The East Carolinian, August 26, 1986






Site �aat (ftaniltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.61 No.l
Tuesday, August 26, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
48 Pages
Circulation 15,000
Pirate Walk
Offers Campus
Protection
By CAROLYN DRISCOLL
AsslstaBt News Editor
Pirate Walk is a student-run
escort service, organized in hopes
of preventing rapes and assaults
on campus, according to Chris
Tomasic, temporary acting direc-
tor.
"Our escorters will walk
anywhere on campus and up to
!ao blocks off-campus said
Tomasic. "However he added,
"We can only be effective when
our services are used
I ast year, East Carolina
University was the only school in
North Carolina to have such an
escort service. ECU, according to
Tomasictook the idea from
UNC-Chapel Hill's service
(which was discontinued until
this year) and made it a reality
ECU aided NC State Universi-
ty in starting their escort service.
He added that since last year,
UNC-Asheville has also started a
program similar to Pirate walk.
Pirate Walk is currently seek-
ing volunteers, both "male
students for escorts and female
students tor operators explain-
ed Tomasic. "If you're new to
ECU, Pirate Walk is the best way
to get involved immediately on
campus and become active in an
organization
"Basically, It's a very good
way to meet people on campus
said Scott Miller, a volunteer
walker. "We have had several
rapes in the past and I think that
this is a good service because it
provides the girls at ECU protec-
tion against rape
Tomasic said that freshmen
and sophomores make up most
of Pirate Walk's manpower.
Marilyn Baugham, temporary
acting assistant director com-
mented, "I enjoy working with
Pirate Wralk to help out female
and handicapped students so that
the will have a safer campus
Students interested in
volunteering can fill out an ap-
plication at 238 Mendenhall from
2 p.m. to 4 p.m Monday
through Thursday.
Anyone interested in using
Pirate Walk can call 757-6616
from, 10 p.m. to 12p.m or can
call earlier to make reservations.
New State Drinking Age
Affects ECU Policies
Is it legal
ILLINMUIHr - Th� East Carolinian
Will these guys still be able to drink after the legal age changes Sept, 1? See story on page 1.
Financial Aid
Students Experiencing Wait
By CAROLYN DRISCOII
Assistant News Editor
Many students at ECU are ha -
ing great difficulty in securing
their financial aid for the fall
semester; howeer, the mounting
frustration is not only a local pro-
blem. It is being felt nationwide,
according to both the National
Association of Student Financial
Aid Administrators in
Washington, DC. and ECU
Chancellor John Howell.
The three-month backup in
processing financial aid forms is
due mostly to a new budget act
passed by Congress and "new
and confusing" rules regarding
the verification of
applications,says the NASFAA
in a letter sent to school officials.
According to Ray Edward,
director of the financial aid of-
fice,because it is now required
that the office certify documents
which were never required
before, the staff had to mail out
forms to the students,and wait
for them to be returned before
they could even begin to process
them.
A second law passed by Con-
gress outlined new guidelines for
awarding PELL Grants. These
new changes made it necessary
for the office to revise (under the
new guidelines) grants already
given out to students.
Complicating the situation
even more, said Edwards, is the
fact that "the government came
up with a new system to verify
applications, so that many of the
problems the office has faced
have had to do with the im-
plementation of a new system.
"It's a very confusing process
he statedWe are dealing with
situations which we have no con-
trol over "
There is, in fact, one aspect of
the problem which the students
do have some control over: mail-
ing their forms in on time. Ed-
ward stated that many students
are simply waiting too long to ap-
ply, which has contr i buted to the
delays.
He added, "Parents and
students alike have been calling
for two months now because of
the backlog, and it's been very
difficult to explain and com-
municate to them exactly what's
been going on
Edwards estimates that there
will have been approximately
750�800 determents of tuition
payments given to students by the
time registration ends Tuesday.
However, in light of the situa-
tion, and compared to the 500
deferments that were given last
year, he says, it's not that bad.
This sentiment is echoed by
Howell, who said that "given the
increased workload and the
changes that the office has had to
deal with, the situation could be a
lot worse.
Continued Howell, "The peo-
ple in the Financial Aid Office
are under a mountain of paper-
work. We will work at it as rapid-
ly as we can. We hope everyone
will be patient
According to Edwards, it is
hoped that all of the applications
will be completed by the end of
September or the middle of Oc-
tober.
Hopefully, said Edwards, "we
won't have to deal with this next
year. However, there are some
things in the bill that is before
Congress which could increase
our problems so that we could be
even further behind than we
already are.
By PATTIKEMMIS
News Editor
As of Sept. 1, the North
Carolina Beverage Control laws
raise the legal drinking age from
19 to 21.
However, the university put
the new law into effect Aug. 1.
Administrators gave the reason
for the early change as being the
complications of allowing
students two weeks to have
alcohol on campus and then for-
bidding it.
"We want students to know
this is a state and federal law, not
a university law said Carolyn
Fulghum, associate dean and
director of Residence Life.
The alcohol policies for dorm
residents follows the state law. If
you are legal, you are allowed to
have alcohol in the dorms. If you
are not legal, you cannot have
alcohol in the dorms.
However, all alcoholic
beverages must stay within the
residents' dorm rooms.
"The university has an obliga-
tion to follow state laws, our stu-
dent staff is responsible for
reporting all incidents said
Fulgham. "We are trying to be
fair to the students while still
following the law
The drinking age for
downtown Greenville remains 19
until Sept. 1. Most bars will still
be letting 19 and 20 year olds in
after the age raises, they will just
not be able to drink.
Some bars, such as the Attic,
Elbo Room and Pantana Bobs
will allow 18 year olds in. A ma-
jority of the bars are going
private.
The federal government gave
the states until Oct. 1 to raise the
legal drinking age to 21 in order
to receive funding for highways.
The new North Carolina law
makes it illegal for anyone under
the age of 21 to purchase,
possess, or consume any
alcoholic beverages. It is also il-
legal for anyone 21 or over to
purchase or aid in purchasing
alcohol for those under age.
If caught purchasing, possess-
ing, or consuming alcohol while
under age, a person will be charg-
ed with an infraction.
An infraction is less than a
misdemeanor, and does not go on
record. One can receive an infrac-
tion for not wearing a seat belt.
The fine for under age drinking
is $25.
A bduction Recalled
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (UPI) �
One year after a University of
North Carolina student was ab-
ducted from a campus parking
lot and slain, authorities say there
was nothing they could have done
differently to prevent the crime.
"We were at full staff because
it was the beginning of school,
and she was abducted from a
parking lot that's not too far
from where our shifts change
said Robert Sherman, director of
the university's security services.
"It happened right around shift
change time, so officers were
around th. area
Stewart.2 I, a graduate student
at the Chapel Hill campus, was
kidnapped Aug. 4, 1985. Six days
later. Maxwell Avery Wright led
police to a Guilford County
dump site where Stewart's body
was found.
Stewart and her roommate,
Karla Hamett, were abducted at
knifepoint while heading to
See SLAYING Page 2.
ON THE INSIDE
Announcements2 �Student Infirmary offers a wide
Editorials4 range of services � sec page 14.
Classifieds7 �Gray Gallery's fall exhibits
Features21 previewed � see page 21.
Comics24 See Sports for an in-depth look
Sports35 at ECU Football and the 1986
Pirate opponents � page 35.
SGA Night Transit
On Trial Basis
The East Carolinian
New General Office Hours
10 a.m. � 5 p.m.
Monday � Friday
No business handled before 10 a.m.
By PATTI KEMMIS
News Editor
"What I'd like to see this year
is more student involvement
said Steve Cunanan, Student
Government President.
"They could become more in-
volved through the SGA he
said.
The SGA offers many oppor-
tunities to students who wish to
become involved.
As the largest organization on
campus, the SGA represents the
students in university matters and
allocates money to student
organizations.
Within the SGA is many com-
mittees which operate the bus ser-
vice, refrigerator rentals, Carpet
sales, and provides free legal
counseling.
The bus service runs through
campus and to most area apart-
ments. Students are provided
with this service with no charge.
The night transit is also being
run this year on a trial bases. The
bus picks up in the parking lot
across from Chico's every hour
after 10 p.m.
It drops off at the hill anu most
apartments. No alcohol is allow-
ed on the bus.
"We are going to see how it
goes before we deterrrine
whether or not we will continue
the service said John Eagan,
SGA treasurer.
The SGA will also pick up the
cost for students who have to
travel to the to the medical
facilities. Students interested
should stop by the SGA office.
The Refrigerator Rental
Board offers students the oppor-
tunity to rent a 2.8 cubic foot
refrigerator.
The cost for this is $25 a
semester or $35 a year. A $10
deposit is also required.
Rentals will be held Tuesday,
Wednesday, and Thursday of this
week.
The SGA will be selling carpet
for dorm rooms on Monday,
Tuesday and Wednesday of this
week. The sizes and colors vary
and the price range is between
$10 and $18.
Free legal consultation is
available to all students. This is
provided by local areas.
ILLIN MUHPHY - T. l.tt C�r�toM��
Extra Help
The opening of the dorms on the 19th caused traffic congestion,
broken elevators, and sore muscles!
t. ���.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26. 1986
Announcements
FOOTBALL OFFICE
Thara will b� a Walk-On tryout tor m�
ECU Football Turn on Saptambar I, 'm tor
any ECU ttuOant. come draasad and ready
to participate on that day at Scalaa Field
Haute.
MEDICAL COLLEGE
ADMISSION TEST
The Medical College Admission Test will
be ottered at ECU on SATURDAY. SEPT 13.
t�M. Application blanks are to be completed
and mailed to me American College Testing
Program, P O. Boh 414. Iowa City, lowa
S�aa. to arrive by AUG I. lfM Application
blanks art available at tne Testing Center.
Speight Building, Room 105, ECU
NON-CREDIT
COMPUTER PROGRAMS
introduction to Pascal. Sat. Oct 4 11,
Beginning Muitimate. Sat , Sept 77, Ad
vanced Muitimate, Sat , Od. 4; Lotus 17 3.
Sat. Oct. 18; Lotus II, Sat . Oct 75. Contact
Continuing Education. Erwin Mall. 757-4143
GRADUATING?
Seniors and Graduate Students are en
couraged to pick up a REGISTRATION
PACKET at the Career Planning and Place
merit Service. You art able to leave a
resume with us and establish a place to put
letters of reference on file You will be able
to interview on campus if you meet the
qualifications of me employers who come to
campus between October and April Those
wno wait will miss me chance to interview on
the 40 already scheduled infeviewing per
sons coming in October You need to return
the cards and resumes in the REGISTRA
TtON PACKET as soon as possible Recom
mended that if be in for those interviews by
mid-Sept !
MILLER ANALOGIES
TEST
The Miller Analogies Test (MAT), for
graduate school entrance, will resume ao
ministration on Wednesday. Aup 27 l���
This test will be offered every wed dur.ng
the 1887 academic year, at 7 30 pm The
fee for the test is S73, payable in the
classroom on the day of the test Candidates
will need picture 10i e . driver's license)
SI pencils, and the proper fee
ATTENTION RUNNERS
You have the opportunity to be part of
ECU Athletics Women's and men's cross
country teams are looking for runners that
wish to develop their potentials working with
other runners with similar interest All in
forested runners meet with Coach Weiborn 4
Coach Thomas Tuesday. Aug. 76. at 3 00 pm
in Minges 142. For more Information contact
Coach Weiborn or Coach Thomas at 745 �753
IMPROVING YOUR
STUDY SKILLS
Learning how to improve your study skills
� or greater success in college The following
mini course and workshops can help you
prepare tor the added workload of college or
help to increase your grade point average
When and Where ALL SESSIONS WILL BE
HELD IN 317 Wright Building. Sept 1, Mon
day. Time Managements, 3 5 pm. Sept 9
Tuesday. Making and Using Notes. 3 5 pm.
Sept 10, Wednesday. Efficient Reading, 3 5
pm. Sept 11, Thursday, Test Taking, 3 5pm
Please call Counseling Center for other in
formation (757 4441)
FRESHMEN A SOPHMORES
Enroll in me Army ROTC 4 year program
and start an education in leadership at me
same time you start an education in your
chosen malar Army ROTC offers hundreds
of full tuition scholarships each year, too
But even if you're not a scholarship student,
you'll still get financial assistance Up c
$7,700 for your last two years of Army ROTC
Mow do you get started? Just sign up for
MLSC 1001, introduction To ROTC and me
Army FOR MORE INFORMATION STOP
BY 319 ERWIN MALL OR CALL 757 4947
LEARN WMAT IT TAKES TO LEAD
GRAD SCHOOL FOREIGN
LANGUAGE TEST
The Graduate School Foreign Language
Test ari� pe offered the first Tuesday In
every month (exceptions � Aug k Jan ),
dunng the 1914 17 academy ytar. at 9 00
am, begmmng on Sept 2, 1904 This test is of
tereo tor credit at ECU only The tee for mis
test is $10. payable ir the classroom on the
aay of me test Candidates will need picture
ID (. e , dr.ver's license). $7 pencils, and the
proper fee Application for this test must be
received In me ECU Testing Center by the
last Fnday of the month prior to the month
that testing is requested
I.F.C.
There will be a meeting of the I.F.C. Tues
24th in Room 744 at 5 00 in Mendenhall All
presidents and delegates are asked to be
there Rush and the Leadership Workshop
will be discussed
FRESHMEN
Campus Crusade for Christ Is sponsoring
"Prime Time" which meets every Thursday
night at 7:30 pm atOld Joyner Library Room
771 We welcome you to East Carolina and
hope you will loin us for some fun, fellowship
and Bible study. We look forward to meeting
you
ECU SURFING
The ECU Surf ClubTeam will hold it's
first meeting Thursday, Sept n at 8:00 In
Room 721 Mendenhall. Topics will include
the team try outs as well as trips and ec
tivities for the year Hot new surf videos will
be shown and a party will be held after the
meeting. Guys and girls art welcome and
any new students art urged to attend.
NCSTUDENT
LEGISLATURE
If you really care, men VOICE YOUR OP I
NIONI The East Carolina Delegation to the
NC Student Legislature will hold a fall
semester organizational meeting on Thurs
day, August 28th, at 7 00 pm. Room 712
Mendenhall Veteran legislators and in
terested new students make plans to attend.
Questions or information, call Gordon at
745 4382 NCSL � The Campus Volcel
PRESBYTERIAN STUDENTS
You and your friends are invited to a hot
dog open house at the Methodist Student
Center on Thursday, Aug 2i, from 61 pm
Meet the campus ministers and our new
minister from Mexico, make new friends,
and eat great food (It's FREE) The
Methodist Student Center is located at 501 E
5th Street across from Garrett Dorm
METHODIST STUDENT
CENTER
You are invited! Open House and Mot Dog
Supper Thursday. Aug 28. from 6 8 pm
Meet the campus ministers and our new
minister from Mexico, make new friends.
and east great food (It's FREE) The
Methodist Student Center is located at 501 E
5fh Street across from Garrett Dorm
METHODIST STUDENT
CENTER
Come loin us for OPEN HOUSE at me
Methodist Student Center on Thursday.
August 28 from 400 � 8 00 pm Free hot
dogs and soft drinks The MSC is located at
501 East 5th Street, across from Garrett
Dorm
PHI SIGMA PI
Welcome back I The first event this
semester is an Executive Meeting, which
will be at 5 p.m. Aug. 27m. Wed in Austin
132. Also, don't forget the Annual Softball
Game I Cookout on August 30th at 4:00 pm
at Elm St Park. Party afterwards See you
th ere I
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMS
Basic SCUBA Certification, Sept 2 25,
Basic Sailing, Sept n 27. Sailing and Cruis
mg Instruction. Oct 11 12. The Dance Fac
tory, Sept 4 Nov 4. Beginning Ballet for
Adults. Sept 9 Nov II Contact Continuing
Education, Erwin Mall, 757 4143
NON-CREDIT
LANGUAGE PROGRAMS
Beginning Conversational German, Sept
14-Oct 14, Intermediate Conversational
German, Oct 21 Nov 20, Beginning
Hebrew, Sept 14 Nov 18; Beginning Conver
sational Japanese, Sept 2 Nov II. Conver
safional Spanish, Sept 4 Nov 6 Contact
Continuing Education, Erwin Mall. 757 6143
HONORS PROGRAM
Any honors student or faculty member in
tenaing to submit a proposal for an honors
seminar spring semester should do so co
David Sanders, English Dept , by noon
Tues . Sept 2
BAPTIST STUDENT
UNION
The Baptist Student union will hold an
open house. Aug 25. at 5 30 pm which will In
elude a free cook out and a short program
Come early and play volleyball
ATHLETIC DEPT.
The ECU student allotment of tickets for
theECUNC State game to be played Satur
day Sept 4 will go on sale today at 9 00 a m
at the Minges Coliseum ticket office
Students can purchase 2 tickets per 1 valid
ECU I D and one other valid I D for a rnax
imum of four tickets Cost is $13 00 per ticket
and mere is a very limited number of tickets
available
INDT
Several outstanding opportunities art
available with maor corporations tor fan
semester for industrial technology students
Excellent experience and salary n excess o)
$4 per hour Contact cooperative educator
13 Rawi Bidg
Earn Money While Attending
Classes??
Dedicated students in good academic standing with
the University are needed to take notes for hearing
impaired students. Will train any qualified
applicants. For more information, contact the
Program for Hearing Impaired Students at 757-6729
or stop by Brewster A-114.
a9t1 ABORT!OSS UP fcl TO 12th WEEK � OF PREGNANCY I S20? Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at 1 additional cost. Pregnancy Test. Birth Control. �j and Problem Pregnanc Counseling. For � further information, call 832-0535 (toll free
�� &
r -� gag te. LV number: 1-800-532-5384) between 9 am and 5 BJ p m. weekdays General anesthesia available RALEIGH WOMEN'S � HEALTH 1 ORGANIZATIONS
Slaying Causes A wareness
Continued From Page 1.
Stewart's car in a campus parking
lot. Wright instructed Hammett
to drive away and then abducted
Stewart.
"They (Stewart and Hammett)
were doing everything that's
recommended, like walking in
well-lit areas and walking with
someone rise Sherman told
Sunday's Durham Morning
Herald. "It just shows that you
can do your best, and still
something can happen to you
Wright, 17, of Hillsborough was
sentenced to life plus 55 years in
prison for the stabbing death of
Stewart and for other crimes.
Wright was allowed to plead guil-
ty to second-degree murder in
return for leading officers to
Stewart's body.
The crime has affected the way
Chapel Hill and campus
authorities protect the communi-
ty, said Keith Lohmann, Chapel
Hill police planner.
"The whole issue of police
patrols uptown came to a head
with the Sharon Stewart case
he said. "We're doing as much as
we can to maintain high visibility
given the amount of manpower
we have
Sherman said residents have
also become more aware of
potential dangers in the com-
munity.
"The main thing that came out
of the case is that people are more
aware of their potential for
becoming a victim and more
aware of who's around them
he said.
5TH STREET IMPORT
SERVICE
MOVES
Fiat, Porsche,
BMW, Audi.
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�We repair Toyota, Honda, VW,
Volvo, Datsun, Lotus, Mercedes
Subaru and others
�New Location! Dickinson & Memorial � across
from Lincoln Mercury Dealership.
4500 sq.ft. 757-9434 2204 Dickinson Ave.
QUESTION 2.
HOW CAN THE BUDGET-CONSCIOUS
COLLEGE STUDENT SAVE MONEY?
a) Save over 50 off AT&T's weekday rates on
out-of-state calls during nights and weekends.
b) Don't buy textbooks when "Monarch Notes" will do
just fine.
c) Save 40 off AT&T's weekday rate on out-of-state
calls during evenings.
d) Count on AT&T for exceptional value and high quality
service.
e) Hang around with the richest kids in school; let them
pick up the tab whenever possible.
If you're like most college students in the western hemisphere,
you try to make your money go a long way. That's why you should
know that AT&T Long Distance Service is the right choice for you.
T AT&T offers so many terrific values. For example, you
can save over 507r off AT&T's day rate on calls during
weekends a until 5 pm Sunday, and from 11 pm
Sunday through Friday.
Call between 5 pm and 11 pm,
Sunday through Friday, and you'll save 40
off our day rate.
Ever dial a wrong number? AT&T gives you
-immediate credit if vou do. And of course, you can count on
AT&T for clear long distance connections any place you call.
To find out more about how AT&T can help save you money,
give us a call. With a little luck, you won't have toTiang around with
the rich kids. Call toll-free today, art 800 222-0300 .y
ip"
AT&T
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19S6ATAT
OUR BEST DEAL EVER
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Available to Departments, faculty, staff and students in the Education market
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is offering additional discounts on the PC4 to the Education market.
FEATURES:
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ECU Sales Rep: Jimmy Harrington
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72-Year-
Returnedl
POWHATAN, Va. (UPI)
The case of Thomas Moo.e -
72-year-old grandfather returnee
to prison 28 years after he brokt
free � is new ammunition fc
critics of the state's returmni
escapees to prison after vears
freedom.
Moore was sen- back to pi
Aug. 15. 28 ears aft
escaped from a road gang when
he was serving time for stealinj
$130. He had not been in ser
legal trouble since he escaj
"I have learned m lesson.
Moore told Sunday's Nor!
Virginian-Pilot and Ledger-
"I have learned the hard waj
and I've been trying for 26
years to prove to them that I have
learned mv .esson by stav .
of trouble
Virginia's Absconders L'n
tracked down dozens of escapee'
in its first 13 months, but none
had been free as long a Mo
Moore, who was living in
Edenton, N.C, came to thd
unit's attention after his 35-vear
old wife filed a compla
scare him" after an argurrer
The charges were dismissed,
but the fingerprints were routine-
ly forwarded to the FBI. w
notified the Absconders I
After escaping from what
now the Capron Correctiona
Unit in Southampton County or.
June 8, 1958, he made his �3
Conneticut where he worked con-
struction jobs.
After suffering a back in u
he retired to North Carolina,
where his parents had grown up
He had been drawing Scv:a
Security under his real name anc
real social security number.
"The one thing I'm asking is
please let me go home Moore
�said.
Criticism of the Absconded
Unit has shown up in editonaN.
letters to the editor and radio cal
in shows. The basic questic
with prisons already overcrowc
I
ja��
Not vali
nm-
mm ����� in m im i j 04 �mmmmm





THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 26. 1
INOT
Several outstanding opportunity ara
available wi maior corporations tor fall
vemester tor industrial tecrtnafogy �tvio�nti
E �.eiien' experience ana salary in axcau of
t� per noor Contact cooperative education,
313 - �- Bids
Nile Attending
ses??
od academic standing with
d to take notes for hearing
I Mi train any qualified
information, contact the
1 paired Students at 757-6729
renster 4-114.
I
ARORVIOSS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
Vb to 18 weeks ai
I esi, Birth Control,
.i v inseting For
a 832-0535 (loll free
, a 532-5384 Ki'een s) a.m. and 5
� � rsthesia available.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
ET IMPORT
VICE
VES
-de VW, Fiat, Porsche,
Mercedes, BMW, Audi,
& Memorial
rship.
across
2204 Dickinson Ave.
in the Education market,
fed Office Systems. Present-
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ication market.
ftware. Extensive library of
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ble
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V
"A

1

72-Year-Old Inmate Wt&mt CtoaUntati
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
needs
Returned to Prison
POWHATAN, Va. (UPI) -
The case of Thomas Moore � a
72-year-old grandfather returned
to prison 28 years after he broke
free � is new ammunition for
critics of the state's returning
escapees to prison after years of
freedom.
Moore was sent back to prison
Aug. 15, 28 years after he
escaped from a road gang where
he was serving time for stealing
$130. He had not been in serious
legal trouble since he escaped.
"I have learned my lesson
Moore told Sunday's Norfolk
Virginian-Pilot and Ledger-Star.
"I have learned the hard way,
and I've been trying for 26 or 28
years to prove to them that I have
learned my lesson by staying out
of trouble
Virginia's Absconders Unit has
tracked down dozens of escapees
in its first 13 months, but none
had been free as long as Moore.
Moore, who was living in
Edenton, N.C came to the
unit's attention after his 35-year-
old wife filed a complaint "to
scare him" after an argument.
The charges were dismissed,
but the fingerprints were routine-
ly forwarded to the FBI, which
notified the Absconders Unit.
After escaping from what is
now the Capron Correctional
Unit in Southampton County on
June 8, 1958, he made his way to
Conneticut where he worked con-
struction jobs.
After suffering a back injury,
he retired to North Carolina,
where his parents had grown up.
He had been drawing Social
Security under his real name and
real social security number.
"The one thing I'm asking is
please let me go home Moore
said.
Criticism of the Absconders
Unit has shown up in editorials,
letters to the editor and radio call
in shows. The basic question is
with prisons already overcrowd-
ed, why waste time and money
returning people to jail after
they've spent years as law-
abiding, productive citizens.
"As long as he's out there we
have no choice said the head of
the unit, investigator Harold
Catron. "We can't make excep-
tions
Powhatan Warden W.P.
"Buck" Rogers estimates it'll
cost $15,000 to hold Moore for a
year. He's currently being
evaluated at the prison hospital;
he'll likely be transferred to the
geriatric prisoners wing in Staun-
ton unless Gov. Gerald Baliles
steps in to grant either a pardon
or make him eligible for parole.
"1 just hope God softens the
heart of the governor Moore
told the paper. "Take a look at
the 20-some years I did right
Moore said what turned him
away from a life of crime was
also what drove him to escape �
a 15 year prison sentence.
"I knew if I kept on, I would
eventually be caught stealing
he said. "And I'd be back here
when I was trying to do
everything to stay out of here
Writers
in News,
Features,
Sports &
Editorial
departments
Apply in person at the East
Carolinian office, 2nd Floor
Publications Building
between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Become a part of the East
Carolinian team. We need
excellent and reliable writers
with a desire to learn.
PANTANA BOB'S
CELEBRATES
THE 1986 FALL SEMESTER
WITH A ONE WEEK
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Bar Hours For Extravaganza
4:00 til Closing
Discounted Memberships
Regular Membership was $15.00 Now$ 5.00
Lifetime Membership was $25.00 Now $15.00
New Pantana Bob's T-Shirts only $4.00
GET PANTANASIZED
Private Club for Members and Invited Guests Only.
Travel Agency For Students
We plan trips to fit student budgets
Student Cruises
Snow Skiing Holidays
Vacation Air Travel
Welcome Bock ECU - We Wont To Meet You
Come in to our downtown Greenville office
Q QUIXOTE TRAVELS INC.
rK 319 Cotanche St.
S ! Greenvi,le' NC- 27834
m 757-0234
cett
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Student Specials
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must present ECU ID
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HI W. 10th St.
, corner 10th & Evans
PICK-UP SPECIAL!
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PI I
(Sire East (Earnlimatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender, cm. kumr
Daniel Maurer. .����
PATTI KEMMIS, rw tn,
Scott Cooper, w '�
John Shannon, -����� &�
DeChanile Johnson. .� ����
Steve Folmar, Pm-i, A,nim
Anthony Martin. ����.?� uar
Meg Needham, a ��,�-
Shannon Short, wur.�, a,�
August 26, 1986
OPINION
Page 4
Welcome
Goodbye Sunscreen, Hello Books
"Welcome back my friends to
the show that never ends. I'm so
glad you could attend. Come in-
side, Come inside
� Emerson Lake & Palmer
It may not be original, but it does
seem to say it all. Yes, friends, it is
time once again to say goodbye to
the sand, sunscreen and hot sticky
car seats and say hello to 8 o'clock
classes, overpriced text books and
neverending dropadd lines.
Like it or not, it's school time.
Yes, it's that time of the year
when we all gather to learn valuable
lessons. And when they say college
provides an atmosphere condusive
to learning, believe them.
A few of the important lessons
include: how to budget your time
(i.e. balancing academia and par-
tymania); how to deal with pressure
(like the kind that accompanies
finals); and how to live with a
stranger while couped up in a room
akin to a shoebox.
It's true, our being here affords
us the rare opportunity to expand
our perception of the world and the
people we share it with. However,
keep in mind this can't be done en-
tirely in the confines of the
downtown area.
Socializing is only one means of
understanding people (though we
admit, it is the most enticing), in-
volvement is the other and perhaps
the more important one.
Graduates of ECU should leave
here with a lot more than just a
piece of sheep's skin. They should
leave having experienced a taste of
the real world. The only way to do
this is to get involved and be aware
of what's happening and how it af-
fects you.
The East Carolinian is here to
help students do just that. We're
here to serve as a channel of com-
munication for the University com-
munity, while offering students
valuable hands on experience' So
please, utilize us. Use us and abuse
us.
We're not alone, though. SGA,
Student Union and SRA are only a
few examples of the many organiza-
tions that offer so much and ask for
so little. So take a look, give them
an ear, hell, lend them and us a
hand. Don't just stand there. Do
something!
Oh, and by the way, welcome
back.
UNHOLY UNION.
The Voice Of Experience
Some Survival Tips For Freshmen
GUE55 WHO ELSE IS "BflCK TO SCHOOL?
"
BE AWftfrE- HELP PRHVEtT RftPE
BvTERRIORE
�urrwniar
Okay. So I piobably wouldn't have
listened to anyone's advice when I was a
freshman, especially the advice of a
SENIOR. But that was my hangup and
hopefully a few of you novice East
Carolinians will benefit from my
mistake and possibly from my advice.
Let's face it, the majority of incoming
freshmen have one goal in mind�to par-
ty. It may be wise to note at this point,
however, that a fairly high percentage of
students won't make it to their
sophomore year. The statistics could be
lowered if several suggestions are kept in
mind throughout your beginning year
here.
First, the trick to being a successful
student is to be one that can make the
grade and still find time to attend all the
happening events.
My main problem three years ago was
that I knew how to party but not how to
make the grade. It wasn't that the ability
wasn't there, only the motivation
wasn't.
I found myself neglecting the number
one tip to attaining better grades�go to
class. It's much too easy to cut that 8
o'clock class when you have a bit of a
hangover. You lay in bed with a throbb-
ing headache and rationalize all the
reasons you shouldn't go to class that
day.
You think to yourself, "well, we pro-
bably won't go over anything
important" or "I'll just get the notes
later or "I know everything about
World History anyway
The only person you are kidding is
yourself. Fortunately for my GPA, by
my junior year I had discovered that I
had a much easier time with tests by go-
ing to class regularly and taking notes.
Unless you wake up with pneumonia,
you should pop an asprin or two, grab a
strong cup of black coffee, wash your
face with cold water and head to class.
You won't have the guilt feeling of let-
ting yourself down and you might even
learn something.
Secondly, along with attending class,
it is very important to pay attention once
you get there. Not only does it make the
time go by faster but you get much more
from the information. I can't count the
number of classes at ECU that I've nap-
ped through, and I was no better off
than I would have been at my room in
the bed.
Finally, if you have been paying atten-
tion, you'll notice that I haven't men-
tioned a lot about studying. I have
found that by utilizing the first two
points made, studying time is cut down
on, and you end up having to spend less
time reviewing for quizzes and tests.
If I had only known then what I know
now. A classic cliche but nonetheless,
one that I had to learn the hard way.
Now, after two semesters and two
summer sessions of being a faithful
class-goer, taking efficient notes, and
studying before tests, I have not only im-
proved my grades tremendously but
have been able to party without guilt.
There is more of a feeling of reward
for my efforts, not a feeling of anxiety
knowing that I had to get up at 5 a.m
the following morning to study for a test
that I had no notes on.
So, Good Luck and remember, class,
studying, good grades and partying do
mix.
�Campus Forum-
You Can Move Mountains
Are you one of those students who
likes to complain about the status quo
but who doesn't like to "get involved
Perhaps you'd like to say something,
but, then again, who'd listen?
The Campus Forum, otherwise
known as letters to the editor, provides
for a virtual marketplace for your
ideas, helping students voice their opi-
nions on the vital issues of concern on
campus. Space will be made available
for all letters, provided the following
guidelines are observed:
�All letters must be typed or neatly
handwritten and double-spaced on
clean white paper;
�Letters must not exceed two pages;
�Letters must focus on a pertinent
issue of concern � no personal attacks
will be permitted;
�All letters must be signed by the
author;
�Author's address, phone number,
major and classification must be includ-
ed so that letters may be verified;
�Students are limited to one letter
every two weeks;
�All letters are subject to editing for
style, grammar, libel and clarity, and
�Deadline for turning in letters is
noon on Mondays for the Tuesday issue
and noon Wednesday for Thursday's
paper.
Remember, The East Carolinian's
Campus Forum is the best campuswide
vehicle for dispensing your own
thoughts on the issues that affect
students.
Please adhere to the above guidelines
for the Campus Forum and bring your
letters to our office on the second floor
of the Old South Building across from
Joyner Library. Your cooperation and
input are greatly apreciated.
So, don't just sit back and complain;
take action. Granted, a letter won't
move mountains. But, then again, it
just might be the first step towards get-
ting something done.
Monkey Trial Makes A Come Back In '86
By DAVID LEWIS
suff Writer
Tennessee's Greene County has been charged
with violating constitutional rights to free exercise
of religion by using a national series of textbooks
identified by Newsweek magazine as objecting to
The Wizard of Oz (for its portrayal of witches as
good), King Arthur, and Cinderella (both for con-
taining supernatural acts and magic).
This trial barkens back to eight days in July,
1925, when John Thomas Scopes was convicted in
the Circut Court of Rhea County (also Tenn.) for
the then heretical but now incredible charge of
teaching evolution in a public school.
In the Greene County case, the bugaboo of
evolution has been expanded to include "secular
humanism a vague appellative for all the evils of
the modern world.
Such a trial might be considered yet another act
in the comedy of human errors were it not for the
collusion or unthinking co-operation of well-
intentioned autnorities resulting in periodic, if
temporary, victories for such fringe causes.
An example is the March, 1981 passage in
Arkansas of Act 590, legislation mandating
balanced treatment for "creation-science" and
evolution-science.
A permanent injuction prohibiting enforcement
of this unwise and unconstitutional Act was issued
Jan. 5, 1982. That same day Mississippi enacted
virtually identical creationist legislation.
Why does the conflict continue?
It seems to stem from a basic misunderstanding
on the part of many as to the necessity for what
Thomas Jefferson termed "a wall of separation
between church and state compounded by the
obstinate perception of some zealots that there is
no position of neutrality in matters of faith, and
for the state to attempt such neutrality is for it to
be biased against religion.
TV authors of our Bill of Rights were
motr 3ted not just by the history of European
religious persecution, but colonial America's
established churches as well. Nine of the original
thirteen colonies had established churches.
The adamant support among early Baptists for
state and church separation in this country began
with Roger Williams. Founder of the colonies'
first Baptist Church in Providence, R.I Williams
had been banished from the Massachusetts Bay
Colony for his religious practices. Baptists
thereafter recognized the establishment as a threat
to their very existence.
Campus
Spectrum
undamentalism in this country could not have
fc .ten started without the pluralism possible in a
state separate from ecclesiastical controls, yet is is
principally fundamentalists who are repensible for
challenging this separation. The battleground for
this challenge is commonly the public schools.
Contrary to popular belief, the courts do not
prohibit teaching about religion in schools. In-
deed, many who favor a separate church and state
favor comparative religion studies.
The difference between teaching about religion
and teaching religion, however, is the difference
between a liberal education and indoctrination. It
is not surprising fundamentalists tend to shun the
first and embrace the second.
Vicki Frost, a plaintiff in the present Tennessee
case, has said even reading about Catholicism, for
example, "could produce changes in my child's
way of thinking � they could become confused
so she objects to teaching about other religions.
With laws prohibiting religious advocacy in the
schools, a movement arose around 1963 to cloak
religion in the guise of science and force balanced
treatment in the public schools for the new
r�if��imHt�Mfc�riiHiwi�i iiMMW�Wiil
"creation-science" and evolution-science.
A deceptive dichotomy, for it not only implies
there exist only two alternatives, but also that
evolution is all that might be effected, when en-
forcement of this balanced treatment would also
drastically alter the teaching of such disciplines as
astronomy, physics, geology, anthropology, and
so on.
This push eventually gave rise to Arkansas' Act
590. The court in Arkansas had no problem fin-
ding "creation science has no scientific merit or
educational value as science
It also found that, "such a concept is not
science because it depends upon a supernatural in-
tervention which is not guided by natural law. It is
not explanatory by reference to natural law, is not
testable and is not falsifiable (McLean vs.
Arkansas).
In addition came the admission of several pro-
ponents, including the bill's author, that crea-
tionism is not science.
Although creation-science appears not to be
what it claims, that is not enough to deny its being
taught; even if it's religious (as many adherents
readily admit it is).
The Establishment Clause "reaches only those
statutes having as their primary effect the ad-
vancement of religion (McLean vs. Arkansas).
The courts found, however, since it lacked any
scientific merit, creation-science was primarily in-
tended to advance a religious cause.
The next tack by these forces was to claim
neither creationism nor evolution is science; both
are religion. But, as Judge William R. Overt on
wrote in the Court's Memorandum Opinion,
McLean vs. Arkansas, "it is clearly established in
the case law, and perhaps in common sense, that
evolution is not a religion and that teaching evolu-
tion does not violate the Establishment Clause
The battle is not ova. An Alabama federal
court is scheduled to hear a case in which 600 fun-
damentalist parents, students, and teachers de-
��-� i�� KNw�i t '
mand the removal of secular humanism from the
schools on the basis it is religion.
Although "secular humanism" is a nebulous
designation used primarily by fundamentalists to
indicate ideas they do not care for, it is difficult to
imagine how it could ever be construed as religion.
Webster defines religion first as "belief in a
divine or superhuman power or powers to be
obeyed and worshipped as the creator(s) and
ruler(s) of the universe and only later as "loose-
ly, any system of beliefs, practices, ethical values,
etc. resembling, suggestive of or likened to such a
system
Secularism is defined as "a view of life or of any
particular matter based on the premise that
religion and religious considerations should be ig-
nored, or purposely excluded while humanism is
defined as "a philosophy that rejects super-
naturalism, regards man as a natural object, and
asserts the essential dignity and worth of man and
his capacity to achieve self-realization through the
use of reason and scientific method
The common sence that Judge Overton referred
to makes it plain a religion which exludes religion
is a patently absurd concept.
Those interested in protecting individual belief
from the tyranny of Establishment are not passing
judgment on the quality of belief in this religiously
diverse society; each of us is entitled to his or her
own, provided it does not encroach upon the
freedom of others.
The price of this liberty is, as always, constant
vigilance. In this instance, we must beware the
self-appointed consciences who exert uncom-
promising influence to undermine a constitutional
principle responsible for the religious tolerance
which makes even their own existence possible.
Their crusade, crippled as it is by historical
myopia, makes them oblivious to the fact that the
worst thing which could happen to them, and the
rest of us, might well be for them to achieve then-
goal.
i
ECU
� 1 Nr-� � MAI
ECU has announced thai
establishing its 10th protc
school, the School of Socj
Work, with a fully-accredit
master's of social work degrl
program with studv, research af
training to meet needs of i
human environment
The school also will
undergraduate degree prograrl
in social work and cnmirj
justice. The graduate (MS
program will offer a
specialized areas of pra.
aging, health, criminal
famil and children and men
Convocation
How
ECU began its 77tl
ear on Aug I wit
Chancellor J n M. H
place empha on adap-
isting progra to cl j
needs.
With an estimates
students preparing for j
semester classes, near a 1,(
members of the faculty com t e
at Mendenhall Student Centei
the annual fall facult)
tion.
"I have said man times
our major effort is to add.
existing program to char. iJ
needs, not in expansion
physical plant or new progran
and schools Dr. Howel! said
his convocation address 'i
evidence of continued growth
the state's third largest institutioJ
of higher learning was clear in a
anticipated record fall em
ment, new campus const-
and recent establishing of ECU'
10th professional school, th
School of Social Work.
"1 always added that it w a
ly a matter of emphasis D
Howell added. "Consequerv
covered myself for the ofc
tion that we look forward to U
completion of a new genet
classroom building which loo
even bigger than mos-
pected
�jm
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752-3223
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(9191736 7235





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST U, 1916
r Freshmen
reviewing for quizzes and tests,
had onl known then what I know
classic cliche but nonetheless,
I had to learn the hard way.
ow, after two semesters and two
mei sessions of being a faithful
wr, taking efficient notes, and
-efore tests. I have not only im-
ed mv grades tremendously but
been able to party without guilt.
s more of a feeling of reward
not a feeling of anxiety
wing that I had to get up at 5 a.m.
rig morning to study for a test
no notes on.
rood Luck and remember, class,
g, good grades and partying do
t
ve Mountains
�Students are limited to one letter
every two weeks;
�Ali letters are subject to editing for
tyle, grammar, libel and clarity, and
�Deadline for turning in letters is
on on Mondays for the Tuesday issue
and noon Wednesday for Thursday's
paper.
Remember, The East Carolinian's
Campus Forum is the best campuswide
vehicle for dispensing your own
ughts on the issues that affect
.dents.
Please adhere to the above guidelines
e Campus Forum and bring your
'o our office on the second floor
� 'he Old South Building across from
ner Library. Your cooperation and
it are greatly apreciated.
So. don't just sit back and comp'ain;
Ice action. Granted, a letter won't
move mountains. But, then again, it
might be the first step towards get-
ting something done.
In '86
e removal of secular humanism from the
n the basis it is religion.
lgh "secular humanism" is a nebulous
ion used primarily by fundamentalists to
ideas they do not care for, it is difficult to
how it could ever be construed as religion.
er defines religion first as "belief in a
r superhuman power or powers to be
and worshipped as the creator(s) and
f the universe and only later as "loose-
ystem of beliefs, practices, ethical values,
lbling, suggestive of or likened to such a
uism is defined as "a view of life or of any
it matter based on the premise that
md religious considerations should be ig-
r purposely excluded while humanism is
"a philosophy that rejects super -
m, regards man as a natural object, and
te essential dignity and worth of man and
tit to achieve self-realization through the
lason and scientific method
jmmon sence that Judge Overton referred
it plain a religion which exludes religion
uly absurd concept.
(interested in protecting individual belief
tyranny of Establishment are not passing
on the quality of belief in this religiously
ciety; each of us is entitled to his or her
vided it does not encroach upon the
uf others.
ice of this liberty is, as always, constant
In this instance, we must beware the
tinted consciences who exert uncom-
mfluence to undermine a constitutional
responsible for the religious tolerance
ikes even their own existence possible.
:rusade, crippled as it is by historical
takes them oblivious to the fact that the
lg which could happen to them, and the
I, might well be for them to achieve their
I
ECU Establishes School Of Social Work
ECU has announced that it is
establishing its 10th professional
school, the School of Social
Work, with a fully-accredited
master's of social work degree
program with study, research and
training to meet needs of the
human environment.
The school also will offer
undergraduate degree programs
in social work and criminal
justice. The graduate (MSW)
program will offer a choice of
specialized areas of practice in
aging, health, criminal justice,
familv and children and mental
health services.
It has 160 majors enrolled in
the undergraduate degree pro-
grams and 62 graduate students.
With a fulltime faculty of 17 and
four parttime professors and in-
structors, it will be headed by a
dean in the university's division
of academic affairs.
In May, the division of Social
Work and Criminal Justice
graduated 18 master's degree
recipients in its first MSW class
and the program was given full
accreditation last month by the
National Council on Social Work
Education.
Such accreditation, making
ECU the only university in the
state with accredited graduate
and undergraduate degree pro-
grams in social work, was a
prerequisite to establishing the
new school, officials said. It was
announced at a meeting of the
ECU Board of Trustees by Roy
D. Flood of Murfrecsboro, chair-
man of the trustees' academic af-
fairs committee.
Angelo A. Volpe, vice
chancellor for Academic Affairs,
said, "We at East Carolina
University have long recognized
Convocation Held
Howell Addresses Faculty
ECU NEWS BUREAl
ECU began its 77th academic
year on Aug. 20 with a call by
Chancellor John M. Howell to
place emphasis on adapting ex-
isting programs to changing
needs.
With an estimated 14,000
students preparing for fall
semester classes, nearly 1,000
members of the faculty convened
at Mendenhall Student Center for
the annual fall faculty convoca-
tion.
"1 have said many times that
our major effort is to adapt our
existing program to changing
needs, not in expansion of
physical plant or new programs
and schools Dr. Howell said in
his convocation address. Yet
evidence of continued growth of
the state's third largest institution
of higher learning was clear in an
anticipated record fall enroll-
ment, new campus construction
and recent establishing of ECU's
10th professional school, the
School of Social Work.
"I always added that it was on-
ly a matter of emphasis Dr.
Howell added. "Consequently, I
covered myself for the observa-
tion that we look forward to the
completion of a new general
classroom building which looks
even bigger than most of us ex-
pected
Scheduled for completion next
fall, the new $10.4 million
classroom building will be the
largest on the campus, containing
65 modern classrooms and 140
faculty offices.
Dr. Howell, who will retire at
the end of this academic year
after five years as chancellor said
the university "is now coming in-
to its own
"This is its time to flourish, to
draw upon its rich resources, and
to enhance its programs as it pro-
vides leadership for a region that
is on the threshold of its most
challenging era he said.
Howell noted that during
1985-1986, the School of
Medicine celebrated its 10 an-
niversary, the School of Nursing
celebrated its 25th anniversary
and the School of Business laun-
ched a Golden Anniversary cam-
paign with gifts and pledges
totalling over one million dollars.
The School of Business
established its first endowed
distinguished professorship; con-
ferring of the O. Max Gardner
Award upon Theatre Arts
chariman Edgar Loessin signifies
the advances of theatre arts and
"also enhances the good reputa-
tion that ECU already has in
creative and performing arts
Howell said.
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f

Welcome Back Students
We have
� Posters and Poster Frames
� Memo and Bulletin Boards
� Many Personalized items including:
darylic mugs and clipboards as well as sorority and
fraternity items
� Handcrafted Jewlery
� Tee Shirts, watches and many more fun and crazy gifts
Come browse and visit
Open
10-9
153 Carolina East Mall
Greenville. M.C. 27834
pppiwim �nnm ifcfmwi am iiimi mmmm
He said the ranking of East
Carolina University among the
top 10 comprehensive universities
in the south and border states in a
national survey of college and
university presidents "validates
its claims of quality and ex-
cellence
In the survey published by U.S.
News and World Report last fall,
ECU was ranked seventh among
158 colleges and universities in
the region. "I know this is old
news, but I like to brag about it
Howell said.
A convocation for new
students and parents was also
held Sunday evening at Minges
Coliseum.
the need for a focus of research
and training in the important
areas of society which the social
work profession enhances.
"Formation of the School of
Social Work is the culmination of
a great deal of planning and vi-
sion on the part of the faculty
and administration in the division
of Social Work and Criminal
Justice Volpe said.
"I particularly want to com-
mend Professors Ronald L.
Thiele, dean of the School of
Allied health and Social Work,
John R. Ball, Constantine
Kledaras, Theodore Gartman
and, of course, Maria Joan
O'Neil whose leadership as
associate dean and director of
Social Work and Criminal Justice
during the past year was essential
to achieving our goals
She said the curriculum in-
cludes areas of field practice
which involve students and facul-
ty "in a very broad range of
agencies The school works with
more than 100 specific agencies
such as courts, hospitals, prisons,
family and child service agencies
and departments of social ser-
vices.
At least two projects are being
designed to assist farm families in
distress, part of a "Help Farmers
in Crisis" program initiated
within the division of Social
Work, she said.
"Our program is particularly
committed to research on rural
needs in which we attempt to
determine what the needs are and
what resources are available to
meet the needs O'Neil said.
The School of Social Work
also will emphasize training and
continuing education of
presently-employed social
workers in departments of social
services, a program that is being
designed based on a needs assess-
ment. She said this program was
requested by departments of
social services in the eastern
region of the state.
The School has been asked to
develop a bachelor's degree pro-
gram for inmates at the Eastern
Correctional Center at Maury,
N.C and to develop an off-
campus master's of social work
degree program in Wilmington.
The division of Social Work
and Criminal Justice heretofore
has been part of ECU's School of
Allied Health and Social Profes-
sions which was established in
1967. ECU's other professional
schools include Allied Health,
Art, Business, Education, Home
Economics, Music, Nursing and
Technology in the academic af-
fairs division and the ECU
School of Medicine.
COMING ATTRACTIONS
ATTIC
752-
7303
AUG
27 WED
Wrathchild
SI 00 ECU Adm W Tnis Coupon
28THUR
Doug Clark and
The Hot Nuts
CTKO Tof Pmrtyt
29 FRI
Wrathchild
SI 50 ECU Adm W, This Coupon
30 SAT
The Usuals
w'Unusual Contest
31 SUN
HIGH
RISK
SI 00 ECU Adm WThis Coupon
The Student Union
Welcomes You
Looking for Something to Do?
JOIN THE STUDENT UNION!
Be involved in Our
� Films
� Recreation
� Concerts
� Comedians
� Barefoot on the Mall
Check Us Out at Our Office
234 Mendenhall
LET US EXPAND YOUR LIFE
See What's Coming Up:
Brian Huskey
FREE ADMISSION
Thursday Sept. 14, 8:00 p.m.
featured in the Underground
(ground floor of Mendenhall)
Sponsored by the Coffeehouse Committee
L
msmm
i� ���
gathering place
Kentucky Fried Chicken
Kentucky Fried Chicken will close the doors at 2905 E. 5th St. on August 25th and move to our
modern Kentucky Fried Chicken at 2000 E. Greenville Blvd. on August 26, 1986.
Kentucky Fried
Chicken
$1.99
plus tax
Kentucky Nugget Snack
6 Kentucky Nuggets
Kentucky Fries
1 Large Drink
Expires Dec. 31, 1986
We Do Chicken Right
FOR ONE COMPLETE
2-PIECE PACK
2 Pieces of Chicken
1 small mashed potato
and gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
Expires Dec. 31, 1986
$1.99
plus tax
,�amgmm,� m� i'��i������mimimm0mmimm0mimr0mmpm0mmmmm
BvSmiII





6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUOUST jj, 19t6
i
Law Suit Filed Against Race Car Driver
ORLANDO. Fla. (UPI) � A
husband and wife have filed suit
against race car driver Bill Whit-
tington, charging that Whit-
tington bought the mobile home
park they live in with illicit drug
profits.
Larry and Gladys Camnitz fil-
ed the civil racketeering suit last
week in U.S. District Court in
Orlando.
Whittington, 37, of Fort
Lauderdale, is under indictment
for importing 400.000 pounds of
marijuana into the United States
from 1977 to 1981. He also is
charged with evading taxes on the
$73 million that the smuggling
ring he led allegedly received, and
the $20 million profit it allegedly
made.
Whittington's trial on the
smuggling and tax charges is set
for Sept. IS, in Fort Lauderdale.
Whittington is listed as trustee
of Gulfstream Harbor Mobile
Home Park, where the Camnitzes
live.
Their suit asks for attorney's
fees and an unspecified amount
in damages, which can be tripled
under racketeering statutes. The
suit charges that Gulfstream Har-
bor Mobile Home Park and its
sales arm, Gulfstream Mobile
Home Sales of Orlando, engaged
in an illegal criminal enterprise by
using drugs to:
-Help make fraudulent in-
ducements to "lure elderly pur-
chasers on limited fixed income
to purchase homes It claims
Whittington failed to install
storm drains and roads or main-
tain the grounds as promised.
-Put the Camnitzes in
"economic fear" because he
criticized the park. Camnitz says
Whittington told him he could
make residents "so miserable
that people will leave and give mc
their homes and "I have more
money and I will wear you dowr.
I don't care what kind of lawsoii
you get started. For every witness
you can get, I can buy two
-Hire guards to control public
access to the park and discourage
people from buying from private
owners.
The Benefits Of Being Greek
By JILL MORGAN
Start Writer
Just one of the many decisions
freshmen will face is whether or
not to "Go Greek
To "Go Greek" meanssimp-
ly, to join one of ECU's 19 social
fraternities or 12 sororities.
Traditional "rush held dur-
ing the second and third weeks of
September, is usually associated
wiht a lot of good hard partying
� this fall, however, ECU
students will face their third of-
ficial dry rush.
Many Greeks see the positive
aspect of dry rush. Dry rush let
the fraternities and sororities to
weed out those not-so-serious
rush candidates. To many Greek
organizations this is becoming
more and more important.
To "Go Greek" means dif-
ferent things to different people.
Stuart Sloan, Assistant Alumni
Advisor for the Kappa Sigma
fraternity said, "being in a frater-
nity builds character, a sense of
belonging and friendships that
last a lifetime
Stuart added, "the bonds
flSaHt Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community smce 1923
HELP WANTED
Feature
Layout Artist
Needed
Pbase apply at The East
Carolinian, 2nd floor, Publications
Building, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Experience helpful, but not
necessary.
757-6366
The East Carolinian is an equal opportunity employer.
MFHV
Professional Resume Compositions!
Affordable Rates
Atlantic Personnel Services
209 Commerce St.
355-7931
JjLarsKs
SURF N SEA
THE PLAZA
END OF SUMMER
SALE
Ladies Swim wear
55 Off
Men's Shorts
50 Off
Sandals
50 Off
Town & Country Instinct
Mistral Quicksilver
Jimmy ZRoisins
developed throughout your col-
lege years as a Greek can also be
beneficial to later in life, in a
business sense
The benefits of bnng Greek are
not all free. Monthly dues must
be paid as well as various other
expenses.
Monthly dues range anywhere
from $10 to $30 per month.
One Greek said, "The dues
aren't a means of buying
anybody's friendship � it's a
matter of supporting an
organization you care about
Leave
forests
and parks
clean.
Reebok
Because life is not a spectator sport?
Get Physical�Reebok
fitness shoes for health
club participants.
Designed to gfvr support,
stability and comfort
through all levels
of physical exercise
and activity.
styles for men a women
34.95-49.95
. pink. hUck ,rcv
Raleigh � Chapel Hill
Durham � Rocky Mount
GokJsbofo
noscoe
� Irhof.s
Wilson � Roanoke Rapids
Washington � Greenville
Danville. VA
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n a lona time, oo te
me
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Suggestive Greeting Cards �8�
? Balloons For All Occasions �8�
Local and Out of Town Newspapers
Central Book & News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Classified
WANTED
MODELS WANTED Com c a
part of our "New Attitudes" h� r
Show Monday Sep' 8 a' Shelter
Greenville For more -nfo piease
call Nancy at Honeycu" Saic- er
vices 752 6178
SKILLED WORK 700 000 MEN
AND WOMEN ARE CRAWNG
BEFORE TMEV MALM v s v
PART TIME. $5 000 MAXIMUM :
MILLION A YEAR , TM J EAR
SERVICE CALL I 919 32: �536
PART TIME HELP WANTED
door work, some ea Ea- . r�
,ngs 10 15 hrs a wee $.3 7:
start Can worn arounc scec. es
Driver's license reecec E
756 9618
STUDENTS NEEDED Norfc stud
and self-help Must neve sti
ng skills Contac SchOQ of Nun
at 757 6061
COLLEGE REP WANTED
distribute "Stijde" Ra'e s.cs
t.on cards a Iti s campus Go
come For nformat at ac:
, - e to -EOA'E
MARKETING SER . CES 25 3 e-
wooa Or Moc-es. c N
SOCCER COACHES t s :
REFEREES Needed I
nours Contac P "
munity Schoois a "52 1934 Exl
or 267
SOCCER COACHES SEEDED
Greenville Recea' at s-z '�
Dept is recru ting 4 pari I
Soccer coaches lor the a
program Ape "as must sse
some knowledge n soccer s sr:
nave pat erce 'z wort
Applicants muS' Z a: - l
young peop e ages 6 -
fundamentals Hours�Pf -e .
37 p m Monday Fr ca. SC
anc week enc a: ; Pros
a extenc from Sept � I
Salary rate $36 hour a"s
zviii oe accee'ez s Sep1
Contact Ben es a "5: 4137 Ext
262
WANTED: 2 -ooa'es rt �
share comfoia: e house at veace
S S13C a morrtt! a . I
a'osphere anc centra a r
Dav.o at 752 97gfi
ROOMMATES Snert
m star ng a S 13 X a
area s Prices arK. s re
ousng Now ava arr 2a .s �1
752-27B0 Home toca't-s ee
WANTED Fema e t :� I ass St
housewfe with OlS� ; ea" s z
ccareinexca a
ooaro Near cac.s "5"
GIRL SCOUTS: Ca l
will be organised a "e'esed
in working Mrift � I
vidmg services tc e commur
contact Ji e a i 8O0 55fi 5
Scout offce
ATTENTION WORK-STUD
STUDENTS! Neec fu I
rewarc ng c� �-
study' We have e c cv. ng :oe
mgs avaiiao e a' "e k�c
Deve'opmen s tut C:a L sa
Trippat 757 6�5C BriaJ
- sa Tr pD t?eg :a "nen1
institute Eas' Ca uUn e-s -�
Corner of First ac Reace S"ee$
Greenville, NC 27858 4352- Open rtgs
'hciuoe ART:S' LLUSTR
III Art major to dc cae'a az
layout for pr r�t $4 per
SECRETARY BcS -ess ed
tion major tc De '2
answer phone S4 se1 Ccc CE
ASSISTANT II- Snjce- K I
Vpe ano answer phone 2 pos
3 60 per hour L BRAR A 22E
Library Science ma w - 's "
small library 13 6Coe AUO I
VISUAL AIDE II- C0
Arts major to use cara � ce:
equipment, ano to scr p y�- e i
Per hour COMPUTER ASS SAS'
ii Computer sc ence "a M : '
programs for IBM PC I3-5C re
hour
ROOMMATES WANTED
bedroom house at 111 N LH5
$150 a montr p�Ls tit es s-a'ec
Washer dryer ara pnee IK ndad
Steve M'tchem 752 Si1'
ROOMMATE WANTED c: I
duplex 4 blocks eas 8t za-
$l5mo oeoos ' es �'ee-
responsibie graa s'uoe"
smoker 758 1590
WANTED: A recep' 0T s it GOkJ'l
Gym. Hours. 9 a.m 3 P " Ps�
4hr Call 758 4359 ask for Rob? I
STAFF POSITIONS: Te P-
caneer yearbook s accec"v sc
plications tor staff pos tons Come
by office or contact Mec a 8oar:
secretary for intormat on ocaec
across from joyner L brar� lBl
floor
LOST BEAGLE I: Hot p,nk collar
Missing smce l-ll 86 Owner
HEART BROKEN Answers
FLACA Day 756 3440 Evening
752-0577.
WANTED: Person to deliver parts
from 8 a.m 12 or 1 p m Mon Fr
Company vehicle provioeo
deliver. Good for student with afta
noon classes Barnes Auto Parts
756 4191. Dickinson Ave
MANAGER WANTED' The UV
Pirate Basketball Team is seek.ng
someone to serve as their manage-
tor the 84-87 season interested ap
plicants should contact me basK
ball office immediately! 757 6384 or
come by room 14 in Minges
WANT TO BUY: Earth Q
good condition. Price negotiable
Please call Kathy 758-30f
'I
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r Driver
come
idaims
iinstall
main-
Bed.
in
he
savs
�ou'ld
rrabie owners.
that people will leave and give me
their homes and "I have more
money and 1 will wear you down
1 don't care what kind of lawsuit
you get started. For every witness
you can get, I can buy two
-Hire guards to control public
access to the park and discourage
people from buying from private
e
azs6o
rself
Inimals
Wedding Registry
i� 27834 � (919)756-0771
y'j?
'is?

Jft
X ����� ���'
� � . �- � JDtdS
� eenville
(
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P'�y �L
t i f
iter
Classifieds
w
MOOELS WANTED: Come be a
part of our "New Attitudes" Hair
Show. Monday, Sept. 8 at Sheraton of
Greenville. For more info, please
call Nancy at Honeycutt Salon ser
vices. 752 6178.
SKILLED WORK: 700,000 MEN
AND WOMEN ARE CRAWLING
BEFORE THEY WALK. MINIMUM
PART TIME, $5,000, MAXIMUM, 2
MILLION A YEAR. WITH 5 YEAR
SERVICE. CALL 1-919-322-5534.
PART-TIME HELP WANTED: Out
doo- work, some heavy. Early morn
ngs 10-15 hrs. a week, S3.75hr.
start. Can work around schedules.
Driver's license needed. Bob,
7569618.
STUDENTS NEEDED: Work study
and self-help. Must have strong typ-
ing skills. Contact School of Nursing
at 757 6061.
COLLEGE REP WANTED: To
distribute "Student Rate" subscrip-
tion cards at this campus. Good in-
come. For information application
write to: COLLEGIATE
MARKETING SERVICES, 251 Glen-
wood Dr. Mooresville, NC 28115.
SOCCER COACHES AND
REFEREES: Needed for afternoon
hours. Contact Pitt County Com-
munity Schools at 752-2934 Ext. 276
or 267.
SOCCER COACHES NEEDED:
Greenville Recreation and Parks
Dept. is recruiting 10-14 part-time
Soccer coaches for the fall soccer
program. Applicants must possess
some knowledge in soccer skills and
have patience to work with youth.
Applicants must be able to coach
young people, ages 6-15 in soccer
fundamentals. Hours approximately
3 7 p.m. Monday-Friday. Some night
and week-end coaching. Program
will extend from Sept. 8- to mid Nov.
Salary rate, $3.46hour. Applicants
will be accepted August 20- Sept. 12.
Contact Ben James at 752-4137 Ext.
262.
WANTED: 2 roommates mf to
share comfortable house on Meade
St. $130 a month and utilities. Nice
atmosphere and central air. Call
David at 752 9788.
ROOMMATES: Shared accomoda
tions starting at $113 to $200 all
area's Prices and sizes alternative
housing. Now available. Call us at
752-2780. Home locators fee.
WANTED: Female student to assist
housewife with house cleaning and
child care in exchange for room and
board. Near campus. 757-1798
GIRL SCOUTS: Campus Girl Scouts
will be organized. Anyone interested
in working with youths and pro-
viding services to the community
contact Julie at 1-800-558-9297 (Girl
Scout office).
ATTENTION WORK-STUDY
STUDENTS Need fulfilling,
rewarding work in your field of
study? We have the following open-
ings available at the Regional
Development institute. Contact Lisa
Tripp at 757-6650 or 6651 or write to:
Lisa Tripp, Regional Development
institute, East Carolina University,
Corner of Firsi and Reade Streets,
Greenville, NC 27858-4353. Openings
include: ARTIST ILLUSTRATOR
ill- Art major to do camera and
layout for print. $4 per hour.
SECRETARY III- Business educa-
tion major to type 70 wpm and
answer phone. $4 per hour. OFFICE
ASSISTANT ll- Students to file,
type, and answer phone. 2 positions,
3.60 per hour. LIBRARY AIDE II-
Library Science major to maintain
small library. $3.60 per hour. AUDIO
VISUAL AIDE II- Communication
Arts major to use camera, video
equipment, and to script write. $4
per hour. COMPUTER ASSISTANT
ll- Computer science major to write
programs for IBM PC. $3.50 per
hour.
ROOMMATES WANTED: 3
bedroom house at ill N. Library St.
$150 a month, plus utilities shared.
Washer, dryer and phone included.
Steve Mitchem 752-8519.
ROOMMATE WANTED: For 2 br.
duplex 4 blocks east of campus.
Sl45mo deposit, Va utilities. Prefer
responsible grad student, non-
smoker. 758 1590.
WANTED: A receptionist at Gold's
Gym. Hours: 9 a.m3 p.m. Pay:
$4hr. Call 758-4359, ask for Robbie.
STAFF POSITIONS: The Buc-
caneer yearbook is accepting ap-
plications for staff positions. Come
by office or contact Media Board
secretary for information. Located
across from Joyner Library. 2nd
floor.
LOST BEAGLEi: Hot pink collar.
Missing since 8-10-86. Owner
HEART BROKEN. Answers to
FLACA. Day: 754-3440, Evening:
752-0577.
WANTED: Person to deliver parts
from 8 a.m 12 or 1 p.m. MonFri.
Company vehicle provided to
deliver. Good for student with after-
noon classes. Barnes Auto Parts,
756-4191. Dickinson Ave.
MANAGER WANTED: The Lady
Pirate Basketball Team is seeking
someone to serve as their mtn�9r
for the 84-87 season, interested ap-
plicants should contact me basket-
ball office immediately! 757-43t4 or
come by room 144 in Mlnges.
WANT TO �UY: Earth Cruiser In
? good condition. Price negotiable.
Please call Kafhy 758-4309.
HELP WANTED: Part-time
telephone collector for local collec-
tion agency. 20-25 hrs. a week. Apply
in Person. s.C.A. Collection, 308
Evans St. Mall.
JSAIi
WINDSURFER FOR SALE:
Fanatic funboard complete with 6 0
meter powerhead sail, six
footstraps, and retractable dagger
board. 7S8-2940, ask for Steve.
FOR RENT: 2 room furnished
apartment for rent. Lights and
water furnished. Call 754-0174 or
752-7212.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom wprivate
bath with Christian couple. Front
and back entrance, heat and air con-
dition furnished. Call 752-7212.
FOR SALE: Is it true you can buy
jeeps for $44 through the U.S.
government? Get the facts today!
Call 1-312-742-1142, ext. 5271-A.
PIANO FOR SALE: Wanted:
Responsible party to assume small
monthly payments on piano. See
locally. Call credit manager
1-800 447 4266.
FOR SALE: Dorm -si ze refrigerator,
$50. Good condition. Call 757-0769.
BACK TO SCHOOL OARAOE
SALE: 8 untii. Saturday, August 30,
rain or shine. Hope Fellowship
Church Gym (formally Old Parker's
Chapel Gym) Pactolus Hwy. Fur-
niture, antiques, appliances,
household items, clothes. Watch for
signs at intersection of 244-bypass
and Pactolus Hwy.
MATHCOMPUTER TUTOR I NO:
758-1237 for appointment or printed
information
LOOK GREAT AT SUPER SAV-
INGS New York trained Hair
Stylist- Paul Mitchell � Chadwick
haircutting methods. Professional
Image Hair Studio. Hair cuts for
men and women to fit your bone
structure. Free hair consultations.
754-1945.
FOR RENT: Clean, l-bed room, cen-
tral air, $210 per month-or-2
bedroom, $250, both near campus.
752-2780 Home Locators Fee.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FOR SALE: 1971 Volvo, 2 door,
stick shift. New tires, brakes and
battery. Good car, $900. Call
7532325.
FOR SALE: Bed, day bed, heaters,
table and other misc. items. Call
Jennifer 752-3352 weekdays 810
a.m. and p.m. Priced to move!
FOR SALE: Sleeper sofa in great
condition. $100. Call 754-9559 after 5
p.m.
FOR SALE: One small refrigerator,
ideal for dorm room, $50, one piece
of carpet large enough to cover
dorm room, $15, and one cabinet,
good for storing food, $10. Call
758 5224.
BACK ACTION: Music provided for
Greek functions. Bar Mitzphas, pool
parties, etcContact the
TRASHMAN at 752 3587. Gigantic
selection of music. Lights too!
august 24, mm
POR SALE: Two white twin
bedspreads, $10 each, 2 sets white
Prisciila curtains with Cape Cod
curtains, W long x 10C wide, SIS
both sets 2 sets lined gold drapes,
�P long x 41' wide. S10 both sets
754-1464.
BEAUTIFUL COLLEGE WATER-
FRONT AFT Resort area Normal
$400. Students- S250month. Electric,
water, gas, sewer furnished. 400 ft.
fishing and crabbing pier. Commute
45 ml. 1-919-322-5534.
ALPHA PHI BIO BROTHERS:
Meeting 8 p.m. Wednesday at the
Alpha Phi House.
Cont'd en page 9
OL7)

GTYM
Located on the Evans Street Mall
(across the street from the Elbo)
SPECIAL
STUDENT
RATES
Semester4 Months
$70.00
THE LARGEST FREE WEIGHT
Nautilus Gym in Greenville
(Over 7,000 sq. ft.)

YOUR MEMBERSHIP INCLUDES
Nautilus Equipment
Over 50 Exercise Stations
10,000 lbs. Free Weight
Aerobic Classes Karate Classes
Men & Ladies Shower
Locker Rooms & Sauna
Members Get Discounted Rates on
Suntanna Tanning Bed
GOLD'S AEROBICS
Semester Special
4 Months $25.00
Hours: M-F 9:00 AM to 9:00 PM
Sat. 12:00 PM - 6:00 PM Sun. 2:00 - 6:00 PM
rov AAofo InfofNicrtiOA
Coll Today 754359
A Hcoumo of GOLD'S GYM INT INC.
If '� �"� - �li"WpT�lJU
MfefMMMSM
&
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26. 1986
Ships In Harbor Searched
NEW YORK (UPI) �
Helicopters hovered, Coast
Guardsmen and federal agents
searched and police dogs sniffed,
but a massive hunt for drug
smugglers that brought officials
onto 90 ships in New York har-
bor netted only one arrest.
When daylong "Operation
Glass Eye" drew to a close Friday
at dusk, hundreds of officials had
boarded every vessel from
pleasure craft to commercial boat
in the harbor but found no nar-
cotics.
The lone arrest officials made,
that of Thomas Hall, 27, of
Asbury Park, N.J was on an
armed robbery warrant from his
home state.
Coast Guard Capt. Gene
Henn, who commanded the
operation, said its objective was
as much to send a message to
drug traffickers as to intercept
shipments of drugs.
"For those who would poison
the children of the United States,
the message is clear; We're going
to get you Henn said. "He who
runs drugs into the Port of New
York runs a high risk of getting
caught
Despite exhaustive efforts, the
lack of drug seizures appears to
be routine.
"I've only found drugs on
about three or four vessels" in
the past two years, said Lt. Mike
Selavka, who began boarding
boats from a small cutter when
the operation began at dusk
Thursday in a stiff rain.
The operation mobilized about
250 guardsmen, 100 officers from
the New York Police Department
maritime unit, and numerous
agents from the U.S. Customs
Service and Drug Enforcement
Agency.
Fifteen Coast Guard vessels,
four police boats, two Customs
boats and six helicopters took
part. A command center was set
up aboard the 140-foot cutter
Penobscot Bay based at Staten
Island.
Coast Guardsmen with
megaphones directed ships,
allowing other guardsmen clad in
bulletproof vests to board each
vessel in teams of three.
They were armed with a
shotgun, an M-16 automatic rifle
and .45-caliber sidearms for a
round of routine paperwork
checks. They scrutinized the
boats' registrations, passengers'
identities, and required safety
equipment.
Henn said that while drug
smugglers were more likely to
operate off Long Island by using
small powerboats running
shipments to mother ships off-
shore, Friday's operation was
flexible and could be staged
anywhere.
There was no word on when
the patrol might resume.
New York's Mayor Edward
Koch commended the operation,
but said widespread publicity sur-
rounding it resulted in "a poorly
performed maneuver Everyone
he spoke to knew about it, Koch
said.
Greensboro Cited As NC
Bank Robbery Capital
GREENSBORO, NC. (UPI) �
FBI statistics show one of every
five bank robberies in the state
this year has been in Greensboro,
making the city North Carolina's
bank robbery capital for 1986.
To date, Greensboro has had
12 robberies, three more than in
all of 1985. Charlotte follows
with eight robberies to date, com-
pared with 26 in 1985. High Point
is third in the state with six rob-
beries this year, compared to one
last year.
Of the 18 bank robberies in
Greensboro and High Point, six
have occurred at branch offices
of First Citizens Bank. Three of
those have been at the Eastgate
Shopping Center in High Point.
City and federal investigators
said bank robberies are cyclical
and rates are often inflated by
repeat offenders who rob several
banks within a short period of
time. A total of 56 robberies had
occurred statewide through
Thursday.
"We normally lead the state,
but it looks like Greensboro is the
leader this year said Brendon
Battle, bank robbery coordinator
for the FBI in Charlotte.
"They're putting a lot of peo-
ple in jail he said. "But I don't
know why they keep happening
In Greensboro and High Point,
six banks have been robbed since
June � three in four days. Near-
by Winston-Salem has recorded
one robbery compared to three
last year.
before said Greensboro police
Capt. Byron Thomas. "I have no
way of knowing why people
decide to rob banks when thev
do
Greensboro police and FBI
agents are looking for convicted
bank robber John Joseph Sousa,
who walked away from a
Winston-Salem halfway house
one day before he was to be
released. Battle said authorities
want to question him about a
Feb. 10 robbery of a First Union
National Bank in Greensboro
and several recent robberies.
A dver Using m � � �
Call 757-6366
Master Program Receives Funding
fJCl NEWS �! Kt a I
ECU's master's degree concen-
tration in "special physical
education" � specifically aimed
at preparing teachers to work
with the handicapped � has
received funding from the U.S.
Department of Education.
An instructional grant of
$59,065 was awarded to ECU's
Department of Health, Physical
Education, Recreation and Safe-
ty to support teacher training in
the field. Assistant professor
David Poretta will direct the new-
curriculum.
"Graduates will be able to
assume roles as full-time special
physical education teachers or
resource specialists as well as
regular physical education
teachers Poretta said.
"However, the main focus of
preparation is to train specialists
in adapted physical education at
the master's degree level
ECU recently conducted a
survey of special education ad-
ministrators in the Carolinas,
Poretta said, with results in-
dicating that there is a "definite
need for specialists" in physical
educaton for the handicapped.
Ninety percent of the respondents
stated that adapted physical
education specialists would be
employed in their districts when
positions become available, he
noted.
The competency-based pro-
gram would be composed of
"theoretical, practical and other
professional development ex-
periences Poretta said.
Graduates of the program might
expect to teach classes of only
handicapped children or in
"mainstreamed" classes in which
children with orthopedic, sensory
or mental handicaps are taught
along with nondisabled students.
Poretta said plans are to
evaluate the program continually
in order to insure "cost effective
training of quality personnel
In addition to the adapted
physical education emphasis,
ECU's Department of Health,
Physical Education, Recreation
and Safety offers graduate degree
programs and concentrations in
such areas as athletic administra-
tion, leisure systems studies, and
driver and traffic safety.
The Episcopal Student Fellowship
invites you to
a service of Holy Eucharist
5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 27th
St. Paul's Episcopal Church
401 E. 4th Street
Supper and conversation will follow the service
DUNKIN'
DONUTS
It's worth the trip.
758-5607
10 Off Any Purchase
With ECU ID
South Memorial Drive
Near the Hospital
24
7 Buy AW

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Other Stores in Jacksonville. Kinston. Goldsboro and Atlantic Beach
Expert Repairs Done on the Premises
14K Gold Chains & Bracelets
Watches, Manual and Quartz
HOUSEWARES OUTLET
Back To Campus Savings
Diamonds remounted in Gold or
Platinum
Certified Appraisals For Insurance
Purposes
Gift Certificates
Free Gift Wrap
Ear Piercing
You May Use Your Choice, Discover, American Express or Bank Card charge
cards
Open MonSat. 10 A.M10 P.M.
Phone 7564696
Cash�Layaway�Bank Cards
or Store Charge
SANYO
CUBE
REFRIGERATOR
Ideal for Apartment or Dorm
� Freezer w2 Ice Trays
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Save on Compact Disc Players by
Magnavox, Sony, Pioneer & Panasonic.
VCR's by Sony, Pioneer, Samsung, Lloyds
Hurry! While Supplies Last
HOUSEWARES OUTLET
Memorial Drive
Buyers Market Place Mall
756-1567
r
3
2
Infectious Wa.
Sty's Tw
;HARLOTTE, N (Ul
Mecklenburg Count)
iv they have caught
MS largest hospitah dumping i
.gal infectious waste in a c
indfill-
In June, an inspe
jarnsburg Road lane
hree Hefty plastic bag
Tom Charlotte Men
lospital. According I
ion notice the count)
hospital, "each plasi
iained 500 milhliters (ab
jint) of red liquid wl
jeared to be bio.
ther liquid "
Officials said coi
lore than 20 millibtei
lood" and n
'We're doing ev
ran to deal rep
ervative!y "
:hallenge
iMemonal sp.
Newton, who
generates 9 mill.
Iwaste a year.
"With beds
Continued From f
HGMA PHI EPSILON
�oud I e �
sackoscoc a-
jrea sufWiw!
5IG EPS: Welcome - �
ove. Yxr Little 5 se-s
JBARB. WCe s: B a: " H
hie lila a aog " s s -
'he Shnmp n Cac s Crew
JSIGMA NU'S BACK Z'
age ;s gong uc bo1 -
jaPvwav R'9r' G- f&
THE KNIGHTS OF SiGVA NU
would I'Ke to weicoe a
?reshmen to EC.
meetings for the brott
sisters win be e d
Wendennaii ever� Sundav
p.m. Gene. The Be.e- i
can be found a' v. I - 3 P
ding
SIG EP LITTLE SISTERS
Welcome oac gns!
meeting will be nex �ee�
me house anc be soo - I
of Our meeting!
Who-o-o
who has
FINE
K
Open 7 davs
Located beh j3l '
In the Fanv Frest
STUD
OUPON
SPE
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h I i). 88 with coupon
Air Conditioning
Servicing
hP I .88 (includes '
Can Freon)
I 2� Used Tires
$8.88
���� IW ' ��
mmi0mmum0mmi0
m





I Hi hASTC AROl IN1AN
AUGUST 26. 1986
s NC
31
Infectious Waste Dumping At Landfill In Charlotte
City's Two Largest Hospitals Accused By County Officials
people
:he
FBI
S

6366
ft1-
UTS f
3SG
Lrfl V�
m�k
ic
iMSUNG
ROWAVE
995
9,95
NNON
pESTAR 4
WRITER
ore?
I c.
I d:
ET
1
o.
JSs,
aro
iful
irtd
in
but
t.
ard
if-
.m.
test
a.ss.
do
te:
to
d
is
$e
.
'ide
iv�.n
feel
ines
�our
rom
and
am;
On't
I. it
get-
r 'he
uious
Sts tO
lilt to
igion.
in a
t( be
) and
loose-
�lues,
�Ueh a
Dl any
: that
be lg-
lism is
super-
t, and
in and
fh the
jferred
digion
belief
.ssing
jiousK
Or her
00 the
Xstant
are the
aicom-
Utional
krance
le.
itorical
that the
and the
�� their
HARLOTTE, N.C. (UPI)
lilenburg Counts officials
ie have caught Charlotte's
j .rcest hospitals dumping il
nfectious vaste in a county
ill.
June, an inspector a: the
shurg Road landfill opened
�; Heft plastic bags of waste
Charlotte M e m o r i a 1
.( According to a viola-
lotice the count sent the
al, "each plastic bag con
� 500 milliliters (about a
� red liquid which ap
to be blood and some
iquid
als said containers with
a 20 milliliters are "bulk
and must be incinerated.
e doing everything we
deal responsibly and con-
v e I s w i t h i h e w a s: e
lge said Charlotte
pokesw oman e
n, w ho said the hospil il
� 9 million pounds ol
beds and 3,500
itinued Krom Page 1
S 3MA PHI EPSILON: Tl
employees and an awful lot of pa-
tients, it's always possible this
can happen she said.
1 ast month, a landfill inspec-
toi checked waste dumped at the
landfill by Presbyterian Hospital
and reported finding 40 syringes
with needles, six unattached
needles and quantities of blood
beyond the 20 milliliter cutoff.
A notice of the violation was
sen: to the hospital this month,
bul officials sa the JuK incident
was an isolated event, the pro
duct of human error.
nfectious waste is blood,
hypodermic needles, lab cultures,
surgical waste and other material
that may carry infectious disease.
On JuK 1. 1985, North Carolina
began regulating how this waste
is treated before dumped in
sanitary landfills.
State officials adopted a defini-
ol infectious waste and
ordered it be sterilized, in-
cinerated, or m the case ol
nee es, mutilated before being
dumped.
The new rules do not impose
requirements on packaging,
storage and transport. While
some officials are calling for
more regulations of the issue,
state and local agencies say the
are already stretched too thin to
ensure compliance.
Experts disagree ovei what
sh mid be treated as infectious
waste. Foi thai reason, the En-
vironmental Protection Agency
has only issued guidelines on the
topic.
"Right now ,e haven't seen
any damages from mismanage-
ment of infectious waste said
J a c q u e 1 i n e Sales, EPA
spokeswoman. "We don't have a
basis on which to promulgate na-
tional regulations
Bui with the concern ovei
AIDS arid other diseases, some
want the definitions broadened
and moie regulations put in
place. In New x. oi k City lasl
material marked, "Precaution
AIDS" � were found.
"It kind of scares me said
Ricky Gray, a Charlotte landfill
worker. "You're going through
that waste, you don't know
what's in it
Some contend that the threat
of infectious waste to the public
is exaggerated. Microbiologist
William Rutala said some waste
now considered potentially infec-
tious can be safely disposed of
directly into properly run
sanitary landfills.
"1 think that one needs to
realize there have been aesthetu
and emotional considerations
that overemphasize possibly the
actual risk of disease transmis-
sion said Rutala, who has
helped draft the state rules and
EPA guidelines. "And for those
reasons various types of solid
waste were designated as infec-
tious but not because of the
likelihood or relative risk ol
disease transmission
Rutala and local hospital of-
ficials sav the hazards of hospital
waste sometimes pale in com-
parison to the waste in a family's
trash can, such as the hazardous
waste of a baby's soiled
disposable diaper.
CHECKOUT WE.
Classifieds
757-6366
:ar, tw
-i'

trom using city landl ills aftei
us w as -ncluding
.so m � . �
Ae "tope you al
-
E ps A� me Dac�, gi �
L ' e S s?ers
3ARB �' 9 ad that youc . I
� jog K s suer! Lov
� mp n Chablis Oew
s s BACK The dr nk ng
: p b t we lon't drink
- ght Guys?
-�E KNIGHTS OF SIGMA NU
� .�, el( or.e all o �
Our week �
� � �� � � � fhet 5 �
eld ir roo' 221
every - nday at 9 30
� The Bever a-c Che '
nd at suit 13 p rafes Lan
E p LITTLE SISTERS
� next week Come Dy
� f- -h ng i � '� � time
Recent Study Presents
New Murder Statistics
WINS! ON SA1 EM, N.C.
(UPI) While men may plot
murdei foi a variety ol reasons.
women are most likely to kill
spontaneously because they or a
nship is threatened, says
author of a recent study.
Mosl of the "6 female
murderers interviewed last vear in
the North Carolina Correctional
(err ' Women bv John
Humphrey, a University of North
Carolina al Greensboro pro-
fessor, killed their victims while
they slept.
Humphrey told the Winston-
S i em Journal thai 66 oi the
en killed men mosl otter,
a husbai A, family member or
. e in boy fi iend.
Many �1 tl e � m en had been
long periods by their
tims, he said. Mosl had been
brought up "with regular, fre-
� � ti d excessive descipline
All bul sis o: the women had
been employed ai
anothei m low -paying
bs � and 4! rece ed local,
tate oi federal assistance.
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Catering � Restaurant� Tavern

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Art Showings
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In the Farm Fresh Shopping Plaza
r
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STUDENTS
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H I 0.88 with coupon)
Air Conditioning
Servicing
: 4 Wheel Drum or
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: vj0y.88 (
with coupon)
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: Oil Filter, Oil Change
.88 (Includes 1
Can Freon)
I $12.88
(with coupon)
I 2� Used Tires
5U.88
4-Wheel Computer
Balance and Rotate
$19.
88 (with coupon)
C0GGINS CAR CARE
QrMiwHto. N.C. Phon 756-5244
te
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1
i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUOUST M. UtS
sNC
al
1
Infectious Waste Dumping At Landfill In Charlotte
City's Two Largest Hospitals Accused By County Officials
re said Greensboro police.
t. Byron Thomas. "I have no'
of knowing why people
Ide to rob banks when they
preensboro police and FBI
its are looking for convicted
k robber John Joseph Sousa,
walked away from a
ston-Salem halfway house
day before he was to be
sed. Battle said authorities
I to question him about a
10 robbery of a First Union
nal Bank in Greensboro
several recent robberies.
7 757-6366
Wl
rchase
ID
il Drive
ipital
to
id
it
d
ity
n.
est
bfo
ings
SAMSUNG
ICROWAVE
OVEN
3tts Cooking Power
Minute Timer
995
$129.95
is
ue
ry's
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rwn
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ines
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oor
torn
and
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m't
, it
jct-
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1
ANNON
ESTAR 4
WRITER
y Line Memory
or AC Adaptor
995
$249.95
Tore!
y
�nic.
(oyds
it
IT
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in a
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and
lues,
:ha
any
that
i�-
i is
iper-
and
and
the
red
ion
� -Belief
MBi r
3Basing
9
-
��
sBr her
� s1 the
3
itast
the
lonal
the
the
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (UP1) �
Mecklenburg County officials
say they have caught Charlotte's
two largest hospitals dumping il-
legal infectious waste in a county
landfill-
In June, an inspector at the
Harrisburg Road landfill opened
three Hefty plastic bags of waste
from Charlotte Memorial
Hospital. According to a viola-
tion notice the county sent the
hospital, "each plastic bag con-
tained 500 milliliters (about a
pint) of red liquid which ap-
peared to be blood and some
other liquid
Officials said containers with
more than 20 milliliters are "bulk
blood" and must be incinerated.
"We're doing everything we
can to deal responsibly and con-
servatively with the waste
challenge said Charlotte
Memorial spokeswoman Cecily
Newton, who said the hospital
generates 9 million pounds of
waste a year.
"With 777 beds and 3,500
Continued From Page 1
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: The r,ig Eps
vvould like to welcome everyone
back to school. We hope you all had a
great summer!
employees and an awful lot of pa-
tients, it's always possible this
can happen she said.
Last month, a landfill inspec-
tor checked waste dumped at the
landfill by Presbyterian Hospital
and reported finding 40 syringes
with needles, six unattached
needles and quantities of blood
beyond the 20 milliliter cutoff.
A notice of the violation was
sent to the hospital this month,
but officials say the July incident
was an isolated event, the pro-
duct of human error.
Infectious waste is blood,
hypodermic needles, lab cultures,
surgical waste and other material
that may carry infectious disease.
On July 1, 1985, North Carolina
began regulating how this waste
is treated before dumped in
sanitary landfills.
State officials adopted a defini-
tion of infectious waste and
ordered it be sterilized, in-
cinerated, or in the case of
needles, mutilated before being
dumped.
The new rules do not impose
requirements on packaging,
storage and transport. While
some officials are calling for
more regulations of the issue,
state and local agencies say they
are already stretched too thin to
ensure compliance.
Experts disagree over what
should be treated as infectious
waste. For that reason, the En-
vironmental Protection Agency
has only issued guidelines on the
topic.
"Right now we haven't seen
any damages from mismanage-
ment of infectious waste said
Jacqueline Sales, EPA
spokeswoman. "We don't have a
basis on which to promulgate na-
tional regulations
But with the concern over
AIDS and other diseases, some
want the definitions broadened
and more regulations put in
place. In New York City last
year, two hospiu 's were banned
from using city landfills after in-
fectious waste � including
SIG EPS: Welcome back
lovc Your Little Sisters.
guys!
Recent Study Presents
New Murder Statistics
BARB: We're so glad that you didn't
die like a dog this summer! Love,
The Shrimp-n-Chablis Crew.
SIGMA NU'S BACK: The drinking
age is going up, but we don't drink
anyway. Right Guys?
THE KNIGHTS OF SIGMA NU:
would like to welcome all of the
freshmen to E.C.U. Our weekly
meetings for the brothers and lil
sisters will be held in room 221
Mendenhall every Sunday at 9:30
p.m. Gene, The Bever, and Cheeto
can be found at suit 13 Pirates Lan-
ding
SIG EP LITTLE SISTERS:
Welcome back girls! Our first
meeting will be next week. Come by
the house and be looking for the time
of our meeting!
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C.
(UPI) � While men may plot
murder for a variety of reasons,
women are most likely to kill
spontaneously because they or a
relationship is threatened, says
the author of a recent study.
Most of the 76 female
murderers interviewed last year in
the North Carolina Correctional
Center for Women by John
Humphrey, a University of North
Carolina at Greensboro pro-
fessor, killed their victims while
they slept.
Humphrey told the Winston-
Salem Journal that 66 of the
women killed men � most often
a husband, family member or
live-in boyfriend.
Many of the women had been
abused for long periods by their
victims, he said. Most had been
brought up "with regular, fre-
quent and excessive descipline
All but six of the women had
been employed at one time or
another � most in low-paying
jobs � and 41 received local,
state or federal assistance.
Who-o-oWho-o-o
who hasn't found
FOOD & SPIRITS
Open 7 days -11 AM til 1 AM
Located behind Quincy's and Ace Cleaners
In the Farm Fresh Shopping Plaza
WELCOME
2"STUDENTS
OUPON
SP
C
1 Wheel Alignment
1$ I O � 88 with coupon)
SERVICEl
IALS
: 4-Wheel Drum or
� Front Disc Reline
!$59.
88 (with coupon)
Air Conditioning
Servicing
$ 1 7.88 (includes 1
Can Freon)
Lubrication
Oil Filter, Oil Change!
$12.88
(with coupon)
12-
Used Tires
$888
4-Wheel Computer
Balance and Rotate
$19.
U (with coupon)
material marked, "Precaution
AIDS" � were found.
"It kind of scares me said
Ricky Gray, a Charlotte landfill
worker. "You're going through
that waste, you don't know
what's in it
Some contend that the threat
of infectious waste to the public
is exaggerated. Microbiologist
William Rutala said some waste
now considered potentially infec-
tious can be safely disposed of
directly into properly run
sanitary landfills.
"I think that one needs to
realize there have been aesthetic
and emotional considerations
that overemphasize possibly the
actual risk of disease transmis-
sion said Rutala, who has
helped draft the state rules and
EPA guidelines. "And for those
reasons various types of solid
waste were designated as infec-
tious but not because of the
likelihood or relative risk of
disease transmission
Rutala and local hospital of-
ficials say the hazards of hospital
waste sometimes pale in com-
parison to the waste in a family's
trash can, such as the hazardous
waste of a baby's soiled
disposable diaper.
CHECK OUT THE.
Classifieds
757-6366
Simply Elegant Inc.
Catering � Restaurartf� Tavern
Private FacilitierAvailable For:
Workshops
Banquets (200 people)
Art Showings
Recitals and More
TAILGATE PARTY CATERING
Open at 11:30 a.m. for your dining pleasure � Daily Specials
Visit Us Today For Your Catering Needs
Free Consultations
757-1227 Cotanche Street All ABC Permits
C0GGINS CAR CARE
�(FGoodnch
730 Greenville Blvd
Greenville. N.C. 355-2626
I f M �! ifcl (All m f'
!tve'y Ang'fibi
ASTONIA � CUNCUHU � Mumul
ST f. pp- a! in
mi, m m i .in � W ,�,
mm
mmmmmmmm
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l
ft k
�M





10
THE EAST CAROL IN 1A N
j-UJGUST 26, 1986
I
Aids Victim Finally Back To School
KOKOMO, Ind. (UPI) �
Teenage AIDS victim Ryan
White was so anxious to get back
to school today that he started
reading his textbooks even before
classes started.
"He's excited to go back
said Jeanne White, the boy's
mother. "He has his locker, his
lock and his books. I think he's
going to like it
Ryan, the subject of a pro-
tracted legal battle during the
1985-86 school year on whether
he should be allowed in the
classroom, has to start school to-
day with his eighth grade
classmates at Western High
School.
His mother said his health cer-
tificate was renewed last week
after routine medical examina-
tions by his personal doctor and
Dr. Alan Adler, Howard County
Health officer. Ryan already has
gotten a head start on his studies
by reading his textbooks, his
mother said.
The parents opposing Ryan's
admission to school recently gave
up their court battle and now say
they will work for legislation to
ban AIDS victims from schools
when the General Assembly con-
venes next year.
Ryan, who contracted acquired
immune deficiency syndrome
during treatment for hemophilia,
Christ Image Seen On Tanks
HJSTOR1A Ohio. (UPI) �
While students were doing a brisk
business hawking memorial cof-
fee mugs at four bucks a pop,
thousands of curious spectators
flocked to a soybean oil tank
upon which they hoped to see the
image of Jesus.
Another onslaught t hi
weekend slowed traffic to a crawl
as people drove bumper-to-
bumper past the tank where
witnesses say they have seen two
images of Christ and the profile
of a young child.
Reports of a larger-than-life
size apparition of a long-haired,
bearded man and a profile of a
young child on the tank's west
side have drawn thousands of
motorists this week to the nor-
thwest Ohio communitv oi
16,000.
The news Friday said that
witnesses reported seeing a se-
cond image, the likeness of the
face of Jesus, on the opposite
side of the 40-foot-high tank at-
tracted even more people to the
city, about 35 miles south of
Toledo.
"Traffic's bumper to bumper
and moving very slowly police
dispatcher Tim Hatfield said.
Hatfield said Friday's crowd
was comparable to Thursday
night's, when spectators
numbered in the thousands.
Cars and trucks slowed to a
crawl as people tried to see the
shadowv figures.
Some people claim the images
are a message from God, but of-
ficials for the Archer Daniels
Midland Co which owns the
tank, attributed the outlines to a
combination o' rust, paint and
shadows caused by sodium vapor
lights on the tank.
Rick Pfeiffer of Fostoria, who
produced mugs bearing a sketch
of the tank with the image and
the words "I saw the Image
said he and several high school
See PEOPLE Page 11.
spent most of the last school year
studying at home, linked to
classrooms by a telephone-
computer hookup, while the
parents of some classmates tried
to get judge after judge to keep
him out of school.
Ryan's lawyers, arguing there
is no evidence AIDS is spread
through casual contact, eventual-
ly prevailed and the boy was
readmitted to school but not until
the school year was almost over.
School Superintendent J.O.
Smith said the district will take
the same state-mandated precau-
tions it took last year when Ryan
attended middle school, such as
providing separate eating utensils
and bathroom facilities.
There are about 1,000 students
in the five grades at Western
High School near Kokomo in
central Indiana. The middle
school has about 300 students.
"We never doubted that he'd
be there this year said Mitzie
Johnson, leader of a group of
parents that opposes Ryan's
presence at the school.
"What we have to do now is go
through the Legislature and the
governmental process she said.
"You have to get the laws that'll
work for you first Ryan con-
tracted AIDS in December 1984
and was barred from classes by
Smith on July 30, 1985 He
studied at home until Feb.21,
when he was allowed back in
school after a special state educa-
tion panel and Adler agreed the
boy did not pose a threat to other
students.
He was again barred from
classes later that day when
parents obtained a temporary
restraining order in Howard
County Circuit Court.
But Clinton County Circuit
Judge Jack O'Neill threw out the
order April 10, allowing Ryan
back in classes for the remaining
six weeks of the school year.
Some parents then created their
own school in Russiaville to keep
their children away from Ryan.
The Indiana Court of Appeals
last month rejected an appeal to
O'Neill's ruling and the parents
gave up their legal fight because
of funding problems.
I Nesday-Wedaesda)
Spaghetti All you can eat
S3.95
Authentic Northern ' &���
Italian Cuisine
� Excellent Service
� More Elegance
All ABC Permits
Hours: MonThurs. 5-10 p m
Fn -Sat. 5-10:30 p.m
Rierjale Shoppingenter
757-1757
Get the
word out
in the
Announcements
in The East Carolinian
SOUTHPARK
a
MAYIAG
: � iiTIl)
LAUNDRY
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
Corner 10th & Dickinson Ave
We Buy Gold & Silver
All Transactions Confidential
Buy � Sell � Trade t
752-0322
Hours. 9:00 a.m6:00 p.m. Moa-Sat
� Large Washers
for your sleeping banv
quilts, draperies or
355-5023 9 v 12 rugs
�Cleanest & Most Economical in Greenville
�Drop-Off Service (Fluff & Fold) M)n Ceai
�Refreshments & Video Games -Helpful Attendants
�If you get a TOKEN in your change
You get your laundry washed and dried for FREE!
LOCATED NEXT TO THI SPA ND FOOD LION
Open 8:00 a.m9:15 p.m. MonSat 2:00 p.m9 - rn Sui
Bring This Ad & Gel ONE FREE WASH & DRV When Wa ng 2 More Loa
SlTY
5th St. T
757-1557
TV'S
MON
MOVIES
AM-9PM

VCRS
RENT BY THE DAY WEEK, MONTH
SEMESTER AND
cs
X
m
m
Day
Week
Month
$9.95
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(1 Free Movie)
TV-VCR
Combo
$24.95
$79.95
$179.95
Free Membership to ECU Students
Ai
Threat.
To Ba
:ORDELE. Ga UPI)
0-year-old girl ar
,ld accomplice appar
riven by "televisioi
oredom" in calling ban)
cmanding bags of atone
id Saturday
'It was weird saiJ
ommy L Wesi who
0-year-old on I -
dephone to one ol I
jclif-ve this is the . inge
ve ever arrester I
erse.
West said the 10- � �
essed to making
hreats � a violati n
rxtortion and bank .
ind the investigatior
in 8-year-olc .
jenied any invoKemen!
"We think the �
?e brought into the
ie said. She's si
m hoping we car g
ha
West said tha'
banks in Cordeie
1.000 people 150 n
Atlanta, received
Wednesday from
demanded that tellers
into bags for picker
"The caller desa
a 19-year-old bla �
said she would be i
weapon and not tc
or they'd be sorrv. We
"She apparently m
voice to sound older
He said the caller;
ame wording an
lions to tellers at -
"I think it was jusl bi
by television and bore
said.
West said �utii
the calls seriously arj
closed briefly. P
surveillance at the ba �
(Jesus Image
Sighted On
Side Of Tan
Continued From Pane 10
students had sold 500 I
$4 apiece.
"These peopie who a
can't leave witl
their minds he &a
human being car, uses
Pfeiffer said ne p a
part of his prol
ratholic school.
"1 don't want pe
I'm just stuffing mv.
from this he sa"d
Hundreds of peer?
gathering at the site
two weeks, but the throng
last weekend after new �
,about the apparition spread
far away as Australia v
say the images are usua
(after sunset
The tank, capable
million gallons of sovbear.
as assembled from sect
month and painted. Company
fitials said the outlines ma
lesulted from a section resting
the ground and developing -
Dick Burket, vice president
the Decatur. 111 company,
there are no plans to repair-
tank before October
The Re James Ba, k i
theologian for the To I
Catholic Diocese, playe
tile religious significance ol
tightings He said people have
Heed for a deeper meamr.
dinar, experiences.
ijSvv
Hillcri
Memorial Dn
F
G
Bowl One d
r
i
l Another Game
Cou
!
k





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26. 1986
11
"uesda -V edneda
Mi ll �u can eat
S3.95
?.

SUNDRY
i Washers
Pur sleeping bags
, draperies or
2 mos
iile
�Drj Cleaning
Iptul Attendantsj
FREE!
f . sun ,
1 2 r More Loads
��'
f
'
rS
H
V-VCR
Combo
$24.95
$79.95
$179.95
Threats Phoned In
To Bank By Youths
r
CORDELE, Ga. (UPI) � a
10-year-old girl and her 8-year-
old accomplice apparently were
driven by "television and
boredom" in calling banks and
demanding bags of money, police
said Saturday.
"It was weird said detective
Tommy L. West, who caught the
10-year-old on her bedroom
telephone to one of the banks. "I
believe this is the youngest female
I've ever arrested for a felony of-
fense
West said the 10-year-old con-
fessed to making the phone
threats � a violation of federal
extortion and banking laws �
and the investigation implicated
an 8-year-old girlfriend, who
denied any involvement.
"We think the 8-year-old will
be brought into the picture, too
he said. "She's still denying it but
I'm hoping we can get through to
her
West said that two of the three
banks in Cordele, a town of
11,000 people 150 miles south of
Atlanta, received phone calls
Wednesday from females who
demanded that tellers put money
into bags for pickup later.
"The caller described herself as
a 19-year-old black female and
said she would be armed with a
weapon and not to call the police
or they'd be sorry West said.
"She apparently muffled her
voice to sound older
He said the callers used the
same wording and same induc-
tions to tellers at both banks.
"I think it was just brought on
by television and boredom he
said.
West said authorities treated
the calls seriously and the banks
closed briefly. Police set up
surveillance at the banks but no
Jesus Image
Sighted On
Side Of Tank
Continued From Page 10
students had sold 500 of them at
S4 apiece.
"These people who are coming
can't leave with just a picture in
their minds he said. "Every
human being can use a mug
Pfeiffer said he plans to give
part of his profit to the local
Catholic school.
"I don't want people to think
I'm just stuffing my pockets
from this he sa'd.
Hundreds of people have been
gathering at the site for about
two weeks, but the throng swelled
last weekend after news stories
about the apparition spread as
far away as Australia. Witnesses
say the images are usually visible
after sunset.
The tank, capable of holding 2
million gallons of soybean oil,
was assembled from sections last
month and painted. Company of-
ficials said the outlines may have
resulted from a section resting on
the ground and developing rust.
Dick Burket, vice president of
the Decatur, 111 company, said
there are no plans to repaint the
tank before October.
The Rev. James Bacik, a
theologian for the Toledo
Catholic Diocese, played down
the religious significance of the
sightings. He said people have a
need for a deeper meaning in or-
dinary experiences.
one came to pick up the money
bags.
"She called back on Thursday
and by that time we'd had the
telephone company ready to put
a trace on the call and I had a
tape to record it said West.
The detective said he could
hear the sound of a railroad
crossing gate bell in the tape. He
called the train depot master who
consulted railroad schedules and
pinpointed the neighborhood.
"I know this town by heart
said West, who began driving
through the area while the phone
company was tracing the call. It
led to a small frame house.
"I knocked on the door and
the mother answered. I asked her
if anyone was with her and she
said only her little girl. We walk-
ed into the house and her mother
pushed open her daughter's door
and there was the little 10-year-
old on the phone to the bank.
"She turned and looked up
West said. "You couldn't explain
the look on her face. Her mother
was just startled.
"She was just a little kid like
you see playing on school
grounds he said.
"We found what we think is
her litle accomplice because we
were getting two different
voices said West. "While we
were questioning the 10-year-old
at the bank another call came in
and we determined it was one of
her little playmates. I visited the
home of the 8-year-old and, well,
her mother agreed to counsel
her
The 10-year-old, who juvenile
authorities said had never been in
trouble before, will have to ap-
pear before a juvenile judge but
no court date has been set, said
the detective.
Parking Patrol
i MUMIUT � Tk� East C�ronn��
Pink slips on car windows are becoming a common sight for students struggling to find a Dirkine ol.ee
Future university plans do include an increase in parking spaces.
USHA T GULATI
BflMports UMESH c GULATI
M ImpcRts, Inc.
SALE
All Summer Clothing � 12 Price
All Fall Clothing � 20 or more
All Shoes Up To 75 Off
Home Decorating Items And Gifts
Greenville Square
207o Off
�Greenville
�756-5961
Beat The System
NAME BRAND JEANS
5.95-7.95
Buy 3, Get 4th Free
NAME BRAND SHIRTS �
Polo Type � $2.95
Long Sleeve Polo Type � $4.95 Buy 3
Button Down � 3.95 Get 4th Free
Tee Shirts � 1.49
Name Brand Dresses, Blouses, Etc.
$3.95 up Buy 3 Get 4th Free
Just Arrived Great Selection of LONDON FOG �
and others
$12.95
O�
CLOTHES
X)
ICOIN and RING MAM) 4th E.ans SI
�N�iw Brand iuw Clothing
MARATHON RESTAURANTS
"Greek Owned and Operated Since 1979"
DELIVERY MENU
University Optometric Eye
Clinic
DR. DENNIS O'NEAL
"Comprehensive Eye Examinations including air
tonometry & computerized auto refractions
�Contact Lenses � Hard, gas permeable, soft,
extended wear. Contacts for astigmatism.
'Glasses � 1 -day service in most cases
Student & Faculty � Discount on glasses &
contact lenses.
Convenient Location � Clot To. Campus
612 E. 10th St. 1 block from Darryl's 750-6600
Subs
Steak and Cheese$3.75
Steak and Mushrooms$3.75
Reuben wFrench Fries$4.25
Ham and Cheese$3.75
Roast Beef & French Fries$4.25
Cold Sub$3.75
Chicken Salad Sub$3.75
Pastrami Sub$3.75
Turkey and Cheese$3.75
Super Sub$4.25
BLT$3.75
Greek Dishes
GYRO Sandwich$3.75
Souvlaki Sandwich$3.75
Aegean Grilled Cheese$2.75
GYRO Platter$4.25
Marathon Special$4.25
Athenian-Style Chicken$4.25
Sandwiches
Hamburger$1.65
Cheeseburger$1.85
Hot Dog$1.25
Chicken Salad Sandwich$2.75
Chicken Breast$2.25
Shrimp Eggroll$1.15
DEUVERY HOURS
Seven Days A Week
4:00-11:00
Salads
Greek Salad$3.75
Chef's Salad$3.75
Chicken Salad Plate$3.75
Tossed Salad$1.85
Potato Salad$1.50
Greek Pastries
Baklava$1.25
Pizza Menu
a
a
12"
$4.50
5.15
5.85
6.50
7.10
$1.00
Cheese Pizza
Any 1 Item
Any 2 Item
Any 3 Item
Any 4 Item
Add'l Item
Mushrooms
Ground Beef
Green Peppers
Hot Peppers
Anchovies
Marathon Deluxe
Pepperoni, Onions, Ground Beef,
Mushrooms, Green Peppers
Soft Drinks
Small .70 Large .80
French Fries
Small .65 Large .75
16"
$6.50
7.25
8.25
9.15
9.95
$1.50
Pepperoni
Onions
Sausage
Olives
$10.00 $13.00
s
I
s
s
CALL US � � � � � FAST DELIVERY
752-0326 or 752-3753
560 Evans Street
Greenville, NC 27834
essssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss&s
Hillcrest Lanes
urd g- tu d j fjnotf 03!O
8091 LSL � ���4S SuOA3 LIP
tndui03 luojj 93u04tip 6uiiOm
Memorial Drive
756-2020
FREE
GAME
(uoos sajidxa jaffO)
jajsauias aijj joj qq$
i;u,6u i! op 9M puD 6ujlj; auo op a
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ttsviD sDiaoaav iviao
D SI
Bowl OneGwne & Receive "
I Another Game FREE With This j
J Coupon.
IimiiiCoqnJJson
Iudm noA D u8L)M SDds o Suj Adudj olj D joj 6uiAdcI jo peji j -
T "��oawsa
immjimumni i i ii mm �in�
sewxwefcmsamiiesiiir mm m �





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26, 1986
Copyright 1986
Kroger saw on
Ouantttv Rights Reserved
None Solo To Dealers
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
F.vn of these advertised items is required to be readily
available for sale in each Kroger sav on except as
specifically noted in this ad if we do run out of an item
we will offer you your choice of a comparable item
when available reflecting the same savings or a rain
riic-ck which will entitle you to purchase the advertised
arm at the advertised once within 30 days Limit one
manufacturers coupon per item
welcome
ECU
items and Prices
Effective thru Sat
Auq 50 1986
ASSORTED TOPPINGS
Jeno's Pizza
REGULAR OR LIGHT
Coors Beer
SUPERMAN
a 12-oz
Cans
499
asp 0;
PWW!� Jar
Peanut Butter
$
KROGER ALL MEAT
OR JUMBO
Meat
Franks
BUY ONE
GET ONE
SAVE
$1.89
Vvi
FREE
ALL VARIETIES
OLD VILLAGE
Smoked
Lb.
LAND O LAKES
Margarine
Lb.
Qtrs.
SERVE N SAVE SLICED
Lunch Meats
Lb.
Pkg.
USDA CHOICE HEAVY WESTERN
GRAIN FED BEEF CENTER CUT
BONELESS
Round Steak
Lb.
J48
SPARKLING
Party


'vr
�i �
'�����i'�.�t�a���w����g��'�11� i �
affnii 1. 1 w r H�1
$
�J
t�





I
Back
Students
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 26. 1986 13
REPUBLIC
Money Order
ALL VARIETIES
Breyer's
Ice Cream
2$5.
oo
PAPER

Scot Towels
O
Jumbo
Roll
DELICIOUS SWEET
(JUMBO 5 SIZE)
Honeydew
Melons
$j29
KROGER
HAMBURGER OR
Hot Dog
Buns
$

.��
yC


v�efeo Movie
Centals
N� Club Fees
VHS TITLES
INCLUDING:
�Beverly Hjs Cop
�Rambo-First Blood U
petes Dragon ONLY
'Silverado
AND MANY MORE
4sr
CAROLINA
UWVCHSITY
DAY
NTAL
New
CeVDAV LOW P,�
�ssssar
ONLY
PER DAY
BLVD.
TOOTHPASTE
Close Up
Pump
CONDITIONER OR
Aqua Net
Shampoo
NET
16
Oz.
Btl
99
SINGLE TOPPING
THIN CRUST
Deli Fresh
12"
SLICED TO ORDER
PINK LABEL
Sandy Mac
Boiled Ham
y
INCLUDES 4 DINNER ROLLS
WISHBONE
8-Pc. Fried
Chicken
449
FRESH BAKED
French
Bread
Lvs.
CHOCOLATE CHIP, OATMEAL
RAISIN, PEANUT BUTTER
RANGER OR �
Sugar '
Cookies t7

�l





14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN Aiir.ircr� ,o
Student Health Center
Students Offered Variety Of Health Services Senato
By MARY-ELESHA ADAMS
Student Health Center
The Student Health Center is a
student oriented health care clinic
located in the Infirmary Building
between Joyner Library and the
Flanagan Building. Our main
concern is to provide you with in-
dividualized and quality health
care as well as giving you infor-
mation to help you stay healthy.
Our services are confidential and
your medical records are not part
of your school record. The
following services are available:
�OUTPATIENT CLINICS �
Walk�in clinic hours are from
8 a.m.�4:45 p.m. Monday
through Friday during the school
year. Weekend clinics are held on
Saturdays and Sundays from
3:30�5:30 p.m. No appointment
is necessary for outpatient clinics.
�EMERGENCY SERVICES �
Physician care is available after
outpatient clinic hours for
emergencies. An emergency is a
condition that occurs without
warning, causes high fever or ex-
treme pain, worsens without
treatment and needs treatment
before the regular outpatient
clinic hours. Your condition will
be assessed by a registered nurse
who will either treat or give first-
aid based on standing physician
orders or call the physician if in-
dicated.
�INPATIENT CARE �
Facilities are available for
students who require additional
care, such as observation of il-
lness or injury, intravenous fluids
or medication. Your health care
provider makes the decision for
admission.
�PHARMACY SERVICES �
Most medications are dispensed
at no cost by a licensed phar-
macist. Maintenance drugs, such
as insulin and antibodies for the
treatment of acne are not provid-
ed. Only prescriptions written by
Student Health Services physi-
cians and nurse practitioners can
be filled. A reduced charge is
made for medications such as
oral contraceptive agents.
�LABORATORY AND
RADIOLOGY SERVICES �
Many laboratory tests are done at
either no cost or a minimal
charge to the student. There is a
charge for X-rays.
�WOMEN'S HEALTH CARE
� Contraceptive education and
counseling, breast and pelvic ex-
aminations, pap smears, lab pro-
cedures and written prescriptions
for contraceptive methods are of-
fered by the Student Health
Center. Pap smears are scheduled
in advanced by appointment.
HEALTH EDUCATION -
The promotion of skills con-
tributing to health maintenance
andwellness is an important part
of the Student Health Center ser-
vices. Educational classes, pro-
grams, and materials are offered
throughout the year.
HYPERTENSION CLINIC �
A hypertension clinic is available
by appointment to assist you with
the diagnosis and treatment of
high blood pressure.
ACNE CLINIC � The acne
clinic provides evaluation and
treatment of acne. Appointments
are needed for the clinic.
ALLERGY CLINIC �
Allergy vaccines are given during
the hours of 8-1 noon and 2-4
pm. Monday through Friday by a
registered nurse. You must supp-
ly the antigen and an injection
schedule from your allergist.
WART CLINIC � A wart
clinic is available by appointment �
to provide treatment of warts
PSYCHIATRIC SERVICES
� Psychiatrist services are
available on request or by refer-
ral. The cost of this service is in-
cluded in the student health fee
STUDENT HEALTH IN-
SURANCE - All students are
encouraged to have health in-
surance coverage of some type to
assist with the cost of services not
covered by the student health fee,
such as referrals to off-campus
specialists or hospital costs for
surgery and serious illness. A
group student health and acci-
dent insurance plan has been
selected by the Student Health
Advisory Committee and is
available to all ECU students. It
is an inexpensive plan specifically
designed for the needs of ECU
students. A brochure is mailed to
each student prior to enrollment
at ECU. Further information can
be obtained at the Student Health
Center.
CLASS EXCUSES - Respon-
sibility for class attendance rests
primarily with the students who
communicate directly with their
instructors. Written class excuses
are not provided by the Student
Health Service.
SPECIAL REQUESTS - Re-
quests for medical withdrawals or
changes in class schedules for
reasons of health are handled by
the Director of the Student
Health Service. Medical forms
for students who require special
privileges for parking, room
assignments, or physical educa
tion for medical reasons also
must be approved by the Direc
tor.
Pirate
Mascot
TRYOUTS-
111
� � �
�Excellent Opportunity for
Travel
�Meet New People
�Be A Part of ECU Athletics
First meeting Tuesday,
September 2 at 5:00 p.m. in
Minges Coliseum lobby
For more information, call
757-6491
ONSOLIDArED
Theatres
All Seats $2.00 Everyday 'Til 5:30 PM
BUCCANEER MOVIES
"N
oo
xmed
and
Dangerous
1.00-3.00-9:00
1 30-3:30-5 30-7 30-9 TO
TEXAS (HAISSAVV
MASSACRE
R
4 3 0-79:15
HEARTBURN
Welcome Back
ECU Students!
August 22-28
$1.94 ALL WEEK
(Evenings Only)
Compliments of
WRQR & Western Steer
Family Steakhouse
'1:00- 3 00 - 9 00'
@ ARMED AND
Heartburn

IMIAIKM NT PR Tl RK
Fmn
i tr-N r.fr
A HutAJ I
R
CHAJNSAW
PART
Welcome To
STUDENT
STORES
WRIGHT BUILDING
Owned and Operated by East Carolina University
Shop Student Stores For Your Back-To-
School Needs Of:
Art Supplies
Calculators
Gift Items
Greek Items
Greeting Cards
Jerseys
Leisure Reading
Paperbacks
Microcomputers &
Accessories
Official ECU Classrings
Rain Gear
Room Accessories
School Supplies
Shorts
Sundries
Sweatshirts & Pants
T-Shirts
Textbooks
And Much More
Register for Drawing of One Man's and
One Lady's 10-Speed Bicycle
Drawing to be held Thursday, Aug. 28, 1986 at
3:00 p.m.
FALL "RUSH" HOURS
Aug. 25-28
8:30 a.m7:00 p.m.
B PATTI KEMMIS
News Editor
East Remembered
Friends, relatives, supporters
and politicians gathered to pa
tribute to Senator John East at a
memorial service at Jams
Memorial Church on July 1
East committed suicide June
28. His bod was found early the
new day by an aid who had come
to deliver East's mail.
Senator East had made plans
to return to ECU and teach in the
Political Science Department. He
had signed a preliminarv con-
tract.
Chairman of the Political
Science Department, Maurice
Simon, said Eas: was expected to
teach several courses on contem-
porary American politics
political philosophy.
"Senator East appeared to be
very enthusiastic about return a
to the department said Simon.
He added, "East commented
that he felt he had many in-
teresting insights to offer to the
students and he was looking for-
ward to working with member
of the department in developing
our program. He said he didn't
expect any special staff support
or special privileges
Simon said he and East had
discussed how East's return
would "represent a wonderful
opportunity for our students to
have close contact with a former
U.S. Senator who was also a ver
well trained political scientist
I
FJ
I
si
51
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Si
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Jl
For An All-Amencai
STEERS
PLAT
BECAUSE Y(
ANALL-AIV
FAMILY
-syrj"

rv
lA lb. of sit loin
proudlv served
with tries
USD
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cool
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letti
grea
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Steel
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Greenvill
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Ser vices
eges tor parking, room
01 physical educa-
medical reasons also:
be approved b the Direc-
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26, 19g6
15
ts S2.00 Everyday Til 5:30 PM
m?m
I '30-9 '0
M osM Kr
Kme Back
Students!
(gusr 22-28
I.l WEEK
ring Only)
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M�� rord
Senator East's Death Tops Summer News
By PATTI KEMMIS
News Editor
�a$f Remembered
Friends, relatives, supporters
and politicians gathered to pay
tribute to Senator John East at a
memorial service at Jarvis
Memorial Church on July 1.
East committed suicide June
28. His body was found early the
next day by an aid who had come
to deliver East's mail.
Senator East had made plans
to return to ECU and teach in the
Political Science Department. He
had signed a preliminary- con-
tract.
Chairman of the Political
Science Department, Maurice
Simon, said East was expected to
teach several courses on contem-
porary American politics and
political philosophy.
"Senator East appeared to be
very enthusiastic about returning
to the department said Simon.
He added, "East commented
that he felt he had many in-
teresting insights to offer to the
students and he was looking for-
ward to working with members
of the department in developing
our program. He said he didn't
expect any special staff support
or special privileges
Simon said he and East had
discussed how East's return
would "represent a wonderful
opportunity for our students to
have close contact with a former
U.S. Senator who was also a very
well trained political scientist
WZMB Signs Off Presidents Lobby
After temporarily shutting
down for an hour in May due to
the use of exploitive language on
the air, ECU's campus radio sta-
tion WZMB has rewritten several
policies to insure the repeatition
of a similar incident will not oc-
cur.
The May incident involved a
student disc jockey during the
stations "permanent wave" pro-
gram.
The situation was brought to
the attention of the ECU Public
Safety Department by a concern-
ed citizen who had heard the
broadcast.
No force was needed to remove
the disc jockey from the station.
The station was signed back on
the air by the newly appointed
General Manager, Jeff Chester.
Chester issued a formal apology
to the station's listeners.
According to Chester, the stu-
dent disc jockey acted entirely on
his own without any authoriza-
tion from station management or
the university.
Chester has since rewritten
several policies and designed new
policies to clarify the rules con-
cerning station programming.
The policies were approved by
the Media Board.
"We at the station are taking
steps to see that this type of inci-
dent does not happen again
said Chester.
WZMB faced no charges from
the FCC.
For An All-American Familv MeaTr
STEERBURGER
PLATTER
BECAUSE YOU WANT
AN ALL-AMERICAN
FAMILY MEAL
Va lb. of sirloin
proudly served
with fries
USDA CHOICE Sirloin,
ground fresh daily and
cooked-to-order. Sized to
satisfy your hunger for this
Ail-American favorite.
Fries included in out platter
price. No charge for cheese,
lettuce, and tomato. One
great price when hunger
strikes�the Western Steer
Steerburger platter.
Because Yov Want An All-American Family Meal
sm

Western Steer
Family
STEAKHOUSE
���,�
�1986 Western Steer-Mom n' Pop's, Inc
3005 East 10th Street
Greenville, N.C.
SGA President Steve Cunanan
joined other members of the
University of North Carolina
Association of Student Govern-
ments in July to lobby against
Governor Martin's proposed tui-
tion increases.
Martin's proposal was to in-
crease in-state tuition 3.2 percent
and to hike out-of-state tuition
12.3 percent.
The UNCASG lobbied to keep
both in-state and out-of-state tui-
tion at the 1985-86 level.
Cunanan said Martin wants to
take the revenue earned by the
tuition increase and put in in the
General Fund.
"If Martin does that
Cunanan said, "we'll never see
that money again
Cunanan added, "If there has
to be an increase, the least Martin
could do is give the money back
to the schools
The UNCASG passed a resolu-
tion outlining their reasons for
opposing Martin's tuition in-
crease.
The resolution pointed out that
because the Gramm-Rudman
Hollings Act will reduce financial
aid to students by 16.5 million
dollars, the UNCASG claims the
cost of a public post secondary
education is past the ability of a
working class family to pay.
In their lobbying effort, the
UNCASG met Lt. Governor Bob
Jordan, House Speaker Liston
Ramsey, and about 100 state
legislators.
"They sympathized with us
about the in-state tuition
Cunanan said, "but they were
not too positive about the out-of-
state increase
Blue Law Lifted
At a public hearing June 9, the
Greenville City Council voted 4-2
to revise Greenville's Blue Law.
The original law prohibited the
selling of certain items on Sun-
day.
Included in the prohibited
items were clothing, furniture,
and business items.
The new law allows all
businesses to operate and sell all
merchandise between the hours
of 1 p.m. and 1 a.m. on Sundays.
"I think it is a positive move
for the city said Mayor Les
Garner. "The law was unfair and
I think the revision will be good
for Greenville and will help the
city grow.
"I'm dissappointed to see the
law changed said S.J. Hopper,
manager of J.C. Penney's in Pitt
Plaza. "I feel shopping can be
done on the other six days of the
week.
Thomas Fisher of the ABC
Board stated the new law will
have no effect on Greenville's
ABC Stores since state law pro-
hibits the sale of liquor on Sun-
days.
Fashions in eye wear
come and go, but
Good
eye care
is always
in style.
RIDGEWAYS
OPTICIANS, Inc.
GREENVILLE SQUARE � GREENVILLE
355-7070
REMN4NT-R0T
MonFri. 9:00 a.m6:00 p.m.
Saturday 9:00 a.m12 Noon
1009 Dickinson Ave. Greenville 758-0057
airCette
ttntdTrpcm
I
NOLLS. REMNANTS VINYL WALLPAPER & TILE
Ca.lmg All Budget Watchers' Renters' NewlywedV & Students' You Can Have Carpet And Have It Now These Roll Ends And Remnants From The F.nest C.rpe. Ar.
vT h(MC"�n 9 SqUar Yafd PnCeS M�St From 'amOUS Makers No Doub� �0 �� Q"�"�Y "oil Ends Are Today s Best B.rga.ns So Pr.et.C
ALL ITEMS SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE
SZIMsaurnoNVALUESALE
12x8Gray226 0048 99
12x7Mauve208 0048 99
12x7Green207 0048 99
12x7Gold213.0048 99
12x7Burgandy200 0048 99
12x7Cranberry205 0048 99
12x7Brown2100048 99
12x6Gray162.0048 99
12x7Beige197 0048 99
12x7Yellow200 0048 99
12x7Cranberry2130048 99
12x6Brown160.0048 99
12x7Peoch2100048 99
12x6Ton181 3348 99
12x6Tan165.0048 99
12x8Tan216.0048 99
12x7Green202.0048 99
12x8Green234.0048 99
12x6Gray184.0048 99
12x7Brown189 0048 99
12x7Beige200.0048 99
SIZEDESCRIPTION
12x8Beige
12x7Gold
12x8Wine
12x8Tan
12x6Green
12x7Brown
12x6Peach
12x9Blue
12x6Purple
12x5Cranberry
12x3Bisque
12x3W.ne
12x5Brown
12x4Blue
12x5Brown
12x5Green
12x5Brown
12x5Tan
12x4Blue
12x5Brown
12x5New Earth
VALUE
$234 00
207 00
220 00
21300
167 00
207 00
180 00
240.00
180 00
144 00
101 00
100 00
157 00
130 00
153 00
140 00
133.00
153.00
107.00
152.00
160 00
SALE
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
$36 66
2444
2444
36 66
36 66
36 66
36 66
36 66
36 66
36 66
36 66
36 66
SII DESCRIPTION
12x5 White
12x9 Toupe
12x12 Tan
12x6 Choc
'2x7 Taupe
11 x6 Gray
12x8 Choc
12x7 Ton
12x7 Tan
12x6 Ton
12x7 Green
12x6 Peoch
12x8 Rust
12x8 Rust
12x7 Mauve
12x7 Grape
12x7 Ton
12x6 Brown
12x6 Tan
12x6 Gray
12x6 Tan
VALUE
$240 00
209 00
31500
149 00
192 00
166 00
200 00
185 00
182 00
170 00
190 00
165 00
275 00
270 00
21900
21300
21300
165 00
176 00
170 00
173 00
SALE
$48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
FHA
APPROVED
CARPET
Back To College
ONLY
$4.95s.
Yd.
Hurry To
The
REMNANT-ROT
Sale
Ends
Sat
Aug. 31
12"
Prime
Cushion
89
Sq Yd
SIZE DESCRIPTION
12x5 Peach
12x5 Brown
12x5 Brown
12x3 White
12x3 White
12x3 Brown
12x5 Purple
12x5 Brown
12x4 Ton
12x5 Ton
12x4 Green
12x4 Tan
12x3 White
12x5 Gray
12x5 Purple
12x5 Brown
12x5 Burgandy
12x5 Green
12x4 Beige
12x5 Green
12x3 Brown
12x5 White
VALUE SALE
144.00
133.00
152.00
80.00
98.00
90.00
154.00
146.00
106.00
154.00
130.00
133.00
80.00
133.00
146.00
133.00
153.00
153.00
120.00
133.00
93.00
144.00
36.66
36.66
36.66
24.44
2444
24.44
36.66
36 66
36 66
36.66
36.66
36 66
24.44
36.66
36 66
36.66
36 66
36 66
36.66
36.66
24.44
36.66
SIZE DESCRIPTION
12x3 Green
12x5 Brown
12x5 Tan
12x5 Peach
12x5 Peach
12x5 Brown
12x3 Blue
12x4 Brown
12x5 Peach
12x5 Gray
12x5 White
12x5 Bisque
12x5 Brown
12x5 Wine
12x5 White
12x5 Purple
12x5 Peach
VALUE SALE
$80 00
133.00
157 00
157.00
144.00
146.00
8500
133.00
152.00
154 00
154 00
160.00
133 00
157.00
141.00
141.00
146 00
$24.44
36 66
36 66
36 66
36 66
36.66
24 44
36 66
36 66
36 66
36 66
36 66
36 66
36 66
36 66
36 66
36 66
This is not a complete listing.
Other remnants A sizes at similar
savings.
SIZE
12x6
12x7
12x8
12x7
12x7
12x8
12x6
12x5
12x4
12x5
12x5
12x5
12x5
12x2
12x7
12x6
12x7
12x7
12x7
12x6
12x7
12x5
DESCRIPTOR
Bisque
Blue
Lavender
Rust
Bisque
Gray
White
Gray
Brown
Brown
Ton
Pink
Brown
Pink
Brown
Peoch
Taupe
Blue
Peoch
Brown
Peoch
Cranberry
'ALUS
170 00
186 00
226 00
194 00
186.00
220 00
180 00
146 00
120 00
152.00
152.00
140 00
153 00
67 00
180 00
149 00
180 00
169 00
21334
173.00
210.00
153.00
SALE
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
36 66
36 66
36 66
36 66
36 66
36 66
2444
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
48 99
36 66
mwroctit
&
ROLLS. REMNANTS. VINYL WALLPAPER & TILE
1009 Dickinson Ave. Greenville 758-0057 VISA-MASTERCARD, CASH OR CHECK
� ����vi� ��� wi.
�m� � m a m i ��a . � - � r r - lTr tr f jm .f






16 THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUOUST 26, 1986
Admissions Beginning Sept. 1
CLUB TYPE LOWEST AGE
Private Club
Private Club
Public Club
Private Club
Restaurant
antana Bobs Private Club
Public Club
Private Club
18
21
18
18
18
18
21
Adva
THE NEWSLETTER FOR OtfEfjlO
� MONEY
� RECOGNITION
� SELF-ESTEEM
ARE YOU BEGINNING TO THINK ABOUT YOUR FUTURE?
ADVANTAGES is a newsletter expressly for students who want to
succeed in the job market.
ADVANTAGES gives you the benefit of quality career skill advice
from people who are already successful in their fields. Practical, hard-
hitting advice that comes from experience on topics like Job Hunting,
Networking, Resumes, Interviewing, Reputation, and many more.
ADVANTAGES covers 2 subjects every 3 weeks from October
through May for a total of 20 of the most important topics you need for
your future success. With each one you gain a clear understanding of
another career skill, you get examples of how to do it right, what to
watch out for, and an action checklist to get you started.
If you want to succeed, start by taking advantage now of the advice
of men and women who have already done it. Of all the learning you do
this year, this might benefit your future the most.
(Detach Coupon)
Get 40 savings with this special risk-free Back to School offer!
While the normal subscription price for ADVANTAGES is $49.95, send in your
check or money order payable to ADVANTAGES postmarked no later than Sept 4
1986 and pay only $29.95 for all 20 topics. Not only a small investment in your
future, but a risk-free one: if you ever wish to cancel your subscription, just let us
know and we'll promptly refund your money on all unmailed issues.
? YES! I want to start using ADVANTAGES. Enclosed is my payment for
I $29.95 $49.95
(Please Print Clearly)
Name
Address
CityStateZip
Class (Check One):Fresh D Soph D Jr. Sr. Grad.
Mail to: ADVANTAGES P.O.BOX 17076 HAUPPAUGE, NY 11788
(Please allow 4-6 weeks tor delivery ol your first issue).
2430S
4 1
mi
J.�. humiiit - th� sst c
Those of us who were smart decided to go book shopping with visiting parents.
���. - ii � � �� Bw uv� KKg � .�� pwiuq,
A ward Winning Ice Cream
Comes To Greenville!



Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
��b
321 Tenth St. (near Wendy's)
� Picked as one of the Top Five Ice Creams in the Nation two years in a row!
� Featured on PM Magazine




� Selected for inclusion in "The Very Best Ice Cream" by Warner Books
� "The Store's Strawberry Ice Cream was the winner Akron Beacon Journal jj
� the kinds of frozen desserts that people brave blizzards for Carol Robbins
and Herbert Wolff, authors of "The Very Best Ice Cream" J!
Patricia "Hank"Steele, the founder of Hank's Homemade
Ice Cream is bringing her nationally acclaimed flavors
to Greenville
Old Fashioned hard ice cream made right in the store.
The very best ice cream, using the very best ingredients.
In 1984 and 1985,
Hank's participated in the National Ice Cream contest sponsored by the National Ice Cream Retailers
j� Association. Both years Hank's was selected as one of the top five ice creams in the U.S.
j Hank's uses a custom built ice cream machine to make its delicious desserts. Modern ice cream machines turn the dasher too
r quickly which puts a lot of air in the ice cream. Many of the ice creams you buv are half air. We had our ice cream freezer
?If specially built to turn the dasher at the speed of the old fashioned hand-cranked freezers so we can get the same nch oure
flavors. v
! A speciality at Hank's is the BLEND-IN. You pick your favorite ice cream flavor, and your favorite fruit or candy and then
�J we put them in our special blend-in machine and combine them into your own personal flavor. The blend-in machine breaks up
1J� the candy or fruit into small pieces and mixes it into the ice cream. It tastes great because the candy or fruit doesn't get frozen
tU. so it still has its full flavor while the ice rram m frmn ���� � . t �.



so it still has its full flavor while the ice cream stays frozen, so you get the best of both
Hanki will be open from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m Monday through Saturday, and 12 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Sundays.
Special Introductory Offer
We want you to find out for yourself how
good ice cream can be. So bring a friend
and come on down to Hank's and take
advantage of our introductory coupon of-
fer(we're on 10th Street between
McDonalds and Wendy's.).
HOURS:
11:00 am-12:00 midnight
MonSat.
Noon-Midnight Sun.
Hank's Homemade
Ice Cream
321 E. 10th St. (next to Wendy's)
BUY 1 Sundae or Blend-In
Get One
FREE
Coupon good through
Sept. 1, 1986
"I
I
I
I
FILM
SALE
$J79
21 Exposure
as low as
Kfc
All Film on Sale While Quantities Last
POtO
�xpfe-
"The Specialists"
10th and Cotanche
beside Hardee's
Phone: 756-7767
Date: Aug. 22-Aug. 30. 1986 I
Over :W Locations m the Carolina and Virginia.
r
"
Plus
H
IIIIIIIHEUW
Your Bank at ECU Mendenhall
BB&T offers ECU Convenience PLUS
FREE 24 HOUR BANKING
We never charge you for using our
BB&T 24 machine. You'll receive your
24 hour card when you open your
checking or savings account.
Other BB&T Greenville
Offices:
Main Office � Stantonsburg Road
BB&T 24
Downtown Office � Corner 3rd & Greene
301 Arlington Boulevard
BB&T 24
FREE PIRATE CHECKS
Just for ECU � Your FIRST PIRATE
CHECKS ARE FREE with your new
BB&T checking account.
CHECKING PLUS
I& MoreThan A Bank.
Its An Attitude.
For $3.00 per month you can have
� Free checks all the time
� Free money orders
� Discounts at Greenville Theaters
� Travel and Amusement Park Discounts
� $10,000 Accidental Death Insurance
. . . AND MORE
For Service or
Information Call
Mcakcr Federal DepeeJt hnraace Corporation
752-6889







Schedule
Mam students nol onl had tin
to school, but also had to makt id
ends Tuesda.
MC
brand1
Greenville B
Memori
RACK ROOM h(
brands at affordable
top quality name br
the entire family.
WE ARE A STYI
A FOLLI
WE DO ALL
SAVE YO
SAl
UP
Special Bad
cou
CUP Al
RACK
TAKE AN
E-X-T-R-A
1
One coupon par purchase
Good'til 9-15-86
��Pll��i'�lMieillll1MWiBW.l'i�i�iiii" r �'
"� � JC





� HUMIHT - Th� att Cardtiua
pping with visiting parents.
e Cream
w ville!
Ice Cream
Nation two years in a row!
I ' n Warner Books
� Beacon Journal






Hank '$ Homemade
icclaimed flavors
�tore.
Mien ts.
nal Ice Cream Re
iizzards for Carol Robbins
he Very Best Ice Cream" J
achincs turn the dasher too J,
V e had our ice cream freezer J
e can get the same rich pure P
it or candy and then r,
m tn 11 p.m. on Sundays. r,



� blend-in machine breaks up
: " fruit doesn't get frozen
ik's Homemade
Ice Cream
)th St. (next to Wendy's)
iundae or Blend-In
Get One
REE
i
1986
US
tall
HECKING PLUS
per month you can have
checks all the time
loney orders
ints at Greenville Theaters
land Amusement Park Discounts
HO Accidental Death Insurance
LND more
For Service or
Information Call
752-6889
I
J � HUMBERT � Tht East Carolinian
Schedule Troubles
Many students not only had the trouble of unpacking upon returning
to school, but also had to make schedule changes. Official registration
ends Tuesday.
RACK
OPEN 10-9
MON-SAT
1-6 SUNDAY
ROOM
branded shoes
Greenville Buyers Market
Memorial Drive
RACK ROOM . . . home of your favorite
brands at affordable prices � We offer you
top quality name brand merchandise for
the entire family.
WE ARE A STYLE LEADER NOT
A FOLLOWER!
WE DO ALL THIS AND WE
SAVE YOU MONEY!
SAVE
UP TO
60
O
Special Back-To-School
COUPON
CLIP AND SAVE
RACK ROOM
TAKE AN
E-X-T-R-A
10
One coupon per purchase
Good 'til 9-15-86
OFF OUR
EVERYDAY
LOW PRICES
(Exopt A.gner. Nik
ondRMbofc)
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 26. 1986 17
Air Controllers Reassigned
LANCASTER, Calif. (UPI)
Thirty-four air traffic controllers
have been reassigned to desk jobs
during a drug investigation at a
regional Federal Aviation Ad-
ministration center that handles
1.6 million flights a year.
The controllers were reassigned
pending the results of urine
analysis tests to determine if they
have used illegal drugs while off
duty, a violation of FAA policy,
an FAA official said.
A spokesman for the Air Traf-
fic Controllers' Association said
the charges were "nebulous
and said many of the controllers
felt they were based on "innuen-
do and rumor
The investigation stemmed
from a July 8 drug raid at the
home of a secretary who works at
the Pamdale regional air traffic
control center in the desert 65
miles northeast of Los Angeles.
Demoted controllers will be re-
quired to take urine analysis tests
to determine if they used cocaine
or hashish, said Don Early,
manager of the Palmdale facility.
"The FAA emphasizes that
there was no indication of any
adverse effect on performance,
nor were there any indications or
allegations of use of illegal
substances on the job Early
said at a news conference.
He said the traffic controllers
would not be fired if found guil-
ty, but would be required to
undergo rehabilitation.
Kelly Candaele, the western
representative of the controllers'
association, said if the urinalysis
tests proved negative the
organization, which hopes to
become the new controller's
union, would insist that the con-
trollers be reinstated.
The Palmdale center � one of
22 FAA traffic control centers in
the nation � directs 1.6 million
commercial and noncommercial
flights a year with a staff of 238,
including 156 certified air con-
trollers.
Early said supervisors will fill
in for the demoted traffic con-
trollers, possibly working over-
time until the investigation is
completed.
The center handles air traffic
for most of California and parts
of Nevada and Utah.
The allegations against the
traffic controllers stem from in-
formation gathered from "inter-
nal and external sources Early
said.
Deputy Pete Fosselman of the
Los Angeles Sheriff's Depart-
ment said the investigation stem-
med from a narcotics arrest on
July 8, when police and FAA in-
vestigators served a search war-
rant at the home of Steven and
Karen Mcintosh in Palmdale.
Mrs. Mcintosh works at the
flight control center as a
See CONTROLLERS, Page 20
Compact
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EMERSON
Compact 1.7 Cu. Ft. Refrigerator Compact Microwave Oven
�Actable mermostat ana AHHAM � Feares coo & ae'ros
heavy insulation lor low WWwHH cycles � 30-m.nute
temperatures 2 ice tra. O M ���� -imer with bell
� Removable cabinet shelf M M � Removable qlass trav
� Wooagram door -53818 M M . Cookdook �51832
$8788
Smoke
Detector
With Battery
$R99
0 �306C

Design Table
With Stool
And Light
$39"
� Steel frame with
baked-enamel finish
�3V?"Wx23"D
� Swing arm lamp 34 H
� 18 high stool "96144
� Has 4 shelves 8
posts � Adjusts
to 60' high
�30"x 12' "Sturdy
� Grey finish "62451
Canvas
Laundry
Hamper
Metal
4-Shelf
Unit
$099 $"M99
�j �2440l I 11
Great
Value!
SAMSUNG
12" Diagonal
Black & White TV
� Quick-start tube for instant pictures
� Low power consumption
� 100� o solid state chassis �54450
$4888
8"x 8"x 16"
Concrete
Block
14" x 50"
Framed
Door Mirror
1 x 12 x 4'
Pine
Shelving
V J�.
Combination
Padlock
5"x 7"
Picture Frames
$199 $199
� �60351 .96773
69
26" 10 Speed
Bike - Your Choice
� Both have lugged frames for strength � Stde-
pull cahper brakes � Foam grips � Boy's model
black & gold � Girl's model light blue 99624,6
16 Oz. Wood
Handle
Hammer
Each - "99861
D-Cell
Economy
Flashlight
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H THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUOUST26. 1986
African Volcanic Gas Leak Kills Many
YAOUNDE, Cameroon (UPI)
� At least 2,000 people here
believed killed by deadly natural
gas seeping from a lake created
by a volcano in Western
Cameroon, the Information
Ministry said today.
The ministry said the death toll
was based on an estimate by a
crisis team that traveled to the
remote area in western Cameroon
where the disaster occurred Fri-
day.
The disaster occurred at Nios
Lake near the town of Wum, 250
ed to a strict figure of 40 dead un
til the sharp increase was
reported.
The estimate of 2,000 dead was
broadcast on state-run Radio
Cameroon, quoting the Informa-
tion Ministry, but diplomatic
sources said its source was one of
Cameroon's eight regional radio
stations and that the figure was
not repeated in later national
broadcasts.
Western diplomats said they
heard unconfirmed reports of
1,500 people dead from travelers
heard nothing from the Informa- provide instruments and material
tion Ministry apart from the first in monitoring the releases of tox-
miles northwest of the capital city in the area. They said the area
of Yaounde. Officials said to tox- was extremely difficult to get to
ic gas escaped from a volcanic because of the mountainous
fissure that opened from the bot- region, unpaved roads and the
torn of Lake Nios. rainy season
toll of 40 dead.
Radio Cameroon said injured
people were evacuated to a
hospital in Bemenda, the regional
capital 10 miles south of the
disaster site.
It did not give a figure on the
number of injured or say how
many people were evacuated.
The government said Sunday it
declared an emergency zone in
the area.
The government said President
Paul Biya went to Bemenda to
oversee rescue operations and
was trying to "avoid an extension
of the catastrophe
The radio said the United
ic gas, as well as medicine and
food for victims.
Israel radio reported that
Israeli medical and rescue teams
had been sent to assist victims of
the eruption and French radio in
Paris said France had also pledg-
ed aid.
Radio Cameroon said housing
was being provided for people
displaced by the disaster.
Several lakes in the western
region were created by volcanic
activity, and a similar
catastrophe occurred three years
ago in which several dozen people
were killed.
In Washington, State Depart-
ment spokeswoman Anita
Stockman said, "The U.S.
government is prepared to assist
the government of Cameroon.
They have indicated there may be
a need
The government had maintain- The Diplomats said they had States and Britain had pledged to
Student Union Plans Several Activities
The Student Union is the
largest programming organiza-
tions on campus. Its twelve com-
mittees provide a wide range of
activities for students, from
movies to trips to concerts.
According to Liz Deupree,
president, upcoming movies in-
clude Pretty in Pink, Back to the
Future, and Out of Africa. She
also noted a change in the
schedule; movies will be shown
only at 8:00 pm Thursday, Fri-
day, Saturday and Sunday at
Mendenhall. Students with their
IDactivity card will be admitted
free.
The Student Union has also
planned a coffeehouse September
4 featuring Brian Huskey, an
acoustic guitarist. He will be per-
forming at the Underground in
Mendenhall at 8:00 pm. Admis-
sion is free.
The travel committee of the
Student Union is now accepting
reservations for the trips it has
planned this year. They will be
going to New York at Thanksgiv-
ing, Hawaii over Christmas
break, taking a cruise to the
Bahamas and going skiing in Col-
orado sometime during the Spr-
ing.
There will be an outdoor con-
cert on campus, organized by the
Student Union in September, said
Deupree. Also coming up in the
fall are a lecture on rape preven-
tion, a performance by the U.S.
Military Band, and a dinner
theater entitled The Owl and the
Pussycat.
"The Student Union is totally
student-funded and
student-run said Deupree.
"Applications for any of our
twelve committees are taken
throughout the year. In fact, we
are presently looking for a cof-
feehouse committee chairperson
to organize small scale entertain-
ment in the Underground's
nightclub atmosphere
Deupree emphasizes that serv-
ing on a committee does not
necessarily "limit your time. It is
a good way to keep in touch with
your interests
ACK TO SCHOOL
LABOR DAY CELEBRATION
WAREHOUSE SALE
August 28 - Sept. 2
Tom Togs Factory Outlet
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Carolina Crisis Pregnancy Center
111 East Third StreetThe Lee Building
Greenville, North Carolina
Free Pregnancy TestConfidential Counseling
All Services and referrals are free of charge
The Center is open Tuesdays from 10-2,
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For an appointment or more information call
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2 for 1 Pick-up Special
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Buy any Pizza, Get One FREE!
Menu
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757-1955
This store independently owned by
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757-1955
American
PEKING (UPI) - A Chinese
judge sentenced an American
with alleged links to a U.Sbased
intelligence agent to 12 years in
prison on charges he spied for
Taiwan, it was announced Satur-
day.
U.S. consular officers said the
man, identified by Chinese
authorities as Roland Shensu
Loo, 67, of Los Angeles, is the
first American jailed as a spy in
China since the two nations
established diplomauc relations
in 1979.
In an unusual broadcast,
Chinese television Saturday night
aired a 15-minute documentary
showing the arrest, trial and
sentencing of Loo, two Chinese
men and a Chinese woman who
pleaded guilty to espionage
charges.
It said the three provided Loo
with military, political and
economic secrets.
The program showed the
stocky, bespectacled Chinese-
ECU Plays
Host To
Camps
eci sTW5.li ami
Approximately 260 youngsters
from North Carolina and four
other southeastern states have
completed a summer science pro-
gram in one of two residential
summer camps sponsored by the
ECU Science Math Education
Department.
The students were enrolled in
one or two weeks of the annual
ECU Summer Science Camp for
children aged 10-12 held at Camp
Caroline near Arapahoe or in
either of two sessions of a camp
for academically gifted students
in grades 7-10.
Both camp programs were
directed by Dr. Floyd Mattheis.
who heads the ECL
Science Math Education Center
Assistant directors for both camp
programs were Gregory McCall
and Vivian Martin. Associate
director of the camp for
academicallv gifted was Karen
Collier.
The latter program was held on
campus and featured laboratory,
lecture and class sessions in
physics, chemistry, paleontology,
computer science, photography,
robotics and astronomy.
Students were housed in a cam-
pus residence hall and had access
to campus recreational facilities.
The Camp Caroline program
emphasized high interest science
activities designed to increase the
children's awareness and
knowledge of the environment,
along with fishing, swimming.
boating, campf.re storytime and
other recreational activities.
Counselors for the summer
science camps were Bert Bnght of
Snow Hill; Roger Bynum of
Stantonsburg, Carol and Al
Davis of Ayden, Pat and Kim
DeRoos of Powell, Tenn Vickie
Harris and Glenn Gamey of
Wilmington, Lisa Jackson of
Autryville, Betty Strain of
Jacksonville, Matt Hooper of
New Bern, Alton Hobbs Jr. of
Sunbury, Sufiana Jones and
Joseph Rollins Jr. of Rocky
Mount, Elizabeth Pope of Como,
Benjamin Midyette of Englehard,
and Carl Brow and John Rose Jr.
of Greenville.
r
Check
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� JMP���
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
y
Anita
ie U.S.
.o assist
leroon.
may be
AUGUST 26, mt
19
TO SCHOOL
AY CELEBRATION
IEHOUSE SALE
ist 28 - Sept. 2
is Factory Outlet
Dickinson Ave, Greenville
DIRECT FROM FACTORY
lurs � Overruns � Irregulars
5C To Not Over $10
TROCADERQ
les That We Cannot Mention
AND WINTER MERCHANDISE
HCURS:
rHURSFRl open till 8.00 for your
SAT 9 30-600
in m� Wholesale Arao
rear of rit� building
HiLDREN'S AND INFANTS WEAR
;nancy Center
eetThe Lee Building
arolina
onfidential Counseling
als are free of charge
mi Tuesdays from 10-2,
"hursdays from 10-5 and by
It or more information call
57-0003
ansit
thonty.
EENVILLE
7-1955
HOURS:
- 2 AM MonSun.
EN TIL 2 AM
'ERY NIGHT!
msit
mty,
955
msit
pity-
955
American Citizen Arrested In China For Espionage
PEKING (UP1) - a Chinese
judge sentenced an American
with alleged links to a U.Sbased
intelligence agent to 12 years in
prison on charges he spied for
Taiwan, it was announced Satur-
day.
U.S. consular officers said the
man, identified by Chinese
authorities as Roland Shensu
Loo, 67, of Los Angeles, is the
first American jailed as a spy in
China since the two nations
established diplomatic relations
in 1979. .
In an unusual broadcast,
Chinese television Saturday night
aired a 15-minute documentary
showing the arrest, trial and
sentencing of Loo, two Chinese
men and a Chinese woman, who
pleaded guilty to espionage
charges.
It said the three provided Loo
with military, political and
economic secrets.
The program showed the
stocky, bespectacled Chinese-
ECU Plays
Host To
Camps
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Approximately 260 youngsters
from North Carolina and four
other southeastern states have
completed a summer science pro-
gram in one of two residential
summer camps sponsored by the
ECU ScienceMath Education
Department.
The students were enrolled in
one or two weeks of the annual
ECU Summer Science Camp for
children aged 10-12 held at Camp
Caroline near Arapahoe or in
either of two sessions of a camp
for academically gifted students
in grades 7-10.
Both camp programs were
directed by Dr. Floyd Mattheis,
who heads the ECU
ScienceMath Education Center.
Assistant directors for both camp
programs were Gregory McCall
and Vivian Martin. Associate
director of the camp for
academically gifted was Karen
Collier.
The latter program was held on
campus and featured laboratory,
lecture and class sessions in
physics, chemistry, paleontology,
computer science, photography,
robotics and astronomy.
Students were housed in a cam-
pus residence hall and had access
'o campus recreational facilities.
The Camp Caroline program
emphasized high interest science
activities designed to increase the
children's awareness and
knowledge of the environment,
along with fishing, swimming,
boating, campfire storytime and
other recreational activities.
Counselors for the summer
science camps were Bert Bright of
Snow Hill; Roger Bynum of
Stantonsburg, Carol and Al
Davis of Ayden, Pat and Kim
DeRoos of Powell, Tenn Vickie
Harris and Glenn Gainey of
Wilmington, Lisa Jackson of
Autryville, Betty Strain of
Jacksonville, Matt Hooper of
New Bern, Alton Hobbs Jr. of
Sunbury, Sufiana Jones and
Joseph Rollins Jr. of Rocky
Mount, Elizabeth Pope of Como,
Benjamin Midyette of Englehard,
and Carl Brow and John Rose Jr.
of Greenville.
American meeting with his
Chinese contacts and during his
sentencing to 12 years in prison.
He showed no emotion as the
judge read the sentence to a pack-
ed courtroom.
Sources said Loo was arrested
six or seven months ago and the
sentencing took place last month.
Loo is the second foreigner in
two months to be detained on
suspicion of espionage in China.
Last month, New York Times
correspondent, John Burns, a
British citizen, was held for six
days on suspicion of spying and
then expelled from the country.
Ning Nianci, 42, an engineer
with the Peking Construction
X
Engineering Institute, was
sentenced to 10 years in prison
for her involvement, the
documentary said. Her husband,
Yu Defu, 48, director of the Pek-
ing Science and Education Film
Studio, received a three-year
sentence.
Zhu Junyi, 43, a resident of the
eastern city of Hangzhou, was
sentenced to 10 years in prison.
The documentary said Loo
befriended Ning in 1983 after she
had expressed "depression at her
present situation Loo reported
the meeting to his superior, an
alleged Taiwanese agent teaching
at the University of California in
Los Angeles.
�milllllllllMIIIMIHIIIMMIIMIIIMIMIMIWIIMIIIIIMIHnilMWIMHIIIIlMMMIHIiyil
The agent, identified as a
U.Strained spy named Edward
Yang, ordered Loo to cultivate
his relationship with Ning. The
documentary said Yang still lives
in Los Angeies and is responsible
for intelligence activities among
mainland Chinese in the United
States.
The broadcast said Ning was
instructed in the use of radio
receivers, invisible ink and other
spying methods. She then passed
on military, political and
economic secrets, some of them
from the Communist Party Cen-
tral Committee and the Ministry
of Finance, it said.
"Loo came to China in 1984
and 1985 and collected a large
amount of intelligence provided
by Ning Nianci and her husband,
Yu Defu, who covered Loo while
he spied the official Xinhua
News Agency reported.
The documentary said Zhu
entered the scheme in November
1985, when he was recruited by
Loo. It said Zhu used a fake
military uniform to gather in-
telligence in eastern China's Zhe-
jiang military region.
Xinhua identified Edward
Yang as a "Kuomintang (Na-
tionalist Taiwan) spy in the
United States and a (former) spy
of the Sino-American Coopera-
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"This organization, under
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maintained a concentration camp
in Sichuan Province before (the
1949 communist) liberation
where 300 communists and other
patriots were massacred
Xinhua said Yang received
special training from U.S. spy
organizations and after the com-
munist takeover in China worked
in Hong Kong and Tokyo. It said
he immigrated to the United
States in 1980 and continued his
intelligence activities under the
"direct leadership of the Taiwan
Military Intelligence Agency
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20
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26, 1986
Karen Silkwood Case Settled Out Of Court
OKLAHOMA CITY (UPI) �
The Karen Silkwood case, which
dramatically illustrated the
dangers of plutonium and raised
new questions about the safety of
nuclear processing plants, has
finally been settled- out of court-
for $1.38 million.
Silkwood's three children will
share $500,000 of the settlement.
Lawyers will get the rest.
The lawsuit charged Kerr-
McGee, Silkwood's employer,
with negligence and inadequate
safety procedures and contended
the company was responsible for
contaminating her and her home
with plutonium in the days before
she died in an automobile acci-
dent Nov. 13, 1974.
Kerr-McGee spokesman Rick
Pereles said the company did not
admit wrongdoing but agreed to
the settlement because of
"burdensome legal costs and
significant time demands" in
fighting the suit.
"Today marks the end of a
chapter in the history of Kerr-
McGee that has been difficult
he said.
Silkwood's father, Bill
Silkwood,said"I feel pretty good
about it. It's been a long 12 years
for me
He said Kerr-McGee would
"never admit their guilt but the
world will remember his daughter
"as a person who didn't give up.
The courts proved what she said
was true
He said he agreed to the settle-
ment because "we might as well
get the kids some benefits of the
money while they are young
Silkwood, 28, a laboratory
analyst at the Kerr-McGee
Cimarron Nuclear Facility in
Crescent, Okla died in a car
crash while driving to meet a New
York Times reporter with infor-
mation about the company's
alleged failure to protect workers
from radiation.
Silkwood was contaminated
with pultonium several times in
early November 1974. On the
morning of Nov. 7, her apart-
ment also was found to be con-
taminated, and everything in it
had to be destroyed.
Six days later, she died in the
traffic accident. Her death in-
spired a national bestselling book
and the movie "Silkwood" with
Meryl Streep in the starring role.
An attorney who represented
Silkwood's estate in the historic
law suit said it was not what he
expected for 10 years work.
"I could have made more
working at a Burger King said
Jim Ikard, who was one of three
attorneys to represent the
Silkwood family in their suit
against Kerr-McGee Corp.
Silkwood's family hired a
private detective to investigate
suspicions that someone ran her
car off the highway, but never
raised that allegation in its suit.
The documents that Silkwood
was said to have been taking to
the reporter never were found.
The suit filed by the family in
November 1976 dealt with the
plutonium contamination of
Silkwood and her home.
In an 11-week trial in 1979, the
estate won $500,000 for personal
Controllers
Positions
Reassigned
Continued From Page 17
secretary. During the search,
hashish and cocaine were seized
and the Mcintoshes were ar-
rested, Fosselman said.
Miscellaneous papers were also
seized that led to the FAA in-
vestigation into its personnel,
Fosselman said.
He declined to discuss specifics
of the case for fear of jeopardiz-
ing an investigation by FAA
security personnel, but did say
that no criminal charges had been
filed against the controllers.
Candaele said he thought the in-
vestigation stemmed from the
allegations of someone who was
at a party with air controllers.
"We are unequivocably oppos-
ed to drug use or any other illegal
substance use by air traffic con-
trollers, but in talking to people
who have come to us, there are
strong feelings that for the most
part, the accusations are based on
innuendo and rumor Candaele
said.
injury, $5,000 for property
damage and $10 million in
punitive damages under state
law. The awards later were over-
turned and a new trial eventually
was ordered.
Pereles said company officials
believe they would have won the
new trial that was ordered by an
appeals court and upheld by the
Supreme Court.
"We firmly believe Kerr-
McGee would have prevailed in
the scheduled retrial he said.
"However, burdensome legal
costs and significant time
demands would be imposed on
our company and our people by
another trial and the inevitable
and lengthy appeals
After the first trial, the
$500,000 personal injury judg-
ment was set aside because it
duplicated damages available
under the state's worker compen-
sation law.
The multimillion dollar
punitive damage award also was
overturned by the 10th U.S. Cir-
cuit Court of Appeals, which ac-
cepted the company's argument
that the award infringed on the
federal government's exclusive
authority to regulate nuclear
safety.
The Supreme Court on Jan. 11
1984, ruled 5-4 that state courts
could impose punitive damages
on the nuclear power industry for
safety violations, a partial victory
for Silkwood's family.
But the justices sent the case
back to the appeals court to
determine the amout of punitive
damages, if any, to be assessed
against Kerr-McGee. The appeals
court then ordered a new trial,
saying the first was tainted
because of the introduction of
improper evidence about
Silkwood's personal injuries.
The Supreme Court in May
upheld that order for a new trial,
despite Kerr-McGee's appeal.
Silkwood's three children
Beverly Meadows, 19, Michael
Meadows, 17, and Dawn
Meadows, 15- live with their
father, Silkwood's ex-husband,
William Meadows in Ardmore,
Okla.
The two younger children's
share will be placed in trust ac-
counts until they are 18.
42 Ounce � 40 Off Label
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IVORY
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72 Ounce
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35 Ounce - Regular - Lemon Scent
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96 Ct.
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299
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15 Ounce
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�MY PAY S3.M
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Gray
B JOHN SHANNON
1����IOr
Gray Galler ofl
fchat is in one respe alw
lame: it's alway
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As Beauvai- ! y � ;
fcoming exhibitor in Graj
"The history
recurring stor) f
resemble nor. -��
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displayed along �
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through Septembei 27,
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; Lyons of the Hokes V
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2

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Art To Sit On
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5
Although it cost $8,000 and
took two weeks of back-breaking
work to build, environmental ar-
tist Kinji Akagawa is hoping
ECU students will do more than
just admire his latest sculpture �
Akagawa wants them to sit on it.
Akagawa, associate professor
at the Minneapolis College of Art
and Design, designed the sturdy,
three-piece wooden structure
with utilization in mind. "This is
a good site for students to sit
around, talk and have picnics
Akagawa said. "It can also be us-
ed by faculty members as a lec-
ture space and for
performances
The design of the sculpture was
inspired by North Carolina front
porches. "When I was studying
1
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Court
The Supreme Court in May
upheld that order for a new trial,
despite Kerr-McGee's appeal.
Silkwood's three children
Beverly Meadows, 19, Michael
Meadows, 17, and Dawn
Meadows, 15- live with their
father. Silkwood's ex-husband,
William Meadows in Ardmore,
Okla.
The two younger children's
are will be placed in trust ac-
nts until the are 18.
all Towels- 10c Off Label
waveAssortedDesigner
OUNTY
Conditioner
al or Dry
ELL
83
u
PI S2 19
Peanut Butter
or Smooth
ular or Unscented
leodorant
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3 Pk.
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VORY
�04
HY PAY SI 15
15C Off Label
iwash
ir or Conditioning
ipoo
OULDERS
22
IV S2 66
Ounce
)l Shampoo
lERT
08
PAY S3 69
THE EAST C AROI INIAN
AUGUST 26, 1986
Page 21
Gray To Offer Variety
By JOHN SHANNON
��t F'dllor
Gray Gallery offers a menu
that is in one respect always the
same: it's always art. The dif-
ference is in how it's served up.
As Beauvais Lyons, an up-
coming exhibitor in Gray, puts it,
"The history of modern art is the
recurring story of making art
resemble non-art Art works
often masquerade as games, toys,
food, furniture, clothing or just
about anything. Sometimes ar-
tists themselves become integral
participants in their work; these
artists are known as performance
artists.
Lyons, whose work will be
displayed along with Cheryl
Goldsleger's from August 28
through September 27, is a per-
formance artist of sorts. He will
present a guided tour of his ex-
hibit posing as "Dr. Beauvais
Lyons of the Hokes Archive
Lyons is as little the traditional
archeologist he pretends to be as
he is a traditional artist, except
perhaps in the tradition artists
have of not fulfilling cultural ex-
pectations of what they are.
Lyons places his work in the
genre of "mock archaeology or
"ariifactual fiction He has
created fragments of an im-
aginary ancient culture called the
Apasht, and provided elaborate
documentation of the discovery
of these artifacts. The effect is
one of an authentic museum ex-
hibit, yet in many ways this show
may be far more interesting for
what it will reveal about the way
people experience the past.
"Paintings and Drawings" by
Cheryl Goldsleger promises to
complement "The Excavation of
the Apasht" well, as Goldsleger's
work deals with architectural
situations often seen from more
than one perspective. Goldsleger
is this fall's Artist-in-Residence
with the painting department,
and this show will be a good op-
portunity to get acquainted with
her talent.
Lyons will present a "Survey
of Archaeological Fiction" 7
p.m. Thursday in the Jenkins
Auditorium, in which he will ac-
quaint listeners with other artists
working in that unusual and
often humorous vein. After the
lecture, a reception for Lyons
and Goldsleger will be held in
Gray Art Gallery from 8:30 to
9:30 p.m.
Lyons will conduct a public
tour of his exhumed artifacts and
lithographs Friday starting at
noon. Goldsleger will lecture in
Jenkins Auditorium at 7:30 p.m.
Monday.
Visiting artist Cynthia Carlson
will present "Drawings From The
Monument Series" from October
3 through November 1. Her
large-scale drawings of
monuments will be exhibited rais-
ed and tilted on painted wooden
frames for an unusual effect.
Alongside Carlson's work will
be "Selections I" and "Art Quest
'86 an overview collection of
photography and a video over-
view of contemporary working
artists respectively. Carlson's lec-
ture at 7 p.m. Friday, October 3,
will be followed by a reception
for the exhibits in the gallery at
8:30 p.m.
A national exhibition of 24
works by 19 artists called
"Rape" will run from November
7 through December 6. The show
focuses on the artist's interpreta-
sas � $i m
Art To Sit On
Wi:stto�h
A lithograph by Beauvais Lyon from 'Excavation of the Apasht
tion of rape and its aftermath. In
November, a symposium will be
held on the topic of rape, in-
cluding members of the campus
and community who deal with
the issue from a psychological,
medical and preventative
perspective.
Alongside "Rape "Draw-
ings" by well-known and na-
tionally acclaimed artist Alice
Aycock w ill feature several of her
works. Aycock will lecture Mon-
day, October 6 at 7:30 p.m. in
Jenkins Auditorium.
Boxing Is Not The Best Way
To Improve Looks Or Vision
By ED TOSHACH
Ml Writer
Every year, ECU's TKE frater-
nity organizes an amateur boxing
tournament, the proceeds of
which go to charity. And yearly,
young men step into the ring
starry-eyed and step out with
stars in their eyes. This is the
story of one student's similar ex-
perience in a bar in Fayetteville.
Fump! A gloved fist bounced
off my head, and for a fraction
of a second 1 traded my normal
vision for a field of white. Before
I had a chance to move, the other
crashed into my face. I couldn't
think. Tears welled up in my
eyes.
Somehow I just couldn't
believe Rocky started this way.
You might say Rocky had got-
ten me into this. You see, I was
that fictitional gladiator's biggest
fan. I had seen Rocky II upwards
of ten times. Whenever I heard
the fanfare from "Gonna Fly
Now" my adrenal glands went in-
to overdrive. I had even bought
my own seventy pound, teflon-
coated Everlast punching bag and
had beaten my fists into ham-
burger.
Stallone made boxing look
fun. "There's nothing to it I
thought. "They punch you. You
punch them back. You both
bleed a little. They punch you
again. You punch them back
again. They fall down. You yell
'Adrian Nothing to it
Naturally, when a local bar
advertised its amateur boxing
night � an event during which
anyone who could put an X on a
waiver could step into the ring
and fight for glory � I couldn't
resist.
Thank God I wasn't a Conan
fan.
My friend Kenneth and 1 had
been there the first boxing night,
ostensibly as spectators. 1 promp-
tly became drunk, cornered one
of the promoters and started
agreeing to fight anyone who of-
fered. Kenneth, who had been a
little more on the sober side, step-
ped in and negotiated on m
behalf, avoiding the gnarly-
muscled adepts and finally settl-
ing for a local who was more my
size. As the man Kenneth had set
me up to fight the next week turn-
ed and walked away, we noticed
the word COBRA printed across
the back of his shirt.
I decided to go into intensive
training. 1 ran. 1 jumped rope. I
punched the bag. 1 listened to the
soundtrack from Rocky. 1 started
to spar, but I was getting hit too
much, so I stopped.
In a second one week passed.
The bar w here 1 was to box was
dark with a high ceiling, from
which flat black, cinder block
walls descended to a conrete
floor. Pool tables were scattered
loosely across the room; in one
corner, surrounded by dingv
foam rubber, was a mechanical
bull. In a doorless cubbyhole of a
side room hung a punching bag,
one of those lightweight plastic
ones filled mostly with air.
A friend of mine who had
fought Golden Gloves in New
York wound my hands tightly
with cotton wraps. I opened and
closed my hands over and over
waiting for my turn. When it
came, 1 climbed into the ring. I
noticed spots of blood on the
floor. Someone asked me if 1 had
a mouthpiece. 1 didn't. He reach-
ed into a bucket of water in my
corner and pulled out a U-shaped
piece of rubber and stuffed it in
my mouth. 1 have since learned
what those buckets are for.
Across the ring, wearing only
blue jeans, sat COBRA.
Some dirty bastard rang the
bell and COBRA was across the
ring, beating on my face like a
bongo drum. There was no
music, no drama, only duct-
taped boxing gloves buzzing
around my head. The crowd
booed; apparently they didn't
like to see people lose too quick-
ly-
COBRA was throwing only
wide hooks, but I was not fast
enough to avoid them. When I
caught my breath, I managed to
throw some wild hooks back at
him. and he grabbed me.
We were still in my corner, so I
could easily hear Jay, my Golden
Gloves friend from New York.
"Straight-punch, you idiot
"Good advice 1 thought. A
hook is probably the most easily
detected punch you can throw;
you start telegraphing it virtually
from the time you think about it.
Sec BOXER, page 22
Porches Inspire Sculpture
ECU News Bureau
Although it cost $8,000 and
took two weeks of back-breaking
work to build, environmental ar-
tist Kinji Akagawa is hoping
ECU students will do more than
just admire his latest sculpture �
Akagawa wants them to sit on it.
Akagawa, associate professor
at the Minneapolis College of Art
and Design, designed the sturdy,
three-piece wooden structure
with utilization in mind. "This is
a good site for students to sit
around, talk and have picnics
Akagawa said. "It can also be us-
ed by faculty members as a lec-
ture space and for
performances
The design of the sculpture was
inspired by North Carolina front
porches. "When I was studying
North Carolina dwellings, I
noticed that the front porch was a
very important part of architec-
ture Akagawa said. " I wanted
the structure to have the same
restful qualities
The site-specific sculpture
(designed for a particular site) is
made of treated pine with fir trim
and is located on a triangle-
shaped piece of wooded land
behind the Jenkins Fine Arts
Center. "No trees were removed
to make room for the sculpture
Akagawa said. "I sensed from
hearing everybody talk that trees
are a very important part of this
campus
Funding for the sculpture was
provided by the School of Art
and a $4,000 grant from the
North Carolina Arts Council.
"We wanted to do something
that would bring the School of
Art and the campus more closely
together said Dr. Edward
Levine, dean of the School of
Art. "I like it aesthetically and I
like the way it kind of moves
around the site. It doesn't try to
overpower the site or the other
buildings.
"Ultimately, I think, and Kinji
would agree, the success of it will
be how it is used by the
students Levine said.
Adagawa's piece is the second
site-specific sculpture at ECU.
Last fall the School of Art com-
missioned Andrea Blum to con-
struct entranceways through a
row of hedges located in front of
Jenkins.
"The students were breaking
the hedges down to get on cam-
pus because there was no
access Levine said. "That's
what I mean by extending the no-
tion of what art can be. Art is not
just something in a gallery or a
museum; it partakes of all the
kinds of experiences we have and
also maybe helps solve some pro-
blems
Levine hopes to be able to
commission more works in the
future, although no definite plans
have been made. "It's a matter of
getting grants and seeing if we
can raise some money he said.
'It'd be nice given that we are one
of the major art schools in the
area, to make art more available
to the whole campus and com-
munity. Students who come here
will not only get an education,
but will become familiar with
what artists are doing
J. �- Hvffbfcort �
Artist Kinji Akagawa at work on a triangular strt. .
behind the Art Building. " 8lrict� loci
K
mm mm m
m. �, � � ir. j �lnr'uiryj- "iiC
gb
MM
!� m r ii � � ii0 i iiibim,





22
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 26. gg
Dwcfc s Firs Motion
Christ
By MICAH HARRIS
Staff Writer
"Howard's debut is, welljust
ducky � Swana Barrett,
Duckville Times
recently saw Howard the
Duck with a re-release of Duckter
Zhivago what a double bill
� Roger Eggbert, Great Lakes
Tribune
"I said to my uncle the other
day: Why can't we be in a movie
like that?" � Huey Duck, Walt
Disney Movie Star
Looking over the above laurels
cast at Howard's webbed feet, I
can only sigh and think, "I knew
him when You've come a long
way, ducky, from that jail cell
where we first met.
Actually, Howard was in the
cell and I was in a speedy mart. It
was the summer of 1975, a time
when I had stopped buying (but
not occasionally perusing) com-
ics. Still, this particular character
with his off-beat back-up story in
a book featuring "Man-Thing"
caused me to shell out a whole
fifty cents for that issue.
Howard was in jail for disturb-
ing the peace (a misunderstan-
ding on the authorities part). A
thorough frisk later (an episode
included in the movie) and the
police were quick to get rid of this
"mutant Still craving accep-
tance, Howard decided iu im-
press society by smoking out and
confronting a blood sucking
vampire: Bessiethe Hellcowf
Bessie was an old victim of
Dracula's. When the Count
visited her native Switzerland, the
villagers were safely locked in
their homes. Bessie was alone in
the pasture and Dracula, as the
copy reads, was very thirsty.
And not for milk
Bessie returned from the grave,
donned a cape, and began a
vengeful search for Dracula. She
eventually wound up in
Cleveland, Ohio where Howard
cornered her in an automotive
shop by using a lug wrench as a
cross. With Bessie's fangs safely
imbedded in a white wall,
Howard drove a stake into her
broken heart.
Wow! This was outrageous
stuff to discover in 1975 when the
comic book shops and the alter-
native comics they would offer
had not yet begun to flourish like
dandelions at least not in my
part of the country.
But since I had momentarily
misplaced my infatuation with
comics, the attraction soon wan-
ed and I unfortunately missed the
next Howard story which ap-
peared in his collector's item first
issue. I caught up with the duck a
couple years late during a Star
Wars parody.
Back tracking, I learned that
Howard had just walked out of
the bushes without any cover
baliy-hoo in an issue of Adven-
ture Into Fear (featuring Man-
Thing, again). The editor told
Howard's creator, writer Steve
Gerber, to immediately dump the
duck. So, Howard became a
casualty of the story line's cosmic
war. He fell from some stepping
stones across the sky and into a
void.
Heroes who fall into voids
don't stay gone forever whether
they are Gandalf or Howard the
Duck. Response to Howard was
strong. He returned, and in
subsequent months ran for presi-
dent, was devil possessed, turned
into a human and back again,
met Spider-Man, and saved the
universe from being leveled to
make way for a cosmic shopping
mall, the Death Store.
And now, Howard can add
"feature film star" to his credits.
To be honest, I was skeptical
about the movie. Very few comic
book characters make the transi-
tion to film or video tape without
suffering frontal lobotomies in
the process. The first two Super-
man movies were good. TV's In-
credible Hulk pulled it off a few
times but mostly Ferrigno's shirt
was all that was pulled off. And
Supergirl was a major disap-
pointment.
I expected the worst and was
pleasantly surprised. Howard the
Duck is not a modern Aesop's
Fable as the comic book even-
tually became. Instead, it's an ab-
surd, wacky, off-the-wall adven-
ture which pits Howard, the
underdog er, duck against a
bizzare menace to mankind just
as those early back-up features
did.
The movie opens in Duck
World to the strains of the jazzy
sax music heard in 60s detective
movies. Howard has returned to
his apartment and settled down
to peruse the latest air-brushed
beauty in Playduck when he is
caught by a force which drags
him from his planet to earth.
Howard suffers a most
physical "culture shock" at sud-
denly finding himself in a world
of "hairless apes After accep-
ting refuge in a garbage can out-
side a night club, Howard hears
some creeps assaulting would-be
rock superstar, Beverly Switzler
(Leah Thompson). Bad move.
Howard makes short work of
them by using the martial art of
Quack-Fu.
Howard and Bev strike up a
friendship. We learn that
Howard was an outsider even in
his own world. And in addition
to being a master of Quack-Fu,
he is also an accomplished musi-
cian (evidently a big Jimmy Hen-
ducks fan, he plucks out "Purple
Haze" from a guitar with his
bill).
Howard and Bev eventually
discover that Howard was a vic-
tim of a science experiment which
is probing space with some sort
of beam. Another probe brings
an H.P. Lovecraftian horror
known as the "Dark Overlord"
to earth where it possesses the
scientist who was going to help
Howard return home.
The feathers start flying as the
always misunderstanding
authorities pursue Howard. He,
Bev, and the possessed scientist
flee and stop at a country-western
sushi restaurant along the way.
As you may suspect, this is where
the film gets really absurd.
A waitress informs the trio that
no pets are allowed. "Don't you
have any compassion?" quips
Howard as he grabs the scientist's
hand. "I'm a seeing-eye duck
The possession complete, the
Dark Overlord rants and raves of
coming inflictions of pain and
agony. A much put-upon
waitress tells him to at least try
the food before he complains.
Things get rowdy when some
good oi boys begin picking on
Howard and Bev. Firing beams
of energy from his hands and
eyes, the Dark Overlord saves
Howard but only because the
duck has a component needed to
See SCI-FI, page 23
Socctx Coaches Greenville Recreation & Porks
Greenville Recreation and Parks Department is recruiting 10-14
part-time soccer coaches for the fail soccer program. Applicants
must possess some knowledge in soccer skills and have the
patience to work with youth. Applicants must be able to coach
young people, ages 6-15 in soccer fundamentals. Hours are
approximately 3 p.m 7 p.m Monday-Friday. Some night and
weekend coaching. Program will extend from September 8 to
mid-November. Salary rate is S3.46 hour. Applications will be
accepted August 20-Sept. 12. Contact Ben James at 752-4137
ext. 262.
Boxer Learns A Good Lesson
Continued from page 21
from the time you think about it.
A jab or cross is harder to see
coming and gets to your oppo-
nent much faster.
COBRA was coming back at
me after the referee separated us,
so I jabbed out a left. It popped
him smartly on the nose and he
looked at me, stunned. Another
left caught him on the cheek. He
reached way back to Burgaw to
throw another wide hook and I
crossed over with a right.
Kaboom. As my adrenaline final-
ly kicked in, I followed COBRA
across the ring, launching
leather-covered missiles into his
face. In between punches I notic-
ed mucous hanging from one of
his nostrils, and took it as a sign
of victory. After the last of
perhaps ten consecutive punches
bounced him off the ropes,
COBRA looked at the referee
and saidphuulnk illf
Loosely translated from
mouthpiece, that means, " I
quit
I had done it. Like my hero,
Rocky, I had come up from the
land of underdogdom to stand
victorious over my foe.
After giving COBRA the
obligatory post-carnage hug, 1
walked over to the bar and
ordered a beer. 1 really felt like a
champ. Having bested the mighty
COBRA, surely now I was ready
for the likes of Roberto Duran,
Gerry Cooney, Apollo Creed, or
Skeletor.
Then I saw it.
Some of the more experienced
fighters on hand had shown pity
and decided to teach COBRA a
little boxing. As they coached, he
worked the bag, best as he could.
When men try to imitate
women fighting-men that have
never seen women fight-they
bunch up their shoulders and
lightly flail and slap at each
other. Although doing his best,
this was what COBRA was doing
to that bag.
I went home.
Tequila Bar
a Weekly Specials
Sunrise Sunday: $2.00per serve
Melo-Mondays: $2.25 per serve
Toasty-Tuesday: $2.25 per serve
Wednesday: $1.75 Pirates Cane Muitney
Tonic Thursday: $1.75 per serve
Fried Friday: Get Fried Early at
our new Attitude Adjustment hour at
4:30; end the night upside down!
Saturday Night Specials
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(Look for our new "Lagoon" Bar)
Located Outside
109 E. 5th St.
752-8926
SORORITIES .
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i
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The key to success?
Sorority Rush: Sept. 7-12
Sorority Rush Signup: Aug. 27-29
Sept. 1-4
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Sorority Information Sewlong In AM Female Resident Hrih Sept ri -w- u hf
& i
B ROB BELL
The following is a transcript,
of a talk with actor H
Christopher, who was in Gre
ville recently to perform in
Summer Theatre produi
Greater Tuna Christopher is
known for his role as Fail
Mulcahy on the teletsion se4
'MASH
Of all the places you
have worked, what made �
choose Greenville7
Oh, very simple to anue-
question. Greenville has
university here, which is su
ported by state funds. I'm n
sure exactly how generous
state is in funding their theatrj
ut from all I can see there arel
lot of very highly qualified peop
working here in the theatre Tr
staff is large, and they have cor
)lex facilities. They have wondej
ful costume shopping and a lot
k'ell-trained people. They ah
tave this program that brings
uest actors; and they pay u
-cry good fee.
As an out of work acto-
usualh get jobs through
agent But Greater Tuna is mor
than just a job; it is an interest
play to work on and very
ferent for me. A lot or
characters are from I
Southwest. Southeast Texas
not a part of the countr that
know. Also, when 1 read The plaj
it sounded like a fascir.anng
That's like getting paid too. Pa;
Sci-Fi Film F
Continued from page 22
activateienace probe �
will�flTrTg more Overiord-
rrtmFfe makes off with Be-
with the intentions of using he
a "host
The slam-bang climax occur
in the laboratories housing
space probe equipment. Howar;
and Beverly's friend, Phil, sa
her and their scientist fnena
to be confronted by the Darl
Overlord in his true form.
As one would expec:
anything connected with Ge
Lucas, the special effects are stau
of the art. Happily, the visual'
are allowed to compliment
story instead of becorr. ; I
raison d'etre. 1 was espe
pleased with the final mamfe
tion -of the Overlord wh
features excellent stop-mo-
puppet animation.
The actors jAIso do espe.3a
well considering they are
ting cast to a guy in a duck su
Performances border on ca
but never cross the line Lea
Thompson is not as volupt
as the comic book Beve -
she is more likable than he: I
color counterpart. The charade
of Phil, a would-be stieatistl
friend of Bev's, is occasional
Wi
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 26, MM 23
Pctere I Christopher Gets The Carolina Experience
fee
the film gets really absurd.
A waitress informs the trio that
no pets are allowed. "Don't you
have any compassion?" quips
Howard as he grabs the scientist's
hand. "I'm a seeing-eye duck
The possession complete, the
Dark Overlord rants and raves of
coming inflictions of pain and
agony. A much put-upon
waitress tells him to at least try
the food before he complains.
Things get rowdy when some
good ol' boys begin picking on
Howard and Bev. Firing beams
of energy from his hands and
eyes, the Dark Overlord saves
Howard but only because the
duck has a component needed to
See SCI-FI, page 23
inville Recreation & Parks
krks Department is recruiting 10-14
he fall soccer program. Applicants
Ige in soccer skills and have the
pplicants must be able to coach
Isoccer fundamentals. Hours are
. Monday-Friday. Some night and
will extend from September 8 to
$3.46 hour. Applications will be
Contact Ben James at 752-4137
It 262.
la Bar
Specials
serve
serve
serve
yane Muitney
serve
iy at
ur at
t
iila Blues
far)
E. 5th St.
U-8926
i
allege"
cess?
7-29
m to be announced.

�njtfess
�y ROB BELL
SUff Writer
The following is a transcription
of a talk with actor William
Christopher, who was in Green-
ville recently to perform in the
Summer Theatre production of
Greater Tuna. Christopher is best
known for his role as Father
Mulcahy on the television series
MASH
Of all the places you could
have worked, what made vou
choose Greenville?
Oh, very simple to answer that
question. Greenville has the
university here, which is sup-
ported by state funds. I'm not
sure exactly how generous the
state is in funding their theatre,
fcut from all I can see there are a
lot of very highly qualified people
working here in the theatre. The
staff is large, and they have com-
plex facilities. They have wonder-
ful costume shopping and a lot of
�well-trained people. They also
have this program that brings in
guest actors; and they pay us a
very good fee.
As an out of work actor, I
usually get jobs througn my
agent. But Greater Tuna is more
than just a job; it is an interesting
play to work on and very dif-
ferent for me. A lot of the
characters are from the
Southwest. Southeast Texas is
not a part of the country that I
know. Also, when I read the play
it sounded like a fascinating idea.
That's like getting paid too. Part
of it is the money, part of it is for
fun � only 1 don't get enough of
that with Greater Tuna because I
only get to play it for the one
week. That was a drawback, but
it was also a challenge. I have
never been in North Carolina
before, so that, too, was an add-
ed attraction � to go to some
place where you have never been
and to see the country
Can you describe some of what
you experienced, being in this
area for the first time?
It looks different. This part of
the country has a special look
about it. To me it's just been a
state, one of those green or red
shapes on the map. South
Carolina it seems to me was col-
ored purple on my map, and
Georgia was colored green, and
Florida was colored red and
that's all those states were to me
and to actuallly come here and
realize what it looks like was ex-
citing.
This far east, of course, North
Carolina has a different kind of
look. I haven't seen the center of
the state � the real piedmont
country. I've driven east where it
starts to get marshy. The people I
like, though most of the people I
deal with are the college people.
But, they're ok too.
What has been the most dif-
ficult part of playing in Greater
Tuna?
"The fact that the Texan ac-
cent was something that I had to
work on and something I had
never done before. Not that I
haven't done different accents,
but I have never used such a wide
variety of accents with such a
conglomeration of characters. I
still feel that a few of them are
not quite complete enough in my
mind, even though we've already
opened the play. I would like to
build them a little more complete-
ly. There are so many details in a
play like this, and also a lot of
pantamime used.
Could you tell me about the
directing of the play?
"Ron Carol directed it. Ron
Carol, having replaced one of the
original actors in New York, was
under the tutelage of the guys
who wrote it and created it, and
he has a lot of wonderful ideas
that come from the original pro-
duction. So, he's qualified to
direct. When I knew Ron was go-
ing to do this I was pleased
because I felt that the play would
run more smoothly
Would you say the role of
Father Mulcahy on 'MASH' was
close to your own personality?
See MULCAHY, page 24
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Sci-Fi Film Features Effects
Continued from page 22
Space probe which
more Overlords to
makes off with Bev
with the intentions of using her as
a "host
The slam-bang climax occurs
in the laboratories housing the
space probe equipment. Howard
and Beverly's friend, Phil, save
her and their scientist friend only
to be confronted by the Dark
Overlord in his true form.
As one would expect from
anythipg connected with George
Lucas, the special effects are state
of the art. Happily, the visuals
are allowed to compliment the
story instead of becoming its
raison d'etre. I was especially
pleased with the final manifesta-
tion xf the Overlord which
features excellent stop-motion
puppet animation.
The actors Also do especially
well considering they are suppor-
ting cast to a guy in a duck suit.
Performances border on camp,
but never cross the line. Leah
Thompson is not as voluptuous
as the comic book Beverly, but
she is more likable than her four-
color counterpart. The character
of Phil, a would-be scientist
friend of Bev's, is occasionally
too annoying. Still, there is a
priceless scene when he first
meets Howard and tries com-
municating with him by speaking
in a Donald Duck voice.
And then there is Howard's
voice. Reading the comics, you
might expect Howard to speak
with acid tones. At first,
Howard's voice struck me as too
mellow. As the movie goes along,
however, the voice becomes more
acceptable. It fits Howard's
movie personna: a more sym-
pathetic duck.
Sympathy or not, Howard the
Duck is not E.T. Despite a PG
rating it is not a "family" film
and I understand the box office
receipts reflect this. I don't mean
to imply that Howard the Duck is
obscene. It's just that the movie
is too off beat for everyone to en-
joy. You may want to wait for
the video version which can't be
far behind.
Still, the larger screen allows
for more impressive visuals,
especially in the Dark Overlord's
final attack. If you are in the
mood for something different, I
would recommend Howard the
Duck. Go ontake a
gander.This is be kind to poultry
week.
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24
THE EAST CARPI INlan
AUGUST 26. 1986
BLOOM COUNTY
UH OU
&LL the CAT
a in m News
AOAIN

V
Al
&&
mX
THE SOVIET UNION
HAS ANNOUNCEP THAT
THEY'VE FORCIBLY
mtxmpmi tu
A WESTERN OH NO
COUNTS ,
mr im me
wimmtof m tains
urne prince, so
WIUIAM THE
TCRRPCE'7
by Berke Breathed
utftxm.
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ihj&nze
throttle
1 -X ln f�w tr-
SingerGuitarist To Perform
In Mendenhall Underground
70PAY �� �
fihmiZi

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the reapers
chance ro
TALK PACK
Recently me epitor$
of mis ceatvri receivep
NUMEROUS COMPLAINTS
RElrARPlNV LAST WEEKS
EPISOPES PEAUNE WITH
THE VITAL ISSUES 3VRROVNPlN0
me prttish monarchy.
A REPRESENTAPVE
EXCERPT FOLWUS �
j
I MY SON. I WAS
youve MppEp mm
THE QUEEN MUM FOP AUNT
ON THE NOOPLE FEPblE 5
HIPS. CANT
SEE HOiAl I
RUXK7Y WELL
MISSEL7 M

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We promise m opportunity
FOR ANY PESPONSI&LE REAPERS
W RESPONP ANP THEREFORE
WE REQUEST THAT A ONE
SIR RUMWALP EPINARP
CHARLES CHATSFIELP M
OF me TOLEPO CHAPTER
OF THe FRlENPS OFEMLANP
PLEASE STOP CALLING OUR
OFFICES ANP WAFFLINO
NTO THE PARN PuNE.
1!4fflG&$i
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Vdmmi
VPAY A REAPER
QESPONPS TO LAST WEEKS
CONTROVERSIAL EPISOPES
WHICH PEALT SENS'TIVELY
WITH TO:Pup AREAS WITHIN
me mnsh wrrWi
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FOLLOWS �
VMC TOGO
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CHARLIE?
A CONCERNEP REAPER
CHOSEN AT RANPOM
FOLLOWS WTTH HIS
COMMENTS �
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Fk'EN HPPEN PECAiSE
OF POSSPLi
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3�XVK County
-T� CPPORPNTTY WE 'JIVE
iOU, mE PEAPE TO PESPONP
PC OPINIONS EtRRESSEP V
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,C JS M�A WE PRESEJVT
mE SECONP INSTALLMENT
OF VIEWPOINT' ATA0OUT
THE SAME TIME HEEL
FREEZES C7.EP
Movie Review
Reiner Film A Success
By ED TOSHACH
9Uff Writer
During the opening ten
minutes of Stand By Me, the first
thing you see is a bunch of kids
swearing their heads off. If you
walk out then, thinking that's all
there is to this new movie by Rob
Reiner, you'll be making a
serious mistake.
Stand By Me is an adventure
about four young boys on a two-
day hike. Their goal is to see a
real dead body � the corpse of a
school friend who was killed by a
train. One of the boys learned of
the body by eavesdropping on an
older brother.
The Cobras, a gang of older
punks (including two of the boys'
older brothers), are also traveling
toward the body; this provides
for a climactic confrontation.
Stand By Me is a period piece,
and it recreates what is was like to
grow up in the fifties with a ge-
nuine edge � almost like a time
machine.
The movie is based on the
novella The Body, by Stephen
King, but we are mercifully
spared the usual media blitz sur-
rounding King's name.
This film takes you back to
when you were twelve, and you
had just learned about curse
words and cigarettes and thought
you were an adult � and it does
so fondly.
Along with the boys' imagined
worldliness is a moving realism
that makes anything that happens
to them captivating entertain-
ment. Its tone is quiet and
nostalgic; and it's helped along
by a kindly narration given by
Richard Drey fuss, who in a
cameo appearence plays one of
the boys as an adult.
If this is what we can expect
from Rob Reiner now that he's
directing, maybe he's not such a
meathead afterall.
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Th� Emenaincr
The Underground will ring
with the well-toned tunes of
singerguitaristsong writer
Brian Huskey on Thursday,
September 4, at 8 p.m. Admis-
sion to this performance by this
frequent visitor to ECU is free,
and his appearance is sponsored
by the Student Union Cof-
feehouse Committee.
Brian hails from Charlotte and
has been on the road for several
years now as a solo entertainer.
As a result of many road miles
and lots of contact with all sorts
of colorful places and people, he
has become quite a character in
his own right. He was playing
some hard-living, gritty, honky-
tonk music with strong Texas
overtones long before it was
fashionable.
His repertory now runs from
the Grateful Dead to the Eagles
and from Willie Nelson to
Jackson Browne. He also plays
his own material and a number of
traditional tunes. His one-man
show is both musically adept and
quite entertaining � he has
amassed quite a few tales from
his years on the road, and he is
sure to tell one or two during the
course of a performance. Bet-
ween his humor and his music,
the evening promises to be quite
memorable.
Don't miss this first of the
special performances to be held
in the Underground located on
the ground floor of Mendenhall
Student Center � beyond the
vending machine area.
Welcome Back To The
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We are glad to have you back!
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savings.
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tts Fa Oossn't Cost A Fortuns
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 26. 1986 25
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26
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26, 1986
Mulcahy Talks About Life
Coatlnued from page 23
"Oh yes, it used my personali-
ty a great deal; but the main thing
about Father Mulcahy is that he
is a very religious, single-minded
person who had given his life to
others and this is something in
my life that is, of course, not
trtse.
"I am pretty materialistic. I
like my pleasures. 1 have a wife
and a family. I'm not so good all
of the time but I could sort of
understand. I talked to a lot of
priests to try to understand what
it is like to be a priest who has
decided to become a parent to the
world.
"They are called father
because they do relate to all
humanity as their children and
especially their Catholic flock,
but Mulcahy was in a situation
where he is pretty excom-
municable. Not many people in
the MASH unit are very
religious. There may be a few
Catholics, but none of them are
ever really talked about as
Catholics. Hawkeye certainly
isn't.
"The main reason for talking
to priests was that 1 wanted to get
a feeling for them. I wanted to
avoid the pitfalls and dangers of
playing such a character because
there have never been too many
religious people portrayed in
television. Not for a long time.
Do you think that 'MASH'
could have been possible without
the social climate produced by
the Vietnam War?
"No, I don't. It wouldn't have
happened. 'MASH' came from
� let's face it � the brain child
of a guy who came back from the
Korean war and felt very much a
need to tell his story. He wrote
under the name of Hooker but
that's a pseudonym. He wrote
that little book MASH which was
not a big seller but a very funny
book. They just spotted that
book I think because of what was
going on in Vietnam
Did 'MASH' change over the
years in what it was trying to ac-
complish?
the awfulness of war, and there
really wasn't any plot except that
a lot was going on at the MASH
unit and everybody was very tired
and you saw each person work-
ing, then falling asleep and then
they had these terrible dreams
and that was all there was. Very
interesting for actors and fun to
do but not the kind of thing you
do in the first season or the se-
cond season. You have to be
awfully well established. So, that
kind of thing happened and it
was exciting
What was your favorite
episode of 'MASH'?
"I think I always say that the
favorite ones I did were the ones
where Mulcahy began to emerge,
"I'm not a student of the present, of
what 9s going on today in the world
sometimes amazing things happen
and I don't even know about them
� William Christopher
�y HUGH CAIIOl
William Christopher
Yes. Well, early on Larry
Gelbart was responsible for this
thing of humanity. 1 don't know
where he got his material; he may
have read the book and probably
saw the movie. I'm sure he didn't
study it. He wanted to keep his
things separate from that. He is a
great writer and he set the tone
for an emphasis on humanitarian
feelings.
"Then Larry left after the
fourth season and Alan expand-
ed, because Alan was interested
in writing more and more and
started doing more writing and
working on the scripts. We
always had a lot of script
writings, but that element of
humanity did expand as we got
further along because we felt con-
fident enough to do offbeat
shows.
"There was a kind of sur-
realistic show called 'Dreams' in
which everybody had dreams of
as he was a pretty small character
to begin with and it got bigger;
and I think that one of the great
ones was the one where Mulcahy
does that field operation, the
tracheotomy over the radio. It
was called 'Mulcahy's War
"Every year Mulcahy got a lit-
tle more and more. It was fun to
do and it grew within me. I had a
better feeling of what Mulcahy
was like and what I wanted to do
with him. I am not sure why I
don't have many favorites, but it
was so much fun to do. The show
where we had an interviewer
come and talk to us all was a very
exciting show
Was there a sense of compa-
nionship among the actors on the
show?
"Yes; we came, went, worked
together. We liked and respected
each other. It was also fun. We
will probably always be in touch
a little bit. We were a tight knit
PIRATE
WALK
Now accepting applications
through Sept. 5 for
DIRECTOR OF PIRATE WALK
Also accepting applications for:
� Walkers
�Operators
Pirate Walk begins
Aug. 27
Open SunThurs.
6 p.m12 midnight
757-6616

Just Because We Care"
V
group and good friends
Do you miss them?
"Well, I don't in a sense. I see
them. I miss not going to the
studio every day and working on
a show that was fun to do. I hope
to have that experience again. It
won't be 'MASH but I will enjoy
whatever it is. I hope that I can
work on something that succeeds
and can be a long-running
thing
This question relates to politics
and you don't have to answer it.
Do you see any similarities bet-
ween what is occuring in Central
America, and Vietnam? Are
there any lessons to be learned
from 'MASH'?
"I won't wax eloquent on this
or develop this theme, but I think
it's pretty scary. I remember
when we started in Vietnam. I
didn't quite know what it was all
about I didn't question it.
Never thought it could be so terri-
ble, and in retrospect it really
seems hard to argue that it was a
good thing to do. I just can't.
"I'm not a student of the pre-
sent, of what's going on today in
the world. I read the paper a bit,
read other things; and I don't
even listen to the news very com-
pletely. Sometimes amazing
things happen and 1 don't even
know about them. In retrospect
Vietnam is pretty horrible and I
don't know quite what to believe
about Central America but the
parallels are terrifying. I don't
believe in war. I can't believe in
nuclear armament. I don't
believe in it at all. I would rather
we just disarmed unilaterally, the
United States without Russia
disarming
What makes you happy? Suc-
cess? Money? Family?
"Oh, it's all of those things. I
mean I do love working. I can go
See VETERAN, page 27
ATTENTION:
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Vetera
Continued from page 26
quite a while 1 suppose withoj
working, but I want to work
have a lot of interests. I listen t.
lot of music
What are . �
groups?
"Oh, m favorite groups
think groups like The Acader
of Ancient Instruments and t
Los Angele Chamber Orchesr
are doing well lays The
are a lot of good groups
D you ever listen - I
Roll?
"Well, 1 get a little sn
of it eer once and a
mean 1 hea- I Not much
Elton John is ;�
When the Beaties came ou
ly loved listening to them
bought all of the Bcae- �
and 1 hae a tape � Ahhe Roc
in m car at home
RealK I listen I a
most of the time
I
Survey To I
(UPI) � A wY �
can evoke sighs from a r�
long ago,the fragrance
bread can conjure up mei
of a grandmothe
the smell of burning leaes c
spark instant rv
Recognizing that smel
important, though
ed, part of life. The V.
Geographic Societ sasd Tuesdi
it has launched the lar.
tific test eer conduce
The test consists of a f
brochure in the September issi
of National Geographic, whil
contains six - I
squares, plus a sure ��
tions about re as tc eac
square and character : -j
sniffers, such as whether
smoke.
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Kvnov
College Students
:ds
�weie S�nca '893
)Oh
IS I Ol PO
THE EAST CARPI.INIAN
AUGUST 26. 198
27
Veteran Of 'MASH' Reveals Personality
Continued fmn. ��� w
of Greeny i Hi
17 ! town"
ck Students
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avors
p Trees
sizes
lements
lady made or let us
e for you
6-Tree
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w Student ID & Coupon
enville Blvd.
Union Carbide

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� ClALIZING IN LARGE
BUSINESS ORDERS
GREENVILLE
Continued from page 26
quite a while 1 suppose without
working, but I want to work. 1
have a lot of interests. I listen to a
lot of music
What are your favorite
groups?
"Oh, my favorite groups. I
think groups like The Academv
of Ancient Instruments and the
Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra
are doing well these days. There
are a lot of good groups
Do you ever listen to Rock and
Roll?
"Well, I get a little smattering
of it every once and awhile. I
mean 1 hear it. Not much. I think
Elton John is pretty exciting.
When the Beatles came out I real-
ly loved listening to them. 1
bought all of the Beatles albums,
and 1 have a tape of Abbey Road
in my car at home that I listen to.
Really 1 listen to classical music
most of the time. I have been
listening to Mozart more than
anything else. I like earlier Baro-
que music, but Mozart was a
pretty influential writer. I haven't
hardly gotten to Bach. There is so
much of that. When you are real-
ly interested in classical music,
in college. I didn't do very well
academically but I love to read it
and I carry Homer with me all the
time just so I can have a little fun
reading over the poetry. Besides
Homer, I have my few children.
We spend a lot of time together. I
" didn't have to search for
something. I was not in school
wondering what I wanted to do with
my life. I knew
� William Christopher
you know that you aren't going
to listen to everything that you
would like to hear. You can't live
long enough.
"I have also gotten interested
in studying Homeric Greek and I
did learn some Greek when I was
have a handicapped son who is
now 18, and John who is 20.
They have brought a lot into our
lives. My wife and I were very
much into athletics and John
became very athletic all through
school so we went to a lot of
baseball games
Has fame changed you in any
way?
Fame?
Well, I wouldn't say that it has
particularly. I guess one of the
things that becoming successful
with 'MASH has done is that it
has given me a feeling of security
and also a feeling of confidence,
a good feeling that I accomplish-
ed something that was really nice
to do and now I get more work.
"I feel like I have reached a
new plateau it's hard as an ac-
tor when you start out and
nobody cares who you are,
nobody wants you and you can't
get work. It's scary as hell. It
really is. It's terrifying. It's like
all you guys coming out of col-
lege and you don't know where
you are going. I did that. I went
to college and I went to New
York and I was scared to death
and it happened very slowly and
gradually the pieces came
together
What do you see in store for
you in the future?
"I don't know. I would like to
work in features more. I've been
in a few feature films. I would
like to have this happen. Televi-
sion has been good to me, so if I
could get in another series I
would like that, too.
Do you think that practical ex-
perience has helped you as much
as being in an academic setting
would?
Well yes, it's certainly very dif-
ferent but I would recommend
the academic setting up to a cer-
tain age because I don't think
very many people get out of high
school ready to use their time
well. You like to goof off a lot
when you are around 18, 19, or
20 � and you ought to have a
few wild times � and the
academic setting gives you struc-
ture. You know where you're
supposed to be, when you are
supposed to appear, what work
you are supposed to do. Your
professors tell you what to do
and when to do it, and if you
don't do it of course you won't
stay there.
"The reward for all of that
work is that you are allowed to
stay there and you can get all the
good times with it. And if you get
turned on to learning that's great.
I really think that if you can get
turned on to anything, that is
really a good thing to have hap-
pened.
"Of course, 1 was very single-
directed. So, I didn't have to
search for something. I was not
in school wondering what I
wanted to do with mv life. I
knew
Survey To Uncover Facts About Smelling
(UPI) � A whiff of perfume
can evoke sighs from a romance
long ago, the fragrance of baking
bread can conjure up memories
of a grandmother's kitchen, and
the smell of burning leaves can
spark instant nostalgia.
Recognizing that smells play an
important, though little research-
ed, part of life, The National
Geographic Society said Tuesday
it has launched the largest scien-
tific test ever conducted.
The test consists of a fold-out
brochure in the September issue
of ational Geographic, which
contains six scratch-and-sniff
squares, plus a survey with ques-
tions about reactions to each
square and characteristics of the
sniffers, such as whether they
smoke.
The brochure, which accom-
panies an article in the magazine
about smell, has been mailed to
the society's nearly 11 million
members.
Researchers point out that the
sense of smell has an important
function in life, such as in bon-
ding mothers to their infants and
alerting one to danger, such as
when the gas is left on.
"It's the least understood of
our senses, and the most
critical Geographic editor
Wilbur Garrett said.
A medical specialist said as
many people suffer from defi-
ciencies in their sense of smell as
there are people who wear
eyeglasses, Garrett said.
Garrett called the survey the
closest thing to an "eye chart for
the nose
. Turn any
occassion into a
special event ;
Send flowers
from
Cox Floral jh '�
Jfc Service W
&
Arlington Blvd.
756-7226
POSTER SALE
Art Reproductions
Laser Prints
Impressionist Prints
Sports Images
Modern and
Abstract Images
Art Deco
Movie Posters
Scenic Prints
Wildlife Prints
All Contemporary
Art Prints
DATE: August 25-29, 1986
PLACE: Mendenhall Student Center
TIME: 9 a.m. � 5 p.m.
SPECIAL FEATURE - Mats and
Silver and Wood Frames
Available
Universal Graphics
mmmmX
mmu0m� t �
�' � � ftaT � 1 ii i" j1ii.ri nin iiti �





28
THc EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 26. 1986
Folklore Continues To Flourish In Society
By MICAH HARRIS
Suff Writer
Question:What do damaged
Cabbage Patch Kids, the center
of a glf ball, baby alligators, and
the pop tops of soda cans all have
in common? They are all subjects
of urban legends � the modern
version of the folk tale. Professor
Jan Harold Brunvand, an
English instructor at the Univer-
sity of Utah, coined the term and
has even written a book on the
subject entitiled The Vanishing
Hitchhiker.
Urban legends, like the
folklore of the past, are com-
municated by word of mouth.
These Saki-like short tales with
twist endings pop up around the
country with no apparent com-
mon origin. In fact, urban
legends can cross oceans an
spread to other continents.
Consider the story of the Hip-
pie Babysitter. A couple return
home to discover the babysitter
to whom they entrusted their
child has been doing drugs in
their absence. The by-now spacey
babysitter announces that she has
stuffed the turkey and put it in
the oven.
What turkey? The panic
stricken parents cannot find their
baby anywhere in the house
The story of the Hippie
Babysitter has appeared in dif-
ferent versions over the centuries
in Finland, Brazil, and South
America, as well as in the United
States.
Folktales of old often dealt
with the supernatural. My grand-
mother told me of a young girl
who was noticed carrying food
behind the barn. Someone
followed her and found her hand
feeding a snake. The snake was
immediately killed and shortly
thereafter the girl also died. Ex-
planation? The snake had
"charmed" her.
In our technical society we
laugh at such stories, find them
quaint, and wonder how people
ever could have believed such a
yarn. None of that superstitious
stuff for us. Instead, we accept
and spread with certainty such
facts as. If your Cabbage Patch
Kid becomes damaged, you may
return it to the manufacturer who
will send you a "death
certificate" and a funeral bill.
(The true, untold story is that this
really happened to Joan
Collins)
A little boy cut into a golfball
only to be blown up. Seems he
didin't know that a golf ball's
center is a powerful explosive.
Baby alligators flushed into
New York sewers have grown to
Son-of-GodziUa proportions
and occasionally enjoy a good
meal of a stray dog or sewer
By RUSTY HARRINGTON
Sliff Writer
Each week The East Carolinian
will try give you, our readers, a
comprehensive overview of the
entertainment happenings locally
and occasionally to highlight
regional or national events.
The Attic
At the Attic this week there will
be a mixed bag of entertainment
for the first week of school. Kick-
ing off the week, Thursday, the
music of Doug Clark and the Hot
Nuts comes to the Attic stage. Up
and coming national rockers
Wrathchild will add to the usual
excitement on Friday, and speak-
ing of Usual excitement � Sam
Madison and the rest of his crew,
better known as The Usuals, will
bring their 60s tunes to the Attic
to close out the week on Satur-
day.
New Deli
The New Deli will have people
debating which night to go as
they will have some of the finest
in North Carolina's new bands.
Thursday starts the week off with
the Graphic, followed on Friday
by the Bad Checks. Saturday will
feature Raleigh's own, The Con-
nells. Sunday night rounds up
with the rockabilly of the Phan-
toms, who put in quite a show at
last year's Barefoot on the Mall.
Sheraton, Rama da Inn
That brings us to the lounge
lizards � at the Off the Cuff
lounge in the Greenville
Sheraton, the new singles game,
Melt Down, will be the featured
entertainment, while Double Ex-
posure will appear at the Veranda
lounge at the Ramada Inn from
Tuesday through Saturday.
TWs
TW's will feature their long
running hit, the Comedy Zone,
which features national come-
dians on Wednesday, and spear-
ing of long running � The Super
Grit Cowboy band will be ap-
pearing Saturday.
The pick of the week is to take
advantage of the last weekend
before your rights are denied.
Yes, the drinking law goes into
effect September 1. Start the
week off with the Graphic at the
New Deli on Thursday. Their
original tunes will create suffi-
cient momentum (and rumor has
it that the Deli has been stacking
up on Swiss Lowenbrau, which
should put some coal in the
burner). A fitting end to the week
is to blow it out with the Usuals
at the Attic on Saturday � their
orgy of a show should hold you
for a while. Remember to call
clubs to confirm acts and times,
an support live music.
worker.
The aluminum company will
add an extra minute to a child's
time on a dialysis machine for
each soda can's pop top returned.
And there's more:
A Chinese restaurant is forced
to close down because the Health
Department found cat skins and
bodies in the restaurant's gar-
bage.
A lady gives her poodle a bath
and then dries him off in the
microwave oven, causing the
pooch to explode.
A woman takes a bite out of a
piece of fried chicken bought
from a fast-food chain and
discovers she was eating
southern-fried rat.
With snakes dangling from his
body, a screaming swimmer is
pulled from a pond.
Just as vampires and
werewolves become fodder for
the movie industry, modern ur-
ban folk legends are being
adapted to Hollywood. Friday
the Thirteenth, and its endless
series of sequels is the spawn of
the old "hook" story: The
teenage couple are at a lonely
lover's lane. The news comes
over the radio that an insane
killer who has had a hand replac-
ed by a prosthetic "hook" is on
the loose. Suddenly, there is a ter-
rrible "thunka-thunk" as so-
meone tries to break into the car.
The couple escapes to
safetyand discovers a hook in
the door handle.
Similarly, the "Runaway
Grandmother" tale provides a
funny but morbid moment in Na-
tional Lampoon's Vacation and
the baby alligator story was
adapted in the B-minus movie,
Alligator.
Comedians may occasionally
approriate an urban legend for
their routines. Bob Newhart told
of a woman who finds herself
alone in an elevator with a big,
scary man with a big, scary dog.
The doors shut. The man
snapsSit, Lady
The woman falls to her
kneesthen realizes the man was
talking to his dog.
Most of us have swallowed and
will continue to make a steady
diet of urban legends. As a kid, I
regarded the center of a golf ball
as taboo territory breached at
your own risk. I remember trying
to find a Tootsie Pop wrapper
with a complete picture of an In-
dian. I heard this would bring
you luck, but the "actual" story
was that you could ger a free bag
of Tootsie Pops if you returned
the wrapper.
And then there was the tale of
the guy with an enormous afro
who went to the barber shop for a
haircut. As the barber was trim-
ming, he noticed a blackwidow
spider on his scissors. He brushed
it off and continued cutting.
Then he noticed another spider
and another until he discovered
the guy had a nest of black widow
spiders in his hair.
Perhaps our country is a
prime target for a Russian take-
over. In case of such an event, I
suppose we can always go up on
our roofs and drop golf balls on
them.


the unique difference
is now on the air
and accepting applications for
all positions
Deadline: Fri. Aug. 29,5 p.m.
Applications accepted between 11
a.m. & 4 p.m.
Contact Jeff Chester or Scott Hall
for more information
757-6656
Equal Opportunity Employer mfhv
Hot Spots
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MAJOR
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HAVE AVACHC�IA
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Use your Wachovia Banking Card to get
cash or check your balance anytime of
the day or night at Teller IT machines
across North Carolina. Through the
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Location nearest campus: University Office
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at over 12,000 locations across the
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a -�.





THE EAST CAKOLINIAN AUGUST H l-�
n Society
ie brushed
Perhaps our country is a
prime target for a Russian take-
in case of such an event, I
we can always go up on
u � 's aad drop golf balls on
'hem
I II
difference
now on the air
oting applications for
all positions
: Fri. Aug. 29, 5 p.m.
ns accepted between 11
m.
ft Chester or Scott Hall
lore information
"57-6656
� h mplover m f h


re-denta
Psychology majors
id bei razv
c
utrv majors
formula
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Economics majors
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ise their cash flow
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ns across the
jng Card is free
fechovia checking
Just stop by and
inker.
Wachovia
Bank& Trust
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Register to Win
Free Tuition to ECU
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Visit our Delicatessen
Call Ahead for Party Orders
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$1.49
Haiti
QHpm �iiiwi � nnm
n�'M�m�infcrfui�� -
11 �� ttm� mrnm,i00in�





30
THE EAST CAROL IN IAN
AUGUST 26,1916
Exotic Travel Films Bring World To ECU
The Entertainer
If you are well-traveled or if
you've never been out of North
Carolina, then the 1986-1987
Travel Adventure Film Series has
something special for you. From
the wilds of the Him ilayas to the
shores of the Mississippi, this
series offers a fascinating, in-
depth view of many lands and
people. Sponsored by the ECU
Student Union Travel Commit-
tee, each program will begin at 8
p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
The 1986-87 season once again
finds us joining old friends on
new journeys. Jens Bjerre, an
ever-popular guest on the travel
film circuit, returns with
gorgeous footage in "Hunza-
Kingdom of Longevity" on
Thursday, October 9. Deep in
central Asia are Hunza natives
who are 80 plus, look as if they
are in their forties, frequently
become parents again, and are
not familiar with the words
"cancer" and "heart attack
Raphael Green has woven a
fascinating film story of his free-
If You 're Smart
Dogs Are For You
wheeling adventure in China with
"China � A Film Adventure to
Far Cathay This is the first
American travelogue on Com-
munist China and it provides a
truly comprehensive look at the
Chinese people of today. Raphael
Green, having visited China a
great number of times, laces his
dialogues with numerous anec-
dotes. This film presentation is
scheduled for Monday, October
20.
Howard Meyers and his wife,
Lucia Perrigo, capture the au-
dience in a long past era to their
film "Glory on the River on
Monday, November 24, 1986.
From Natchez to New Orleans,
the wealth and prime of America
prospered and our country was
born. Howdee and Lucia, as they
prefer to be called, say, "It didn't
all go with the wind and prove
it with this film that brings to life
a Golden Age, complete with
hoop-skirted belles and cavalier
beaux.
"My Switzerland to be
presented on Monday, January
26, 1987, returns to ECU peren-
nial favorite Ken Richter.
Richter's awards and citations,
including an Academy Award,
are just a small part of the
phenomenal success attributed
him. In this film, Ken Richter
gives a precise account of the sur-
vival of the world's oldest
democracy, accompanied by
beautiful scenery and wonderful-
ly warm people.
The last time Doug Jones
visited Hendrix Theatre, he had
been aboard the Queen Elizabeth
2 on a world cruise and he told us
about the many things he'd seen.
Now he is coming back with the
"Queen Elizabeth 2 Sails
Australia and New Zealand
Doug Jones will describe in depth
the amazing contrasts which exist
between the two lands with his
award-winning photography on
Wednesday, February 18, 1987.
The finale will be "The Orient
Express � Paris to Istanbul" on
Thursday, March 19, 1987.
Kathleen Dusek, the presenter
and film-maker, made her first
appearance at Mendenhall during
the 1984 season. With her return,
she will bring outstanding
footage from a train ride with a
glory unsurpassed � you will en-
joy the sights of Europe and the
countries behind the Iron Curtain
as you roar along toward the
shimmering minarets of Istanbul
Asia, North America, Europe,
the Far East, and
Australiathese are yours. The
Travel-Adventure Film Series re-
mains one of the best shows at
one of the most reasonable prices
in town.
ByEDTOSHACH
Staff WrtUr
Sometimes in college, when
you're so busy with exams, you
want a friend who will show you
unconditional affection � a
friend smart enough to play with
you, but also a friend that you
can look down on simply because
you have opposable thumbs. Get
a dog.
Cats are too distant. You get to
ride horses, but a horse won't
sleep at the foot of your bed. Try
to wrestle with your mouse, rat or
gerbil and you'll be digging a tiny
grave before you know it. In-
deed, there are many reasons why
the dog � not the cat, the horse,
Cybil Shepard or a '57 Chevy �
is man's best friend.
Dogs are great. They're friend-
ly, loyal and they serve more pur-
poses than a cuisinart.
To name a few:
Dogs are companions. Cons-
tant Companions. They stare you
down while you eat, they roll
around on the newspaper you've
just laid out to read.
Dogs are alarm clocks. If your
bedside buzzer doesn't go off you
can always count on Fido to stick
his nose down your throat at 4:30
a.m.
Dogs provide security. A dog is
a fiery protector of his territory.
He will protect you from such
menaces as mailmen, garbage
men, and repairmen. If,
however, a psychopathic axe-
murderer drops by, the dog will
join you in the closet.
Dogs are quiescent, seldom
destructive. You will be amazed
at the quiescence and seldom-
destructiveness of a dog when
compared to say, the detonation
of a small thermonuclear device.
Dogs are artistic. Believe it.
The average dog can transform
two cups of Alpo over night into
30 pounds of abstract sculpture.
If there is somewhere in your
house you don't want abstract
art, just put newspaper there.
Dogs will avoid creating their
works of art on the paper at all
costs. Your canine friend will
probably excel in other arts
besides sculpture. Within an
hour, even a small Chihuahua
with a broken leg can turn the
contents of a dumpster into three
acres of environmental art.
Dogs are heroic, loyal, and
they don't listen to Prince. And
the best ones are free, so if you
have been sold on the idea of hav-
ing a dog, go down to the Animal
Shelter and pick one out. Mine's
not for sale.
If you didn't get your copies at
KINKO'S
you paid too much
COPIES
2'2
j 8' i � II while ?0 atilo led
. i until Sept. I
VI -
?
Wintfrl
a si
D D
Kmi UcOenkT(
EuCmhiMm,
Monday - Friday
7:00am-10:00pm
321E 10th St Saturday
752-0875 9:00am - 6:00pm
Welcome Back Pirates
THIS PICTURE'S BEEN
MISSING SOMETHING

f k 3?

Its
For lunch, Sunday buffet, or dinner.
The Arbor is one of the most tasteful
restaurants in town
We made ALL YOU CAN EAT
Dinner Specials Famous.
Wed. Shrimp & Chablis$10.95
Thurs. Crab Legs & Chablis$12.5
Fn & Sat. Your choice of our 3 specials$12.95
Prime Kib & Burgandy$12 95
Sunday Buffet $6.95
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ImKJiJrjF. 756-27
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Friday and Saturday Nights
10:00 p.m2:00 a.m.
SCHEDULE HOURLY
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Cannon Court12 after hour
Eastbrook14 after hour
River Bluff19 after hour
Kings Row26 after hour
Village Greene30 after hour
'Departure for last round will be at IS minutes after the
hour.
��No beverages or food may be consumed on the bus.
PURPLE SCHEDULE
(7:30 a.m5:30 p.m.)
PLACE DEPARTS
SpeightOn the Hour
Univ. Cond5 after hour
Cannon Court6 after hour
Eastbrook7 after hour
River Bluff10 after hour
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(Mon-Fri 6:30 a.m7 p.m Sat. 9 a.m6
p.m.)
PLACE DEPARTS
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1st St. (Wilson Acres)18 after hour
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Overtoil's Supermarket22 after hour
GOLD SCHEDULE
(7:30 a.m9:30 p.m.)
PLACE DEPARTS
MingesOnthe hour
Allied Health3 after hour
�Greenville Square5 after hour
�Pitt Plaza6 after hour
��Hargett Drugs10 after hour
Mendenhall20 after hour
10th and College Hill25 after hour
College Hill26 after hour
MingesOn half hour
Allied Health27 till hour
�Greenville Square25 till hour
�Pitt Plaza24 till hour
��Hargett Drug20 till hour
Mendenhall10 till hour
10th and College Hill .5 till hour
College Hill4 till hour
�Bus schedule includes shopping centers only between the
hours of 3:30 p.m9:30 p.m M-Th.
��Bus schedule includes Hargett Drugs only between the
hours of 7:30 a.m3:30 p.m M-F.
BICYUe
90S
INC
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Schwinn
TREK
Raleigh
Earth Cruisers
Peugeot
Complete Repair
Service
Register for
FREE BIKE
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Large selection
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SiO Cotanchr St.
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m-mt
ECU
ECU
� Bur eab
For most people the blue
marlin is a wall trophy displayed
in seafood restaurants and tackle
shops, but for sportsmen who
hunt the marlin and its billfish
cousins, the sailfish and sword-
fish, a trophy catch can be more
than a trophy. It can be big bucks
as well.
Hundreds of thousands of
dollars are awarded each year to
those who catch these big fish in
marlin tournaments held around
the world, according to Dr. John
R. Maiolo, an ECU sociologist
who is studying the recreational
billfish industry. In one tourna-
ment alone, Maiolo said, prize
money totaled SSO.OOO.
But before trading in the old
bass boat on a larger off-shore
model, fishermen should con-
sider some other findings in a
study by Maiolo for the South
Atlantic Fisheries Management
Council. Marlin tournament
fishing, despite its rich prizes, is
not a get-rich sport.
Consider first that a top-of-
the-line boat will cost a million
dollars or more. Then comes the
cost for boat maintenance and
salaries for a crew. Add to these
expenses the cost of entering a
tournament. This cost can be &s
much as S5.000 that each b
must pay as an entry fee Then
consider the possibility that some
boats, their owners and crew ma
spend hours, days, without ca
ching anything.
So why do it? That's one of the
questions Maiolo is trying to
answer. Other questions include
who's doing it and how much
pressure these fishermen are exer-
ting on the billfish stocks.
Answers to these questions -
be used to establish management
regulations that will protect both
the fish and this multi-million
dollar recreational industry.
Commercial Market
Billfish are not deliberate
caught by commercial fishermen
in U.S. waters. The problem.
"I
f i
� j
I
Lunch Menu M
11:00 A.M
f
We
Bull's
SALAD BAR &
if rwo (2) people prefer to
Salad. Potato, and Bread
Cow's
T-Bor
Sirion
RibEv
Includes all the
Bevera
Soft Drinks
Iced Tea -
Greenvilll
- r
� ifxaimi
mmt
� � i ��nwiiiiiiii
mmmmmmmm
!MMMiMH�i
'�IJI If Up





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 29. 1986
31
oECU
Jones
ne had
Ihzabeth
told us
I'd seen.
th the
Sails
Hand
n depth
:h exist
ith his
hv on
1987.
Orient
' on
1987.
leNenter
and film-maker, made her first
appearance at Mendenhall during
the 1984 season. With her return,
she will bring outstanding
footage from a train ride with a
glory unsurpassed � you will en-
joy the sights of Europe and the
countries behind the Iron Curtain
as you roar along toward the
shimmering minarets of Istanbul.
Asia, North America, Europe,
the Far East, and
Australiathese are yours. The
Travel Adventure Film Series re-
mains one of the best shows at
one of the most reasonable prices
in town.
me Buck Pirates
"TORE'S BEEN
SOMETHING
m

j
s You!
iy buffet, ur dinner.
�' ' th most tasteful
I � town
LL YOU CAN EAT
specials Famous.
$10.95
$12.95
$12.95
$12.95
$6.95
Ramada Inn
64 By Pass
756-2792
u
ers
Book packs
Skate Boards
arge selection
VtSA
ECU Professor Studies Martin Fishermen
ECU News Bureau
For most people the blue
marhn is a wall trophy displayed
in seafood restaurants and tackle
shops, but for sportsmen who
hunt the marlin and its billfish
cousins, the sailfish and sword-
fish, a trophy catch can be more
than a trophy. It can be big bucks
as well.
Hundreds of thousands of
dollars are awarded each year to
those who catch these big fish in
marlin tournaments held around
the world, according to Dr. John
R. Maiolo, an ECU sociologist
who is studying the recreational
billfish industry. In one tourna-
ment alone, Maiolo said, prize
money totaled $750,000.
But before trading in the old
bass boat on a larger off-shore
model, fishermen should con-
sider some other findings in a
study by Maiolo for the South
Atlantic Fisheries Management
Council. Marlin tournament
fishing, despite its rich prizes, is
not a get-rich sport.
Consider first that a top-of-
!he-line boat will cost a million
dollars or more. Then comes the
cost for boat maintenance and
salaries for a crew. Add to these
expenses the cost of entering a
tournament. This cost can be as
much as $5,000 that each boat
must pay as an entry fee. Then
consider the possibility that some
boats, their owners and crew may
spend hours, days, without cat-
ching anything.
So why do it? That's one of the
questions Maiolo is trying to
answer. Other questions include
who's doing it and how much
pressure these fishermen are exer-
ting on the billfish stocks.
Answers to these questions will
be used to establish management
regulations that will protect both
the fish and this multi-million
dollar recreational industry.
Commercial Market
Billfish are not deliberately
caught by commercial fishermen
in U.S. waters. The problem,
however, is that billfish often get
hooked by commercial
fishermen, primarily those
fishing for tuna and swordfish
using a technique called long-
lining. The method involves set-
ting long lines across the water
with baited hooks set at intervals
along the line. Tuna comprise
most of the catch but billfish are
caught too.
Recently enacted laws require
that all billfish taken by the tuna
fishermen must be thrown back
even if they are dead. Fishery in-
spectors also examine the catches
by the commercial tuna boats to
insure that no billfish are taken.
"We know about the pressure
placed on billfish by the commer-
cial fishermen, primarily the
Japanese and domestic tuna
fishermen, who fish within 200
miles of the U.S. shoreline said
Maiolo. "We know that a lot of
pressure comes from this com-
mercial side. What we don't
know is how much pressure is put
on that fishery from recreational
fishermen specifically in regard
to these big tournaments and
other billfish fishing he said.
"That's why we've been given
a contract to study these tour-
naments and the people who par-
ticipate in them he said.
Sport Of Kings
The key to the marlin tourna-
ment fishing, observed by
Maiolo, is a simple, four-letter
word: r-i-c-h. In one recent tour-
nament, Maiolo recorded on
videotape a processional of
brightly colored and lavishly-
equipped fishing vessels as they
paraded through an inlet into the
open sea. "That's $50,000,000
worth of boats he said. And on
board each vessel is an owner,
himself a millionaire. Like a golf
or tennis pro, some will travel the
circuit entering tournament after
tournament from the mid-
Atlantic United States to
Venezuela.
"It is really a sport of kings
said Maiolo. It's a sport that re-
quires a king's ransom to play.
First there is the cost of the boat,
its maintenance, and the salaries
for a crew all of which can range
into the hundreds of thousands
of dollars. In most tournaments,
entry fees can be $500 to $5,000
with operating costs as high as
$2,000 a day.
Of course, a lot of money can
be won, too. In the big money
tournaments there are events call-
ed Calcuttas in which each boat
antes an amount of money for
each day of the tournament.
Whoever catches the biggest fish
of the day and the tournament
wins the cash.
In one tournament, held last
spring in the Bahamas, the daily
prize was $10,000 and the grand
prize for the biggest catch was
$35,000. "Obviously the person
who won the grand prize won a
daily prize too and went home
with $45,000. And I found out
that's nothing said Maiolo. "I
may go to a tournament where it
is winner-take-all with a $5,000
Calcutta per boat and $750,000
first place he said.
At tournaments such as these,
Maiolo meets incredibly wealthy
people with million dollar sport
fishing boats. He was on one
boat that had just been delivered
in the Bahamas at a price of
$1,150,000.
The Marlin Sportsman
In addition to the strictly tour-
nament fishermen, there is
another class of marlin
fishermen, according to Maiolo.
They are only out there for the
sport. "They have older and less
expensive boats and while they
catch the fish they release them
afterwards he said.
This group conducts very ex-
WGHB
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ECU
Featuring:
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? Insight for Living with Chuck Swindoll
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elusive tournaments, by invita-
tion only, and they don't allow
Calcuttas. Any prize money that
is offered goes to the captain and
the crew.
"There is a real distinction bet-
ween the two groups said
Maiolo. He said the real high
See ELITE, page 32
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Lunch Menu Monday-Friday
11:00 A.M2:00 P.M.
Menu
We serve USDA Choice Beef that is always fresh and exit daily.
Bull's Cut 10 95
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Banquet Facilities Available
& DINNER MENU
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& Welcome to Riverside Steak Bar. W� offer to you � unique din-
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mm Ail dinners include afl the Salad. Potatoes, and Bread you care to
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Country Style Steak
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(Served SunThurs. 5-9 p.m.)
French Fries
Cole Slaw
Cabbage
Mashed Potatoes
Com
Green Beena
Boiled Potatoes
Collards
Beets
Apple Sauce
BS
(Meets vegetables subject to change daily)
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Choice of 44 Moats 4 64 Vegetables Daily
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Fried Chicken
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it

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c





32
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 29,1986
Elite Group Of Fishermen Hold Superstitions I Unkn
Continued from page 31
status marlin fishermen belong in
the second group.
Both groups comprise an
assortment of interesting people
including industrialists, oilmen,
road pavers, large construction
and chain store owners. "They
represent the real entrepreneurial
class of American society said
Maiolo.
He said many of the people he
has interviewed are retired and
are 45 or 50 years old. They par-
ticipate in about 10 to 25 tour-
naments a year. "1 met one
young man who is 23 years old
and he has already decided that
his livelihood is going to be from
tournaments he said. Many of
the younger people, active in
tournament fishing, are seeking
sponsors that will allow them to
be professionals.
"They are all very nice
people said Maiolo. "Most of
them just happen to be rich
Getting Hooked on Marlin
"We're trying to get a profile
of who the people are and how
they got into recreational fishing
and tournament competition
said Maiolo. "We also want to
know what keeps them there
He has observed a socialization
process in which most people are
either conscripted into tourna-
ment fishing or are accidentally
brought into it. "In many cases a
person will go out for the first
time with somebody else and with
a little luck they will hook and
even catch a marlin Maiolo
said. "That's all it takes for some
people. It seems that when you
get a hook into a marlin and
watch it jump then you are hook-
ed yourself he said.
Once the urge to catch marlin
gets into a person it becomes in-
toxicating. "Some people will go
to great lengths to mortgage
themselves to get the boats said
Maiolo.
It usually takes about two
years for the fishermen to calm
down. In some cases the love af-
fair with marlin fishing will end
completely, which creates a lot of
turnover among tournament
fishermen.
Maiolo speculates that one
reason for the turnover may be
because the people involved are
"very high-powered individuals
and they get bored easily For
example, Maiolo was told by a
captain of a tournament boat
that the worst thing that could
happen to a new fishermen would
be to enter a tournament and
catch the biggest fish. The
fishermen will think there's
nothing to it and will look for
something more challenging.
The other reason for the high
turnover is that some people
begin with very high expecta-
tions. When they don't catch a
lot of fish, they exit.
He says that this is why the
selection of the captain and crew
is very important. "There has got
to be a chemistry there where
these guys can work together for
long periods of time. The captain
has to be subservient to the owner
but be forceful enough to do
what he thinks has to be done
he said.
Lucky Boats
Over the long run, captains
who don't catch fish don't last.
But on the other hand the boats
that do catch fish may last a long
time. The industry has a tradition
� call it superstition � that im-
plies that the boat itself con-
tributes to the successful fisher-
man's ability to catch fish. In
fact, the reputation of a boat may
be held in as high esteem as the
reputation of a successful cap-
tain.
"These superstitions among
fishermen are incredible said
Maiolo. He says that some boat
owners will refuse to sell a boat
even if they need to and can af-
ford a bigger one because they
believe the boat catches fish. It
may be the sound of the engines
that does it or the way the boat
rolls or takes a wave.
"They think, and I'm not de-
nying it, that the way the boat
heaves and rolls affects the way
the bait is pulled and that catches
fish Maiolo said.
An owner of a boat told
Maiolo that he was finally selling
his boat because it was getting
dangerous and he wanted to do
more fishing in Venezuela. But
the owner regretted having to sell
the vessel because he was sure
that it contributed to his success
as a fisherman. The boat was
listed for $100,000 over its
market value and was advertised
as a boat that catches fish.
Trends
Catching fish is easier to talk
about than to do especially in the
south Atlantic waters where
fishermen are having to work
long hours to hook a marlin.
Some fishermen blame the com-
mercial boats for the scarcity of
billfish but are hopeful that new
governmental regulations, now in
effect for commercial boats, will
increase billfish stocks. Mean-
while, Maiolo agrees with some
fisherv bioloaists who theorize
See MARLIN, page 33
ELLIE'S
Ladies Fashions & Mens Sportswear
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED
Why not coma by the REAL Crisis Intervention Center 312 E.
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in order to assist you in virtually any problem area you might heve.
Our longstanding goel hes ahveys been to preserve and enhence
the quality of life for you and our community.
Lic�nsd And Accr4tt�l By Th� Stata o4 North Carolina
Clearance Sale
If You Like Something
Different at affordable
prices come and see us.
Summer sale items
reduced for quick
clearance.
Jeans �Sweaters �Dresses
Shorts �Pants
While You Were Away
PARA D l
Came To Greenville!
Show Your Student ID & Get A
10
DISCOUNT
On All Services & Products!
This offer good until September 30. 1986
Drop by and see
our beautiful new shop . . .
Greenville's Newest, Most Unique
Beauty Center!
Stylists:
Petey Hathaway
Lisa Brann
Lisa Wright Burns
Tina Getsinger
Trudy Barber
Kay Pase
Denise Hinnant
Mercedes Rivera
'�
i d
206 E. 10th St.
Greenville
PEELER'S
Sports and Trophies
OWNTOWN
758-3996
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Selection to Choose
From
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AND TROPHIES
210 East 5th Street
Greenville, NC
758-3996
MONDAY:
MEXICAN MADNESS
FREE NACHO BAR 10 PAA UNTIL
.75 DRAFT �3.50 PITCHERS � 1.99 MARGARITAS
TUESDAY:
BEACH NIGHT
1.67 WINE SPECIAL � 1.50 HOUSE HIGHBALLS
HAWAIIAN PUNCH . . . 2.95
GIFTS SUPPLIED FROM HAWAIIAN TROPIC
WEDNESDAY:
RIBTACULAR 5-9 PM
ALLL YOU CAN EAT BEEF RIBS . . . 7.95
INCLUDES SALAD, POTATO AND BREAD
BOSTON TEA PARTY
LONG ISLAND TEA . . . 2.95
THURSDAY:
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3.50 PITCHER � .75 DRAFT � 1.67 WINE SPECIAL
FRIDAY:
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CINNAMONPEPPERMINTAPPLERASPBERRY
& PEACH SCHNAPPS FOR 1.50
SATURDAY:
SOURS & COLLINS FOR 1.99
SUNDAY:
.99 DRINK SPECIAL
SLOE GIN FIZZS � BLOODY MARYS
MIMOSA � CHAMPAGNE � SCREWDRIVERS
BELGRADE. Yugoslavia
� Esther Raab wa- among 30
Jews who escaped from j
death camp of Sobibor m P. I
in 1943. Sr.e figured m
:tr to get a bullet .
get into a ga
Now Raab. 64. is
from her New Jerse h n
vise on a three-
film ba-ed on the
stor of the � ggc
revolt and escape dui ; g w
War II in Europe
�"Escape fr - Sobibor j
filmed outside Be .
scheduled to -
nex: sprinj
showcase pre t
a boot the sarr
Richard R .
directed b Jack
elude- AJai V� Rutj
and Joanna P.
"Some people -a the Nai
were slaughtering the Jew- . j
sheep said Raab
N.J. "The Jem
resist ej
l i i.
world the Jew.
dea . eep h S
Jews defeated
the rare hand
Hitler' Nai
Sobibor extern -
oni for Jew- � nea
eastern Poland
"final solution to
question
About 250.000 Jew
Poland. He. and, B
France. Czech :loval
other European . .
sent to death in Sobifc
Oct. 14. 1943. when - 60
remaining inmates t e i
rebellion and killed n
15 Nazis in charge
About 300 of the inmate
their way to freedom - j
are still alive today.
Martin A re
Endangered
By Fishing
Continued from page 32
that the marlin is a nigrai
specie; that may have migrated I
other parts of the world
"You could spend three
jn U.S. waters in the south A
tic and get one hookup. It doesn
mean you are going to catch th
fish, just that you have
it he said.
But off the coast of Vene2 le
fishermen are getting : . e tc
-10 hookups a da. He sa
fishermen will enter tourr
�for the social structure ai
iglamor but when they realh
$o catch fish they'll go spend a
week off Venezuela.
Another trend, affecting
ifcillfish industrv, thai m
ifishermen are releasing the fis
ihe catch. "Most people
3cill a marlin unless it is in a
Atrophy class Maioio said He
jsaid more tournaments are en-
couraging catch and release oi
jare offering catch and release
ftions. Many tournament are a -
Requiring minimum weights
ahe fish that compete for d
pnzes.
I "I also wouldn't be surprised
-Ito see a bag limit established
twithin the next couple of ye�rs
tMaiolo said. He emphasized
fthe bag limn would on! affect
�the fishermen who kill everything
Ithev catch.
fResearch Data
In gathering his data. Maic
has attended tournaments in the
Bahamas. St. Thomas. Pu
Rico, Maryland, Florida and
INorth Carolina. He plans to at-
jtend events in Louisiana, Texas
land Venezuela in the summer and
Ifall. From these tournaments he
is compiling a profile on the
marlin fisherman that will help
(fishery managers determine if
and how regulations should be
applied to the industrv.
Marlin fishing may be the sport
of kings but it is also a sport that
pumps millions of dollars into
boat building and into maritime
fishing and resort communities.
Because of this, the ECU
sociologist and the South Atlan-
i tic Fishery Management Council
(believe it is an industrv worth
their study and protection.

�HllJIW�H��
�' �t iirgjaj





rstitions
re governmental regulations, now in
k effect for commercial boats, will
increase billfish stocks. Mean-
while, Maiolo agrees with some
fishery biolocists who theorize
t See MARLIN, page 33
Were A way
PISE
Greenville!
dent ID & Get A
�o
IOUNT
es & Products!
t September 30. 1986
and see
new shop . . .
est. Most Unique
Center!

Ms
s
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r7
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D I S E
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Step Out in Style
ivd. Greenville 756-1579
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ss
UNTIL
MARGARITAS
HIGHBALLS
2.95
AN TROPIC
M
BS . . . 7.95
D BREAD
TY
2.95
NE SPECIAL
VRASPBERRY
1.50
R 1.99
L
IAAARYS
WDRIVERS
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26. 1986
33
Unknown Death Camp Targeted In Expose
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia (UPI)
� Esther Raab was among 300
Jews who escaped from the Nazi
death camp of Sobibor in Poland
in 1943. She figured it was "bet-
ter to get a bullet in the back than
get into a gas chamber
Now Raab, 64, is in Yugoslavia
from her New Jersey home to ad-
vise on a three-hour television
film based on the little-known
story of the biggest prisoner
revolt and escape during World
War II in Europe.
"Escape from Sobibor being
filmed outside Belgrade, is
scheduled to be shown on CBS
next spring in a Chrysler
showcase presentation. Based on
a book of the same name by
Richard Rashke, the film is being
directed by Jack Gold and in-
cludes Alan Arkin, Rutger Hauer
and Joanna Paula in the cast.
"Some people say the Nazis
were slaughtering the Jews like
sheep said Raab, of Vineland,
N.J. "The Jews allegedly never
resisted.
"This film should tell the
world the Jews did not go to
death like sheep. In Sobibor, the
Jews defeated the Nazis with
their bare hands
Hitler's Nazis set up the
Sobibor extermination camp �
only for Jews � near Lublin in
eastern Poland as part of the
"final solution to the Jewish
question
About 250,000 Jews from
Poland, Holland, Belgium,
France, Czechoclovakia and
other European countries were
sent to death in Sobibor until
Oct. 14, 1943, when all the 600
remaining inmates rose in
rebellion and killed most of the
15 Nazis in charge of the camp.
About 300 of the inmates made
their way to freedom. About 20
are still alive today.
Marlin Are
Endangered
By Fishing
Continued from page 32
that the marlin is a migratory
species that may have migrated to
other parts of the world.
"You could spend three days
jn U.S. waters in the south Atlan-
tic and get one hookup. It doesn't
mean you are going to catch the
fish, just that you have hooked
it he said.
But off the coast of Venezuela
Tishermen are getting from five to
10 hookups a day. He says the
fishermen will enter tournaments
for the social structure and
glamor but when they really want
to catch fish they'll go spend a
week off Venezuela.
Another trend, affecting the
billfish industry, is that more
fishermen are releasing the fish
they catch. "Most people will not
kill a marlin unless it is in a
trophy class Maiolo said. He
-said more tournaments are en-
couraging catch and release or
are offering catch and release op-
tions. Many tournaments are also
requiring minimum weights for
the fish that compete for daily
prizes.
"I also wouldn't be surprised
to see a bag limit established
within the next couple of years
Maiolo said. He emphasized that
the bag limit would only affect
the fishermen who kill everything
they catch.
Research Data
In gathering his data, Maiolo
has attended tournaments in the
Bahamas, St. Thomas, Puerto
Rico, Maryland, Florida and
North Carolina. He plans to at-
tend events in Louisiana, Texas
and Venezuela in the summer and
fall. From these tournaments he
is compiling a profile on the
: marlin fisherman that will help
fishery managers determine if
and how regulations should be
applied to the industry.
Marlin fishing may be the sport
of kings but it is also a sport that
I pumps millions of dollars into
boat building and into maritime
fishing and resort communities.
. Because of this, the ECU
j sociologist and the South Atlan-
� tic Fishery Management Council
1 believe it is an industry worth
their study and protection.
Sobibor was the "most con-
cealed death camp in Europe
Raab said as the film crew and
some 600 extras shot scenes of the
escape.
Immediately after the revolt,
the Nazis closed and dismantled
Sobibor in an attempt to
obliterate all traces of it. It re-
mains little known outside
Poland.
Raab, who was 21 then, said
she would like a new memorial
monument built at Sobibor.
"People who risked their lives
to fight the Nazis should be
recognized she said. "I'm do-
ing this for those people who did
not make it
Thomas "Tiovi" Blatt, 58, of
Santa Barbara, California, also
came to Yugoslavia as consultant
on the film. Blatt was 15 at the
time of the escape.
"Little kids played a big part in
organizing the revolt he said in
an interview. "We were
messengers and guards watching
to see that the Germans didn't
surprise the revolt organizers.
"Many of the inmates, in-
cluding captured Soviet soldiers
� all Jews, of course � were
armed with homemade and stolen
weapons. They killed the Ger-
mans one by one.
"When we rushed through the
gate I saw people blown up by
mines in front of me. People were
leaping on the bodies to avoid the
mines buried around the camp.
"I ran and fell, ran and fell un-
til I reached a forest. There were
about 50 inmates in a group when
I reached the trees Blatt said.
"We did not know where to
go, but we knew we had to run as
far and as fast as possible from
Sobibor. At that time I wanted to
be a cat, a bird, anything that was
moving around freely, but not a
Jew. The Nazis were around
looking for Jews
Raab and Blatt both remained
hidden from the Nazis until the
end of the war in 1945 and
emigrated to the United States in
the 1950s.
Raab said she and her husband
have been "very successful" in
America in running a chicken
plant. They have two sons and
five grandchildren. Blatt owns a
Santa Barbara auto stereo and
mobile electronics shop.
"The film should make known
worldwide the truth of the
Sobibor death camp and the
Jewish revolt against the Nazis
Blatt said.
WELCOME
BACK
We're glad you're back. And we
hope you'll come check out our
new look.
That's right. WENDY'S on
Tenth Street has been remodeled
so we can serve you better.
Remember, you also can visit us
on Greenville Boulevard or
Memorial Drive. Enjoy our
delicious hamburgers, garden fresh
salads, hot stuffed baked potatoes,
Crispy Chicken Nuggets, chili or a
Frosty.
So, come see us, and welcome
back.
502 E. Tenth St
103 Greenville Blvd.
624 S. Memorial Dr.

HAMBTJBeEBS.J
Open 'til Midnight
Friday and Saturday
11 p.m. Sunday-Thurs.
" �" vi��hp'
im"�
� H I 1 Bl ��� m n m m i
� i
Qj





34
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26, 1986

HmimimmHimum
?E
hue
:
Welcome Back Students & Faculty
��'
�Al-SSSS
W


Visit Overtoil's Shopping Center
Home of
Overtoil's Supermarket
Kerr Drugs &
Overtoil's University Laundromat
2�W5
oviw
�tto5Z
o

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� 5
crtfev
V So f?�

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tftf


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c�1

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tec1
N
jO
$
�vKort'
Ate1 at Overton 's
Greenville's Freshest
Salad Bar
Ifs cool, crisp, & satisfying!
Have a snack or make a meal!
Choose from over 60 rotating
salad items, including the
freshest fruits, meats, &
vegetables; cheeses, tasty
dressings (Regular & Lo-Cal),
plus pasta salads & MORE!
All for Only
per lb.
Also Try Our HOT FOOD
Choose from several varieties
daily (prices vary)
� LASAGNA
� CHICKEN & PASTRY
� MACARONI & CHEESE
� HOT SOUP
All are HOT & READY to eat! Take-out only!
COMING SOON
Subs, Sandwiches,
& Hot Dinners
plus
Fruit, Meat, &
Vegetable Trays
Salad Bar
10 a.m8 p.m. Mon-Sat
1 p.m6 p.m. Sundays
offers 5 service which includes
enlargement and reduction capabilities
FF
m

mH
i:
B
s
STORE HOURS
8 a.m8 p.m. Monday-Saturday
1 p.m6 p.m. Sundays
�4r

i
Shop Overton's � We Care About ECU
& The Pirates
i
i
i
i
i
MOUNTAIN DEW,
DIET PEPSI &
PEPSI COLA
2 liter bottle
99
NO LIMIT!
LAY'S REGULAR
POTATO CHIPS
7 oz bag
99 �
BUD LIGHT or
BUDWEISER BEER
6 pack � 12 oz. cans
OVERTON'S 5 DISCOUNT COUPON
Present coupon to cashier at time of purchase
to receive 5 discount on purchases of $10.00
or more. Good for ECU students and faculty
only. Limit one discount per I.D. .
I.D.
Amount of Purchase
r�-
1 1 111 3
5

9w mvpOYIRTOICI

1
Sheridanl
In this, the first edition of
fall, the sports staff previews
11 Pirate opponents on 'be 19
schedule in order. See the insil
pages of the sports section for t
remaining 10 teams.
By SCOTT COOPER
ECU will battle a brand n
N.C. State Wolfpack team
their season opener on Sept.
head coach Dick Shend
jo took Furman to the Divisit)
l-AA national champions!
le (losing to Ga. SouthcJ
-42),has brought a new look
,

p
&
&4t
$

OVERTON'S
siM
f, 1
ThWA
EDEEE
JmMJ
OB
Walker p�ts the hard
� 33-14 ECU trhiMph m
����� ��� �nW �� � - � �� i,i� p ,1 i i � avof ���iiii� mm,IWimmmmHtmntm1m'1"1 � � �� � �
- �� -0 .1. lfc,���i- ��.�
om i���-H 1 in iiiWit
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MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMm
Ity
THE EAST CAROi INI AN
Sports

AUGUST 26, 1986 Page 35
er
at
s Freshest
, & satisfying!
r make a meal!
ver 60 rotating
including the
s, meats, &
heeses, tasty
(ular & Lo-Cal),
ds & MORE!
per lb.
Bar
km. Mon-Sat
m. Sundays
HOURS
ionday-Saturday
m. Sundays
Gci on the BOAT
Sheridan's Wolfpack: A New Image, Attitude
In this, the first edition of the NCSU fonthaii in.h.H;� O 1 ��
IGHT or
EISER BEER
12 oz. cans
In this, the first edition of the
fall, the sports staff previews all
II Pirate opponents on the 1986
schedule in order. See the inside
Pages of the sports section for the
remaining 10 teams.
By SCOTT COOPER
ECU will battle a brand new
N.C. State Wolfpack team in
'heir season opener on Sept. 6.
New head coach Dick Sheridan,
who took Furman to the Division
I-AA national championship
game (losing to Ga. Southern
44-2),has brought a new look to
NCSU football, including new
uniforms, a new offense, a new
defense and a new coaching staff.
"We made some progress in
the spring Sheridan said, "but
it's still very difficult to say how
effective we're going to be
Sheridan, who ranks seventh
nationally in winning percentage
among active college coaches
(69-23-2, a .745 mark), would
like his Wolfpack to avenge last
year's 33-14 loss to the Pirates.
Despite the numerous changes
surrounding the Wolfpack foot-
ball program, there are some
48
positive returners at some key
positions. Perhaps the most
notable returnee is senior all-
ACC signal caller Erik Kramer.
In his first NCSU season,
Kramer established himself in the
ACC and the nation as well. The
JUCO transfer set school marks
in yards passing (2,510), total of-
fense (2,252) and touchdown
passes (16).
Kramer, in his final campaign,
should re-write the Wolfpack
record books. Behind Kramer is a
pair of talented youngsters. Red-
shirt freshman Cam Young and
sophomore Joe Hollowell have
both shown promise in spring
drills, but are both untested.
Joining Kramer in the
Wolfpack backfield is tailback
Frank Harris, who was N.C.
State's top returning rusher after
transferring from Snow Junior
College. Harris will split time
with Junior Bobby Crumpler.
Crumpler made the switch from
defensive back to tailback during
the spring. Two freshmen, Troy
Russell and Jim Lowe, have
shown promise and should cer-
tainly provide depth at the
tailback slot.
At the fullback position, a trio
of returners will try to replace the
departed Ricky Isom. Junior
Larry Dodd was the leader at spr-
ing practice and is likely to get the
nod, but sophomores Mai Crite
and Steve Salley will also be in
the battle for the starting job in
'86.
The passing game looks bright
as Kramer's aerial attack should
have a full arsenal of recievers.
Two juniors, Mack Jones and
Nasrallah Worthen, give NCSU
an exciting pair of flankers.
Jones averaged 25.3 yards on
seven catches, while trackster
Wothen was at 19.4 for 26 grabs
in '85. Sophomore Keith
Welborne. at 5-5, could also find
playing time.
The split end situation is a bit
See N.C. STATE, page 37
Cross Country Squad
New Sport For ECU
Crunch!
Inc
Kevla
ytw't
Walkw pad Ike kard HI oo Suit's Haywood Jeffrie la tail
33-14 ECU trianpk la RaMgk.
Domino's
Award
Announced
The East Carolinian and
Domino's Pizza will be choos-
ing an Athlete of the Month
beginning with the month of
September.
The selected individual must
be an ECU student par-
ticipating in an ECU sport. The
athlete will receive a plaque
from Domino's Pizza in
recognition of hisher ac-
complishments.
The winning recipient will be
announced in the first edition
of the new month. The sports
staff will vote on the award and
I coaches are asked to send in
player nominations.
By TIM CHANDLER
SorUrt�r
East Carolina University is ad-
ding a new sport to it's fall slate
this year. For the first time in 15
years there will be a men's cross
country team and for the first
time ever, ECU will field a
women's cross country squad.
The coach of the cross country
teams will be John Welborn, a
long-time member of the Pirate
athletic staff.
Welborn has called for a
special organizational meeting
for all interested ECU students.
The meeting is scheduled for to-
day (Tuesday) at 3 p.m. in room
142 at Minges Coliseum.
Welborn stated that any stu-
dent who would like to try out for
either the men's or women's team
should try to attend the meeting
this afternoon. Students who
cannot attend the introductory
meeting but still want to try out
should contact Welborn or assis-
tant coach Steve Thomas at
752-6253.
Welborn said that the cross
country teams will be strictly
walk-on programs this year,
however, he hopes to build a
foundation this year and hopeful-
ly get stronger in future years.
"I don't feel that we will have
a real strong team this year said
Welborn. "We are hoping to
start a foundation this year that
we can build on in the future.
"We will start out with a walk-
on program and do the best we
can and have fun added
Welborn.
The men's and women's cross
country teams will compete in the
same events. A tentative schedule
for both teams is listed below.
Sept. 6
Sept. 13
Sept. 20
Sept. 27
Oct. 4
Oct. 11
Oct. 16
Oct. 25
Nov. 1
Nov. 8
DATE EVENT
Campbell Univ. Invitational
Pembroke College Invitational
Seahawk Cross Country Invit.
Univ. Of Richmond Invitational
OPEN
Methodist College Invitational
The State IntercoUegeiate Cross
Country Championships
VCU Invitational
UNC-W Cross Country Relays
CAA Championships
V
ECU
Gridders
Profiled
By SPORTS STAFF
The 1986 edition of the East
Carolina Pirate football team
once again faces some of the
toughest competition in the na-
tion. Even after a disappointing
2-9 campaign last season, head
coach Art Baker is hopeful that
his second edition of Pirate grid-
ders will make a turn for the bet-
ter.
"I'm optimistic about our
football team this fall, yet you
have to realistic considering our
youth, inexperience and formida-
ble schedule Baker said.
"Coming back from the spring
we are in pretty good shape. We
are better than we were last year
� from a team-depth
satndpoint
As for the competition, ECU
takes on the country's finest, in-
cluding three bowl participants of
a year ago. The Pirates visit
Auburn (who played in their
fourth consecutive bowl game,
losing 36-16 to Texas A&M in last
year's Cotton Bowl), Penn State
(losers to national champion
Oklahoma in last year's Orange
Bowl game) and preseason No. 1
pick Miami (who played in last
year's Sugar Bowl).
The schedule is just as impos-
ing at home. West Virginia, who
finished 7-3-1 last year, was
deserving of a bowl game, but
wasn't selected for the first time
in four years. Also, the Division
I-AA national champion Georgia
Southern Eagles visit Ficklen
Stadium in '86.
'7'm still excited about
the future of our pro-
gram at East
Carolina
�Art Baker
"There's no reason we can't
compete with the schools on our
schedule Baker said. "Though
I'd like to play a few more teams
where our chances might be
greater, I'm still excited about the
future of our program at East
Carolina
Baker feels that the Pirates are
a young team and must get
leadership from the veterans as
well as the younger players.
Baker felt he needed some im-
mediate impact and brought 26
newcomers to the Pirate squad.
The biggest question mark in
'85 was ECU's passing game. The
quarterback position is up for
grabs as a sophomore and two
freshman vie for the starting role.
Berke Holtzclaw, who started
two games last year, completed
23 of 58 passes for 284 yards.
Redshirt freshmen Travis Hunter
turned some heads with some ex-
cellent play in the spring and was
co-offensive MVP in the annual
Purple-Gold game. Freshmen
Charlie Libretto looked im-
pressive in early fall workouts
and, according to Baker, has a
great deal of promise.
To bolster the passing game
coach Baker brought in some new
talent to blend with the returners
at the wide receiver spot. Junior
Tony Smith returns as the leading
pass catcher last year and will be
joined by senior Amos Adams.
Jackie Armstrong, Andre Fields
and highly-touted freshman
Walter Wilson will all challenge
for playing time while providing
sorely needed depth at a key posi-
tion. Last year's quarterback
Ron Jones has been working out
at wide reciever and could also
See UNDERCLASSMEN,
34
r
Sports Fact
Taes.ABt.2i, 14
Ageless John Henry wins the
Arlington Million for the sT
condtime and becomes the first
racehorse to exceed $5 niilfion
in earnings. The nine-yearJd
gelding runs down pacesetter
Royal Heroic in the
cUun � 00.000 wSner?
purse and doesn't stop tfZL
before the year is Z.j
P��theS6.3 million mark
T
�WBal

4m,m& mm
0mBmmitmmtAwi m0t
��Hp
i �1
I






36
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 26. 1986
Underclassmen Dominate Football Roster
Continued from page 35
see time at tailback if needed.
Seaior Mike Gainey returns to
start at tight end, after finishing
as the Pirates' second-leading
reciever in 1985 with 13 catches
for 184 yards and a touchdown.
Depth will be provided by Matt
Mclaughlin who had a good spr-
ing, junior-college transfer Ben
Billings and redshirt freshman
David Carr.
Although the Pirates lost Tony
Baker (ECU's second all-time
rusher), a full corps of runn-
ingbacks return to provide depth
at the position. Junior Anthony
Simpson, the leading returning
rusher (488 yards) last year,
should carry the load at the
fullback slot. Sophomore Tim
James will backup Simpson while
senior Pat Bowens will provide
more depth at the position.
The tailback spot will be
shared among a host of returners.
Sophomores Jarrod Moody and
Reggie McKinney should battle
for the starting call. Redshirt
freshman Willie Lewis will pro-
vide more speed at tailback.
A senior dominated offensive
line will definately be a strong
point for the Pirates. Fifth-year
seniors Ken Bourgeois (center),
Greg Thomas and Paul Hoggard
(guards), Robert Alexander and
Curtis Struyk (tackles) have all
started games in the past.
Depth will be provided by
sophomore Brad Brown and
Todd Drugac at center, along
with Rich Autry, Kyle Condrey,
Stewart Southall and sophomore
Joe Molinaeaux at guard.
Depth at tackle will come from
junior Leon Hall and Tim Orr
along with Wade Perry and Andy
Schebal.
The defense should be much
improved, despite the loss of
Robert Washington Oast year's
leading tackier) and Kevin
Walker (who led the nation in in-
terception in 1985).
The strength of the defense
should lie in the linebacking
crew. Juniors Vinson Smith and
Bubba Waters (third leading
tackier with 88 last year) anchor
the position.
Redshirt freshman Compton
McCurry will also see action at
the spot after a very impressive
spring along with junior Ron
billiard, who moved from defen-
sive end, to linebacker and senior
Larry Berry. Terrel Britt also will
provide depth at the strong side
spot.
The bandit position (drop end)
will also be a strong point, as
junior Essray Taliaferro returns
along with sophomore transfer
Billy Michele. Redshirt freshman
Steve Englehart will also provide
depth at this difficult position.
Pirate Soccer Expecting Best
Season In School's History
By GEORGE OSBORNE
MX r Wnita
As fall approaches most sports
fans turn their attention to foot-
ball, but at ECU the Pirate soccer
team has been gaining more
recognition.
After taking over the Pirate
squad three years ago, head
coach Steve Brody has seen
gradual improvement in his
team's performance and attitude.
After two years of building and
molding a soccer team, Brody
can see the light at the end of the
tunnel. The 1986 season has the
potential to be the best in ECU
history.
A good mix of veterans and
newcomers spell success for
Pirate soccer this fall. Brody
remarks, "In the past two years
we've brought in a good group of
players to build a solid team. I
feel that the scenario is set to
have the best season ever
The team will begin their
season with an abundance of
talent which will solve the depth
problems encountered in
previous seasons. Leading off the
list of returning players are team
captains Palmier Grossi and
George Podgorny.
"We have two great leders on
and off the field. They are great
people and great students
Brody said of his two captains.
"Palmier opens his fourth season
with us this year. He has been a
hard worker and is strong on the
ball. He has a good head for the
game at his fullback position
Senior George Podgorny will
play at the goalkeeper position.
"George is a natural born leader
and a great goalkeeper Brody
said. "He's a good competitor
and can run things on the field.
He is also a good motivator for
the rest of the team
Also in the Pirate backfield is
Larry Bennent. The junior
fullback is expected to contribute
greatly to the Pirate team.
"Larry is a strong-willed
ballplayer who doesn't give an
inch Brody said. "He has good
ball skills and is a great com-
municator
Robert Larrison is expected to
fill the mid-field position. The
Raleigh native is described by
Brody as an "excellent mid-
fielder and good all-around
player
Another all-around asset for
1986 will be Jeff Kime. "Jeff can
play anywhere on the field and
gets the job done
In addition to Podgorny, ECU
is fortunate to have a second
outstanding goalkeeper. Mac
Kendall saw a lot of time at goal
last year and picked up ex-
perience at that position Brody
said. "I expect a lot of competi-
tion between Kendall and
Podgorny this season
Brody has surveyed his team
and schedule and mapped out a
plan for this fall. "The goal of
the ECU soccer program is to be
the best in East Carolina history.
To do that I think that we need to
win at least eight matches
Brody remarked.
With the talent that ECU has,
that goal can be reached, but it
will be an uphill battle. The Col-
onial Athletic Association is a
strong soccer conference and
league-leading American Univer-
sity will enter the 1986 season in
good shape after losing only a
couple of players to graduation
last year. The Eagles were
runners-up in the NCAA finals
last year.
The Pirates open their season
Sept. 6th at St. Andrews College.
They travel to Francis Marion on
the following day for a 2:00 pm
contest. ECU will host con-
ference rival WilliamMary
Sept. 10 with the match starting
at 3:30 pm. There is no admission
charge. The Pirates face a tough
schedule this fall, but Brody and
his team are confident that they
can continue to improve.
1986 ECU Soccer
DATE
Sept. 6
Sept. 7
Sept. 10
Sept. 13
Sept. 14
Sept. 17
Sept. 20, 21
Sept. 21
Sept. 24
Sept. 27
Sept. 28
Oct. 2
Oct. 6
Oct. 12
Oct. 15
Oct. 19
Oct 22
Oct. 25
Oct. 29
Nov. 4
OPPONENT
at St. Andrews College
at Francis Marion College
WILLIAM & MARY
at George Mason University
at James Madison University
at Longwood College
at N.C. Wesleyan Tournament
(Washington & Lee, ECU, N.C.
Wesleyan, Shenandoah)
Shenandoah Vs. ECU
N.C. Wesleyan Vs. Washington
& Lee
at Atlantic Christian College
AMERICAN UNIVERSITY
NAVY
UNC-WILMINGTON
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VIRGINIA WESLEYAN
at Elon College
at Virginia Commonwealth
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at Greensboro College
NORTH CAROLINA WESLEYAN
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Junior free safety Ellis
Diliahunt, who was the second-
leading tackier last year with 100
stops, heads the secondary. The
coaching staff feels that he has
the potential to be one of the very
best in a long line of talented
secondary player at ECU.
Returning at the strong safety
position is senior and three-year
starter Gary London. Sophomore
Barriet Easterling will backup
Diliahunt, while senior Joe Aloia
will spell London. Sophomore
Lynn Porcher will also battle for
playing time.
The cornerback position will
have some talented yet inex-
perienced performers as
sophomores Flint McCallum,
Lewis Wilson and Roswell
Streeter will battle for the starting
positions. The coaches say some
of the finest athletes are at this
position, but they lack game ex-
perience.
A very talented redshirt
freshman Ricky Torrain along
with junior college transfer
Robert Martin could also inter in-
to the picture.
"Our defense will be very
balanced talent-wise, and we'll
have a little better depth Baker
said. "Our strength is Ellis
Diliahunt at free safety and the
overall play of our linebacking
corps with Vinson Smith and
Bubba Waters
After battling some of the big-
gest offensive lines in the nation
last year, the defensive front
gained some valuable experience.
The unit includes senior David
Plum, juniors Medrick Rainbow
and John Williamson, and
sophomores Walter Bryant and
WiUie Powell.
Depth will be provided by
junior Bruce Simpson and
sophomore Rodney Glover at the
left end position. Also junior-
college transfer Mike Donahue,
sophomore Junior Johnson and
freshman Carl Carney will add
support to the defensive front.
Sophomore Tim Wolter
returns after a fairly successful
freshman season. Wolter, who
punted 68 times, averaged 38.5
yards and landed 13 kicks inside
the 20-yard line and had no punts
blocked in '83.
The placekicking spot is
perhaps the biggest void for the
Pirates to fill as all-time leading
scorer and four-year performer
Jeff Heath graduated. No true
kickers had emerged during spr-
ing drills, however Baker is coun-
ting on some newcomers to fill
the vacancy.
Although the squad is
youthful, coach Baker feels his
Bucs can be successful as a unit
despite the demanding schedule.
"It's fairly obvious that
underclassmen dominate the
lineup at every position Baker
admitted. "So we have to be
realistic in our assessments. But
we've set goals for ourselves,
both as a coaching staff, and as
players.
"We've made progress in a
number of areas Baker added.
"The biggest being in attitude
and doing what it takes to win "
Open Mon - Fri.
355-2076
April Walston
Ownr

For The Active
Young Men A Women
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355-2076
236 Greenville Blvd.
behind Tipton Annex
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26. 1986
37
Mountaineers Seek Winning Campaign
By RICK McCORMAC
Don Nehlen's 1986 West
Virginia football enters the up-
coming season on a positive note
after winning their final three
games to finish with a 7-3-1
record.
However, the seven wins were
not enough to earn the Moun-
taineers a bowl bid, the first time
in four seasons that West
Virginia stayed home for the
holidays.
Nehlen has turned West
Virginia into an Eastern power,
after inheriting a squad in 1980
that had experienced four con-
secutive losing seasons. Last
year's seven-win total was the
fewest for Nehlen since his in-
auguaral 6-6 campaign.
Standing in the way of another
successful season for the Moun-
taineers is a difficult schedule. In
addition to facing the Pirates,
West Virginia faces Maryland,
Pittsburgh, Miami (Fla),
Virginia, Boston College and
Syracuse.
In addition to a challenging
schedule, Nehlen must settle on a
starting quarterback, plug holes
along the offensive line and im-
prove his linebacking situation.
Nehlen admitted that the
quarterback situation was the
most pressing hole to fill.
"There is no doubt we must
solve the quarterback riddle
Nehlen said. "We are going to be
an extremely young team offen-
sively. Consistent play at quarter-
back is going to be crucial to our
success as a football team
Mike Timko played in six
games last season and led a game-
winning drive in the last game of
the year against Syracuse and
looks to be the starter at quarter-
back. The sophomore passed for
567 yards and four touchdowns.
Ben Reed, a transfer from Nor-
theast Oklahoma Junior College,
and redshirt freshmen Lee
Holder and Chuck Levinus could
enter the picture.
The rest of the backfield ap-
pears to be solid. The most
talented among the group is
senior John Holifield. The 6-1,
191-pound senior led the Moun-
taineers with 595 yards on 140
carries.
The return of Pat Randolph at
fullback will also bolster the
ground game. Randolph, who
missed last fall with thigh pro-
blems, gained 416 yards in 1984.
In a move to get more produc-
tivity from the receivers, last
year's part-time starter at
quarterback, John Talley has
been move to flanker. Others ex-
pected to play receivers will be:
Robert White (a sophomore who
caught 15 passes last year),
Harvey Smith and Grantis Bell.
Replacing NFL first-round
draft pick Brian Jozwiak and
Chuck Joliff at the tackles will be
the biggest job for the offensive
line. Last year's starting center,
Dave Griffith, passed up his final
year of eligibility as well.
Brian Smider earned a letter
last year and should start at one
tackle position along with Milton
Redwine. John Barton and John
Stroia will man the guard spots.
The defense will be led by All-
America candiadate Matt Smith
who was the third leading tackier
last year from his linebacker posi-
tion with 95 stops.
On the defensive front, nose
guard David Grant and tackle
Jeff Lucas return. Grant is a 6-4,
267-pound junior while Lucas
also possesses size and quickness
at 6-7, 282 pounds. The final
down lineman spot is manned by
6-3, 282-pound junior Brad
Hunt.
N.C. State Personnel Changes For '86
The Mountaineers return their
entire secondary. At the corners
will be Benny Cureton and Stacy
Smith, while Travis Curtis and
Larry Holley man the safeties.
Sophomore Charlie Bauman
hit on 14 of 21 field goal tries last
season and all of his PAT's as a
freshman.
The punting duties will be
handled by Lance Carion or Joe
Beckelheimer, as they try and
replace school record holder
Steve Superick.
Mountaineer Notes:The West
Virgina game will be the home
opener for the PiratesWest
Virginia leads the series 4-0The
last meeting between the two
schools was in 1983 with WVU
winning 30-3.
Continued from page 35
cloudy for Sheridan's Pack
because many of the receivers ran
track during the spring. Senior
Haywood Jeffries, the Pack's
leading reciever in '85 with 36
catches should anchor the posi-
tion. Kelly Hollodick, the NCSU
punter and kicker is listed as Jef-
fries' backup. Danny Peebles, a
speedster who competed in the
NCAA Track & Field Champion-
ships (finished fourth in
200-meters), should provide the
deep threat.
The offensive line may be a bit
untested as big shoes will have to
be filled with the departure of all-
ACC tackle Joe Milinichik and
guard Joe Kosor. Senior Bill
Leach and junior Joey Paige look
solid at the tackle positions. The
guard slots are held by senior
Johnny Smith and junior John
Inman. However, juniors Jeff
Strum and Lenny Schultz are ex-
pected to see a lot of time. Chuck
Massaro is the number one center
heading into '86 while Jeff Ho-
jnacki, who was out with a
shoulder injury in the spring, is
expected to battle for the spot.
Senior Ralph Britt returns to
his starting role at tight end. The
6-3 Britt will be relieved by
sophomore Harry Lee Burruss,
called an outstanding talent with
a great deal of potential.
Defensively, Sheridan has
made a number of switches to
strengthen a defense that allowed
378.2 yards per game last season.
Former QB Scott Wilson was
moved to outside linebacker,
linebacker Brian Bulluck to
tackle, fullback Fred Stone to in-
side linebacker, linebacker Chris
Johnson to strong safety and
linebacker Michael Brooks to
free safety.
Inside linebacker Kelvin
Crooms, who led the Pack with
161 tackles in '85, should
spearhead the defensive unit. He
will be joined by either Pat
Teague, Fred Stone or Sterling
Quash. The outside linebacker
spot is open, but sophomore
Greg Harris and junior Wilson
appear to have the edge.
The secondary is solid with
veteran cornerback Nelson Jones
and free safety Brooks. Also
Keith Young and Derrick Taylor
provide stable support. However,
the backups are inexperienced.
The defensive line is anchored
by noseguard Sandy Kea and
Bulluck at tackle. Junior tackle
Eric Kling will join Bulluck and
Kea � both three-year lettermen.
Junior Kent Winstead and
sophomore Grady Harris are ex-
pected to see much action and
provide depth up front.
State's kicking game is in the
capable foot of fifth-year senior
Mike Cofer. Cofer has connected
on 37 of 51 field-goal attempts
during his collegiate career and is
NCSU's fifth all-time scorer with
175 points.
Craig Salmon finished as the
top punter in the spring. He will
be challenged by Hollodick and
Bryan Carter for full-time duties.
Wolf pack Notes: This is the 17th
meeting between the intra-state
rivals. The Pack leads the series
11 to five although ECU has won
two of the past three including
last year's 33-14 season opener.
This will be the fifth time the
Pirates have travelled to Raleigh
to open the season. ECU and
NCSU played to a capacity crowd
(58,000�) for the second con-
secutive year. New State coach
Sheridan and Baker are old
friendsrivals as Baker hired
Sheridan for his first position and
the two met as opposing coaches
when Baker headed The Citadel
from '78-82 and Sheridan guided
Furman from '75-85. Former
ECU assistant, Mike O'Cain,
now coaches the offensive
backfield at State. All 16 games
in the ECUNCSU series have
been played on the Wolf pack's
home field.
Students Seeking Part-time &
Full-time Employment
A
WaitressWaitress
Cashiers
Clerks
All Positions A vailable Now
Call
Atlantic Personnel Services
209 Commerce St.
355-7931
Student
Government
Association
accepting applications
Aug. 26 thru Sept. 12
For:
�Cabinet
�Judiciary
1. Honor Board
2. Review Board
�Legislature
1. Class Officers
2. Day Representatives
3. Dorm Reps
� SGA Attorney available to all ECU
Students for Free Consultation.
For Any Information, Call 757-6611
��
welcomes you back to
ECU
Mon. thru
Thurs.
Aug. 25 & 26 9:00 p.m2 a.m.
DRAFT NITE
Admission: $1.50 guys $1.00 ladies
$2.00 18 yr. olds
1 K Draft
Nite
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 26, gM
Intramural Programs, Policies Explained
The University Sports Football September. Registration is Tues. if .� . �
The University Sports Football
League is alive and well!
The Division of Intramural
Sports announces the beginning
of another exciting, fun-filled
Flag Football season. With the
addition of a seventh player, this
season promises to be fast-paced
and high scoring.
Intramural
Column
Parti
The season will kick off on
Sept. 2nd from 11:00 am to 7:00
pm, when registration will be
held. A representative from your
team must attend this session in
room 105-C Memorial Gym to
obtain an information packet and
Team-Entry Roster. The Roster
must be returned by the team
captain or alternate contact per-
son to the Team Captain's
Meeting in room 103 Biology
Building at 8:30 pm on
September 3rd.
Pre-season games will be
played on Sept. 4th and 7th. This
will be a chance for you to get
some early season work in and an
opportunity for the officials to
prepare for the season. Par-
ticipating teams will be taken on
a first-come first-serve basis at
registration. The regular season
will begin on Sept. 8th, with
games scheduled Sundays
through Thursdays from 4:00 pm
to 11:00 pm.
Todd's Pre-Seasoa Tales
Men's
1. LAGNAF
2. McGarrett
3. Tau Kappa Epsilon
4. Bomb Squad
5. Sigma Phi Epsilon
Women's
1. Slay Mama's
2. White Raiaers
3. Alpha Phi
4. Enforcers
5. Delta Zeta
Co-Rec Softball
If you enjoy mixed fun, co-rec
softball will be up at bat early in
September. Registration is Tues.
Sept. 2, room 105-C, Memorial
Gymnasium from 11:00 am to
7:00 pm. The team captain's
meeting will be the following day
Wed. Sept. 3, in Biology room
103 at 9:30 pm. A co-rec team
will consist of five men and five
women. Less than ten players
' may be used, but there must be
an equal number of men and
women.
Strong returning teams are the
Dodge City Hustlers; Good, Bad
and Ugly; Strike Force and the
defending champions Fried City
Gang. Games will be played on
i the Allied Health Fields (7, 8 and
9) on Sundays through Thursdays
from 4:00 pm to 7:00 pm. The
season will slide into full swing
on opening day, Mon. Sept. 15.
Bowling
Does anyone have some spare
time or is interested in striking up
a good time? Come join our
bowling leagues. Registration is
Mon. Sept. 8, Memorial Gym-
nasium room 105-C, from 11:00
am to 7:00 pm. The team
captain's meeting is scheduled for
Tues. Sept. 9, Brewster C-103,
5:30 pm. A team will consist of
four players and up to two alter-
nates. The cost will be
$1.50match, with a match con-
sisting of two games (this fee in-
cludes balls and shoes).
Awards will be given for team
winners, best averages, and
highest scores. Also the top-five
males and top-five female par-
ticipants will qualify for the
ACUI tournament.
Defending Champions who
hope to keep their titles are Sigma
Phi Epsilon (Fraternity A),
Thunderballs (men's indepen-
dent), Slay Gutter Bailers (men's
residence hall), Alpha Phi
(sorority), and Tootsie Rollers
(women's independent). All mat-
ches will be played Mondays
through Thursdays from 4:00 pm
to 10:00 pm at Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. "Hook" up with a
team and we'll see you at the
allies!
Employment Opportunities
It's More Than A JobIt's
An Adventure
If you are a conscientious
dedicated young person in-
terested in earning some extra
money while working in a great
recreational environment, we
may have a job for you. The
Department of Intramural-
Recreational Services has an ex-
citing and challenging variety of
positions available for students.
Sports officials, artists, office
assistants, athletic trainers,
photographers, lifeguards,
editorsjournalists.
For additional employment in-
formation, please drop by 204
Memorial Gymnasium.
Club Sport Officers
For those of you who are not
familiar with this program, the
club-sports program is a sport
based organization allowing
students to band together around
a particular interestactivity.
These student initiated clubs
can be recreational, competitive
or even instructional in nature.
Many will have all three com-
ponents. Students have the op-
portunity to participate on a level
less than intercollegiate but more
competitive than intramural.
Games, matches, and tour-
naments are played both locally
and regionally.
The 1985-86 Sport-Club Pro-
gram ended with quite a legacy,
including one of the most suc-
cessful competitive seasons by the
most clubs in East Carolina
University history. A name
change was adopted for the
1986-87 academic year. The new
program name is Club Sports. In
addition, some excellent leader-
ship was developed and hopefully
will be maintained during the
1986-87 season.
Clubs slated for the new season
include: Cycling, Frisbee, Ice
Hockey, Karate, Lacrosse, Rac-
quetball, Rugby, Soccer, Surfing,
European Team Handball, and
Water Skiing.
The following policies and pro-
cedures reflect changes within the
intramural sports program for
the 86-87 academic year. Based
upon recommendations from the
Advisory Council, these rules
have been initiated to meet the
expressed needs and desires of
program participants. Please feel
free to share your reactions to
these with us.
1. University I.D. cards will be
checked prior to participation in
each contest.
2. Resident hall residents may
only participate on teams from
their individual residence hall.
The exceptions to this new
eligibility rule are members of
university recognized fraternities,
sororities, clubs andor organiza-
tions.
3. All teams with one victory in
regular season play are eligible
for playoffs.
4. A non-appearance default
occurs when at least one half, but
not a full amount of the required
number of players appears, at
game time.
5. Outdoor contests which are
cancelled due to inclement
weather will have an additional
notification method. A red flag
will be raised on fields 1-4 when
outdoor games have been cancell-
ed andor the fields are not to be
played on.
6. Registration for all In-
tramural Sports activities will be
a one-day process taking place
between 11:00 am and 7:00 pm in
room 105-C Memorial Gym.
Specific registration dates are
available in the activity calendar.
7. Information concerning up-
coming activities is available two
weeks prior to registration
deadlines. Participants are en-
couraged to utilize this method of
gathering specific information
about an upcoming sport.
8. All-Campus Playoffs will in-
clude four teams. The league with
the largest number of teams at
the beginning of the regular
season will be allowed two berths
to the All-Campus tournament.
9. Co-Ed residence halls will
compete against only the other
Co-Ed residence halls in the
point-system totals.
10. The Co-Rec Division is
now separate from the Men's,
Women's, and Co-Ed play. This
division is open to all eligible par-
ticipants and promotes fun and
recreation.
11. The Chancellors Cup Point
System has undergone major
revisions. Interested persons are
encouraged to pick up specific in-
formation in Room 204
Memorial Gymnasium.
12. Pre-season playing oppor-
tunities will be available to in-
terested teams in major team
sports. Play is of a round-robin
nature and entries are taken dur-
ing sport registration on a first
come first serve basis. (Football,
volleyball, soccer, basketball!
and softball)
IIIIUIHIIIIHIIIIIIHillllimiitllillNIIINIWHWIHim
NEWMAN-CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER
953 East Tenth Street
Greenville, N.C. 27858
K

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Free hair consultations. Call 756-1945.
CAMPUS MASS SCHEDULE
Sunday-ll:30 a.m.
Biology Building, Room 103
9:00 p.m. Newman Center
Wednesday-5:30 p.m.
Newman Center
(followed by a fellowship dinner)
SHARE THE WORD BIBLE STUDY
I Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.
at the Newman Center
All are welcome
For information, call 752-4216
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Aero
Dare To Be Challenged:
Regular participation
Intramural-Recreational Serv
aerobic classes can provide
opportunity for personal re
as well as a fun challenge
Intramural
Column
Part 11
Aerobic Challenge
dividualized e ed
gram in which participar -
earn a T-shirt award thrc
cumulation oi r from cl
participation Interested pers
may sign up during aorofc
registration or mav regi�
anytime at 204 Memoria
nasium. The program oper;
this semester from Sep'
through Dec 5 More speq
program information can be
tained in 204 M t VJ
nasium.
Pepsi Physical Fitness Club'
The Pepsi Physical P
Club offers something
everyone, whether just beginni
an exercise program or pj
ticipating on a regular basis TJ
individual, self-directed progrj
offers five choices of exercise
a challenge basi: jogging, wij
ming, walking, biking, aj
pushing (wheelchairs). Pi
ticipants select their a j
work out on their own. rec
distances and receive an awj
for successful completion
goals. Registration
mileageparticipation form
available in 204 Memorial Gyi
nasium.
"Almost Anything Goe
Ease into a year of fun full
activities with Almost Any.r.if
Goesthe kick-off event for
tramural sports. Registration '
be Thurs. Aug. 28, 1986, in roc
105-C Memorial Gymnasiul
from 11:00 am to 7 ;00 pm.
The activity will involve te;
of six members (three men
three women), participating il
G
LU
$
Lunch 11 a
500 Wei
Greenville
-�'I i





lained
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26, 1986
39
will be-
lt place
0 pm in
Cim
Hes are
mdai
lg up
khle two
ration
�a e e'1
ti lod of
rmation
II in-
lue with
lams ai
ar
ths
li lit.
I) will
the
point sstem totals.
10. The Co-Rec Division is
now separate from the Men's,
Women's, and Co-Ed play. This
division is open to all eligible par-
ticipants and promotes fun and
recreation.
11 The e hancellors Cup Point
stem has undergone major
revisions. Interested persons are
encouraged to pick up specific in-
formation in Room 204
Memorial Civmnasium.
12 Preseason playing oppor-
tunities will be available to in-
terested teams in major team
sports Play is of a round-robin
nature and entries are taken dur-
ng sport registration on a first
come first serve basis. (Football,
volleyball, soccer, basketball!
and softball)

s
i
iiiiiiiiitiHiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiHiiiiimiiiiim
N-CATHOLIC
IKNT CENTER
last Tenth Street
ville, N.C. 27858
5 MASS SCHEDULE
1 30 a.m.
lEuilding, Room 103
Newman Center
lesday 5:30 p.m.
fwman Center
? a fellowship dinner)
WORD BIBLE STUDY
ay at 7:30 p.m.
Newman Center
'e welcome
ition, call 752-4216 l
liititiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiuuiiiiiHiitiitiiiinHiiitiiitmimuutiimNHHMS
5
ners
tin
ir Styling
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ned hair
tation
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ng System
754-4200
vices
Aerobics, Windsurfing Highlight IRS Fun
Dare To Be Challenged!
Regular participation in the
Intramural-Recreational Services
aerobic classes can provide the
opportunity for personal reward
as well as a fun challenge.
Intramural
Column
Part II
Aerobic Challenge is an in-
dividualized self-directed pro-
gram in which participants may
earn a T-shirt award through ac-
cumulation of points from class
participation. Interested persons
may sign up during aerobic class
registration or may register
anytime at 204 Memorial Gym-
nasium. The program operates
this semester from Sept. 8
through Dec. 5. More specific
program information can be ob-
tained in 204 Memorial Gym-
nasium.
Pepsi Physical Fitness Club
The Pepsi Physical Fitness
Club offers something for
everyone, whether just beginning
an exercise program or par-
ticipating on a regular basis. This
individual, self-directed program
offers five choices of exercise on
a challenge basis: jogging, swim-
ming, walking, biking, and
pushing (wheelchairs). Par-
ticipants select their activity,
work out on their own, record
distances and receive an award
for successful completion of
goals. Registration and
mileageparticipation forms are
available in 204 Memorial Gym-
nasium.
"Almost Anything Goes"
Ease into a year of fun filled
activities with "Almost Anything
Goesthe kick-off event for in-
tramural sports. Registration will
be Thurs. Aug. 28, 1986, in room
105-C Memorial Gymnasium,
from 11:00 am to 7:00 pm.
The activity will involve teams
of six members (three men and
three women), participating in six
different events, from relays to
egg tossing. As a team, you will
compete against 48 other teams.
The team with the most points
after six events will be the winner.
Awards, donated by Jeffreys
Beer and Wine and Bud Light,
will include t-shirts for all par-
ticipants, and trophies for the
top-four teams.
The event will be held on Wed.
Sept. 3 at 3:30 pm on the College
Hill field. Only 48 teams will be
accepted at registration, so gather
up your friends and join the fun!
Representatives Meeting
The Department of
Intramural-Recreational Services
would like to encourage any
dynamic sports-minded students
who want to know more about
our programs and services to
come to a representatives meeting
on Wed. Aug. 27th at 5:00 pm in
Brewster B-102. You can be the
sports leader for your group or
organization.
Advisory Council Vacancies
The Intramural-Recreational
Services Advisory Council is a
recommending body, and serves
as a means of communication
between departmental staff and
program participants. If you
would like to represent the
students, faculty and staff at East
Carolina with respect to recrea-
tional programs and services,
please contact Nance Mize at
757-6387.
fun while learning to windsurf.
Two vans are reserved for an
early departure on Sat. Sept. 13,
at 6:00 am for this exciting
outing. A 10:00 am class is
scheduled that will provide you
with three hours of instruction
and practice on your own
sailboard with qualified instruc-
tors. An additional 3-4 hours of
relaxation on the beach will
follow your class.
This outing is open to all
students, faculty, staff and
spouses. The cost is only $37.50
per person. Register early, bet-
ween Aug. 26 and Sept. 10 in
room 204 Memorial Gymnasium
to ensure a place. The rest is easy.
Sit back and let your guides for
the trip drive you down and back
while you relax. Just remember,
this is another quality acitivty
brought to you by the Outdoor
Adventure Program of
Intramural-Recreational Ser-
vices.
It's An Outdoor Adventure
Do you like the sun?
Do you like the water?
Do you enjoy a challenge?
Forget all these questions. Do
you want to go windsurfing on
Sat. Sept. 13? Make your mind
up early and set your nautical
sights to enjoy the age-old com-
bination of man, wind and water.
At a location a few miles south of
Kitty Hawk Sports, on the
Roanoke Sound, you can begin
learning the new and exciting
sport of windsurfing. These
shallow and protected waters, of
the Roanoke Sound, close to the
historic Dare beaches, can pro-
vide you the challenge to have
some all-around end of summer
All returning Club Sport Of-
ficers are requested to contact the
Club Sports office as soon as
possible to provide phone
numbers for new recruits.
Anyone interested in joining an
existing club or interested in
beginning a new club is also in-
vited to contact the Coordinator
of Club Sports at 116 Memorial
Gymnasium.
Ice Hockey Club
Anyone interested in playing
Ice Hockey this year is invited to
join the East Carolina University
Ice Hockey Club. We are looking
forward to a banner year. Con-
tact Mike White at 752-2051 or
the Department of Intramural-
Recreational Services at 757-6387
for information on an organiza-
tional meeting.
Sports Officials we need you!
The Department of
Intramural-Recreational Services
is searching for qualified in-
dividuals to officiate flag foot-
ball. Although previous ex-
perience is preferred, it is not
necessary. The first training clinic
will be conducted on Wed. Aug.
27th at 9:00 pm in room 102
Memorial Gymnasium. Addi-
tional clinics will be held on Aug.
28th from 8:00 pm to 10:00 pm in
102 Memorial Gymnasium, Sept.
2nd from 8:00 pm to 10:00 pm
and Sept. 3rd from 5:00 pm to
7:00 pm in room 142 Minges Col-
iseum.
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial
Mon-Fri 7-8 am
Mon-Fri 11 am-lpm
Minges
Mon-Fri 4-7 pm
Sat-Sun 1-5 pm
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
Mon-Thurs 11 am-7 pm
Fri 11 am-6 pm
Sat 11 am-5 pm
Sun 12noon-5pm
Minges
Mon-Thurs 3-7 j,m
OUTDOOR RECREATION
Mon 1-5 pm
Fri 1-5 pm
Sat 11 am-2pm
EQUIPMENT CHECK-OUT
(MG 115)
Mon-Thurs 11 am-7 pm
Fri 11 am-6 pm
Sat 11 am-5 pm
Sun 12noon-5pm
For additional information, 757-6387 or drop by 104-A
contact Todd McCollum at Memorial Gymnasium.
Kick OH A Great Weekend
Come To Sheraton
Football Package
($45.00 plus 4 12 tax)
Package includes overnight lodging in a large
double-bedded room and transportation to and
from the football game.
Sept. 6th
ECU
vs.
STATE
��
Call for reservations
787-7111
Sheraton-Crabtree Inn
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East Carolina University
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Lunch 11 a.m3:30 p.m.
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I





40
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26. 1986
Auburn
Without
Bo Jackson
2041.5tfi St.
OpM Men-Thura.
FriSot.
Sun.
B RICK McCORMAC
Auburn fans will have to ad-
just to life without Bo Jackson,
as the talented runningback has
taken his talents to minor league
baseball. However, Pat Dye's
cupboard is far from bare as a
number of proven performers
return to ease the loss of Jackson.
A total of 43 lettermen return
for the Tigers, including six
starters on offense and seven on
defense.
Even with the loss of Jackson,
Auburn returns a host of talented
running backs. Leading the way
is senior tailback Brent
Fullwood. Fullwood, a pre-
season all-SEC selection, was
Auburn's second-leading rusher
last season with 684 yards on 93
carries. Fullwood, subbing for an
injured Jackson, gained 153
yards on 14 carries in last year's
game against the Pirates.
Also returning is last season's
starting fullback Tommy Agee,
who rushed for 40 yards last
season.
Other talented backs returning
include Collis Campbell, Tim
Jessie, Reggie Ware and
Demetrius Threatt.
Jeff Burger, who started two
games last year as a sophomore,
will get the starting nod this year.
However, Burger is untested as
he only attempted 36 passes all of
last season, completing 19 for 50
yards and one interception. Back-
ing Burger up will be junior
Robert Smth and freshman Brian
Bell.
The receiving corps will be led
by split end Freddy Weygand.
The junior, who has led the
Tigers in receiving each of the
past two seasons, caught 19
passes for 367 yards a year ago.
Senior Trey Gainous returns to
handle the other wide receiver
spot where he caught 16 passes
for 351 yards last season.
Auburn's offensive front in-
cludes Outland Trophy Can-
didate Ben Tamburello at center,
tackle Stacey Searels and guard
Steve Wilson. Veterans Yann
Cowart, Jim Thompson and
Stacy Dunn will battle for the re-
maining offensive line spots.
Heading the way on defense
for Auburn will be defensive
tackle Tracy Rocker. Rocker led
the team in tackles last year with
93 and will provide some needed
experience on the defensive front.
Others expected to contribute on
the line are Nate Hill, Benji
Roland and Robert Goff.
The linebacking positions will
be manned by transfer Kurt
Crain, junior Russ Carreker and
Aundray Bruce.
The secondary returns three
regulars, including pre-season all-
SEC selection Kevin Porter. The
junior cornerback picked off five
passes last year. Also returning at
cornerback is Chip Powell, while
Tom Powell, Arthur Johnson
and Shan Morris will man the
safey postions.
Junior Chris Knapp returns to
handle the placekicking chores,
while juniors Brian Shulman and
Conrad Carwille will battle it out
to replace ALL-America punter
Lewis Colbert.
Tiger Notes In Dye's four years
at Auburn, the Tigers have won
37 games, an average exceeding
nine a yearAuburn won the
first meeting against ECU last
year 35-10 ECU will once again
travel to Auburn's Jordan-Hare
StadiumLast year's game drew
65,600 (the fifth largest crowd
ever to see the Pirates play.)
HONDA U
NEVER
Be Late To
Class Again
Ride To Class
In Style On A
HONDA Scooter.
"We do our own financing"
BAGLEY'S
EQUIPMENT COMPANY
US 13 17 By Pass PHONE 792 5041 Williamson, NC
Lions Strong As Ever
By SCOTT COOPER
Auburn's leading returning rusher Brent Fullwood could be a possible
Heisman candidate in his senior season.
The Pirates will once again
travel to University Park, Pa to
battle Penn State. Birthday
wishes will be in order this year as
Penn State celebrates its 100th
season of intercollegiate football.
Last year's matchup saw ECU
battle the Lions very closely
before losing 17-10. PSU escaped
many close calls a year ago as
seven of the team's victories came
by seven points or less. Joe Pater-
no's Lions won their first 11
games but fell short in their bid
for a national title with an
Orange bowl loss to Oklahoma
23-10.
Penn State once again pro-
mises to be in the bid for another
national championship but a
tough season awaits the Lions in
'86. PSU travels to Alabama,
Boston College, Notre Dame and
West Virginia. Temple,
Maryland, Syracuse and Pitt-
sburgh will be hosts of PSU in
'86.
The question of whether Penn
State can continue their success
still remains. The Lions are a
Let Me Draw You!
Tired of the same old posters that
everybody has? Be unique with
an original cartoon caricature of
yourself or someone you love.
(Or love to hate)
To order send a color photo and
a brief description of how you'd
like your drawing (work, hobby,
etc.).
Enclose a check or money order for $12.45 (include postage
handling & N.C. sales tax) Mail to THE CARTOON SHOP
P.O. Box 2623, Greenville, N.C. 27834.1 will return your photo
with a 9"xl2" color caricature. Please allow 2-3 weeks for
delivery.
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED!
senior-dominated team as they
return nine starters on offense
and eight on defense.
The quarterback position is in
competition as veterans John
Schaffer and Matt Knitzer both
return. Schaffer saw more time as
he passed for 1,367 yards and
eight touchdowns a year ago.
Although he threw 10 intercep-
tions, he was a big-play man and
found a way to win.
The remainder of the backfield
is set as possible Heisman can-
didate D.J. Dozier returns at
tailback and will be relieved by
David Clark. Tim Manoa and
Steve Smith will alternate at the
fullback slot. Dozier led the
Lions with 723 yards rushing
while the fullback tandem of
Smith and Manoa rushed for 801
yards.
The offensive line returns four
senior starters with tackles Stan
Clayton and Chris Conlin, center
Keith Redecic and guard Mitch
Frerotte to block for a solid
ground-attack offense.
A solid core of receivers return
for Paterno's Lions. Junior split
end Ray Roundtree, who is one
of five returning recievers to
catch more than 10 passes, led
PSU with 15 receptions for 285
yards. Senior Eric Hamilton
grabbed 13 passes as sophomore
speedster Michael Timpson
caught a dozen. Senior Brian
Silvering will replace graduated
tight end Dean DiMidio.
The stubborn Nittany Lion
defense should be as strong as
ever although three starters
graduated from a year ago. All-
America candidate Shane Con-
Ian, who led the defense with 91
tackles, returns at outside
linebacker. Trey Bauer will man
the inside spot as the other out-
side position will be shared by
Chris Collins and Greg Johns.
The defensive line will be one
of the team's biggest strengths in
1986. Four returning starters
return from last year. Ends Dan
Graham and Bob White, along
with tackles Mike Russo and Tim
Johnson, are incumbents.
Despite the loss of Michael
Zordich, the secondary returns
two regulars. Free safety Rav
Isom, who led PSU with four in-
See NITTANY, page 41
REFRIGERATOR
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August 26, 27, 28 from 12 noon to 4 pm
:
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nun
SP0RTSWDRLD
COLLEGE NITE
Every Tuesday Nite
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$1.00wCo!legel.D.
104 E. Red Banks Road
Greenville, NC
756-6000
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Get Your Refrigerator
At These Locations
Top of the Hill
Central Campus Mall
Front of Greene Dorm

I
1!
Carpet Sales Aug 25,26,27
ALL DAY
For information call 757-6611
752-5251
'Greenville's Finest Bakery for over 63 years
iJJSfii
815 Dickinson Avenue
DOWNTOWN
E Family Owned & Operated KT Within Walking Distance P�m i
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I The Southwestern LoJ
Ragm' Cajuns will have 7
coach this season when thcvl
"� GreenvUIc. Nelson StoJ
graduate of LSLils the neJ
man, and he will try to irrj
on the Cajuns 4-7 record
year.
Stokley w,U have U SJ
returning (eight on offen j
six on defense) along
eturning lettermen.
Stoklev also got a break i
schedule, a Florida 45-o
and Auburn (49-7 loss) are ri
' the USL slate this fall.
On offense, Stoklev has u
d the "run and shoo-
which puts a premium ol
athletic abilities of the oJ
back.
So, it mav come as a surprl
a number of people thai
starter is going to be a re(
freshman
Richard Pannel emerged
starter in spring drills, bt,
out last year's starters Th
King and Clint Campbell.
King has been since mo
the defensive secondary, sc
quarterback competition
been left between Pamell, cl
bell and sophomore Leslie
quette.
Of the threesome, Campt
the only one of who hasL
game experience. Campbell ll
ed to be the starter last T
before breaking his collarbo
preseason fall drills,
although he did see action
fall, his progress has been sk
by the injury.
Heading the returnees at rj
ing back is senior Dwi
Williams, who rushed for
yards and three touchdown!
year.
AJso returning at running
is Karl Bernard, another sei
w ho missed much of last year
to injuries. In the "run
shoot" offense this fail,
Bernard and Williams are hi
to line up from a wing pos
rather than the traditii
tailback spot.
Sophomore Glen Floyd
man the fullback spot aft
rr
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g As Ever
the catch more than 10 passes, led
PSU xvith 15 receptions for 285
yards Senior Eric Hamilton
g abbed 13 passes as sophomore
speedster Michael Timpson
caught a dozen. Senior Brian
N � ng will replace graduated
ijhi end lean DiMidio.
The stubborn Nittany Lion
ense should be as strong as
although three starters
aduated trom a vear ago. All-
erica candidate Shane Con-
who led the defense with 91
Acs. returns at outside
rbackei Tre Bauer will man
le spot as the other out-
sition uill be shared by
( ollins and Greg Johns.
lefensive line will be one
team's biggest strengths in
Four returning starters
last vear. Ends Dan
and Rob White, along
k es Mike Russo and Tim
are incumbents.
t :he loss of Michael
the secondary returns
gulars. Free safety Ray
no led PSU with four in-
set1 MTTANY. page 41

ATOR
VLS
12 noon to 4 pm

Year
$35
S10
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rigerator
cations
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g 25, 26, 27
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potatoe � lemon custard
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Cajuns To
By WCcjyCORMAC
I The Southwestern Louisiana
Ragin' Cajuns wUl have a ne.
coach th.s season when thev come
10 Greenvdle. Nelson Stok
graduate of LSUs the new head
man and he will try to improve
on the Cajuns 4-7 record of last
year.
Stoklev will have 14 starters
returning (e.ght on offense and
six on defense) along with 35
returning lettermen.
Stoklev also got a break on the
schedule, a Florida (45-0 loss)
and Auburn (49-7 loss) are not on
the USL slate this fall.
On offense, Stokley has install-
ed the "run and shoot" scheme
which puts a premium on the
athletic abilities of the quarter-
back.
So, it may come as a surprise to
a number of people that the
starter is going to be a redshirt
freshman.
Richard Pannel emerged as the
starter in spring drills, beating
out last year's starters Thomas
King and Clint Campbell.
King has been since moved to
the defensive secondary, so the
quar rback competition has
been left between Parnell, Camp-
bell and sophomore Leslie Lu-
quette.
Of the threesome, Campbell is
the only one of who has had
game experience. Campbell look-
ed to be the starter last year
before breaking his collarbone in
preseason fall drills, and
although he did see action last
fall, his progress has been slowed
by the injury.
Heading the returnees at runn-
ing back is senior Dwayne
Williams, who rushed for 524
vards and three touchdowns last
vear.
Also returning at running back
is Karl Bernard, another senior,
w ho missed much of last year due
to injuries. In the "run and
shoot" offense this fall, both
Bernard and Williams are likely
to line up from a wing position
rather than the traditional
tailback spot.
Sophomore Cilen Floyd will
man the fullback spot after a
QB
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 26 1QIU 41
tremendous spring. Floyd, who
rushed for only 32 yards and one
touchdown in limited action last
fall, routinely rushed for over 100
yards in spring practices. He is
being touted as having the talent
to be USL's first 1,000 yard
rusher ever.
The offensive line returns two
starters, including all-Louisiana
selection Leonard Isacks, a senior
who has been shifted from tackle
to guard for this upcoming
season. Dennis Frederick also
returns to start at one of the
guard positons.
Juniors Cardell Randle and
R.C. Mullen along with senior
Jay Hebert round out the rest of
the offensive front.
Returning to man the receiving
positions are senior Dana Herrick
and sophomore Willie Culpep-
per. Culpepper had nine catches
last year for 127 yards and one
score, while Herrick hauled in
seven passes for 93 yards.
Tight end will be manned by
sophomore Melvin Barber, who
inherits the spot from senior
Kevin Issac who has been moved
Nittany Lions
Continued from page 40
terceptions, returns. Isom is join-
ed with cornerback Duffy Cobbs.
The remaining two spots are up
for grabs as the PSU depth is ever
apparent. Juniors Dwayne
Downing and Marques Hender-
son and sophomores Eddie
Johnson, Gary Wilkerson and
Sharrod Rainge will all vie for the
openings.
Senior John Bruno, who
averaged 42.9 yards per punt last
year, returns with the veteran
placekicker Massimo Manca to
handle the kicking duties.
Nittany Lion Notes: Penn State is
one of three former Division 1 na-
tional champions on ECU's
schedule this season, along with
Auburn (1957) and Miami (1983).
The Pirate offense had its most
productive day of '85 at PSU
rolling up 385 yards of total of-
fense, including 129 yards by QB
Ron Jones. Penn State managed
the fewest number of of first
downs (16), the fewest offensive
plays (59) and the fewest yards of
total offense (324), of any one of
ECU opponents. The Pirates had
three fumbles at PSU tying with
their trio against South Carolina
for the most in a single game.
to defensive end.
The defense is expected to be
spearheaded by outside
linebackers Joe DeForest and
Quinten Thomas and JUCO
transfer Ken Staples who plays
inside linebacker.
Issacs is expected to make a big
contribution at defensive end and
help anchor the defensive front.
Others to watch on the line in-
clude junior defensive tackle
Stanley Hall and noseguard Tim
Calcagno.
The defensive secondary will
once again be led by senior strong
safety Steve Judice.
Patrick Brossard returns to
handle the placekicking duties,
while the punting position is still
up in the air.
Ragin' Ctjun Notes:USL
broke the series tie of three games
apiece when they won 16-14 in
the rain last year in
LafayetteFormer ECU assis-
tant Rex Kipps is in his first year
as defensive line coach and ECU
grad Steve Hale is coaching the
outside linebackersThe Ragin
Cajuns are one of the few visiting
teams to have a winning record in
Ficklen Stadium at 2-1, althoug
ECU won the last meeting 21-18
in 1983.
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42
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26. 1986
Palmer Paces Powerful Temple Owl Offense
By RICK McCORMAC
The 1986 version of the Temple
Owls will hope to reverse last
year's trend of losing close
ballgames and improve upon last
season's 4-7 record.
Temple began last season with
three straight loses to Boston
College, Penn State and Brigham
Young by a combined total of
seven points.
Coach Bruce Arians Owls
seemed to have turned things
around, winning four straight
against ECU, Cincinnati, Rutgers
and William & Mary.
Unfortunately, Temple return-
ed to their early season form, los-
ing their last four games of the
season. Syracuse, West Virginia,
Pittsburgh and even Delaware
got the better of the Owls during
the latter part of the schedule.
However, things may not be as
bad as the record would indicate,
as Temple lost five games by
seven points or less.
Arians, in his fourth year at
Temple, will once again face a
difficult schedule. The Owls must
travel to Penn State, BYU, Pitt-
sburgh, Virginia Tech, Alabama
and Rutgers.
A senior dominated defense,
and a highly potent back field ori
offense will be the keys if Temple
is to achieve success in 1986.
All-America candidate Paul
Palmer leads the way for the
Owls from his tailback position.
Palmer finished second in the na-
tion in rushing last year averaging
168.4 yards per game. He also
finished second in the nation in
all-purpose yardage, averaging
211.8 per contest.
In all, Palmer set 15 school
records, including single-game
rushing (281 vs. William & Mary)
and career yardage.
Palmer's running mate in the
Owl back field is fullback Shelley
Poole, who was the team's third-
leading rusher with 243 yards.
Sophomore Todd McNair, the se-
cond leading rusher last year with
311 yards, provides depth in the
back field.
Temple's air attack is equally
impressive. The senior tandem of
quarterback Lee Saltz and wide
out Willie Marshall connected for
a school-record tying three
touchdown passes against
William & Mary. Saltz completed
107 of 229 passes for 1,875 yards
and 13 touchdowns. Marshall
caught 40 passes for 893 yards
and nine touchdowns. Keith
Gloster, the second-leading
receiver last year with 14 recep-
tions for 377 yards, is also a deep
threat.
The lone weakness in Temple's
offensive arsenal is along the line.
All five staters, including All-
America guard John Rienstra
have departed. Center Dan
Codispot, guards Keith Dembro
and John Incollingo and tackles
Carl Holmes and Kevin Jones are
letterwinners and should see ac-
tion this season.
An experienced defensive con-
tingent includes seven seniors in
the starting lineup. It is now or
never for the group, which
features solid linebacking and a
secondary that returns intact.
Seniors Bob Pikauskas, Joh
Smith and Steve Domonoski
ranked 1-2-3 in tackles in 1985.
This trio along with Chris
D'Amiuco leads the Temple
Nat'l Champion Eagles Seek Repeat
B TIMCHAVni FR ,u .i r -
linebacking corps.
The secondary returns ex-
perience, as Pervis Herder, Larry
Brewton, Terry Wright and Ed-
die Parker are all incumbents.
Parker led the team last season
with four interceptions while
Herder added three.
Arians must rebuild the in-
terior line of the defense. Defen-
sive end Jeff Ward, the fourth-
leading tackier last year is the on-
ly returning starter on the line.
Tackle Mark Swanson's return to
form should bolster the defense,
as Swanson missed most of last
season due to injuries.
The kicking game was perhaps
the reason the Owls lost so many
close games last season. Temple
connected on just seven-of-21
field goal attempts. Jim Cooper
.�
and Bill Wright will battle for the
placekicking chores. Last year,
Wright was perfect on extra
points hitting on 26.
The loss of punter Kip
Shenefelt will hurt, as he averag
ed over 42 yards a punt, while
placing 22 inside their opponents
20-yard line.
Owl NolesThe series with the
Owls is second only to N.C. State
in number of consecutive game,
with 1986 marking the fifth
yearECU has won both of their
games in Philadelphia, while
Temple has returned the favor in
Greenville the past two
yearsTemple's 20 rushing first
downs were the most given up bv
ECU a year ago.
By TIM CHANDLER
-iWrttef
What can Georgia Southern do
for an encore. After an outstan-
ding season last year, head coach
Erk Russell, has heard this ques-
tion all year long.
Georgia Southern did what
many people thought was im-
possible last season. After com-
peting in the NCAA I-AA for on-
ly two seasons the Eagles won the
National Championship.
Georgia Southern did all of
this in only four years of com-
petition in football. So, what
does Erk Russell do for an en-
core? Possibly beat Florida, who
is on the Eagles 1986 schedule, or
go to the I-AA playoffs again?
The Eagles have a strong
nucleus back from last year's
team with 19 lettermen returning.
However, the schedule is tougher
and five defensive letterwinners
are gone.
"This is the toughest schedule
we have had here said Russell.
"Swapping Newberry and Troy the offense. Ham completed 55
State, who were on the Eagles percent of his passes last year for
schedule last season, for Florida 1,405 yards. He also ran for 751
and East Carolina can be ex- yards and scored nine
tremely hazardous to an Eagle's touchdowns. Backing up Ham is
health. Our opening game with sophomore Ernest Thompson.
Attention Jewish Students
Hillel Will Sponsor
A Bar-B-Que
Wed Aug. 27
at 5:30 p.m.
For further information
Contact
Rabbi Bonnie Koppell
830-1138
Florida requires no comment, ex
cept 'HELP Fortunately, we
have an open week following the
game in which to heal. Hopeful-
ly, that will be long enough
The strength of the Eagles will
come from skill positions on of-
fense. Tracy Ham returns to run
Thompson saw limited action a
year ago. Ken Burnette will also
add support at the position.
The running backs are seniors
Ricky Harris and Gerald Harris.
Ricky Harris led the team in
See Veterans, page 43




-
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Snowskiing As An
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important things in life, GREENVILLE LINEN
OUTLET offers some necessary amenities at low,
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All interested persons meet in room 108 Memorial Gym Todax
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For more information, contact:
Karen Israel � 355-6215




-
�X-
Jjcjf: 5e:ftjeJ
Veterans
Return
For Eagles
Continued from page 42
rushing a ear ago with 825
yards. Gerald Harris picked up
494 yards at the fullback spot and
nearly doubled that total in the
playoffs. He scored 10
touchdowns and averaged 4.3
yards per carry. Gary Miller will
add depth at fullback and Steve
McCray and Keith Geter will see
plenty of action at tailback.
The wide receivers positions
have possibly the most depth of
any position on this year's team
Monty Sharpe, Ton Belser,
Delano Little, Darren Chandler
and Ross Worsham will all see a
great deal of playing time. Sharpe
is considered the leader of the
receivers as he holds nearly e
pass receiving record at Georgia
Southern.
On the offensive line, the
Eagles return two experienced
centers and both starters at left
and right guard. Dennis Fran
and Ja Marshal will battle
the starting spot a; center A
guards, the Eagles have Cha
Cochran and James Carter ret
ning.
The area that is of most con-
cern to the Georgia Soutr
coaching staff is the offa
tackle.
"We have lost our two stai nj
tackles from '85 in Vance I
and Jeff Evans Russel! 5
"Thev were the mainstays of our
offensive line and we will be hard
pressed to be as effective at those
positions, especial)) earl,
season
One of the replacements will be
Fred Stokes, who will take over
the duties at left tackle. Red-
freshman George Jones and Tony
Smith will battle for the other
tackle spot.
Defensively, Georgia Southern
must replace defensive guard
Jessie Jenkins, second-team All-
America linebacker Charles
Carper, defensive tackle John
Richardson, defensive guard Ed-
die Johns and rover Hogo
Rossignol. All five of the players
were starters and leaders of last
year's team.
"We have had to fight and
scratch for survival on defense,
and it looks like we will have to
continue in that vein in spite of
our experience in the secondary
said Russell.
The secondary returns ex-
perience this season with Chris
Aiken and Nay Young. Aiken
finished with 70 tackles and five
interceptions a year ago, while
Young had 65 stops and pulled in
two interceptions. Depth will be
provided by Terry Young,
younger brother of Nay Young,
and Bruce Holbrook.
At the safety position. Brad
Bowen and Milton Gore will bat-
tle for the starting role. Both axe
seniors and split time at the p
tion last year. Bowen finished
with 48 tackles and one intercep-
tion, while Gore had 53 stops and
three interceptions.
The linebacking corps should
be the strong point of the defense
this season. Flint Matthews, a
sophomore, returns along with
senior Wesley Lee and junior
Tyrone Hull has moved to
defensive tackle from inside
linebacker. Doug Taylor, a
transfer from Temple and Kelly
Dawson will add depth at the
tackle position.
At the defensive guard posi-
tion, Larry Boone and red-shirt
freshman Charlie Waller seemed
to have the positions nailed
down. Boone had 53 stops a ear
ago.
Edward Eaves returns at the
defensive end position after star-
ting at the end of the regular
season. Eaves will be backed up
by Jeff Banks and Sammy
Williams.
The Georgia Southern kicking
game should be in great shape
once again with All-America
selection Tim Foley handling the
chores. Foley connected on 16 of
17 field goals and 34 of 35 PATs
last season.
Rob Whitton and Pat Parker
will battle for the the punting
chores. Last season Whitton
averaged 32.1 yards per punt
while Parker averaged 39.1
yards.
Robert Underwood, who will
battle for one middle linebacker
position.
Danny Durham, who played
outside linebacker last season,
will get the starting nod at the
rover position. Warnell Anthony
and Everette Sharpe will provide
depth at the rover spot.
. m�,��.�0. ,�,�afc,�,i�,M �� m 90m$imm0mmmmmm
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Offense
leturns ex-
Irder, Larry
it and Ed-
jcumbents.
last season
Icn.s while
the in-
i Defen-
le fourth-
is the on-
the line,
-eturn to
defense,
it of last
is perhaps
so man
Temple
-en-of-21
Cooper
and Bill Wright will battle for the
placekicking chores. Last year,
Wright was perfect on extra
points hitting on 26.
The loss of punter Kin
Shenefelt will hurt, as he averag
ed over 42 yards a punt, while
placing 22 inside their opponents
20-yard line.
Owl NotesThe series with the
Owls is second only to N.C. State
in number of consecutive games
with 1986 marking the fifth
yearECU has won both of their
games in Philadelphia, while
Temple has returned the favor in
Greenville the past two
vearsTemple's 20 rushing first
downs were the most given up by
ECL' a year ago.
inowskiing As An
Activity
. Course
: 5f:5jc





















�X-
�X-

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sical Education,
Safety
fredit
lasses
IKesort
khoe Mountain Resort, WV
Steamboat Springs Ski Resort,
p E 1150 Beginning Snon skiing
te Snowskiing
SnoHskiing
teet in room 108 Memorial Gym Today
re information, contact:
fen Israel � 355-6215
BCD
t II .MI
ECU
Wf
TM
Veterans
Return
For Eagles
Continued from page 42
rushing a year ago with 825
yards. Gerald Harris picked up
494 yards at the fullback spot and
nearly doubled that total in the
playoffs. He scored 10
touchdowns and averaged 4.3
yards per carry. Gary Miller will
add depth at fullback and Steve
McCray and Keith Geter will see
plenty of action at tailback.
The wide receivers positions
have possibly the most depth of
any position on this year's team.
Monty Sharpe, Tony Belser,
Delano Little, Darren Chandler
and Ross Worsham will all see a
great deal of playing time. Sharpe
is considered the leader of the
receivers as he holds nearly every
pass receiving record at Georgia
Southern.
On the offensive line, the
Eagles return two experienced
centers and both starters at left
and right guard. Dennis Franklin
and Jay Marshall will battle for
the starting spot at center. At the
guards, the Eagles have Charles
Cochran and James Carter retur-
ning.
The area that is of most con-
cern to the Georgia Southern
coaching staff is the offensive
tackle.
"We have lost our two starting
tackles from '85 in Vance Pike
and Jeff Evans Russell said.
"They were the mainstays of our
offensive line and we will be hard
pressed to be as effective at those
positions, especially early in the
season
One of the replacements will be
Fred Stokes, who will take over
the duties at left tackle. Red-shirt
freshman George Jones and Tony
Smith will battle for the other
tackle spot.
Defensively, Georgia Southern
must replace defensive guard
Jessie Jenkins, second-team All-
America linebacker Charles
Carper, defensive tackle John
Richardson, defensive guard Ed-
die Johns and rover Hogo
Rossignol. All five of the players
were starters and leaders of last
year's team.
"We have had to fight and
scratch for survival on defense,
and it looks like we will have to
continue in that vein in spite of
our experience in the secondary
said Russell.
The secondary returns ex-
perience this season with Chris
Aiken and Nay Young. Aiken
finished with 70 tackles and five
interceptions a year ago, while
Young had 65 stops and pulled in
two interceptions. Depth will be
provided by Terry Young,
younger brother of Nay Young,
and Bruce Holbrook.
At the safety position, Brad
Bowen and Milton Gore will bat-
tle for the starting role. Both are
seniors and split time at the posi-
tion last year. Bowen finished
with 48 tackles and one intercep-
tion, while Gore had 53 stops and
three interceptions.
The linebacking corps should
be the strong point of the defense
this season. Flint Matthews, a
sophomore, returns along with
senior Wesley Lee and junior
Tyrone Hull has moved to
defensive tackle from inside
linebacker. Doug Taylor, a
transfer from Temple and Kelly
Daw son will add depth at the
tackle position.
At the defensive guard posi-
tion, Larry Boone and red-shirt
freshman Charlie Waller seemed
to have the positions nailed
down. Boone had 53 stops a year
ago.
Edward Eaves returns at the
defensive end position after star-
ting at the end of the regular
season. Eaves will be backed up
by Jeff Banks and Sammy
Williams.
The Georgia Southern kicking
game should be in great shape
once again with All-America
selection Tim Foley handling the
chores. Foley connected on 16 of
17 field goals and 34 of 35 PATs
last season.
Rob Whitton and Pat Parker
will battle for the the punting
chores. Last season Whitton
averaged 32.1 yards per punt
while Parker averaged 39.1
yards.
Robert Underwood, who will
battle for one middle linebacker
position.
Danny Durham, who played
outside linebacker last season,
will get the starting nod at the
rover position. Warnell Anthony
and Everette Sharpe will provide
depth at the rover spot.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST �. 19 43
USC Hopes High
By TIM CHANDLER
Gamecocks show "Flreaat" defense against Anthony Simpson last year.
After a dissappointing '85
season, South Carolina has high
hopes for the upcoming season.
One of the reasons South
Carolina fans have such high
hopes about this season is the
new offense which has been in-
stalled. The offense is known as
the "Run and Shoot or one-
back offense. Another reason for
enthusiasm is the return of the
"Fire Ant" defense.
'We had a very good spring
practice said head coach Joe
Morrison. "Our young men were
enthusiastic and intense
throughout. We accomplished a
great deal and more importantly,
laid a solid foundation for the
fall
The Gamecocks will return 48
lettermen from last year's 5-6
squad, 15 of whom were starters.
With the change in offensive
style no positon from last year is
secure for the upcoming season.
For the past three seasons South
See GAMECOCKS, page 44
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44
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26, 1986
Gamecocks
Continued from page 43
Carolina used the Veer offense
and this year it will employ the
one-back offense.
"We've made the decision to
switch offenses mainly because of
the returning personnel and those
we were bringing in the fall
stated Morrison. "We brought in
folks who had run the offense,
watched a lot of film and viewed
the workouts of teams that use
the run and shoot. Spring prac-
tice with our own players and the
way they reacted convinced us
that we had made the right deci-
sion. The enthusiasm of our
players was contagious
One thing is for certain for
South Carolina, the Gamecocks
will be using a freshman at
quaterback. A year ago USC had
three senior quaterbacks and as a
result were in a position to red-
shirt Todd Ellis and Pat Turner.
The two will battle for the star-
ting role.
Ellis is a little ahead of Turner
in the fight for the starting spot
because as a high school All-
American he ran the run and
shoot offense. Ellis is a tremen-
dous passer and is also strong and
quick.
Turner is also strong and quick
with a 4.6 time in the 40 yard
dash.
The Gamecocks signed three
more freshmen quaterbacks who
will add depth at the position.
Defense
With the exception of the
talented Anthony Smith, the run-
ning back spot is a big question.
Since swithcing from the Veer,
where six quality backs were on
hand, to the run and shoot the
number of proven players has
diminished. Talent is on hand but
it is inexperienced talent.
Raynard Brown was switched to
wingback leaving only Smith with
game experience.
Back-ups in the backfield in-
clude redshirt freshmen Kevin
Jones and Keith Bing.
A pair of juniors pace the
receiving corps for the
Gamecocks. Flanker Sterling
Sharpe and tight end Danny
Smith ranked one-two in catches
last season totaling 54 reptions
for 850 yards.
Sophomore split end Ryan
Bethea could become a deep
threat with a little more ex-
perience.
There is plenty of bulk along
the offensive front for the
Gamecocks. The likely starters
for the offensive line include
junior Buddy Charles at left
tackle, senior Ray Carpenter at
left guard and junior David
Poinsett at right guard, all of
whom started last year, along
with junior Woody Meyers at
center and sophomore Charles
Gowen at right tackle.
Morrison had several reasons
to be upset with last year's defen-
sive performance. The "Fire
Ant" defense did not live up to
expectations, partially due to in-
juries. The numbers speak for
themselves: 208 yards rushing
yielded per game and the fact that
South Carolina gave up 30 or
more points five times during the
season.
Nine players with starting ex-
perience will return to try to im-
prove the defense this season.
The linebacking duties will be
anchored by junior Carl Hill. Hill
recorded 69 hits last season even
though he was hampered by in-
juries. Senior Kenneth Robinson,
who paced the Gamecocks last
year with 131 hits, joins junior
Gleen Peacock and Hill to form
the linebacking troops.
Along the line, three veterans
return to the starting squad.
Seniors Willie Mclntee and Fit-
zgerald Davis are three-year letter
winners and tackle Tom Chaikin
returns with two years of ex-
perience. The other end slot will
be taken by sophomore Derrick
Little who returns after an im-
pressive freshmen year.
The secondary will be headed
up by junior Greg Philpot.
Philpot led USC in interceptions
last season with six and finished
second on the team in tackles
with 115 stops. Chris Major who
totaled 71 hits last season will
return to the cornerback position
along with sophomore Robert
Robinson. Junior strong safety
Brad Edwards rounds out the
starting contingent for the
Gamecocks in the secondary.
Perhaps the most consistent
member of the South Carolina
squad is the placekicker, Scon
Hagler. Hagler has never missed
an extra point in 80 attempts and
is 16 of 28 for his career in field
goal attempts.
The punting chores will be bat-
tled for by a pair of redshirt
players, freshmen Rodney Price
and sophomore Wes Hendricks.
Gamecock Notes: In its first ap-
perance ever at Ficklen Stadium
last year, South Carolina
defeated the Pirates soundly
52-10the seven touchdowns
scored last year by the
Gamecocks and the 52 points
were both highs against the
Pirates last season ECU is 0-3
in games against South
CarolinaThe game against
ECU at home on Oct. 25 is one of
seven home games for the
Gamecocks in '86USC has
played no fewer than seven home
games in the past 12 yearsLast
year's meeting with USC marked
the first time that ECU had sold
out Ficklen Stadium, the atten-
dance for that game was 35,047
ojies beauty Sa&w
Back-To-School? - No Problem! Hard-To-Manage
Hair? - No Problem! Damaged Hair? - No Problem! Big
Labor Day Weekend Planned - No Problem!
Transportation? - No Problem!
State Student Tickets
On Sale Today At
Minges Ticket Office
People i
Call Shirley � Max � N�.n �.
For An Appointment 7 �6-25tfi
811 South Lee Street � Aycten N
Tuesday & Wednesday. 0 a m ur il
Thursday-Saturday. 8 3 r -until
-v &fe
K5
. m
ee-
3
I
8

New Restaurant
Features
American Classics
Reflecting back upon a meal eaten at See-Ze's
could be an afternoon-long event � a pleasant,
afternoon-long event.
See-Ze's is a new restaurant located at 100 E.
10th St. (where Szechuan Gardens once stood),
and the portions they serve are more than
generous. They also are quite good.
Seen from the outside, See-Ze's (it's name
plucked from the utterings of the owner's seven-
year-old son) looks more like a large, green
warehouse than a restaurant; however the
resemblance ends there. Inside is an atmosphere
that would make even the grumpiest lunch-time
mealer feel welcome.
Once inside, one may either be seated or order
to go. If the decision is to be seated, a waitress will
arrive with a smile and a menu of American
cuisine ranging from a Maryland crabcake
sandwich ($2.50) to a New Yorker hotdog �
complete with relish, onions and mustard ($1).
The ambience that See-Ze's offers is almost as
good as the food. The restaurant is remarkably
clean and there are no irritating people who push
brooms by patrons while they dine. Indeed, there
was no need for a broom. There was no need for
dining music, either; the sound of conversation
between the other guests was sufficient.
The other diners seemed to feel quite at home
while they ate, enjoying very mellow bantering
with the waitresses and the owner. The owner
stopped by every table in order to check on the
food and further assist the guests.
No outstanding dress code was being enforced.
People wore clothes ranging from coat and tie to
tee shirt and sandals seemed more aptly suited for
the experience than did the others. That is not to
take away from the sense of cleanliness that one
feels upon entering the restaurant.
See-Ze's is reminiscent of the classic American
deli restaurant. Their menu features regional
foods from all over the United States.
From Baltimore, they have a cornbeef sandwich
served with either rye or white bread ($2.50). And
of course they feature the now-famous Philly-
steak sandwich covered with melted cheese and
onions. ($2.50)
The subs that See-Ze's offers are being touted as
the "largest in Greenville and after seeing them,
one might definitely be inclined to agree with the
proclamation. For $2.50, one may select a small
coldcut, steak, hamburger, Italian or spiced
shrimp sub. The large subs cost $4.00.
The American fare also includes pizza at a
reasonable cost. For $4, one may bite into a 12,w
cheese pizza. And for an additional 65 cents, a
topping can be added. The price for a large 16"
pizza with everything is $10.25 � hot peppers are
free.
See-Ze's is open Monday through Saturday
from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m and call-in orders are ac-
cepted. For the student who enjoys eating a lot of
good food, this is a restaurant that must be
visited.
� Pat Moiloy
The East Carolinian
'�"� an � TK�, �
�.�l il H
I � ' I
tyteeKviMe't Cofuf Center
AccuCopy welcomes all ECU students
for the Fall Semester.
We have copied more term papers, class reports
and thesis than anybody in Greenville.
Trust your work to AccuCopy.
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Paid AdvtrtiMmeat
Eagles
B SCOTT UX)PFR
The Golden Eagies of Southern
Mississippi, coming off an
pressive 7-4 season, face a .
competitive schedule in
Seven road gar-
games at Alabama. Texas A
Mississippi State. Ke:
Florida State and ECU,
make '86 a definite challenj
Carmody and his Eagles
Southern M.
fensive starters from a ear .
while only five
defensive side T
be spearhead? . ,
cent Akxandei 1�
for 83" yard -i c
carry) last yea
ed in the back- eld -
Randolph Brown B-
cond in m . 513 yard
the two exper.e
carry the Kul� f th gi
tack.
Senior QB V ;
who threw I
touchdow
lead the -attack
some impressive
Rozelle
Sees Salary
Change
NEW YORK 11 PI.
Commissioner Pete -
Thursdav his league's pa
may change a a -e . �
dition of �. et �� -
L.S Football Leaf
"You hae i be .
with the
Rozelle, in a na' nw
ference call, -a
the multi-million d lai V I .
tracts giver, to L'SF
Kellv, Kelvin Bryai
Herschel Walker
"But J have mixed .
the commissioner ajtue
know what Herschel mean
Dallas and the leas -
Kelvin Bryant mean and
Kellv means You sa wha
personality did for a Super Be
� team with W'i inarm
'Refrigerator' Perry, and even
Jim McMahon.
"I do have a feeling this might
affect future salaries. But I also
realize what these players mear.
for the league at the gate and on
television
On Monday, the U.S. Footr
League, seeking to improve ts
one-dollar award, filed pape
for a retrial in its antitrust -
against the NFL. In the 12-wee
trial, the NFL was found g i
of monopolizing pro footb
not responsible for the L'SFL's
, problems.
Since that earlv August de
sion and the LSFL' annoui
ment to suspend pla in 1986 and
I free its players, the NFL has -
I ed a number of L'SFL plaverv A
I of last week, Rozelle sa:d 75
I USFL players signed b the NF1
; this year remained on NF1
I rosters.
"In 1983 (when the I SFI
- began play) I told the cm
I there will eventualK
so let's not do anything - ng
;Rozelle said. "Now, 1 fed
ft
t proud of the NFL owners
� There's been dissent in the pasi
;but they hung together
In a wide-ranging 50-rn nute
�talk with reporters, Rozelie ad-
rdressed himself to othe- sues
Jfacing the NFL as it enters ts
!6"th vear
The commissioner said tree
� agency is the mam obstacle
pew collective bargain.ng agree
:ment with the league's players
"That will be the ma
Stumbling block he said. "1
haven't talked to all the owners
but two or three owners have
walked to me and told me thev fee!
lt would be very unhealthy
Slhem and for the game
The collective bargaining
�greement between players and
Pnanagement is in its fifth vear
pnd expires after this season.
The league's contract with the
;ihree major networks concludes
iifter the season. Rozelle said the
Results of talks with the networks
nil have a great bearing on the
:ollective bargaining negotia
ions.
"Unlike the last two contracts.
(television money) will not go
ip two-and-a-half times he
lid. "Jack (NFL Management
Council Executive Director
)onlan) will not have as many
ships and (NFL Players Associa-
ion Executive Director) Gene
Ipshaw) will be pressed to seek
iprovements
i
pmWupiw ��!�
- - - - � � �-
i.iiwili wWw�
S?
v4





e Return
arolina scored last year by the
t. Scott Gamecocks and the 52 points
missed were both highs against the
ipts and Pirates last season ECU is 0-3
in Held in games against South
CarolinaThe game against
he bat- ECU at home on Oct. 25 is one of
Iredshirt seven home games for the
I Price Gamecocks in '86USC has
neks. played no fewer than seven home
lirst ap- games in the past 12 yearsLast
Itadium year's meeting with USC marked
Irolma the first time that ECU had sold
undl out Ficklen Stadium, the attcn-
I towns dance for that game was 35,047.
P
u-$
OPY
Cafuf Centex I
rnes all ECU students
-all Semester.
e term papers, class reports
! anybody in Greenville.
l�ork to AccuCopy.
CIAL
VICE COPIES
11 only
c
Pt 7. 1986
ed
83
on
�re
3n
an
ed
an
as
VS
11-
n-
91
ie
in
it-
!y
ae
in
TS
in
lg
m
el
as
n-
town Shops
ie Chico's
-2400
B
00 p.m.
70
OFF
tea
S
GER
of
10
OFF
:
Eagles Face Challenging Slate
TiliEASTCAROUMAN 986 45
BySCr2HC�OPER
The Golden Eagles of Southern
Mississippi, coming off an im-
pressive 7-4 season, face a very
competitive schedule in "86.
Seven road games, including
games at Alabama, Texas A?M,
Mississippi State, Kentucky'
Florida State and ECU, wili
make '86 a definite challenge for
Carmody and his Eagles.
Southern Miss returns eight of-
fensive starters from a year ago,
while only five return on the
defensive side. The offense will
be spearheaded by tailback Vin-
cent Alexander. Alexander ran
for 837 yards (4.5 yards per
carry) last year and will be team-
ed in the backfield with fullback
Randolph Brown. Brown was se-
cond in rushing with 513 yards as
the two experienced backs should
carry the bulk of the ground at-
tack. �
Senior QB Andrew Anderson,
who threw for 1,319 and 10
touchdowns last year, should
lead the I-attack offense with
ome impressive numbers.
flankers Andrew Mott and
Lyneal Alston as primary con-
tributors to the receiving corps.
They will try to pick up the slack
with the departure of last year's
leading receiver tight end Robert
Ray StaJlings. Mott and McGee
both averaged over 20 yards per
reception last year as McGee led
the way with five TD grabs.
Four returning starters should
provide Anderson with adequate
protection. The junior
Steve Brown
One area Carmody is excited
about is the kicking game.
Southern Miss is well stocked as
placekicker Rex Banks, punter
Billy Knighten and kickoff
specialist Mike Richards return.
Banks, who connected on 13 of
Berke Holtzclaw. The shutout
was the first for the Pirates since
Temple blanked the Bucs 17-0 in
'84 and only the third time an
ECU squad has been held
scoreless in the past 14 years. The
Pirates gained just 140 yards of
total offense against the Eagles,
�T �VZ 2? Sat. 5SHS
scoring with 66 points. Knighten
averaged 42.1 yards per punt last
year.
Golden Eagle Notes: Southern
?rFri,corps jn?,udi �"�" sssrviss
Jim Ferrell. suarH im u,iu,� -�-� � . � . maic
Rozelle
Sees Salary
Change
NEW YORK (UPI) � NFL
Commissioner Pete Rozelle said
Thursday his league's pay scale
may change as a result of the ad-
dition of star players from the
U.S. Football League.
"You have to be concerned
with the salary structure
Rozelle, in a nationwide con-
ference call, said in response to
the multi-million dollar NFL con-
tract given to USFL stars Jim
Kelly, Kelvin Bryant and
Herschel Walker.
"But I have mixed feelings
the commissioner added. "I
know what Herschel means to
Dallas and the league, what
Kelvin Bryant means and what
Kelly means. You saw what one
personality did for a Super Bowl
learn with (William)
Refrigerator' Perry, and even
Jim McMahon.
"I do have a feeling this might
affect future salaries. But I also
realize what these players mean
for the league at the gate and on
television
On Monday, the U.S. Football
League, seeking to improve its
one-dollar award, filed papers
for a retrial in its antitrust suit
against the NFL. In the 12-week
trial, the NFL was found guilty
of monopolizing pro football but
not responsible for the USFL's
problems.
Since that early August deci-
sion and the USFL's announce-
ment to suspend play in 1986 and
free its players, the NFL has sign-
ed a number of USFL players. As
of last week, Rozelle said 75
USFL players signed by the NFL
this year remained on NFL
rosters.
"In 1983 (when the USFL
began play) I told the owners
there will eventually be litigation
so let's not do anything wrong
Rozelle said. "Now, I feel very
proud of the NFL owners.
There's been dissent in the past,
but they hung together
In a wide-ranging 50-minute
talk with reporters, Rozelle ad-
dressed himself to other issues
facing the NFL as it enters its
67th year.
The commissioner said free
agency is the main obstacle to a
new collective bargaining agree-
ment with the league's players.
"That will be the major
stumbling block he said. "I
haven't talked to all the owners,
but two or three owners have
talked to me and told me they feel
it would be very unhealthy for
them and for the game
The collective bargaining
agreement between players and
management is in its fifth year
and expires after this season.
The league's contract with the
three major networks concludes
after the season. Rozelle said the
results of talks with the networks
will have a great bearing on the
collective bargaining negotia-
tions.
"Unlike the last two contracts,
it (television money) will not go
up two-and-a-half times he
said. "Jack (NFL Management
Council Executive Director
Donlan) will not have as many
chips and (NFL Players Associa-
tion Executive Director) Gene
TJpshaw) will be pressed to seek
improvements
Jim Ferrell, guard Jim Hallman
and tackles Rick Slater and Silas
O'Neal.
The defensive picture may not
be so bright for the Eagles in '86.
Carmody must replace six
regulars from last year's unit that
allowed opponents just 14.5
points per game. The three
leading tacklers from a year ago
return, however. Linebacker
Onesimus Henry, who led the
Eagles with 121 stops (77 solo),
has built a reputation as a fierce
hitter. Seniors Ken Spencer and
Curtis Wright will battle for the
spot opposite Henry in the 50
alignment.
Free safety Tim Smith, who
had 102 tackles will be paired
with strong safety Collins Hess,
who had 90 stops a year ago.
Junior John Baylor and
sophomore Jonathon Robertson
figure to round out the defensive
secondary. Junior Darrell
Williams and sophomores James
Henry, Vincent Rollins and
Wallace Magee will provide
depth towards the secondary.
Carmody admits that the
defensive front is a sore spot in
his defensive unit. Junior Sidney
Coleman will be tried at
noseguard while left tackle Doug
Bolt is the lone returning senior
up front. Juniors Ulyssess
Slaughter and Eric Redd should
start at tackle and end respective-
ly. The other end position will
27-0 in a driving rainstorm to
season. Although former ECU
assistant coach Mark McHale
never coached in a season, the
Pirate tight end coach of last spr-
ing now coaches the Southern
Miss offensive line.
fcnfeM
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tighter than usual, now's a fitting time to
join The Spa. Students can join The Spa
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any strings attached.
The Spa offers 52 aerobics work-
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weights, steam room, sauna and whirl-
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3
i
.r
�.





46
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 29.1986
Currey Trying To Turn
By SCOTT COOPER
Cincinnatti Bearcat head coach
Dave Currey has built a reputa-
tion as an offense-oriented men-
tor and is trying to bring his win-
ning ways to a once-troubled
Bearcat program.
Coming from Long Beach
State, Currey is trying to
revitalize his Cincinnatti team
from their x-9 record two years
ago. The 'Cats finished 5-6 iast
season.
Currey saw improvement in his
squad throughout last season and
is optimistic about the '86 cam-
paign. The Bearcats return nine
starters on offense and eight
return on the defensive side.
"We showed improvement
through the course of the season
as the players gained experience
and maturity Currey explain-
ed, "and that will be our biggest
asset for 1986
Currey has the right to be op-
timistic with all the talent return-
ing, especially the veterans of the
running and passing attack. The
most vital player being senior
runningback Reggie Taylor.
Taylor, who rushed for back-
to-back 1,000-yard seasons (only
the second time done in the
school's history), needs just 81
yards to surpass Allen Harvin
Junior
Testaverde
Returns
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Writer
The Hurricanes went into last
season's Sugar Bowl thinking
they had a legitimate chance of
winning the National Champion-
ship, after all they had defeated
Oklahoma 27-14 in a battle on
the Sooners home turf.
However, Oklahoma won the
Orange Bowl game over Penn
State and Miami was blown away
by Tennessee thus ending the
hopes for a second National
Championship.
Even though the Hurricanes
did not win the National Cham-
pionship, head coach Jimmy
Johnson deserves a lot of credit
for continuing the winning tradi-
tion that was started by Howard
Schnellenberger. During two
years at Miami, Johnson has a
record of 18-7 and a pair of New
Year's Day bowl apperances.
Miami, who is picked in many
polls to win this year's national
championship, should make it
three straight New Year's Day
and possibly make another run
for the National Championship.
The Hurricanes will return 17
starters and the entire backfield,
which includes Heisman Trophy
candidate Vinny Testaverde.
Another plus for the 'Canes
this season is the fact that the
schedule for this season is easier
than last year's. Maryland and
Notre Dame have been replaced
by Northern Illinois and Tulsa.
Only six of the 11 opponents for
Miami this season finished above
.500 last season. Texas Tech, Pit-
tsburgh, South Carolina and
West Virginia are all newcomers
on the schedule.
Miami's offensive attack will
hinge on the throwing arm of
Testarverde. After sitting in the
shadow of Bernie Kosar,
Testa verde took advantage of
his opportunity to play. The
senior threw for 3,238 and 21
touchdowns last season while
completing over 61 percent of his
passes. He threw for 250 yards or
more in eight games last year.
At the running back position,
the Hurricanes have several
capable backs. Alonzo
Highsmith, Darryl Oliver, War-
ren Williams and Melvin Bratton
will all see action in the backfield.
This foursome combined for over
1,500 yards in total offense last
season. Also adding depth in the
backfield is sophomore
Cleveland Gary, a transfer from
Georgia.
At the receiver positions,
Testaverde has several speedsters
available. Mike Irvin and Brian
Blades, who took over for Eddie
Brown and Stanley Shakespeare
last season, combined for 76
receptions and nearly 1,500
yards. The two also combined for
15 touchdowns. Reserves include
Brett Perriman, David Kintigh
and Andre Brown.
The tight end position is up for
grabs this season as All-America
Sec TOP-RANKED, page 47
and become Cincinnattis all-time
leading rusher. He was the
workhorse last year, carrying the
ball 64 times for 1,112 yards.
Ranked 13th in the nation in
passing efficiency, the Bearcats'
junior quarterback Danny Mc-
Coin completed 57 percent of his
tosses (115-201) for 1,576 yards
and a dozen TD's. Fullback
Robert Williams rounds out the
backfield. Scott Tackett and
Matt Daniels will backup
Williams while Al McKinney will
relieve Taylor at the tailback
spot.
A powerful riht side of the of-
im
fensive line will be opening the
wholes for the backfield. Guard
�i
end position.
The defense
will be led by
Rick Childress and tackle Steve mainstays at the outside lineback
Gruenschlager man the right side.
Steve Belew and Dave Langen are
top candidates for the center
spot, as the left side of the line is
still up in the air.
Joe Hice, who led the Bearcat
receivers with seven catches for
358 yards, will team with
Roosevelt Mukes at the wide
receiver spot. Flanker Jason
Stargel is the deep threat as he
averaged 21.8 yards on 20 grabs
last year. Daryl Huber and Greg
I �than will split time at the tight
ing positions � Alex Gordon,
who was the second-leading
tackier a year ago, and Toney
Catchings, who tied for the team
lead in tackles-for-loss. End J.H.
Caldwell and tackle Chris Asbeck
have gained added experience at
their respective spots. Seniors
Andre Jackson and Dan Sellers
will battle for the other end slot.
Perhaps the Bearcats' biggest
improvement came in the secon-
dary. Richard Rhodes, a con-
verted tight end, alternated bet-
ween the safety spots while
leading the team in tackles in '85.
JUCO transfer Jon Sawyer was a
stand out at the left cornerback
slot. Terry Archer, Rob Niehoff,
Vincent Carreker and Terry No-
ble will fill the remaining posi-
tions for a solid defensive
backfield.
A pair of seniors will handle
the kicking chores. Placekicker
Rober Barone, who led the team
with 55 points (11 of 19 field-goal
conversions, 22 consecutive
PAT's), will team with punter
Shaun Burdick who averaged 42
yards per kick last year.
Bearcat Notes: The Bearcats join
the Pirate schedule for the first
time in '86. Cincinnatti, 5-6 hut
season, will travel to Fickka
Stadium for the first two yearsaf
a six-year contract signed bet-
ween the two independents. ECU
will play in Riverfront Stadium-til
Cincinnatti in '88 and '89 before
the Bearcats return to play tfw
final two games in Fickleo
Former Pirate standout Cacy
Godette is the offensive linetight
end coach at UC. Common op-
ponents for the two teams in P5ii
include Penn State, Miami and
Auburn.
'op-rt
end Willie Smith opted
jo his final year of eligibili
a shot at the NFL draj
tries Henry, Alfredo Rober
Bill Hunt will battle for tl
Hurricanes return all bj
starter from their offensn
Guards Dave Alekna ai
O'Conner, center Grc
koczy and tackle Ed Davis.
rn to their positions on t)
ing line. John O'Neill ai
: Patchan are the leading
SAV-A- CENTER ESSS
PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH SAT. AUGUST 30 AT SAV A-CENTFR in roccuvii . c
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES ACENTER IN GREENVILLE
Welcome
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the sUperJCK �R1�ES
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Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality
i
ANAOOmONAL
�wwwc�
703 GRI
MtwMMQMqpa
"
a





46
UMEAST CAROLINIAN
APRll 29, W86
Currey Trying To

B SCOTT COOPER
Cincinnatti Bearcat head coach
Dave Currey has built a reputa-
tion as an offense-oriented men-
tor and is trying to bring his win-
ning ways to a once-troubled
Bearcat program.
Coming from L ong Beach
State. Curre) is trying to
revitalize his Cincinnatti team
from their -9 record two years
ago The 'Cats finished 5-6 iast
season.
( uire saw improvement in his
squad throughout last season and
is optimistic about the '86 cam-
paign. The Bearcats return nine
starters on offense and eight
return on the defensive side.
"We showed improvement
through the course of the season
as the plavers gained experience
and maturity Currey explain-
ed, "and that will be our biggest
assei for 1986
Currev has the right to be op-
timistic with all the talent return-
ing, especiallv the veterans of the
running and passing attack. The
mosi vital player being senior
runningback Reggie Taylor.
Taylor, who rushed for back-
to-back 1.000-yard seasons (only
the second time done in the
school's history), needs just 81
yards to surpass Allen Harvin
Junior
Testaverde
Returns
B HM CHANDLER
sporu nler
I he Hurricanes went into last
season's Sugar Bowl thinking
the had a legitimate chance of
winning the National Champion-
ship, after all they had defeated
Oklahoma 27-14 in a battle on
the Sooners home turf.
However. Oklahoma won the
Orange Bowl game over Penn
State and Miami was blown away
by Tennessee thus ending the
hopes for a second National
Championship.
Even though the Hurricanes
did not win the National Cham-
pionship, head coach Jimmy
Johnson deserves a lot of credit
� - continuing the winning tradi-
tt was started by Howard
Schnellenberger. During two
vears at Miami, Johnson has a
record of 18 and a pair of New
Year's Day bowl apperances.
Miami, who is picked in manv
polls to win this year's national
championship, should make it
three straight New Year's Dav
and possiblv make another run
tor the National Championship.
The Hurricanes will return 17
starters and the entire backfield,
which includes Heisman Trophy
candidate Vinny Testaverde.
Another plus for the 'Canes
this season is the fact that the
schedule for this season is easier
than last year's. Maryland and
Notre Dame have been replaced
by Northern Illinois and Tulsa.
Only six of the 11 opponents for
Miami this season finished above
.500 last season. Texas Tech, Pit-
tsburgh, South Carolina and
West Virginia are all newcomers
on the schedule.
Miami's offensive attack will
hinge on the throwing arm of
Testarverde. After sitting in the
shadow of Bernie Kosar,
Testa verde took advantage of
his opportunity to play. The
senior threw for 3,238 and 21
touchdowns last season while
completing over 61 percent of his
passes. He threw for 250 yards or
more in eight games last year.
At the running back position,
the Hurricanes have several
capable backs. Alonzo
Highsmith, Darryl Oliver, War-
ren Williams and Melvin Bratton
will all see action in the backfield.
This foursome combined for over
1,500 yards in total offense last
season. Also adding depth in the
backfield is sophomore
Cleveland Gary, a transfer from
Georgia.
At the receiver positions,
Testaverde has several speedsters
available. Mike Irvin and Brian
Blades, who took over for Eddie
Brown and Stanley Shakespeare
last season, combined for 76
receptions and nearly 1,500
yards. The two also combined for
15 touchdowns. Reserves include
Brett Perriman, David Kintigh
and Andre Brown.
The tight end position is up for
grabs this season as Ail-America
See TOP-RANKED, page 47
am
and become Cincinnati's all-time
leading rusher. He was the
workhorse last year, carrying the
ball 64 times for 1,112 yards.
Ranked 13th in the nation in
passing efficiency, the Bearcats'
junior quarterback Danny Mc-
Coin completed 57 percent of his
tosses (115-201) for 1,576 yards
and a doen TD's. Fullback
Robert Williams rounds out the
backfield. Scott Tackett and
Matt Daniels will backup
Williams while Al McKinney will
relieve Taylor at the tailback
spot.
A powerful right side of the of-
fensive line will be opening the
wholes for the backfield. Guard
Rick Childress and tackle Steve
Gruenschlager man the right side.
Steve Belew and Dave Langen are
top candidates for the center
spot, as the left side of the line is
still up in the air.
Joe Hice, who led the Bearcat
receivers with seven catches for
358 yards, will team with
Roosevelt Mukes at the wide
receiver spot. Flanker Jason
Stargel is the deep threat as he
averaged 21.8 yards on 20 grabs
last year. Daryl Huber and Greg
I than will split time at the tight
end position.
The defense will be led bv
mainstays at the outside lineback-
ing positions � Alex Gordon,
who was the second-leading
tackier a year ago, and Toney
Catchings, who tied for the team
lead in tackles-for-loss. End J.H.
Caldwell and tackle Chris Asbeck
have gained added experience at
their respective spots. Seniors
Andre Jackson and Dan Sellers
will battle for the other end slot.
Perhaps the Bearcats' biggest
improvement came in the secon-
dary. Richard Rhodes, a con-
verted tight end, alternated bet-
ween the safety spots while
leading the team in tackles in '
JL'CO transfer Jon Saw vet was a
stand out at the left cornerback
slot. Terrv Archer, Roh Ntettoff,
Vincent Carreker and Terrv No
ble will fill the remaining posi
tions for a solid defensive
backfield.
A pair of seniors will handle
the kicking chores. Placekickei
Rober Barone, who led the team
with 55 points (1 1 of 19 field goal
conversions, 22 consecutive
PAT's), will team with punter
Shaun Burdick who averaged 42
yards per kick last vear.
Bearcat Notts: I he Bearcats loin
the Pirate schedule tor trie I
time in 'K6 incinnatti, 5 6 atf
season, will travel I I kite
Stadium tor the firs two vears ui
a six-vear contract signed bet-
ween the two independents 1CL
will plav m Riverfront S'adium �fl
Cincinnatti in '88 and '89 before
the Bearcat to plav ;ik
final tw unes in Fickle
Former Pita'e standout C arv
(iodctte is the offensive line tight
end coach a; I(ommon op-
ponents for the two teams in '86
include Penn State, Miami and
Auburn
Top-r,
Continued from p�Rr
tiff" end Willie Sn pted
gBTCgo his final yet,
for a shot at tl drjl
Charles Henrv, Alfredo
gBd Bill Hunt will battle f
IP
-jsThe Hurricanes return
dm starter from their o
Hoe Guards Dave a
Paul O'Conne'
takoczy and tackle
Ifturn to the p
narting line Jor
Mar Patchar a
PRICESEFFECTIVF THROUGH SAT AUGUST 30 AT SAV A CENTER IN r.RNVli
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES CfcNTtR IN GRF F NVIl
I t
Welcome
Back
Pirates
the supermarket w.tn tMr�Jj
Plus Double Coupons
(See store for details
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce. Deli, Bakery S Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current Week Food
Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality:
BUY ONE 1 LB. PKG. OF A&P
Meat Franks
JUMBO CALIFORNIA
Broccoli
GET ONE
FREE!
I
bunch
P&Q
Paperjowels r Rib Eye Steak
TOWtlS
big
roll
LIMIT ONE OF YOUR CHOICE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
U.S.D.A. CHOICE BEEF
JUMBO CALIFORNIA
Honeydews
each
fc&2
LUNCHEON MEAT
Armour Treet
12 02.
can
LIMIT ONE WITH AN AUOITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
DUKES
Mayonnaise
32 oz.
jar
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
ASSORTED
Coca-Cola
liter
bottle
SAVE ON
Miller Lite
cans
LAUNDRY DETERGENT
Arm & Hammer
65 oz.
Pkg.
703 GREENVILLE BLVD. � OPEN 24 HOURS SMS OPEN SUNDAY 7 A.M
EA
1





Around
hile
'85.
v as a
rback
hofi,
No-
KJSi-
n i e
UIC
linker
team
oal
� e
4:
Bearcat Notes: The Bearcats join
the Pirate schedule for the first
time in '86. Cincinnatti, 5-6 last
season, will travel to Ficklen
Stadium for the first two years-o
a six-year contract signed bet-
ween the two independents. ECU
will pla in Riverfront Stadium in
Cincinnatti in '88 and '89 bcfQH
the Bearcats return to play tfte
final ro games in Fickleo
Former Pirate standout Cary
Ciodette I- the offensive line tight
end coach at UC. Common op-
ponents for the two teams in '86i
include Penn State, Miami and
Auburn.
Icome
Back
'rates
on
e Coupons

irrent Week Food
(ity.
JUMBO CALIFORNIA
I
JUMBO CALIFORNIA
neydews
each
BLE "CT . IN OH. OR WATER
6.5 02.
can
REGULAR-BUTTER
I
0 Shortening
3,b168
lb
can
1
KHASE AT EvEPypAy LOw pBirc
LAUNDRY DETERGENT
n & Hammer
65 oz.
A.M.�11RM.
Continued from page 4
didates to replace Paul Bertucelli,
tight end Willie Smith ooted t� TS in 3? Straight gamcs
forego his final year of SShZ i m'
for . shot at ST �l3l J�2Z2 Swithcd thc
Charles Henry, Alfred Robert t?? ��? to a � sct
and BUI Hunt will battfe fo?7� ?P �ks,t0 this season �� a
oattle for the great deal of optimism. The en-
The Hurricanes return all but SL a! returns intact-
one starter from their offenTi 71 AU-Amenca candidate
line. Guards DaveknTa ES Br,�Wn wiU head UP the
Paul O'Conner, cemeTore th� Which wi" have
Rakoczy and tacUe BvS m� ncoum� Juniors Bennie
return to their lotions on tSS B�� � and Sdwn
starting line. JoW0.Neu?a �5 sophomore
Matt Patchan are the! � �T �Jf 8h?Ud 1CVen bet"
g an ter in the secondary this season
Hurricanes
�THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST WL IMt
Jf �ssSr

i
SMKrtte ssisks rta�- ��-L�
Brown, a 275-pound senior of John McVeigh Th u � p,ons on the Pirate M
tackle, recorded 75 stops and The linebacking corns is the definite iL shou,d ��� hm, Miami
n,ne sacks last year. The victory main concern on the defens ve L?m-J.for ��� � �� t�m since 1970
over Oklahoma was one of side for coach Johnson n?Zl HTZZ "Uon1 Champion- to defeat ECU on Homecomim
BTnJ:S,m0rC �"� �� n���w�?wCn� Perienconh 2? Teataverde pTSf
as he had 16 tackles, two sacks, jor hoi? to rTXi Top tacSer" ES�Tt� SP 3M " in ���,� �-
George Mira, Jr. wiltSE 5S7tj�2� SeeSTir
hneback.ng contingent, while pointing upset loss to Tenet o"005 �" �I " "
Winston Moss and Rod Carter in last vear?��r n� iSSS. KC�ed off b Kevin
wiU batUe for startingTposido miih IZZZtEZ!?! 5?2 W���-The Pirates are 0-3 in
Junior placekickeMoCcSnta fight in them thf S5 " T8 in$t ����-ECU was
hisownPrightisCanGTff Kalt�" gftgi
threat. Cox proved to be almost Hurrk j� V- � , sP��ung the Hurricanes 'S3 cham-
one blocked field goal attempt
and he also caused a Sooner fum-
ble.
Derwin Jones, who has seen
some starting action, and Daniel
Stubbs are also slated for posi-
tions on the line. Bill Hawkins
and Jimmy Jones will contend
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
New Exciting Menus!
'Meatball Hoagies
�Philly Cheese Steaks
�Italian Subs
�Hot Sausages wPepper & Onions
. �Pita Pockets
�Fried Chicken
�Snack Foods
�Quick Burgers
�Hot Dogs
� � � AND MORE
Locations:
College Hill Dining Hall
MendenhaU Student Center
The Galley
Wl
the New "Sweet Shoppe" at MendenhaU
Freshly baked sweet rolls, donuts, cookies, brownies,
rolls and breads available on cash basis to eat in or carry
out
EAST CAROUNA UNIVERSITY
DINING SERVICES
mmm�





48
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26. 1986
The UBE COUPON BOOK
is back and
It's Free
Only at the UBE � Downtown
,����y��������
i Barnes
�v-
WrfcalH
TW
THI
�F�B�NI
'I i natural fibers
r discounts
�� �$Mffi, fi&4& Save f
n5J5.�.ftt 0
A
iSmLJ-2 Sfe.5
The Cut AbovV Sl
me Cut AbovV
Right Down To� ?
Total Hanjjr
v- s2 0fL?
S5 SAVE 5
�����
5 ctt Great New C f
y xy2L
Kt-
i8!
OVEKTON&
r7 oo off
1 1 cacuatoi
,Sjpck
E SEMESTER
S7 16M
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9las
�sea

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. 1 Anv
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4
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5te

A-
� Boxed
Stationery
I Limit One Coupon
I
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.
ft
T,
cv

fcoA
4ft
A�,
One Coupon � T � Ia' (
Per Customer 5I6 s cotanciie V? L.
� Void 9-30-86 giieenville. n.c. Oj
E7ehA 3. �� cot �
Bigger and Better than ever!
New rear entrance
on Evans Street
With 30 parking spaces
U.B.E
516 S. COTANCIIE
GREENVILLE, N.C.
- �
��)� �� �i � ��.��- ������.
I





� THE BEST PLACE
FOR THE BEST PRICE
GREENVILLE, N.C.
"O

CD
C
o
Pitt
Memorial
Hospital H
Stantonsburg Rd. i
it,
14.97
a
Lee Jeans
Reg. 19.97
Junior or Missy 5 pocket jeans. Available in sizes 5-18.
Missy stretch Lee jeans in regular or petite lengths,
sizes 8-20, Reg. 21.97, Sale 17.97
Jr. baggies, reg. or petite lengths, sizes 3-15,
Reg. 22.97, Safe 17.97
Girls' Lee jeans, sizes 4-6x, Reg. 13.97, Sale 10.97
Girls' Lee jeans, sizes 7-14, Reg. 15.97, Sale 12.97
�m-�
FREE PRIZES!
Prizes Available At Grand Opening Store Location Only
You Could Win One Of These Great Prizes:
� 19" Color Television � One $100 Shopping Spree
� VCR Two $50 Shopping Sprees
� Microwave Oven � 10 Speed Bicycle
Name,Phone.
14.97
Lee' Jeans
Reg. 19.97
Men's Lee' straight leg or boot cut pre washed denim
jeans. Made of comfortable 100 cotton. Sizes 28-42.
Boys' 100 cotton prewashed Lee" jeans. Available in
sizes 8-14. Reg. 15.97, Sale 12.97
Junior Boys' polycotton jeans. Available in sizes 4-7.
Reg. 13.97, Sale 10.97
Super value on a quality brand name.
I
Address
City
State
Reg. 1.17
Hand towels. Choose from
a variety of prints and
solids. Slightly imperfect.
.99
Pack
White Cloud� tissue.
Choose from assorted col-
ors or white. 4 roll pack.
DOORS OPEN
WEDNESDAY
Aug. 27th
9 a.m.
till
10 p.m.
49.97 Reg. 69.88
12" black & white televi-
sion with woodgrain plastic
cabinet. Model B121122
79
Gallon
Clorox bleach. Whitens
and brightens your laun-
dry. 1 gallon size
notebook paper
&0 Sheets
� OO Pack
Mead� 200 count wide
rule filler paper. Size
10V2" x 8 . Great buy!
n
BARS I .53
Safeguard� deodorant
soap. Each bar is 5 ounce
size. Stock up and save
Regular Prices May Vary Al Some
Stores Due To Local Competition
ROSE'S ADVERTISING
MERCHANDISE POLICY
ROSES PLEDGE TO OUH CUSTOMERS
it 15 Rom 5 honest intention to have every
advertised item in stock, however due
to the certain purchases we will be
unable to issue ramchecks. these items
will carry a "NO MINCHECK" message
Also Rose 5 leserves the right 10 limit
quantities on any advertised item All
items ate sold on a first come basis It
�s the honest intention ot Rose s to bach
up our policy ol Satisfaction Guaranteed
Always
ROSE S STORES INC
fc FOR 9 Reg. 5.9?
Panasonic� T-120 VHS
video cassette. Build your
own home video NUBry.
Ptx Quart Attar I
Valvoline� 10W-40 motor
oil. Vaivoline because
your car is special. Reg. 1.09
Stanton Square
2470 Stantonsburg Road
Greenville,
Store Hours:
Monday-Saturday 9:30 A.M. to 9 P.M.
Sunday 1 P.M. to 6 P.M.
N.C.
Also Good At The Following Location:
Pitt Plaza Shopping Center
Greenville, N.C.
weyy m �� iiyt imiiiOi a�i i��niiif
m
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ii�j � �� ,
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88
f dot uno f uf
Todays Active Lifestyle
Pants
Reg. 9.97
Skimps Team up these separates for a look and feel you'll love, ladies' stirrup or legging style knit pants in an
Reg. 9.97 assortment of colors with a print or solid knit skimp in bold fashion colors. Available in sizes S-M-L. Colors
to 10.97 and styles may vary. Shop Roses spectacular Grand Opening for the look you want without spending a fortune.
5
u WAR
j
MonsanG i
6.88
Reg & 1
Men s sizes S-XL or ladies S
sweatshirts or pants
Women s tops sizes 38 to 44 par
32 to 38. Reg 10 97 Saie
7.88
Reg �
Walking is made easy in a pair of
ladies Sneax canvas aerobic c
te � �" - �"
PICK YOUR SEPARATES AND TUR
OUT A SENSATIONAL NEW WARDROBE

� '
7.88 Reg
Update your back
attractive sweater
ment of styles and
Save to 4.09
9.97 to 11.97
to-school fashions with an
vest. Select from an assort-
colors Sizes S-M-L
14.88
Save to
Reg. 16.97 to 19.97
5.09
8.88
Reg. 10.97
Assorted ladies fashion jackets in great look
ing solids and prints. Available in sizes S-M-L.
5 to 15. Styles may vary.
Ladies' tummy slimmer pants. 100�o poly with
an elastic tummy control panel. Sizes 10 to 18
Women's sizes 32 to 40. Reg. 12.97. Sale 10.88
1.44
Each
Ladies' unpadded bra. Available in
white only. Sizes 34 to 40 Make
Roses your one stop fashion store
9.88
Your Choice!
Reg. 10.97 to 12.97
Shop Roses maternity department
and find a great selection of tops
and pants. Variety of styles and
fashionable colors Sizes 6-18. S-M-L
7.44
Reg. 9.97
2.88
Reg. 3.97
68
Each
Ladies1 knit dorm shirt. Make your Versatile ladies' cobbler aprons.
selection from a variety of colors and Choose from a wide assortment of
screen prints. Available in sizes S-M- colors and styles in easy care po-
L or One Size Fits All lycotton. Sizes S-M-L. 1x-4x
Your Choice! Ladies' bikinipanty.
Select from a variety of styles and
colors. Sizes 5-10 Styles may vary
Great value at a great price!
Choose from a large selection
idd that sp
���. � �
I
'S
6.88
Reg 7 97 & 8 97
For the beach or shopping choosj
of these totes from Roses
tion of attractive styk ind bnghi
i
r





J?&
-F
40
ig style krit pants n an
- M-L Colors
: a fortune.
I
10.97
pmmer pants. 1001- poly with
e Sizes 10 to 18
to 40. Reg. 12.97. Sale 10.88
44
Each
is unpadded bra. Available in
jnly Sizes 34 to 40. Make
your one stop fashion store
Each
Ladies bikini panty.
from a variety of styles and
Sizes 5-10 Styles may vary.
v ilue at a great price!
Monsant
6.88
Reg. 8.47
Men s sizes S-XL or ladies S-M-L fleece
sweatshirts or pants. Many colors
Women's tops sizes 38 to 44. pants sizes
32 to 38. Reg. 10.97. Sale 8.88each
4.88
Reg. to 6.97
Boys' or girls' fleece
sweatshirts or pants. Select from a variety
of assorted colors. Boys' sizes S-L. 8-16 or
girls' sizes 7-14. Tremendous values.
3.88
Reg. to 5.97
Choice Boys' or girls' fleece
sweatshirts or pants. Choose from an
assortment of popular colors to mix and
match1 Boys' sizes 4-7. girls' sizes 4-6x
2.88
Reg. 3.97
Infant or toddler boys or
girls fleece tops or bottoms in an assort
menf of popular colors and styles Infants'
sizes 12-24 mos or toddlers sizes 2T-4T
7.88
Save 3.09
Reg. 10.97
Walking is made easy in a pair of these
ladies' Sneax canvas aerobic oxfords.
White with blue or pink trim. Sizes 5-10
9.88
Save 4.09
Reg. 13.97
Styling and comfort are combined in
these ladies' 'In-Action hi top aerobics.
Choose whitepink or whiteblue. Sizes 5-10
7.88
Reg. 9.97
Men's or boys' "In-Action" court oxfords.
Available in white Great for exercising'
Select from men's sizes 7-12 or boys' 21 ?-6.
6.88
Save 3.09
Reg. 9.97
Ladies' popular woven moc unit in many
dazzling colors for fall Sizes 6-11
Girls 9-4 or infants 5-8. Reg. 8.97. Sale 5.88
ACCESSORIES FOR THE ENTIRE
lMILY AT SUPER LOW LOW PRICl
MANUFACTURER S LIST PRICES
ON ALL TIMEX WATCHES
Choose from a large selection of 14kt. gold jewelry to
add that special touch to any wardrobe Select from a
variety of beautiful chains, bracelets, earrings and more'
Make your choice from a wide variety of attractively
styled men's or ladies' Timex' watches in a spectacular
assortment of styles and colors. Styles and colors may vary
S J
" mm YOUR WARDROBE'
V Reg. 4.97
Select your favorite from a tremendous assortment of
Omni quartz sport watches that are sure to please
anyone. Available in a rainbow of dazzling colors
6.88
Reg. 7.97 & 8.97
For the beach or shopping, choose one
of these totes from Roses in a wide selec
tion of attractive styles and bright colors
si
Stylish Jewelry!
Your Choice! Make your selection from a
colorful assortment of fashion jewelry.
Sure to accent any outfit this season!
1.88
Reg. 2.57
Comfort top fashion knee his. 6 pairs per
pack Available in assorted colors Choose
from sizes 81 11 for that perfect fit'
2.88
Reg. 3.77
Ladies' sport socks. Made of 80� o cot-
ton200 o nylon 3 pairs per pack Sizes
9-11 Buy 3 pairs get 1 pair free'
j �

�.mmm �






� Mi
6.49

I
sus :� �
S8
2.88
��� .
Jua �. ii :
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6.88
7.88
Reg. 7.97 f mJJ Reg. 8.97, 9.97
Mix and match these separates for a great look! These girls' oxford shirts are always a favorite
Girls' oxford shirts in a variety of colors or basic and perfect to team with basic denim jeans,
embroidered pocket jeans. Sizes 4-6x Shirts in a variety of colors Sizes 7-14
T �TT Reg. 5.97
Girls' rain slickers. Made of 100�o vinyl Great
way to keep dry on the rainy days ahead
Available in a variety of colors Sizes 4-6x. 7-14
JLKJx
G & SAVINGS
iDTCn ci CC( 3 rnn
AMn RHV
Now is the time to save big on warm and comfortable sleepwear for fashion minded girls' and boys Choose from a
large selection of popular styles, colors and screen printed pajamas. All your favorites are on sale during our gigantic
Grand Opening Celebration, so stop by now and take advantage of these fabulous savings.
Available in girls' sizes 4 to 14, boys' sizes 4 to 7, 8 to 14.
FOR ' W Reg 2.97
Your little one will look adorable in a pair of these infant
or toddler boys or girls twill or denim boxer pants.
Available in infants sizes 9-24 months or toddlers' 2-4T
I
�m FOR O Reg 2.97
Select from a large assortment of package knit tops toi
your infant or toddler boy or girl Choose from a variety of
stripes Infants sizes 12-24 months or toddlers sizes 2-4T
FOR ' J Reg 2 97
Make your selection from a sensational variety of boxed
one piece sleep n plays. Made of comfortable Drushed tn-
cot Choose from many colors Sizes small or medium
f r
ti.
I
I
,fcv�-
0i40 Pack' Cm m 0 Pack �m m T T
3 Per "V MS Per
Pack Cm � J J Pack tLm m TT Reg. to 3.97
Boys 100�o cotton Boys Fruit of the Girls' packaged panties in a wide variety of
tee shirts Choose Loom briefs. Sizes colors 3 pair per pack Available in sizes
from sizes 2-16 2-16 Supei buy! 4 14 Another great buy from Roses
2.97
Reg. 4.97
Girls' turn cuti sport socks with assorted
stripes Made of 75 cotton25 nylon 6
pairs per pack Choose from sizes 6-812
FOR ' W Reg 3.47
Terry training panties. 3 pairs per pack
age Choose from white or pastel colors
Available in sizes 1-4 Super buy'
I





I
10.97
96 x 63"
Reg. 15.97
Moonbeam" Seeded Voile Priscilla curtains with tiebacks
Made ot 93 polyester7�o cotton. Choose white or eggshell
96 x 81" Priscilla Curtain, Reg. 17.97Sale 12.97
60 x 63" Matching Panel, Reg. 6.47Sale 4.97
60" x 81" Matching Panel, Reg. 6.97Sale 5.97
7.97
Reg. 10.88
Kenny vinyl mini blinds. Features one inch slats and
rotating wand. Easily shortened to any length Available in
white, walnut or ivory to match any decor in your home
Easy to clean. Choose from sizes 23" x 64" 27" x 64"
30" x 64 31" x 64 35" x 64" or 36" x 64"
11.88
48 x 63
Reg. 14.97
Thermal foam back drapery. Made of 60� b rayon400-
acetate Machine washable Select from blue, flax or go
48 x 84 Drapery. Reg. 16.97Sale 12
72" x 84" Drapery. Flax only. Reg. 29 97 . . . Sale 24
96" x 84' Drapery. Flax only. Reg. 36.97Sale
GIVE YOUR HOME A REFRESHING
NEW LOOK BY SHOPPTNtt AT ROSE!
BLEACHED WHITE OR FITTED SHEETS
O m O O Reg" 494 60�0 Cotton40�� Polyester
Full size flat or fitted. Reg. 6.94 Sale 5 88
Queen size flat or fitted. Reg. 9.94 Sale 8 88
King size flat or fitted. Reg. 13.94 Sale 10 88
Standard pillowcases. 1 pr Sale 3.44 King size pillowcases. 1 pr Sale 4.44
3ottoC �tt&dL .
4.88
Great Buy!
72 x 90
Reg. 5.97
Blankets made of easy care 100uo polyester Choose from
many prints or solid colors Extra warmth at affordable
prices Be sure to shop Roses for all your bedding needs
THE BIG TOWEL
30 x 52'
dm FOR ' I Reg 4 77
Upbeat bath towels made of 100�o cotton Our largest
bath towel ever, over 10 square feet of towel Many beauti-
ful colors available to add a new look to your bathroom
11.88
Save 4.09
Reg. 15.97
Wicker look hamper. Features ventilated
waterproof interior and padded lid Sturdy
construction. White, brown or natural
8.88
11.88
Save 4.09
Save to 3.59
Twin Size
Reg. 10.47 1 I B W Reg. 15.97
Bedsack' mattress pad. Great quality Santa Cruz'M five piece bath set. Includes
Full size, Reg. 13.97Sale 11.88 rug. lid cover, contour and two piece tank
Queen size, Reg. 17.47Sale 13.88 set Many eye pleasing colors available
ALL SIZES A-tSAME LOW PR.CE!
I � "OO Reg. 19.88
Comforter assortment Made of polyester
and cotton blends Twin, fullqueen or
king sizes. Patterns may vary
� � I I Reg. 3.47
better bath towels
un Standard
FOR V3 Reg 3 97
Cannon' better bath towels. Bed pillows made of polyester
Make your selection from jacquards, help you get a good nights sleep
prints or solids. Sizes 24" x 44" to Queen size, Reg. 5.97Sale 27
King size, Reg. 6.97Sale 2S9
prints or solids. Sizes 24" x 44'
25" x 50 Slightly imperfect
i Great Buy'
Colorweave utility rug. Multi-
colored. Easy care, machine
washable and reversible Long
wearing 21" x 36'
Super Value!
Kitchen towels. Choose from
our large assortment of prints
Made of 100 cotton Patterns
may vary. Shop now and save
Reg. 2$3
Poly-fil 100�o pure polyester
fiber. The crafters choice Non
allergenic. never bunches and is
hand washable 12 ounce bag
�"�
W � W �� Reg r,
Your Choice! Royal Flush or Series
Both are 52 inches 3 speech
are light adaptable A.
summer and winter ei
dLmT wJ I 29 97 mC
Trac light kit. Sty e '8-20 Trac li
Each Kit contains four feel
into any 110 ot et White ily A fas
so
- -
Reg 12 9:
30 inch bar stool
vinyl seat and rJurabli
able in gold r - jssetl S .
19.88
Sav
Reg 24 97
Graco Swyngomatic ntr
printed bear demm seat Ju'
the new arrival in your family'





I
1
.
j�
I
if
Sale 12.88
Sale 24.88
Sale s30
29.92
Reg. 49.97
Your Choice! Royal Flush or Series 4000 ceiling fans.
Both are 52 inches. 3 speeds, have reversible motor and
are light adaptable Available in antique brass Perfect for
summer and winter energy savings Buy now & save
599
Reg. 129.97
Aladdin 22.600 BTU kerosene heater. Model TR6000
Features push button ignition, wick stop for consumer
safety, emergency shutoff and built-in fuel tank Heats
approximately 800 square feet UL listed
19.88a, 16.88
Reg
24.97
Oscillator tan heater. The
Heat Director Model HFH-
503 3 settings 45� oscilla-
tion Thermostat selector
Reg
21.97
Patton Heater Plus Fan �
3 heat settings Convene I
carrying handle & cord stor-
age U L hsted Save 5.09
ON ALL CEILING FAN
IGHT KITS IN STOCK
THE BIG TOWEL
30 x 52
w ��
M
iLL SIZES AT SAME LOW PRICE'
7.88
Reg 19 88
'�'�'�� f p ester
Twin full queen or
$1
Reg 2 J
Poly til !00�o pure polyester
fiber � ����
er bunches and
24.97 29.97 $27
Trac light kit. Style 18-200 Trac light kit. Style 18-201
Each kit contains four feet of trac and two globes Plugs
mto any 110 outlet White only A fashionable accent
Reg. 39 88
Oak bentwood rocker featuring a cane insert seat ai I
back A lovely accent for any room Hardwood construc-
tion with oak finish Some assembly required
$88
Reg. 119.97
Foremost entertainment center. -�. e 4560 features a
beautiful plymouth oak finish and sturdy construct
vears of dependable use Some assembly requ red
tjfyyal IfationXJni.
ore most
S9
Reg. 12.97
30 inch bar stool. Features a supported
vinyl seat and durable construction Avail
able in gold black or russett Super buy'
$9
Reg. 12.97
Metal stacking chair with vinyl supported
seat and baked on enamel finish Comes
fully assembled Great buy from Roses
$07
imm f Reg. 39.97
TVVCR cart, style 99311 Features a wal-
nut finish and a pull out shelf for your con-
venience Some assembly required
$27
Reg. 39.97
Foremost microwave cart.
with twin roll shielded casters
in oxford oak Some assembly
style
and f
requ
609
inishec
ired
1
19.88
Reg 24 97
Graco Swyngomatic with silk screi
printed bear den in eat lue f'�f
�� e � ����. irrival in youi fan
59.88
15.09
Reg 74 97
Fisher Price style 9100 car seat. Once
locked, the restraint automatic ally adjusts
to the right fit Built for safety and comfort
12.88
Save 3 09
Reg. 15.97
Sassy Seat" portable high chair. Fea
tures exclusive Sassy Set-Locks " that lock
to virtually any table Easy storage
39.88
'0.09
Reg 49 97
Pride-Trimble stroller. Features told
back canopy reclining hack rest and pad
ded arm-rests Folds for easy storage





18.64
Save to
Your Choice!
Reg. 21.97 to 24.97
Clairol model C-20R 20 curl hair setter with carrying case. Waring model VB-100-1
blender with ten speed levels. Presto' model 05420 Fry Daddy� or Munsey model
SK-411 11 inch skillet with heat control Handy household helpers from Roses!
9.94
Your Choice!
Reg. 12.97 & 13.97
Rival' model 3100MB3100M 312 quart crock pot, Proctor-Silex' model T620B two
slice toaster with front operating control panel or Waring' model C01-1 standard can
opener or model HM3-1 three speed hand mixer. Buy now and save!
mrcqffee:
84.73
Tremendous Value! Save 75.24
Reg. 99.97
Emerson model AR-502 .4 cu. ft. under cabinetcounter top microwave. Features a
30 minute timer, cook and defrost cycle. Great for the person on the go! Shop Roses now
for quality time saving appliances at sensational low prices'
9.92
12 92 Our Sale Price
-3.00 Less Mail-m Rebate
Final Cost After Rebate
Presto" model 04820 Pop Corn Now Plus
hot air popper or Hamilton Beach model
512 Butter-Up popper. Reg. 14.97 & 17.97
11.97
17 97 Our Sale Price
-6.00 Less Mail-m Rebate
Final Cost After Rebate
Mr. Coffee' model CM-10 coffee brewer.
Features onoff switch and glass decanter.
2-10 cup capacity Reg. 22.97, Save to S11
CHECK OUT THESE SPECTACULAR PRICES
ON QUALITY HOUSEHOLD HELPERS
2.44
3.44 Our Sale Price Each
-1.00 Less Mail-In Rebate
Final Cost Each After Rebate
Bacon rack, covered bowl, fluted cake
pan, covered versatility pan, round muffin
pan, covered main dish or divided dish.
11.88
7 Piece Set
Reg. 16.97
Stainless steel cookware. Includes 1 & 2
qt. covered saucepans, 512 qt. covered pot &
IOVa" skillet. Pot lid also fits skillet.
3.88
Case
Reg. 4.97
Anchor Hocking' heavy base glasses,
12V2 ounces each or cola glasses, 12
ounces each. 12 per case. Great value!
9Q7 Re9
� 73 i 15.88
Lady Seymour fold-
ing ironing board.
Sturdy construction.
1.97
Ironing board
cover & pad set.
Teflon" coated.
1.44
Each
Reg. 1.77 to 1.97
Servin' Savers. Choose from 4 cup rec-
tangular, 5 cup square. 6 cup cylinder or
bowl or 1 quart dry foods keeper.
2.97
Each
Reg. 3.97 & 4.97
Your Choice! Natural corn broom, angle
plastic broom or speedy sponge mop.
Quality products for you from Vining" .
4 FOR $1
FOR I Reg. 3M
Frem' mini bins. Choose from an assort-
ment of popular colors. Perfect for storing
make-up or craft and art supplies.
4Q Save S3
a 5 Reg. 7.97
Wooden indoor dryer. Folds for convenient
and easy storage. Perfect for all your hand
washables. Super buys that cant be beat.
a i I Reg. 3.97
Sterilite' 2 piece sink set. In-
cludes drain tray and drainer.
Shop Roses for all your kitchen
needs Great value!
� w Your Choice!
FOR M I Reg. to .87
Ekco gadget assortment.
Choose from basting spoon, small
turner, slotted spoon or high back
turner. Available in almond.
Save 4.09
Reg. 11.97
20 piece dinnerware set contains a
complete service for four. Perfect
for everyday use or that special oc-
casion. Quality at a low price!
O a 5 I Reg. 5.47
Tabletop ironing board. Perfect
to use for those quick ironing jobs.
Just the right size for dorm rooms
and a great helper for home
O a i I Reg. 8.97
20 gallon galvanized garbage
can. Wont rust Lasts for years
Quality products is what you can
find when you shop Roses!
M4MM
Ji





239.97
Save S30
Reg. 269.97
Goldstar' model GHV-51FM 2 head, video cassette
recorder with front loading system. 14 day2 event pro-
grammable timer with everyday recorder, recording up to 4
hours. 13 function wireless remote and auto rewind.
153 'Emerson
218.97
i
Reg. 277.88
Emerson model ECR211212 19 inch remote control
color television. Features infra-red direct access remote
control and quick start picture tube Tune into Roses for
sensational prices on all your sight and sound equipment'
189.97
- - Reg. 229.97
Soundesign model 5994PK8 AMFMFM stereo
receiver. Features built-in programmable clocktimer twin
cassettes. 8-track player and semi-automatic record player
Hack requires some assembly A great buy1
RWROn
56.71
Reg. 69.97
Alaron model TV-628 4Va inch black and white com-
pact portable television. Features advance electronic
tuner. AC and carboat adaptor Buy now and save1
Gol
372.84
Reg. 439.97
Goldstar" model CMT-2528 25" diagonal portable color
television with random access remote control frequency
synthesis tuning system and 139 channel cable capabilities

Save .
Kodak
(Offt.
8.98
W W � I I Reg. 79.97
Emerson' model M2200C cassette playrecord trimode
compact Stereo System with semi-auto turntable and
J2�!�r2!I!gsPeakers Entertainment for the entire family1
Reg 10.97
Kodak film. Choose Kodacolor VR 400
film for that special picture 24 exposures
per roll 3 rolls per pack Stock up now1
86.93
Reg. 99.88
Kodak K-10 35mm camera with built-in
electronic flash, electronic shutter, auto-
matic focusing and film speed setting
i I tfirson
56.71
unlden
f ttrrt�f(m
Reg. 74.97
Emerson model CTR949 AMFM stereo
dual cassette playrecord Boom Box
with AC'DC and carry handle
59.97
Reg. 74.97
Uniden" model XE200 cordless tele-
phone with 1000 foot range and 5 year bat-
tery hfe Great for the person on the go'
TUNE INTO m& FOR THE BEST
SELECTION OF HOME ENTERTAINMENT
Save on Cassettes and Albums
PT TT1-U PQC
DP OPT V
nS :
i ma wi ib lion atnc
&
soundtrack
DeBARGE
WHOSJOHNNY SECRETS OF
THE NIGHT I WANNA HEAR IT
FROM MY HEART SOMEONE
WHEN LOVE HAS GONE AWAY
PRIVATE LINE LOVE ALWAYS
LOST WITHOUT HER LOVE
THRILL Of THE CHASE DON T
SAV ITS OVER
GtNE
� . m '
Invisible To-
GENESIS
Invisible Touch
fU
nnn�
;SCA
�a
�. Ik Ilk
SCARED
Soundtrack
BILLY JOEL
THE BRIDGE
A
l

1v'
Cassette or Album
5.96
� The Statler Bros Four
For The Show" mktd.
by Polygram
� Various Artists- The
Class Of SS" mktd.
Cassette or Album
6.96
by Polygram
� Soundtrack- Ruthless
People on Epic
� Soundtrack- Running
Scared on MCA
� Madonna- True Blue
on Sire
� Rod Stewart- Rod
Stewart on
Warner Bros.
� El DeBarge- El
DeBarge on Motown
� Genesis- Invisible
Touch on Atlantic
� Billy Joel- The Bridge'
on Columbia
Cassette or Album
9.96
� The Beach Boys- 'Made
In The USA on Capitol

���" �� "�"�Wmiw��MS






Firearms sold only in stores with Federal Firearms License
129.97
A. � IfaH f � ft Reg. 169.97
Savage" pump shotgun. Features Ven
tilated rib. Choose from 12 gauge or 20
gauge. A sensational value! Save $40
189.97
B- � � W � Reg. 249.97
Winchester" Ranger� semi-automatic
shotgun with Ventilated Winchoke" rib
barrel. Choose 12 or 20 gauge. Save S60
69.97
C. gT � W Reg. 89.97
Marlin Glenfield' 22 caliber rifle with 4
power scope. Roses has everything for the
avid hunter in your family. Save S20
59.97
D. � ff Reg. 69 97
F.I.E single barrel shotguns .vth hare
wood stock Choose 12. 20 or 410 gauge
tremendous buy from Roses Save S10
P"ce does at.
reflect State
Stamp �
Reg. 4.97 & 5.97
Realtree w or Woodland short sleeve camou
flage T-shirts. Available in sizes S-XL
Long sleeves T-shirts. Reg. 6.97. Sale 4.97
Reg. 8.97
Camouflage regular or mesh
back game vest or brown duck game
vest. Make your selection from sizes S-XL.
3. v7 Reg. 6.97 & 7.97
Camouflage PVC parka,
reversible adult PVC parka or children's
reversible PVC parka. A super value'
$3
Final Cost After Rebate
Winchester Dove & Quail shotgun
shells. Choose from 12. 16 or 20
Reg. 4.47. StocK up novn anr sa.e
i f
15.97
Reg. 19.97
Realtree� camouflage pants. Available in
browngrey, browngreentan or leaf designs
Choose from sizes 32-38. Great for hunting
19 QT
IfciVl Reg. 16.97
Woodland 6 pocket camouflage pants.
Buy now for those hunting days ahead
while the savings are great' Sizes 32-38
18.97
Save
Reg. 24.97
For the hunter in your fami-
ly, choose these camouflage 2 piece
suits or light weight coveralls. Sizes S-XL
I L � I Reg. 16.97
For those rainy hunting trips, choose a
pair of these camouflage rubber boots
Choose from sizes 7-12 for that perfect 11
LOW LOW PRICES
THREE CONVENIENT WAYS TO PURCHASE
CASH, CHARGE OR LAYAWAY
The CHcorp Card
4KXCE
VISA
1.22
5.94 Our Sale Price on 2 Gallons
-3.50 Less Mail-in Rehgtp on 2 Gallons
Final Cost Each After Mail-in Rebate
Texaco" anti-freeze coolant. Summer and
winter protection. One gallon size. Reg.
3.97, Sale 2.97 per gallon before rebate.
24.97
Reg. 28.88 & 29.88
200 PSI Air compressor with pressure
gauge and light or Portable six gallon air
tank with hose and gauge. Save to 4.91
29.97
Save S20
Reg. 49.97
2 ton floor jack. Capacity of 4000 pounds
Features 360� swivel saddle. Reinforced
body with dual arms and flanged sides.
12.97 19.97
7.97
hr!K�M,ydraU:t(?n hvdrau- 12tonhydrau
he bottle jack, he bottle jack. ,ic boWl ack
Reg. 19.96 Reg 32 J6
Save 6.99 Save 12.99
Reg. 12.96
Save 4.99
REGULAR RETAIL ON ALL
SEAT COVERS AND FLOOR
OR 0o
�J OFF
Seat covers by Allison" in bench, split, h
back or low back bucket or floor mats by
in rubber, vinyl or carpeted styles.
W Your Choice!
� If Reg. .97 to 1.77
STP gas treatment, 8 ounce size;
Snap Fix-A-Flat, 16 ounce size or Go
Jo' hand cleaner, 14 ounce size
.77
Reg. .97
Windshield washer solvent and antifreeze.
Cleans in the summer and defrosts in the
winter One gallon size. Quality at low prices
2.97
o 0ur Saie Prc? Each
-2 j)0 Less Mail-m FtehatP
Final Cost Each After Rebate
Ham Dance paste car wax in 14 ounce
size or liquid car wax in 16 ounce size
Guaranteed to last longer Reg 5 97
I4PC COMBINATION WRENCH SfT
SIZE: -4 TO I i �
��� �!$� lull srm
cue ���"�
kit -��
FranV single oil
filters. Quality at
a low price
Fram double oil or
air filters. Help protect
the life of your car.
Reg. 4.47 & 5.17
Master Lock combination padlock or
twin pack key locks. Shop Roses for great
quality at great low prices.
Reg. 11.97 & 17.97
Your Choice! Metal 19 inch tool box by
Disston . Includes convenient removable
tray or 14 piece combination wrench set.
6 97
f � W f Your Choice'
Filled parts cabinet or household orga-
nizer. Each contains 25 drawers filled with
assorted useful parts Shop now and save
F
� � � -
.
� r
Ros-
ICdL F
. '
-
A
� ��
:� I �
sameku
9
k ��
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BIG BRAND NIL
.
want :
Fteiai
r i
� a � ��
OVER
50,000 SQUAB
OFBJGVALVi
Roses stores are r a
be delighted with the ease wi1
quality goods at low
63 departments





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69 9:
DOVi
' :es iot
State ri.
h�W app able
.97
se a
oots
SA


��
97
1.2.97 19.97
12 ton hydrau-
lic Dottle jack
Reg 32.96
Save 12.99
.97
i � After Rebate
pa ' wax - 14
if wax m i(
Reg 597
1 - ' " �
T i- L f -a
� gfltfStffi '
-I
ill
97
parts cabinet or household orga-
' : ' :� �wei � e : "
v and ave
" : "� ' re will make shopping
���-� : '�' � i . . av' mi n y.
'�'�' keel : �; with : d iy fam
�'�� ��' ' I plenty f stock ontheflooi
' ' � : '�- �' I what you nee I And
' : '� ��'� '�� � l: arranged and displayed log
�'��� �'� � '�� racetrack aisles an I m �lem
" � thii :s v- in need ire easy : find
; ' ' ' ��� : �" ' ' illy mputenz. I
koutisfasl � lent
11 ; hl : ; artment: there are h in ring
'� �' " whal v . v- � r t to choose
: �� : � ; � nty � � sefrom We've : I
'�' ' �' t the latest fash fi m I
�'� � N a V - -
���� : ��� hat they nee : in
�' weai maternity full figure bn
� ' � I artm An : we hav the
: ' � �� and men
F tweai has a vanety of sport and fashion
shoes foi the entire family
There are many departments in F i
devoted to improving, beautifying and en v i
youi home
Foi thf kitchen, there is everything fi n I a
itlery to corn poppers to the most sophist ���
food processors Thereare hshe: m : kware m
:� retry an i functional styles
You 11 find the things you need to imi i ve
youi home at Rose I o Like paint rhtin : :or
Lntenoi andextenoi h u Iw ire pluml in : eilmg
fans, even )ig saws
m : tj :s Rose: ha� i : eautrl � lection
of curtains heets, toweL an la e sfort; ��
bedr m in I : athi n m
�"�" "� �'�� � � ' �� I the irt technology il
a� : laJ le : m es Homecom itei tere eq
ment and televisions are all available aswella
vCHs, teleph ne equipment and mici wave vens
.
i � . fin Ibrandn ime �� ! in �
In i it m �.� .� : �;� �
� in v i need t keei v u
'�'�'��. king go I.Andy I'llfmd.
� � �� � : fi t
: : : �ttene Why rotoasp
When V . � F . . � . .
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' m � It F � v . j
��' � want md need at pnces y .
we ffer y i a big gu u mte � �.�� ryt .
: � � � '�'�' w mt nothing h than y
; �� �� ���� faction
All this an : ��� � y . �, � . .
I iy v . � F � m ive you big . �
our even- layl w � In fact, y ill find ir reg
��: pncesare le th � m my tore
�"�'� '� '�' " '� �- : ma : � v- ry �
v � m � '�'� : �� :� th thin : y
� I need

irDestl .v i
pecial iy it I
� .�
BIG BRAND NAMES.
Yo; �� �' � pleased t find the brand names you
�' � r le it F se Names like Lee, GE, Hoover,
. �: i i. Timex, Wilson Texaco and Revlon.
rea n
OVER
50,000 SQUARE FEET
OF BIG VALUES.
'�' e: tores are spaciou and attractive You'll
I �� - d � t� - i with the ease with which you find high
I lality - h h is at low pnc � in i (very one of Roses
lepartments
MANY WAYS TO PAY.
We'll gladly accept your check or credit cai :
as well as cash. Or, if you prefer, tiy our convenient
layaway. We try to make it so that at Roses, it's as easy
to pay as it is to shop.
SERVICE IS ONE OF OUR
BIGGEST ASSETS.
Roses fnendly associates want to make sure
shopping at Roses is pleasant for you. So whether
you're asking a question, checking out or returning
merchandise, they'll be happy to do anything they
can to ensure your satisfaction
BIG SELECTION IN EVERY
DEPARTMENT.
Roses has more than 30,000 different products
for you to choose from We've been careful to stock
a wide range of items in every department. So when
you shop at Roses, it's the only place you have to
stop to get everything you need
YOU'LL THINK ROSES IS
THE BEST PLACE FOR THE
BESTPRICE.
Come by Roses You'll find that ease, quality
convenience and good prices all go together in
Roses modern stores You may even find mat you
won t want to shop anywhere else
� �'�'� �'� � �� ru :� ; utn - - � F a :� i in
� � election ���� � � ��
PSES
,Thebestplace
Aw the best price.






Select from Ranch Fries Regular or
BBQ potato chips. 8 oun es Nacho
Tortilla or Corn Chips. 12 oun es
1 27
� � fc f Reg. 1.78
Embers' charcoal briquets. Easy lighting
and long burning. Ten pound bag
Mark charcoal lighter. Reg. 1.18. Sale .88
2.97
Reg. 3.97
For those school days ahead, choose
one of our lunch kits. Complete with in-
sulated bottle featuring a flip top spout
15.97
Each
Reg. 17.97
Pampers disposable
diapers. Choose from ultra medium 96 count
or ultra large 64 count Shop Roses and save'
SENSATIONAL PRICES ON QUALITY
MERCHANDISE FOR ALL YOUR NEEDS
fift Each
� w W Reg. .97
Mead 3 subject college
rule or wide rule theme-
book. 120 count each
0 ESSELTE
3.88
10 Pack
Reg. 5.96
Hanging file folders in-
cludes folders, index tabs,
set of A to Z tabs and more
QQ 3 Per Pack
� W W Reg. 1.47
Avanti 90 minute cas-
sette tapes. Stock up now
while the savings are great
Reg. 1.17
Baggies storage and
sandwich bags. 180 coui I
bonus pack Special buy!
Five Star lunch bags
count Be ready to p i -
those hi hes for scl
Reg.
.38 Ea
Select from a variety of
popular single candy bars
'rom 45 to 2 28 oz
Each
Reg.
44.97
Steel 2 drawer file with lock
' 2 drawer simulated oak
file cabinet.
28.88
7.88
Reg. 11.97
18 inch suspension filing
system with hanging fold-
ers Great for filing cabinets
.25
Each
Limit 8
Mead" 70 count themebook
10 " x 8" Buy now and save
for school'
1.97
4 Bulbs
Per Pack
Soft-white bulbs. Choose
from 40. 60. 75 or 100 watt
3-way bulb. Reg. 1 47. Sale 1.27
1.77
D or C. 2 ct
AA or AAA.
1.87. Sale 1
Per Pack
Reg. 2.27
or 9 o: ' cl
2 count. Reg.
47. Super buv!
97
Reg. 1.57
G.E. 9 foot polarized ex-
tension cord. Brown or white
15 extension cord Reg 2 27 Sale 1 5?
Crest toothpaste. Choose
regular, gel. mint, tartar or
tartar gel 6 4 ounce size
Summer's Eve douche
twin pack. Many different
formulas available
Your Che
Soft & Dri deodorant. 2 oz
Adorn hairspray. 9 oz or
Mink hairspray. 7 oz
Your Choice'
Dry-Idea roll-on, 2 25 oz
aerosol. 5 oz Silkience
shampoo, conditioner. 15 oz
�. FOR
Stayfree maxi pads.
Available in deodorant,
regular or super 30 count
Plastic clear canvas cloth.
10 x 13 Great to use
ith all your needlepoint


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Dawn dishwashing li-
quid. Cuts through tough
grease fast 22 ounces each
Ajax cleanser. Cleans
tough food stains fast. 14
ounces each. Great buy!
Each
Wisk" heavy duty laundry
detergent. Gets your whole
wash clean. 64 ounces each
Downy fabric softener.
Reduces static cling in the
wash 64 ounces each
Kordite kitchen 28 ct
trash 20 ct lawn 15 ct
wastebasket 40 ct Reg
or
1.97
C. FOR .88
Furnace filters. Sizes 16
20" x 1 . 16' x 25" x 1"
20 x 1 or 20 x 25"
Reg.
67 Ea.
x
20"
1
3.88
Each
Framed art assortment.
Choose from many subjects
11" x 14" each Super buy'
1.27
Reg. 1.97
Roses dry
roasted salted or unsalted
peanuts. 16 ounce size
3 for $2 3 for $2 .69
Roses plates. 1014" 12 ct
878" 25 ct plates or 878"
25 ct divided plates
Solo plastic cold cups
16 ounce size Assorted col-
ors 20 count per pack
Roll
Bounty paper towels
Choose designer or assorted
colors 77 sg ft roll
C. FOR .88
Roses aluminum foil. 25
square foot roll Great for
storing and freezing
� '
1





DOMINO'S
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$1.00
OFF
Order any delicious
pizza with two or more
toppingsandget
S1 00OFF the price'
One coupon per pizza
Offer good thru 10 16 86
at Domino s Pizza
stores in Greenville.
Rocky Mount Wilson.
Goldsboro Kinston.
Tarboroand Ayden
Not valid with any
other offer
Dinner
for Four
$9.99
Get a large 16" pizza
with any two toppings
and four cans of Coke'
for only 59 99
One coupon per pizza
Offer good thru 10 16 86
at Domino s Pizza
stores in Greenville.
Rocky Mount Wilson.
Goldsboro Kinston.
Tarboro and Ayden
Not valid with any
other offer
DOMINO'S
PIZZA
DELIVERS
Lunch, Dinner or a Late Night Snack
Just call the nearest Domino s Pizza store within 30 minutes. Guaranteed, or you II
listed below for hot. del icious pizza made receive $3.00 OFF your order. Ask about
fresh to your order and delivered to you our party discounts.
Serving West Greenville
and ECU Campus
� 1201 Charles Blvd.
758-6660
Serving East Greenville
� Rivergate Shopping Center
752-6996
Coming Soon:
Our 3rd Greenville location
2405 West Dickinson Ave.
Serving Tarboro
� Park Hill Mall
823-8269
Serving Kinston
� 2301 N. Heritage
523-4422
� HOURS
11AM-1AM Sun-Thurs
11AM-2AM FriiSal
Limited Delivery Areas
Drivers carry less than $20 00
c 1986 Dominos Pizza. Inc
Serving Ayden
� 106 North Lee St.
746-4042
Serving Goldsboro
� 409 N Berkeley Blvd
778-7260
Serving Wilson
� 361 Parkwood Plaza
237-4444
Serving Rocky Mount
� 1808 Sunset Avenue
977-7777
Menu:
Every pizza is made by
hand to your order with
only the finest ingredi-
ents and pizza toppings
Our 12 pizza has
8 slices, serving 2-3
persons
Our 16 pizza has
12 slices, serving 4-6
persons
Our Cheese Pizza
12'S5.49 16 S758
ExtravaganZZa is
the ultimate combination
of 9 carefully selected
and portioned toppings
for the price of only 5'
12" $9 40 16" $13 59
Toppings:
Pepperoni Mushrooms.
Ham Onions Anchovies
Green Peppers. Sausage
Olives Hot Peppers
Ground Beef and
Double Cheese
12"78 Topping
16" S1 21 Topping
Coke" available in
12 oz cans
Our prices include tax





Title
The East Carolinian, August 26, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 26, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.487
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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