. Moorma
torney. "The pi
court's decision
Layo
The
Monda
Tau Kappa
presi
BEA
BL
TH
500
TOI
Immediately
- V





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 4. 1986
ATTIC
septAsept
4THUR
SiMWINWfc
it
5 FRI
Producers and
arac
A net Glass of Champagne
w 15th Anniversary
"6SAT
panic
$1.50 For ECU
8 MON
Giants vs
Cowboys

1
�$TO
THE ARMY.
�� er w
uj re
n,
j Box 771;
If
OU CAN BE.

�i
v'X
84
SIMON
Iceland
Neil Young
'ACT DISC.
n AND GET
I
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IS EXCLUDED
�ES 93086 I
I
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ST MALL 1
Player!
iA
Scholarship Established
ECU News Bureau
The Clyda Woodard Batton
Memorial Scholarship Fund has
been established at East Carolina
University by one of her former
students, Allen G. Hoyt and Mrs.
Batton's husband, R.E. (Ed) Bat-
ton. Batton, a retired attorney,
still resides in Smithfield.
Mrs. Batton, who died last
winter, graduated in 1927 from
East Carolina Teachers College.
After teaching in public schools
for seven years, she conducted a
private kindergarten in her home.
Hoyt, a technical editor for the
Environmental Protection Agen-
cy in the Research Triangle Park,
was a member of Mrs. Batton's
first kindergarten class and is a
1966 ECU graduate.
"I kept in touch with Mrs. Bat-
ton over the past 42 years because
she made a very strong impres-
sion on me Hoyt said. "She
was a wonderful teacher and a
strong individual - an inspiration.
"She had been in a car accident
which left her partially paralyzed,
but was able to maneuver with a
walker. I remember her teaching
from that walker he said.
"She molded, shaped and nur-
tured the hearts and minds of two
generations in Smithfield Hoyt
said. He remembers that "every
spring she had a graduation
ceremony that even ECU
couldn't top. We had caps and
gowns and our own little band. I
played the sticks the year 1
graduated.
"That's the kind of seemingly
unimportant thing you just never
forget Hoyt said. "I hope this
scholarship will make a 'Mrs.
Batton' out of someone aspiring
to be a teacher today.
Batton said that his wife taught
approximately 1,600 students
during her career. "We had a
special room built onto the
house. Usually the classes held
about 25 children, but there were
times when she had up to 45. She
never could turn anyone away
he said.
"Clyda loved children, and our
nnly child lived less than 24
hours. I think that's why she was
such a wonderful teacher Bat-
ton said that one of the secrets of
his wife's success was strict
discipline. "She could punish a
child and five minutes later, he'd
be hugging her neck
Mrs. Batton retired in 1974.
Her last kindergarten class
graduated from high school in
June 1986.
The scholarship will be award-
ed annually to a Smithfield-
Selma High School graduate who
plans to major in early childhood
education at ECU. Recipients
will be chosen on the basis of
scholarship, citizenship and need.
CLIFFS
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington H.ghway INC. 33 Ext.) Greenville. North Carolina
Phone 752-3172
(Past RiverbluffApts.)
I
Flounder
Popcorn Shrimp
$325
$325
Hours 4:30-9:30 MonSat.
jNEWLY REMODELED -
NC Court Overturns Rape Conviction
UCir.U KI r linn m. . .
RALEIGH, N.C. (UPI) - The
Court of Appeals overturned
Tuesday the second-degree rape
conviction of Percy Moorman, a
former North Carolina State
quarterback, but the decision has
no effect on his 1-year prison
term.
Moorman was convicted in
1985 of second-degree sexual of-
fense, which carries a 1-year
prison sentence, and breaking
and entering, carrying a two-year
sentence. The sentences, along
with the 1-year sentence for rape,
were to be served concurrently.
"The net effect on our client is
he's still looking at 12 years
said Roger Smith, Moorman's at-
torney. "The practical impact of
court's decision is that it doesn't
change his prison sentence
The three-judge panel ruled
that the 1984 second-degree rape
indictment erred by charging
Moorman had sexual intercourse
with his victim "by force and
against her will
Because testimony showed that
the victim was asleep when Moor-
man began having sexual inter-
course with her, he should have
been charged with having inter-
course with a person who was
"physically helpless
"Thus we are faced with the
question of whether, given the
facts of the case, the State issued
a proper indictment for second-
degree rape said the 15-page
opinion written by Judge Gerald
Arnold.
"We hold that a proper indict-
ment for the rape of a person
who is asleep is one alleging rape
of a 'physically helpless'
person We find there is a fatal
variance between the indictment
and the proof the decision said.
Moorman had appealed the
sexual offense conviction on the
basis of insufficient evidence, but
the judges found evidence was
sufficient and dismissed that ap-
peal.
"We're disappointed Smith
said of the court's decision. "We
were hoping for setting aside
both (sexual crime) convictions as
well as get a new trial on the
breaking and entering charges.
"At first blush, it would ap-
pear that the next step is to go to
the Supreme ort of North
Carolina. That's a probability
but not a certainty Smith said.
Moorman is free on bond pen-
ding appeal, but because of Tues-
day's decision, he may soon
begin his prison term, Smith said.
Smith was hired by Moorman's
family after they fired his trial at-
torney Jerry Paul.
Hillcrest Lanes
Memorial Drive 756-2020
FREE
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1 I Coupon,
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Monday-Friday 10p.rn5p.rn.
Kentucky Fried Chicken
$1
plus tax
FOR ONE COMPLETE
2-PIECE PACK
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1 Biscuit
Tau Kappa Epsilon
present the 2nd annual
B E AT ST AT E
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Featuring
Music By
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KA House
500 East Uth Street
TONIGHT at 8:00
Immediately Following ECU Pep Rally
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10
THE EAST CARPI INI AN
SEPTEMBERS 1986
Prince
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (UPI) -
Britain's Prince Charles, who will
Play a starring role in Harvard
University's $1-million 350th bir-
thday party, touched down on
American soil to the strains of
colonial fife-and-drum music.
The prince, who arrived
aboard a Royal Air Force jet
Tuesday amid heavy security at
Boston's Logan International
Airport, planned whirlwind tours
of high-tech, medical and
economic landmarks today
before joining Harvard officials
350th Birthday
for a dinner in his honor.
Harvard's four-day birthday
celebration, six years in the plan-
ning, includes a keynote speech
by the prince, a fireworks show at
the 5,000-seat Harvard Stadium
and more than 100 symposiums.
Charles, a graduate of
England's Cambridge University,
where many of Harvard's
founders were educated, will
deliver his address Thursday at
Harvard Yard. Harvard,
established in 1636, is the
Empire State Building
Employee Charged
With Grand Larceny
NEW YORK (UPI) - An Em-
pire State Building observatory
supervisor who was found hand-
cuffed in an office told police a
robber took $80,000 in ticket
receipts, but later was charged
with stealing the money and put-
ting on a hoax.
Donald Nagel, 25, an assistant
director for the observatory, was
found handcuffed to a pipe in an
office at 7:30 a.m. Tuesday,
police Sgt. Raymond O'Donnell
said.
Nagel told police that a robber
wearing gloves entered his office
shortly after he had opened a
locked metal cabinet holding the
money. Nagel said the man
ordered him to turn over the
money, but did not show a
weapon, O'Donnell said.
The Midtown South Robbery
unit investigated the alleged
theft, and "determined that the
robbery could not have occurred
as it was reported O'Donell
said.
Investigators returned to the
Empire State Building, and in a
search of an office adjacent to
Nagel, recovered a brief case con-
taining $106,000.
Nagel was charged with grand
larceny and falsely reporting a
crime. O'Donnell said it was not
known whether anyone else was
involved in the scheme or how
Nagel got handcuffed to the pipe.
Goetz Murder Trial
PutOff TwoMonths
NEW YORK (UPI) - A judge
Tuesday delayed the trial of sub-
way gunman Bernhard Goetz, ac-
cused of shooting four teenages
in 1984, because Goetz's lawyer is
working on the defense of an
alleged member of the Gambino
crime family.
State Supreme Court Justice
Stephen Crane was to hear the
case today but postponed it
because attorney Barry Slotwick
is representing John Carneglia,
one of the co-defendants of
reputed Gambino godfather John
Gotti, on trial on racketeering
charges in U.S. District Court in
Brooklyn.
The Gotti trial is expected to
last two months, meaning that
Goetz will not be on trial for
shooting and wounding the four
youths on Dec. 22, 1984, until at
least November, nearly two years
after the incident. No specific
date was set.
Goetz is charged with attemp-
ted murder and assault as well as
illegal weapons possession in the
case. He claims he shot the four
youths in self-defense after at
least one of them asked him for
$5.
Attempted murder charges
against Goetz were dropped last
Jan. 16 but in July the New York
State Court of Appeals ruled that
Goetz must stand trial on attemp-
ted murder and assault charges.
In the January ruling, Crane
refused to throw out weapons
and reckless endangerment
charges against Goetz.
Crane said prosecutors at a se-
cond grand jury failed to say
Goetz could plead self-defense if
he "reasonably believed that
unlawful physical force was
about to be used against him
One of Goetz's victims said in a
newspaper interview the youths
intended to rob Goetz.
Crane said the "man on the
subway galvanized the world
and raised profound questions
about self-defense.
After the shooting and Goetz's
surrender nine days later, he
refused to take contributions for
his defense, turned down offers
of several thousand dollars for an
interview, and rarely spoke to
reporters who dogged his every
move - and then only to deny he
considered himself a hero.
Despite his efforts to keep a
low profile, Goetz, 37 at the time
of the incident, became a folk
hero.
Goetz faces as much as 25
years in jail on each of the four
attempted murder counts.
SAVE BIG
ON FILM DEVELOPING
STUDENT STORES
Wright Building
As Low As $1 .7
15 Exposure $2.47
24 Exposure $3.77
36 Exposure $4.97
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24 Exposure $4.47
36 Exposure $5.97
COLOR PRINT FILM (C-41) DEVELOPED:
Printed Coupon Must Accompany Order (No
Limit)
OFFER EXPIRES September 15, 1986
nation's oldest educational in-
stitution.
Scotland Yard, the U.S. Secret
Service and seven other agencies
blanketed the area for the arrival
of the prince, who emerged from
his plane smiling and waving to
about 100 wellwishers, cordoned
off in a heavily guarded section
of the airport.
Harvard police said officials
are especially concerned about
possible terrorism by the Irish
Republican Army.
"Obviously Boston is a hotbed
(for the IRA) said Harvard
police chief Paul Johnson.
"That is something we have to
be aware of. We are doing special
things for him. He'll have ade-
quate security, believe me
Charles was met by newly ap-
pointed British Ambassador An-
thony Acland, Consul General
David Burns, Massachusetts
Gov. Michael Dukakis and
Boston Mayor Raymnd Flynn.
The prince was greeted by a
fife-and-drum corps mae up of
volunteer National Guardsmen
and civilians in authentic 18th
century uniforms who played
"God Save the Queen" and "The
Star Spangled Banner
Charles was then whisked away
in a silver Rolls-Royce to the
fashionable Ritz Carlton Hotel in
downtown Boston, where an en-
tire floor was reserved for the
royal entourage
Give a hoot.
Don't pollute.
Forest Service, I LS.D.A. fli
lEaat (Earolttnan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
HELP WAN1E D
Feature
Layout Artist
Needed
Please apply at The East
Carolinian, 2nd floor, Publications
Building, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Experience helpful, but not
necessary.
DAY STUDENTS
Do You Want To Make
A Difference?
Apply now for the position of Day Student
Representative on the ECU Media Board.
Help set policies for operations of WZMB,
THE REBEL, THE EAST CAROLINIAN,
BUCCANEER, EXPRESSIONS, & THE
PHOTO LAB.
Apply in Media Board Office
757-6009
Filing Dates: Aug. 26-Sept. 5 1986
-5:00 p.m.
CO KROCERINC FOR ALL YOUR
Tailgate Party
Needs
Register To WW I 11
Pirate Football Tickets
2 Pairs To Be Given Away
For Each Home Game Register Now!
�A�N!V�V�V�V�V�V�v�V�V�V�V�VAV�V��V��
ALL FLAVORS
POLAR PAK
Ice Cream
0
Vi
Gal.
Ctn.
99
SOUR CREAM. BAR-B-Q,
OR REGULAR
Lay's Potato
Chips
O
6.5-7
Oz
Bag
99
DIET COKE
CHERRY COKE OR
Coke
Classic
99
CAROLINA PRIDE
ALL MEAT OR
All Beef n
W�inersPkg
$119
SWEET. RIPE
California
Cantaloupes . .
Ea
68c
KROGER BUTTERCRUST
WHITE OR
Wheat
Bread
Lb
Lvs
59
ALL VARIETIES
SERVE & SAVE
I.
FIRST OF
THE SEASON
Sliced ity Bartlett
Lunch Meat v �
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99
Oz.
(GEL 6.4 OZ.) OR
Colgate
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79
REGULAR OR
LIGHT
6
12-Oz
Cans
Budweiser
$
279
VHS Video Movie Rentals
ADVERTISES ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised
Items Is required to be
readily available for sale in
each Kroger sav-on. except
as specifically noted In this
ad if we do run out of an
item we win offer you your
choice of a comparable
item when available
reflecting the same sav-
ings or a ralncheck which
will entitle you to pur
chase the advertised item
at the advertised price
within SO days. Only one
vendor coupon win be ac-
cepted per item
24
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Hundred of fmvorMo movim
to choomo from!
RANGER. SUGAR. OATMEAL
RAISIN. PEANUT BUTTER OR
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$
24
For
199
oldblum Flu
Remake Of Si
r
By ED TOSH AH
Does this sound familiar0
A scientist creates a machine
hat can transport matter and.
Ranting to prove it wit worl
humans, transports himsell
wren the device's '�o recepta
A. fly comes along for the
and unfortunately, the n
gets them jumbled up, turning
the scientist into a monster It
you're thinking of the 195 hor-
ror classic The Fh. you're
Actually me
classic The Fly � a re-
gory film that, I would
missed for the world.
Jeff Goldhlum plaj
tist Seth Brundle, a- has
developed whai
"telepods in which m
disintegrated, transmitted and
then reformed. Veronica Qua:re
(Gena Dav is a reporter for
Particle Magazine wh picks up
Brundle's story and later
becomes involved with him in one
Of the steamier film romance
the year.
The good times d
long, hi wever. Brund -
trip ha- bonded him and a
housefly together genetically, and
they eventually be me ner
man nor insect, but a new
Br.
n


thed
i
ibst
The

"B? .
� n c
a new
h
Q
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film
squean
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Buffett Is
(UPI) � Jimmy Buffetl tun 4
this Cr . but he
reason to worn �
excuse for a partv
"It's gonna be a g
he said, a typical resj
the mar. who cooked up
Mark e "
Buffett was i
before a -how in Na
last of this summer's tout
With a pirate's gold earring glin-
ting from his left ear, his h
frizzy hair receding a little h:r
more each year, ar.c: spark n
blue eyes. Buffett sat back
laughed at the thought or" tun
40 bothering him.
"I've done more in 40 years
than most people do in a lifetime.
I don't foresee any midlife .
in m life
He may not have time to get
melancholy ab tone
birthday. A world r is i
works � firsi 51 p Vustra
"January.
"For the next album I'm -dik-
ing off around the world �
'Around the World in 80 N ghts
'Hang a Right at Rio he a
-throwing out possible ab
rtitles. "I'm gore take
guttar, play in bar shooi some
Arideo
Buffett is riding the crest of a
new wave of popuiartv. with - �
core cult of fans buoying
long, and he not concerned
Jtbout playing the h I rad o game
iuivmore.
i
i
I
the
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rrew u

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can
reprodi
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'Down And
"hard Drey fuss and Bette Midler star ia
Theater. Admission is free for studeat'
7


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I
i





f
thday
lentic 18th in a silver Rolls-Royce to the
Irio played fashionable Ritz Carlton Hotel in
' and "The downtown Boston, where an en-
tire floor was reserved for the
linked away roval entourage.
Give a hoot.
Don't pollute.
N'F
vice, I LS.D.A.
STUDENTS
Want To Make
)ifference?
he position of Day Student
on the ECU Media Board.
I or operations of WZMB,
HE EAST CAROLINIAN,
EXPRESSIONS, & THE
HOTO LAB.
Media Board Office
757-6009
s: Aug. 26-Sept. 5 1986
-5:00 p.m.
Register To
WIN
Pirate Football Tickets
2 Pairs To Be Given Away
For Each Home Game Register Now!
IE1
Ltr
NRB
ER BUTTERCRUST
OR
DIET COKE.
CHERRY COKE. OR
Coke
Classic
99
at
lad
Lb
59
REGULAR OR
LIGHT
Budweiser
$
J2-Oz
ICans
279
RANGER. SUGAR OATMFAl
RAiSIN. PEANUT BUTTER 0R
Chocloate
hip Cookies
$
199
Copyigm 1986
"�rxjer Sav-On
Ouanttry �i�,tt ��ervM
on sow fo ortien
on
THE KAST C AROIINIAN
Goldblum Flies High In
Remake Of Sci-Fi Oldie
Entertainment
By ED TOSHACH
Srff Writer
Does this sound familiar?
A scientist creates a machine
that can transport matter and,
wanting to prove it will work on
humans, transports himself bet-
ween the device's two receptacles.
A fly comes along for the ride
and unfortunately, the machine
gets them jumbled up, turning
the scientist into a monster. If
you're thinking of the 1958 hor-
ror classic The Fly, you're close.
Actually it's the 1986 horror
classic The Fly � a repulsive,
gory film that I wouldn't have
missed for the world.
Jeff Goldblum plays the scien-
tist Seth Brundle, who has
developed what he calls
telepods in which matter is
disintegrated, transmitted and
then reformed. Veronica Quaife
(Gena Davis) is a reporter for
Particle Magazine who picks up
Brundle's story and later
becomes involved with him in one
of the steamier film romances of
the year.
The good times don't last for
long, however. Brundle's short
trip has bonded him and a
housefly together genetically, and
they eventually become neither
man nor insect, but a new
lifeform that playfully calls itself
"Brundlefly
The film comes by its "R"
rating honestly; it is filled with
graphic, grisly images that make
you want to pull the armrest off
of your chair. In some movies
(the endless Friday the 13th series
comes to mind) this is done as a
substitute for good writing; in
The Fly, it is the result of good
writing.
A humorous tone is part of
what makes The Fly more than
just another remake. The
dialogue is witty and intelligent
and Brundle's cynical jocularity
makes his slow change to
"Brundlefly" all the more pain-
ful to watch. Goldblum works
wonders with both roles, creating
a new character for the monster.
Also doing excellent work for
the picture is Gena Davis as
Quaife: she plays a sort of strait
man to the horror. Her very
believcable responses to
Brundle's transition provide a
link with the audience, making it
all the more real to us.
The fly is an excellent horror
film, but if you're kind of
squeamish, this movie may not be
for you. If not, however, get
yourself a box of popcorn and a
big can of Raid, and, as the ad
puts it, "Be afraid.
Attic Has Been Hit By
Hard Times, Goes On
By DAVID BRADSH AW
Tom Haines is used to tough
times. Last Wednesday, a roof
that was being repaired leaked
hundreds of gallons of water,
flooded the Attic and caused the
club to close for the night. (Con-
trary to nasty rumours running
rampant around campus, the
floor did not cave in on Rafters.)
On Sunday, Haines had to deal
with moving an outdoor concert
to inside the Attic due to weather
conditions,
equipment under their arms and
say 'where's your stage? and now
they come in semi-tractor trailers
and want to know where the road
crew is. It's a totally different
ball game
Due to the necessity of change.
the Attic has continued to evolve
annually. This year is no dif-
ferent, with the club undergoing
major formatchanges as a direct
result of the change in the drink-
ing age.
Part of this format change in-
volves having specific nights aim-
ed at specific groups of people.
Tuesdays will be "And Now For
and on the same
night, he had to extinguish a fire
rn�wChr0�f �f th,C, Uiuing 5? A LTtUeDTffer�t
SSJTllSSS thC S? Ni. with computer-age musk,
structure had it not been nouced. acoustic music, local bands, and
ThAtt? V?n l ,CnOU8u' comedy- � will be a dance
lint � ,Jk ad t0 J8?. ni�ht on Wednesdays, with a VJ
long-awaited change in the drink- and a light show. Thursdays wiU
ing age. And to top it off, it had
to gear up for it's 15th Anniver-
sary celebration this Friday night.
Haines, owner of the club,
said, "We have to worry about
the weather, about whether a
band's going to Greenville, South
Carolina instead of Greenville,
North Carolina, whether they'll
be Heavy Metal Night, and
weekend nights will be devoted to
mainstream rock bands, con-
certs, and tribute acts.
The Attic as it is now is the
cumulation of a maturing process
which began when Haines opened
the Attic in the same building it is
in now. The club that used the
B. HUMIIIT � TMI (AST CAROLINIAN
' v � . i in. UUU UIA1 UCU 111'
be any good, if they're too loud, building before the Attic was call
Jd hv xk bEk! A!er ' tW� year "bs'nce due to dwn� �
with the Attic s fifteenth birthday to be celebrated Friday
Buffett Is A Pirate Looking At Forty
(UPI) � Jimmv Buffett turn 4A "I a�; .u:i.
(UPI) � Jimmy Buffett turns 40
this Christmas, but he says it's no
reason to worry � just another
excuse for a party.
"It's gonna be a good party
he said, a typical response from
the man who cooked up the song
"Margaritaville
Buffett was relaxing recently
before a show in Nashville, the
last of this summer's touring.
With a pirate's gold earring glin-
ting from his left ear, his blond
frizzy hair receding a little bit
more each year, and sparkling
blue eyes, Buffett sat back and
laughed at the thought of turning
40 bothering him.
"I've done more in 40 years
than most people do in a lifetime.
I don't foresee any midlife crisis
in my life
He may not have time to get
melancholy about the milestone
birthday. A world tour is in the
works � first stop Australia in
January.
"For the next album I'm tak-
ing off around the world �
'Around the World in 80 Nights
'Hang a Right at Rio he said,
throwing out possible album
titles. "I'm going to take my
guitar, play in bars, shoot some
video
Buffett is riding the crest of a
new wave of popularity, with his
core cult of fans buoying him
along, and he's not concerned
about playing the hit radio game
anymore.
"I don't think my record com- pear '
LT A f�f mC I ?" hC 'Tm basically oin8 to do
said. I decided to quit trying to what I do best and that's write "
7Tl����-e h?ge Writin ���. sy to Buffett, he
following and I cater to that
market. We'll play to more than
750,000 people over the summer.
Those aren't shabby numbers
he said.
"I'm not the same person I was
15 years ago when I was laying on
the beach writing all those things.
These songs are servicing a whole
new generation of people he
said.
Buffett says he has stayed right
on course with his "goofing off"
lifestyle in Key West, Fla but
he's anchored it with several
business enterprises and wants to
open his own recording studio
there.
In fact, 40 may bring several
changes for him. MCA has been
his Fabel for 14 years, but his
latest album, Floridays, says in
bold letters on the back, Fifteen
down and one to go, he said.
For years Buffett talked about
doing a movie version of
Margaritaville, one of his biggest
hits, but he doesn't sound too en-
thusiastic about the project now.
"The movie Club Paradise
came out and took the wind out
of our sails he said.
"Don't worry. If I can't pre-
sent it as the exact visual
reproduction of the song,
somewhere in some form the
essence of Margaritaville will ap-
says, because he listens
"The easiest thing to do is keep
your eyes open. Today people
don't listen to normal conversa-
tions. It's because the printed
word has taken a beating since
television has come in.
"It's a unique phenomenon the
way the music is written, played
and accepted Buffett said a
poll of concert-goers shows "60
percent of the people that came
to the show don't go to record
stores. They're readers. They
watch a few intelligent things on
TV
"Now that I think we've really
got this market pinpointed, I
want to service it with music and
videos
One thing his marketing
studies showed was that Buffett's
audiences are getting younger. It
seems people who grew up party-
ing to his songs have passed on
their love for his music.
"It's a word of mouth situa-
tion more than it is hype. I like
that a lot
"One of the great things I like
to see is kids singing lyrics at my
concerts. It's just yarn-spinning
or about rapscallion characters. I
like humor and those kind of
tales. I like to see kids and know
that if they don't stay glued to
MTV they still have the ability to
enjoy a good story
"Don't worry. If I can't pre-
sent it as the exact visual
reproduction of the song,
somewhere in some form the
essence of Margaritaville will ap-
pear
"I'm basically going to do
what I do best and that's write
Writing comes easy to Buffett, he
says, becausejie listens.
"The easiest thing to do is keep-
your eyes open. Today people
don't listen to normal conversa-
tions. It's because the printed
word has taken a beating since
television has come in.
"It's a unique phenomenon the
way the music is written, played
and accepted Buffett said a
poll of concert-goers shows "60
percent of the people that came
to the show don't go to record
stores. They're readers. They
watch a few intelligent things on
TV
if they're going to break up, if
somebody's going to have
laryngitis, if school is going to be
on break, or if there's going to be
a home football game that we
lose
So how has the Attic survived
15 years entangled in a web of
social, economic, and musical
change when other rock
nightclubs have fallen, by the
wayside?(By the way, theSittic is
the oldest rock club in the state,
having the same name' and
management as it did when it
opened in 1971.)
Haines thinks one answer is the
club's management. He explain-
ed, "The Attic has the strength of
soUd management. We have three
managers who have six, eleven,
and twelve years experience in the
club. The whole crew approaches
the business as a business; we ap-
proach it in a very professional
manner
Haines also believes that the
club's ability to change with the
times has been a major factor in-
volved in its longevity. He said,
"People have changed. When we
started, this place had no heat
ed The Id, and all that remains of
it is the large painting of the face.
The Attic moved to 4th Street in
1976, staying there until it was
destroyed by fire in 1984. The At-
tic survived, however, relocating
back to its original home on 5th
Street.
Fifteen years, 7000 members,
and 65,000 Attic T-shirts later,
the club has continued to grow
and expand its horizons in the
music entertainment business
while remainng dosely attached
to its roots. This week, for in-
stance, for the first time, the At-
tic will have an advertisement on
T.V. which will appear regionally
on MTV, CNN. and USA's Night
Flight. The Attic made the com-
mercial itself, caing �s own ndco
studio.
At the same time, the chib will
reintroduce "The Pirate a
trademark of the old club which
was destroyed by the fire but has
been rebuilt. This pirate from the
past makes tipping the bar fun,
so go check him out.
The Attic's 15th Anniversary
will be celebrated officially this
and air conditioning, and people Friday night with the Producers
didn t care. Back in those days, and Panic, so go out and wish a
bands used to come in with their great club happy birthday
From The Not So fight
Flying Scared Over Boston
By PAT MOLLOY
lUtar
Aloha friends and fellow party
freaks. It's that time again. It's
time to say goodbye to summer,
and hello to the dull, gray days of
fall. To be honest, this really isn't
all that bad.
I can write only so many
restaurant reviews before I begin
to break out in hives at the men-
tion of the words "exotic yet
humble
Indeed, the best part of my
summer vacation has just ended.
I returned Tuesday from Boston
where my cousin was married.
With a few exceptions, the visit
was fine � it was the plane ride
up that was rather disquieting.
To start, this was my first
plane ride � I know I can count
on you not to laugh at me for be-
ing frightened; However, if you
do, I hope you get fat.
Yeah, I was scared, and the
flight attendant who looked like
Chewbacca didn't help my
stomach a bit. Folks, this woman
was ugly � not Phyllis Diller ug-
ly � I mean UGL Y. To phrase it
My pilot thought he was Wally
Personality. "Good evening,
folks. This is your pilot. As you
may have surmised, one half of
the plane has no electricity; this is
because engine two isn't working.
We hope to have it fixed before
take-off. Thank you
Ha, ha, you're a funny dude.
I'll bet you have a lot of friends. I
hope you die with boils on your
legs.
scat cushion was an excellent
floatation device.
"Perfect I thought. "If we
wreck, not only do I get to put
my head where my ass was, I can
suck air out of a trash bag to
boot Oh happy day.
At one time or another, I think
every dude (except for Lance)
wonders if the flight attendants
really get it on in mid-air After a
few drinks I figured I'd hunt
down one of the good looking
stewardesses and find out.
I waited until Locust Lips
disappeared into the bathroom,
and I strolled toward the atten-
dju's station. Folks, what you
hear and what is fact are truly
two different things.
Not only did I walk away with
a puffed Up Mick Jagger would
have killed for, but Lance gave
me his phone number � which
not surprisingly, spe�ed out
"rug-burn
My advice for any guy plann-
ing to fly is to stay away from
those people - unless you're
'Down And Out In Beverly Hills'
Richard Dreyfuss and Bette Midler star in Down And Oat In Beverly HUb, a comedy now olavins at H�n
drfat Theater. Admission it free for student with current activity cat and their gneits.
How about it I put a stocking practiced in Sumo wrestling H
over my face and say Pm from have a real hankermTforlw!
Libya � wouldn't that be a Georse � in wk�tJ �
differently, she looked as if she scream? Why don't youjustcJ awa?from me
wa? notrettv " 1� " � dm - �� e in-flight snacks
W" Ei2?t �1 T $P�t �d that are served simnlyTkee
separate your lips from your attendants from staiioWar�f
with their fnigmiutS noT
Piedmont gives you great
vice - some babe throws a nael
thing to keep everybody! aB
off the fact that we're dJE
gravity over the Cnesaieak7i?
that can only bTol
small exrMoaives, v,7a �fci
Of course, as luck would have
it, the human insect was the only
animate object serving drinks
during the flight � I guess it was
logical since she was able to serve
six people at once.
I've learned a couple of things
from the two plane rides I've
taken. Firstly, I've learned that
there's nothing worse than a pilot
with a sense of humor.
your
face. Moron.
After that comedic intermis-
sion, a flight attendant whose
name was Lance (it should have
been Lucy) explained that the
dangling apparatus that looked
like a dad bag connected to a
Dixie cup contained oxygen.
Then he went on to explain that
should we crash in the water, mv
and
12





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 4. 1986
(UPI) � A new study shows
lotteries are expanding as a major
force in the U.S. gaming industry
with nearly half the states now
running games and sales expected
to top $14 billion this year.
"The American lottery system
took another giant step in 1985.
proof that this form of gaming
has captured public imagination
and has become firmly implanted
as a socio-economic phenomenon
of the 20th centhury said the
Dallas Houses
Largest Roach
In Texas
(UPI) � There were no dirges
or drums, only a steady rain from
leaden clouds and a few words of
eulogy Thursday as the biggest
cockroach in Dallas, recently
deceased, was displayed for
posterity at the American
Museum of Natural History.
The cockroach, nearly 2 inches
long, may have had a name
among its own, but its home was
a rather scientific description and
a story of how it came to die as
the prize bounty in a roach-
hunting contest.
It was displayed in a black-
bordersd case below a newspaper
account of the contest. In glass
cages nearby were live runners-up
devouring a late lunch after the
long flight from Dallas.
"It was brought in dead on ar-
rival said Michael Bohdan,
president of Bizzy Bee Pest Con-
trol Co of the prize roach. His
company had sponsored the con-
test.
How old was the roach at the
time of death? Hard to tell,
Bohdan said. Was it male or
female? Probably female, he
said. Any surviving relatives?
Billions, in a family line reaching
back 350 million years.
Three employees of
Southwestern Bell in Dallas had
won $1,000 for the catch. They
cornered it in a cable vault of
their office building and spritzed
If with fnig spray as ft attempted
to scramble out of their way.
In offering the bugs to the
museum, Bohdan had a mission:
to educate the public.
"We are donating these to the
museum here so that people from
all over the United States who are
trying to shoot up roaches can
come and see exactly what they
are he said.
Said Sally Love, director of the
museum's insect zoo, where the
roaches are displayed: "I just
thought something from Texas
that they thought was the biggest
would be interesting to everyone
else
Of the 4,000 or so species of
roach, some grow larger than the
museum's specimen; one type in
South American can reach 4 or 5
inches, Love said.
But Texas, said Bohdan,
should nevertheless take some
pride in its achievement.
"Bugs are big in Texas he
said, possibly because the climate
is so nice and warm.
The Wild Blue
Is No Place
For OI Yellow
Coatiased From Pate 11
shoves a Coke in your face. I
don't like Coke, and I told her as
much.
Lord, right in front of my eyes
she turned into Skeletor � I
swear to God she started to
salivate. "Coke is all we have
sir she said as her teeth grew an
inch. "Or maybe you'd like some
freshly brewed coffee?" I
couldn't imagine bone head
freshly brewing spit, so I took the
Coke � I didn't like it, but I took
it.
Finally, thankfully, we started
to land. Wally came on the loud
speaker to tell us the temperature
and all the other crap he thought
we should know. "The
temperature in Norfolk is 78
degrees under partly cloudly
sides, and I'm not wearing
underwear Man, flying is fun.
You may wonder what die se-
cond thing I learned is. That, my
friends, is simple � I'm never
frying again.
1
Profit
study by Laventhol & Horwath,
an international consulting and
accounting firm.
The Philadelphia-based com-
pany also reported that the
domestic casino gambling in-
dustry, in Nevada and Atlantic
City, N.J continued a "seesaw"
performance in 1985. Some
casinos filed for Chapter 11
bankruptcy but others reached
new income highs.
The study said four more states
Be In Billions
began lotteries in 1985, including
California, Missouri, Iowa and
Oregon, and West Virginia
started a lottery in January 1986.
That brought the total that con-
duct lottery games to 22 states
plus the District of Columbia.
But several of the lotteries did
not operate the entire year, in-
cluding California, which only
started a lottery game last Oc-
tober, Leonard said. His firm's
study predicted sales for all states
But Leonard warned the lot-
tery frenzy is not boundless.
"We're seeing some problems
already with small states. Small
states can't offer the same big
prizes. They don't have the
population he said, noting
some may opt for combined,
multi-state lotteries.
Leonard said some states are
"nervous" about a possible
federal lottery.
"It could happen. There's a lot
of talk about it. When Congress
is looking for money they do a lot
of crazy things he said.
Pennsylvania, which on
Wednesday began a new seven-
digit game, had the highest sales,
$1.29 billion, and net income,
$621 million, for 1985. New York
was second with sales of $1.27
billion and net income of nearly
$600 million.
The study predicted California
would easily exceed both
revenues of $1.9 billion in just the
past 10 months since starting an
instant, or rub-off, lottery game.
Leonard said a Lotto game was
scheduled to begin there soon.
For per capita sales,
Massachusetts led the field at
$212. It was followed by
Washington, D.C $180;
Maryland, $157; and New Jersey,
$123.
THOUSANDS of ITEMS
PRICES EFFECTIVE SUN AUGUST 31 THRU SAT, SEPT 6
AT AAP IN
Z-
�E THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES � ��
the supermarketi� ir7�
�WE WIU. MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN (TOWN NAME)
Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli, Bakery S Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current Week Food
Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality.
WMW mmm
Wff Wain in i �Wiiii� tm � rpi qb�i mm �,
MtfMlMfcBftrilh
MMW� -urnr1 r t1 t t t -it t �� nti m m � �i�i � m m mm





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 4, 1986
Profits
Be In Billions
(UPI) � a new studv shows
lotteries are expanding as a major
force in the U.S. gaming industry
with nearly half the states now
running games and sales expected
to top $14 billion this year.
"The American lottery system
took another giant step in 1985
proof that this form of gaming
has captured public imagination
and has become firmly implanted
as a socio-economic phenomenon
of the 20th centhury said the
Dallas Houses
Largest Roach
In Texas
(UPI) � There were no dirges
or drums, only a steady rain from
leaden clouds and a few words of
eulogy Thursday as the biggest
cockroach in Dallas, recentlv
deceased, was displayed for
posterity at the American
Museum of Natural Historv
The cockroach, nearlv 2 inches
long, may hae had a name
among its own, but its home was
a rather scientific description and
a story of how it came to die as
the prize bounty in a roach-
hunting contest.
It was displayed in a black-
bordered case below a newspaper
account of the contest. In glass
cages nearby were live runners-up
devouring a late lunch after the
long flight from Dallas.
"It was brought in dead on ar-
rival said Michael Bohdan,
president of Bizzy Bee Pest Con-
trol Co of the prize roach. His
company had sponsored the con-
test.
How old was the roach at the
time oi death"1 Hard to tell,
Bohdan said. Was it male or
female'1 Probably female, he
said. Any surviving relatives'1
Billions, in a family line reaching
back 350 million years.
Three employees of
Southwestern Bell in Dallas had
won $1,000 for the catch. They
cornered it in a cable vault of
their office building and spritzed
it with bug spray as it attempted
to scramble out of their way.
In offering the bugs to the
museum, Bohdan had a mission:
to educate the public.
"We are donating these to the
museum here so that people from
all over the United States who are
trying to shoot up roaches can
come and see exactly what they
are he said.
Said Sally Love, director of the
museum's insect zoo, where the
roaches a'c displayed: "I just
thought something from Texas
that they thought was the biggest
would be interesting to everyone
else
Of the 4,000 or so species of
roach, some grow larger than the
museum's specimen; one type in
South American can reach 4 or 5
inches, Love said.
But Texas, said Bohdan,
should nevertheless take some
pride in its achievement.
"Bugs are big in Texas he
said, possibly because the climate
is so nice and warm.
The Wild Blue
Is No Place
For Ol Yellow
Continued From Page 11
shoves a Coke in your face. I
don't like Coke, and I told her as
much.
Lord, right in front of my eyes
she turned into Skeletor � I
swear to God she started to
salivate. "Coke is all we have
sir she said as her teeth grew an
inch. "Or maybe you'd like some
freshly brewed coffee?" I
couldn't imagine bone head
freshly brewing spit, so I took the
Coke � I didn't like it, but I took
it.
Finally, thankfully, we started
to land. Wally came on the loud
speaker to tell us the temperature
and all the other crap he thought
we should know. "The
temperature in Norfolk is 78
degrees under partly cloudly
skies, and I'm not wearing
underwear Man, flying is fun.
You may wonder what the se-
cond thing I learned is. That, my
friends, is simple � I'm never
flying again.
study by Laventhol & Horwath,
an international consulting and
accounting firm.
The Philadelphia-based com-
pany also reported that the
domestic casino gambling in-
dustry, in Nevada and Atlantic
City, N.J continued a "seesaw"
performance in 1985. Some
casinos filed for Chapter 11
bankruptcy but others reached
new income highs.
The study said four more states
began lotteries in 1985, including
California, Missouri, Iowa and
Oregon, and West Virginia
started a lottery in January 1986.
That brought the total that con-
duct lottery games to 22 states
plus the District of Columbia.
But several of the lotteries did
not operate the entire year, in-
cluding California, which only
started a lottery game last Oc-
tober, Leonard said. His firm's
studv predicted sales for all states
But 1 eonard earned the lot-
tery frenzy is not boundless.
"We're seeing some problems
already with small states. Small
states can't offer the same big
prizes. They don't have the
population he said, noting
some may opt tor combined,
multi-state lotteries.
Leonard said some states are
"nervous" about a possible
federal lottery.
"It could happen. There's a lot
of talk about it. When Congress
is looking for money they do .i
of ctazy things he said
Pennsylvania, which on
Wednesday began a nev sever
digit game, had the highest sales,
$1.29 billion, and net income,
$621 million, tor 1985. Sew York
was second with sales ol Si 2
billion and net income ol nea
S600 million.
The studv predicted Califoi
jld easiK exceed both
� nues ol $1 9 billion in just the
past 10 months since starting an
instant, or rub-off, lotterv game.
I eonard said a Lotto game was
scheduled to begin there soon
f per .aprla sales.
Ma led the field at
:i2 l! was followed hv
Washington, DC 180;
Maryland, $15 and New Jersev
$123
PRICES EFFECTIVE SUN AUGUST 31 THRU SAT SEPT 6
AT A&PIN
V
It THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES - JL Lfc
the supermarket w ir � Jfi
M WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN (TOWN NAME)
Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli, Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current Week Food
Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality
ALL NATURAL
MonteCatSlip
m
32 oz.
bottle
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
$10 00 OR MORE PURCHASE
Cubed Steaks r Green Beans
ESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
FAMILY PACK
FRESH TENDER
59
WHOLE KERNEL OH CREAM STYLE CORN
REGULAR OR FRENCH CUT GREEN BEANS
I.A&P Vegetables
I
rl
16-17 oz.
cans
m
HOMOGENIZED � BUTTERMILK � LIGHT
Flav-O-Rich Milk
SBSc
half
BUTTER � DEVIL S FOOD � YELLOW � MOCHA
CHOCOLATE CHIP
Pillsbury ��
-LSBURV � ASSORTED1
Ready-to-Spread
Frosting
i27 package
18 oz.
Coca-Cola
99C
2 liter
ORANGE
i-C Drink
�,
CHICKEN � BEEF � TURKEY
Banquet Pot Pies
� "Sf
III
8oz.
packages
OPEN SUNDAY 7 A.M11RM.
OPEN M0N. 7 AM.
CLOSE SAT. 11 PM.
703 GREENVILLE BLVD. � OPEN 24 HOURS
V
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 4. 1986
13
TV To Examine America
NBC RELEASE
Inspired by the centennial
salute to the Statue of Liberty,
the NBC Television Stations
Division is undertaking an exten-
sive examination of "The
American Promise" � its suc-
cesses, its failures anJ its outlook
for the future. Announcement of
the ambitious project was made
today by Albert D. Jerome,
President of NBC Television Sta-
tions.
The NBC Television Stations
are WNBC-TV.New York
WRC-TV, Washington,D.C
WMAQ-TV, Cleveland, and
KNBC-TV,Los Angeles.
Jerome also announced that
the series will premiere with a
one-hour prime-time special
hosted by NBC News Commen-
tator John Chancellor.
John Chancellor as part of the
program will be a panel of
distinguished Americans.
Together, ther will attempt to br-
ing into sharp focus the issues
and choices that define how we,
as a nation, are maintaining our
basic values.
The panel is composed of U.S.
Senator Daniel Patrick
Moynihan(D.NY); prize-winning
author Toni Morrison; Ernest
Boyer, President of the Carnegie
Foundation for the Advancement
of Teaching and former U.S.
Commissioner of Education; and
Hispanic-American rights activist
Beatrice Cortez, former National
Chairman of the Campaign for
Human Development and current
consultant to the Parish Develop-
ment Office of the Archdiocese
of San Antonio,TX.
Said JeromeThe American
Promise' is probably the biggest
project the NBC Television Sta-
tions Division has ever under-
taken as a group, and we hope
that through this effort we can
make a significant contribution
towerd better understanding the
true meaning of 'the American
promise' and how it is faring.
"The special that kicks off the
series would be best described as
an ascertainment of 'the
American promise In it, we will
endeavor to identify where 'the
dream' has gone right and where
it has fallen short, and what its
prognosis is for the future.
Subsequent programs, produced
by each of the NBC Television
Stations, will then focus on
specific issues that evolve from
the opening program
The special, produced by the
division, will be followed by a
quintet of half-hour programs to
be produced over the next 18
months by each of the five NBC
Television Stations for presenta-
tion by the entire group.
WMAQ-TV, WKYC-TV and
KNBC-TV will telecast the
special on Wednesday, Aug.27;
the other two stations, on Thurs-
day, Aug.28. The first of the
subsequent five locally produced
programs is planned for
December of this year.
The panel discussion will be
preceded by segments from four
of the NBC Television Stations,
via satellite, that will feature
visits with four individuals, each
from different walks of life,
representative in some way of to-
day's American society. They are
an illegal Mexican alien in Los
Angeles (KNBC-TV), an
unemployed steelworker in
Cleveland(WKYC-TV), a welfare
recipient in Wshington (WRC-
TV), and a successful, yet disen-
chanted, career businesswoman
in Chicago (WMAQ-TV).
They will be featured in in-
dividual interviews as well as a
group discussion with
CHancellor.
"We have chosen these in-
dividuals because they represent
important trends of issues in
America today said Steve
Reiner, executive producer of the
special. "Each stands at a point
of social, political or economic
change and each stands at a point
of personal change.
"What we hope is that a
discussion of the individual ex-
pectations and frustrations of
these people will lead us to a
clearer defintions of what 'the
American promise' means today.
We think their own lives may well
be barometers for millions of
other Americans
The executive in charge of pro-
duction of "The AMerican Pro-
mise" project is Ann Berk, Vice
President, Advertising and Pro-
motion, NBC Television Sta-
tions.
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Civil War To Be Revisited
(UPI) � An old claim that the
first shot of the Civil War was
fired in Florida three months
before the bombardment of Fort
Sumter is at the center of a
group's request to fund a re-
enactment.
The Pensacola Civil War
Reenactment Association this
week asked a tourism committee
to contribute up to $4,500 to help
pay for an annual re-enactment.
One engagement being con-
sidered is a skirmish Pensacolians
for a quarter of a century have
claimed as a Civil War "first
It occurred around midnight
Jan. 8, 1861, when one of the
estimated 130 Union soldiers at
Fort Barrancas in South Pen-
sacola fired at a group of about
20 unwanted militiamen nosing
around a powder magazine. The
rebels were chased away and the
engagement was over.
It was not until April 1861 �
three months after the skirmish in
Pensacola � that Fort Sumter,
S.C was bombarded in what is
recognized as the opening action
of the Civil War.
Although documented, the
Pensacola skirmish received scant
attention until 1961, when a
group called the Civil War Round
Table of Pensacola began
pushing for recognition of the
event as the 100th anniversary of
Civil War approached.
J. Earl Bowden, editor of the
Pensacola News-Journal, was
president of the group that met
monthly during the centennial.
He recalled that they sent a
telegram to President Kennedy to
protest kicking off the centennial
in Charleston Harbor rather than
Pensacola.
Bowden said the telegram pro-
mpted a debate between
Charleston and Pensacola � and
plenty of headlines. He said the
chairman of the centennial com-
mittee sent a reply saying Pen-
sacola had made a significant
historic contribution, but
Charleston was the proper site
for the kickoff.
Bowden said Thursday that the
Pensacola skirmish was not the
first shot fired in the Civil War,
but did involve "the first shots
fired in defense of the Union
Russell Belous, chief of the
Historic Pensacola Preservation
Board's museum bureau, agreed
that it was the first shot fired by a
federal soldier. But he said the
first gunfire by a Confederate
soldier might have occurred
several days earlier near Mobile,
when Alabama militia took over
Fort Morgan.
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UNION
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St.
Elmo
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The Student Union Needs

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You To Help

SS

� Select, Plan, Promote Activities
� Develop Leadership Skills
1 Make Lasting Friendships

We're Looking for a Coffeehouse
Chairperson Immediately
or
Join One of Our Committees
Now!
Minority Arts Special Concerts
Productions Special Events
Public Relations & Travel
Publicity Recreation Visual Arts

Get Involved
CaSifl Call 757-6611 Ext. 210
or Come by our office at Room 234 Mendenhall
Student Center
Become a Part of ECU!
Coffeehouse
Films
Forum
Major Concerts
aerodynamically
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SEPTEMBER 4, 1986
On Tour Run-DMC Is I Just 'Raising Hell
NEW YORK (UPI) - "I am
great � get it straight � that's
what I say � my name is Run �
I'm number one � that's how I
rate
Run-DMC, the biggest group
in the history of rap music, is
largely responsible for the style's
transition from an inner city cult
following to a nationwide
popular audience.
The group's third album, Rais-
ing Hell, is the first double-
platinum rap album. The album
is currently in the Top 10 of the
Billboard charts. Run-DMC also
has a hit single in the Top 20,
"Walk This Way
The "Raising Hell" tour, a
45-city arena series headlined by
Run-DMC and also featuring
rappers Whodini and L.L. Cool
J, has sold out across the coun-
try. The tour also generated
tremendous controversy after
gang violence erupted outside
concerts in New York, Pittsburgh
and Atlanta.
The fiercest violence, though,
occurred inside the auditorium at
Long Beach, Calif on Aug. 16,
when 300 gang members savagely
attacked the audience with
makeshift clubs fashioned from
broken chairs.
"They were rippin' up, robbin
and beatin' down all of our
fans said Joseph Simmons,
who calls himself Run. "You
could see 300 people all movin'
against one section, beatin' and
robbin' them.
"It was frightening. I was real-
ly scared for our fans out there
The situation got so out of
hand that the gang members tried
to storm the backstage area.
"They couldn't get back there
said Simmons, "the entrance was
too small and we had put up a
barricade
The concert was called off
before Run-DMC took the stage.
The band immediately canceled.
"The group refuses to play Los
Angeles until police or other
authorities take sterner measures
to protect Run-DMC fans against
local gangs the group said.
"Last night approximately
14,000 fans were victimized by
the members of a few gangs. The
gangs stand for everything rap is
against
"Last night approx-
imately 14,00 fans were
victimized by the
members of a few
gangs. The gangs stand
for everything rap is
against
Only two years ago it was in-
conceivable that rap music would
attract this kind of nationwide at-
tention. The style is the unique
product of an underprivileged ur-
ban lifestyle. Ghetto kids with no
money to purchase musical in-
struments created their own per-
formance style by rapping
through a microphone over in-
Greenville's Hotspots
strumental sections of disco
records.
Run-DMC expanded the style
to include heavy metal bands like
Aerosmith as the background for
their raps. In order to safeguard
their secret the band scraped the
labels off the records they used to
confuse their competitors.
All three members of the group
are 20 years old and have been
friends since childhood, when
they grew up only a few blocks
from each other in Hollis,
Queens. Simmons and Darryl
McDaniels (DMC) attended St.
Pascal's Catholic grammar
school together. Simmons and
deejay Jason Mizell (Jam Master
Jay) were teammates on the St.
Pascal's basketball team and
later went to Andrew Jackson
High School together.
Run's older brother, Russell
Simmons, managed one of the
original rappers, Kurtis Blow,
and Run got to be Blow's deejay
in 1977. Run saw himself as the
master rapper, taking the mike
and trying out his stuff. He
recalls his earliest rap: "DJ Run,
son of a gun � Always plays
music and his big fun � Not that
old, but that's all right � Makes
all other emcees bite all night
Back at home, Run and DMC
practiced rapping together until
they developed the exciting call-
and-response style that made
them masters of the playground.
After Run graduated high
school his older brother agreed to
produce the fledgling group's
music. The first release was the
1983 single, It's Like That,
Sucker M.Cs. The first album,
Run-DMC came out in 1984.
The group's second LP, King
of Rock, broke Run-DMC out of
cult status on the strength of the
electric tide track, an excep-
tionally effective rap boast. The
tune's promotional video actually
got heavy airplay on MTV. Run-
DMC went on to make the Sun
City and King Holiday recordings
and were featured prominently in
the rap film Krush Groove.
Raising Hell takes rap into new
dimensions, using the deejay
turntable effects as only part of
an instrumental background that
now includes electric guitars,
keyboards and bass. Aerosmiths
Steve Tyler and Joe Perry play on
Walk This Way, while the
humorous You Be Win employs
Coasters-like saxophone fills.
Run-DMC's crossover success
has been chilled by the violent in-
cidents on the concert tour. Rock
riots have always been used as a
convenient excuse for anti-music
forces to call for bans.
After the Pittsburgh show on
the "Raising Hell" tour. Public
Safety Director John Norton said
"There's no question in my mind
the disturbance was drug and
alcohol related. The lyrics in the
songs are provocative and por-
nographic. They incite violence
Pittsburgh mayor Richard
Caliguiri threatened to ban all
rock shows as a result.
Run-DMC vehemently deny
such charges. "We come to party
and have a good time says Sim-
mons, "and our fans are here to
party, but the gangs are out for
another thing which we are
against. Our rap has nothing to
do with what they stand for. We
say 'go to school, be cool ya
dig?"
By RUSTY HARRINGTON
SUft Writer
What's happening this
weekend?
Who's playing?
What's going on?
Well at The Attic this weekend,
they are celebrating their 15th an-
niversary, and by all indications,
ithey are doing it up in their own
unmatched style.
Thursday night, North
Carolina favorite Sidewinder will
bring their extravaganza to
Greenville's 15-year-old institu-
tion, while the anniversary
celebration continues on Friday
night with the nationally-known
band, The Producers. Opening
for The Producers will be Panic,
who will return to the Attic on
Saturday.
Corrigan 's will feature the duo
of Lahnn and Loftin for one
night only Thursday � they put
on a good show recently at
Mendenhall, and are worth a
look.
Thursday starts the weekend
off for the New Deli, where 98
Colors will take the stage. Friday,
Starving Artists will be featured,
and Southern Culture on the
Skids will round up the schedule
on Saturday night.
The lounge lizards will be glad
to know the Bill Cray Band will
be at the Veranda lounge at the
Ramada Inn tonight through
Saturday.
For those of you that are
already thinking road trip � The
Brewery in Raleigh has Walk the
West on Thursday, The Bob
Margolin Blues Band on Friday
and rock legend Hank Ball and
the Midnighters for Saturday's
bill.
Pick of the week � Pro-
ducersPanic at The Attic, Fri-
day.
On East Carolina And NC State
�D
By J. DAVID MATTHEWS
MlWrilx
Do you ever wonder what NC
State students think about the an-
nual ECU invasion of Raleigh
and Carter-Finley Stadium?
I happened to be at a truckstop
near the NCSU campus recently
when I overheard two Wolfpack
students conversing about this
very topic. I knew they were State
students by their appearance:
Overalls, CAT hats, red necks
and just a pinch between their
cheek and gums. Here is what I
heard (Remember: In order to
better comprehend the following
conversation, please read aloud
with an exaggerated southern ac-
cent � kind of like Bill Elliot):
Billy Bob: "Well doggy, it's
sure as hell good to be back here
in Raleigh again
Jimmy Joe: "It sure as hell is.
Say, ain't our first football game
at Carter-Finley pasture?'
Billy Bob: "It sure as hell is. I
jes hope they sweep all those cow
those ol' boys from down east
way � the East Caroliner
Pierats
Billy Bob: "Yeeeehaaaa
That's gonna be one helluva no-
down
Jimmy Joe: "It sure as hell is.
Them Pierats got some of the
puniest womenfolk I know of. I
cain't figer out why they don't
like us good ol' farm boys
Billy Bob: "Me either. We got
the purtiest tractors, we chew the
best 'baccer and we got four
wheel drives jacked up so high
that you need a stepladder to get
in
Jimmy Joe: "They jes like
them city slicker dudes that go to
school over yonder and take them
pretty boy classes like readin
writin and rithmatic
Billy Bob: "We'll show them
preverts who's boss come Satur-
day
Jimmy Joe: "What time does
the game commence?'
Billy Bob: "Seven o'clock
Jimmy Joe: "Gawldarn it!
We're gonna miss Hee-Haw
also
Billy Bob: "Like what?'
Jimmy Joe: "Well, We got us a
whole new klan of coaches for
one thing. We also got a new
song to sing instead of the Star
Spangled Banner
Billy Bob: "What's it called? '
Jimmy Joe: "I don't recollect
its name, but you spell it E-I-E-I-
O
Billy Bob: "Maybe it'll have a
steel guitar solo in it. That'd
make me happier than a hog
eatin' slop
As you can tell, it was not a
pretty sight. Jimmy Joe and Billy
Bob continued talkin' and spit-
tin' and scratchin' all prere-
quisites in order to enroll at Moo
U mind you. Hopefully, all of
us "Pierat" fans can go to
Raleigh this weekend and show
them what it means to party. By
the way, ever wonder why NCSU
never plays ECU in Greenville?
Too long of a trip � they would
all have tractor-lag!
Best Tan � Bikini Contest
Thursday September 4
Contestants be at Tequila Bar 9-4-86 9:00 PM
Sign up or call for more information:
Tequila Bar 752-8926 WRQR 8304)943
chips outta the way damn Billy Bob: "Aw, sheepdip.
them cheerleaders. Who do we Welp, cain't win 'em all
Pk?" Jimmy Joe: "There's gonna be
Jimmy Joe: "I believe we play a couple of changes this year
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SORORITIES
"helping you find a path through College"
The key to success?
Sorority Rush: Sept. 7-12
Sorority Rush Signup: Aug. 27-29
Sept. 1-4
Student Store & Croatan
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Presen
By M1CAH HARRIS
fun VJkeki
December 21, 1937 �, lhc
date Walt Disney's Snow Hnite
the first feature length, cartoon
movie, made its world premiere
Ironically this event, which
should have inaugerated a new
age for the art of animation,
ushered in instead its decline.
Before Snow Hhite, cartoons
were shorts used to fill out the
theatre bill. These films rarelv
had a plot, but just a hook on
which to hang a series of gags.
(Example: Elmer Fudd goes �
bit hunting and the wabbit tnaJ
him look like a fool.) These
hooks were repeated over and
over with minor variations. (Ex-
ample: Elmer Fudd goes d i I
hunting and)
The attitude of the dav �a
that this was all cartoons w
ever amount to. It seen
Disney alone saw the vast
tial of the animated film, like am
other medium, it could aspire to
an. He put everything on the line
with Snow Hhite, a movie most
people believed no one would sit
through
Those people were wrong.
Snow VWiite was a financial.
technical, and artistic success.
However, it was the movie's suc-
cess which stunted the artistic
growth of the animated film. The
post-5tOH Hhite prevailing at-
titude was, "If an animation
feature succeeds, it must be like
Disney's
At this time, at least in the area
of shorts, there were divee a-
titudes toward the cartoon.
Disney's cute family attitude was
one. Tex Avery's absurd, violen
and sexy cartoons for M G M
were intentionally as oppos
Disney as possible. And the street
humor of the Fleischer Brothers
at Paramount was as unique as
either of the above.
But when the Fleischer
Brothers. Max and Dave, began
developing their own cjnoon
feature of Gulliver's "Travels.
Paramount pressured them to
make it tike a Disney film. As a
result the unique Fleischer ap-
proach was gone and the film
failed miserably as a Disnev im-
itation.
Ironically, in imitating Disnev.
the Fleischer Brothers actualh
parodied that studio. The
weaknesses of Gulliver's Travels
are the same flaws evident in
many Disney cartoon features
namely, the lack of a strong st
and characters with all the depth
of the paper they w ere draw n on.
The "best" example of
Disney's failure is the film Walt
designed to be his
masterpiece, Sleeping Beauty
From a technical standpoint, like
Gulliver's Travels, the film is
stunning. The levels of scenery
depth are breath-taking; the op-
tical effects are dazzling. And the
human characters, especially the
evil Maleficent, are expressively
animated.
Unfortunately, it is painfullv
obvious that these expressions are
the result of the animator's tug of
string on these two-dimensional
puppets. Our belief is no:
suspended to accept that the
characters are motivated within
themselves.
It is a sad paradox that the
Disney Studio, which prides itself
on "character animation does
not develop stories of character.
The fact that Sleeping Beauty is
"just a fairy tale" is no excuse
for lack of character depth. C. S.
Lewis' "Chronicles of Narnia"
series contains fairy talcs, and
they contain both characters and
stories of multiple depths. Hans
Christian Anderson's "The Little
Mermaid" is another example of
a fairy tale which is primarily a
story of character.
Princes Aurora of Sleeping
Beauty is such an animated cliche
that no one cares when she pricks
hex finger on a spindle and falls
under Maleficent's spell. For
most of the movie, Aurora is
either a baby, or asleep, or both.
Her character isn't given a chance
to develop.
Even worse, consistency of
character is deemed unimportant.
Maleficent who threatens the
hero with hell-fire in one scene
bemoans her stupid ogre guard in
another by lamenting, "Good
help is so hard to find these
days Could you have ever
taken Darth Vader seriously
if he said such a campy
'





THE EAST CA1QLIMIAN
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Steve Tyler and Joe Perry play on
Walk This Way, while the
humorous You Be Win employs
Coasters-like saxophone fills.
Run-DMC's crossover success
has been chilled by the violent in-
cidents on the concert tour. Rock
riots have always been used as a
convenient excuse for anti-music
forces to call for bans.
After the Pittsburgh show on
the "Raising Hell" tour, Public
Safety Director John Norton said
"There's no question in my mind
the disturbance was drug and
alcohol related. The lyrics in the
songs are provocative and por-
nographic. They incite violence
Pittsburgh mayor Richard
Caliguiri threatened to ban all
rock shows as a result.
Run-DMC vehemently deny
such charges. "We come to party
and have a good time says Sim-
mons, "and our fans are here to
party, but the gangs are out for
another thing which we are
against. Our rap has nothing to
do with what they stand for. We
say 'go to school, be cool ya
dig?"
r
A
R
ni Contest
ember 4
ir 9-4-86 9:00 PM
formation:
WRQR 830-0943
h College"
ccess?
-12
27-29
an
3. Times to be announced.
1
By MIC AH HARRIS
Staff Writer
Day A nimation Can't Find A Home
line?
For the last forty odd years
since Snow White's success,
Disney has practically cornered
the animated feature market.
It is significant that both of the grammina But aeain �iimi� ����
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over wtthmmor variations. (Ex- from his P�wn novel wasoU, V"
complex and moving.
Television's version of C. S
Lewis' The Lion, The Witch And
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ple.
and economics.
Tha tha that would be
all, folks!
And that would be a shame.
And folks like Don Bluth and limited only by imagination
ample: Elmer Fudd goes duck
hunting and)
The attitude of the day was
that this was all cartoons would
ever amount to. It seems Walt
Disney alone saw the vast poten-
tial of the animated film: like any
other medium, it could aspire to
art. He put everything on the line
with Snow White, a movie most
people believed no one would sit
through
Those people were wrong.
Snow White was a financial,
technical, and artistic success.
However, it was the movie's suc-
cess which stunted the artistic
growth of the animated Him. The
post-Snow White prevailing at-
titude was, "If an animation
feature succeeds, it must be like
Disney's
At this time, at least in the area
of shorts, there were diverse at-
titudes toward the cartoon.
Disney's cute family attitude was
one. Tex Avery's absurd, violent,
and sexy cartoons for M. G. M.
were intentionally as opposite
Disney as possible. And the street
humor of the Fleischer Brothers
at Paramount was as unique as
either of the above.
But when the Fleischer
Brothers, Max and Dave, began
developing their own canoon
feature of Gulliver's travels,
Paramount pressured them to
make it like a Disney film. As a
result the unique Fleischer ap-
proach was gone and the film
failed miserably as a Disney im-
itation.
Ironically, in imitating Disney,
the Fleischer Brothers actually
parodied that studio. The
weaknesses of Gulliver's Travels
are the same flaws evident in
many Disney cartoon features;
namely, the lack of a strong story
and characters with all the depth
of the paper they were drawn on.
The "best" example of
Disney's failure is the film Walt
designed to be his
masterpiece,5eep� Beauty.
From a technical standpoint, like
Gulliver's Travels, the film is
stunning. The levels of scenery
depth are breath-taking; the op-
tical effects are dazzling. And the
human characters, especially the
evil Maleficent, are expressively
animated.
Unfortunately, it is painfully
obvious that these expressions are
the result of the animator's tug of
string on these two-dimensional
puppets. Our belief is not
suspended to accept that the
characters are motivated within
themselves.
It is a sad paradox that the
Disney Studio, which prides itself
on "character animation does
not develop stories of character.
The fart that Sleeping Beauty is
"just a fairy tale" is no excuse
for lack of character depth. C. S.
Lewis' "Chronicles of Narnia
series contains fairy tales, and
they contain both characters and
stories of multiple depths. Hans
Christian Anderson's "The Little
Mermaid" is another example of
a fairy tale which is primarily a
story of character.
Princes Aurora of Sleeping
Beauty is such an animated cliche
that no one cares when she pricks
her finger on a spindle and falls
under Maleficenfs spell. For
most of the movie, Aurora is
either a baby, or asleep, or both.
Her character isn't given a chance
to develop.
Even worse, consistency of
character is deemed unimportant.
Maleficent who threatens the
hero with hell-fire in one scene
bemoans her stupid ogre guard in
another by lamenting, "Good
help is so hard to find these
days Could you have ever
taken Darth Vader seriously
again if he said such a campy
1 fHWHiiWlnWiilPli
Economics eventually killed
the theatrical short and was the
necessity that mothered the
"limited animation" which
floods Saturday morning pro-
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
$205 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at
additional cost. Pregnancy Test. Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For
further information, call 832-0535 (toll free
number: 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5
p.m. weekdays. General anesthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
FIRST MEETING
OF THE
FALL SEMESTER
Tuesday, Sept 9
7 30PM
Rm 221. Mendenhall
I
Promoting Leadership
in every phase!
Membership is open to all students, faculty and staff
rrMJUIIIttHIMIUItftflHiHWMUJtlHIHUMUdllllHnillMHHIK
I
I
ic
Astronomy majors
Think of it as a way
to bank under the stars
Architecture majors
Call it a blueprint
for getting green
Geography majors T )
See it as a way to find V
cash in over 12,000
locations
Chemistry majors
Feel it's the perfect formula
for finding money
Geology majors
See it as a way
to dig up cash
O-
Art majors
Think of it as a great way
to draw cash
s
4
VL&S& '
Pre-med majors
Call it the cure
for the no-cash blues
THE
5
Economics majors
See itasa way
to increase their cash flow
MAJOR
REASONS TO
HAE A VWCHCWIA
BANKING CARD
Use your Wachovia Banking Card to get
cash or check your balance anytime of
the day or night at Teller IT machines
across North Carolina. Through the
Relay and CIRRUS networks get cash
31 3500 2311 51HT
� N 1IST1I
�I-IT
Location nearest campus:
University Office
Member FDIC
802E
rsity
10th
St.
at over 12,000 locations across the
country. Your Banking Card is free
when you open a Vtochovia checking
or savins account. Just stop by and
talk to a Personal Banker.
WDcnowi
'
-�. �. i�� i� a
p.g�
�w��iaiMWM
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16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBERS 1986
BLOOM COUNTY
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21 Narrow, flat
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23 Short-distance
track man
27 Article
28 Barter
29 Small lump
31 Parent: colloq
34 Maiden loved by 5 Call on
48 Transport to
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50 Europeans
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33 Antlered animal
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40 Beam
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Editorial Writers Needed
Call 757-6366
THE EAST C ARC
ECU-NC Stat
Resumes On
B SPORTS EDITORS
It may not the biggest rivalry in
college football, but to the people
of Greenville and Raleigh, it just
may be. Just as the illustration
(below) say, "there is no love
lost here" when these two mtra-
vtate nah open their season op-
posing each other for the f
time.
Last year's contest drew a
record crowd of 58.000 plus and
opened Art Raker's career a
ECU in tvle with a 33-14 victory
over the Wolfpa-f
Thiv vear it's N C. State's turn
with a new coach, a Baker's
good triend and former assitant
coach Dick Shendan leads a new
WolfrK dub.
"Both Dick and 1 will want to
win this game Baker sajd. "He
and I are good friends and we
remain so after this game
shoulc
we'll
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to be
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"This
extra-
two
'The respect between us
(Baker and Sheridan) makes this betu
game have a more intense mean- like
- on our schedule Shendan but yj
said. "There is no game I would the
rather win than this one, and I'm Sh�
sure Art feels the same way know
"There's been a lot said about ECU
- game Baker said. "It ap- c j
pears n will be a sellout again, Piraq
and I thmk even, team likes to
play before a sellout crowd. 1
don't think it matters who's
coaching (at N.C. State or
ECU)
Sccond-ear coach Baker fees
good about the Pirates' chances
for a good season, despite star-
ting a freshman quarterback. with
"This is the first time I can how
ever remember going into an Bake
opening game with a true titud
freshman quarterback Baker over
said. "It's a situation we tea
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66
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
ECU-NC State Rivalry
Resumes On Saturday
Sports
SEPTEMBERS 1986
Pt�en
By SPORTS EDITORS
It may not the biggest rivalry in
college football, but to the people
of Greenville and Raleigh, it just
may be. Just as the illustration
(below) says, "there is no love
lost here" when these two intra-
state rivals open their season op-
posing each other for the fifth
time.
Last year's contest drew a
record crowd of 58,000 plus and
opened Art Baker's career at
ECL in style with a 33-14 victory
over the Wolf pack.
This year it's N.C. State's turn
with a new coach, as Baker's
good friend and former assitant
coach Dick Sheridan leads a new
Wolfpack club.
"Both Dick and I will want to
win this game Baker said. "He
and I are good friends and we will
remain so after this game
'The respect between us
(Baker and Sheridan) makes this
game have a more intense mean-
ing on our schedule Sheridan
said. "There is no game I would
rather win than this one, and I'm
Mire Art feels the same way
"There's been a lot said about
this game Baker said. "It ap-
pears it will be a sellout again,
and 1 'hink every team likes to
pla before a sellout crowd. I
don't think it matters who's
coaching (at N.C. State or
ECU)
.Second-year coach Baker feels
good about the Pirates chances
tor a good season, despite star-
ting a freshman quarterback.
"This is the first time I can
ever remember going into an
opening game with a true
freshman quarterback Baker
said. 'It's a situation we
shouldn't be in, but we are and
we'll make the best of it. Even so,
I think Charlie Libretto is going
to be a good quarterback for us.
"I feel good going into the
game, even though I am uneasy
about the number of young
players we'll be using Baker
added, "but I think Dick is
uneasy about some of the things
on his team too
Sheridan has made many new
moves in both the offensive as
well as defensive units since com-
ing to Raleigh. He will try to
break the Wolfpack's dismal 3-8
record over the past three
seasons. Sheridan hopes his team
will be more motivated to face
ECU, something he feels needs to
be changed if his team is to win.
"It's been my understanding
that, in the past, East Carolina
has been fired up emotionally
more than N.C. State. We've got
to change that Sheridan said.
"This game will be something
extra-special. You're going to see
two emotionally charged groups
of players
Both coaches agree that the
game will be a fiercely-fought
contest and that the rivalry is
quite apparent. As for it being
the season-opener, Sheridan feels
it might have been better later in
the schedule.
"Most coaches would agree it's
better to play a game with a rival
like this one later in the season,
but you learn as a coach to play
the cards as they're dealt
Sheridan and the Wolfpack
know what to expect, despite
ECU's 2-9 season last year. Ac-
cording to Sheridan, the '85
Pirate record was a bit deceiving.
"Know matter what their
record was, I saw them on film
against Miami, Penn State and
Auburn Sheridan acknowledg-
ed. "They played toe-to-toe
physically with all three of those
teams
The Pirates will invade Raleigh
with an untested quarterback,
however, another year under
Baker's system and a winning at-
titude may enable a Pirate encore
over N.C. State and propel ECU
to a successful season.
Podgorny, Grossi
Backbone For Bucs


Co-captain Georg? Podgorny
Co-captain Palmier Grossi
Libretto Named QB
For ECU's Opener
ecu srorrs information
Well, the waiting is finally over
as ECU football coach Art Baker
named freshman Charlie Libretto
as the Pirates' starting quarter-
back heading into Saturday's
season-opener at N.C. State.
Libretto, a 6-2, 190-pound
native of Middleburg, Fla won
the job over returning sophomore
Berke Holtzclaw and redshirt
freshman Travis Hunter.
"Charlie was selected as our
starting quarterback because of
his execution and his perfor-
mance in fall drills Baker said.
"I don't mind telling you that I
probably put our quarterbacks
under as much pressure as any
group during this preseason.
"This pressure might hurt us
some during the early part of the
season because we weren't able to
choose a starter earlier in the fall
Sports Fact
Ttaur. Sept. 4, 1945
42-year old Paul Schriber
returns to the major leagues
after an absence of 22 years.
Shreiber, a batting-practice pit-
cher for the Yankees, is pressed
into action when the war causes
a manpower shortage; he pit-
ches in two games for the
Yankees and has no record.
and let that person work with the
first team. But I felt in fairness to
all three players they were very
close right up until last week, but
Libretto's ptrformance continues
to hold up
Baker noted that Libretto had
shown the most poise behind
center during the majority of fall
drills even at his young age.
"Charlie throws the ball bet-
ter, and he's a big, strong young
man who has shown amazing
maturity at this point Baker
said. "Of course he hasn't been
I probably put our
quarterbacks under as
much pressure as any
group during this
preseason. M
�Art Baker
thrown out there in front of
58,000 fans in his first college
game yet, but he recognizes
defenses and has just done the
right things at the right time
The Pirates and Wolfpack will
open the season �f�iwft each
other for the second straight
season. ECU won the opener in
1985 by a 33-14 margin as
sophomore Ron Jones was the
Bucs starting signal caller. This
year Jones has been converted to
receiver.
ByGEORGE OSBOURNE
�cu apt mmmsb
The ECU soccer team conclud-
ed preseason drills with a con-
trolled scrimmage last Sunday
and head coach Steve Brody was
pleased with his teams progress.
"The scrimmage gave us an
opportunity to evaluate our pro-
gress and see what we needed to
work on this week Brody com-
mented.
The Pirates started practice
this week with a definite starting
lineup that included three
freshman.
"We have a starting eleven that
everyone is happy with Brody
said. "I worry more about the
team pulling together as a unit
that any one group, including
freshmen
Among the freshmen starting
will be Mel Morris. The
Baltimore, Md native has been
hampered by an injury and has a
lot of work to make up this week,
but Brody is confident that he
will rise to the occasion. Also new
to the Pirate lineup is freshman
Frank Marsh.
"Frank has shown day to day
improvement since the start of
fall drills and I really expect him
to contribute Brody remarked.
Although freshmen fill some of
the starting ranks, the Pirates are
not without strong leadership on
the field.
"The leadership so far this
season has been excellent, not on-
ly from the captains but from the
rest of the upperclassmen as
well Brody said.
Seniors George Podgorny and
Palmier Grossi are the co-
captains for the 86 season.
Podgorny has had an outstanding
pre-season practice while Grossi
has been slowed somewhat by a
nagging ankle injury. However,
Grossi is expected to start against
St. Andrews.
The Pirates are in final
preparations for their opener
against St. Andrews this Satur-
day. "This week we are spending
a lot of time on match
situations Brody said. The
team will travel directly from St.
Andrews to South Carolina to
take on Francis Marion College
on Sunday afternoon.
"If we can win both of these
road matches we will be well on
our way to our goal of eight mat-
ches Brody said.
The Pirates will open at home
Wed. Sept. 10 at 3:30 against
William & Mary.
Football Festivities
Pep Rally I
t
The festivities surrounding
the 1986 ECU football season
begin tonight with the sixth-
annual Budweiser Football Pep
Rally.
The Marching Pirates will
get things underway at 6:30
pni, when they make their way
up College Hill to Flcklen
Stadium where the pep rally
will begin at 7:00.
In addition to the band, the
ECU cheerleaders and the
Pirate mascot will be on hand
to provide entertainment.
Guest speakers will include
Pirate Football Coach Art
Baker, ECU Associate Athletic
Director Dave Hart, and
players from both the offensive
and defensive units.
A number of prizes will be
given out, with coach Baker
giving away the grand prize, a
19-inch color television. Ad-
mission is free to all who wish
to attend.
MrNDttNE"J.0$TMERE
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18
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 4,1986
Classifieds
SAIF
FOR RENT: 2 room furnished
apartment for rent. Lights and
water furnished. Call 756-0174 or
752 7212.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom wprivate
bath with Christian couple. Front
and back entrance, heat and air con-
dition furnished. Call 752-7212.
FOR SALE: Is it true you can buy
jeeps for $44 through the U.S.
government? Get the facts today!
Call 1-312-742-1142, ext. 5271 A.
FOR SALE: Bed, day bed, heaters,
table and other misc. items. Call
Jennifer 752-3352 weekdays 8-10
am and p.m. Priced to move!
FOR SALE BY OWNER: Im
maculate 3 bedroom, 2'j bath, brick
Cape Cod Large great-room with
fireplace, sunroom, wet bar, dual
heatpump and central vac. $96,900.
Call 756-8596 after 5 p.m.
BED STILTS FOR SALE:
Jeff at 355-5244.
$30. Cal
IBM-XT COMPUTER: 2-360k Flop
pies, 640k on system board, color
graphics card, Amber Monitor,
PROPRINTER and software setup.
11 months old. $2,450neg. Call
752-0735 now
LARGE COUCH FOR SALE: $35
Ask for Kelly or Jerry. 757-3990.
FOR SALE: Suzuki 50cc
motorscooter FASO. Two cycle, oil-
injection $300, also basket case Hon-
da 200cc $50. 752-9780.
FOR SALE: 1985 Pontiac Firebird
5-speed, T tops, cruise control- tilt
wheel- electric windows,AMFM
cassette stereo, maroon wgray in-
terior, AC. $500 down, and balance of
loan, $10,000. 5-year warranty. Call
Dony 752-4225 or 752-8045
SICK ROOM SUPPLIER: Electric
wheelchair Power Rolls IV Maxtra:
All manuals and tools $2,500. Manual
Wheelchair $300. Walkers, $10 and
$20. 752 9780.
TYPING: Professional service at
low rates includes: proofreading,
spelling and grammatical correc
tions. 12 yrs. experience; familiar
with all university formats. Cindy:
757 0398 anytime after 6 p.m.
NEED A D.J.?: Are you having a
pary and need a D. J.?: For the best
in top 40, beach and dance call
Morgan at 758-7967. Reasonable
rates. References on request.
WET LATHER: CONTACT THE
TRASHMAN if your
grouporganization is planning a get
together. Best rates, huge selections
of tunes. 752-3587.
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICE: Word processing. The
Dataworks specializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertions,
theses, resume's and more. All work
is computer checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary. Rates
are as low as $1.75 per page, in-
cluding paper (call for spedific
rates.) Call Mark at 757 3440 after 7
p.m.
SAVE MONEY 8 lb. bag of ice
for only 35c. Barkers Refrigeration
on Memorial Dr. at West-end circle.
8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 756 6417.
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc. Call
Anne at 752-3015 and leave a
message.
i �i ���
WANTEP
THE LADY PIRATE BASKET-
BALL TEAM: Is seeking someone to
serve as their manager for the
'86'87 season. Interested applicants
should contact the basketball office
immediately! 757-6384 or come by
room 164 in Minges.
SOCCER COACHES AND
REFEREES: Needed for afternoon
hours. Contact Pitt County Com-
munity Schools at 752-2934 Ext. 276
or 267
SOCCER COACHES NEEDED:
Greenville Recreation and Parks
Dept. is recruiting 10-14 part-time
Soccer coaches for the fall soccer
program. Applicants must possess
some knowledge in soccer skills and
have patience to work with youth.
Applicants must be able to coach
young people, ages 6-15 in soccer
fundamentals. Hours approximately
3-7 p.m. Monday-Friday. Some night
and week-end coaching. Program
will extend from Sept. 8- to mid Nov.
Salary rate, $3.46hour. Applicants
will be accepted August 20- Sept. 12.
Contact Ben James at 752-4137 Ext.
262.
FIRST STRIKE: Is looking for a
talented lead guitarist. Must be
creative and have ability to im-
provise. Only metal-oriented in-
dividuals need apply. 752-9445.
BAR-MAIDS NEEDED: At Sport
sman Lounge. Must be 21 yrs. old.
Contact Rose at 758-0058.
JOBS AVAILABLE: Positions are
available at MARATHON
RESTAURANT, 560 S. Evans St. For
more information call or come by
between 2-5 p.m. Phone numbers:
752-0326 and 752-3753.
$100 REWARD: For the return of
ladies 14kt. gold double-rope
bracelet lost downtown Friday
night. Please call 758-6959 (sen-
timental value).
$25 REWARD FOR LOST CATI:
Have you seen white long-haired
male with yellow spots? Last seen at
Village Green Apts. Sat Aug. 23.
Please call 355-7130 or 756-5286.
PART-TIME HELP WANTED: At
Greenville Opticians, Doctor's
Park, Bldg. 1. Will work around stu
dent schedule. No experience
necessary. Apply in person to
manager.
SIG EPS: Get ready
everyone, looks like if s going to be
another SCARY weekend!
THE KNIGHTS OF SIGMA NU: Are
having dinner Thurs. at8 p.m. at the
Pizza Hut on loth St. Brothers and
Lil Sisters are invited. There will be
i party Friday night at 7 p.m. at
dene's Apt. Bring your own drink
jnd Gene will supply the hot dogs,
3rothers and Lil Sisters invited.
��I KAPPA PHI: Formal
jrotherhood and dinner out Monday
t 7 at Western Steer.
PI KAPPA PHI: The TOGA party
was RAD! Be ready to throw down
again at the NCSU Pi Kapp house
after brother Baker and the boys
kick BUTT!
PI KAPPA PHI: A reminder from
brother Stacey. "If you should go
skating on the thin ice of modern
life, dragging behind you the silent
reproach of a million tear-stained
eyes. Don't be surprised when a
crack in the ice appears under your
feet. You slip out of your depth and
out of your mind with your fear flow-
ing out behind you as you claw the
thin ice P.F. Pi Kappa Phi- The
Ultimate in Fraternal Life.
SIGMA NU: Party Friday night for
Brothers and Little Sisters at
Pookies. B.Y.O.B. Free food, but sex
isn't.
ZBT LITTLE SISTERS: There will
be a meeting Sunday night Sept. 7 at
7 p.m. at Cindy D's house. Please be
there. Thanks.
FOOTBALL TRYOUTS: Will be
held Sept. 8th at 4 p.m. at Scalesfield
House (on the practice field). Be
dressed for, the tryouts. Any ques-
tions contact Clyde Christiansen at
757 6330.
K
I Fo
mtuiiuimHtttiii
CAMPUS MASS SCHEDULE
Sunday-11:30 a.m.
Biology Building, Room 103
9:00 p.m. Newman Center
Wednesday-5:30 p.m.
Newman Center
(followed by a fellowship dinner)
SHARE THE WORD BIBLE STU0Y
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.
at the Newman Center
All are welcome
For information, call 752-4216
tlltllllllillMtfl�llftlltllilllllHIIIIHHHI5�il�l
HEY YOUI THE BLONDE GUY
WITH THE BROKEN THUMB):
Sorry about your injuryhope your
girlfriend didn't injure you more
after our meeting at Rafters Sat.
night! Nice talking to you across the
room. Call and we'll talk again.
Kathy 752 3572.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI: Little Sister
Rush will be Sept. 9 8.10 at the Alpha
Sig house on 422 West 5th St. at 9.
Come on over and get to know the
brothers and little sisters of Alpha
Sigma Phi.
WINDSURFING: The Outer Banks
at Nags Head, N.C. are an excellent
location for a windsurfing outing of-
fered by the Dept. of intramural-
Recreational Services on Saturday,
Sept. 13. This will be an all day ex-
cursion with a three hour class in
windsurfing offered from 10 a.m.
through 1 p.m. The cost will be $37.50
per person covering transportation
and the class. Stop by room 204 in
Memorial prior to 4 p.m. on Friday,
September 3 to sign-up.
LOUISE: Don't think we can't
scheme because we can! Watch
outThe West Virginia game will be
radical - ALM
HOPPER: Don't think the semester
won't be radical because it will!
Remember we love ya and your side
of the room looks great.
SHANNON: This semester was
made for snaking! Work them!
DEE: Happy Birthday Diana
Margaret. We stopped counting at 21
cause now you're getting old.
Announcements
ICE HOCKEY CLUB: Anyone in
terested in playing hockey this year
is encouraged to attend an organize
tional meeting in Room 105
NAemorial Gym on Monday, Sept. 8
at 4:00 pm. if you want to play, I
need to hear from you NOW. The
sooner we get things rolling, the bet
ter. For more info contact Mike
White at 752-2051.
ECU VETERANS CLUB: The East
Carolina Veterans Club will have its
first meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 9, in
room 221 Mendenhall. We will be
discussing our plans for the fall
semester. I t's going to be a big year,
and participation is the key. If you
cannot make the meeting but desire
more information call Mike White at
752-2051 or Jim Ried at 758-0333,
everyone is invited!
LIFE'S A HEALTH AFFAIR: The
2nd Annual Life's A Health Affair
will be held Wednesday, Sept. 17
from 3-6 pm at Mendenhall Student
Center. Special give-aways will be
available. Sponsored by the West
Area Residence Council, Student
Health Center, and Intramural
Recreational Services.
PRE PHYSICAL THERAPY:
Deadline for returning admission
packet materials for applying to the
1987 professional phase is November
1, 1986. in order to be eligible toapp
ly to this program all general college
and physical theraphy prerequisites
must be able to be completed by the
end of spring semester 1987 The
Allied Health Professions Admis
sions Test must be taken on
November 8 (application deadline is
October 11). Application packets
should be picked up first week of Oc
tober in the Physical Therapy
Department office (Belk Building,
757-6961, ext. 261). Call or come by
office by Oct. l to find out if you are
eligible to apply.
DR. CHILDER's PSYC 1050 CLASS
SPRING 1986: If you did not pick up
your individualized vocational com
puter analysis, please go by Dr
Childer's office in Speight Building
105 and pick it up.
SURF CLUB: There will be a
meeting Thurs Sept. n at 800 pm
in Rm. 221 Mendenhall concerning
the club and team tryouts. For more
information, contact Blair Riddick
3t 758 8393
LEISURE LIVING MAJORS: The
Student union Recreation Commit
tee is accepting applications for
committee membership The com
mittee plans and promotes recrea
tional activities for students, faculty
and staff For more information,
contact the Student union in Room
234 or call 757 6611, ext 210
ECANS: Attention all nursing
students there will be an ECANS
meeting Thurs , Sept 4 at 6 m NB
101 Dr Frances Eason will be the
guest speaker on "Leadership your
professional obligation to your
organization Please come and see
wha ECANS is all about Everyone
is invited and refreshments will be
served ECANS would also like to
welcome all new nursing students to
the School of Nursing
FOOD FOR THOUGHT: Come to
the Methodist Student Center this
Wednesday night at 5 pm and ever
Wednesday night for a delicious, all
you can eat home cooked meal with
a short program afterwards The
meal costs $150 Call 758 2030 for
reservations Sponsored b
Presbterian and Methodist Cam
pus Ministries.
Please see page 20
Woodsy Owl says
Stash Your Trash
South Park
Amoco
Complete Automotive Service
756-3023 24 fen.
310 Greenville Blvd.
Western Auto
Not Be
Undersold!
We will meet or beat any local competitor's advertised price
on any identical products in stock. Just bring their ad with you.
JHIHIIIIIIIIIIIIlHIHIIIIIIili;iilMlllliHIlllllllllllllllllllll!llll!lllllllllllllinillllllllllllllllUIIIIIIHIUIII
I NEWMAN-CATHOLIC I
STUDENT CENTER
I 953 East Tenth Street I
Greenville, N.C. 27858
P'SVtW 1Jl 9�
P'Si � 'vsoe31 OO
P'iV�OB'5!) OC
P'tS -v14 OO
Pi�V'W�MOO
P�V?��� OO
P?'V75'�MOO
PTOVTyiiMOO
pV-Wi40 00
p '����4 OO
P71i���43 OO
'�ffj a- �
Free Mounting � Mo Trade-in Required � Balancing Available � Extended Road Hazard Warranty Available
SNOPPER STOPPER
AC, NGKor
Metorcraft
Armor-All
Protectant
8 oz pump
mmor ah
44
Limit 2 Per
Customer
SMtllMMOMltrSilM 74�tQl349
Havoline
10W40 or
10W30
Motor Oil
Lube, Oil and Filter Change
V7
Limit 2 Fitter
Include uoicS quort
K�nd4l' 10W40 motor Oil
oil Mt�- (74 5901 Mr )
chti tub ond �li
labor MostCs cars
2 Western JUito
The Auto Supply Company
119 Red Banks Road Greenville, N.C.
Phone 355-2341
Convenient Credit Available
Dtecount Auto Paris. Behind Burger
King, Near Food Lion.
SALE ENOS SAT. SEPT. 6
OPEN SUNDAY
1 PM TIL 6 PM
MONDAY 8 AM TIL 5 PM
TUESFW. 8 AM TH, 9 PM
SATURDAY 8 AM TM. 6 PM
i�
Pirate
ECU vs NC Stale � Top, in t
State
The Pirates 16-game series
North Carolina State's Wolfpa
(State leads 11-5) is the long
running active series on ECU
schedule. However, the
have had the upperhand in I n
the last three games taking
year's contest by a 33-14 margj
The Wolfpack Pirate
has become the most �
college football contest
slate with a stadium
58,300 fans turning out for i
year's opener. Carter-Fmiev
the largest football stadiun j
state of North Carolina and
ECU NC State series ha
six of the top-10 crow
All sixteen game j
hae been plaed on
Wo!pack's home field.
Baker vs. Sheridan
The opposing head c
Saturday's conu j
to be the best of I ECl
head coach .V Bak
Wolfpack leader Dick S
go back man -
sonal and professional
hip. Sheridan receive:
collegiate coaching job (
Baker was the head coa
man. Shendar. a named as tl
Paladins' head coach when Baki
took a similar posstior. n
Citadel.
This wall be the s xtl
two have met acre
opposing head coache- S :J
and Bake: met five I
198-82 when Furmar i
Citadel tangled � e nei
Wolfpack coach hold -�
lead in the ma
won the first three mee a
198-80, while The Cita
in 1981 and the F
out on top again in 1982
An Independent Schedule
ECU will face onlj two
on the 1986 season affiliated
a football-playing confei i
The Pirates open with V i
Coast Conference member N.G
State and also play Auburn c-
Southeastern Conference T" i
maining opponents � NX ej
com;
Thi
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8
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8:
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ts
LEISURE LIVING MAJORS The
le i1 union Recreation Commit
s accepting applications for
��� membership The com
� is and promotes recrea
, . - � oe its faculty
� 't f- or more intoi mation
?he Stuaenf union in Room
57 6611, ext I
ECANS A" � � nursing
an EC AN S
5 sec' 4 at � in NB
Dr Frances Ea- A oe the
Leadership your
b I i g a t i on I .our
Pleas i ne and see
S a about Ever yone
eft eshments wn be
ECANS fee 1
students to
� - -v if N
D FOR THOUGHT Come '
iter this
� eve.
si
ked mea
SI 5 �� tor
Sponsored by
C a m
Please se� pai' 20
L.Ap
ptnce ta ecttf
HOUSE
Auto
tBe
old!
Ititor's advertised price
It bring their ad wiitti you.
eel Belted7S.OOO MILE Fiberglass
2T97P'(�.BOB 1 1 Whilraxll2297
M K.HrOrd P-l �
?fc OO
-J� OO
11 OO
H ta oe t� OO( 1 OO II OO V OO 1 OO
�1 Warranty Opti
ER
1
e Ciu.
ANT
J
iard VWarranty Available
Lube. Oil and Filter Change
i i- I
7
udes up In 5 quarts
A -ir motoi oi
.� Mte. I "4 590" set
"MS'S lube tnd all
�abo Mos'C S ca's
12
SALE ENDS SAT. SEPT. 6
OPEN SUNDAY
1 PM TIL 6 PM
MONDAY 8 AM TIL 5 PM
TUES-FRI 8 AM TIL 9 PM
SATURDAY 8 AM TIL 6 PM
j
Pirate Wolfp
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 4,
�y"
19
ECU vs NC State � Tops in the
State
The Pirates 16-game series with
North Carolina State's Wolfpack
(State leads 11-5) is the longest
running active series on ECU's
schedule. However, the Pirates
have had the upperhand in two of
the last three games taking last
vear's contest by a 33-14 margin.
The WolfpackPirate series
has become the most watched
college football contest in the
state with a stadium record
58,300 fans turning out for last
year's opener. Carter-Finley is
the largest football stadium in the
state of North Carolina and the
ECU NC State series has drawn
six of the top-10 crowds.
All sixteen games in the series
have been played on the
Wolf pack's home field.
Raker vs. Sheridan
The opposing head coaches in
Saturday's contests also happen
to be the best of friends. ECU
head coach Art Baker and
Wolfpack leader Dick Sheridan
go back many years in both a per-
sonal and professional relation-
ship. Sheridan received his first
collegiate coaching job when
Baker was the head coach at Fur-
man. Sheridan was named as the
Paladins' head coach when Baker
took a similar position with The
Citadel.
This will be the sixth time the
two have met across the field as
opposing head coaches. Sheridan
and Baker met five times from
1978-82 when Furman and The
Citadel tangled with the new
Wolfpack coach holding a 4-1
lead in the matchups. Furman
won the first three meetings from
1978-80, while The Citadel won
in 1981 and the Paladins came
out on top again in 1982.
An Independent Schedule
ECU will face only two teams
on the 1986 season affiliated with
a football-playing conference.
The Pirates open with Atlantic
Coast Conference member N.C.
State and also play Auburn of the
Southeastern Conference. The re-
maining opponents � West
Virginia, Penn State,
Southwestern Louisiana, Tem-
ple, Georgia Southern, South
Carolina, Cincinnati, Southern
Mississippi and Miami (FL) are
all independents.
ECU'S 50 Years of Season
Openers
The Pirates own a 25-24-1
record in season openers in their
50-year history of collegiate foot-
ball. ECU's last season opening
victory came when the Pirates
handed N.C. State a 33-14 defeat
in Raleigh last year.
The 1986 opener with N.C.
State on the road marks the fifth-
straight season the Pirates have
opened the year on the road, and
the sixth time in the last seven
years.
This will mark the fifth time
the Pirates have opened their
season with the Wolfpack. ECU
is 2-3 in those five openers in
Opener
Raleigh.
NCSU has opened its season
six times against the Pirates with
a 3-3 mark.
ECU and the ACC
The Pirates have managed only
a 10-20-1 record against op-
ponents from the Atlantic Coast
Conference in their 50 years of
college football history.
Head Coach Art Baker owned
a career 1-4 record against ACC
competition during his coaching
stints at Furman and The Citadel.
Baker's first year Pirates beat
N.C. State in the season opener
last year to make him 1-0 against
ACC schools while a Pirate head
coach and 2-4 overall.
Since 1981, N.C. State has
been the only ACC member on
ECU's schedule. The last time the
Pirates played more than one
ACC opponent in a season was
1981 when ECU tangled wirh
North Carolina, N.C. State, and
Duke.
ECU vs the ACC:
Duke
North Carolina
N.C. State
Wake Forest
Virginia
TOTALS
Art Baker vs the ACC:
2-2-0
1-6-1
5-11-0
1-1-0
1-0-0
10-20-1
NC State
Wake Forest
Clemson
Georgia Tech
TOTALS
2-0-0
0-2-0
0-1-0
0-1-0
2-0
Go
Pirates!
HELP
WANTED
New Drycleaning
Laundry Matt Facility
HOURS
5-11 p.m. Mon-Fri
1-10 p.m. Sat-Sun
355-2005
nights and weekends
STUDENT STORES
Wright Building
Owned and operated by East Carolina
University
CONGRATULATIONS:
Student Stores announces the winners of the
drawing for 2 bicvcles held Thursday, August
28, 1986 as:
Michael P. Daniel
Chinita Tate
Shown in photo with winners is Manager of
Student Stores, Joseph O. Clark.
� i i
i
i i
COMING ATTRACTIONS
II
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday
September 4-7
Down And Out In
Beverly Hills
8:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
Sponsored by Films Committee
Thursday September 4
Brian Huskey��
8:00 p.m. The Underground
FREE ADMISSION
Sponsored by Coffeehouse Committee
Tuesday September 9
BingoIce Cream
Party
7:00 p.m. Mendenhall Multi-
Purpose Rm
50$ Admission
Sponsored by Recreation Committee
REQUIRED
COURSE
SK
9 zr
-f&thering place
Serving West Greenville
and ECU Campus
� 1201 Charles Blvd
758-6660
Serving East Greenville
� Rivergate Shopping Center
752-6996
� HOURS
11AM- 1AM
11AM-2AM
Sun- Thurs
Fn&Sat
Limited Delivery Areas
Drivers carry less than $20 00
Domino's Pizza Delivers' the
tastiest, most nutritious course'
on your busy schedule We
make great custom-made pizza
and deliver - steamy hot - in
less than 30 minutes! So take a
break from studying and have a
tasty treat
Q4jtf
30
Guarantee
or $3.00
OFF
l
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
Delivery is always FREE I
I
I
I
I
I
I
J
i&
Dommos Pizza will
deliver your order within
30 minutes guaranteed
or your pizza is
$3 00 OFF'
No coupon necessary
DOMINO'S
PIZZA
DELIVERS
lg� ft ��
nmmmmm
mmmmmmmm i i mm






f
20
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTMBER 4. 1986
Continued from page 18


CIRCLE K: Are you a student in
terested in a community service
organization as well as one with an
excellent social life as well? Well,
Circle K is the place for you! We'll
be holding our first meeting of the
semester on Sunday, Sept. 7 in Room
212 of Mendenhall at 7 pm. Be there
and find out what fun really is. If you
have any questions contact Bren at
7562165.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT
ASSOCIATION: International Stu
dent Association would like to
welcome everyone back to school.
We have our first meeting at
Mendenhall Student Center on Fri
day, Sept. 5 at 7 pm, Room 244. Old
members and interested students
are welcome to attend. There will be
a social party with refreshments and
music in the International House
after the meeting. Also, we have a
cookoutwith volleyball on Sat Sept
6 at 3 pm on the Mall (beside the
library) Come and join us.
PNYS ED MAJORS: The physical
education motor and physical fitness
competency test is scheduled for
1:30 pm, Friday, Sept. 12 at Minges
Coliseum. A passing score on this
test is required of all students prior
to declaring physical education as a
major Passing the test consists of:
1) Maintaining an average T-score
of 45 on the six item test battery, 2)
Having a T-score of 45 on the
aerobics run. Any student with a
medical condition that would con
traindicate participation in the
testing should contact Dr. Israel or
Mike McCammon at 757-6497. To be
exempted from any portion of the
test, you must have a physician's ex
cuse. A detailed summary of the test
components is available in the
Human Performance Laboratory
(room 113 Minges Coliseum). Your
physician's excuse must specifically
state which items you are excused
from.
HONOR REVIEW BOARD: Con
gratulations to the new Honor
Review Board members: Jay
Johnson, Lisa Williamson, Paul
Jones, Mike Riley, Anthony Porcelli
Dana Dunlow, Rusty Wiley, Richarc
3ond, Brian Burke, Shari Clemens.
Tim Roberson and Thomas Cherry.
Please plan to attend training ses
sion on Tuesday, Sept. 2nd, at 6 p.m.
Call 757-6611 ext. 218 for details.
STUDENT COUNCIL FOR EXCEP-
TIONAL CHILDREN: Be a special
person and help special children.
Join and support SCEC (Student
Council for Exceptional Children).
First meeting Monday, Sept 8th at 5
in Speight Look for signs for the
room number.
INTERESTED IN BICYCLE RAC-
ING, TOURING ETC?: Come to the
Sept. meeting of the Down East
Cycling Club! Learn about upcom
ing races, training rides and touring
events. Meeting date: Friday, Sept.
5, 6:30 p.m. Meeting Place. Bicycle
Post Shop in Downtown Greenville.
WELCOME BACK AM-
BASSADORS We are looking for-
ward to a great year. Plans have
already begun. Our first general
meeting will be held on Wed Sept. 3
at 5:15 p.m. in room 221 Mendenhall.
VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE: The
Student union Visual Arts Commit-
tee is starting a new year and we are
looking for new members. Anybody
with an interest in Art is encouraged
to join. Last year was exciting but
this year promises to be even better.
If interested call Steven Zakely at
752-8481 or call the Student Union at
757 6611.
DEPT. OF ELEMENTARY AND
MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION:
Announce its class meetings for Fall
Semester, 1986: Seniors, Aug. 27, 5-6,
Speight 129. Juniors, Aug. 28, 5-6,
Speight 129. Sophomores, Sept. 2,
5-6, Speight 129. Freshmen, Sept. 3,
5-6, Speight 129. All elememtary and
middle grades majors are expected
to attend these very important
meetings.
GAMMA BETA PHI: Mandatory
meeting for all old and new
members will be held Thursday,
Sept. 4 at 7 in Biology 103. Semester
dues of S4 will be collected. If unable
to attend, contact Teresa at 752 3255
or Claudia at 757-0769.
PART TIME WORK: National Col
lege Marketing Company seeks in-
dividual or campus group to work
part-time assisting students in ap-
plying for credit cards. Flexible
hours, excellent pay, full training.
Meet students and have FUN. Call
Susie at 1-800-592-2121.
MINORITY ARTS COMMITTEE:
The Minority Arts Committee of the
Student union is now accepting ap-
plications for new members.
Membership is open to students of
all minority groups. All interested
persons should come by the Student
Union Office in Mendenhall or con-
tact Cedric Adderley for an applica-
tion.
PEP RALLY: The 6th Annual
Budweiser Football Pep Rally will
be held tonight (Thurs.) at 7:00 pm
in Fickien Stadium. Admission is
free, and many prizes will be given
away.
PRIME TIME: Prime Time is spon-
sored by Campus Crusade For
Christ and is meeting in a "new
place" this Thurs. in Brewster B-102
al 7:30 pm. This week we are show-
ing a film entitled "The Secret of
Loving Please join us for fun and
fellowship. We look forward to
meeting you.
GSFLT: The Graduate School
Foreign Language Test will be of
fered the first Tuesday in every
month (exceptions-August &
January), during the 1986 87
academic year, at 9:00 am, beginn-
ing on Sept. 2, 1986. This test is of
fered for credit at ECU only. The fee
for this test is $10, payable in the
classroom on the day of the test.
Candidates will need picture ID
(i.e driver's license), No. 2 pencils,
and the proper fee. Application for
this test must be received in the
ECU Testing Center by the last Fri
day of the month prior to the month
that testing is requested.
NON-CREDIT LANGUAGE PRO-
GRAMS: Beginning Conversational
German, Sept. 16 Oct. 16, in
termediate Conversational German,
Oct. 21 Nov. 20, Beginning Hebrew
Sept. 16 Nov. 18; Beginning Conver
sational Japanese, Sept. 2-Nov. II;
Conversational Spanish, Sept.
4 Nov. 6. Contact Continuing Educa
tion, Erwin Hall, 757-6143.
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Positions available for environmen
lal health students in Charlotte and
Richmond with major utilities for
fall and spring semesters. Outstan
ding opportunities to gain ex
perience and earn salary of $i ioo per
month. For more information con
tact Cooperative Education, 313
Rawl Building.
ATTENTION CO-OP STUDENTS:
All students who participated in the
ECU Co-op program last year
(students who applied andor were
placed in jobs) should contact the
Co-op office immediately to update
their files. We need information such
as telephone number, address, and
current work status. We have an ex
panded staff and may be able to pro
vide additional services to you this
year.
MCAT: The Medical College Admis-
sion Test will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday,
Sept. 13, 1986.
Clemson Players Get Off On Rape
PICKENS, S.C. (UPI) a
grand jury decided against indic-
ting two present and two former
Clemson University football
players on rape and kidnapping
charges, and the prosecuting at-
torney says the case is now clos-
ed.
The Pickens County grand jury
returned no bills Tuesday on 12
counts against Clemson tailback
Kenny Flowers, defensive back
A.J. Johnson and former players
Craig Crawford and Duke
Hollomon.
"The criminal justice system
���
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMS: Basic SCUBA cer
tification, Sept. 2-25; Basic Sailing,
Sept. n-27; Sailing and Cruising in
struction Oct. 11 12; The Dance Fac
tory, Sept. 4-Nov. 6; Beginning
Ballet for Adults, Sept. 9-Nov. 11.
Contact Continuing Education, Er-
win Hall, 757-6143.
ECU NAVIGATORS: A new look
and a new night. "Nightlighf" every
Thursday at 7:30 pm. This week
Jarvis Metnodist Chruch downtown.
Next week - Mendenhall Coffee
House. A light night of navigatin'
and socializin' with a great bunch of
friends. It's Christian and in-
terdenominational.
EDUCATION MAJORS: The
Department of Speech Language &
Auditory Pathology (SLAP) will be
conducting the speech and hearing
screening for all students who are
fulfilling requirements for admis-
sion to Upper Division of Teacher
Education. Speech and Hearing
screening will be held Monday, Sept.
8, 5-6:30 pm; Tues Sept. 9, 5-7 pm,
Wed Sept. 10, 5-7 pm. These are the
only screening dates during the fall
semester. The screenings are con
ducted on a first come, first serve
basis. Please do not call for an ap
pointment. The screenings will be
conducted in the Belk Annex (ECU
Speech and Hearing Clinic) located
next to the Belk Building (School of
Allied Health and Social Profes-
sions), near the intersection of
Charles Street and 264 Bypass.
has spoken and the case is over
said 13th-Circuit Solicitor Joe
Watson. "We left no stone un-
turned in this case. We
discovered every bit of evidence
that was discoverable. We
presented it all to the grand jury
and the grand jury spoke
The four athletes were accused
of abducting and raping the
mother of another Clemson
player in June. The case was in-
itially closed when the woman
agreed to drop the charges, but
Watson reopened the investiga-
tion later and decided to take the
case before the grand jury.
The woman told police she as
attacked after getting into a car
with a man June 20 in nearb
Clemson and riding to an apart
ment.
Flowers, touted by Clemson
supporters as a contender for
football's Heisman Trophy, said
he believed justice prevailed
"I'm glad. I'm glad it's over
said Flowers, who gained 1, 00
yards for Clemson during the
1985 football season. "Up until
now it's been rough
ECU
Cheerleaders
�k Cheerleader Tryouts
Girls & Guys
Opportunity For: Travel, Meeting
People, Being Part of ECU Athletics
� All interested people should
meet in Room 142 Minges Colisum
Mon. Sept. 8 at 5:00 p.m.
QUESTION 3.
WHAT EXACTLY IS
AT&T'S "REACH OUT AMERICA
a) A long distance calling plan that lets you make an
hour's worth of calls to any other state in America for
just $10.15 a month.
b) A 90-minute special starring "Up With People
c) A great deal, because the second hour costs even
less.
d) If you'd read the chapter on Manifest Destiny, you'd
know.
e) Too good to pass up, because it lets you save 15 off
AT&T's already discounted evening rates.
If you can guess the answers to this quiz, vou could save on vour
longdistance phone bill, with AT&T'sReach Out America; lonk
distance calling plan.Jf you live off campus, it lets youmake a
full hour's worth of caiTIsToliivofher state in America�
including Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Ricond the J.S
Virgin Islands�for ju$l0.15 amonthT
All you have to do is caTtWeekends,
11pm Friday until 5pm Sunday, and
every night from 11pm to 8am.Save
�T5!Poff our already discounted evening
rates by calling between 5pm and 11pm
Sunday through Friday. The money you
could save will be easy to get used to!
To find more about 'Reach Out America"
or to order the service, caiTtollfree
today at 1 800 CALL ATT,
that is 1 800 225-5288.
1986 AT&T
AT&T
The right choice.
Barnes
B STL ART G A NTT
The 1986 version of the Lad
Pirate volleyball team features a
strong returning nucleus ii
of a winning season and the I
onial Athletic Association I
Head coach Imogene Turner
back for her fourth
with seven letterwinner; " n
season's much improved squad.
Senior Aiyson Barne i
the way in 1986 The 5-1
Lumberton native,
ankle injury last sc
bolster a strong group I
Among those are junior 1
IRS Wei
The weight lifting .
have an organizat
on Thur. Sep: 4 al t
room 105-C Mei
Anyone interested
this club is invitee I
The women's soccei
have its first meet rig
Sept. 4, at 7:30 pn ;
Memorial Gym. A �' �-
ticipants and anyone
joining the club are i:
tend this meeting.
There will be a me
those interested
Rugby. New players or anyo
interested in -he
welcome. The mee" g a
pm on Thurv. Sep- 4
SWIMMING POOLS
Memoi
Mon-Fn �
Mon-Fri Han
Mil s
Mon-Fn 4-pm
Sat-Sun "
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memoi a
Mon-Thurs 11 ai
Fri i! a: (
Sat 11 a
Sun 12 noon-5
Minges
Mon-Thurs
OLTDOOR RECREATION
Mon :
Fri
Sat
-
m�mmm�immm'mi mm n
�M
WWI. UQHimmwiM.inmii �m� mi,pa
A
AFRE
WHI
Reward ourj
ami
or gij
(hir Represent!
tradinol
each bac'J
A
Representati
September
from





ff On Rape
.ase before the grand jury.
The woman told police she was
attacked after getting into a car
Aith a man June 20 in nearby
vlemson and riding to an apart-
ment.
Flowers, touted bv Clemson
upporters as a contender for
ootball's Heisman Trophy, said
bdieved mstice prevailed.
"I'm glad. I'm glad it's over
said Flowers, who gained 1, 00
(yards for Clemson during the
J1985 football season. "Up until
now it's been rough
u
aders
louts
: Travel, Meeting
I ECU Athletics
people should
Minges Colisum
10 p.m.
A"?
!
Barnes Leads Volleyballers
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 4 19 21
By STUART GANTT
ECU S�oru laf ora.do.
The 1986 version of the Lady
Pirate volleyball team features a
strong returning nucleus in search
of a winning season and the Col-
onial Athletic Association title.
Head coach Imogene Turner is
back for her fourth year along
with seven letterwinners from last
season's much improved squad.
Senior Alyson Barnes will lead
the way in 1986. The 5-11
Lumberton native, slowed by an
ankle injury last season, will
bolster a strong group of hitters.
Among those are junior Traci
Smith and sophomore Traci Gall.
Smith, a 6-0 High Point native,
had the highest kill percentage
last season while the 5-11 Gall
had the most total kills. Donna
David, a 5-10 sophomore, is
another talented hitter who saw a
great deal of action last season.
Returning at the important set-
ter position is senior Ann Guida.
The Coraopolis, Pa veteran has
been a mainstay in the middle the
past two seasons. Rounding out
the returnees are Sandra Willis, a
sophomore who performed ad-
mirably in pressure situations last
season; and Stefanie Barber, a
senior from Raleigh.
Six newcomers join the
veterans to complete the 1986
roster. Jemma Holley, a left
handed hitter from Teachey;
Kerry Weisbrod, a setter from
Hillsborough, and Cindy Gale of
Annapolis, Md head the list.
Other newcomers include Cindy
Carden, Michelle Mclntosh, and
Kris McKay.
A balanced attack will be the
strength of this year's more ex-
perienced squad. "We will have a
more disciplined offense said
Turner. "We should be able to
run more set plays this season
The Pirates face a tough
schedule again this year. Six
teams will be in strong pursuit of
the CAA crown with William &.
Mary the favorite. Non-
conference tilts against the likes
of Virginia Tech, Virginia Com-
monwealth, Wake Forest and
Clemson round out a group of
formidable opponents.
"We feel we can do a good job
this season and we're aiming for
the CAA championship said
Turner. "The players are very
optimistic. I think its our turn
this year
IRS Weight Lifting, Soccer, Rugby
The weight lifting club will 102 Memorial Gym. � A team con.iu, rtf f L 5. . .
Come To Sheraton
Football Package
($45.00 plus 4 12 tax)
Package includes overnight lodging in a large
double-bedded room and transportation to and
from the football game.
The weight lifting club will 102 Memorial Gym
have an organizational meeting Rally for the win! The to-
on Thur. Sept. 4 at 6:30 pm in tramural Sports program will
room 105-C Memorial Gym. have their tennis-singles tourna-
Anyone interested in revitalizing ment starting Sept. 15 Divisions
this club is invited to attend. will be Intermediate and Open
The women's soccer club will for both men and women. Swing
have its first meeting on Thur.
Sept. 4, at 7:30 pm in room 105-C
Memorial Gym. All 85-86 par-
ticipants and anyone interested in
joining the club are invited to at-
tend this meeting.
There will be a meeting for all
those interested in playing
Rugby. New players or anyone
interested in the sport are
welcome. The meeting will be at 8
pm on Thurs. Sept. 4, in room
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial
Mon-Fri 7-8 am
Mon-Fri llam-lpm
Minges
Mon-Fri 4.7 pm
Sat-Sun 1-5 pm
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
Mon-Thurs 11 am-7 pm
Fri 11 am-6 pm
Sat 11 am-5 pm
Sun 12noon-5pm
Minges
Mon-Thurs 3-7 pm
OUTDOOR RECREATION
by Memorial Gym, room 105-C
on Mon. Sept. 8 to register.
Registration will run from 11 am
to 7 pm. Go for it!
Strike up some fun with the In-
tramural sports bowling league.
Registration will be held Mon.
Sept. 8 in Memorial Gym room
105-C, from 11 am to 7 pm. The
team captain's meeting is
scheduled for Tues. Sept. 9 in
Brewster, room C-103 at 5:30
EQUIPMENT CHECK-OUT
(MG 115)
Mon-Thurs 11 am-7 pm
Fri 11 am-6 pm
Sat 11 am-5 pm
Sun 12noon-5pm
RACQUETBALL
RESERVATIONS
pm. A team consists of four
players and up to two alternates.
Why not bowl in your spare
time? Season play begins Sept.
18, at 4 pm in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
The excitement of the upcom-
ing Flag Football season is moun-
ting to a climax. Kick Off Day is
Sept. 8. Officials are still needed!
If you have an interest plesae
contact Todd McCulIom at
757-6387 or drop by the In-
tramural Complex in Memorial
Gym, room 104A.
The Department of Intramural
Recreational Services will spon-
sor a Cross Campus Fun Run on
Sat. Oct. 18, Homecoming
weekend. Registration for the
two (2) and four (4) mile run will
be 8 am - 8:30 am the morning of
the race. The run will take place
at 8:45 am. Come run for the
health of it!
IS i
Sheraron-Crabrree inn
Coll for reservations
787-7111
�'s c3v Zz
Mon-Fri
Mon-Fri
ll:30am-3 pm
12 noon- 3 pm
Mon
Fri
Sat
1-5 pm
1-5 pm
11 am-2pm
GYM FREE PLAY
Memorial
Mon-Thurs 11 am-7 pm
Beat The System
NAME BRAND JEANS �
5.95-7.95
Buy 3, Get 4th Free
NAME BRAND SHIRTS �
Polo Type � $2.95
Long Sleeve Polo Type � $4.95 Buy 3
Button Down � 3.95 Get 4th Free
Tee Shirts � 1.49
Name Brand Dresses, Blouses, Etc.
$3.95 up Buy 3 Get 4th Free
Just Arrived Great Selection of LONDON FOG �
and others
$12.95
f��LPrint Fi,m developing
r2:d SiT-
FREE
Af rime of developing
Apples to 110.126.135 ond Dae Color Print Rim
(C-41 Proceu)
Offer Good
September 2-13, 1986 , B
foto express JzJgB
I
YOU'RE
WORTH
GOLD
$35 OFF OR
AFREE$50 NECKLACE
Presents
1st Beach Music Football Party
ECU vs. N.C. State
Daytime Party Nighttime Game
Band of Oz
Showman
Tarns
Doug Clark & Hot Nuts
WHEN YOU BUY 14K GOLD
Reward yourself with a 14K gold ArtCarved ring,
and we'll take $35 off its price
or give you a $50 necklace, free.
Our Representative is on campus with distinguished
traditional and contemporary styles-
each backed by a Full Lifetime Warranty.
IRTQIRVED
CLASS RINGS
Representative will be at the Student Store
September 4th, 5th, 8th, 9th, and 10th
�� from 9:00 a.m4:00 p.m.
I 1986 AffCafved Class Rings
Saturday, September 6,1986
Trinity Road, Raleigh, N.C.
Adjacent to Carter-Finley Stadium
Gates Open at 9:00 A.M.
Coolers Welcome!
Positively No GLASS Containers
At The Gate
$10.00
Advance Tickets
$8.00
Tickets on sale at Reds, United Carolina Bank, Oasis Records
Record Bars Statewide, Don Murray's Barbecue
For Information Call Reds - 828-1250
or John Hightower 846-1092
mmm
m ���
.
ai





22
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SFPTFMBFb 4 1986
Columbia Heads Linderman s Worst
By LARRY LINDERMAN shot at ��� ,h�, � r - ,k. . . . . ��" kJ V V S ij fr
By LARRY LINDERMAN
Feat tone
It's an annual traditionPen-
thouse magazine's list of the "20
Worst College Football Teams"
appears in the October issue, and
will be on sale Sept. 9.
Larry Linderman, America's
leading football forecaster, once
again gives his "list of losers" for
the upcoming 1985-86 season.
Worst Five
At the top of this year's
"roster of the rotten" is Colum-
bia. "Columbia hasn't won a
game since 1983, and has a good
shot at getting shut out for a
third-straight season Columbia
is followed by Kansas State.
"Last season's Wildcats scored
nine points a game an gave up an
average of 27 the University of
Texas at El Paso is next.
"U.T.E.P. is the NCAA's own
Bermuda Triangle � head
coaches disappear and are never
heard from again Nor-
thwestern "Last fall, the 3-8
Wildcats finished last in the Big
Ten, averaging all of 10.1 points
per conference game and
Oregon State "One of these years
the Beavers will have a winning
seasonOf course none of us
will be around to witness it
Fifteen Most Frightening
Linderman continues his list
with Wake Forest, "Wake Forest
attracts more dorks than any
other school in the conference
and Wichita State. "Last fall the
Shockers gave up better than four
touchdowns a game Boston
University is third. "The Terriers
touchdowns a game, while scor-
ing only two themselves and
Tulane, "As predicted here last
year, the Green Wave continues
to make its fans nauseous
The lineup continues with Kent
State � "Given a tougher
schedule this season, Kent State
figures to take it on the chin once
again, but I hope I'm wrong
meat, and then Vanderbilt - against traditional rivals Air
unit for years has used 'Absence
of Malice' as its main training
aid"), East Carolina ("Nothing
could be finer than to play East
Carolina � just ask the school's
opponents"), and Houston ("It's
eminently
facing an improved state of op-
ponents"), and Rice ("Although
I think the Owls will once again
get stuffed this season, their days
as a Southwest Conference door-
mat are coming to a close").
possible for the
Cougars to end up at the bottom Editor's Yore: We chose to print
of the conference this fall"). this article because we've printed
Rounding out the list are it in the past and didn't want to
Rutgers ("Expect the Scarlet omit it because he berated ECU.
Knights to keep sweating and cry-
ing, and, most of all, losing"),
Wyoming ("You're looking at
"In '85 tha rnmmA U6�M nduiuonai nvais Air Wyoming "You're looking at
up an tSTtr EZ �? "� A"ny" V�� �y- �f doming pla'tng
average of four State ("Its
pitty-pat defensive
S�S! lootba,lers Are Serious About Opener
cnvrtL MILL, NC (UPI) � season ODener. r;��,j-i
CHAPEL HILL, NC (UPI) �
Any doubts North Carolina
would treat an opponent like The
Citadel seriously are swept away
by a desire to erase last year's 5-6
record, Tar Heel football players
said Tuesday.
The Citadel has not won a
Southern Conference title since
1961 and is 15-17-1 under fourth-
year coach Tom Moore, in-
cluding last season's 5-5-1 record.
North Carolina went to five
bowls from 1979 to 1983. But Tar
Heels have had little to cheer
since 1984's 5-5-1 record.
"A lot of the North Carolina
players who were on our Gator
Bowl or Peach Bowl teams over
the past few years would have
looked at The Citadel like it was a
warmup game said Tar Heel
safety Danny Burmeister. "But
to this team, it's going to be a real
challenge to see what we can do.
We have a lot to prove
"Some teams like to start off
with a big opponent, and some
like to start with an easy oppo-
nent said offensive guard
Ralph Phifer. "It doesn't matter
to me who we start with. It just
matters that we have an opponent
and we've got a game to play
Sophomore Jonathan Hall will
start at quarterback for the Tar
Heels, said coach Dick Crum.
Tuesday's formal announce-
ment virtually ended any hopes
fans of junior Mark Maye had of
the former Charlotte prep star
getting the nod as a starter in the
season opener
Maye was considered by many
as one of the best quarterbacks in
the nation when he signed with
North Carolina in 1983. But
surgery more than a year ago on a
shoulder problem has sidelined
Maye for most of his
career.
"I don't think (Maye) is ever
going to be fully recovered to the
point he was at before the
shoulder problem developed
Crum said. "The surgery has
changed his throwing motion and
delivery. What he needs to work
on now is honing his skills
Crum said he felt "comfor-
table" with Hall as a starter. The
6-2, 197-pound Hall saw spot ac-
tion in North Carolina's first
seven games last year, then
played the entire second half in a
28-10 loss at Maryland and
started the Tar Heels' final three
games. He completed 38 of 79
passes for 559 yards and four
touchdowns.
"Where Jonathan Hall is im-
proved the most is in his
understanding of the offense
Crum said. "There were a couple
of situations last year he didn't
seem to know what to do. But he
understands now. It's just been a
matter of having that year's ex-
perience
Crum noted The Citadel has a
veteran quarterback in senior Kip
Allen. Allen, 6-5 and 200 pounds,
passed for 2,478 yards and 16
touchdowns last year for The
Citadel.
Tailback, not quarterback,
may prove the inportant position
for North Carolina. Crum said
the Tar Heels may be counted on
to return to a more run-oriented
offense after last year's fling with
college fielding an aerial circus.
North Carolina has seen 17
tailbacks get 1,000 or more yards
in a season but failed to do so last
year. But Crum said senior
William Humes, 1985's top
ground gainer for UNC with just
515 yards "could be as good a
tailback as we've ever had here
Crum said.
"The think I like about
William Humes is that he's a
complete back Crum said.
"He's a devastating blocker; he's
able to block linebackers like he
was an offensive lineman. He's a
very good runner and a good pass
receiver.
"He's not a Kelvin Bryant-type
runner, but all three things
together make him a very good
tailback Crum said.
more like wimps than gunsl-
ingers"). North Carolina State
("The Wolfpack is a cinch to get
skinned all season long"),
Louisville ("The Cardinals figure
to be better this year, but their
record won't be, for they'll be
Oh, by the way, last year Pen-
thouses' Linderman picked Col-
orado in the worst 20 and the
Buffaloes went on to play in the
Freedom Bowl. Personally, we
feel that Penthouse should stick
to what they know most about �
you know, those feature stories
and photo journalistic spreads
about seafood and stuff, and
leave football alone.
NEED MONEY?
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J





22
JTHEEAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 4, 198
Columbia Heads Linderman 's Worvt
B LARRYLINDERMAN shot a, ae,tina shlll ftlll fnr . ,h. �. � L AJ ff JI & I
By LARRY LINDERMAN
RmMmm
It's an annual traditionPen-
thouse magazine's list of the "20
Worst College Football Teams"
appears in the October issue, and
will be on sale Sept. 9.
Larry Linderman, America's
leading football forecaster, once
again gives his "list of losers" for
the upcoming 1985-86 season.
Worst Five
At the top of this year's
"roster of the rotten" is Colum-
bia. "Columbia hasn't won a
game since 1983, and has a good
shot at getting shut out for a
third-straight season Columbia
is followed by Kansas State.
"Last season's Wildcats scored
nine points a game an gave up an
average of 27 the University of
Texas at El Paso is next
"U.T.E.P. is the NCAA's own
Bermuda Triangle � head
coaches disappear and are never
heard from again Nor-
thwestern "Last fall, the 3-8
Wildcats finished last in the Big
Ten, averaging all of 10.1 points
per conference game and
Oregon State "One of these years
the Beavers will have a winning
seasonOf course none of us
will be around to witness it
Fifteen Most Frightening
Linderman continues his list
with Wake Forest, "Wake Forest
attracts more dorks than any
other school in the conference
and Wichita State. "Last fall the
Shockers gave up better than four
touchdowns a game Boston
University is third. "The Terriers
will wind up looking like dog
meat and then Vanderbilt �
"In '85, the Commodores gave
up an average of four
touchdowns a game, while scor-
ing only two themselves and
Tulane, "As predicted here last
year, the Green Wave continues
to make its fans nauseous
The lineup continues with Kent
State � "Given a tougher
schedule this season, Kent State
figures to take it on the chin once
again, but I hope I'm wrong
Navy is next as "The Mid-
shipmen figure to be sitting ducks
against traditional rivals Air
Force and Army New Mexico
State ("Its pitty-pat defensive
IS&S ?����� Are Serious About Opener
CHAPEL HILL, NC (UPI)
Any doubts North Carolina
would treat an opponent like The
Citadel seriously are swept away
by a desire to erase last year's 5-6
record, Tar Heel football players
said Tuesday.
The Citadel has not won a
Southern Conference title since
1961 and is 15-17-1 under fourth-
year coach Tom Moore, in-
cluding last season's 5-5-1 record.
North Carolina went to five
bowls from 1979 to 1983. But Tar
Heels have had little to cheer
since 1984's 5-5-1 record.
"A lot of the North Carolina
players who were on our Gator
Bowl or Peach Bowl teams over
the past few years would have
looked at The Citadel like it was a
warmup game said Tar Heel
safety Danny Burmeister. "But
to this team, it's going to be a real
challenge to see what we can do.
We have a lot to prove
"Some teams like to start off
with a big opponent, and some
like to start with an easy oppo-
nent said offensive guard
Ralph Phifer. "It doesn't matter
to me who we start with. It just
matters that we have an opponent
and we've got a game to play
Sophomore Jonathan Half will
start at quarterback for the Tar
Heels, said coach Dick Crum.
Tuesday's formal announce-
ment virtually ended any hopes
fans of junior Mark Maye had of
the former Charlotte prep star
getting the nod as a starter in the
season opener.
Maye was considered by many
as one of the best quarterbacks in
the nation when he signed with
North Carolina in 1983. But
surgery more than a year ago on a
shoulder problem has sidelined
Citadel.
Tailback, not quarterback,
may prove the inportant position
for North Carolina. Crum said
the Tar Heels may be counted on
to return to a more run-oriented
offense after last year's fling with
Maye for most of his college fielding an aerial circus
career.
"I don't think (Maye) is ever
going to be fully recovered to the
point he was at before the
shoulder problem developed
Crum said. "The surgery has
changed his throwing motion and
delivery. What he needs to work
on now is honing his skills
Crum said he felt "comfor-
table" with Hall as a starter. The
6-2, 197-pound Hall saw spot ac-
tion in North Carolina's first
seven games last year, then
played the entire second half in a
28-10 loss at Maryland and
started the Tar Heels' final three
games. He completed 38 of 79
passes for 559 yards and four
touchdowns.
"Where Jonathan Hall is im-
proved the most is in his
understanding of the offense
Crum said. "There were a couple
of situations last year he didn't
seem to know what to do. But he
understands now. It's just been a
matter of having that year's ex-
perience
Crum noted The Citadel has a
veteran quarterback in senior Kip
Allen. Allen, 6-5 and 200 pounds,
passed for 2,478 yards and 16
touchdowns last year for The
North Carolina has seen 17
tailbacks get 1,000 or more yards
in a season but failed to do so last
year. But Crum said senior
William Humes, 1985's top
ground gainer for UNC with just
515 yards "could be as good a
tailback as we've ever had here
Crum said.
"The think I like about
William Humes is that he's a
complete back Crum said.
"He's a devastating blocker; he's
able to block linebackers like he
was an offensive lineman. He's a
very good runner and a good pass
receiver.
"He's not a Kelvin Bryant-type
runner, but all three things
together make him a very good
tailback Crum said.
unit for years has used 'Absence
of Malice' as its main training
aid"), East Carolina ("Nothing
could be finer than to play East
Carolina � just ask the school's
opponents"), and Houston ("It's
eminently possible for the
Cougars to end up at the bottom
of the conference this fall").
Rounding out the list are
Rutgers ("Expect the Scarlet
Knights to keep sweating and cry-
ing, and, most of all, losing"),
Wyoming ("You're looking at
another year of Wyoming playing
more like wimps than gunsl-
ingers"), North Carolina State
("The Wolfpack is a cinch to get
skinned all season long"),
Louisville ("The Cardinals figure
to be better this year, but their
record won't be, for they'll be
facing an improved state of op-
ponents"), and Rice ("Although
I think the Owls will once again
get stuffed this season, their days
as a Southwest Conference door-
mat are coming to a close").
Editor's ote: We chose to print
this article because we've printed
it in the past and didn't want to
omit it because he berated ECU.
Oh, b the wa, last ear Pen-
thouses' Linderman picked Col-
orado in the worst 20 and the
Buffaloes went on to pla in the
Freedom Bowl. Personal!), we
feel that Penthouse should stick
to what the know most about �
ou know, those feature stories
and photo journalistic spreads
about seafood and stuff, and
leave football alone.
NEED MONEY?
We Pay CASH For:
Sterling Class Rings
Silver Coins Wedding Bands
Any Gold Jewelry
Coin & Ring Man
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5TH STREET IMPORT
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�New Location! Dickinson & Memorial - across
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4500 sq. ft. 757-9434 2204 Dickinson Ave.
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CHAINSAW II � R
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900 '�'
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All Seats $2.00 Everyday Til 5:30 PM
BUCCANEER MOVI
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BILLIES
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STARTS TOMORRn
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sorority sisters
were dead
on their feet.
PICK-UP SPECIAL!
Buy any size pizza, get one of equal value FREE
(NO COUPON NECESSARY)

s-
w4&

T�tV.ORUDS
kDHSfR
I�.ip.BiiH
The 6th Annual Budweiser
FOOTBALL PEP RALLY
Thursday, September 4. 1986
7:00 - 7:45 p.m. � Ficklen Stadium
At 6:30, the Marching Pirates march up College Hill!
Jr.
Not valid with any other coupon or special.
Transit
Authority.
Corner of 14th & Charles Streets, Greenville
Call Us Now! 757-1955
� � � WE ALSO DELIVER! � �
� FREE ADMISSION TO ALL �
MANY PRIZES TO BE GIVEN AWAY
Grand Prize: 19" GE Color Portable TV
Donated by V.A. Merritt &. Sons
In cose of rain, the Pep Rally u,ll he held ,n .V.ngr Coliseum
Budweiser
KING OF BEERS.

� n. ay jitoo �� -�, tiytan

1
i.
w





Title
The East Carolinian, September 4, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 04, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.489
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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