The East Carolinian, August 28, 1986






Qftfe SaHt darnltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.61 No.2
Thursday, August 28, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
18 pages
Circulation 12,000
Center Works On
Updating Records
By DAWN STEWART
Staff Writer
Due to a new immunization
law that went into effect July 1,
the Student Health Service along
with the admissions office, have
upgraded their health forms.
The law requires all new
students, freshman, transfers,
and all students who have broken
their enrollment, or who were not
here spring semester, to show
proof of their childhood im-
munizations. Students taking
both day and night classes are re-
quired to show verification either
by the Health Departments stamp
of approval, a physician's
signature, or North Carolina
High School health records.
"A lot of children did not
receive proper immunization dur-
ing their younger years ex-
plains Kay VanNortwick, Ad-
ministrator of ECU's Student
Health Center. She adds, "This
program is nothing new. We've
always required records. Now
we're just enforcing them
The shots that are being
verified are for Diphtheria,
Tetanus, Pertussis, Polio, and
the Measles.
For students 17 years of age
and younger, 3 DTP or TD shots,
3 polio doses, 1 measles (rubeola)
dose and 1 Rubella dose are re-
quired. The polio dose must have
been given no earlier than their
1st birthday. Students 18-29 years
of age have the same measures
with the exception of no polio
dose. For students 30 years of age
and older only 3 DTP or TD
doses are expected.
Students who have not obtain-
ed proof of immunizations have
30 calendar days from the first
day of classes to do so. The
penalty for failure to comply is
dismissal from school.
There are two exemptions to
this law. One is if a North
Carolina physician certifies that
an immunization required is or
may be detrimental to a person's
health. The other is that if the
legal religious beliefs of an adult
are contrary to the administra-
tion of immunizations.
11
The Student Health
Center has gone out of
its way to aid students
in this process
"The student health center has
gone out of its way to aid
students in this process stresses
VanNortwick. She briefly ex-
plains that upon receipt of admis-
sion, new students were notified
of the new law.
"James McCallum, our direc-
tor of medicine, personally wrote
a letter to new students she
continues.
The health center spent most of
the summer checking each in-
dividual's records. After this pro-
cess was completed, letters to
each student were sent out telling
each person of their deficiences.
At Freshman and Transfer Stu-
dent Orientation, emphasis was
placed upon the importance of
verification.Free shots were of-
fered to everyone who needed
them.
One more chance will be given
to all those who have not showed
their records. The registrar will
send out a letter explaining the
penalty for not complying.
If students are not sure about
records or have any questions,
they may call the Student Health
Center at 757-6841.
Ambassadors
Students Promote ECU
ByCAROLYN DRISCOLL
Assistant News Editor
The ECU Ambassadors are the
official student representatives of
the university whose goal is to
promote ECU, according to Sven
Van Baars, coordinator of the
six -year-old program.
The Ambassadors give daily
tours to prospective students and
help out with receptions at the
chancellor's home. They also
man the phones for the ECU
Telefund in the fall, and welcome
VIP's at the chancellor's box at
home football games.
"Basically said VanBaars,
"we are available to all depart-
ments on campus whenever they
need help. We want to instill an
feeling of pride in ECU
students
Another activity the am-
basadors plan is an "admissions
telethon according to Van
Baars, volunteers place calls to
students who have been accepted
to ECU. "We want them to
come to ECU and we want to
show them that this school really
cares about them he continued.
Brian Burke, who has been an
ECU Ambassador for three
years, stated, "Joining the am-
bassadors allows students a very
broad range of involvement with
the East Carolina community �
the administration and faculty as
well as the student body
There will be a booth set up in
front of the Student Store from
Sept. 8-12 where any in-
terested students can pick up an
applications and schedule an in-
terview, VanBaars said.
He explainedWe are looking
for students with at least a 2.2
GPA, are friendly and have a
love for ECU
This year, students will be
working with the alumni office
through a new committee called
"Students Are Alumni in
Residence" and will be planning
such activities as Senior Informa-
tion Night. "Students are actual-
ly in residency to become
alumni said Van Baars, "so
through this committee we are
hoping to build support for ECU
and its alumni
"The activities of the am-
bassadors are always changing;
we get involved in a lot of dif-
ferent areas, whatever the ad-
ministration and the student
body ask us to do said Burke.
ECU Ambasssador Clay
Deanhardt commentedThis is a
very good way to get to meet a lot
of people, especially those who
are new to ECU, and a lot to the
administrators. I enjoy working
with people and that's what the
ambassadors do most
ON THE INSIDE
Editorials4 'Local art and music by Patrick
Features9 Keough, Lemon Sisters, and
Comics12 Rutabago Brothers � page 9.
Sports13 "Student Comics � new strips
Announcements17 premier.
Classifieds17 �Pirate Quarterback situation
becomes clearer � page 13.
Library Becomes
Fully Automated
I B HUMBERT - THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Heave Ho!
Today is the last day for dorm students to rent refrigerators from
the SGA. Rentals will be held from 1p.m.�5p.m. on the Hill, the
Mall and the Circle. The cost is $35 for one semester, and $45 for
both semesters.
Six- Year Renovation
Nears Completion
By PATTI KEMMIS
News Editor
On Oct. 21, the newly
renovated Wright Auditorium
will hold its first production since
spring of 1985.
The renovation was done in
two phases.
Phase one was started six years
ago. In this phase, basic architec-
tural renovation, such as enlarg-
ing the stage and changing the
balcony, took place.
Phase two was started in the
fall of 1986. Concentration here
was placed on improving accustic
sound and furnishings.
The renovation, which took
place over a six year span, cost an
estimated three million dollars.
The money for the renovation
was appropriated by the state
from taxes. No student fees were
used.
However, the appropriated
money could be used only for
renovations, not furnishings.
The Refrigerator Rental Board
made a donation of18,000.
to be used for furniture in the
lobby and dressing room areas.
John Eagan, SGA treasurer,
stated he thought this was a good
gesture from the students.
"This is a building for the
students said Eagan, "so it
seems good to have something
from the students
According to Rudolph Alex-
ander, associate dean of Univer-
sity Unions, the auditorium will
be used mainly for campus
oriented productions. However,
Alexander did say it would be
available for public use if there
were no conflicting time pro-
blems.
"This will be the most
beautiful hall in the eastern part
of the state said Alexander.
The first production in Wright
will be the opening of this year's
artists series with a group of
young Japaneese violinists. A
gala re-opening will take place
Nov. 16 featuring the com-
bined North Carolina Symphony
and the East Carolina Sym-
phony.
ByCAROLYN DRISCOLL
Assistant News Editor
The Health Science Library has
completed its automation project
which is expected to result in add-
ed benefits to both students and
staff, according to Jo Ann Bell,
the library's director.
One of the main features of the
new system is an on-line card
catalog. Terminals will be located
on different floors of the library,
rather than on the main floor, as
the card catalog is now.
"This will make it easier for
the students to go back and use
the terminal rather than going
back downstairs to look under a
different subject heading, etc
said Bell.
"Something else that will help
out the students is that when they
find a book that they are looking
for on the terminal, it will actual-
ly say on the screen whether or
not the book is available and if it
is checked out.it will give the due
date. This way the student will
not have to go lookng for a book
that is not on the shelf she con-
tinued.
The new terminals will also
provide more subject headings
than the traditional card catalog.
"Hopefuly this will make it
easier for students to find what
they are looking for said Bell.
In addition, the new
automated system will make
checking a book out faster and
easier, both for the students and
the staff, says Bell. Students will
no longer have to fill out call slips
for each book. Instead, books
will be checked out using the bar
on student ID's.
The automation that has taken
place at the Health Science
Library is actually part of a joint
project with Joyner Library here
on campus.
According to Marilyn Miller,
assistant director of Joyner, the
fact that the library is not yet
automated is due to the size of its
collection, which is larger than
the one at the Health Science
Library.
"We're shooting for January
or the early part of next year for
Joyner's automationstated
Ruth M. Katz, the librarv's direc-
tor.
Miller noted that Joyner
Library will be starting out with
six terminals for the public to
use, and emphasized that the ad-
dition of those terminals does not
mean the elimination of the pre-
sent card catalog system.
In addidti c$ Jovner will be
hooked up ,th the Health
Science Librarv svstem, she add-
ed.
According to Bell, the Health
Science Library (which is located
next to Pitt Memorial Hospital)
can probably useful to students
specializing in any of the allied
health fields, home economics,
special education, health and
physical education, as well as
those needing information on
current health issues, such as
AIDS or alcohol abuse.
MacDonald Files
Final Appeal
WASHINGTON (UPI) - Jeffrey
MacDonald, serving life in prison
for the brutal murders of his
pregnant wife and two children,
passed a polygraph test "with fly-
ing colors" to support his claims
of innocence, his lawyers said
Wednesday.
Dennis Eisman said the
polygraph test results, plus what
he claims is new evidence in the
sensational MacDonald case,
should bolster efforts to have the
Supreme Court overturn the
three murder convictions.
An appeal was filed with the
high court in March and Eisman
said the justices may decide
whether to hear the case as early
as Oct. 6. He acknowledged at a
news conference that the appeal
process would be exhausted if the
Supreme Court, which has
reviewed the tangled MacDonald
case before, refused to act.
"My reaction is so what said
Brian Murtaugh, the U.S. at-
torney who prosecuted Mac-
Come Join The Band
J.B. HUMBERT - THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Members of ECU's Marching Band practice for the first football game of the season, on September
4, when the Pirates take on the Wolf pack of NC State.
Donald, "because it is not
evidence. The truth and falsity of
his story was determined bv a
jury
"Legally, there is no
significance whatsoever he
said.
Murtaugh said Eisman an-
nounced the latest test results in
an effort to "manipulate" the
news media and because he is
"opening his shop in
Washington, so he wants to grab
a couple of headlines
MacDonald, 42, was a 26-year-
old Army captain and Green
Beret physician when his preg-
nant wife Colette, 26, and their
two daughters - Kimberly, 5, and
Kristen, 2 - were beaten and stab-
bed to death Feb. 17, 1970. Nine
years later, following an in-
vestigation pushed along by his
late wife's parents, he was con-
victed and sentenced to three life
terms.
His first appeal for a new trial
was denied in 1985.
The case became the subject of
a book. Fatal Vision, which
was made into a TV series.
"We feel that at least the
public should know that he did
get this examination and passed it
with flying colors said Eisman.
"Naturally, this evidence does
not affect what the court's deci-
sion will be, whether or not they
will hear the case
But "in the long run he said,
the polygraph results and new
evidence may convince the parole
board to grant Mac Dona Id's
release when he is first eligible - in
April 1991.
MacDonald claimed four "hip-
pies" broke into the family's
apartment at Fort Bragg, N.C
and attacked them � a story that
recalled the previous year's
murders in Los Angeles by the
Charles Manson "family Mac
Donald's injuries were superficial
except for a lung puncture, which
prosecutors argued could have
been self-inflicted.
The polygraph test was con-
ducted by David Raskin of Salt
Lake City, described by Eisman
as "a leading polygraph expert
He said it was the first, full ex-
amination of MacDonald and
such tests now have a 95 percent
accuracy rate.
See MACDONALD page 3
� ���"v� �
t






THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 28. 19M
Rook Claims Discrimination
Death Row InmateWantsDelay
RA! PIP.U XI r itnn Di.� i. .L - .
RALEIGH, N.C. (UPI)
Lawyers for convicted murderer
John Rook have asked the State
Supreme Court to postpone
Rook's execution, which is
scheduled for September 19th.
Rook has been on Death Row
since his 1980 conviction for the
murder, rape and kidnapping of
a Raleigh nurse.
Last week Wake County
Superior Court Judge Marsh Mc-
Clelland refused to grant a hear-
ing at which a nt w study could be
presented to support defense
arguments. Wednesday, Rook's
attorneys formally filed a petition
asking the state Supreme Court
to review McClelland's order.
Rook's contention that the
death penalty is imposed in a way
that discriminated against males,
poor people, and people accused
of killing whites, was dismissed in
1983 in Wake Superior Court.
Rook's lawyers say their argu-
ment is supported by a new study
of North Carolina murder cases
that was not available in 1983.
In a notion for a stay of execu-
tion filed Tuesday, Rook's
lawyers repeated the issues they
raised last week, in an unsuc-
cessful attempt to obtain a stay in
Superior Court.
The request notes that the U.S.
Supreme Court has agreed to
review two death penalty case
from Florida and Georgia. Those
cases - like Rook's - contend that
the death penalty is imposed in an
arbitrary and unconstitutional
manner.
The Supreme Court's review
"may substantially change the
manner in which John Rook's
claims should be evaluated and
the weight to be given the
evidence introduced in support of
those claims says the motion
for a stay.
Martin Plans To Develop NC
Rural Areas9CreateNew Jobs
The Line Forms Here
IB HLMBE-RT THE EAST t AROI ISIas
RALEIGH, N.C. (UPI) - Gov.
Jim Martin and state Commerce
Secretary Howard Haworth
unveiled Wednesday a
multimillion dollar plan to pro-
mote North Carolina's economy
by developing rural areas and ex-
panding the state's less tradi-
tional industries to create jobs.
"We're not now in a crisis, but
a business cycle can not only go
up, but go down Martin said,
noting North Carolina's com-
paratively low unemployment
rate of 5 percent. "We want to be
prepared
The Commerce Department
and the state Economic Develop-
ment Board studied current
market trends in devising the plan
called "North Carolina's
Blueprint for Economic Develop-
ment The study included
declines in manufacturing and
agricultural iobs, trends in small
business and economic disparity
between urban and rural areas.
Cures to North Carolina's
economic ailments in these areas
involve job training, industry
recruitment, increased rural
development and diversification
of North Carolina industries, the
plan said.
Implementing the blueprint
would cost at least $2.9 million,
including $1 million for adver-
tisig and recruiting new industry,
$350,000 to help increase North
Carolina exports to the Orient,
and about $250,000 for domestic
and international trade missions
by department officials, Haworth
said.
Commerce Department of-
ficials said the Legislature will b
asked to approve funding for the
plan next summer.
"This plan overall is a good
one because it builds on the
strengths North Carolina has
Martin said.
But Haworth said Norm
Carolina must recruit business in
fields other than textiles and
agriculture. He noted that 80 per-
cent of the gross national product
is derived from service industries.
"If you're going to play in the
ballfield, where three-fourths are
not (manufacturing) industries,
you have to have a strategy to do
it he said.
Students have been waiting in long lines all week at Mendenhali to get their on-campus parking deeals
and to pay parking fines. Today is the last day this will be held in Mendenhali, from 8:30 a m to
T;r h P!ln IO fegiSter y�Ur Car' make sure you nave VOur ECL ID or schedule and vour vehicle
registration with you.
Businesses Examine Abuse
CHAPEL HILL (UPI) -
American businesses and other
groups must examine the nation's
drug problems before rushing in-
to plans to test workers for drug
Life Sentence Appealed
DURHAM, N.C. (UPI) - David
Mancuso's defense attorney
Wednesday filed an appeal seek-
ing to overturn his client's con-
viction and life sentence for the
January murder of classmate
Norma Russell.
In a motion filed in Durham
County Superior Court, attorney
Thomas Manning asked Judge
Robert Hobgood to commit
Mancuso to Butner Psychiatric
Hospital for treatment, pending
the outcome of the appeal.
Manning also asked Hobgood
to overturn the second-degree
murder conviction and life
sentence imposed Aug. 1. Instead
Manning requested a 14-year
sentence for Mancuso. Mancuso,
18, was being held under a suicide
watch on the psychiatric unit at
the Central Prison in Raleigh,
Manning said.
In a tape played to jurors,
Mancuso admitted to "willfully
and joyfully" gunning down
Russell, a 17-year-old
cheerleader, because she spurned
his affections.
abusewo University of North
Carolina scientists said Wednes-
day.
Drs. Arthur McBay and Page
Hudson said alcohol is the top
cause of lost productivity in in-
dustry, but few businesses have
shown interest in testing workers
for alcohol abuse even though the
tests are accurate and inexpen-
sive.
"In our opinion, alcohol has a
greater adverse effect on health,
safety and performance than all
of the other drugs conbined
McBay and Hudson said in a
statement. "Adequate personnel,
procedures and instruments are
available for testing for alcohol,
and the results can be satisfac-
torily interpreted. This is not true
for the widespread testing of
urine for other drugs that is being
attempted at the present time
McBay is head toxicologist in
the state Office of the Chief
Medical Examiner and professor
of pharmacy and pathology,
while Hudson is the chief medical
examiner and professor of
pathology.
A 1984 report by the Research
Triangle Institue claimed drug
abuse cost the nation $33.3
billion in lost productivity in
1983, but the doctors said a close
reading of the report does not
support the cost effectiveness of
testing in the workplace for any
drug except alcohol.
Between 1970 and 1985, there
were 1,600 deaths in North
Carolina directly attributable to
alcohol poisoning and about
45,000 deaths indirectly at-
tributable to alcohol in
automobile and other accidents,
the doctors said.
See ABUSE page 3
WELCOME
BACK
We're glad you're back. And we hope you'll
come check out our new look.
That's right. WENDY'S on Tenth Street has
been remodeled so we can serve you better.
Remember, you also can visit us on Greenville
Boulevard or Memorial Drive. Enjoy our delicious
hamburgers, garden fresh salads, hot stuffed
baked potatoes, Crispy Chicken Nuggets, chili or
a Frosty.
So, come see us, and Welcome Back!
502 E. Tenth St
103 Greenville Blvd.
624 S. Memorial Dr.
Open 'til Midnight
Friday and Saturday
11 p.m. Sunday-Thurs.
New Si
Sex Hai
(CPS) � Almost a third
nation's women grad
students sa thee gotten
son of unwanted sexual advi
from a professor, and man)
them were punished academJ
for not reciprocating, a nati
University of Missouri sun.
grad students has found.
The survey, published in
new issue of Glamour magj
also found one in six of
female psychology grad stt
surveyed had had �.ex with a
fessor during the last year
Of the student who had
with professors, 28 percent
they felt coerced into the relatj
ship, Missouri psycholo
Joseph Thorpe and revear;
Robert Glasser report.
And of 31 percent of
women who said they'd been
uaJIy harassed by a prof�
while in grad school, 45 per
told the Missoun researches :1
were punished academicalh
refusing to submit.
The study is consistant
other recent reports abou
harassment on campus
Four of every ten female i
students at Harvard xaid
1985 student survey p:
had made sexual advarti
toward them A 1984 Indi
University survey warned
one of every four female collt
students can expect to be sexui,
harassed before they graduate.
This school year, "over
million female students" will si
fer some form of unwantl
"leering, sexual comments,
plied threats, patting or touchn
and'or propositions" from pi
fessors, says Bernice Sandier
the Association of American c
leges.
Religious
WAKE FOREST, N.C. iLPJ
The growing clash between f
damentalists and moderate-
the Southern Baptist Convent
has clouded the opening of
36th academic year
Southeastern Baptist Theologi
Seminary.
Fundamentalist leaders in
14.4 million member SBC insi
that the Bible is inerrant - withoj
error even in matters of scien
and history.
They oppose the ordination
women, criticize Southeastern
w
12
Christiai
ECU outreach
Campus
� Great Christian Progr
� Great Christian Musi
Coll today for your tr�
Ife.
Thursd:
TACOI
Two &
for o
60 oz. Pi
Offer Good Frj
Not Valid
ALLD,
32 oz. Bucket of I
215 E. Fowtk Stntt





Here
HIMBIK! TH1 I S1 RiMINlAN
all to get their onampus parking decals
held in Mendenhall. from 8:30 a.m. to
ir Kl II) cir schedule and our vehicle
ne Abuse
NLBa is head toxicologist in
ite Office of the Chief
Medical Examiner and professor
pharmacy and pathology,
le Hudson is the chief medical
miner and professor of
patholog)
A 1984 report b the Research
igle Instnue claimed drug
si the nation $33.3
on in lost productivity in
�. hut the doctors said a close
reading of the report does not
ipp � the cost effectiveness of
- in the workplace for any
drug except alcohol.
Between 1970 and 1985, there
were 1,600 deaths in North
Carolina directly attributable to
alcohol poisoning and about
45,000 deaths indirectly at-
tributable to alcohol in
automobile and other accidents,
the doctors said.
See ABUSE page 3
nel,
I . are
Dohol,
tisfac-
true
I of
ie
I
v
n 'til Midnight
y and Saturday
Sunday-Thurs.
New Survey Shows Female
Sex Harassment On Campus
-�l�ASL�OUWAN AUGUST 28. �
(CPS) � Almost a third of the
nation's women graduate
students say they've gotten some
sort of unwanted sexual advance
from a professor, and many of
them were punished academically
for not reciprocating, a national
University of Missouri survey of
grad students has found.
The survey, published in the
new issue of Glamour magazine
also found one in six of the
female psychology grad students
surveyed had had sex with a pro-
fessor during the last year.
Of the students who had sex
with professors, 28 percent said
they felt coerced into the relation-
ship, Missouri psychologist
Joseph Thorpe and researcher
Robert Glasser report.
And of 31 percent of the
women who said they'd been sex-
ually harassed by a professor
while in grad school, 45 percent
told the Missouri researchers they
were punished academically for
refusing to submit.
The study is consistent with
other recent reports about sexual
harassment on campus.
Four of every ten female grad
students at Harvard said in a
1985 student survey professors
had made sexual advances
toward them. A 1984 Indiana
University survey warned that
one of every four female college
students can expect to be sexually
harassed before they graduate.
This school year, "over one
million female students" will suf-
fer some form of unwanted
"leering, sexual comments, im-
plied threats, patting or touching,
andor propositions" from pro-
fessors, says Bernice Sandier of
the Association of American Col-
leges.
"It's an absolutely illegal use
of authority adds K.C. Wagner
of the Working Women's In-
stitute in New York. "Tradi-
tionally, men have used sex as a
means of power. Traditionally,
men are the professors and chairs
of departments. Traditionally,
men are on dissertation boards
Before 1980, however, few
campuses had any programs set
up to help harassed students.
Now "some colleges have
rather good programs, pro-
cedures and training (for the
staff) says Sandier, citing Har-
vard for banning in 1985
"amorous relationships" bet-
ween professors and students
"over which heshe has profes-
sional responsibility
But when schools have no
grievance procedures, students
sometimes have to resort to
unusual appeals.
A group of female New York
University students, working as
nude models for a life drawing
class, were embarassed and
humiliated to see a male pro-
fessor taking photos of them
from the back of the room.
The professor then allegedly
used the photos to try to
blackmail the students.
Scared of reprisals, the models
decided there was safety in
numbers, and complained en
masse to a visiting art teacher,
who in turn put them in touch
with WWI. WWI eventually got
the women an attorney.
Sandier thinks it can all be
avoided if schools "make
policies" for handling both com-
plaints and offending professors.
"Spell out what the parameters
(of acceptable behavior) will be
Wagner adds.
Religious Clash Grows
WAKE FOREST, N.C. (UPI) -
The growing clash between fun-
damentalists and moderates in
the Southern Baptist Convention
has clouded the opening of the
36th academic year at
Southeastern Baptist Theological
Seminary.
Fundamentalist leaders in the
14.4 million member SBC insist
that the Bible is inerrant - without
error even in matters of science
and history.
They oppose the ordination of
women, criticize Southeastern as
a bastion of liberalism and have
suggested making all denomina-
tional employees sign statements
attesting to a belief in inerrancy.
Some students said they are
concerned about the upcoming
school year and the future of the
denomination.
"The convention we have now
is not the convention I grew up
in said student body President
Larry Hovis. "I really have to
think about my future as a pastor
I don't want to be this new
kind of Baptist that they seem to
be pushing
WGHB
1250 am
Christian Radio for
ECU
ECU outreach Saturday 1 p.m. with
Campus Ministry news
� Great Christian Programs
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Coll today for your free WGHB Program Guide 753-4122
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But the problem may be harder
to solve than that, adds Dr
Frank Saal of Kansas State
University.
Saal's ongoing study of sexual
harassment suggests the
harasser's first mistake is to
misinterpret his or her victim's
behavior as inviting a sexual ad-
vance.
Men, he's found, "have a
tendency to ascribe higher levels
of sexuality to people's behavior
than females do
Saal pre- ?d his point by mat-
ching 49 male freshmen and 49
female freshmen, ostensibly to
discuss what their first week at
KSU had been like.
Observers and participants
alike led Saal to conclude most of
the men thought their female
partner was "flirtatious and
seductive while the women
thought of themselves as "friend-
ly
On the other hand, Saal wor-
ries women, reading about how
often sexual harassment occurs
on the nation's campuses, will
become so paranoid that every
friendly gesture by a man will be
considered "harassment
He agrees with Sandier and
Wagner that programs, pro-
cedures and education are needed
to define, avoid and treat harass-
ment.
acDonald
leads His
Innocence
Continued from page 1
The results of polygraphs,
popularly known as "lie detec-
tors generally have not been
admitted as evidence in U.S.
courts, although they are allowed
in some instances. I
MacDonald, who is being held
in Phoenix, Ariz denied during
a two-hour examination that he
had any role in killing his family
or arranging to have them
murdered, Raskin said.
"Friends of Dr. MacDonald"
paid for the test, said Raskin
who fee includes $1,500 a day
?lus air fare.
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�te Eafit (Earnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender. a� va
Daniel Maurer, �,��� mm
PATTI KEMMIS, Mm e,o, STEVE FOLMAR, Dtamr � Mmu,
Scott Cooper. ,� �� Anthony Martin, mmm Manottr
John Shannon, mm. h meg Needham. oom. -r. uj
DeChanile Johnson. � o.�v Shannon Short
Producing Manager
August 28, 1986
OPINION
Page 4
Scruples
Where Do You Keep Vours?
Scruples. Have you ever
wondered about them? Probably
not, you're a college student. You
have more important things to
worry about, like how to swindle
the Dominos man, or (if your under
age) how to drink without getting
caught.
Stop a minute and think about it.
Are the scruples you exercise at
school the same you use on the
home front?
Hell no!
Would you hang out your
bedroom window at home yelling at
the passing women while rating
their shapely figures with olympic-
style score cards? Probably not.
Would you attempt the world's
beer bong consumption record with
your parents looking on? Hardly
likely.
How about those frank sexual
discussions with your friends. You
know, the ones that go like this:
"Yeah we (censored). Then I (even
more censored). And I have pic-
tures, too Would you attempt
such a conversation with good ol'
Mom an' Dad? Not unless you have
a death wish.
So what happens to our scruples
when we leave the nest? I have a
theory. You see, I believe college
box. Quickly, you slip into your
scruples, only to find they don't fit
like they used to.
For instance, when Dad proudly
pats you on the back and hands you
a Bud, instead of saying thank you,
you find yourself reaching for the
beer bong.
And how about this scenario?
You sit down for a heart warming
talk with Mom. Much to your sur-
prise, you find your vocabulary has
deteriorated and you must struggle
to refrain from punctuating your
sentences with vulgarities.
You know your behavior has
slipped from bad to worse when
your parents say something about
it, and they undoubtedly will.
Your Dad might say something
like, "your mother and I worked
hard to give you those scruples. The without appearing to do so
least you could do is wear them at
the dinner table
A little far fetched, perhaps?
Perhaps, but not far from the
truth. No matter what it is, there
will be a difference between the way
you act at home and the way you
carry on at school, and that dif-
ference will be signifigant.
I'm not here to tout the scruples
of our parents and their generation.
Celibacy and sobriety are not my
Defending Star Wars
Critics Try To Stall SDI Research
Professor Robert Jastrow, the
renowned astrophysicist who teaches at
Dartmouth but lectures to a universal
audience in his enthusiasm for the
possibilities of a strategic defense
system, writes now that the opponents
of Mr. Reagan's space shield are adop-
time needed to build and deploy � and
we are well into the next century. Con-
gressmen call that: 'Research forever
and deploy never
Jastrow adds a widely neglected point.
It is that regulations of the Department
of Defense "forbid initiating a program
it.
On The Right
By WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY
students store their scruples in an favorite past-times. In fact, in the
old shoe box and hide them away in past I rather enjoyed hanging from
the back of their bedroom closets.
Don't laugh, I'm serious.
Think about what it's like to
return home after just two months
at school. You get home and right
away you rush to your bedroom
and reach for your hidden shoe
my dormroom window and
shouting at the pretty women.
What bothers me about it is this:
which set of scruples would we
want our sons or daughters to
have?
I wonder.
AJ LL NOT &N6P16E iN
Pa- '(cs:
NIC ijA �

I
gCM
AUENl
ting tactics designed to kill the program which, when brought to fruition, would
violate an arms-control treaty. A Five-
year extension would mean not only that
we could not deploy for five more years
but that we couldn't get any closer to
deployment for five years
Presumably, the regulations of our
own Department of Defense could be
altered by executive fiat, but one can
hear the hue and cry that would bring
on.
The utterly bewildering failure of the
Reagan administration to sweep that
preposterous cobweb (the ABM treaty)
out of the way hinders us at every turn.
It encourages a heavy fog that obscures
the penetration of our objective, which
is to make free people secure.
Consider the matter of the SDI's
budget. The administration asked for
$4.8 billion, the congressional commit-
tees came up with $3.4 billion and $3.6
billion. So what does it matter if we slow
down a little bit, given that we're talking
about something way off there in the
late '90s?
The Department of Defense had
scheduled for the near future the test of
an airplane called the AOA. Think of it
as a super-complicated AWAC. Its mis-
sion? To detect an enemy warhead,
calculate its trajectory, and send that in-
formation to our land-based smart
bullet.
"It fires a beam of fast-moving
atomic particles at the oncoming
warhead. The beam goes clean through
the warhead, scrambling its electronics
so that the nuclear weapon inside it can-
not explode. Progress is so rapid that the
SDI team plans to test a neutral-particle
beam in space in 1990
Now, the AOA would be the heart of
the defense system of Europe, designed
as it is to intercept Soviet tactical
missiles. European technology is not up
to launching an AOA. Either we do it or
it does not get done. "Putting a ceiling
of $3.4 (billion) to $3.6 billion on the
SDI budget is a way of seeming to vote
for the program while actually killing
Their principal weapon is to stress the
years and years that lie ahead of us
before deployment is even thinkable. If
we announced a program to land a man
on Mars by the year 2012, the tactical
appeal of husbandry can be pleaded to
postpone that to the year 2015 without
greatly upsetting anybody.
It is a version of this kind of thing that
is going on, and Professor Jastrow
perceives the extraordinary subtlety of
it.
Consider the basic question of the
ABM treaty. As previously discussed in
this space, there are two understandings
of its bearing on our Star Wars research.
The so-called restrictive version
(adopted by the United States, not-
withstanding a ruling by the legal
counsel of the State Department that the
permissive version is the correct legal
reading of the treaty's provisions) pro-
hibits certain kinds of testing, and, of
course, deployment.
Well then, crafty opponents of SDI
look up at you with wide-eyed in-
nocence, since deployment of the system
is at least five years away � more pro-
bably 15 years away � and since testing
at the critical phase is years away, why
not just go ahead and reaffirm the ABM
treaty for another five years? That way
we make some points with the Soviet
Union and with world opinion, and
delay our program not at all.
"A five-year extension of the ABM
treaty writes Professor Jastrow,
"would stop SDI cold. In 1992, the SDI
team would still be several years away
from the results needed to make a deci-
sion on deployment.
Add five to 10 years to that � for the
They talk of the need to curb spen-
ding, to cut defense 50 cents, non-
defense 50 cents in pursuit of lower
budget deficits. But defense, which used
to eat up 50 percent of the budget back
in the 1950s and 1960s, now takes up 27
percent.
In plain dollars (i.e not accounting
for inflation), defense spending has risen
425 percent in the last 25 years; non-
defense spending, 1,473 percent.
No, it isn't fear of a misspent dollar.
It is that asphyxiating fear of a
technological breakthrough that would
concentrate the human brain on how to
frustrate nuclear destruction. Strange,
and increasingly strange that Mr!
Reagan should be so acquiescent in these
maneuvers.
Campus Spectrum
Rules
In addition to the "Campus
Forum" section of the Editorial
Page, The East Carolinian has re-
established the "Campus Spectrum
This is an opinion column featuring
guest writers from the student body
and faculty. The columns printed in
the "Campus Spectrum" will contain
current topics of concern to the cam-
pus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of
grammer and decency. Persons sub-
mitting columns must be willing to
accept "by-line" credit for their ef-
forts, as no entrys from ghost writers
will be published.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information may
contact Daniel Maurer, managing
editor of The East Carolinian at
757-6366, or stop by our offices on
the second floor of the Publicarons
Building.
Wanted
Editorial Columnists
Call 757366
The Marijuana Business Reaches Middle Age
By JAMES K. GLASSMAN
The New Metallic
"Dear Ed writes a troubled reader, Mr. K.F.
"A few months ago I planted a couple of Thai
seeds indoors and had some bushy four-foot plants
growing. In your March issue a reader asked about
a 5 percent bleach solution added to water to kill
nasty insects. My plants had bugs eating away at the
leaves, so I tried your advice. Unfortunately, the
solution wilted the entire plants. What happened?"
Ed replies: "A 5 percent bleach solution is used
as a disinfectant for rooms and equipment only. It
should not be used on plants because it will loll
them, as you experienced
This exchange between Mr. K.F. and Ed Rosen-
thai, the Ann Landers of the marijuana world, is
found in the July issue of High Times magazine, a
thriving 12-year-old publication for druggies.
The correspondence gives you an idea of what's
happened to the marijuana business over the past
four or five years. It's reached middle age � literal-
ly gone to seed.
It's a fascinating case of an illegal business that
operates under the same market rules as a legal one,
adapting to ebbs and flows in demand and supply as
well as to powerful forces of psychology, sociology
and plain old taste.
Marijuana is no longer a symbol of rebellion or
creativity. Andrew Weil argues in his 1972 book,
The Natural Mind, that marijuana is not a par-
ticularly potent drug.
Instead, "the influence of set (that is, frame of
mind) and setting dwarfs the influence of the drug
itself And set and setting are largely social
phenomena; they've changed drastically during the
Age of Reagan.
Yupdom wants more than a buzz or a sedation or
a heightened peanut-butter taste. It's practical. It
wants to perform, either by being wired on cocaine
or by being clearheaded and natural.
Tastes have changed, but marijuana has survived
� partly by becoming more blue collar, partly by
adopting a odd agrarian mystique. High Times was
once filled with articles on drug culture. Today it's
obsessed with botany.
Pages that once carried ads for roach clips,
flavored rolling papers and hookahs now carry ads
for powerful indoor "grow lamps kits to detect
the sex of cannabis plants and traps to stop rabbits
from eating your young sprouts.
While cocaine makes the cover of Newsweek
every other week (alternating with AIDS), mari-
juana has reached a kind of low-profile stasis.
It's still America's best-selling drug, but the latest
estimate of the Drug Enforcement Agency claims
that consumption has dropped from around 9,700
metric tons in 1981 to around 8,500 in 1984. Use on
college campuses is down, and prices have leveled
off.
Now, coke is king � for consumers, for
criminals and for the law. High Times itself does
not glorify cocaine: "The coke lifestyle, it's pretty
disgusting says Steven Hager, executive editor.
The marijuana economic chain is dominated by
small domestic growers, who make an average pro-
fit of $22,500 a year, according to an admittedly
dubious survey.
The big-time smugglers are still around, with
their Colombian connection, but the smart money
is now in cocaine.
Over the past 10 years, marijuana has gone from
a strictly imported product to a major domestic cot-
tage industry. Small farmers grow it � often on
public lands (the idea being that if they're caught,
the feds can't confiscate the fields).
The National Organization for the Reform of
Marijuana Laws makes the outlandish claim �
blithely repeated by much of the press � that mari-
juana is now "the most valuable cash crop in the
United States worth $18.6 billion in 1985.
That figure is probably eight or nine times too
high. The best guess is that the wholesale value of
the crop is $2 billion to $2.5 billion � still a lot,
considering the tobacco crop last year was worth
$2.7 billion.
With the DEA and the Coast Guard becoming
more vigilant, smuggling has become harder, and
exporters figure that it's easier to get $1 million
worth of cocaine (wholesale) into this country than
$1 million worth of marijuana. The cocaine weighs
90 pounds; the marijuana, nearly a ton.
So, in the early 1980s, the most important source
of new marijuana in this country became this coun-
try itself. Marijuana is one industry where balance
of payments is improving.
The DEA estimates that 12 percent of the mari-
juana consumed in the United States is grown
domestically. NORML puts the figure at 50 per-
cent. Twenty-five to 30 percent seems about right.
Growing � more than smoking � has become
the object of fanaticism, the new focus of the mari-
juana culture. Marijuana farmers primp their prize
plants as though they were blue-ribbon Iowa hogs.
They hold contests.
The "Ask Ed" column in High Times has a
"Plant of the Month" and "Garden of the Month"
feature. Readers send in pictures of what they've
grown.
But the main reason that marijuana still sells is
the advent of sinsemilla, which means "seedless
High Times reports in its "Trans-High Market
Quotations" section that in Charlotte, N.C an
ounce of the best "Carolina kickass potent buds"
(sinsemilla) is going for $180 to $190.
As a result, says a survey in Sinsemilla Tip
(which describes itself as "the technical trade jour
nal of the domestic marijuana industry"), "18 per-
cent of the growers said they are now armed when
tending their gardens (and) 19 percent said thev
booby-trap their gardens
The glory seems to go to the marketers. Warner
describes one: "The labels were his own design, a
wide green indica leaf against an outline of the
lower 48 states with a title, Cannabis Americana,
running underneath.
Under this logo ran a couple of paragraphs telling
his customers how great American agriculture was,
why they should only smoke American sinsemilla,
and so on Obviously, this entrepreneur keeps up
with the las test trends, a follower of Miller's Made
the American Way.
A wards Pre
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Research
The talk of the need to curb spen-
, to cut defense 50 cents, non-
et er.se 50 cents in pursuit of lower
udget deficits. Bui defense, which used
: x eat up 50 percent of the budget back
i the 1950s and 1960s, now takes up 27
ercent.
In plain dollars (i.e not accounting
inflation), defense spending has risen
425 re-cent in the last 25 years; non-
r, efense pending, 1,473 percent.
No, it isn't fear of a misspent dollar.
is that asphyxiating fear of a
technological breakthrough that would
oncentrate the human brain on how to
rrustrate nuclear destruction. Strange,
and increasingly strange that Mr.
Reagan should be so acquiescent in these
maneuvers.
r
Campus Spectrum
Rules
! In addition to the "Campus
Forum" section of the Editorial
Page, The East Carolinian has re-
established the "Campus Spectrum
is an opinion column featuring
guest writers from the student body
and faculty. The columns printed in
the "Campus Spectrum" will contain
current topics of concern to the cam-
pus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of
grammer and decency. Persons sub-
mitting columns must be willing to
accept "by-line" credit for their ef-
forts, as no entrys from ghost writers
will be published.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information may
contact Daniel Maurer, managing
editor of The East Carolinian at
"5-6366, or stop by our offices on
the second floor of the Publications
Building.
Wanted
Editorial Columnists
Call 757-6366
die Age
more than smoking � has become
of fanaticism, the new focus of the mari-
ire. Marijuana farmers primp their prize
hough they were blue-ribbon Iowa hogs.
i contests.
sk Ed" column in High Times has a
the Month" and "Garden of the Month"
leaders send in pictures of what they've
I main reason that marijuana still sells is
of sinsemilla, which means "seedless
nes reports in its "Trans-High Market
section that in Charlotte, N.C an
he best "Carolina kickass potent buds"
) is going for $180 to $190.
kult, says a survey in Sinsemilla Tips
cribes itself as "the technical trade jour-
iomestic marijuana industry"), "18 per-
growers said they are now armed when
nr gardens (and) 19 percent said they
their gardens
y seems to go to the marketers. Warner
(ne: "The labels were his own design, a
J� indica leaf against an outline of the
Itates with a title, Cannabis Americana,
derneath.
Its logo ran a couple of paragraphs telling
lers how great American agriculture was,
Ihould only smoke American sinsemilla,
I" Obviously, this entrepreneur keeps up
ptest trends, a follower of Miller's Made
in Way.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 2. 1986
(
ft
A wards Presented
Alumni Presents Teaching Awards
ie political
of
the
the
and
Kl MHS11 RIM
The East Carolina University
lumni Association presented its
annual Alumni Teaching Ex-
cellence awards to Vicki L.
Berger, a chairperson in the
School of Home Economics, and
Herbert R. Carlton, a eteran
28 ears on tht
science faculty.
lames A. Hicks
eensboro, president of
Mumni Association, said
ecipients are "known
espected for their dedication to
ducaton and then excellence in
assroom teaching Hicks
ade the award presentations at
i annual fall faculty convoca-
ion which opened the
iversity's 77th academic year.
Berger, assistant professor and
' airperson of the Department of
thing and Housing, School of
lome Economics, receied the
ben dnd I ina Worthington
Mays award, established by a
ireensboro couple who are 1951
aduates of ECU.
C arlton, associate professor ol
political science and director of
ndergraduate studies in .he
lepartment, received the Robert
t R o d d Jones award
blished in honor of a former
chairman of the ECU Board of
Trustees.
Recipients of the Mays and
Jones awards are selected from
the faculty through a process
established by the Teaching Ef-
fectiveness committee of the
Faculty Senate which includes
nominations, peer evaluation,
student survey data and scholarly
achievement.
Berger, a native of Fort Worth.
Tex joined the ECU faculty in
1982. She has the bachelor's and
master's degrees from the
University of Arizona and the
PhD from Florida State Universi-
ty. She had taught previously at
the University of Arizona, the
Univerity of Oklahoma and at
Tallahassee Community College
in Florida.
Carlton, a native of Rich-
mond, Va is a graduate of ECU
and also studied at the University
of Richmond and at the Universi-
ty of North Carolina. He joined
the political science faculty in
about Herb Carlton is that he man of political science. "He is
handles all of the advising for papa right now to about 200
undergraduate declared majors students
said Dr. Maurice Simon, chair-
PIRATE
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Greenville Square �Greenville � 756-5!
1958 and
American
is a specialist in
politics, national
security policy, foreign policy
and international relations.
"One of the amazing things
Abuse Examined
Continued from page 2
During the same time span,
re were 108 deaths from
aspirin, 56 from cocaine, five
from gasoline and none from
irijuana, the said.
"A study of 600 operators kill-
ed in single vehicle crashes in
North Carolina provides further
cadence that by far the most
lificant and most often im-
pairing drug is alcohol McBay
and Hudson said.
While evidence of marijuana
use was found in 8 percent of the
ictims, alcohol vas found in 87
percent of them, the doctors
reported.
Get the
word out
in the
Announcements
in The East CarolJnJM
Welcome
Back
Students
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TjjEjASTCARQLiNlAN AUGUST 28, 1986
v

t
Delegates Voice Opinions
BOULDER. CO (CPS) -
1 iberalism apparently made
something of a comeback at the
recent national convention here
01 the U.S. Student Association
(USSA).
The 250 delegates - themselves
student government leaders from
some 100 campuses around the
country - endorsed a wide array
ol "progressive" platform posi-
tions, and unanimously reelected
officers who in the last year
leered USSA away from its
studiedly moderate course of the
early eighties.
"The pendulum is swinging
toward a more progressive base
Tom Swan, USSA's newly
reelected president, says.
Swan doesn't call the
delegates1 mood "liberal"
because liberalism is "dead on
campus. It's associated with the
old Democratic party
But by anv name, the delegates
.tpproved 0-some pages of
resolutions favoring the Califor-
nia grape boycott and condemn-
ing the arms race, U.S. policy
toward South Africa, William
Rehnquist's nomination as chief
justice and, with a bow toward
the diminishing numbers of con-
servative delegates, communism.
I SSA began a nghtward shift
n 1980, in part to deflect a
hallenge from the now-defunct
merican Student Association
SA) - which marketed itself as
conservative alternative to
ss- although it rarely lobbied
n s ongress and in part because
� ember schools demanded it.
I this ear, USSA - which
on students' behalf in
Washington, D.C. and is pro-
bably the biggest student group in
the country - carefully avoided
taking vehement stands on
"nonstudent issues" like abor-
tion, labor relations or military
registration.
Sticking to overtly collegiate
issues like financial aid, USSA
gradually rebuilt its membership
and outlasted the ASA, which
was troubled by internal scandal
almost since its inception.
At the 1986 meeting, however,
there were few avowed conser-
vatives.
Southern Cal's delegates did
walk out of a "pro choice"
speech by Gave Williams of the
National Congress of Black
Political Women.
But the USC delegates, said Il-
linois delegate Peg Phillips disap-
provingly, "wore suits and ties
everywhere they went
Conservative delegates, added
Iowa State senior Carolyn Bugh
before the votes on
"nonstudent" issues, "will be
listened to, but won't get much
passed
Reelected Vice President
Cecelia Ham contends "USSA
didn't change. The people in it
changed. It's more progressive,
social views now
The delegates, of course, are
themselves student politicians
who are much more sensitive to
such "social" issues than other
students.
And there is evidence they are
out-of-step with the people they
represent.
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Some polls and most conven-
tional wisdom suggest students
are becoming more conservative
with each passing year.
A Michigan State newspaper
poll, for example, earlier this
year found 52 percent of the
students politically moderate, 27
percent conservative and only
20.1 percent liberal. The Young
Democrats at Brigham Young
University is "virtually nonexis-
tent
But more scientifically, the
latest data from the Higher
Education Research Institute at
University of California-Los
Angeles indicate the notion of a
conservative tide on campuses is
not correct.
"We got calls in the 1984 elec-
tion asking us why students were
so conservative. We found that
wasn't the case says Dr. Ken-
neth Green of HERI. "While
Reagan may have been personally
popular on campus, his policies
were not
"Students are not moving left
to right. Our data show the trend
is more from liberal to middle of
the road Green adds. "We've
always shown a fairly constant
number of conservaties on cam-
pus (18 percent to 20 percent) in
the 20 vears we've been doing
this
"USSA Vice President Ham
maintains, "is reflecting the
moods on campuses
"Remember the average age
for students in community col-
leges is now 25-to-17 vears old.
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They are (politically) moving
more to the left Ham says.
She says students today often
juggle their educations with jobs,
families and fiscal obligations,
and so take much broader views
of politics and social issues than
their counterparts of just a few
years ago.
"People here are angry
because they've seen the future,
and they don't like it asserted
University of Wisconsin delegate
Gary Seeman. "The conference is
on the liberal side mostly as a
reaction to Reagan's policies
Criticism o the administra-
tion's college policies - which
have advocated deep cuts in 18 of
19 federal college programs since
1981 - was seemingly universal
among the delegates.
"Education cuts never heal
said one popular i-shirt at the
USSA Congress, "And Reagan is
going for the jugular
While campaigning, Swan also
stressed the drastic cuts in federal
aid to colleges and students.
Pirate
Mascot
TRYOUTS-
� 11
�Excellent Opportunity for
Travel
�Meet New People
�Be A Part of ECU Athletics
First meeting Tuesday
September 2 at 5:00 p.m. in
Minges Coliseum lobby
For more information, call
757-6491
Intucky Pried Chicken j&
$1.99
plus tax
FOR ONE COMPLETE
2-PIECE PACK
2 Pieces of Chicken
1 Small Mashed Potato and Gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
Expires Dec 31, 1986
Money Order
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ALL WEEK WI WILL REDEEM UP TO S
MFCS COUPONS PO� DOUBLE THEIR
VALUE MAXIMIUMM REDEMPTION
SI.OO) WITH EVERY $10 PURCHASE
PLEASE III DETAILS
IN STORE
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HOLLY FARMS CUT UP MIXED
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59c
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WITH $10 AOO L
PURCHASE
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KROGER MOTDOG OR
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3 H19
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till!
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Honeydew
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4-6 LB. AVG WGT WHOLE
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PRtWIOUSLY FROZEN
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PHARMACY
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WERLLOURMQ
AUGUST KROGER
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DYSTROPHY ASSOCIATION
NONE SOLD
TO
DEALERS
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Bivcl
;reenviiie 75G 70ii
Illegal
CHARLESTON, SC
� A shortage of staff is ke
cdcral authon'sc from
cstigating reports or
documented aliens i!le
rig in the l.owcountn
said
"The bottom line
ot to be thousands
housands of undocum
workers in the Cai
Edward Brigham J
nforcement chief 1 r the
nigration and v
erice in Charlotte, I
Charlotte office ' 1
Der North and S
Brigham -aid a June c 1
Alumni
HI N��� I
The alumni
presented S3! �� ;
the acaderr. ;
Jame Hid
Greensboro. presideni
ECU Alumni
the ennchmen- .
ment ol u : mn
highe :de
tellectual deveiopmc
year's alumn: . I SI
greater thar lonati
ECL academe-
Hicks said that alurr
vesting more than 52
program :o benefit I J
1986-198 mucfc I -
directK to stude-
financial aid anc
"1 speak for ind
NEE
WePi
Ster
Silver Cc
Coin & Ri
4th & Evans!
f
EAST
D
I
N
I
N
G
S
E
R
V
I
C
E
S
l4�0�l&l0to&0ltJ004&P
1
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ate
scot
UTS-
11
� �
)pportunity for
avel
ew People
ECU Athletics
ing Tuesday,
at 5:00 p.m. in
hseum lobby
ormation, call
-6491
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 28. 196
m
T
1
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Coupon A
Coupon B
20'
0"
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35M
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loneydew
Melons
si29
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Breyers
lice Cream
KROGER OLD
FASHIONED
White
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25
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nvlle 756-703 1
7fea Aliens Investigated
CHARLESTON, S.C. (UPI)
A shortage of staff is keeping
federal authorities from in-
vestigating reports of un-
documented aliens illegally work
Center Moves
of 30 Mexicans illegally working
at a North Charleston construc-
tion site was never investigated.
He said illegal aliens fill jobs
ranging from construction
-�� eB Hum construction
tag in the Lowcountry, officials workers to engineering and corn-
said.
"The bottom line isthere's
got to be thousands upon
thousands of undocumented
workers in the Carolinas said
Edward Brigham Jr assistant
enforcement chief for the Im-
migration and Naturalization
Service in Charlotte, N.C. The
Charlotte office has jurisdiction
over North and South Carolina.
Brigham said a June complaint
puter professionals.
"If we had 15 or 20 agents in
the Carolinas, I'd be on it he
said. But he said he has only three
agents to cover 10 million people
and 89,000 square miles in the
Carolinas, and that agents spend
much of their time investigating
criminal activity involving aliens.
The problem was aggravated
earlier this summer when officials
expressed concern that INS was
to close its Charleston office. The
INS wrote Sen. Ernest Hollings,
D-S.C, in June, proposing tem-
porarily halting Charleston
operations because of a lack of
resources. But Hollings said he
was not assured the office would
not close, and that he believed
there were sufficient resources to
maintain the Lowcountry opera-
tion.
Brigham said he could not ac-
curately estimate the number of
Lowcountry complaints about il
legal aliens.
Center Back In Operation
By DAWN STEWART
Staff Writer
After a move from Wright An-
nex to Wright Building (room
316), the East Carolina Counsel-
ing Center is back in operation.
The center is "an agency that
helps students find their way
through college explains
William Ball, counselor.
The staff includes six fulltime
members, all of whom have doc-
torates in psychology, and
graduate students who are doing
internships.
The main drive of the program
is to help students adjust to the
differences between high school
and college, deal with the stress
caused by classes, and learn
about themselves.
ing careers, and others.
"We see ourselves as working
with young people in a positive
way to reach their fullest poten-
student development. As a result,
the center offers several seminars
throughout the semester on time
management, goal setting, choos-
er the students to help them in
any way possible. College is stress
and it is a matter of adjustment
-m I � �c main drive of the
a lUTYlTtl jlft jVOWS �ml,Ml�
ECl NEWS HUAl
The alumni association has
presented a $35,000 gift to enrich.
the academic program at ECU.
James A. Hicks of
Greensboro, president of the
ECU Alumni Association, said
the enrichment gift was "a state-
ment of our commitment to the
highest ideals in learning and in-
tellectual development This
year's alumni gift is $10,000
greater than a similar donation to
ECU academics last year.
Hicks said that alumni are in-
vesting more than $245,000 in
programs to benefit ECU in
1986-1987, much of which goes
directly to students in the form of
financial aid and scholarships.
"I speak for individual alumni
as well as for the Alumni
Association when I say we con-
tinue to be impressed by the
university's progress Hicks
told the annual fall faculty con-
vocation. In some quarters, he
said, the difference between a
very good university and a great
university is measured by the
private, non-appropriated
resources offered to the school.
"We are all delighted with the
focus of our Institutional Ad-
vancement program and the
results it is achieving Hicks
said.
The funds for academic enrich-
ment are earmarked for use as
decided upon by the chancellor
and vice chancellor for academic
affairs. Hicks said.
NEWMAN-CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER
953 East Tenth Street
Greenville, N.C. 27858
k
NEED MONEY?
We Pay CASH For:
Sterling Class Rings
Silver Coins Wedding Bands
Any Gold Jewelry
Coin & Ring Man
4th & Evam Str�f
I
1
Prices bated daily cm gold and
silver rales
CAMPUS MASS SCHEDULE
Sunday-11:30 a.m.
Biology Building, Room 103
9:00 p.m. Newman Center
Wednesday-5:30 p.m.
Newman Center
(followed by a fellowship dinner)
SHARE THE WORD BIBLE STUDY
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.
at the Newman Center
All are welcome
For information, call 752-4216
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
$205 Abortion from 13 10 18 weeks at
add.tional cost. Pregnancy Test. Binh Control,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling Fur
further information, call 832-0535 (toll free
"umber: 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5
P m. weekdays. General anesthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS

i
ffllllffllltllHIIIIIISIIllfllftllltllHHMIIIflltlHtlllllHHIII
EAST CAROLINA
L
the unique difference
is now on the air
and accepting applications for
all positions
Deadline: Fri. Aug. 29,5 p.m.
Applications accepted between 11
a.m. & 4 p.m.
Contact Jeff Chester or Scott Hall
for more information
757-6656
Equal Opportunity Employer a.fkv
UNIVERSITY
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ly th�N.w "Sweat Shoppo"
atMendenhall Freshly baked
sweet roll donutt, cookies, brownies,
rolls and breads available on cash
basis to eat in or carry out
Locations:
College Hill Dining Hall
Mendenholl Student Center
The Galley
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
DINING SERVICES
Back to School
Specials
Visit oar Delicatessen
Call Ahead for Party Orders
We guarantee the best Keg Prices in town
Quality Mart
601 Greenville Blvd.
756-1794
We welcome back the ECU
Students with Red Hot Prices
Use Your Shell Credit Card for all Purchases
Cash or Credit � Same Low Price
Bay Oae Get Oat Free
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- .





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 2t. 19M
Following Procedures
Could Save Lives
UPl- At least 1,400 lives could be
saved every year if all hospital
anesthesiologists followed a set
of rigorous procedures calling for
constant monitoring of a
patient's breathing and circula-
tion, researchers say.
"The single most important
thing is monitoring the breathing
words need to be adopted
everywhere, but we think the con-
cept is valid everywhere he
said.
The Harvard standards,
published in this week's Journal
of the American Medical
Association, can save many of
those lives because they are
and the circulation continuously, limited, specific and mandatory,
not from time to time, but all the Eichhorn said.
time Dr. John Eichhorn, a The new standards would not
Harvard anesthesiologist, said require particulary expensive or
Thursday. "Because if something sophisticated medical equipment,
goes wrong, it can go wrong very he said.
uicklv" "It's not a question of equip-
Anesthesia accidents, which ment Eichhorn said in a
often result from depriving the telephone interview. "It's a ques-
patient of enough oxygen, are tion of habits
probably the most serious poten- "For a hospital that doesn't
tial danger in routine surgery, have anything, these standards
Eichhorn said. can be implemented for about $5
He said of the few thousand a (patient) case he said. "Com-
who die in anesthesia accidents
each year, at least 1,400 could be
saved with a new set of pro-
cedures he and his colleagues at
the Havard Medical School have
developed.
"There may be 2,000, 3.000,
4,000, people killed every year in
anesthesia accidents said
Eichhorn. "Is that a lot0 Well,
probably not, but if one of those
people is in your family, then it's
too many
Eichhorn said a version of the
Harvard standards will be
presented for approval at the an-
nual meeting of the American
Society or Anesthesiologists in
October. If adopted, they would
become standard procedure for
every operating room in the
country.
It is unusual for a medical
society to require a specific pro-
cedure rather than issue
guidelines, but Eichhorn said he
thinks the Harvard proposal has
at least a 50 percent chance of be-
ing adopted.
"We're not saying these exact
Air Force
Following
Its Motto
By DA WB STEWART
Staff Writer
"Aim High" is the Air Force's
unofficial motto and that's exact-
ly what ECU's Air Force Reserve
Officer Training Corps is doing.
Over the summer the ROTC
unit moved from the 2nd floor of
Wright Annex to the third floor.
To add to the facelift, the
Detachment has assigned a new
captain, staff sargeant and also,
enrollment has increased to 180
cadets.
AFROTC is a program design-
ed by the Air Force to train
students who have potential to
become officers. Any student
who is a United States citizen,
pursuing a college degree, in
relatively good health, and has
average grades is eligible for the
program. The four-year program
exists for incoming freshmen or
members of the freshman class
while the two-year program ap-
plies to students who have at least
two years of college left at either
graduate or undergraduate levels.
Scholarships are available to
qualified individuals. Scholar-
ships help pay for tuition and
books. Contract cadets receive
$100 per month tax-free
allowance.
The AFROTC unit supports
ECU's campus through its sen ice
fraternity, Arnold Air Society,
and its sorority, Angel Flight.
During football season, cadets
will be seen at concession and
souvenier stands. Arnold Air
sponsors the fall campus blood
drive. The cadets are involved in
many other activities as well.
The goal of ECU's unit is to
produce good officers both while
enrolled in school and on active
duty. Although much work and.
hard training is involved for all
cadets, fun is a key element in the
corps.
Leave
forests
nd parks
clean
Stop hurting
the trees
you love.
pare that to a physician's in-
surance costs, which are about
S53 a case
A review of all the anesthesia
related fatalities at Beth Israel
Hospital in Boston in the past 10
years concluded 70 percent of the
deaths would not have occurred
had the standards been followed,
Eichhorn said.
This would translate into at
least 1,400 lives saved annually
on a national scak, he said.
(BIltlEaBt (Earolitrtan
tflK Ca"MH' �"��� community sine 192
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ByJOHNSHANNOl
In a university town n
ts art community, the sif
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or the odd painting on
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old rhythm and blues, swinj
soul tunes.
For anyone who's not
the band before, these tra
like the group's live
mances � are quirky, refrc
and hard to resist dancing
your living room or dorm)
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
AUGUST 28. 1986
Page 9
If The Medium Is The Message
The Message Is Art
By JOHN SHANNON
�W Editor
In a university town noted for
its art community, the sight of a
piece of sculpture in a driveway
or the odd painting on a front
f
progress is indeed attached to the
side of an old tobacco barn,
retreated to the country for a
reason. He intended to take his
work a step further, "by in-
vestigating, for example, a
peaceful, serene landscape and
'
I r X
Keough and son Robin (with the paintbrush)
porch is not unusual. People
heading out of town might be
surprised, however, to notice
from their car windows a large-
scale abstract canvas attached to
the side of a barn.
ECU Alumnus Patrick
Keough, one of whose works-in-
turning it into an 'action'
abstract-impressionist
landscape
Keough's earlier work,
familiar to ECU students from
numerous exhibits and presenta-
tions in the school of art and
elsewhere in Greenville and
Down East, is an experimenta-
tion in fusing a variety of artistic
disciplines. The difference is
largely one of subject matter.
Works such as "Haunted
Shadows a collaboration with
the Theatre Arts department,
combine collages, slides of
abstract paintings and
photographic superimpositions
to create a "multi-image fusion
which is Keough's trademark, a
style that synthesizes technology
and art.
Like many of Keough's works,
"Haunted Shadows" dwells on
the darker side of experience;
human suffering is emphasized
and the mood is ominous
throughout.
Keough served in the army as a
combat photographer. "I never
lose touch with the things I saw
says Keough. "For me it's all tied
up with the fragmentation and
alienation that modern man is
subjected to.
"The concepts I work with are
a reflection and a synthesis of my
past he says. "But now I'm
driven to take my techniques a
step further
Keough's new direction will be
the subject of an upcoming one-
man show at the gallery of the
Kinston Arts Council. Keough
will present a new video, a series
of photographic collages, and a
slide montage dealing with
abstract, naturalistic themes.
Undertaking a new style has in-
volved a return to landscape
painting, but "The painting is
not meant to stand alone
Keough explains. "It's a catalyst
for an extended body of work
which incorporates photographs,
video and multi-image. To fuse
these mediums into a polished ex-
hibition, I need to have control of
a variety of technical processes to
include video editing, slide
duplication, and computer
graphics
The degree of technicality in-
volved can perhaps be best ap-
preciated by a synopsis of
Keough's technique: First, he
creates an abstract-impressionist
painting. In the case of a
naturalistic landscape, this im-
plies an emotional response to the
scene he is painting.
Next, says Keough, "i
photograph quadrants of the
painting that best express what I
feel needs to be incorporated in
the entire body of the work. I
then super-impose a series of
other real-life images over the top
of the painted quadrants. Then I
take all the slides, which I process
myself, and interact them with
two slide projectors, creating a
Patrick Keough paints on the side of his barn.
montage effect. Adding elec-
tronic music brings another
dimension into the work.
"Finally, I photograph specific
images off the video screen and
enhance the chrome in a variety
of color saturations. This step is
the catalyst for the video pain-
tings and photo-collages.
"I may be the world's first
video painter says Keough. "I
take these enhanced slides and
I've got two options. I can pro-
duce a large, high-quality color
photograph that stands alone, or
can juxtapose � with broadcast
TV images of which he can ob-
tain an unlimited supply by lif-
ting them out of context off net-
work television.
"I'm essentially throwing back
what's being thrown at us � only
being selective says Keough.
"My paintings are controlled
chaos. I'm responding to the con-
stant onslaught of commercial
image bombardment that we as
Twentieth Century people are
subjected to every day of our
lives
The variety of images and
mediums used by Keough makes
it necessary for him to unify the
work. "To tie the work together
thematically he says, "I often
show the images to an audience in
an electronically synthesized
montage
Keough said that the principles
of his selectivity are a direct
response to his philosophical ap-
proach to life itself. "If the
medium is the message, the
message is An. The art of the
electronic medium is an art that
has been largely neglected up un-
til now.
"I still feel in the bottom of my
heart that through all the
madness and chaos is a ray of
hope says Keough, "and if you
look hard enough in the work
you will find a respite, a calm
point that stands out in a subtle
way
Sisters And Brothers Are United On Vinyl
By CARLYN EBERT
Still Wrltr
Greenville's own Lemon
Sisters and Rutabaga Brothers,
:he witty, sassy six-member band
that pack. 1 local clubs with
devoted fans in '83 and '84, have
their first record out � and it's a
beaut. The four-song EP
showcases the Lemons and
Rutabaga's fondness for covering
old rhythm and blues, swing, and
soul tunes.
For anyone who's not heard
the band before, these tracks �
like the group's live perfor-
mances � are quirky, refreshing,
and hard to resist dancing around
your living room or dorm room
to. For their fans � and there are
still plenty of them around, even
though the band gave its
"farewell" performance late in
'84 � this EP is a welcome bit of
nostalgia, a sweet kick in the
Dast.
The Sisters and Brothers joined
forces in 1982 and recorded these
songs in fall of 1983. Over that
year and the next they established
themselves as Greenville's
liveliest and most popular club
draw. Amy Hazard, Sue Ludeke
and Laura Davis (who named
themselves "the Lemon Sisters"
in wry honor of those other sing-
ing sisters with a similar name)
began harmonizing with Mike
Hamer, John Worthington and
"Shakin" Bob Aiken. All had
ECU ties: Amy and Mike with
the Department of English,
Laura and Sue with the School of
Art, Bob and John with the
Schools of Education and
Medicine.
Not surprisingly, their fans
were a diverse bunch. Students
and artists and writers and
teachers and other musicians and
� well, if you didn't hear about
the Lemon Sisters and the
Rutabaga Brothers by word of
mouth, all you had to do was
wander by the New Deli or the
Rat and you'd sort of get danced
in the door on a wave of sax-
ophone, sneaky bass and those ir-
resistable sweet-sour harmonies.
People danced the Charleston
and the Jitterbug and the Frug
and god-knows-what-else to their
music, and they danced out on
the sidewalks of Cotanche or
Fifth Streets when there wasn't
enough room inside to execute a
proper cha-cha-cha.
Side one leads off with "My
Boy, Flat Top a typical
Rutabagas and Lemons set-
opener. It's a novelty swing
number with a hint of country
guitar and rollicking, buttery
vocal harmonies by "sisters"
Davis, Ludeke and Hazard.
Punctuated by Aiken's crisp
rhythms on drums, Hamer's pep-
py bass and Hazard's saxophone,
"My Boy" does whatthe Lemons
and Rutabagas always did best: it
gets you tapping, snapping, and
on your feet. "It's just got that
thang says bassist Hamer, try-
ing to explain the song's instant
appeal.
The Sisters back Hamer on the
second selection, an old R B hit
from Louis Jordan and his Tym-
pany Five called "Is You Is or Is
You Ain"t (My Baby)?" After a
moody bass, sax and percussion
into, Hamer digs into the lyrics
with style and humor. "I've got a
gal who's always late he sings,
and I can't help but picture Mike
lovingly fingering his bass guitar,
his eyes wide and his face spread
with the slightly daffy grin he
always wears while performing.
The third track is "It's In His
Kiss (The Shoop Shoop Song)
a No. 6 pop hit from 1964
originally recorded by soul
vocalist Betty Everett. I've
always been a "girl-group" fan,
and Sue Ludeke delivers a gutsy,
smooth lead vocal with the other
JA
The Lemon Sisters and Rutabaga Brothers mug for the sleeve of
their 45rpm.
Between Worthington's guitar,
subtle and rich, Hazard's sax
break and the girls' sweet blend
of harmony on the chrus, the
Rutabagas and Lemons sound
like a much bigger ensemble on
this cut.
Sisters shoop-shooping along so
lightly and soulfully that if you
can resist doing it too you're
made of tougher stuff than I am.
This track also features Amy
Hazard on flute. She's a wonder-
ful sax player, but her flute solos
were always highlights of the
band's live performances.
Rounding out the EP is a tor-
chy blues crooner called "You
Promised Love" on which lead
singer Laura Davis growls her
vowels and gulps the ends off
phrases with just a touch of the
band's typical tngue-in-cheek
humor. Davis manages to sound
down V dirty and mournful at
the same time, as that man who
done her wrong can't help but
notice: "You promised love
.but you gave me the blues she
wails. Worthington lays down
some fine, fluid blues guitar
licks; Aiken's light touch on
drums and Hamer's delicate bass
lines remnd listeners that this
group can come on just as in-
tensely in a slow blues number as
in the happy-feet swing and pop
tunes they're often best
remembered for.
Sadly, Hamer is no longer able
to play bass, the result of an
August 1985 diving accident at
Whichard Beach which left him
paralyzed. In order to help offset
his medical expenses, the ECU
Department of English (where
Hamer completed aa master's
degree and is currently an instruc-
tor) raised the funds necessary
for the Lemons and Rutabagas to
release this recording in associa-
tion with Audio Arts, a local in-
dependent production studio.
Proceeds from sales of the record
go to the Mike Hamer Relief
Fund to help defray Mike's con-
tinued medical and living ex-
penses.
"I think the dream of any
musician is to get something
down on vinyl says Hamer.
"So we're real happy, even
though we're not performing as
much as before Friends and
fans turned out in large numbers
at a May benefit concert at the
Art School in Carrboro to hear
Harnpc and the Lemons, and fur-
ther performances are entirely
possible although, at this time,
unscheduled.
The Lemon Sisters and the
Rutabaga Brothers is available
downtown at Apple Records,
Quicksilver Records and Rocket
Music, and at the Record Bar in
The Plaza for $3.50. It's also
available by mail order through
Audio Arts (Rt. 1, Box 59, Hwy.
43 N, Greenville, NC 27834) for
$4. Production values
throughout are consistently high,
and the result is four very cool,
very pure, very professional
tracks.
Will Audio Arts wise up and
put out a "Down East" sampler
album (a la Welcome to Com-
boland and Mondo Montage)
featuring, in addition to the
Rutabagas and Lemons, cuts by
Big Boy Henry, Piedmont blues
singer Alga Mae Hinton, and
other eastern North Carolina
blues, classical and gospel artists
on their roster? If The Lemon
Sisters and the Rutabaga
Brothers is a commercial success
locally � as by every right it
should be, for this is well-crafted
music with little pretense and lots
of potential for widespread ac-
ceptance � perhaps we'll be
hearing from them next on such a
release from Audio Arts. Let's
hope so.
Hanks Comes Close
��� But Plays Too Funny
By ED TOSHACH
��f Writer
Tom Hanks is an excellent
comedy actor, as he has proved
again and again in the television
series Bosom Buddies, and
movies like Splash and Bachelor
Party. Director Garry Marshall
should have tried to forget this
when making Nothing in Com-
mon.
In this new movie from Tri-
Star, Hanks plays David Basner,
a highly successful advertiser.
Basner is romantically ambitious
as well; he sleeps around but still
tries to hold on to a relationship
with his high-school sweetheart
(Bess Armstrong). A monkey
wrench is thrown into his fast-
moving life when his father calls
to tell him that Basner's mother
has left him.
Soon Basner's world is turned
upside down, as he tries to juggle
his job, his romantic life, and still
take car of his parents, neither of
whom are prepared for the task
of living alone.
Nothing in Common starts out
like all of Tom Hanks' roles do,
with Hanks keeping a 90-mile-an-
hour snappy dialogue going,
making light of everything in a
world of straight men. For this
movie that beginning is a double
sin; first, its not done well this
time, and second, this movie
could be so much more. The last
hour of the film is a mercilessly
real, serious story about what
really happens when families fall
apart, and about priorities.
By itself this more serious
storyline would have been well
worth a trip to the cinema, but
juxtaposed to the more surreal
comedy aspect it loses a lot.
In the realistic part the acting is
excellent, with Jackie Gleason, as
Basner's father, turning in his
best performance to date, and
Hanks himself doing surprisingly
well with noncomedy.
I don't suggest that Nothing in
Common should have been total-
ly dry and devoid of humour, but
the movie went too far out on a
limb for laughs in the first hour
for this context.
Director Garry Marshall did a
fine job with The Flamingo Kid,
and it's a shame this film came so
close and still missed by so far.
If you are going to see Nothing
in Common, the best thing you
can do is walk in an hour late.
Tom Hanks and Bess Armstrong star in 'Nothing la
Theatres at Carolina East Center.
which Is aow piayiag lt
� Pill
� �m mm 9 m a a u�m i mmmmmmmmmmpmmmmmtmm
� i

j





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 28, 1986
4Watchmen9 Shows That Comic Format Can Be Misleading
'
1
By MICAH HARRIS
Slmff Wrttr
The world was heading toward
nuclear destruction. Vietnam was
the 51st state; President Nixon
was still in office. Nuclear silos
were constructed on the moon,
and the Soviet Union was pro-
testing the U.S. invasion of
Afghanistan.
Oh, yeah. There were heroes,
too. Men and Superman. The
former were helpless to stop the
imminent atomic storm. And, so,
it seemed, was the latter
Watchmen, published by DC
comics and written and drawn by
Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons,
takes place in the science fiction
concept known as the "parallel
time stream" or "alternative
universe This concept has been
mined by most everyone from
"Star Trek" to the holiday
classic, "It's A Wonderful Life
It is very easy to create an alter-
native universe. Just take a
historical event, flip it over, and
speculate what would have hap-
pened if the South had won the
Civil War, or the library of Alex-
andria wasn't destroyed, or Col-
mbus' crew had mutinied and
turned back
Of course, these are obvious
ways of creating an alternative
reality. Watchmen writer Alan
Moore has opted for a more
original way to alter the fall o
the temporal dominoes.
What if there were really super-
heros?
Perhaps you have daydreamed
of how great it would be if ther
was a Superman able to change
the course of mighty rivers with
his bare hands, to intervene in
natural disasters, or repel Soviet
missiles with his fists; or if there
was a real Bat Man, a master of
detective and fighting skills, who
would not be bound by legalities
in administering iustice.
Would we really cheer for these
heros as we do while watching
them in the theater or reading
about them in the comics?
Or would we fear Superman
because he was not only an alien,
but superior to the rest of us?
Would we demand that Bat Man
be locked away because we did
not want laws being enforced by
vigilantes as they interpreted
them?
And would we be justified in
our fear of these super-heros,
because their very presence had
started a chain reaction that
would end in the world's destruc-
tion?
Such is the scenario of Wat-
chmen. The appearance of Super-
man in Action Comics in 1938
resulted in a host of real life im-
itators: The Silhouette, Silk Sec-
tre, the Comedian, Hooded-
Justice, Captain Metropolis, Nite
Owl, Mothman, and Dollar Bill.
These heros and heroines bound
together in the group known as
the "Minutemen" and fought
such villains as Moloch the
Mystic.
The Minutemen were
celebrities for a time. But these
were not supermen. They were
ordinary men and women subject
to all related faults and passions.
The Comedian attempted to rape
the Silk Spectre; the Silhouette,
who had opposed peddlers of
child pornography, was herself a
lesbian. Hooded Justice had Nazi
sympathies and Captain
Metropolis was a bigot.
In addition, there were outside
pressures. During the 1950s, the
Minutemen were forced to testify
before the House UnAmerican
Activities Committee. The seeds
o public mistrust were planted.
And as the costumed criminals
began going out of the business,
the need for them also waned.
The costumed hero finally
became obsolete when the super-
oPPmons
MENS WE A-
CAROLINA EAST MALL
LABOR DAY WEEKEND
FRIDAY-SATURDAY-MONDAY
A Consolidation Sale from our three stores
representing odd groups of merchandise
including discontinued colors, patterns and
styles.
� 162 pair SUMMER PANTS25.00 �
2 pair for 45.00
� A group of SPORT SHIRTS & KNITS. 10.00
� A group of Lightweight JACKETS19.95 each
� A group of DRESS SHIRTS10.00
� A very special group of SWEATERS .25.00
including Shetlands and Cottons
No Exchanges
Alterations Extra
oPPmons
MENS WEAR
Carolina East Mall
Labor Day Weekend
hero arrived in 1960 in the person
of the blue skinned Dr. Manhat-
tan, a being who seemingly
possessed the power to alter the
very fabric of reality, a fabric his
very presence sent unraveling as
the news flashed around the
globe that "The Superman exists
and he's American" and the
Soviets subsequently chose to in-
itiate global suicide instead of ac-
cepting eventual domination.
Watchmen opens in 1985 dur-
ing a time when it is illegal to be a
costumed hero, super or not,
without government supervision.
This is the result of the Keene Act
of 1977 which in turn was the
result of a national police strike.
The authorities claimed costumed
vigilantes made their job impossi-
ble. The public, fearing anarchy
or, worse, domination by
superior beings, protested the
heroes.
Their slogan: Who watches the
watchmen?
As of this writing, Watchmen
is only four issues old. It is
designed as a "maxi-series that
is, it will run for twelve issues and
end. Thus, the story has the opor-
tunity to achieve something more
in character development and
scope than would be possible if it
was an infinite series wherein the
heroes must return month after
month and stay essentially the
same.
Alan Moore is taking advan-
tage of this opportunity and is
constructing a graphic story tha
reveals new levels of depth with
re-readings.
For example, in issue No. 3, a
story which centers on Dr.
Manhatten, there is a con-
tinualtransition to a scene of a
kid reading a comic book. The
"comic" itself is a pirate story
written in the Defoe-Swift style.
This is an interesting side light on
a comics industry in a world of
real super-heros. Who reads com-
ics about them when you have the
real thing? So comics all become
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stories in the "Classics
llustrated" vein.
A neat idea, but Moore is as
economy minded as the best short
story writer. This is not an in-
dulgent aside. The protagonist of
the story within a story, the lone
survivor of a pirate attack, is a
doppleganger of Dr. Manhattan.
Indeed, the story smoothly segues
from the castaway's story to Dr.
Manhattan's story.
It is not until the next issue,
No. 4, that the significance of the
previous issue's episode comes in-
to focus. We learn that Dr.
Manhattan experiences past, pre-
sent, and future all at the same
time. He knows the future but is
helpless to alter it. Just as the
stranded comic character walks
alone among the washed-up corp-
ses of his fellows, so Dr. Manhat-
tan sees himself as a sole survivor
among the dead of the coming
global holocaust.
Such visual ironies, worthy of
Hitchcock, abound in the pages
of Watchmen. Everything is
significant. In fact, most of the
world situation is learned by
reading headlines of wind-blown
newspapers and the like.
The actual plot follows the
outlawed vigilante, Rorshach's
(his mask is an everchanging ar-
ray of ink blots) efforts to
discover who murdered the Com-
edian (who has been killed just
before the story begins) before
any other heroes meet a similar
fate. Different issues spotlight
the major characters (issue No. 2
was the Comedian's post mortem
story, told through flashbacks
No. 3 and No. 4 center on Dr.
Manhattan).
Watchmen is not a "funny
book There is black humor but
the series is a serious drama.
Unfortunately, because Wat-
chmen is a "comic book many
adults who enjoy science fiction
will not read it. Similarly,
another acclaimed comic series,
American Hagg, was not even
allowed a nomination for a
prestigious S F award because it
wa a "comic book Advocates
of the "comic book" bias should
be reminded that, no' so long
ago, science fiction prose was
considered "ghetto trash
This was an American pre-
judice, for in Europe authors like
Wells and Verne were already
Uiken seriously. It iv significant
that today the "comic book" is a
respected medium in Europe.
This particular siory is too
good to be ignored even if it ap-
peared on a "Baooka Joe"
wrapper.
FOLLOW THE PIRATES
Listen to the "Art Baker Show" on Tuesday nights
from 7 to 8 p.m.
Reaching you from a 2,000 ft. tower, splashing
100,000 watts of vibrant, live contemporary hit radio
from Raleigh to the Crystal Coast
P.O. Box 1707, Washington, NC 27889
(919)946-2162
Burning the midnight
oil mav be necessary.
Burning the 2:00or 3:00
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Especially when an HP calculator can get the
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For instance, our HP-15C Professional Scientific Calculator
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� �� . �. w,i -�� - MWMH





Playhouse Season Previewed
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AST 28. Ktttt
By JONATHAN PRINGLE
SUff Writer
You may ask yourself, "What
is the ECU playhouse doing this
semester?" Coming away from a
successful season of summer
theatre, they have planned
another full season of big shows.
Drama department director
Edgar Loessin calls it a season of
"Great American Hits
The season will open with the
clasic musical, A Chorus Line,
the story of Broadway dancers
trying to make it big. Due to the
high cost of royalties, the in-
dividual tickets for this show will
be slightly higher than for the
other shows. The show will run
from Oct. 15 through 18, with
another show on the 20th.
Students can get tickets for
groups of ten or larger, and for
the general public. Open audi-
tions will be held on Sept. 3 and
4.
Their second show, Master
Harold and the Boys, is written
by Athol Fugard and tells the
story of a white teenager and his
two black friends. Set in South
Africa, the play shows the young
man's idealism and friendship in
conflict with racial strife. Even
though there are only three
members in the cast, the director
would still like to see a big tur-
nout to auditions on Nov. 2 and
3. The show will run from Nov.
12 through 15.
The next show won both the
Pulitzer prize and the New York
Drama Critics Circle Award. It is
Beth Henley's first play, called
Crimes of the Heart. This show,
a comedy, is about three sisters
who have to fight to keep their
sometimes explosive passions in
check. Auditions will be held
Dec. 3 and 4 with the show runn-
ing from Feb. 11 through 14.
One of the shows that is most
anxiously awaited at the beginn-
ing of each semester it the
"Dance Theatre Each number
is choreographed by members of
the faculty, and the show is
always exciting. Auditions will be
held on Nov. 3 and 4 with the
show running from Feb. 22
through 28 and March 2 and 3.
The American classic Mr.
Roberts rounds out the season.
Auditions will be held Feb. 17
and 18, with the show running
from April 13 through 16. All
auditions are open to the public
and the department hopes that
the turnout is good.
Also this semester, the
Playhouse will present a
children's theatre. This year's
play will be Dragon tale. It will
run from Jan. 21 to 23 with audi-
tions on Oct. 21 and 22. The
show will be at 9:15 in the morn-
ing with a late showing at 7:15 on
Friday night.
Phi Kappa Tau
LiV Sister Rush
"Come Party With The
Best"
Wed. Sept. 2nd � Dress To Impress
Thu. Sept. 3rd � Beach Night
Parties Start 9:00 P.M.
For A Ride or More Info Call:
757-1319
SEE PERSONALS
Travel Deals Coming
The Enirnaintr
If you take advantage of the
Student Union Travel Commit-
tee's offer, part of your
Christmas vacation could be
spent in Hawaii. The trip starts
on December 30, 1986, and ends
on January 7, 1987.
The Travel Committee takes
care of all the difficult things.
They make reservations and pay
the hotel bill ahead of time from
their budget. Airfare and hotel
accomodations for a single are
$924; double, $790; and triple,
$779. A $100 deposit is required.
Vacationers will stay in the
Outrigger East. Students, facul-
ty, and staff are welcome, but
there are only 50 reserved seats.
This trip, like other trips, is a
non-profit venture for the com-
mittee. Their part is to plan,
organize, promote, and conduct
trips during breaks. They chose
Hawaii again because last year's
trip over Christmas was such a
success that people wanted to go
again.
The Travel Committee is
responsible for other trips, too.
Qn Thanksgiving break, the trip
witl be to New York City. Next
spring break, one trip will be to
the Bahamas and another to
Keystone, Colorado, for a ski
trip.
Although this trip is basically
do-it-yourself (no schedules), the
committee organizes an orienta-
tion session after everyone has
signed up and paid. They also
provide brochures that cover in-
formation a vacationer might
need. But in case of an emergen-
cy, several members of the com-
mittee go along as trip leaders.
One way to stay out of trouble
is ro learn a few Hawaiian words.
Say aloha (hello) when getting off
the pj�me, and mahalo (thank
xJZf) when someone puts a lei
(flower wreath or necklace)
around your neck. There will be
at least one luau (feast) during
this trip. You'll want to attend in
order to complete your educaton.
Hawaii is full of things to learn
and experience.
Hawaii has only two seasons �
summer and winter. Summer
(kau) is from May to October,
and winter (hooilo) is from Oc-
tober to April. Sports are also
popular. Spectator sports include
baseball, football, and basket-
ball. But if you're more of a par-
ticipant, Hawaii has fishing,
swimming, scuba diving, hang
gliding, and polo, just to name a
few.
The nickname for Hawaii is
"The Big Island Not only is it
big, the island is bountiful with
history and culture. There are
See TRIP, page 12
While You Were A way
P A R A D I
Came To Greenville!
Show Your Student ID & Get A
10
DISCOUNT
On All Services & Products!
This offer good until September 30, 1986
Drop by and see
our beautiful new shop . . .
Greenville's Newest, Most Unique
Beauty Center!
Stylists:
Petey Hathaway
Lisa Brann
Lisa Wright Burns
Tina Getsinger
Trudy Barber
Kay Pase
Denise Hinnant
Mercedes Rivera
PARADISE
CJ)ed
1890 SEAF
Step into Paradise
Step Out in Style
329 Arlington Blvd. Greenville 756-1579
COUPONS
GOOD
WITH
SPECIALS
TOO!
FREE
Salad Bar
NOT GOOD
WITH OTHER
COUPONS
GOOD
WITH
SPECIALS
TOO'
NOT GOOD
WITH OTHER
COUPONS
BEAT
STATE
SPECIAL
Everyday Special $1.25
2 eggs 3 pancakes
Plate Lunches $2.25
Hot Roast Beef & Gravy
Steak and Gravy
Turkey and Gravy
Present ECU ID and yell
"BEAT STATE" in order to
receive special.
Special good from Sept. 1 thru Sept. 5
with the purchase of
any meal at
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
FREE
Cup of
Clam Chowder
with the purchase of
any meal at
FOSDICK'S
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
2903 S. EVANS ST.
756 2011
1890 SEAFOOD
EXPIRES DECEMBER 31 1986
2903 S.EVANS ST
756 2011
EVBER 3- -986
GOOD
WITH
SPECIALS
TOO!
$1.00
OFF
NOT GOOD
WITH OTHER
COUPONS
GOOD
WITH
SPECIALS
TOO!
12 OFF
ANY MEAL
NOT GOOD
WITH OTHER
COUPONS
ANY MEAL
At
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
2903 S. EVANS ST.
756 2011
EXPIRES DECEMBER 31 1986
with the purchase of
any meal of equal or
greater value at
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
2903 S. EVANS ST. 756 2011
EXPmtS DECEMBER 31 1 986
GOOD
WITH
SPECIALS
TOO!
NOT GOOD
, WITH OTHER
O COUPONS
10�c
Off Your
Next Meal
GOOD WITH
SPECIALS
TOO!
NOT GOOD
WITH OTHER
COUPONS
at
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
2903S EVANS ST
756-2011
EXPWES DECEMBER 31 1986
Small
Shrimp Dinner
WFrench Fries, Slaw & Hushpuppies
$3.50
at
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
2903 S. EVANS ST. 756-2011
EXPWES DECEMBER 3- 9M
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
V
1 �
i
�mk ,0m0 � ixw � - -
�'�i'irii;





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 28.
1986
BLOOM COUNTY
esmoy
mm
by Berke Breathed Undercover Cats
STORY BEGWS
By PARKER
ANtTHtN I 5WI7
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with old ANtytRjFfm
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GUY
Overkill � One Second Closer
AilcA rVf 8S&0 SJO� TO tPQjx,2� Fbft
wy conMojmfcf zst Wkx asxt what
THO&C UOoERMi CM) t MO 9C�C� OF
WlrtG.9PEClfcAU, KK OUTBURST
Of'sexSCSCX AMD PL&sVPf OF IT
�WT I V�MT "TO V-SAt WA9
l,VTW T.V
By FRIEDRICH
MALLX?V�eAiO 1 fl�WT To
SAV lfeTEACi Of h4vw16S�x THEY
S�M.t HAVe "MEtST.V 's 00?
r rOfor THrsX so jxde.
Campus Comics
By BARBOUR
VVI. C�OT U5 TWO
TICKETS FORTME-
STtSTE (3ft ME.
THEY'RE ON THE
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ftftCrNdEEAlVS
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Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Simian
4 Cloth measure
Pi.
8 Strike
12 Electrified
particle
13 Kind of tide
14 Affection
15 Conducted
16 Rules
18 Ceases
20 Short jacket
21 Pronoun
22 Employ
23 Hard of hearing
27 Existed
29 Skill
30 Climbing spe-
cies of pepper
31 Sign on door
32 Transfix
33 Preposition
34 Sun god
35 Begin
37 Bespatter
3d Marsh
39 Nimbus
40 Permit
41 Spanish article
42 Chicken house
44 Classify
47 Cascade
51 Witty remark
52 Toward shelter
53 Group of three
54 The self
55 Dispatch
56 Cook slowly
57 Lair
DOWN
1 Is ill
2 Bard
3 Furnishes mon-
ey for support
4 Goals
5 Sign of zodiac
6 Most crippled
7 Malice
8 Defame
9 Parcel of land
10 Hail!
11 Footlike part
17 Negative
19 Hebrew letter
22 Vase
24 Latin conjunc-
tion
25 Danish island
26 Pennant
27 Desire
28 Pilaster
29 River island
30 Cut short
32 Go
33 Obese
36 Man's nickname
37 Leave
38 Reproached
40 Attics
41 Teutonic deity
43 Either's partner
44 Shine
45 Venetian ruler
46 Kind of collar
47 Existed
48 Beverage
49 Playing card
50 Falsehood
rliliPn1
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COUIGt P�SS SERVICE
1984 United Feature Syndicate
Trip To
Hawaii Will
Be Offered
Continued from page 11
many museums and four Big
Island tours that originate in
either Hilo or Kailua-Kona which
are on opposite sides of the
island. Some sites that are worth
seeing are the Akaka Falls, the
City of Refuge, Chain of Craters,
Hulihee Palace, and the Lava
Tree State Park.
The Japanese play a great part
in Hawaiian ways. Their work
days begin particularly early,
their family ties are strong, and
the young look up to their elders.
Hawaiians decorate their homes
with Japanese nicknacks and
bonsai plants, and they take their
shoes off before entering their
homes. This practice is not only
practical for keeping the house
clean, but it also epitomizes the
Japanese idea of leaving the day's
worries outside the door.
Throughout Hawaii, Japanese
food is served. In fact, some
restaurants are frequented just
for their sushi bars. The local diet
relies heavily on rice, seafood,
and vegetables.
So you see, this isn't just a
warm place to go for Christinas.
So far, these trips during breaks
have been successful. According
to Beth Simmons, chairperson of
the Travel Committee, the pro-
gram needs more student par-
ticipation. Besides, what student
wouldn't want to warm up in
Hawaii?































Mendenhail Movies
All Shows 8 p.m.
The Official Story
The Gods Must Be Crazy-
Down And Out In Beverly Hills
The Journey Of Natty Gann
Jagged Edge
The Kiss Of The Spiderwoman
Back To The Future
When Father Was Away On
Business
Compromising Positions
Monty Python And The Holy
Grail
After Hours
Out Of Africa
The Trip To Bountiful
Gung Ho
Harold And Maude
Colonel Redl
The Color Purple
Easy Rider
Brazil
Animal House
A Nightmare On Elm Street, Part
II
Seven Beauties
Pretty In Pink
A Clockwork Orange
FX
Hannah And Her Sisters
Clue
Ran
The Money Pit
Plenty
Murphy's Romance
14
827
93
94-7
910
911
917
918-21
924
925-28
926-27
101
102-5
108
1010-12
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1016-19
1022
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1031-111
115
116-9
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1119
1120-23
123
124-7
1210
1211-14









!
IHt I


Rick Gilmore ha not missed an H
Men, Worn
Prepare Fo
B DON RLTLEDGE
S�or�j t�nif
As the ECU men's
women's tennis teams take to the
courts for the start of the 1986-8"
season, they have every reason to
be optimistic about the tennis
which lay ahead Despite a
mediocre 1985-86 performance
(the men finished 7th in the C h
with an 11-13 record, while the
women finished 'h with an 11-11
record) and a tough scheduk
vear. both squads
imxt yemr's piayers returning. A.no
according to Coach Pat Sher
man, now in her fifth year in
charge of the men's and women's
teams, "everybod is playing
much above the level that the
were last spring
Tryouts have been going on I
a week now as Coach Sher
tries to narrow the team dowi
a workable size. Alter the :
cut, the men'v squad consisted
16 players, eleven of whom an
returning athletes. Of the nine
women who are set to compete
for ECU, sever, are re-
players. This pleased coach Sher-
man er much. But what please
ber most is the growth and
mature, 0f the veteran athlel
very pleased with the der
of the men's team Sherma:
said.
For the men, only John An-
r
Sports Fact
Thur. Aug. 28, 1970
After dousing two De'
sportswriters with ice water.
Tigers pitcher Dennv McLain
finds himself in hot water when
he's suspended for eight das,
- s second suspender, of the
vear. The two-time Cy Young
Award winner slips from 24
h as n 1969 to three in "O.
Berke Holtclaw (15) handing here to
didales to lead the Prate attack aai
.
t� BEiirs�M �� r� m m
mm ��
ilia ��
�itL.
i: V Li �
I





By PARKER
C
is
��
H FCUcSf ft FRAHK
0EK OF fKA"�5'CASINO
fTR t-osc or you WHO AK.HT
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��ATS' 1.6U3IHS WHO BECAME
VtTTTiUCS 4Wb-p�Avti T��
. � . Sfc r-L,HTiK& tVL AnO
V KlG FOR M oop Tle:

By BRYANT
RfftLW? ON fT Oh f scfltE RtoM
THOUSAND.
1
man
8
14
10
11
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51
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1984 United Feature Syndicate
V Shows 8 p.m.
nhall Movies















'827
He Crazy93
rn Beverly Hills94-7
batty Gann910
911-14
Spider h oman917
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101
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itiful108
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ie1010-11
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In Street, Part1031-111
115
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m1112
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Sisters1119
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123
124-7
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1211-14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
AUGUST 2�, 1986 Page 13
True Pirate Fan
Racer Gilmore Promotes Alma Mater
By TIM CHANDLER
9�tm Sparta Wrtter
Do your consider yourself a
true Pirate fan?
Here is a way you can test
yourself. Would you give up do-
ing something that meant a lot to
you just to attend an ECU foot-
ball game?
I met someone this summer
while working an internship at
The Courier-Times in Roxboro,
N.C. that would fit the bill.
His name is Rick Gilmore and a.lu rdin T r
he �s a graduate of ECU (1977). ECU home football gam or �
Gilmore currently lives in State-ECU game. "I haven
Durham and races on weekends missed an ECU-State game since
at the Orange County Speedway, '73 said Gilmore
in the Street Stock division. Since leaving ECU, Gilmore
Gilmore ,s currently m fourth has promoted Pirate football to a
place in the season point stan- large extent, especially where he
Former Pirates Making
Grade In Big Leagues
dings at the speedway, only two
points out of third place.
However, Gilmore is willing to
lose points and fall a position or
two in order to attend the ECU-
N.C. State football game on
Sept. 6.
Gilmore, who is a contract ad-
ministrator with AT & T in
Greensboro, displays the Purple
and Gold colors of ECU on his
racing car. The car is gold and
trimmed in purple.
Gilmore is a Pirate's Club
member and rarely misses an
works.
"I have bought 20 sets of
season tickets this year for myself
and people at work commented
Gilmore. "I have 12 tickets to the
State game
Gilmore took up Street Stock
racing about three years ago and
is still looking for his first vic-
tory. His best finish thus far has
been 2nd place, although earlier
this year he had a string of six
straight top-five finishes.
Although he has never won a
Street Stock race, Gilmore is a
former go-kart National Cham-
pion. He won the go-kart title in
1977 by winning a series of races
all across the country.
"The races were held at places
like Rockingham, Charlotte
Motor Speedway, Daytona,
Pocono, and the final race of the
series was held at Indianapolis
said Gilmore.
Gilmore said that he had con-
tacted ECU Athletic Director Dr.
Ken Kerr about getting a Pirate
emblem to go on his car, but
found that there wasn't one
(emblem) big enough to show up
on the car.
"I wanted to get a emblem big
enough for the top of the car, but
there wasn't one available that
was that big said Gilmore.
For all you people that claim to
be Pirate fans but sometimes
come up with excuses to miss
games, maybe you should take
Gilmore's philosophy on the
'ssue
"You've got to get your
priorities right added Gilmore.
RirL r;im "HOTOCOUHTESY OF THeCOU.IM TIMES
Kick Gilmore has not missed an ECU-State game since '73.
Men, Women Netters
Prepare For Action
By DON RUTLEDGE
SportiHrilrr
As the ECU men's and
women's tennis teams take to the
courts for the start of the 1986-87
season, they have every reason to
be optimistic about the tennis
which lay ahead. Despite a
mediocre 1985-86 performance
(the men finished 7th in the CAA
with an 11-13 record, while the
women finished 5th with an 11-11
record) and a tough schedule this
year, both squads have most of
Wl years players returning Aj�d
according to Coach Pat Sher-
man, now in her fifth year in
charge of the men's and women's
teams, "everybody is playing
much above the level that they
were last spring
Tryouts have been going on for
a week now as Coach Sherman
tries to narrow the team down to
a workable size. After the first
cut, the men's squad consisted of
16 players, eleven of whom are
returning athletes. Of the nine
women who are set to compete
for ECU, seven are returning
players. This pleased coach Sher-
man very much. But what pleases
her most is the growth and
maturiy 0f tne veteran athletes.
vr7n very pleased with the depth
of the men's team Sherman
said.
For the men, only John An-
n?
orts Fact
Thur. Aug. 28,1970
After dousing two Detroit
sportswriters with ice water,
Tigers pitcher Denny McLain
finds himself in hot water when
he's suspended for eight days,
his second suspension of the
year. The two-time Cy Young
Award winner slips from 24
wins in 1969 to three in 1970.
thony of last year's starting
squad is not playing again. But he
won't be that badly missed as he
will be on the court with the guys
every day as the assistant coach.
In fact, all of the top-six singles
players are back, with senior Dan
Lamont and sophomores John
Taylor and Jon Mel horn leading
the way. Melhorn was last year's
individual-record leader, while
returning starter Pat Campanaro
and John Anthony represented
the team strongly in doubles play.
The team is rounded out with
return players Greg Lloyd, Todd
Sumner, BiU Wing, and Tim
Morris. Scott Avery, a junior
who competed two years ago with
David Creech at number two
doubles, has made the cut and
may be a key factor if he remains
healthy.
For the women, the loss of top-
two starters Ann Manderfield
and Becky Clements may hurt,
but there is still a great deal of
depth and talent to the team.
Returning are last year's
individual-record leaders Susan
Montjoy and Lisa Eichholz,
along with Amy Ziemer, Holly
Murray, Tyraina "Ty" Myers,
Maria Swaim and Amy
McEachern.
"All the returning women are
playing extremely well Sher-
man said, "and Maria Swaim
(who saw limited singles action
last year) is playing exceptionally
well and will be challenging for a
singles position this fall
With the women's team at only
nine players, coach Sherman
urges any strong players in-
terested in competing for their
school to come see her in Minges
Coliseum, Room 200, or call at
757-6161 for a chance to tryout.
Tryouts for the men's team are
See BUCS, page 15
By RICK McCORMAC
C�-gp�rts Edhar
As NFL teams enter their final
week of preseason games, a
number of former Pirates stand
good chances of making their
respective teams.
Among those who have a good
chance of making it in the pros
are two members of last year's
Pirate squad. Running back
Tony Baker, a tenth-round draft
pick of the Atlanta Falcons, and
defensive back Kevin Walker, a
sixth-round pick of the Tampa
Bay Buccaneers, have performed
well in preseason.
According to Atlanta Falcons
Director of Player Personnel
Tom Bratz, Baker has a "better
than even chance" of sticking
with the club.
Baker, the second-leading
rusher in ECU history, is current-
ly listed number-two on the depth
chan behind former Clemson
standout Cliff Austin. According
Staton Looks
Toward ECU
�� 9Uff Win Rrporu
Jerome Staton, who played
tailback for N.C. State as a
freshman last season, is consider-
ing a transfer to ECU, Pirate
coach Art Baker confirmed Mon-
day.
"He contacted us last week
about the possibility of transferr-
ing Baker said in a telephone
interview.
Baker added, "He did say he
wants to come here
Baker said Staton's transfer
must be approved by the universi-
ty. He said he would not know
"for a ccuple of days" if Staton
would be admitted.
N.C. State coach Dick
Sheridan did not return a
reporter's call to his office.
Baker also confirmed that
former North Carolina lineman
J.R. Jenkins was hoping to
transfer to ECU as well. Baker
said Jenkins indicated he would
attend Pitt Community College
and then try to enter ECU.
Staton and Jenkins both were
to Bratz, Baker has been helped
by the contract holdout of All-
pro performer Gerald Riggs, but
Baker has made the most of the
opportunity, leading the Falcons
in rushing during the first two
preseason games.
"Tony is a fine north-south
runner, who gets the ball upfield
in a hurry Bratz said. "He's a
tough little performer, who has
the speed to be able to get out-
side
Baker also is returning kicks
for Atlanta, as he attempts to
earn a spot on the team.
Baker's former teammate
Walker, who led the NCAA in in-
terceptions last season, is also
turning some heads. Currently
listed third on the depth chart at
free safety behind Ivory Sulley
and Craig Curry, Walker has im-
pressed Buc's personnel with his
ability to return punts. In his first
See Walker, Page 14
Athlete Admits Illness
chance of making the Atlanta Falcons thi summer. H is urrenth
luted as the second tailback oa the team's depth chart.
Former Redskin Has Aidsl
By SCOTT COOPER
C-S��rk) EMr
For former Washington Red-
skin tight end Jerry Smith to
come public and admit he has
contracted the fatal disease
AIDS is quite gutsy as he is
believed to be the first (former)
professional athlete to do so.
Smith, who was an all-pro
and a 13-year NFL veteran,
told The Washington Post last
week that he is making the
disclosure in hopes that
something good will result and
that it may be something that
our society can learn from.
"I want people to know what
I've been through and how ter-
rible this disease is a sickly
Smith said. "Maybe it will help
people understand. Maybe it
will help with development in
research. Maybe something
positive will come out of this
With the growing rate of
AIDS victims in our nation to-
day (about 24,000 Americans),
it seems unclear why more peo-
ple don't come forward and try
to educate our society on a pro-
blem as widespread and
dangerous as this.
Being that Smith is a former
athlete, I feel his case is quite
comparable to that of another
athlete stepping forward about,
say, a drug problem. It's been
no secret about the many pro-
fessional athletes that have
been lost from athletics because
of drug use. Obviously, it's not
an easy thing to admit.
For an individual to realize
that heshe has a drug problem
is enough, but to come public
and seek help is another story.
They realize they have a serious
(and possible life-threatening)
problem and try to seek help �
knowing they may and usually
will face some son of public
scutiny.
When an ahtlete does come
out and admit heshe has a
problem and tries to educate
our society of that problem �
whether it is cocaine, alcohol or
in this case, AIDS, is certainly
commendable by my stan-
dards.
Indeed it is a shame what has
happened to Jerry Smith, who
is the second-leading receiver in
Redskins' history, but his
disclosure to publicly admit his
sickness is something
honorable.
See STARS, page 18
Baker Has Choice Of Quarterbacks
As Pirates Prepare For Opener
Berke Hoitdaw (IS) handing here to Anthony Simpson hi test year's game with Tuba, b oae of four can-
didates to lead the Pirate attack against N.C. Stats a week from Satarday.
By SCOTT COOPER
Ci Sjw Mm
With the start of ECU's 1986
season just a week-and-a-half
away, the Pirates are still unsettl-
ed on a starting quarterback.
There are four possible starters
for coach Art Baker, who is
coaching the quarterbacks, and
to say that the candidates are
young is an understatement �
three freshmen and a sophomore.
Sophomore Berke Hoitzclaw,
who has some game experience
(started in two games in 85) and
freshman Charlie Libretto are
seemingly the top-two choices,
according to Baker. However,
redshirt freshman Travis Hunter,
who was co-offensive MVP in
ECU's PurpleGold Game back
in the spring, and freshman Ed
Brogden are also in the running.
Brogden, 5-9, 165, who recently
entered the scene, impressed
Baker in earlier scrimmages as he
three for two TD's.
"I'm coaching the quarter-
backs this year and they're aware
of the fact that they're (the QB's)
competing for the starting job
Baker said following Tuesday
night's full-scale scrimmage.
"The job rests with Hoitzclaw
and Libretto. They're both young
and are going to make mistakes.
It's my job to correct those
mistakes.
"It's very close Baker add-
ed. "No one quarterback has
been quite consistent enough to
say 'you're the one we're going to
go with They're the kind of
competitors that will get better
After yeasterday's practice ses-
sion Baker said he didn't fed that
there was a big enough difference
between the three (Hoitzclaw,
Libretto and Hunter) to make a
decision. He added that they are
still a long way away from where
they need to be on Sept. 6, but he
was pleased with the progress
thus far.
Sophomore Hoitzclaw and
freshman Libretto commented on
the quarterback situation and
that the position is still up for
grabs.
'Everybody's really been
working hard. I fed like I'm do-
ing a pretty good job, but I know
I have room for improvement
Hoitzclaw commented. "There
are three or four of us that would
really want it (the starting spot).
It's coach Baker's decision and
we'll stand by it. You just have to
go out there and do your thing
"Being a freshman, I fed like
the starting position is there
Libretto said. "May the best man
win. Whether it is Travis or
Berke, they'll be it. It's going to
be the best one of us out there.
The decision is coach Baker's
Baker said, following Tuesday
evening's third full-scale scrim-
mage, that the entire team is im-
proving with time.
"We made fewer mistakes than
in the first two (scrimmages) he
said. "We did have intensity and
we were better on offense. The
defense still dominates.
"The real power is in Bubba
Waters, Vinson Smith and David
Phim � along with the fiiat
defensive group Baker con-
tinued. "They're all playing ex-
cellent football and they're going
to play like that all

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14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 28. 1986
Walker Among
Continued from page 13
exhibition game against the St.
Louis Cardinals, Walker return-
ed four punts for 40 yards, with
his longest effort being 23 yards.
However, a slight shoulder injury
speed and and quickness and the
fact that he is a hitter are his
strong points Brown said. "He
may be small, but he is a tough
guy
Other Pirates currently on pro-
fessional rosters are: defensive
Rally Caparas and Calvin Adams
are playing professionally in the
Canadian Football League.
Caparas plays for the Calgary
Stampeders, while Adams plays
for the Hamilton Tiger cats.
Mike Grant and Henry
has kept Walker from returning end Steve Hamilton (Washington Williams are the only Pirates on
Former Pirate Stefon Adams (14) celebrates TD
Kevin Walker (37) Mocks a punt last year
punts the past two weeks, but
Walker should be back in the
lineup for Friday night's final ex-
hibition contest against the
Miami Dolphins.
Walker's chances may well de-
pend on how he does in the game,
as there are currently eight defen-
sive backs on the Buccaneer
roster, including rookies Craig
Swoope and Rod Jones.
Stefon Adams, a second-year
pro for the Los Angelas Raiders,
looks to be a lock to make the
Raiders, according to defensive
back coach Willie Brown.
Adams is currently listed as the
number two free safety behind
Vann McElroy and also returns
kicks and plays cornerback.
"At this time Stefon looks
assured of making the squad. His
AP Poll
The Top Twenty teams in the
preseason Associated Press col-
lege football poll, with first place
votes in parentheses and 1985
record. Bold type indicates ECU
opponent in 1986 season.
Record
Oklahoma (44)
Michigan (6)
Miami, Fla. (1)
UCLA (3)
Alabama
6. Penn State (3)
7. Texas A & M (1)
8. Nebraska (1)
9. Ohio State
10. Tennessee
11. Florida State
12. Baylor
13. Florida
14. Auburn
15. LSU
16. Georgia
(tie) Washington
18. Brigham Young
19. Arkansas
20. Michigan State
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
11-1-0
10-1-1
10-2-0
9-2-1
9-2-1
11-1-0
10-2-0
9-3-0
9-3-0
9-1-2
9-3-0
9-3-0
9-1-1
8-4-0
9-2-1
7-3-2
7-5-0
11-3-0
10-2-0
7-5-0
REDS
Raleigh, N.C.
Presents
1st Beach Music Football Party
ECU vs. N.C. State
Daytime Party Nighttime Game
Band of Oz
Showman
Tarns
Doug Clark & Hot Nuts
Saturday, September 6,1986
Trinity Road, Raleigh, N.C.
Adjacent to Carter-Finley Stadium
Gates Open at 9:00 A.M.
Coolers Welcome!
Positively No GLASS Containers
Advance Tickets
$8.00
At The Gate
$10.00
Tickets on sale at Reds, United Carolina Bank, Oasis Records,
Record Bars Statewide, Don Murray's Barbecue
For Information Call Reds - 828-1250
or John Hightower 846-1092
mq0mm0mmiimitii �-

Redskins), linebacker Jody
Shultz (Philadelphia Eagles), of-
fensive tackle Tootie Robbins
(St. Louis Cardinals), linebacker
Norwood Vann (Los Angelas
Rams), running back Tony Col-
lins (New England Patriots), of-
fensive guard Terry Long (Pitt-
sburgh Steelers), running back
Ernest Byner (1,000 yard rusher
last year � Cleveland Browns)
and running back Sam Harrel
(Minnesota Vikings).
Former Pirate defensive backs
USFL rosters, as both play for
the Memphis Showboats.
Among the former Pirates who
were recently waived include:
running back Reggie Branch
(Redskins), linebacker Jeff
Pegues (Dolphins), wide receiver
Ricky Nichols (Indianapolois
Colts) and Kicker Jeff Heath
(Kansas City Chiefs).
MUSIC FOR THIS EVENT
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Buc
Continued from page
closed.
The fall season will
mainly of tournaments U
men, and dual matches U
women. Sat. Sept. 13, is thl
for the first scheduled ma
The men will be at Old Dor
for an Invitational, an
women will go to
Greensboro for a dual meej
The first home matcru
scheduled for Wed. Sept.
the women, and Tue. Sept
the men. Both squads begn
r
Get Read
The sixth-annual BudwJ
Football Pep Rally will be
on Thurs. Sept. 4, at 7 p.
Ficklen Stadium.
There will be a numbe
prizes given away, mcludii
grand prize of a 19-inch
television.
The entire football team
coaching staff will be on hanc
well as the Marching Pirate-
Pirate mascot and the
cheerleaders. Axnong the
speakers wil be Pirate fc
coach Art Baker and Asm
AD Dave Hart.
In case of rain, the Pep
will be held in Minge Coin
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ly in the
eague.
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us.
Henry
rates on
lay for
the Memphis Showboats.
Among the former Pirates who
were recently waived include-
running back Reggie Branch
(Redskins), linebacker Jeff
Pegues (Dolphins), wide receiver
Ricky Nichols (Indianapolois
Colts) and Kicker Jeff Heath
(Kansas City Chiefs).
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 28. 1986
IS
Continued from page 13
closed.
The fall season will consist
mainly of tournaments for the
men, and dual matches for the
women. Sat. Sept. 13, is the date
for the first scheduled matches.
The men will be at Old Dominion
for an Invitational, and the
women will go to UNC-
Greensboro for a dual meet.
The first home matches are
scheduled for Wed. Sept. 17 for
the women, and Tue. Sept. 23 for
the men. Both squads begin their
home season versus UNC-
Wilmington. Both matches start
at 3:00 p.m. The men will end
their fall campaign at William &.
Mary in the Colonial Athletic
Association Conference Tourna-
ment. That will be on the
weekend of Oct. 24-26. All the
players are looking forward to
meeting the challenges ahead,
and it looks like this year may be
a very good one.
So come on out and support
your Pirate Aces. These are not
the royal grasses of Wimbledon,
so cheering is definately en-
couraged.
A word to all student players:
if you're planning on playing on
the Minges courts, remember
there are team practices and mat-
ches, and PE tennis classes. You
will probably only be able to play
there before 9:00 a.m. or after
6:00 p.m.
One final word to the student
body: if there are any young
ladies out there who would like to
tryout for the women's team,
contact Dr. Sherman as soon as
possible. The Lady Pirates need
you.
UNIVERSITY RENTALS
206 E. 5th Street
757-1557
Monday-Saturday 11 AAA-9 PM
MEMBERSHIP TO ECU STUDENTS
Day
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Month $32.95
Semester $109.95
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There will be a number of
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grand prize of a 19-inch color
television.
The entire football team and
coaching staff will be on hand, as
well as the Marching Pirates, the
Pirate mascot and the Pirate
cheerleaders. Among the guest
speakers will be Pirate football
coach Art Baker and Associate
AD Dave Hart.
In case of rain, the Pep Rally
will be held in Minges Coliseum.
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16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 28, 1986
Bradley To Lead Golfers
By TIM CHANDLER
AutelaM S�ori� Etar
First-year head golf coach Hal
Morrison held his first official
meeting with the Pirate golf team
yesterday afternoon.
Morrison indicated that he had
high expectations for the 1986-87
Buc golfers because of the strong
nucleus of players that were
returning.
Among the returning Pirate
linksters are standout senior
Mike Bradley, seniors Mark Ar-
cilesi and Paul Steelman. Also
returning for this year's cam-
paign are junior Chris Riley and
sophomore Mike Nadeau. In all
the there are 12 golfers returning
for this season.
Sophomore John Chapman,
who proved to be a helpful part
of last year's team, is out for the
fall schedule and possibly the spr-
ing slate according to Morrison.
Chapman underwent surgery on
his shoulder.
the fall schedule is important and
does carry some weight when
decision time comes around for
the NCAA tournament, that the
spring schedule is the most im-
portant.
"If you have a good spring
then the fall will be weighted in
also, however, the results of the
spring mean more said Mor-
rison.
The ECU golf schedule for the
fall season is listed below.
Date
Sept. 27-28
Oct. 3-4
Oct. 17-18
Oct. 24-25
Nov. 10-11
Event
Augusta College Intercollegiate
MacGregor Classic
John Ryan Memorial Invitational
UNC-W Fall Invitational
Wolfpack Collegiate Interna-
tional
Pirate senior Mike Bradley, who has been team MVP the last three
years, will lead the golfers under new coach Hal Morrison this season.
Bradley earned qualifying medalist honors this summer at the North-
South Amateur in Pinehurst.
Chris Winkel, who played at
ECU in the fall of last season
before leaving, will be returning
to join the Pirates. However, ac-
cording to Morrison, Winkel will
not be able to play until the spr-
ing, due to eligibility re-
quirements.
Other additions to the team in-
clude Brian Conner, a junior
transfer from Methodist College
and Todd Ramsey, a sophomore
transfer from South Carolina.
Morrison, who comes to ECU
after a one-year stint at
Methodist College, stated that he
felt the Bucs should be able to
have a respectable team.
Morrison went on to say that
the competition in the NCAA is
so tough now that sometimes a
good team will still not have top
finishes.
Morrison, who coached the
golf team at East Tennessee State
University for 25 years before go-
ing to Methodist College, listed
Bradley as the team's leader.
"Without a doubt, Mike
Bradley is the top player on the
team said Morrison. "He had a
good summer (playing in tour-
naments) and should be ready to
Play
The linksters have a fall
schedule which is made up of five
matches, with the opener being
set for Sept. 27-28.
Morrison said that although
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STEAK HOUSE
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Lunch 11 a.m3:30p.m.
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PLACEMENT
VICEGRADUA- I NO Se
Graduate Students are encl
to pick up a REGfSTI
PACKET at the Career
and Placement Service
able to leave a resume a I
�StabtMi a place to put i
reference ore you w
interview on campus I .Ov.
qualifications of the empioy
come to campus oe�ween
ana April Those a Aa '
the chance c nterv e� or
aireac tchedu ec -?evtewl
sons com.ng r oxt0per you
return the caras anc 'esumt
REGISTRATION PACKET
as poss Die Reco,r-eae:
be in for those -� ews
September;
3
INDT. Severa outstan I
tunit es are a.a an e a
corpora $ for a sees'el
dustnai technology stcef
eel lent exper ence a-c sa ar
cess o S6 per hour
Coopera �e eauca
Blag
FRESHMEN: CaPuS Cr
Chr s s spos - Pr it
a- cri s every Thursaa?
7 30 p m a oic Joye- L Of
226 We weicon-e you 1
Carolina anc nope you a
for some fun, fellowsnp a'
Stuay We look forwarc �
you
Classit
THE KNIGHTS OP SIGMi
Aou'C e to welcome a
fresr-re" o ECU. Our
meetings for the brothers
sisters will be heta n rool
Menaena every Sunaay
p.rn Gene, The Be.er anc
can be touna at suit 13 p -a
ding
PKA LITTLE SISTERS Tr,
meeting at 8 c
room 221 Menae-ra -��
necessary to ge Ifi ngi -�
for a great year!
SIGEP LITTLE SISTERS
meeting of he ser"?se'
THIS TUESDAY at 9 : -
be a very important
everyone PLEASE ATI
Also, those of you who are -
in playing flag foot&an ee:
the house ana sign up for It
ALPHA PHI OMEGA BROl
Meeting Thursaay a 5 Mer
rm 212. Inauction of off ;e-s
ner at Western sfeer
meeting. Welcome BBC brol
PI KAPPS: Be at te Ml ; id
7 sharp. Let's star me vear :
and throw an unforgear e
TOGA, TOGA, TOGA P Kai
invites everyone to the At'
at 8 for the 6th Annual P Kai
Toga Party featuring Doug
and the Hot Nuts Remew
pHPiast week for mose unoeJ
drink so come to the ultimate
Party ana get trashed with
Kapps!
WELCOME BACK PHI TAI
TLE SISTERS: Tnere a II be
datory meeting. Tues Sec
Everyone rnust go by the p
bouse to leave new aaares;
phone numbers by Tues. Set
orber to be act ;e Get psvcnj
our meeting, lii sister rusr-
party.
PHI KAPPA TAU LIL SI
RUSH � � Come te a memo
best family on campus Ru�
be at 9 p m Wed Sept 2 anc
Sept. 3 with a party on FrMayj
4th for our new lit1 sisters For
info call the Phi Kappa Tau
AID: Preesh getting leia. Ja
party We're looking forwara
next one. Phi Taus
HANK'S
CREAM
HOMEMADE
Wi
NEED BARMAIDS:
at 758 0058
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FIRST STRIKE: Is looking!
talented lead guitarist Mif
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PART-TIME BABYSITTER
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STAFF POSITIONS: The!
caneer yearbook is acceptij
plications for staff positions
by office or contact Media
secretary for information. L
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floor.
�& &'
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 24. 1916
17
Announcements
CAREER PLANNING AND
PLACEMENT $ER
VICEGRADUATING Seniors and
Graduate Students are encouraged
to p.ck up a REGISTRATION
PACKET at the Career Planning
and Placement Service. You are
able to leave a resume with us and
establish a place to put letters of
reference on file. You will be able to
interview on campus if you meet the
qualifications of the employers who
come to campus between October
and April. Those who wait will miss
the chance to interview on the 40
already scheduled interviewing per-
sons coming in October. You need to
return the cards and resumes in the
REGISTRATION PACKET as soon
as possibleRecommended that it
be in for those interviews by mid-
September!
INDT: Several outstanding oppor-
tunities are available with major
corporations for fall semester for in-
dustrial technology students. Ex-
cellent experience and salary in ex-
cess of $6 per hour. Contact
Cooperative education, 313 Rawl
Bldg.
FRESHMEN: Campus Crusade for
Christ is sponsoring "Prime Time"
which is every Thursday night at
730 p.m. at Old Joyner Library rm.
226. We welcome you to East
Carolina and hope you will join us
for some fun, fellowship and Bible
Study. We look forward to meeting
you.
ECU SURFING: The ECU Surf
ClubTeam will hold It's first
meeting Thursday, Sept. 11 at 8 in
room 221 Mendenhalt. Topics will In-
clude the team tryout as well as
trips and activities for the year. Hot
new surf videos will be shown and a
party will be held after the meeting.
Guys and Girls are welcome and any
new students are urged to attend.
NORTH CAROLINA STUDENT
LEGISLATURE: If your really
care, then VOICE YOUR OPINION!
The East Carolina Delegation to the
N.C. Student Legislature will hold a
fall semester organizational
meeting on Thursday, August28th at
7:00 pm, Room 212. Mendenhall.
Veteran Legislators and interested
new students make plans to attend
Questions or Information, call Gor-
don at 754-4382. NCSL � The Cam-
pus Voicel
FOOTBALL OFFICEThere will be a
walk-on tryout for the ECU Football
Team on September 8, 1986 for any
ECU Student. Come dressed and
ready to participate on that day at
Scales Field House.
HONORS PROGRAMAny honors
student or faculty member intending
to submit a proposal for an honors
seminar spring semester should do
so co David Sanders, Engl. Dept
by noon Tues Sept. 2.
HONOR REVIEW BOARD: Con
gratulations to the new Honor
Review Board members: Jay
Johnson, Lisa Williamson, Paul
Jones, Mike Riley, Anthony Porcelll,
Dana Dunlow, Rusty Wiley, Richard
Pond, Brian Burke, Shari Clemens,
Tim Roberson and Thomas Cherry
Please plan to attend training ses-
sion on Tuesday, Sept. 2nd, at 6 p m
Call 757-6611 ext. 218 for details.
STUDENT COUNCIL FOR EXCEP-
TIONAL CHILDREN: Be a special
person and help special children.
Join and support SCEC (Student
Council for Exceptional Children).
First meeting Monday, Sept. 8th at 5
in Speight. Look for signs for the
room number.
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION: Come
join in a celebration with the BSU
Thursdays at 7 p.m. We have
PAUSE, an informal service
celebrating Christ. The BSU is
located on loth St. beside Wendy's
COUNSELING CENTER, 316
WRIGHT BUILDINGIMPROVING
YOUR STUDY SKILLS � Learning
how to improve your study skills for
greater success in college. The
following mini course and
workshops can help you prepare for
the added workload of college or
help to increase your grade point
average. When and Where: ALL
SESSIONS WILL BE HELD IN 312
Wright Building. Sept. 8, Monday,
Time Management, 3-5 pm; Sept. 9,
Tuesday, Making and Using Notes,
3-5 pm; Sept. 10, Wednesday, Effi-
cient Reading, 3-5 pm; Sept. 11,
Thursday, Test Taking, 3-5 pm.
Plese call Counseling Center for
other information (757-6661).
DEPT. OF ELEMENTARY AND
MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION:
Announce its class meetings for Fall
Semester, 1986: Seniors, Aug. 27, 5-6,
Speight 129. Juniors, Aug. 28, 5-6,
Speight 129. Sophomores, Sept. 2,
5-6, Speight 129. Freshmen, Sept. 3,
5-6, Speight 129. All elememtary and
middle grades maors are expected
to attend these very important
meetings.
PRESBYTERIAN STUDENTSI:
You and your friends are invited to a
hot dog open house at the Methodic
Student Center TONIGHTI Thurs-
day, Aug. 28th, from 6-8 p.m. Meet
the campus ministers and our new
minister from Mexico, make new
friends, and eat great food (it's
freel). The Methodist Student
Center is located at 501 E. 5th St.
across from Garrett Dorm.
PRESBYTERIAN STUDENTSI:
You and your friends are invited to a
hot dog open house at the Methodist
Student Center TONIGHT! Thurs-
day, Aug. 28th, from 6-8 p.m. Meet
the campus ministers and our new
minister from Mexico, make new
friends, and eat great food (it's
freel). The Methodist Student
Center is located at 501 E. 5th St.
across from Garrett Dorm.
PHI SIGMA PI: Hey Tau Chapter!
August 30th is our Annual Softball
Game and cookoutl The Cookout is
at 4 p.m. at Elm St. Park, and don't
forget the party afterwardsl Our
first scheduled meeting is at 5 p m
on Sept. 3rd in Austin 132. We're also
going to have two surprise guest
speakers!
Classifieds
THE KNIGHTS OF SIGMA NU:
Would like to welcome all of the
freshmen to E.C.U. Our weekly
meetings for the brothers and lit
sisters will be held in room 221
Mendenhall every Sunday at 9:30
p.m. Gene, The Bever, and Cheeto
can be found at suit 13 Pirates Lan-
ding.
PKA LITTLE SISTERS: There is a
meet.ng ar 8 p.m. Thurs Aug 28 at
rX)m 221 Mendenhall. Attendance
necessary to get things underway
for a great year
SIG EP LITTLE SISTERS: Our first
rneetmg of th� semester will be
THIS TUESDAY at 9 p.m. This will
be a very important meeting so
everyone PLEASE ATTEND
Also, those of you who are interested
in playing flag football need to go by
the house and sign up for the team!
ALPHA PHI OMEGA BROTHERS:
Meeting Thursday at 5, Mendenhall
rm 212. Induction of officers and din-
ner at Western Steer following
meeting. Welcome back brothers!
PI KAPPS: Be at the Attic tonight at
7 sharp. Let's start the year out right
and throw an unforgettable party!
TOGA, TOGA, TOGA: Pi Kappa Phi
invites everyone to the Attic tonight
at 8 for the 6th Annual Pi Kappa Phi
Joga Party featuring Doug Clark
and te Hot Nuts. Remember this is
��WrWlast week for those under 21 to
drink so come to the ultimate Toga
Party and get trashed with the Pi
Kapps!
WELCOME BACK PHI TAU LIT-
TLE SISTERS: There will be a man-
datory meeting, Tues. Sept. 2 at 5.
Everyone must go by the Phi Tau
house to leave new addresses and
phone numbers by Tues Sept. 2 in
order to be active. Get psyched for
our meeting, lil sister rush and a
Party.
PHI KAPPA TAU LIL SISTER
RUSH! 11: Come be a member of the
best family on campus Rush will
be at 9 p.m. Wed Sept.2 and Thurs
Sept. 3 with a party on Friday, Sept.
4th for our new Ml' sisters. For more
info call the Phi Kappa Tau house.
AZD: Preesh getting leid. Jammin'
party. We're looking forward to the
next one. -Phi Taus.
HANK'S HOMEMADE
CREAM! 11
ICE
WANTED
NEED BARMAIDS: Contact Rose
at 758-0058.
FIRST STRIKE: Is looking for a
talented lead guitarist. Must be
creative and have ability to im-
provise. Only metal-oriented in-
dividuals need apply. 752-9445.
ROOMMATE WANTED: 3
bedroom, 2 bath, 14 x 70 furnished
mobile home, central air, $100 a
month plus utilities shared. 758-1522.
PART-TIME BABYSITTER NEED-
ED: Must have own transportation.
Call 756-6319.
STAFF POSITIONS: The Buc-
caneer yearbook is accepting ap-
plications for staff positions. Come
by office or contact Media Board
secretary for information. Located
across from Joyner Library- 2nd
floor.
MODELS WANTED: Come be a
part of our "New Attitudes" Hair
Show. Monday, Sept. 8 at Sheraton of
Greenville. For more info, please
call Nancy at Honeycutt Salon Ser
vices. 752-6178.
COLLEGE REP WANTED: To
distribute "Student Rate" subscrip-
tion cards at this campus. Good in-
come. For information application
write to: COLLEGIATE
MARKETING SERVICES, 251 Glen-
wood Dr. Mooresville, NC 28115.
SOCCER COACHES AND
REFEREES: Needed for afternoon
hours. Contact Pitt County Com-
munity Schools at 752-2934 Ext. 276
or 267.
SOCCER COACHES NEEDED:
Greenville Recreation and Parks
Dept. is recruiting 10-14 part-time
Soccer coaches for the fall soccer
program. Applicants must possess
some knowledge in soccer skills and
have patience to work with youth.
Applicants must be able to coach
young people, ages 6-15 in soccer
fundamentals. Hours approximately
3-7 p.m. Monday-Friday. Some night
and week-end coaching. Program
will extend from Sept. 8- to mid Nov.
Salary rate, $3.46hour. Applicants
will be accepted August 20- Sept. 12.
Contact Ben James at 752-4137 Ext
262.
WANTED: 2 roommates mf to
share comfortable house on Meade
St. $130 a month and utilities. Nice
atmosphere and central air. Call
David at 752-9788.
WANTED: Female student to assist
housewife with house cleaning and
child care in exchange for room and
board. Near campus. 757-1798.
SALE
FOR SALE: Mistral Superlight
sailboard w6.3 progress line sail.
Used only 3 days $1300 value for
lust $895. Call Jill 758-0164
FOR SALE BY OWNER: Im
maculate 3 bedroom, 2'i bath, brick
Cape Cod. Large great-room with
fireplace, sunroom, wet bar, dual
heatpump and central vac. $96,900
Call 756-8596 after 5 p.m.
WINDSURFER FOR SALE:
Fanatic funboard complete with 6.0
meter powerhead sail, six
footstraps, and retractable dagger-
board. 758-2960, ask for Steve.
HOMEMADE HOT WAFFLE
CONESMI: We'll fill'em with your
favorite HOMEMADE ICE CREAM,
top it with HOT FUDGE, then CAN-
DY, real WHIPPED CREAM, and a
CHERRY- Utterly Delicious
YUMHI: Homemade Oreo Ice
Cream with MaM Candy's blended
into itYUMt Only at Hank's
Homemade Ice Cream (beside Wen-
dy's) It can't be beati!
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom apt 3
blocks from campus. $250 monthly
� deposit and 1 yr. lease.
NEWIII: Try one of Hank's NEW
Treasure Chest Treats
Guaranteed to make your evening
complete
REFRIGERATOR FOR SALE:
Mint condition, 1.9 cu. ft. capacity.
Excellent size for dorm use. $50. Call
757-0503 after 8 p.m.
FOR SALE: Sleeper sofa.
Rustbeige herring bone- $75. Call
758-8019 after 8 p.m.
COMPUTER DATING: KATZ Per-
sonalized Computer Dating Service
is offering special low rates to
students. Call or write for more in-
formation. 355-7595 or P.O. Box 8003,
Greenville, N.C. 27835.
PROFESSIONAL WORD PRO-
CESSING: All your typing needs 7
days a week on our state-of-the-art
equipment which features a letter
quality IBM printer. Pick-up and
delivery available. 355-7595.
SAVE MONEY 8 lb. bag Of ice
for only .35. Barkers Refrigeration
on Memorial Dr. at West-end circle.
8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 756-6417.
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPY SERVICES: We offer
experience in typing resumes,
theses, technical documents and
term papers. We manage and merge
your names and addresses into
merged letters, labels, envelopes or
rolodex cards. We also sell software
and computer diskettes. Our prices
are reasonable and we always offer
a 15 percent discount to ECU
students. SDF Professional Com-
puter Services (Near Cubbies) 106
E. 5th St Greenville, NC 27834
752-3694.
GRAND OPENING SALE: Maxell
Diskettes 5Vi .95 each.
Photocopying- .054: each. SDF Pro-
fessional Computer Services (near
Cubbie's), 106 E. 5th St Greenville,
N.C. 752-3694.
FOR RENT: 2 room furnished
apartment for rent. Lights and
water furnished. Call 756-0174 or
752-7212.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom wprivate
bath with Christian couple. Front
and back entrance, heat and air con-
dition furnished. Call 752-7212.
FOR SALE: Is it true you can buy
ieeps for $44 through the U.S.
government? Get the facts today!
Call 1-312 742-1142, ext. 5271-A.
BACK TO SCHOOL GARAGE
SALE: 8-until. Saturday, August 30,
rain or shine. Hope Fellowship
Church Gym (formally Old Parker's
Chapel Gym) Pactolus Hwy. Fur-
niture, antiques, appliances,
household items, clothes. Watch for
signs at intersection of 264-bypass
and Pactolus Hwy.
MATHCOMPUTER TUTORING:
758-1237 for appointment or printed
information.
LOOK GREAT AT SUPER SAV-
INGS New York trained Hair
Stylist- Paul Mitchell � Chadwick
haircutting methods. Professional
Image Hair Studio. Hair cuts for
men and women to fit your bone
structure. Free hair consultations.
756-1945.
FOR SALE: 1971 Volvo, 2 door,
stick-shift. New tires, brakes and
battery. Good car, $900. Call
753-2325.
FOR SALE: Bed, day bed, heaters,
table and other misc. items. Call
Jennifer- 752-3352 weekdays 8-10
a.m. and p.m. Priced to move!
ROOM FOR RENT: Full house
privileges, very close to campus.
$135 a month. Plenty of parking. Call
758-0325.
FOR SALE: Don't rent a dorm
refrigerator. 2 3.4 c.f. refrigerators
for sale. 1 used(six months), 1 used
(1V� years). Make offer, call
752-0735.
FOR SALE: 81 Mazda GLC 75k,
great shape, runs good. $1395 or best
offer. Call 827-4581.
See CLASSIFIEDS, page 18
VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE: The
Student union visual Arts Commit-
tee is starting a new year and we are
looking for new members. Anybody
with an interest in Art is encouraged
to join. Last year was exciting but
this year promises to be even better.
If interested call Steven Zakeiy at
752-8481 or call the Student union at
757-6611.
NAVIGATORS: Volleyball on the
mall. Thursday Aug. 28 at4 p.m The
Navigators of ECU Christion
Fellowship.
WELCOME BACK AM-
BASSADORS We are looking for-
ward to a great year. Plans have
already begun. Our first general
meeting will be held on Wad Sept. 3
at 5:15 p.m. in room 221 MancJanhatt.
INTERESTED IN BICYCLE RAC-
ING, TOURING ITCt: Come to the
Sept. meeting of the Down East
Cycling Club! Learn about upcom-
ing races, training rides and touring
events. Meeting date: Friday, Sept.
5, 6:30 p.m. Meeting Place: Bicycle
Post Shop in Downtown Greenville.
you didn't get your copies at
KINKO'S
you paid too much
?
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a ?
KJnfcol UcUwikU
Eul Carotrn Un.�uy
321 E 10th St
752-0875
Monday - Friday
7:00am- 10:00pm
Saturday
9:00am - 6:00pm
5TH STREET IMPORT
SERVICE
MOVES
�Finest in Foreign Car Repair
�We repair Toyota, Honda, VW, Fiat, Porsche
Volvo, Oatsun, Lotus, Mercedes, BMW, Audi
Subaru and others
�New Location! Dickinson & Memorial - across
from Lincoln Mercury Dealership.
4500 sq. ft. 757-9434 2204 Dickinson Ave.
THE SOURCE FOR ADVERTISING SPECIALTIES SINCE 1978
action
A �D-V-E-R-T-I-S-l-N-G
INCORPORATED
Personalized Items With Your Name
or Advertising Message
Buttons � Huggers
Bumperstickers � Mugs
Visit our showroom for other ideas
300 E. Arlington Blvd. � Parliament Place, Suite 88
P.O. Box 3292 � Greenville, NC 27834
(919) 756-8655
Immanuel Baptist Church
invites all students to Sunday
Worship with Sunday School
at 9:30.
Worship Service at 11:00
September 14 Luncheon
immediately following service.
Immanuel Baptist Church
1101 S. Elm Street
welcomes you back to
ECU
Mon. thru Thurs.
Aug. 25 & 26 9:00 p.m2 a.m.
DRAFT NITE
Admission: $1.50 guys $1.00 ladies $2.00 18 yr olds
1 K Draft Nite
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18
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 28, 1986
Dare Beaches Offer Recreational A ctivities
By SPORTS STAFF &
DAU COUNTY TOl R1ST I1U.AI
A surfing championship at
Cape Hatteras and triathalon on
Roanoke Island highlight the
post-Labor Day week and
weekend along Dare County's
100-mile stretch of beaches.
According to the Dare County
Tourist Bureau, these events will
be the start of a full agenda of
outdoor activities scheduled for
Indian summer and fall.
The East Coast Surfing
Association Championship, an
annual event for association
members held on the beach at the
Cape Hatteras Lighthouse is
planned for Aug. 31 through
Sept. 6. Surfers, dedicated to a
sport that is experiencing a
resurgence in popularity, have
long considered Cape Hatteras to
be a prime East coast destination.
The triathalon � a test of
swimming, biking and running
skills � will be held Sept. 6 at the
N.C. Marine Resources Center
on Roanoke Island. Interested
parties should contact the Dare
County Recreation Department
(919)473-1101, for details.
The Marine Resources Center
will be christened N.C.
Aquarium-Roanoke Island dur-
IRS Hours
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial
Mon-Fri 7-8 am
Mon-Fri 11 am-1 pm
Minges
Mon-Fri 4-7 pm
Sat-Sun 1-5 pm
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
Mon-Thurs 11 am-7 pm
Fri 11 am-6 pm
Sat 11 am-5 pm
Sun 12noon-5pm
Minges
Mon-Thurs 3-7 pm
OUTDOOR RECREATION
Mon 1-5 pm
Fn 1-5 pm
Sat 11 am-2pm
ing week-long ceremonies beginn-
ing Sept. 7.
At Nags Head, a championship
volleyball tournament is schedul-
ed for Sept. 6 and 7.
At the same time, comfortable
fall temperatures contribute to
the enjoyment of other outdoor
and water-related activites �
sunbathing, beachcombing,
sailboating, golf and tennis.
Then, of course, there's
fishing. Post-Labor Day fishing
picks up steam on the Outer
Banks' eight piers and along the
surf as anglers begin anticipating
the blitzes of big blues and the
return to area waters of the
coveted red drum. Small fish
taken incclude four to nine
pound Spanish mackerel, one-
pound size spot, two to five-
pound flounder, croaker, gray
and speckled trout and taylor
blues.
Anglers can rent tackle at the
piers or at a number of tackle
shops, rent a skiff with a motor,
hire a guide, or reach the sound
and ocean waters with their own
boats. Charters are available at
Nags Head, Oregon Inlet, Hat-
teras Village and on Roanoke
Island.
Four major fishing tourneys
Stars May
Transfer
Continued from page 13
are held during the fall from mid- and features decoy carvings,
September through early wildfowl paintings, cross stitch
November. an(j a variety of handmade ar-
Meanwhile, visitors may enjoy tides, will be sponsored by the
a candlelight tour of the Outer Banks Chamber of Corn-
Elizabeth II, a representative
16th century sailing vessel similar
to those that brought England's
first New World colonists to
Roanoke some 400 years ago,
from 7 to 9 p.m. on Sept. 12.
Although the ship will leave its
Manteo berth and take to the in-
land waters of North Carolina
for more than a month beginning
Sept. 20 the visitor center,
which features exhibits and a gift
shop, will remain open to the
public during that time.
A pier fishing contest open to
youngsters is a highlight of the
annual National Hunting and
merce. For information, call
(919)261-3801.
The annual Thanksgiving Fun-
board Regatta will be held on
Nov. 29.
Climaxing these fall events
along with others sponsored by a
number of organizations, civic
clubs and businesses, will be an
attempt by Chuck Yeager,
famous test pilot, to set a new
transcontinental speed record by
flying from Califoria to Kill Devil
Hills � expected date of arrival
Dec. 17. According to the First
Flight Society, Yeager's effort
will be part of the annual First
Sept. 27. The expo includes a
variety of activities and
demonstrations presented at the
N.C. Aquarium-Roanoke Island.
Wildfoods and waterfowl are
on the menu for the following
two weekends.
As part of the popular October
Marsh and Sea Fest, dubbed
"wildfoods weekend" and
scheduled for Oct. 3 to 5, par-
ticipants forage for unusual
seafoods before preparation of a
quite unusual banquet that con-
cludes the affair. For informa-
tion, contact the N.C. Aquarium,
(919) 473-3494.
From Oct. 10 through 12, the
8th annual Waterfowl Weekend,
which attracts exhibitors from up
and down the eastern seaboard
date each year at the Wright
Brothers Memorial.
Aside from special events and
outdoor activities, open to
visitors year 'round are numerous
attractions through the area �
the Wright Memorial at Kill Devil
Hills features a reproduction of
the "Kitty Hawk Flyer The
Flyer will be in the visitor center-
museum which is dedicated to
man's first successful machine
powered airplane flight.
Fall breezes keep hang gliders
aloft and climbers moving along
at Jockey's Ridge, the tallest
natural sand dune on the eastern
seaboard. Late fall, the time
when northern waterfowl seek
warmer climates, is an ideal time
for touring Pea Island National
high school stars at Southwest
Edgecomb High School in
Pinetops. Both, if they enter gHlNNllNUHlllMlliiiiiiiiii
ECU, would be eligible for the - �
fall of 1987. Staton would then
have three years of eligibility and
Jenkins two.
Staton, 5-11 and 208 pounds,
played in 10 games for NCSU last
season, carrying 40 times for 119
yards.
Both Staton and Jenkins had
considered signing with East
Carolina University out of high
school.
Classifieds
Contiued from page 17
FOR SALE: Wood frame sofa �
cushions, 2 chairs and coffee-table
$250. Bedframe and small chest of
drawers- $130 if sold with mattress
$150. Call after 3 p.m. 746-4923.
Mat
chair.
FURNITURE FOR SALE:
ching couch, love seat, and
752 7611 Must sell.
REFRIGERATOR: Barely used,
mid-sized Avanti unit. $50. Phone
7528226.
PORTABELLO BOOGIE
AVAILABLE Private parties, pool
side sh.n digs, cook outs and
etc Contact the TRASHMAN at
752-3587. Best D.J. outfit in thirteen
counties.
POR SALE: Two white twin
SSf v�each; 2 �?
Pnscilla curtains with Car Can
curtains, 60' long x 100 wide, T5
both sets, 2 sets ,ined gold drapes
� .ojb 61' wide, $io both its
DAY STUDENTS
Do You Want To Make I
A Difference?
Apply now for the position of Day Student
Representative on the ECU Media Board. I
Help set policies for operations of WZMB, 1
THE REBEL, THE EAST CAROLINIAN, 1
BUCCANEER, EXPRESSIONS, & THE I
PHOTO LAB. j
Apply in Media Board Office I
j 757-6009
j Filing Dates: Aug. 26-Sept. 5 1986
1 -5:00 p.m.
HiiiiiiiiiiniuiiiiiiiiiiiiitiHiuuiuiHiittiiuiiiiiiniiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
gpiNu
BRbAKFAS
VNE1
STOP YOUR TAIN a:
GREENVILLE,
Here's Your SUPER TASTE TRIP TICKET!
XTC
STATION
CAROLINA EAST MALL (Across from KERR DRUGS)
Try it Once � You'll Chug Back For More!
HONDA. msM
NEVER
Be Late To
Class Again
Ride To Class
In Style On A
HONDA Scooter.
"We do our own financing"
BAGLEY'S
EQUIPMENT COMPANY
US 13-17 By Pass PHONE 792-5041 Williomston, NC
Wildlife Refuge on the northern
end of Hatteras Island. The dou-
ble keepers' quarters at the Cape
Hatteras Lighthouse, which
house a museum and offer visitor
information, were reopened in
May following restoration work.
Ocracoke Island is a free ferry
crossing away from Hatters
Village. The Elizabethan Gardens
on Roanoke Island are at their
best during autumn for
geraniums, hibiscus (sorry, no
relation to cannibus) and
chrysanthemums; and Fort
Raleigh National Historic Site
features a visitor center, orienta-
tion film and nature trails.
Not the least consideration in
planning a fall vacation are the
lower rates for accomodations.
For free informaton about the
Outer Banks � including a list of
motel and hotels, cottages and
cottage courts, campgrounds and
real estate agents who handle cot-
tage and condo rentals � contact
the Dare County Tourist Bureau,
P.O. Box 399, Manteo N.C.
27954; (919)473-2138.
miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;iill,uuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiuiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiniiiiinMiiiiiiiiinf:
SP0RTSW0RLD
Fishing Day Expo planned for Flight Ceremony held on that
COLLEGE NITE
Every Tuesday Nite
8:00-11:00
$1.00wCollegel.D.
I 104 E. Red Banks Road 1
I Greenville, NC i
I 756-6000 j
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House of Hats
Hats
Accessories � jewelry, evening
gloves, pocket books, gloves,
scarves, umbrellas
New Fall hats arriving daily
Summer hats reduced 12
403 Evans Street Mall
758-3025
St. Paul's Episcopal Church
WELCOMES YOU
401 East Fourth Street
The Rev. L.P. Houston, Jr Rector
The Rev. M.L. Wootten, III, Assoc. Rector
Marty Gartman, Episcopal Campus Ministry
Schedule of Services
Sunday, August 31st
10:00 Eucharist � followed by
"Lemonade on the Lawn"
Sunday, September 17th
Fall Winter Schedule begins
Eucharist � 7:30, 9:00, 11:00
WEDNESDAY � 5:30
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FELLOWSHIP
EUCHARIST
Supper and meeting follow service
Kick Off A Great Weekend
Come To Sheraton
Football Package
($45.00 plus 4 12 tax)
Package includes overnight lodging in a large
doable-bedded room and transportation to and
from the football game.
Sept. 6th
ECU
vs.
STATE
(OS
S S Call for reservations
Va- 787-7111
Sheraron-Crabtree Inn
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SalS'Gh CPt� CACL.na 27812
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Welcome
New Students
Stay Cool in 100
cotton separates and
dresses � perfect for the
hot and humid days
ahead
Specializing in Natural Fiber
Clothing for Women.
756-1058
919-A Red Banks Road
MonTuesFriSat 10ti0-5:30
Wed Thurs 1000-8:00
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Title
The East Carolinian, August 28, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 28, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.488
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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