The East Carolinian, July 30, 1986






Stye San! Caraltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No.its S
Wednesday, July 30, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 5,000
8 Pages
Evidence Indicates
Astronauts Knew Fate
Monitor Anchor Unveiled
I hursdav marked the long awaited unveiling of the anchor belonging to the tS.S. Monitor. The
ceremony took place before more than 250 anxious guests. After the being presented to the public the
anchor was moved to Washington, D.C where it will remain until a permanant home is found. See
related story page 1.
WASHINGTON (UPI) � NASA
has closed its investigation of the
Challenger disaster with the
startling disclosure that, although
it remains uncertain exactly how
the crew died, the astronauts may
have been alive during the craft's
fearsome drop to the ocean.
Evidence from the explosion
Jan. 28 indicated at least some of
the astronauts knew something
had gone seriously wrong, and
that three emergency air supplies
were activated in a futile bid
for life, the space agency said
Monday.
"Uh oh were the ominous
words heard at the moment of the
explosion, NASA announced at a
news conference six months to
the day after Challenger's flam-
ing demise.
The space agency, announcing
BB&T Sponsors Leadership Program
B JIM. MORGAN
Maff Wrilrr
Three years ago James
Bearden, former dean of the
ECL) Business School and assis
tani to Chancellor Howell. was
appointed by the Chancellor to
head an innovative program to
seek and train leaders among our
university students.
The BB&T Center for Leader-
ship and Development was the
result If ia funded by a $250,000
grant from The BB&T Bank of
Wilson, NC. The grant will be
authorized over a 5 year span in
increments of $50,000 a vear.
Intrigued by the study of the
phenomenon of leadership since
his graduate school days at ECL'
Bearden was prompted to innate
a formal program based on the
concept of leadership.
"The program has a host of
purposes Bearden stated, "we
are attempting to focus attention
on the phenomenon of leadership
in our society. Traditionally
universities don't focus on
leadership as a general topic �
by trying to give early attention
to a long neglected field in higher
education (if successful) we'll be
way ahead of the game
Although Bearden admits that
it is still early to measure the suc-
cess of the BB&T program he
feels they are definetly headed in
the right direction.
The program consists of an ac-
tual academic seminar for which
nominated students receive one
hour credit and immeasurable
beneficial exposure to national
leaders in fields from all walks of
life.
Students are chosen by the
dean of their respective depart-
menst of study. One student from
each professional school and
three from the departments of
Arts & Sciences are chosen "The
nomination is left entirely up to
the deans and department
chairmens Bearden noted.
"This process brings together
students from various disciplines
and that exposure in itself is a
mutually beneficial experience.
The course these privileged
students attend consists of a
series of seminars in which pro-
minent leaders in fields of
business, government, and
education share their ideas with
the students and 12 invited local
professionals in the area of exper-
tise on which the Thought Leader
is speaking. By participating
along side of the students these
area professionals provide added
insight.
The BB&T Center for Leader-
ship Development appears to be
on the road to success. Bearden is
especially proud of The
American Thought Leader a
publication of the center that is
devoted to the publication of
recognized leaders. The center is
also looking forward to expan-
sion when they are able to occupy
their alottcd area in ECU'S soon
to be completed new classroom
complex on central campus. Nov.
the program operates out of 111
Ragsdale.
"Whether leaders are born,
not made, is moot said
Bearden, "If scholarly research
can throw light on finding, iden-
tifying and developing leaders.
What is obvious is that the most
gifted individuals need training to
effectivly cahnnel their tallents,
and the BB&T center is playing a
unique role in this training pro-
cess
Hendri Plays Host
To Restored Anchor
results of its investigation, said
the cause of death of the
Challenger Seven cannot be
positively determined and that,
except for some remaining ad-
ministrative details, the matter
was closed.
"In all effects, I think it's
over said Rear Adm. Richard
Truly, chief of the shuttle pro-
gram.
The space agency released
transcripts of intercom recor-
dings made of crew conversations
during launch and as expected,
the conversations show the
astronauts were unaware of their
impending doom until the mo-
ment of the explosion, 73 seconds
after blastoff, when co-pilot
Michael Smith made the two-
word exclamation. The recorder
stopped at that point.
Truly revealed the results of an
analysis conducted by Joseph
Kerwin, a former astronaut and
director of life sciences at the
Johnson Space Center in
Houston.
"The findings are in-
conclusive Kerwin said. "The
impact of the crew compartment
with the ocean surface was so
violent that evidence of damage
occurring in the seconds which
followed the explosion was mask-
ed. Our final conslusions are:
"The cause of death of the
Challenger astronauts cannot be
positively determined; the forces
to which the crew were exposed
during orbuer breakup were pro-
bably not sufficient to cause
death or injury, and the crew
possibly, but not certainly, lost
consciousness in the seconds
following orbner breakup due to
in-flight loss of crew module
pressure
Kerwin said the astronauts may
have survived up to 10 seconds or
longer even with decompression,
and he could not rule out the
possibility the shuttle fliers sur-
vived, albeit unconscious, all the
way to ocean impact.
Challenger was destroyed 73
seconds after blastoff when a
rupture in its right-side solid-fuel
booster triggered the explosion of
the shuttle's external fuel tank.
Challenger was 48,000 feet high
and traveling about twice the
speed of sound.
Seated on the split-level crew
cabin's flight deck were com-
mander Francis "Dick" Scobee,
co-pilot Smith and astronauts
Judith Resnik and Ellison
Onizuka. Below on the middeck
were astronaut Ronald McNair,
satellite engineer Gregory Jams
aad New Hampshire school
teacher Christa McAuliffe.
Each crew member was equip-
ped with a "persona1 egress air
pack for emergency use, called
a "PEAP and Kerwin said four
were recovered. Of those, "there
is evidence that three had been
activated
"The nonactivated PEAP was
identified as the commander's,
one of the others as the pilot's
and the remaining ones could not
be associated with any crew
member he said. "The
evidence indicates that the
PEAPs were not activated due to
water impact
See EVIDENCE Page 2.
By JILL MORGAN
Staff Writer
The fully restored anchor of
the U.S.S. Monitor was unveiled
Thursday, July 24th, at ECU's
Hendrix Theater.
ECU'S department of maritime
history and underwater ar-
chaeology, in association with the
National Marine Sanctuary Pro-
gram of NOAA (The National
Insurance Offered
Student Plan Recommended
By BETH WHICKER
Assistant News Editor
A new student insurance plan
is now being offered to ECU
students through the student
Health Service.
"Beginning next fall the SGA
will no longer offer the Emergen-
cy Loan fund, the student in-
surance plan will cover most
aspects of medical care that a stu-
dent would need said Kay Van
Nortwick, administrative
manager of Student Health Ser-
vices.
ECU students enrolled in the
fall semester will find their ap-
plication for the student in-
surance form in the mail at their
home address.
"This policy is good because
it's so inexpensive because of the
low costs of medical care at the
Student Health Center said
On The Inside

Announcements2
Classifieds10
Editorials4
Features6
Sports8
To be ignorant of the past is
to remain a child.
�Cicero
Van Nortwick.
Van Nortwick explained that
student insurance pays in addi-
tion to insurance carried by a stu-
dent's parents. "It's better to
have an additional policy
The insurance plan is under-
written by Lone Star Life In-
surance Company in Dallas,
Texas.
The insurance underwriter was
chosen by bidding for the univer-
sity contract.
All students who pay the health
service fee are eligible to enroll in
the insurance plan.
The cost of the insurance is
$114 and covers the student from
August after the premium is paid
until August 28th of the next
year.
"If a student drops out of
school or is not here for any
reason when the spring semester
begins the insurance is still in ef-
fect if the premium has been
paid said Van Nortwick.
Students with a spouse can in-
sure them for an additional $143
with the student insurance plan.
All newborn children of
anyone insured are automatically
covered at birth for 31 days for
the same benefits as provided the
insured.
After the 31 day period each
child can be insured for $97.00
per year.
An optional pregnancy benefit
of $800.00 is available to any in-
sured person who applies for the
coverage for $363.00 per year.
The Student Insurance Policy
pays $2,000 for the accidental
death or dismemberment of the
insured.
The policy covers up to
$25,000 per accident or sickness.
Payment will be made for
medical expenses or treatment
performed within 12 months
from the date of the accident or
illness.
The benefits of the policy in-
clude out-patient surgery,
miscellaneous hospital expense,
surgical expense, anesthetist fees,
nurse fees, physician's fees and
ambulance fees. The policy pro-
vides for these expenses to a
limit.
Out-patient expense for
laboratory test for each sickness
are covered to a maximum of
$50.
Out-patient expense for
diagnostic x-rays are covered to
$50 for negative x-rays and $150
for positive x-rays.
The policy covers any dental
treatment necessary by injury to
natural teeth. The maximum den-
tal allowance is $200 per tooth.
Up to $60 is allowed for
emergency room, out-patient ser-
vices and supplies.
Students not receiving
brochures on the student in-
surance plan should go by the
Student Health Center to get the
booklet.
Oceanic Atmosphere Administra-
tion) recovered the anchor from
the civil warship the L.S.S.
Monitor in 1983.
The anchor was brought to
ECU in 1983 for restoration and
remained here until last spring
when the anchor was moved to
the University of South Carolina
for finishing touches.
Last week the anchor was
brought back to Eastern North
Carolina and unveiled before a
distinquished crowd of more than
250 people.
Among the guests at Hendrix
Theater were State Represen-
tative Walter B. Jones Jr
Chancellor John Howell, Nancy
Foster of the NOAA and conser-
vator of the anchor Curtis Peter-
son of the University of South
Carolina.
See MONITOR Page 2.
Program
Summer
By BETH WHICKER
Assistant News Editor
Over 100 students from across
the state participated in the Sum-
mer Venture program held on
campus through July.
The participants were rising
juniors and seniors who have
been recognized as being gifted
and talented in the areas of ma;h
and science.
The term 'gifted and talented'
is used to describe students with
an accelerated aptitude in one or
more subjects.
Students were selected by
recommendations written by
their high school instructors.
The purpose of the Summer
Offers
Classes
Venture program is to give the
talented students an opportunity
to take classes that are not of-
fered at their respective high
schools.
Courses offered include
number theory, computer classes,
medical research and many-
others.
The students' classes began at
8:30 a.m. and continued until
3:30 p.m.
After the classes the students
enjoyed planned activities in-
cluding jogging, and aerobic
dance classes.
"None of the students were
from Greenville and most of
them were here on the weekend
See CAMP Page 2.
Summer Ventures Pageant
B MOMaS�T-Th.C���C.ro(mn
The Summer Ventures Program, in it's fifth week is drawing to a successful close. High school
students have participated in classroom instruction as well as planned activities such as the Mr .and
Mrs. Summer Ventures pageant pictured above. For more details see related article page 1.
r
-
i





IMF t AS I lAROl 1M-N
HIV W, 1986
Camp Offers
Benefits
( ontinued From I'aiit- I.
uid Ga Maness, counselor.
I"he counselors took the camp
participants on weekend trips to
t on Vtacon, Emerald Kie. and
� he shea: on- Han is Nik lear
Plani
During the fourth week of the
vamp a 'Ml . & Min Summer
entures' pageani was held in the
lobb of White hall where the
students hed during the camp.
lor the pageant the contestants
dressed in 20's attire and formal
�.sear. After the dress competition
the audience voted on finalisi
The ne con pel lion involved
answering a question asked b
the Master of Ceremonies Once
Public Supports Teacher Education
WASHINGTON, D.C. B
more than a two-to-one margin,
the American public opposes the
hiring as teachers oi men and
women who have not been train-
ed to teach. That's the finding of
a new Gallup poll.
According to the poll, 66 per-
cent oi the public want can-
didates foi teaching positions to
be prepared both in then subject
mattet and in teaching theory and
methods. On! 29 percent are
willing to hire subject area
specialists who have not com-
pleted education coursework.
"The Gallup results are grati-
fying sas Don Cameron, e
ecutive direct oi ol the National
Education Association (NEA).
"The public clearly understands
that there aie no shortcuts to
becoming an excellent teacher.
I hose who ate entrusted with the
education ot our future genera-
tions must hae both a strong
academic background and the
professional knowledge and skills
the) need to be effective in the
classroom
The survey lesults, t ameron
added, reinforce a ke recom-
mendation proposed in May by
the Carnegie Task Force on
reaching as a Profession. The
14-person Carnegie Task Force,
which included NEA Presidenl
Mary Hatwood Tutrell. asked all
iaies. to announce a date beyond
which no school distn
hire a- a teacher someone who
!ia- nol been certified and fully
prepared to
As pat' ij
'each, seven oul of Hi Ameri
sav thai ;
should be required l
supervised stud
perience as well a pass
pencil test ol sul
and professional skills ai
:
1 �� '
See WUKK Pa- 3
aud;ei
winner'
Jerome Colesen and Susan
Wallace were � ted 'Mi & Mrs
Summei entui es
a as funded
"v I mis were
requ bi e any n
. ts en ioyed he
�- atmosphere and
studies as we'll remarked
Maness.
Monitor
Unveiled
t ontinued from I'aue 1
� Washing D.
a lai nc Sa nv i uai
Progra
: . for 1

gust 20 en pha
e the I .S S Mon
�v. example f EC!
.� receni pi
sa pul a News
nard e the LS.S M
Evidence
Examined
( ontinued from Pat 1.
Witl ai i lygci ipply ai
such extren e all -aid.
loss ot db:v. pressure would have
caused quid
PRICESEFFI � TMROUGM SAT AUGUST AT SAV A CFNTFR IMrPft UUII I
WE HESFHVF THE RIGHT TO LIMIT JUANTr:fs
WAKIKill1TV 1��
Double Coupons
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli, Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality.
FRESH FRYER
Leg Quarters
(limit four
family packs)
i M

oxygen
ic t i v e "
could have beer, a
response to d�
The debate �. I e fa c
cre� hingi ex-
perienced as the nose section rip-
ped awav in a supersonic tumble
and : ibin may have
decompressed the thin at-
mosphere 9 miies up
Kerwm said the separation of
the crew compartment probably
subjected the astronauts
force ranging from 12 times to 20
times the force of gravity, hut
"the accelerations were quite
brief. In 2 seconds thev were
below four G's; in less than 10
seconds, the crew compartment
was essentially in tree tall
DOUBLE Q IN OIL OR WATER
Chunk
Tuna
. M T TWO with AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT
FVERVDAV LOW ;
6.5 oz.1
can
Cubed
ATTIC
752-
7303
IULY
AUG
30 WED
Wampus Cats
31 WO ft
HARPO
1 FRI
MiEwiN�ro
TTTT
The Citizens
I j'l'v H i
�7THUR
Buster
Brown
Paper Towels
USD.A. CHOICE
Beef
Steak
Honeydews
RIPE SWEET
JUMBO
ea.
LIMIT TWO WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
DUKES
Mayonnaise
78c
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
REGULAR OR BUTTER FLAVOR
Crisco Shortening
lmt0 3t 129
���ln'r.Tv�-v�
can
ONE Of YOUR CHOICE WITH AN
REGULAR OR LIGHT
00
Coors Beer
949
24
12 oz
cans
A&P CHILLED
- Orange Juice
3
i
BUTTERMILK � HOMOGENIZED � LIGHT
Flav-0-Rich Milk
half
OPEN SUNDAY 7 A.M
11 PM 0PENM0N 7AM
CLOSE SAT. 11
Z 703 GREENVILLE BLVD. � OPEN 24 HOURS
v, it
:
Captors
Veto Possible
Orteg
.
! S
He

America S
( uniiriii:

NEA
new
10Qn
OFFC
New T
SPECIAL
MARYLAND CR
CORN BEEF
Taste t9u
10subs - 20 1 cheese. �? t
OFF 1





IHEFASI CAROLINIAN
Jl 1 Y 30. 1986
Education
a ned valuator.
c event of a teacher
e (iallup poll found
�t ihe American
ipposc or have
. a hi' hiring college
with no pedagogical
heir children.
tnd 82 I had reserva-
or rejected
i tice of assign-
see MKRKA Page 3.

100
f f
Double Coupons
ISED
IVILLE
:ems. Bring Current
ir Equal QualityL
TOESH RIPE NEW JERSEY
Plump
ill
RIPE SWEET
JUMBO
Honeydews
ea.
REGULAR OR BUTTER FLAVOR
Shortening
i Shortening!
1
29
� w5"T �m � YOUR CHOICE WITH AN
AOOmONAL PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
A&P CHILLED
- Orange Juice
64 oz.
ctn.
ii
BUTTERMILK � HOMOGENIZED � LIGHT
Flav-O-Rich Milk
half
BLVD. � OPEN 24 HOURS
A
Captors Release Jenco
WIESBADEN, West Germany
(DPI) � The Rev. Lawrence Jen-
:o, reunited with his family after
)eing held hostage in Lebanon
or nearly 19 months, will fly to
ome for an audience with Pope
John Paul II, a U.S. Air Force
spokesman said today.
Jenco, accompanied by 10
relatives who from the United
States Monday to meet him at a
U.S. hospital in Wiesbaden, was
to leave today for Rome from the
Rhein-Main Air Force Base near
Frankfurt at 10 a.m. EDT, the
spokesman said.
The Pope telephoned Jenco,
who was head of Catholic relief
services in Lebanon, on Sunday
after he arrived from Damascus,
Syria, for a physical examination
at the hospital in Wiesbaden, 12
miles southwest of Frankfurt.
Jenco, 51, was released in
Lebanon Saturday by his captors,
the pro-Iranian Islamic Jihad
movement, and taken to the
Damascus home of American
Ambassador William Eagleton.
The pontiff said he would like
to see Jenco when he felt fit, Jen-
co's brother, John, told reporters
Monday.
The Roman Catholic priest, at
a family reunion at the Air Force
hospital in Wiesbaden, said he
was held in a room 13 feet by 15
feet with three other Americans
kidnapped by Islamic Jihad.
The other captives are David
Jacobsen, an administrator at
Beirut's American University
who was seized Jan. 8, 1985;
Terry Anderson, Beirut bureau
chief for The Associated Press
who was seized March 16, 1985;
and Thomas Sutherland, dean of
the American University
agriculture school who was kid-
napped June 9, 1985.
President Reagan telephoned
Jenco Monday.
"Our prayers for your release
have finally been answered. The
patient and persistent efforts of
so many people have been suc-
cessful Reagan told the priest
during the seven-minute phone
call.
"As happy as I am that you
now have your freedom, I will
not be satisfied until all of our
citizens are released from captivi-
ty the president said. "I know
that you join me in these sen-
timents. All of us were touched
and pleased at your expression of
concern for your fellow hostages
while you were with Ambassador
f11� Eagleton in Damascus
Trade War Predicted
Veto Possible
Ortega Defends Moves
NEW YORK (UPI) �
Nicaraguan President Daniel
Ortega said he wanted to give
President Reagan a chance to re-
pent his policy of aiding the Con-
tra rebels and would not seek for-
mal condemnation of the United
States at the United Nations.
Instead, Orgega planned to ask
the U.N. Security Council today
for "a resolution of support for
the decision by the World Court"
against U.S. aid to the anti-
Sandinista rebels. The resolution
would call on Washington to
comply with the Hague ruling,
diplomatic sources said.
The Reagan administration ig-
nored the court's June 2" ruling
and defended the aid as '�collec-
tive self-defense" against
Nicaraguan-backed leftist rebels
in El Salvador and elsewhere.
Ortega readied for his unusual
appearance before the 15-nation
U.N. Security Council at the
close of his four-day visit by stirr-
ing rousing support from the
pulpits of New York Protestant
churches.
He also defended his moves
against Catholic leaders and op-
position press and sought a
meeting today with Cardinal
John O'Connor.
"We must act firmly and
decisively, not only so that
Nicaraguans will not continue to
die, but that Americans won't be
sent to die Onega, through an
interpreter, told a roaring crowd
of 1,250 people at the in-
terdenominational Riverside
Church Monday.
Turning his remarks to his
meeting at the United Nations,
Ortega said, "We decided no; to
ask the council formally to con-
demn the United States in a
resolution. We would not want to
deny President Reagan and the
U.S. government the ability of
repenting and rectifying
Ortega, whose Sandinista
movement seized power in the
Central American republic in
1979, is assured the backing of
the large non-aligned nations'
block but faces the threat of a
U.S. veto.
TOKYO (UPI) � U.S. Com-
merce Secretary Malcolm
Baldrige predicted today the U.S.
trade deficit with Japan will
widen this year to at least $55
billion and warned the coming
months are "critical" to averting
a trade war.
Baldrige, on the last day of a
four-day visit to discuss trade
disputes with Japanese leaders,
told a meeting of the American
Chamber of Commerce that key
votes approaching in Congress
could swing the United States
toward protectionism.
The House of Representatives
is scheduled to vote next week on
whether to override President
Reagan's veto of a major textile
industry protection bill. The
Senate is expected to finish work
in September on its own version
of an amnibus trade bill, already
passed by the House, to protect
other American industries.
Baldrige said the House om-
nibus bill would provoke retalia-
tion that "would start a trade
war" and said the Reagan ad-
ministration was working with
the Senate to secure a more
palatable final bill in a con-
ference committee.
Baldrige, who warned
Japanese leaders on Monday that
protectionist sentiment is
building in Washington as the
midterm congressional elections
approach this fall, said there
would be little relief in trade
figures.
He said the U.S. merchandise
trade deficit with Japan would
likely expand to $55 billion to $6
billion this year, from the h
$49.7 billion posted in 1985.
The imbalance has proven
resistant to Japan's import
bolstering measures and to the 40
percent rise of the yen against the
U.S. dollar since last September,
which makes Japanese good'
more expensive overseas.
Japanese officials contend the
impact is already showing in
le reasedexpori volume and will
be reflected in the trade figures
la.c this year. But Baldrige said
estimates see the
I S -Japan deficit widening to
more than $60 billion in 1987.
NO NEWS
IS BAD NEWS
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES
.Adults V2 oo
TIL
5:30
CHILDREN
ANYTIME
BUCCANEER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Canter
� ALIENS
1:30, 4:15, 7:00, 9:30 � R-
Club
Paradise
5:00, 7:00
Haunted
Honeymoon
00, 300, 900 �PG�
SV�1
ffl
$'
JASON LIVES
Friday 13th Part VI
1:15, 3:15. 5:15, 7:I5, 9:15 �R�
Number Of Rapes Increases
B LYNN WEAVER
StBfl Writer
According to the official
Greenville Police Department's
Tally Sheet, there were 22 rapes
in the Greenville area from July
1985 to July 1986. Seventeen of
these rapes were cleared by the
arrest and prosecution of the
rapist.
Comparing June and July's
reports of last year to the reports
of June and July of this year, the
figures have doubled. Last year
for those two months, five sexual
assaults were investigated, this
year 10 sexual assault cases are
under investigation.
ECU's Chief of Police, Johnny
Rose, gives his opinion for the in-
creased rapes. Rose said there are
two main reasons for increases in
the figures.
First, he feels that ordinary-
safety precautions are not being
taken as seriously by women as
they should be, but he adds that
this could partly be the universi-
ty's fault. "We could help this
problem by more sexual-
awareness education of the
women co-eds explained Rose.
Second, the rape reporting
systems might be improved. Rape
victims aren't sure where to go or
how to report a sexual assault.
Although the figures are high
America Supports Teachers
for this area, statistically Green-
ville does not have that many
more rapes when compared to
other university cities. Rose add-
ed, "Rapes might be more likely
in the Greenville area because of
the average age of women
When a rape investigation is
started, it is not closed until it is
cleared. "The actual investiga-
tion will continue as long as the
leads keep providing valuable in-
formation states Rose. Police
officers can follow important
leads for months, until there is no
remaining information to in-
vestigate.
Although sexual-awareness
education and rape reporting
systems can be improved, there is
no guarantee there would be any
change in these statistics.
BORTONS I P
TO 12th H EEK
Of PREGNA)
I to 18 wed
� !
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
ron��K'KvMnncyv,n'
i
i
CONTACT LENSES
$105.00
DAIL'r WEAR
$ 145.00
tv
ENDED WEAR
Include? exams tenses ca'e � ' ' '
' tent D No i fhet iscounts -�.
OPTOMCTRIC
�YECAR�C�KT�R
OD
Pa
eter v.
Greenville. N C 27834
The Tipton Anoex
228 Greenville Bivd . ; 756-9404
�������������ptMKIMaBtWBaPBiBBMtaBWBageiMO
Continued From Page3
ing teachers to teach out oi their
subject area.
Gallup also surveyed teacher
and public attitudes on what it
takes to be a good teacher. The
poll found solid agreement bet-
ween the public and teachers on
the traits that make teachers ef-
fective. Good teachers, both
teachers and the public said,
should have: the ability to com-
municate knowledge to students,
the ability to motivate students to
learn, a mastery of subject mat-
ter, and concern for students'
well-being.
The Gallup poll, funded by
the NEA, also compared teaching
to other occupations. How did
teachers fare?
The public ranked teaching
highest of nine occupations (ac-
countant, airplane pilot, com-
puter system analyst, bus driver,
hospital administrator,
newspaper editor, engineer,
teacher, pharmacist) with respect
to the contribution each makes to
the good of society.
And the public rated the com-
plexity of teaching as similar to
engineering. Of the nine occupa-
tions listed in the survey, only
airline pilots were thought to
have a significantly more com-
plex job than teachers.
The Gallup poll also shows:
strong public support for raising
teacher salaries.
Beginning teachers should earn
an average of $20,700, the public
says, whft those with 15 years ex-
perience should be paid an
average of $31,400 per year (New
teachers this fall will earn an
average of $16,500, while their
experienced colleagues will get
$25,257).
Most Americans (54 percent)
I
Torpos
favor raising teachers salaries
even if it means paying more in
taxes.
The public would like to see
teachers actively involved in the
state boards that certify teachers.
Beginning teachers are perceiv-
ed by the public to be as well as or
better qualified than those of 10
years ago. And both the public
and teachers strongly believe that
the job of teaching has become
much harder.
2 Piece Chicken Combo
(Original Recipe or
Extra CrispyTv
1 Small Mashed Potato
& Gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
OR
6 Kentucky Nuggets
Kentucky Fries
1 Large Drink
$1.99
Give a hoot.
Don't pollute.
We Do Chicken Right
Expires 8-20-86
-COUPON
plus tax

Students Welcome!
All Areas, Prices and Sizes
Short and Long Term Leases
219 Cotanche St. Suite 9
Open 6 Days
Home-Locators 752-1375 Fee $40
CLIP COUPON
fiee-ge's
10
OFF
New To The Area
SPECIAL SANDWICHES
MARYLAND CRAB PHILLEY STEAK
CORN BEEF 6 02 HAMBURGER
10
OFF
10
OFF
Taste the difference in our cold cut
subs � 20 slices of meat & 4 slices of
cheese. We also have pizzas with a
northern flavor
CLIP COUPON-
10
OFF
GrecfJ
T&0
Special
85 Item
Salad and
Hot Bar
All You
Can Eat
$2.
99
4 yteat ftto.ee t� eeitf
STEAK HOUSE
- tr. m �m
viil





QUri Eaai (Earniintan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
TOM LtrVENDER, CwiiM�r
Daniel Maurer, �, �,��
Mike Ludwick, �����
Scott Cooper, �� a.
John Shannon, f. ���
DeChanile Johnson, � zww
Steve Folmar, mm�mmmwj
Anthony Martin,�oIWm.�.�,
Meg Needham, - vr .�.�
Shannon Short. w�r��. v.�f�r
July 30. 1986
Opinion
Page 4
Vacation
Hey, Let's Be Careful Out There!
Item number one: immediately
following Friday's last exam, no
student is to touch, look at, or
otherwise come in contact with
anything remotely resembling
school work; nor should students
become uptight at the thought of
doing so on Aug. 25.
This is the first rule to remember
when embarking on that brief
period of near zero brain activity
called vacation.
It is a documented fact that dur-
ing this period any type of brain ac-
tivity above that of the average
sunbatherparty-goer causes
hemorhoids in laboratory animals.
We wouldn't want that now, would
we?
Item number two: It is important
to acquire your weekly, if not daily,
dose of ultraviolet rays. To go
without is a mortal sin for hard core
vacationers and a sure sign that you
spent your time working or, God
forbid, reading romance novels.
We shudder at the thought.
Moreover, lightly browning your
skin does tend to lend some
credibility to your tall tales of that
wild and crazy time at the beach.
That is, if the tales need bolstering
at all. Some of us find truth
stranger than fiction.
Item number three: If a party, or
some other form of "good time" is
encountered, it is your duty as a
student of ECU to join in.
Not to do so could mean being
ostracized by your classmates,
should word get out. What's worse,
it could mean � dare we say it � a
dull vacation.
Item number four: Alcohol, or
the consumption thereof. This per-
tains moreso to those unfortunate
students ages 19 and 20. The East
Carolinian would like to extend its
deepest sympathies to those
students hardest hit by the change
in the drinking age.
We would also like you to
remember this: there are more im-
portant things in life than alcohol
� like pursuing members of the op-
posite sex!
Item number five: Overdoingit.
Yes, that dreaded disease we all
seem to catch in one form or
another. Whether it be the bedspins
or a night in the pokey, we have all
experienced this affliction at on;
time in our lives. Let's say we leave
the instant super slowmo replay to
NBC sports, shall we?
Alright, we've had our say.
We've made our point. Now it's
time you people showed the world
we know how to relax and have a
good time. But remember, be
careful out there.
Tutu Says West Can Go To Hell
We are engaged in reliving the Viet-
nam experience. Whatever Mr. Reagan
does, it is not enough. Whatever Mr.
Botha does, it will not prove to be
enough. The militants in South Africa
will settle at this point for nothing less
than The Federalist Papers, the Con-
stitution, the Bill of Rights, the Eman-
cipation Proclamation, Brown vs. the
Board of Education, the civil rights acts
of 1964 and 1965, and the latest affir-
mative action decision of the Supreme
Court. Otherwise?
The West can go to hell.
On The Right
By WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY
Or to quote Bishop Tutu more exact-
ly, "(President Reagan) is the pits as far
as blacks are concerned. He sits there
like the great, big white chief of old
and "1 am so angry I found it quite
nauseating. I think the West, for my
part, can go to hell
That was after a speech in which the
president of the United states four
separate times condemned apartheid,
condemned the emergency laws pro-
mulgated by South African President
P.W. Botha, asked for a timetable for
the elimination of apartheid laws, called
for the release of political prisoners, for
the release of Nelson Mandela, and for
"unbanning" black political
movements.
One concludes that only if Mr.
Reagan had said that he would send the
U.S. Navy to blockade South African
ports unless his recommendations were
acted on would Bishop Tutu's disgust
with the West have mitigated.
Mr. Tutu's complement in the United
States was Rep. William H. Gray III,
who, representing the Democratic Party,
spoke the official answer to Mr. Reagan.
He was preceded by Sen. Edward Ken-
nedy, who announced that the United
States had become "the las best hope
for apartheid Mr. Gray said that the
United States must "demand" a
timetable for "full democracy, which is
one person, one vote
Mr. Gray went on to say that it hardly
mattered if those South African Macks
who are employed by American capital
should lose their jobs, since they amount
to a mere 47,000 people, or "one tenth
of 1 percent" of the work force.
So that simultaneously we are told
that only sanctions will bring the white
government to its knees and thai
nous can only affect one-tenth of 1 pe
cent of the working force. It that is
then obviously something more l
mere economic sanctions is desired in
order that we succeed with our
"demands
What'7
Well, we know that the (
monwealth nations are doing their besl
to change the nnnd of Margaret I
cher, whose position has been exa
thai of Ronald Reagan and Alan Paton
� namely, that economic growth in
South Africa is the surest means ol ei
fecting the lossening of controls and the
granting of civil rights.
But there is even talk oi the (
monwealth disintegrating il Mrs
cher does not go along, and there arc
rumors that Queen Elizabeth has said
that she had not accepted the throne ol
England in order to preside over the li-
quidation of the Commonwealth.
I swear, if we generated such pressure
against the Soviet Union, Gorbachev
would be sleeping in the cellar of the
Kremlin.
What is clear � beyond the Vietnam
syndrome, which specifies that no con-
cession will generate anything other than
the demand for more concessions is
that before we knew it, one-man one
vote, which not even the Progressive
Federal Party in South Africa has tradi-
tionally favored, is suddenly the com-
monly accepted objective. What isn't
clear but ought to be is that one-man
one-vote in South Africa isn't going to
happen in any meaningful sense.
Why? It is one thing to vote in order
to secure one's civil rights, another to
vote in order to seize one's neighbor's
property. And that is what the militants
wan' Mi Mandela (whom the pres
�A is' '�� M � ��
liberation movemeni in S utl v
proclaimed Ma
wl �se interesi in -Mie-man one
tld he as transitory as tl �
He.
Africa
w hid
ii
B Zulu
' � �
. I
. d

H i Mil
S
GNP b
� S
Bisl
�'��
like W i i hell.
Campus
Spectrum
Rules
n

I . f the Ed

� tm
! in opinion column featuring
guest i m the student body
and faculty. The columns printed in
the "Campus Spectrum" will contain
current topics ol concern to the cam-
pus, community or nation.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information may
act Daniel Maurer. managing
editor of rhe last Carolinian at
757 6366, - stop hv out offices on
the second floor of the Publications
Building.
History Proves The Polygraph Is Ineffective
By STEPHEN R. Dl J ACK
It has long been believed that there can be objec-
tive measures of innocence or guilt, veracity or
deceit. During the Middle Ages there was trial by
ordeal. In ancient China miscreants were forced to
chew rice. If their mouths were dry afterward, they
were considered guilty. Today we have the
polygraph.
The idea that a physiological response � blood
pressure, in this case � could be used to test for
truthfulness was first advanced in 1895 by the
Italian criminologist and phrenologist Cesare Lom-
broso. In the 1930s, William Mouton Marston add-
ed measurements of respiration, and perspiration
and called his machine the polygraph.
The U.S. Court of Appeals found no scientific
evidence supporting Marston's claims for the
device, and he was driven out of the profession he
founded. Marston went on to create the comic book
character Wonder Woman.
The federal court system still refuses to enter into
evidence test results from Marston's wonder
machine, but nearly half of the state courts permit
polygraph tests under some circumstances, and its
use is on the rise among private employers and in
the federal government.
Desperate to do something about the steady flow
of classified information to the press and beyond
our borders, the Reagan administration has
repeatedly pushed the polygraph as a technological
watchdog over the government's vital secrets. And
private employers, facing billions of dollars worth
of losses from employee theft and other miscon-
duct, order perhaps as many as one million tests a
year.
In a business world, the popularity of the
polygraph means the countless Americans will be
refused employment or fired for failing a test that
misidentifies truthful persons as liars perhaps as
much as half the time.
In the public sector, where several agencies are
relying more and more on the polygaph to guard
against espionage, it means trying to ensure our na-
tional security with an electronic Maginot Line.
The polygraph, in fact, detects stress, which
often occurs just because a peson is being subjected
to a test that could result in imprisonment or loss of
a job. So shaky is the scientific grounding of
polygraphy that the FBI forbids polygraph
dragnets, and the American Psychological Associa-
tion prohibits its members from administering tests.
Congress is now considering a bill, co-sponsored
by Orrin Hatch and Edward Kennedy, forbidding
polygraph testing by private employers. But senti-
ment in the White House and on Capitol Hill seems
to favor use of the polygraph in the defense and in-
telligence communities, and perhaps also among the
thousands of other federal employees with security
clearances.
In December the administration quickly shelved a
NSC directive to expand polygraph testing after
Secretary of State George Shultz threatened to
resign. But President Reagan revived the proposal
in a January press conference, and a special security
task force is supposed to be working on recommen-
dations for presidential instructions implementing
the directive.
There are, of course, important civil liberties ob-
jections to the use of the polygraph. There is the
question of personal privacy and a related one of
whether the government can require citizens to
answer questions about criminal activity of which
they are not even suspect. The specter of govern-
ment thought police has brought down the wrath of
conservatives from William Safire to Jeane
Kirkpatrick.
Still, matters of civil liberties are debatable. The
scientific validity of the polygraph is not. Accor-
ding to a 1983 report by the Office of Technology
Assessment, there are "no field studies on the
validity of polygraph testing for pre-employment
screening or periodic screening" � exactly the kind
of testing the government does, and hopes to ex-
pand.
OTA notes that although there are studies that
provide data on its use in another application �
focused investigations of actual incidents � all
"had substantial problems of research design
These studies claimed accuracies of lie detection
anywhere from 50.6 to 98.6 percent, and truth
detection from 12.5 to 94.1 percent.
In other words, notes Dr. David Lykken, a
psychiatrist at the University of Minnesota, the
polygraph is only slightly better at detecting lies
than a coin flip.
The OTA report confirmed what many resear-
chers have found. John F. Beary III, now an
associate dean at Georgetown University Medical
School, wrote a report critical of d.e polygraph
while he was an acting assistant secretary of defense
three years ago.
"There is no physiological response unique to ly-
ing Beary asserts. Lykken keeps a log of people
falsely implicated in wrongdoing by polygraph
tests. A Los Angeles cashier was fired after a
polygraph exam revealed he had given his mother a
discount at the register; he was later able to show
that his mother had died five years earlier.
Polygrah proponents usually claim that inac-
curate results point to inadequate training or im-
proper technique, not to the machine's inherent
flaws.
Standards are obviously lax. Testers in private in-
dustry can be certified with even less training than
those in the government or, in many states, none at
all. The graduates of the government's polygraph
training school at Fort McClellan only take a
14-week course, followed by ten weeks of practice
� less training most beauticians receive.
Advocates ol the polygraph, especially within the
government, relv on substantial anecdotal evidence
to support their case, thousands of job applicants
at the National Security Agency, tot instance, when
screened by agency polygraphers, have confessed to
crimes. All of them had cleared the agency's tradi-
tional background checks.
This has become a favorite Reagan anecdote.
What the president doesn't say is that they were not
caught by the machine but confessed because they
mistakenly thought it works.
The NSA experience would appear to be more ?
comment on the purported ngor of us background
checks than on the "Utility" of the polygraph
Spies are not likely to be so tooled. Intelligence and
polygraph experts believe that the KGB and perhaps
other foreign intelligence services train their moles
in deceiving the machine
The biggest problem with polygraph screening,
however, is not with its accuracy in detecting spies
or other criminals but with the large number of in-
nocents who become wrongly accused.
Imagine that the polygraph falsely identifies a
security violator one percent of the time � a rate
far superior to what even polygraph advocates
claim. A single screening of i0,000 employees
among whom there is a single spy, then, would pro-
duce a pool of approximately 100 persons cast as
spies � but the poloygraph would be of no use in
determining which one was the guilty partv. Indeed,
the offender might well not even be in the sample
A recent study by Beary and two other physicians
cited in the June issue of Discover magazine sug-
gests that a more likely result of a test of 10,000
employees would be a pool of more than 3,500
potential spies � and a significant chance th?t the
real spy had escaped detection. What would the
government do with those 3,500 workers? Fire them
all? Investigate them all? The polygraph, as on
most questions, provides no useful answers.
IHI 1 ASl AkOI INI
Summer Theatre
'Tuna'
By JOHN SHANNON
Charlie likes tuna will .
taste. Starkisl iikc
tastes good Botl �
their noses a
it offered them on a pla
I � ats I m a
play. luna is a small
Texas where "ta
"eat" and where
not to be poisoned I �
is. Tuna an
collectively as "Grea
are a meltint
flavors, given a flexible
tion, to constitute a
if not of the �
of its rotten core.
"Greatei Tuna'
production by trie Las' (
Summer Theatre cu:
ing at McGinnis Theatre -v
ing in that all tl
tiny world are p
men. Even mo:
sidering thai
male or female
alike.
Chalk it up
Rambal
UPl � Carlo Ramba
won Academy Awards
featured roles in three ma
tion p
moviegoers have tie-
face or heard his voice.
Rambaldi,
created and manipulate :
gigantic ape. Kit g K
wling killer aboard a spa
in Alien and the lovable
restnal E. T. Eas
Rambaldi an Oscar for sp
visual effects.
A recognized genius in
field, Rambaldi has been - �
with his son Allesandro, a:
special effects artist, si-
March jn the figures for King
Kong Lives, a Dino De Laurc
sequel to the 196 version ol
giant ape's story.
"Carlo is unique in this .n
with his ability to create. He
deed a.i artist of vision
Martha Shumacher. pres k
DEG Stu e De I au
facility on the
coast. "He
an inventor
Rambaldi's artistic p
taken a turn he never e-
as a 1951 graduate
Academy of Fine
Bologna, Italy, when
sculpt, paint and engrav
to fame.
"Thirty vears ago. I had
idea I was going to end up in
tion pictures Rambaidi
Speaking in a combinatioi
halting Englis d flow .
Italian translated bv
Rambaidi says his cinen
career "really began as
something ol a joke
A friend in the Italian cinema
based in Rome asked bin
sculpt a movable 40-foot drag
in a 1958 produc Seigfrid
Rambaidi came up with a
I
Fii
Hv l(
Busint
W ixnev
l
'�
0
P
� �
GUda Radner, Gene Wilder and Dora DeL
moon which is current! plating tt the P�3
Wilder is rated PG.






HAN6
IN
Go To Hell
president
�Ha of the
Africa,
� Marxisi
vote
'he San
ngress,
ads, is
'sen m-
pari of
tl e Zulus
: CM will
ireds, nor
g foi the
ent can
come
;pe victory
ple and
� and his
ped the peo
educed real
40 per-
.�.e not?
ion was off.
More
go to hell.
ampus
ecirum
Rules
tin pus
ditorial
�n has re-
Spectrum
featuring
���� � bodv
printed in
mtain
e cam-
pating
may
n anaging
� an at
" (cs on
�ttions
Ineffective
thin the
i es idence
: applicants
tance, when
tesed to
's tradi-
ite Reagan anecdote.
- that they were not
sssed because they
I appear to be more ?
background
polvgraph.
diligence and
K iB and perhaps
� leii moles

polygraph screening,
v in detecting spies
arge number of in-
ised.
lisely identifies a
e percent of the time � a rate
�at even polygraph advocates
claim tingle screening of 10,000 employees
t single spy t then, would pro-
dy 100 persons cast as
but the poloygraph wou'd be of no use in
rmming which one was the guilty party Indeed,
�tider might well not even be in the sample.
cent study by Beary and two other physicians
ned in the June issue of Discover magazine sug-
gests that a more likely result of a test of 10,000
employees would be a pool of more than 3,500
potential spies � and a significant chance that the
real spy had escaped detection. What would the
government do with those 3.500 workers? Fire them
THfc t ASTCAROl INI AN
Lifestyles
JULY 30. 1986
Page?
Summer Theatre
'Tuna' Is A Good Catch
By JOHN SHANNON
I ifnlttr, l-4it.M
Charlie likes tuna with good
taste. Starkist likes tuna that
tastes good. Both would turn up
their noses at Tuna, Texas, were
:fered them on a plate.
That's Tuna the town, not the
play. luna is a small town in
lexas where "taste" means
"eat" and where food is likely as
not to be poisoned. Tasteless as it
is, Tuna and its environs (known
collectively as "Greater Tuna")
are a melting pot of just enough
flavors, given a flexible imagina-
tion, to constitute a microcosm,
if not of the whole world, at least
of its rotten core.
"Greater Tuna" is an amaing
production by the East Carolina
summer Theatre currently runn-
ing at McGinnis Theatre. Amaz-
ing in that all the citizens of this
imy world are played by just two
men. Even more incredible con-
sidering that none of the twenty
male or female characters look
alike.
Chalk it up to the talents of
Ronn Carroll and William
Christopher, and the miracle is
half-explained. The other half of
the credit belongs to six behind-
the-scenes dressers without whom
the show probably couldn't be
done.
Christopher and Carroll play
about ten characters apiece, each
of whom looks, talks and moves
very differently from the rest. An
unprepared viewer might think,
for a while, the cast is very large.
But knowing what Carroll and
Christopher are up to backstage
really makes the play exciting: the
speed of the metamorphoses bog-
gles the mind.
Besides the quick costume
changes, there are few props to
get in the wa ot the acting. 1 he
set consists of two bare tables,
each with two plain chairs. From
one of these tables Thurston
Wheelis (Carroll) and rles
Struvie (Christopher) open the
first act with a lengthy Morning
News (or morning trivia) report,
after which Wheelis realizes that
Struvie forgot to turn on the
power. Radio station OkkK is
like everything else in Tuna �
very slack.
Radio station OKKK is a cons-
tant presence throughout
"Greater Tuna and the three
Ks are no accident. Tuna is the
most backwards place imaginable
in terms of cdlture, morals and
just about everything else. Air
time is regularly alloted to
clansman Elmer Wat kins (Car-
roll) and vice president of the
"Smut Snatchers Committee"
V'era Carp (Christopher), among
other proponents of racism and
anti-humanism.
Winners of the Tuna high
school essav contest are announc-
ed bv Wheelis and Struvie �
"The Case for Segregation" and
"Human Rights: Who Needs
"hem?" are among the winning
essavs Vera Carp lists me
words the Smut Snatchers plan to
remove from the dictionary �
'Mum, hooker, coke, clap,
deflower, ball, knocker and
nuts" aie to he deleted; "snatch"
would be on the list but the com
mittee can't afford to change
their letterhead.
Ronn Carroll and William Christopher in one of the many guises each of them donned during a Monday
night performance of 'Greater Tuna now playing at ECL's McGinnis Theatre.
It seems money is the only
force stronger than bigotry in
Tuna, Texas. The only character
who uses the radio station for a
cause remotely "good" is Petey
Fisk, played by Christopher, who
represents the Humane Society
and can't find anyone willing to
take care of a homeless puppy
named Yippy (barked by
Carroll).
There is far more to "Greater
Tuna" than this review can begin
to describe. Bi t take it from the
audience on opening night �
laughter frequently drowned out
the lines, and Ronn Carroll and
William Christopher received a
deafening standing ovation when
it was all over.
Rambaldi Will Create More 'Kong' Movies
L'Pl � Carlo Rambaldi has
won Academy Awards for his
featured roles in three major mo-
tion pictures, but m o s 1
moviegoers have never seen his
face or heard his voice
Rambaldi, 60, is the man who
created and manipulated the
gigantic ape. King Kong, the pro-
wling killer aboard a space-ship
in Alien and the lovable extrater-
restrial T. Each creature netted
Rambaldi an Oscar for special
visual effects.
A recognized genius in his
field, Rambaldi has been working
with his son Aliesandro, also a
special effects artist, since mid-
March on the figures for King
Kong Lives, a Dino De Laurentiis
sequel to the 19"?6 version of the
giant ape's story.
"Carlo is unique in this world,
with his ability to create. He is in-
deed an artist of vision says
Martha Shumacher, president of
DEG Studios, the De I aurentiis
facility on the North Carolina
coast. "He is both an artist and
an inventor
Rambaldi's artistic path has
taken a turn he never envisioned
as a 1951 graduate of the
Academy of Fine Arts in
Bologna, Italy, when he set out to
sculpt, paint and engrave his way
to fame.
"Thirty years ago. 1 had no
idea I was going to end up in mo-
tion pictures Rambaldi says.
Speaking in a combination of
halting English and flowing
Italian translated by his son,
Rambaldi says his cinematic
career "really began as
something of a joke
A friend in the Italian cinema
based in Rome asked him to
sculpt a movable 40-foot dragon
in a 1958 production of Seigfrid.
Rambaldi came up with a
believable creature that prompted
other directors to request his ser-
ices, and he soon abandoned
stone and plaster for modern
materials.
"I had a good experience with
making formal sculptures with
realistic movements he saw
"This dragon was very big. but
very primitive, built fot fun. It
turned out well and led to other
tilings
"Other things" included 12
American and 53 European
films. He lists among his credits
his work on Wood) Allen's
H hat's en Pussycat, Blake Ed-
wards' The Pink Panther and
John Houston's The Bible
Movie fans may best remember
Rambaldi for his work on E.T
the candy-eating, beer-drinking,
bug-eyed visitor from the stats,
but he says he has a special place
m his heart tor King Kong.
King Kong is definitely tnmibet
one. because that's the biggest
star ever to hit the screen, and
he's the star that brought us to
the United States, and the star
that brought us to discover the
technology we needed to create
Rambaldi says. "E.I. would be
second favorite, mostly because
oi the impact he had on au-
diences
All the figures are " 100 percent
of ourselves says Rambaldi,
but some more than others. He
likes E.T. and King Kong, but
loathes Ins own crew-devouring
creation from Alien.
I don't like the idea of building
monsters whose purpose is to
scare he savs. "The greatest
impact with audiences comes
when the people see something in
the creature that has human
value. That's what they liked
about f .7
"His creatures are always cast
members, separate entities
Schumacher says. "That's dif-
ficult to accomplish. With every
face, every blink of an eye, every
coordination of eye movement,
he's got to express stature,
something with charisma,
something fierce or something
ferocious, but something having
a lot of sympathy from the au-
dience
Studio officials and workers
say Rambaldi is undoubtedly a
perfectionist. Working 12-hour
days in his studio, surrounded by
the huge legs, arms and faces of
King Kong, his personal vision
can be overwhelming.
"It's not always easy working
with him, says Shumacher.
"Sometimes you can knock your
head against a wall, saying 'No,
that's not what I want Carlo has
his vision, and wants to stay with
that vision
Rambaldi hopes that vision
will surface again in the
characters of King Kong Lives �
the original giant and a new
mate, "Lady Kong who is
destined to give birth to "Babv
Kong
"Baby Kong will be the pro-
tagonist of future Kong films
Rambaldi says. We think Baby
Kong will be another 'E.T Baby
Kong has that same childlike in-
nocence. But we never know until
we see the finished film, when the
creature is on the screen, with the
music and the sound effects.
Then we can see the creature's
persor .litv
"These are sculptures he
says, waving plaster-flecked
hands over the figures in his sun-
baked studio. "These are
sculptures that move. I don't
regret the path I've taken as an
artist, because I never left
sculpting or painting. I'm just ap-
plying it in a way that has more
impact, in an art form that can
strike deeper than just paintings
or sculptures.
Downtown Action Slows As
The Summer Winds Down
Fighter Pilot Movie Cruises Along
By JONATHAN PRINGI.E
V�ff �T1Ur
Looking for a good action film
this weekend? One that's dif-
ferent, with a bit of romance, and
a believeable story line. Top Gun
is the one to see.
Starrirw Tom Cruise of Risky
Business and Kelly McGillis oi
Witness, the movie is a non-stop
journey on the road to self-
discovery. The story centers
around Cruise, as Maverick, and
his co-pilot Goose, played by An-
thony Edwards. They are sent to
compete against the top one per-
cent of the fighter pilots in the
Navy, so they go to fighter
weapons school, TOP GUN.
None of the characters are call-
ed by their real names; they go by
their call signs. These colorful
nicknames give the viewer some
insight into the characters' per-
sonalities. Maverick is completely
unpredictable, and although
some of the other fighters call
him "reckless" and "unsafe
they must also call him talented.
Goose, short for Mother Goose,
is well liked by all, and could be
called parental in his friendship
with Maverick. Considered by
most to be the best pilot around,
Maverick's chief rival is played
by Val Kilmer; call sign Ice Man.
He earned the name because
"that's the way he flies, ice cold,
no mistakes His by-the-book
fighting style wears you down,
and when you get tired and slip
up, he's got you.
Cruise, Edwards and Kilmer
have all had the title of teenage
stars from their past movie roles,
Tom Cruise makes a giant leap
from his role as the kid from
Risky Business to his excellent
portrayal of the complex
character of Maverick. Anthony
Edwards, who gave a good per-
formance in Gotcha, and more
recently in Revenge of the erds,
brings Goose to life as
everybody's friend, someone you
can depend on. The comical
whiz-kid from Real Genius, Val
Kilmer, clearly shows he can han-
See TOP GUN page 6
Bv J. DAVID MATTHEWS
Staff WrtM
For those hard-core party
fiends who insist on staying in
Greeniown this weekend instead
of going to the beach like regular
people, here is a sampling of
what you will find going on club-
wise in our fair city:
Ramada Inn � The top-forty
and dance music sounds of "Pro-
wler" will be featured in the
plush confines of the Veranda
Room from Tuesday until Satur-
day.
The Attic � Wine, Women
and Wednesday will kick off this
week's entertainment for the
south's number six rock and roll
nightclub. Music will be provided
by the "Wampus Cats Thurs-
day is heavy metal night at the
Attic. "Harpo (from
Baltimore) will dish out the
metallica. The Attic rocks on Fri-
day with the exam jam and the
popular sounds of
"Sidewinder "The Citizens"
will perform at the Attic on
Saturday.
New Deli � There will be no
bands at the Deli this weekend
because of the end of summer
school. However, on Wednesday,
the Deli will feature Deadhead
Jam with 5 cent draft.
At Grog's, every Wednesday
night is New Year's Eve. Bottles
of champagne go for $2.99. On
Thursday, the special at Grog's
will be October Schnapps.
And at TW's Nightlife,
Wednesday night features "The
Comedy Zone" with well known
comedians taking the stage.
Best Bet: Since most students
will be leaving town on Friday, I
recommend New Year's Eve at
Grog's tonight. Andre for three
bucks a bottle? I can't think of a
better deal. Unless you w ant to sit
at home and watch CTBN
(Cleveland Indians Baseball Net-
work) and see if the Indians are
still pretending to be a baseball
team.
Summer Movie
'Honeymoon' Is A Bad Trip
Investigate them all? The polygraph, as on
H questions, provides no useful answers.
Gilda Radner, Gene Wilder and Dom DeLuise appear in the Orion Pictures release, 'Haunted Honey-
moon which is currently playing at the PUtt Theatres at the Carolina East Center. This film, co-written by
Wilder b rated PG.
By EDTOSHACH
M.ftWrtl.
In the new Orion Pictures
release, Haunted Honeymoon,
people are murdered, a werewolf
prowls an old castle, a man walks
on a wall, and a snake jumps out
of a drawer. Despite all of this,
nothing happens.
Haunted Honeymoon stars
Gene Wilder (who also co-wrote
and directed it) and Gilder
Radner as two 1939 radio stars
who are engaged. Wilder has a
psychological problem that
manifests itself when he hears
thunder or sees lightening. This is
awkward for him because the
radio show in which he stars is a
mystery called � surprise �
"Haunted Honeymoon" and
thunder is a sound effect they
often use.
Wilder's uncle, a psychiatrist,
believes he can cure Wilder of his
ailment, which he claims is caus-
ed by paralysing fear. His pla
to expose Wilder to such intense-
ly terrifying situations that he will
be relieved of his psychosis �
much as he would relieve a case
of the hiccoughs.
Some good things jump out at
you at the beginning of Haunted
Honeymoon; the movie captures
the style of the period it depicts
very well, down to the type of
print used for the credits. The
stars are some we have become
accustomed to seeing in funny
films � In addition to Wilder
and Radner, Dom Del uise ap-
pears in the movie.
Even so, the movie is ruined by
two very simple problems.
)Haunted Honeymoon is that
most dreaded of cinematic offer-
ings, a comedy that is simply not
funny. It's not humorous, or
even smile provoking.
2) It is booooring. The story by
Wilder and TeiTence Marsh is
ponderous at its best. This cannot
be blamed on the actors, all of
whom do a fine job with what
they are given. It is totally the
result of a murderously dull
story.
Wilder has shown us in such
films as Stir Crazy, Blazing Sad-
dles, Silver Streak and Young
Frankenstein that he is a crafted
comedy actor. He should either
give up writing or get a lot better
at it before attempting another
motion picture.
Also detracting from Haunted
Honeymoon is a confusing
storyline. The ending is especially
bewildering; it makes 200's look
simple by comparison. You get
the feeling that somebody got
tired of typing.
If your only other choice is At-
tack of the Killer Slugmen from
Burgaw, Part IV: Defeat at the
Salt Mine, then you should pro-
bably see Haunted Honeymoon.
Otherwise, don't waste your time
or your money.
MN





0 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
BLOOM COUNTY
JULY M), lsN6
by Berke Breathed
. �,� v ' .

4'
� �
J L
V

' H6V BLKKHBAPz ��-
Tfig)


V�
.� v
v "�.

V i'
s ��'
" .

1V,


� �
wm. PMN�
in weivesN'i ��
fmom-
s �

r- wM
. - v 7 S

m-O-St
by JARRELL & JOHNSON
�, JvWmI v '��'
. i� � � . . � - t j B
T� F?M IL AA 5 TYl 'QL rft
Ke. VV6. N'ist
ri � ��- rjrm u �� .1 hi!
T"C a V . .1 J� � �'
By So ve Lore
f ATt
J
-
Mmiw
Beam
:r
.a
WHO f?
WHO WOVlP
MARRY VWf
N060PV "
1 PONT
eeueve rrA
IHl 5
WONPCRFIA
��'
MOM
i

. �� - ��-
THtRtlSA
CATCH H&?�
50ME & 7
PLACB-
c
S�

4
CUOUPS � � I
���,
�.
-

'Top Gun' Carries Honors As One
Of This Summer's Biggest Movies
Continued from page 5
die serious acting as Ice Man.
The aerial camera work, and
the dog fight sequences are as
new and exciting as the special ef-
fects from Star Wars. The action
never stops, and whenever
Maverick leaves the runway.
things are sure to get hot. Nearly
two-thirds of the movie is air-
borne, and while in the air,
Maverick has to push it to the
limit to be the best that he can be.
When he loses the edge after an
accident and is grounded,
Maverick takes on the hallowed
look of a man who has lost his
will to live.
In between dog fights, the
director squeezed in a love story.
Maverick meets his lady love in
one of the funniest pick-up scenes
in memory. The romance, unlike
An Officer and A Gentleman, is
not essential to the plot; however,
it is well done and adds an ex-
cellent twist.
All through this high speed ac-
tion film, the music sets the
mood. Veteran sound track per-
formcrs Kenny Loggins and
Harold Faltermeyer, of
Footloose and Beverly Hills Cop
tame, do their part. Loggins has
a hit song and video from
"Danger Zone and his "Plav-
ing with the Boys" provides the
background for a volleyball game
thai the ladies are sure to love.
I altermeyer turns in another fine
instrumental, and relative
newcomer Berlin performs the
love theme "Take Mv Breath
Away teresting. It should be here all
Top Gun has a lot of action, a summer, but don't wait. See it
lot of good music and just this weekend at the Plitt Theatre,
enough romance to make it in- Carolina East Center.
The Casl Carolina (.Summer "heatr
presents
William
Christopher
Known as Father Muicahy
on M'A'S'H
Broadway veter n
O Golden Pond & Carousel
I The hilarious satire of small town life in Texas
Monday - Saturday. July 28 - August 2. 8:15 pm
Special Mahnee Performance
Wednesday, July 30. 2:15 pm
McGmnis T' e itre 5th & Easteri . . nc
FOR RESERVATIONS: 757-63901
COMING ATTRACTIONS
Undercover Cats
' scjc-m flu
PL V- - .
y
vw ;
Stow
By PARKER
fast v r
s
VHMvum
0 hvTM kV 'V
Endless Summer
Celebration
what WELCOME Back DANCE
Free Admission
Free Refreshments
Everyone Welcomed!
where Mendenhall Student Center
Multi-Purpose Room
when Friday, August 22, 1986
8:00 p.m. to 12:00 Midnight
what LIVE OUTDOOR CONCERT
where University Mall Area
when Sunday, August 24, 1986
9:00 p.m.
End The Summer With A
Bang
And Kick Off The New
Year Right
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union
�$�5:�!k
3

,
TV

r
����
3 fys
' i'�
i

T Tfe.
f J �NP
, am to tfwT �ou
A

I HI I AM
Gretta O'Neal, shown here with I ad Hirai,
hopt-s to work her wa into the
ACC Sportsw
Review Awari
PINEHURST, N (
I � v 11 a n
Write
weekend a:
basketball player 1
athle . year, w
selection process I
award.
Several membe:
� riters group say they are em-
barrassed that the organiza
approved Bias I
Coast Conference's top award
shortly after the star forward
died of cocaine intoxical
They also
rail player year �
Barry Word
ruled academica
the Cava
still got the ACC
The group voted 2;
i low its executive -
to sudv the matter a
back at ts next n
ponents ol the n
wanted to see critei i I
academic and moral chara
standard
ACC aw
year, as well as I otba
hasketban pla ei I
Bias. ho Aas volt.
in the week foil
College Park. Md .
r
Sports Fact
Wed. Jui 30. 1982
Chief Noc-A-H a a i
tepee are removed from tl .
field blea. n Atlan
make room for more �
whereupon the Braves blow a
10-and-a-half-game lead as
they proceed to lose I 9
tu'V 21 games Once the tepee
is resurrected, the team
recovers at
i
Bra I
Things He Thought ().
Hot Sum
Now that summei
neanng a close, we would liki
reflect on some things we've ex-
perienced over the two-month
period
By
Sports Editors
First, we would like to thank
the readers for not sending in
negative letters to the editor. We
know how important ECU sports
is to the campus, but there wasn't
too much going on. We tried to
cover the more important aspects
surrounding the sports world �
the biggest being the drug story in
athletics.
We did receive positive feed-
back on our story of the news
media's handling of the Len Bias
Getti

mer in
is alms
redo
Memo
ing !
some
cheap
On
feel wt
ou- I
in '
ment
CO 1
I





V
���- -



J�
Honors As One
ggest Movies
- : Se� 11
��'� c.
Ronn
Carroll
FACTIONS
summer
ation
lack DANCE
Student Center
ist 22, 1986
fight
OR CONCERT
tail Area
st 24, 1986
mer With A
S
The New
ghtH
m
n
11 0s.
gathering place
I Ml EAS1AROI INI AN
Sports
JULY 30, 1986
Page 7
Gretta O'Neal, shown here with I.ad Pirate coach FmU Manwaring.
hopes to work her wa into the starting lineup next season.
ACC Sportswriters
Review Award Process
NEHURST, Vi (I PI) �
I he tlantic Coast Sports
ters ss ciation, which last
weekend announced Maryland
ketball plave: I en Bias as
athlete of the year, will review the
tion process for its annual
award.
Several members of the sport -
writers group say they are em-
barrassed that the organization
approved Bias for the Atlantic
Coast Conference's top award
shortly after the star forward
died of cocaine intoxication.
The also noted the league's
hall plaver of the year �
Barry Word ol Virginia � was
"jled academically ineligible for
the Cavaliers las' -wo games but
still go: the ACC award.
I he gioup voted 23-12 Sunday
to allow its executive committee
to study the matter and report
back at its next meeting. Pro-
ponents of the motion said they
wanted to see some criteria foi
academic and moral character
standards established for the
ACC awards for athlete of the
vear, as well as football and
basketball player of the year.
Bias, who was voted the award
in the week following his death in
College Park, Md also was the
as
r
Sports Fact
Wed. July 30. 1982
Chief Noc-A-Homa and his
tepee are removed from the left
field bleachers in Atlanta to
make room for more seats,
whereupon the Braves blow a
10-and-a-half-game lead as
they proceed to lose 19 of their
next 21 games. Once the tepee
is resurrected, the team
ecovers and regains first place.
ACC's basketball player of the
vear for 1985 and 1986.
Tie ACC sportswriters voted
31-12 following a heated debate
to reject anv specific action on
modifications a; the Sundav
ting. Barney Cooke, of
�s ille, a . the group's
Executive Secretary, said
C 'SNA a bv-laws made no men-
tion on anv criteria for the award
except tor athletic ability.
rhat's absurd Roanoke,
Va sports editor Bill Brill said
of the vote to keep the award's
present criteria. "We've voted to
recognize ourselves
hypocrites
Irwin Smallwood, of the
Greensboro Sews (g. Record,
said he felt "considerable embar-
rassment in choosing someone
for an award who has fallen from
grace as much as this person has.
But 1 doubt you can set up anv
by-laws to handle the situation
Jack Zane, the University of
Maryland sports information
director who accepted the ACC
award on behalf of the school
and Bias' family, accused the
group of wanting to judge an in-
nocent individual who might be
accused of a crime.
You're going to set
yourselves up as judge and jury in
these situations Zane said.
"You can't judge these people
just for having their name linked
to something. And they might
not have done it
Clemson Sports Information
Director Bob Bradley spoke
against an unsuccessful motion
that would have allowed the ex-
ecutive committee to overturn the
membership's vote for the
awards "in extraordinary cir-
cumstances.
"We'd just be hypocrites if we
tried to change the ballot
Bradlev said.
O'Neal Overcomes Injury?
By JANET SIMPSON
s��u Writer
� Many things in life are just
flatly taken for granted. We
assume everything is going to go
our way and nothing bad could
ever possibly happen to us.
We just take for granted that
the tube we grab every morning
in the bathroom is toothpaste, we
assume that just because we're
planning to spend the day at the
beach that it couldn't rain, and
that our best friend is going to
surely be able to get those basket-
ball tickets.
However, something we
shouldn't take for granted is our
health. You never know how im-
portant that ankle or knee was
until it no longer does what you
want it to do. No one knows this
better than Lady Pirate basket-
ball center, Gretta O'Neal.
Earlier this summer the 6-2
sophomore underwent surgery to
correct a problem she had with
her tendons. A few weeks later,
she is well on her way to
recovery. "My knee is just fine
stated the recovering O'Neal. "It
is healing good and looking
good
Playing on the injurec knee
last season hurt O'Neal some;
however, she feels the operation
will be of great help to her. "I'll
have more flexibilty and it should
help my movement on the
court said O'Neal. "Hopeful-
ly, I'll have better jumping ability
also. You can say I'll be new and
improved
Although hurting somewhat,
O'Neal still managed to shine at
times. Against both Indiana State
and William & Mary she scored
14 points and grabbed seven and
four rebounds, respectively.
O'Neal also scored in double
figures � with 10 against Miami,
as well as an eight-point showing
versus Radford. The Williston,
S.C. native also grabbed eight re-
bounds in the team's second
meeting with George Mason.
O'Neal's coach Chris Ricken,
at Williston-Elko High School,
has really been an inspiration to
her. Her confidence in O'Neal
has been instrumental in making
her the player she is today.
"She is the greatest and I
wouldn't trade her for the
world said O'Neal. "The
reason I have confidence that I
can come back and play in the
fall and be a contributing factor
is because a lot of faith was put in
my ability to play in high school.
Therefore, I have confidence in
what I can and can't do.
"I know what I can and can't
do continued O'Neal. "It's
just a matter of doing it
The future is continuing to
look bright for the lady Pirates.
They had a terrific season last
year during which O'Neal was a
"Those three showed the out-
come when you are a senior, but
they had to work hard just as we
have to work hard right now
Delphine Mabry is the player
O'Neal feels will make the dif-
ference this year. "Delphine will
be the team's base expressed
O'Neal. "We will grow around
Delphine. She's probably the
fastest point guard in the country
and would give any guard a run.
She's really looking good and
she's ready
Alma Bethea is also someone
O'Neal thinks will come through
for the Lady Pirates this year.
"Sometimes I thought Alma
could have played a lot better
than she did stated O'Neai. "I
think it was the fear of starting,
but in the upcoming season that
fear will be gone and she'll also
be ready
'7 won 7 say Vm going to start, but I will say Vm
sure going to give it all I have. Vm ready and I
�Gretta O'Neal
want it.
freshman, and this her
sophomore season looks to be
just as shinj.
"The upcoming season will be
a challenge commented
O'Neal. "I think we're going to
do as well as we practice to do.
We have a lot of talent and it's a
matter of putting it all together
We have to be altogether by the
beginning of the season and
definitely clicking at the end �
when it's most critical.
I orraine Foster. Sylvia Bragg
and Lisa Squirewell, three of last
season's senior class, will be miss-
ed; however. O'Neal feels the
team will still be in tact. "As I
said before, we have a lot of
talent elaborated O'Neal.
"The cream of the crop were
those three, but the talent we
have beyond those three is
unlimited.
Anothei player whom O'Neal
feels will be ready this season is
Monique Pompili. "Monique
had a lot of problems handling an
excellant freshman year and she
didn't quite know how to get a
grip of her sophomore year in
dealing with all the pressures and
expectations stated O'Neal.
"She played in the Bay State
Games (in Boston) this summer
as well as being in the Sports
Festival in Houston now 1 really
think she's going to be ready
In addition to O'Neal herself,
Mabry, Bethea, and Pompili. is a
group of talented newcomers.
There are five freshmen: Irish
Hamilton, Christy Harris. Tam-
mie Laney, Sandra Grace, and
O'Neal's future roommate Sarah
Gray. Also added to the purple
and gold this season is a very
talented transfer from I.ouisburg
Wolfpack
Battles
CAA 's Navy
SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (UP!)
� North Carolina State will
battle Colonial Athletic-
Association power Navy in the
eighth annual Basketball Hall
of Fame Tip-Off Classic on
Nov. 22 at the Springfield Civic
Center, officials say.
The matchup was confirmed
Monday by representatives
from both schools. Hall of
Fame officials planned to for-
mally announce the game to-
day.
North Carolina State and
Navy were among the Final
eight teams in this year's
NCAA Basketball Champion-
ships.
One promising matchup in
the game will pit World Cham-
pionship star David Robinson
against Kinston native Charles
Shakleford. Shakleford. a
sophomore, will have a bigger
load to carry in the middle with
the absence of Chris Washburn
to the NBA.
CBS, which televised last
year's Tip-Off Classic, will not
cover this year's, The Morning
L'nion of Springfield reported
yesterday.
Things We Thought Of
Navy's David Robinson will be a tower in the middle next vear
Hot Summer Sessions' Activities Nearing End
lat Summer SChOOl is cas.P � anrl wp arc annriviatiu� �� wi pi- � j
Now that summer school is
neanng a close, we would like to
reflect on some things we've ex-
perienced over the two-month
period.
By
Sports Editors
First, we would like to thank
the readers for not sending in
negative letters to the editor. We
know how important ECU sports
is to the campus, but there wasn't
too much going on. We tried to
cover the more important aspects
surrounding the spor's world �
the biggest being the drug story in
athletics.
We did receive positive feed-
back on our story of the news
media's handling of the Len Bias
case and we are appreciative.
However, we are looking forward
to the day when drug stories need
not be reported on our page.
Getting back to the thoughts,
has there ever been a hotter sum-
mer in Greenville? Well, this heat
is almost unbearable, and it gets
worse. We try to relieve the
boredom by shooting hoops in
Memorial 'Sauna' and then cool-
ing off at Sub Station II with
some $1.99 pitchers � that's as
cheap as we've found.
On the subject of hoops, we
feel we have something to get off
our chest. We put up a sweet goal
in front of our house (in an apart-
ment complex's abandoned
court) about a month and a half
ago. The goal served as a rallying
point for our community �
allowing us to meet such people
as Melvin, Slick and Head. We
could play 24 hours a day (except
when the police harassed us,
which seemed to happen quite
often this summer).
Anyway, some unkown m.f.
(of below average intelligence)
ripped the goal � before the
summer ended � thus depriving
us of our Daryl Dawkins demoli-
tion dunk contest. We had spon-
sors all lined up and everything
with prizes and possibly an ap-
pearance on David Lctterman for
the winner.
Of course we don't spend all of
our time playing basketball and
writing about sports. We have
other hobbies and interests, but
not all can be mentioned in a
family publication.
However, we feel we would be
remiss if we didn't mention one
weekend during the first summer
session. It was a totally unique
after-downtown party of the
wildest variety. A theme party,
where all people drinking from
the keg had to be clad in their
underwear. No skibbies � no
beer! It was truly the top party of
the summer, and we would like to
commend the individuals who
thought up the idea � we had a
great time.
Between weekend trips to
Atlantic Beach and occasional
splurges to He's Not Here in
Chapel Hill, we spent some time
at the infamous campus
newspaper.
We've really met some in-
teresting folks at the paper, and
we'd like to give a fond farewell
to two newspeople. We can't
figure out why anyone would
cover news � is it that impor-
tant? But seriously, Mike Lud-
wick and Beth Whicker are pretty
cool. Ludwick, a St. Louis Car-
dinals fan, is going to be a school
teacher and soccer coach in Wake
County. Whicker will probably
either be a famous newspaper
reporter or follow in Vana
White's footsteps as a TV star in
Hollywood. Seriously, good luck
to both of you!
In the fall, we'll write about all
the latest in ECU football and all
the semester's sports. So have a
good summer and we'll look for
you in the stands at Ficklen and
wherever the Pirates travel.
(Remember: the State game is on-
ly about a month away. Will the
goalposts come down this year?)
Jr. College, Val Cooper.
"These players are very
talented, but it's going to take
some time for them to develop
commented O'Neal. "It's just a
matter of developing this talent,
then once developed the Lady
Pirates are going after it all
Just as O'Neal feels the team
will have a good season, she feels
she'll have a good one also. "My
season will be what I make out of
it stated O'Neal. "Right now
I'm looking for that starting posi-
tion and hopefully coach wants
me to start. I feel I have the abili-
ty to start and I'm sure coach is
confident that if I work hard that
I can start and help the team.
"1 won't say I'm going to start,
but I will say I'm sure going to
give it all 1 have. I'm ready and 1
want it
Postseason play seems likely to
be in the cards for Lady Pirate's
this season. Robbed of their
chance last year, O'Neal believes
they will get the chance again this
season.
"I think we'll get invited to the
WNIT again, hopefully; and I'm
quite sure it won't get turned
down again, or at least I hope
not
O'Neal knows the road to
recovery is long and sometimes
weary; yet, she is going to make
it. "I know I have a lot of work
to do to rehab my knee, but
whatever it takes, I'm going to do
it
O'Neal herself summed up
how the team's season may go.
"If Monique Pompili comes back
and plays the kind of ball she's
capable of playing and Alma
Bethea and I get the job done in-
side, we're going. Delphine is a
player and she is always going to
be there
There are many things in life
that can be taken for granted;
however, any team that takes the
Lady Pirates lightly this year will
be in for a rude awakening.
Astros' Davis
Provides
HR Power
HOUSTON (UPI) - For the
first time since the days of Bob
Watson, the Houston Astros
have a player who can win a game
with one swing of the bat.
Glenn Davis, showing the late-
inning power that managers love,
hit a three-run homer in the
eighth inning Monday night,
rallying the Astros to a 4-2 vic-
tory over the Atlanta Braves.
"It kind of blew my mind
when it went out Davis said. "I
can't explain it but I'll just be
thankful
The Astros have had a couple
of sluggers in their 25-year
history, namely Jimmy Wynn,
Lee May, and Watson. The size
of the Astrodome, however,
usually discourages sluggers.
This time, the Astrodome
brought relief for Davis, w ho had
built an O-for-19 slump mostly on
the road.
"Not much to say, no excuse
Davis said of the slump. "I have
no excuses or statements to make
about struggling on the field. I've
been Fighting an inward and men-
tal battle.
"I walked out on the field
tonight in total confusion
Davis added. "I went to a little
room we have here in the
clubhouse and said, 'I'm confus-
ed, I can't make it on my own
He snapped the streak with, a
first-inning, RBI single, but the
Astros entered the eighth trailing
2-1 and were held to Five hits by
Doyle Alexander.
He had retired 15 in a row
before Bill Doran doubled. One
out later, Denny Walling walked,
bringing up Davis, who hit a 1-1
pitch over the left-field wall.
"The First pitch is the one I
wanted said Davis. "I didn't
think I'd see another one like it
Atlanta manager Chuck Tan-
ner explained his decision to
allow Alexander to face Davis.
"He had thrown less than 95
pitches Tanner said. "He pit-
ched a great game. He had com-
mand. Davis is strong and he
happened to hit it out
The game marked the sixui
straight time at home the Astros
have won the game in their last
at-bat.
j- r - � r r
b�
t �





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 30. 1986
Classifieds
WORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
Derience in typing resumes, theses,
techical documents, and term
papers. We manage and merge your
names and addresses into merged
letters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards Our prices ar extremely
reasonable and we always offer a 15
percent discount to ECU students
SDF inc. 106 East Fifth Street
752 3694.
FOR SALE: 1982 Knox Trailer
Home 3 br , i'i bath, air, dryer.
$500 and take up payments $176 95
Call after 6, 758 1559.
RINGOLD TOWERS: Most conve
nient location to campus! Fully fur
wished condos (except linens) �
priced from $30's $50's Some owner
financing available. University
Realty 355 5866
ATTENTION: Attention fraternities
and sororities, you booked at "The
Alley Tavern" before, now you can
still book at The Tavern" for par
t.es! Call 757 1227
LOOK GREAT: Look great at super
savings! New Youk trained hair
stylist � Paul Mitchell & Chadwick
Hair cutting Methods � Profes
sionai Image Hair Studio Hair cuts
for men and women to fit your bone
structure Free hair consultations
Call 756 1945
FOR SALE: 1982 Kawaski KZ550.
Excellent condition 15,000 miles.
Must sell to stay in school. $600. Call
Rob at 752 2051
FURNITURE FOR SALE: Sofa $35
end table $10 Good Condition. Breat
for student's apartment. Call
752 4892 Moving and must sell now
FOR SALE: Twin bed - frame, box
springs, mattress $25 Must sell im-
mediately. Call 758 0709
ROOM FOR RENT: Full house
priveieges, $135 Very close to cam
pus, 301 972 8543 after Aug. 8 Call
7580325
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Female
roommate needed for i bafh
twnhse, priv bdrm (need bdrm
turn), next to Athletic Cub. prefer
grad student or profess $175 mo &
dep and ' utilities. 756 9583 after 6
p.m.
LOOK GREAT AT SUPER SAV
INGS: New Youk trained hair stylist
- Paul Mitchell � Chadwick Har
cutting Methods Professional Im-
age Hair Studio Har cuts for men
ana Women to ' your Done struc
ture Free rar consultations
?56 1945
MALE ROOMMATE: To share two
bedroom apt. 5 blocks from capus.
Newly furnished all except for
bedroom Includes microwave and
washer Must be mature and reson
sible, preferabley grad student or
upperclassman. $142.50 per month
plus one half utilities. Call 7580940.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Grad. stu
dent needs responsible, nonsmoking
person to share 2 br apt. close to
campus, $125month and ' utilities,
call 752 1914.
MONEY: Make $200 in 2 days selling
back to school merchandise. Send
$1495 for sample kit to: Winsor
house, 4499 via Marisol 335C,
Dept 98, Los Angeles, CA 90042.
RIDE NEEDED: To Richmond or
Annapolis. I can't leave until Sat
but I'll pay for the gas. Please call
Pat at 757 0009 or 757-6366.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Grad Stu
dent needs roommate to share 2 br
apt l block from campus.
Preferablly a nonsmoking serious
student. 758 4987 after 6.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Close to
campus. Nonsmoker, $120 and
utilities, 758 2703.
DO YOU WANT TO WORK
Immediate Job
Op�i�t
�Secretaries
�OfficeClerical
�� F ree word process! ng
training for typists
�Factory Workers
� Data Entry
Full and Part-time temporary
work � Perfect for students.
KELLY
SERVICES
The Keily Girl People
204 E Arlington Blvd.
Arlington Centre Off ice Complex
Greenville, NC 27834
3M-7S30
Not an agency-Never a fee
EOEMFH
SLEEPING BAGS !
CKPACKS. Tttri COTS. SHOVELS MAM
CO. MESS KITS CANTEENS FATIGUES VMt
OTS. RAINWEAR T SHIRTS ENAMELWAREI
HES. WORK CLOTHES 2100 DIFFERENT ITEMS
ARMY-NAVY STORE
l $01 S ErQn�
���������toAAaa
HUNGRY PIRATE
The
Biggest
Burrito!
$2.95
Served
2-5 Weekdays
11-5 Weekends
757-1666
Every Thursday Night Is
TACO NIGHT
Two Great Tacos for only, 99
60 oz. Pitchers $1.99
Offer Good From 7p.m11 p.m. � Not Valid on Deliveries
Every Tuesday Night Is
COLLEGE NIGHT
Free Delivery for $5.00 & Over Purchases
7 p.m. to 11 p.m.
99C SUBS
YOUR CHOICE
Ham & Cheese Bologna & Cheese
Ham, Salami & Cheese Pepperoni, Salami A Cheese
Turkey 4 Cheese Ham, Turkey A Cheese
NOT VALID ON DELIVERIES
60 oz. pitchers $1.99
includes tax
32 oz
215 E. Fourth Street
ALL DAY FRIDAY
Bucket of Your Favoiite Draft
99C
752-2183
Zorn Released By Packers
(UPI) � The Green Bay Packers
released former Seattle quarter-
back Jim Zorn Monday and in a
surprise move announced an
agreement has been reached with
veteran Lynn Dickey.
Coach Forrest Gregg said a
tentative agreement has been
reached with Dickey, who was
released as a free agent this year
after requesting a 10-percent in-
crease that would have pushed his
annual salary to more than SI
million.
Dickey, who turns 37 Oct. 19,
has been the Packers' main
quarterback for the last 10 years.
But midway through the 1985
season, he asked Gregg to bench
him as starter because he was
unhappy with his performance on
the field. The request also led to
VISUAL ARTS COORDINATOR
NEEDED: Full time coordinator
needed by community aris agency.
Work with volunteer gallury com-
mittee's to schedule monthly ex-
hibits year around in 2 galleries,
coordinate classes for children and
adults; manage sales gallery; plan
and produce monthly newsletter.
Visual arts backgroundtraining re-
quired. BSA preferred. EOE Send
letter of application, resume and 2
references: Visual Arts Corrdinator
Position, Community Council for the
Arts, P.O. Box 3554, Kinston, NC
28501.
LOST: Men's burgundy velcro
wallet in Village Green pool area. No
questions asked � reward. Please
call Dale at 758 7056 after 6 p.m.
thoughts of retirement.
But Gregg said Dickey has
assured him he wants to play
football and is willing to earn his
spot in the quarterback corps.
With the release of Zorn, the
Packers still have veteran
quarterbacks Randy Wright and
Vince Ferragamo and BYU
rookie Robbie Bosco.
In other training-camp news:
At Kirtland, Ohio, Cleveland
Browns coach Marty Schot-
tenheimer lashed out at Sam
Rutigliano Monday, saying his
predecessor's remarks about the
death of Don Rogers "are out of
date because he hasn't been here
in two years and has no idea
what's going on
In published reports,
Rutigliano said peer pressure on
the Browns caused Rogers to use
cocaine. The free safety died
June 27 of cocaine poisoning in
his hometown of Sacramento,
Calif.
At St. Louis, place-kicker John
Lee, the first Korean-born player
in the NFL, arrived Monday with
plans to donate to charity a por-
tion of his new $875,000 contract
with the St. Louis Cardinals. His
agent, Leigh Steinberg, said Lee's
four-year contract is the largest
for a place-kicker in the league's
history.
At Smithfield, R.I Indiana
State defensive back Vencie
Glenn, a second-round draft pick
of the New England Patriots, has
agreed to a four-year contract,
the team announced Monday.
Glenn was the Patriots' third
pick overall. The top two, SMU
running back Reggie Dupard, the
first-round choice; and Boston
College defensive lineman Mike
Ruth, selected in the second
round, are still out of camp.
Defensive end Kenneth Sims,
in the option year of a five-year
contract, ended his seven-day
holdout and took part in Mon-
day's practice, management had
refused to negotiate until Sims re-
joined the team.
At Anderson, Ind cornerback
Preston Davis has notified the In-
dianapolis Colts that he is retir-
ing, General Manager Jim Irsay
said.
Leonard Coleman, the Colts'
No. 1 pick in the 1984 draft, has
been elevated to the starting posi-
tion.
Woodsy Owl says
No Noise Pollution Here!
KINGSTON PLACE fW
2 Bedroom 2 Bath Fully Furnished with:
dishwasher, Ice Maker, Dishes and Silverware,
Cookware, Bar stools, Color T.V Microwave,
All Linens, Study desks, Large closets, Mail
delivery, Laundromat, and Swimming pool.
Owner will rent for $550. per month with
annual lease. 758-5393
KINGSTON PLACE
Affordable, Luxurious Furnished Apartments built
specifically for ECU students.
Swimming pool, Clubhouse, lots of Parking, all
Amenities and Accessories. Units Available for
Summer and Fall.
Call 758-5393
i
UOtttdWJSI
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED HELP?
Why not come by the REAL Crisis Intervention Center: 312 E.
10th St; or cell 758-HELP. For Free Confidential Counseling or As-
sists rw�
Our Volunteers and Staff are on duty 24 hrs. a day, year around,
in order to assist you in virtually any problem area you might have
Our longstanding goal has always been to preserve and enhance
the quality of life for you and our community.
LicanMd And Accredited By The Stale ol Norm Carolina
XCO KROGERING POR ALL YOUR .
Needs!
ALL FLAVORS
Breyer's
Ice Cream
tunii x y innno
iimiuoi��� nui
u u u I I 11 I III 1111
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
I I ill 11IIU1I1
I III II I! II U I
y.v.WiV.v.w
THICK. RICH
Heinz
Ketchup
at
Jar
68
LIMIT 1 WITH
$10 ADO L
PURCHASE
i i i i i i 11 i i i i i i i i
ntuuniMimin
11 u n 11 n 11 i n n oy M
i t i i 11 i i i i : i t i i i i
i i i t i i i i : i i � i i i i
i i i i i 11 i i i t i i i i i
tnu It I I 1 I I II II I
I t I I t I I 1 1 I I! 1 I I I
i m 11 x u (111111
I I I I I ! I I I I I I l l I I
11x x nuiiuui
nui 1 xi 111 i 1111
i in 1111 i 111
i t I i ' i i i i i i I XX IX
J s u u i u A x xx xx i
i ui u n n jiYii x
iiiuiiiuii Om i
Ltr
NRB
DIET PEPSI
PEPSI FREE OR
Pepsi
Cola
99
LIMIT 2
KROGER ALL
MEAT OR
All Beef
Wieners
TENDER
12
Oz
Pkg
89
Fresh
Broccoli
Bch
77
KROGER OLD
FASHION
White
Bread .
LB
Lvs
99C
HOLLY FARMS CUT UP MIXED
FRYER PARTS OR GRADE A
Whole
Fryers
C
NEW JERSEY
Lb
59

V.
LIMIT 3 WITH
S10 ADD L
PURCHASE
Plump
Blueberries

m f
T120 OR L750
Polaroid
: Polaroid
Qt
99
y4tmcwu Thurfu
VHS Video Movie Rentals
V kdflr 24 Hour
Ea B Hmnlmt
Hundrod� of fmvoHto movlm
to ehoooo from!
WISE
Machos or
Bravos
99c
FRESH FRIED
15 PC. WISHBONE
Fried
Chicken
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Eacn of tnese advertised
items is required to oe
readily available for sale in
eacn Kroger Savon except
as specif ically noted In tnis
ad if we do run out of an
item we win offer you your
choice of a comparaDi
item wnen available
reflecting tne same sav
ings or a raincneck whlcn
will entitle you to pur
ctiase tne advertised item
at tne advertised price
within 50 days Only one
vendor coupon win Be ac
cepted per item
"
Krogering
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd - Greenville
�� 9 y-





Title
The East Carolinian, July 30, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 30, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.486
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy