The East Carolinian, July 23, 1986






Gftiz 4�mt (EaralinUut
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No.64 L 7
Wednesday, July 23, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
8 Pages
Circulation 5,060
Reagan Rejects Soviet
Proposal Delaying
gk, WASHINGTON (UPI) � Presi- Strategic Defense Initiative � The progr
�� ' dent Reagan has decided to reject often called "Star Wars" � and nn r�nitr�i
SDI
i
J-
Louder!
j B HUMBERT - The Eit Ciiolm.jn
High School students from across eastern North Carolina see who can yell louder than the other.
They are participating in the Champion Cheerleading Camp that is held each summer at ECU. For
further details see the related story on page 1.
Reagan nas aeciaea to reject
Soviet proposals for a lengthy-
ban on the deployment of a
space-based anti-missile defense
system or to restrict the "Star
Wars" research program, an ad-
ministration official said Mon-
day.
Bu: a letter he is preparing to
send to Soviet leader Mikhail S.
Gorbachev, which could hold the
key to whether they meet at a
summit this year, will be
"positive in tone" and indicate a
willingness to negotiate on
nuclear weapons and regional
disputes, another U.S. official
said.
Reagan is delaying a reply to
Gorbachev, who wrote him a
month ago, in order to weigh
conflicting advice on the
Gf
Annual Camp Held
Cheerleaders Learn Fundamentals
By BETH WHICKER
Assistant News Kdiior
Champion cheerleading camp
�a. held last week on the ECU
campus.
Two-hundred and seventy-
cheerleaders from 30 local high
schools, middle schools, and
junior high schools were taught
the basics of cheerleading by a
staff of 11 instructors.
In addition, cheerleading spon-
sors were taught the fundamen-
tals of coaching a squad.
Three of the camp instructors
are ECU cheerleaders.
Instructors were chosen at
tryouts in Raleigh. Contestants
were asked to create an original
dance, cheer, and chant as well as
perform tumbling stunts and
jumps.
Head instructor at the ECU
camp is Kimberly Pixton. Pixton,
a member of the award winning
N.C. State cheerleading squad is
a junior from Washington, N.C.
Pixton explained the instruc-
ting staff will conduct champion
cheerleading camps over the state
on local campuses such as UNC
at Charlotte and Wilmington.
The camps span a five week
period.
"The ECU camp is a
hometown kind of camp said
John Morris a senior
cheerleading instructor from
Hampton, Virginia.
"Student's from Greenville to
Manteo come annually to the
ECU camp he added.
"The most exciting and rewar-
ding aspect of the camp is seeing
the improvement in ability and
enthusiasm the girls gain accor-
ding to Myra Almond, a junior
instructor from New London,
N.C.
"Some of these gifl have
never been cheerleaders before
and the camp gives them a better
perspective of what cheerleading
is all about said Almond.
"The cheerleaders improve
and leave with a better attitude
said Morris.
Pixton added cheerleading
camp was a 'dress rehearsal'
preparing the squad for the fall
when the cheering season begins.
Champion cheerleading camp
instructors are compensated
monetarily, but according to Al-
mond the real satisfaction comes
in seeing team spirit and en-
thusiasm develop.
Cost for the four day camp is
$93 which includes food, board,
and instruction.
The intense instruction in-
cludes learning 75 chants, 6
cheers, 4 dances, plus partial
stunts and mounts.
Pep rally techniques and
methods are also included in the
four day instruction.
Throughout the camp activities
such as swimming and show night
were planned for the par-
ticipants.
During show night participants
entertained the staff and other
campers with skits and imitations
of instructors.
At the close of the camp
awards are given to the best
squads.
The supersharp award is given
to a squad with superior execu-
tion.
The super leadership award is
given to a person or squad that
exemplifies qualities necessary to
boost school spirit and en-
thusiasm.
Legislator's School
Continues At ECU
By MIKE LLDWICK
News Editor
One hundred and thirty five
high school students are taking
part in the second half of the
Legislator's School for Youth
Leadership Development.
"I've learned a lot about peo-
ple in general, especially how to
better communicate with
people said Pam Jenkins, a
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds10
Editorials4
Features6
Sports8
He that cannot bear with
other people's passions, can-
not govern his own.
�Benjamin FrankUn j
junior from Bertie High School.
She added, "I'll be better able to
stand up and speak in front of
crowds
The school's purpose, said Roy
Forbes director of the Rural
Education Institute which is
directing the program, is to
develop leadership, communica-
tion, and thinking skills.
Friday the students were in the
woods behind the Allied Health
Building working on the Ropes
Course.
Bob Wcndling, director of the
Ropes Course said this part of the
program focuses on the leader-
ship skills of the campers.
"Our hardest part was defining
leadership said Wendling. He
said a committee decided on six
characteristics that make a good
leader; they are: cooperation;
communication, which includes
speaking, writing, and listening;
shared decision making; trust;
sensitivity and consideration; and
planning.
Sec STUDENTS Page 2.
Awards of excellence are given
to squads with marked coordina-
tion, attitude, and enthusiasm.
Several individual awards are
given to specific cheerleaders as
weil.
Major trophies are given to
squads considered the best three
of the participants in the camp.
Awards are given for best
original cheer and best pom
routine.
Most winners of awards are
chosen mainly from participant
evaluation.
Rape Suspect Nabbed
By Campus Police
By LYNN WEAVER
Staff Writer
Early Monday morning ECU
Campus Police apprehended a
suspect in the July 6 rape that
started at the Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. ECU Police grabbed
the suspect after the officers
observed a girl scream and flee
from the suspect.
At approximately 3 a.m Lt.
E. L. Suggs and Cpl. B. G. Hud-
son, who were parked in separate
vehicles in the parking lot located
at Ninth and Cotanche,
observed a white male and female
walking south on Cotanche
Street.
As the couple entered the park-
ing lot, the girl jerked away from
the man and started screaming
and ran away. The man turned
and began to chase the subject,
who fled west on 9th then south
onto Forbes Street.
The subject was apprehended
at the 900 block of Forbes Street
and taken to McDonald's park-
ing lot. The subject was placed in
the custody of Greenville Police
Sgt. Joe Simonowich.
Suggs and Hudson, then,
returned to search the scene. The
girl said the subject had a knife.
Suggs and Hudson located the
weapon and turned the evidence
over to the Greenville Police.
Lt. Keith Knox said, "We
would like to commend our of-
ficers for being so observant and
quickly apprehending and detain-
ing the suspect and rendering
assistance to the victim and to the
Greenville Police Department
He added, "We hope that the
cooperation between ECU
Department of Public Safety and
Greenville Police Department
will continue and improve, enabl-
ing us to provide a safer com-
munity in which to live in
often called "Star Wars" � and
to await a report from three U.S.
envoys to Western Europe and
Asia.
The three emissaries, Paul H.
Nitze, Edward Rowny and H.
Allen Holmes, were to solicit the
views of allied governments.
White House spokesman Edward
P. Djerejian said Reagan would
send his reply within 10 days.
According to one of the of-
ficials, both of whom spoke on
condition of anonymity, the Pen-
tagon has sought to counter ad-
vice from other parts of the
government that Reagan should
pledge not to deploy the futuristic
technology for five to six years.
Gorbachev said at the summit
with Reagan last November in
Geneva that the Star Wars pro-
gram would extend the nuclear
arms competition into a
dangerous, new sphere. The
Soviets � as do many U.S. arms
control experts � contend
deployment is banned by the 1972
Anti-Ballistic Missile treaty.
The Soviets have proposed an
agreement not to deploy the
technology for 15 to 20 years, of-
fering in exchange to negotiate a
reduction of more than 50 per-
cent in U.S. and Soviet strategic
nuclear bombers, missiles and
submarines, the official said.
The Pentagon's suggestion that
Reagan turn Moscow down is
based on concern that the Soviets
eventually would try to extend
the ban indefinitely and that any
pledge to defer Star Wars deploy-
ment would send the wrong
political message to Congress, the
official said.
"The essential difference is
whether or not there is some par-
tial step in the area of SDI (the
Strategic Defense Initiative) he
said. The official stressed that the
president and all his advisers were
in agreement that research must
go on and that the Soviets' defini-
tion of the laboratory work per-
missible under the 1972 Anti-
Ballistic Missile Treaty was too
j)
program is under attack
on Capitol Hill because of an
overall budget squeeze and also
because of widespread skepticism
that a less-than-perfect shield
coid deter attack. Theadministra-
tion has requested $5.4 billion for
next year. The Senate Armed Ser-
vices Committee recommended
last month a reduction to $3.2
billion.
Reagan has said the technology-
would not be ready for deploy-
ment while he was still in office
and that he would consult with
the Soviets before he took that
step. Still, the Soviets are eager to
tighten the language of the 1972
ABM treaty, which permits either
side to withdraw from its restric-
tions after giving six months'
notice.
Reagan announced in May that
he would abandon another major
U.SSoviet treaty, the 1979
SALT II accord limiting various
kinds of strategic weapons. He
has accused the Soviets of
violating both accords.
At a White House ceremony-
Monday protesting Soviet control
of most of Eastern Europe, the
president said: "Meaningful pro-
gress can be realized by facing
our differences and not glossing
them over. I believe the Soviet
Union wants better relations It
is time to see the follow-through
� to see deeds now and not
words
The Soviets made their latest
arms reduction proposal June 11
in Geneva, tying it � as they
always do � to restraints on
"Star Wars The Geneva
negotiations are in recess until
September.
The proposal and Gorbachev's
June 23 letter wree discussed at
the White House Friday. Ad-
ministration officials were reluc-
tant to provide any information
about the deliberations to the
public. An information leak last
week saying Reagan was
prepared to offer restriction of
underground nuclear tests in ex-
Bfir.tV Pan. �
California Experiences
Second Big Earthquake
BISHOP, Calif (UPI) � A severe
earthquake and a powerful after-
shock rumbled across California
and parts of Nevada and Utah
Monday, wrecking up to 20
homes, cutting off a town's water
and triggering rock slides in the
High Sierra.
One giant fissure � 200 yards
long and 150 yards wide �
swallowed a parked pickup truck
and stranded 50 campers near
Bishop, but no injuries were
reported. Later Monday, violent
thunderstorms prompted a flash
flood warning.
The temblors measured 6.1 and
5.2 on the Richter scale, accor-
ding to the University of Califor-
nia at Berkeley, the second strong
earthquake in as many days. It
was the fifth sizable quake to hit
California in two weeks.
The quake struck at 7:42 a.m.
in the White Mountains 240 miles
north of Los Angeles and was felt
from San Francisco to Las Vegas,
Nev and in Salt Lake City, more
than 500 miles away. The after-
shock came nine minutes later.
Both were centered 15 miles
north of Bishop in the same area
where a 5.5-magnitude quake hit
Sunday, said Dennis Merdith,
spokesman for California In-
stitute of Technology in
Pasadena.
"A number of mobile homes
were rocked off their founda-
tions" in Chalfant Valley, 17
miles north of Bishop, Mono
County sheriff's Sgt. Terry
Padilla said.
J.� HUMBERT-Th�etC.ro.m�fl
Don V Look Down
An unidentified counselor demonstrates the proper way to
negotiate the 45-foot high rope walk. High school students, who
arc attending Legislator's School at ECU, spent a day on the Ropes
Course. For further details see the related story on page 1.
r k o.44
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1M! I S1 (. VROl IMAN
Jll Y23, IV86
Announcements
Chinese Language I, II
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Japanese Language
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Interviewing Workshop
; v v � - . - ew . -
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Resume Wordship
� V
ABORTIONS UP
I( 12th WEEK
of PREGIS -1 V( )
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- .

RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
This Style From With
Single Vision R Lenses
for only
$21 .95
Up to - or 2 00 �(��
All Other Frames
30 to 60 OFF
with purchase of RX Lenses
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315 Parkview Comn
From Doctors V
752 1446
Open Mon -Fri. 9 a.m. til 5:30 p.m
Employment
�� t Of -ar
rVI �
N ISt I
Seniors
Reagan Rejects
SovietProposal
( ontinued r mm t'ajjf 1
ng of N
i
Al
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r ts and were
-
Soviets I av i dicated thej
s for a
United
'IlsC tO
rol pro-
tronting
s how to
S a id Soviet
mis siles and
nes, and whether the
� al e conces-
Students Learn
Leadership
( ontinued from Pane 1
t h Ro
i levelop
iractei
pera n, communication,
ining are vital since most
� ' are team events.
In nc 'he more scary
ke the 45-foot rope
tivity and considera-
eded. Wendling said
ents learn to be considerate
hers because they could be
es to freeze half-way
M sl of the participants find
the Ropes Course in particular,
I egislatot 's School in
general worthwhile.
"It makes you use all ol your
leadership skills. You really have
ipply whal you've learned
Ross C ribbs a senior from
efieid High School. Tripp
Harper, a I nion Pines senior
agreed, "It's a good experience
for us to be in leadership posi-
tions. We an use what we learn-
ed here when we get back
As for the entire program,
Naihalie Mizelle from Enloe
High School summed up the stu-
dent's feelings. "Your mind
would be idle if you were at
home; it (the program) makes us
work
A junior from Louisburg High
School, Angela Alston said, "It's
helping us to improve our skills.
Besides that it's just alot of fun
Legislator's School is funded
bv the North Carolina General
Assembly. ECU and WCU are
(he two state universities par-
ticipating in the program.
PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH SAT JULY ?6 AT SAV A CENTER IN GUI I NVH i 1
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO I IMIT QUANTITIES
the superset th y�
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat. Produce, Deli. Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current Week Food
Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal QualityL
F
DOUBLE XT IN OIL OR WATER
Chunk ��� �
Light I una
U.S.DA CHOICE TOP ROUND
London Broil
PG
RED RIPE AND SWEET
Watermelons
Cam
Voic
i).
inU-rr
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ft
Hi ru-Mlrr
Ju n
Bryan daiser
Junior, Industrial Technoi
"Yes, as long as Bolivia
1 think we should be thei





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tot only
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Up to Of - 2.00 spfcere
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with purchase of RX Lenses
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.fdsflRNsV 752 446
Op�n MonFri. 9 a.m. til 5:30 p.m.
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too
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 23, 1986
Campus
Voice
Do you think the IS. military should be involved in policing the
international drug trade?
ED
IVILLE
Iring Current Week Food
it Quality.
SUPERIOR
JUICY SWEET THOMPSON
Seedless
V
I
I
Helen Colevins
Graduate, Art
"No, even it it were a military
action we shouldn't get involved
in another country's affairs
Christine Norfleet
Senior, Marketing
"I don't see anything wrong
with it because the cocaine situa-
tion has gotten out of control; so
drastic measures are called for
CHECKMTHE
Classifieds
757-6366
What services are offered at
the Student Health Service?
The Student Health Service of-
fers a variety of services to ECL
students including the diagnosis
and treatment of illness and in-
jury and health promotion ser-
vices. All of our services are
CONFIDENTIAL � no infor-
mation about you can be given tc
your parents, roommates, friends
and others without your written
consent. Services offered by the
Student Health Service (SHS) in-
clude:
The Health C olumn By
Mary Hesha Adams
Self-Care Cold Clinic �
located on the first floor of the
SHS between the lab and phar-
macy. The clinic helps you learn
about your cold symptoms and
decide how to treat your symp-
toms. No waiting time is re-
quired!
Pharmacy � many medica-
tions prescribed by SHS physi-
cians and nurse practitioners are
provided at no cost to you. A
�AGS
CKPACKS. TINTS' COTS. SHOVELS HA
TCS. MESS KITS. CANTfENS. FATIGUES. V-
TS RAINWEAR. T-SHIRTS ENAMELWARE,
IS. WORK CLOTHES. 2100 DIFFERENT ITEMS
��. . ui a
ARMY-NAVY STORE
i S01 S. Ivwm
mm

Melannie Wilson
Senior, Communications
"I think they should because
drugs are coming in easily and if
the military is used it might
help
RED RIPE AND SWEET
Watermelons
half
49
REGULAR OR BUTTER FLAVOR
disco Shortening
ir" ON� OF VOuR CHOICE WiTH AN
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-m
Jackie Armstrong
Junior, Psychology
"1 don't think so because if
they send all the world's troops
over there, drugs will still get
through
f

U
Brooke Stonesifer
Junior, Industrial Technology
"I think the U.S. should be
there to help cut back the drugs in
the U.S
Bryan Gaiser
Junior, Industrial Technology
"Yes, as long as Bolivia agrees
I think we should be there
lA lb. of sirloin
proudly served
with fries
LJSDA CHOICE Sirloin,
ground fresh daily and
cooked-to-order. Sized to
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ISTSAKHOUSS
4:
1986 Western Steer-Mom n' Pop's Inc
3005 East 10th Street
Greenville, N.C.
reduced charge is made for
medications such as oral con-
traceptive agents.
Laboratory and Radiology Ser-
vices � many lab tests are done
at no cost to you. There may be a
small charge for some tests.
There is a minimal charge for
X-rays
Psychiatric Services � are
available by request. The cost of
this service is included in the stu-
dent health fee.
Women's Health Care � mor-
ning and afternoon appointments
are available for routine pap
smears and pelvic exams. There is
a small fee for pap smears. Ap-
pointments can be made by call-
ing 757-6317. Attendance at a
sexuality class is necessary before
making an appointment to obtain
a contraceptive method from the
SHS. Classes are held on
Wednesdays at 2:00 p.m. in Rm.
107 at the SHS during summer
school sessions. They're offered
on Mondays at 10:00 a.m. and
Thursdays at 3:00 p.m. in Rm.
07 during the Fall and Spring
semesiers.
Allergy Clinic � Allergy vac-
nes are given during the hours
of 8:00 a.m. � 12:00 noon and
2:00 p.m. � 4:00 p.m. on Mon-
day through Friday. You must
supply the antigen and an injec-
tion schedul from your allergest.
Special Clinics � Hyperten-
sion, Acne, and Wart Clinics are
held during Fall and Spring ses-
sions; students are seen by ap-
pointment. No appointments are
required for these programs dur-
ing the summer.
Inpatient Care � Facilities are
available for students who need
additional care such as the obser-
vation of illness or injury, in-
travenous fluids, or medication.
Outpatient Clinics � Walk-in
clinic hours are from 8:00 a.m. �
4:45 p.m. Monday through Fri-
day during the summer. No ap-
pointment is needed. Fall and
spring semester hours are the
same as wll as Saturday and
Sunday Clinics which are held
from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Give a hoot.
Don't pollute.
11 Students Welcome!
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Short and Long Term Leases
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MAJOR MOTION PICTURE SNEAK PREVIEW
BOUNDS
SPECIAL SNEAK PREVIEW!
Wednesday, July 23, 1986
3:30 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
FREE!
Albums and Posters to be given away!
Sponsored by tht ECU Studant union Films Committat
COLUMBIA PICTURES presents
A FRIES ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCTION
A RICHARD TUGGLE FILM
mmm ANTHONY MICHAEL HALL "OUT OF BOUNDS"
JENNY WRIGHT � JEFF K0BER � GLYNN TURMAN
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Slje �aat (ttarnlurian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender, (�����-���'
Daniel Maurer. ,�� &�.�
Mike Ludwick. -i imh
Scott Cooper, v��� ��
John Shannon, a�m ���
DeChanile Johnson. 4n
Steve Folmar, unmuumuMi
Anthony Martin. su mdh ,anatrr
Meg Needham, c ��� mnvw
Shannon Short. ��
July 23. 1986
Opinion
Pajic�
Drinking
Dealing With The New Drinking Age
Sometime this week each student
will receive a polite letter from Dr.
Elmer Meyer, vice chancellor for
student life. The content of the let-
ter will explain the first and most
effective step ECU will take in
handling the change in the drinking
age.
The ietter says that even though
the state legislature has set Sept. 1
as the official deadline by which the
drinking age must be changed from
19 to 21, ECU has chosen to
recognize the change on campus ef-
fective Aug. 1.
The initial response to this state-
ment is usually something akin to,
"it's bad enough the state is raising
the drinking age, now the Universi-
ty has to beat them to the punch
But when you think about it,
there is nothing else they can do.
The administration is just doing
their best to avoid the inevitable
difficulties that are inherent in such
a law change. They're trying to
cope as best they can while main-
taining good studeniUniversity
relations.
The question that remains,
however, is how else will the law
change effect students and what is
the University doing to cope with
the situation?
Last October, Dr. Meyer assign-
ed the ECU AlcoholDrug Educa-
tion Committee to study the impact
on this campus of the new drinking
age law, and to make recommenda-
tions regarding how the University
should respond.
The resulting report was a reflec-
tion of an open minded committee
that chose to face the realities of the
situation with a healthy attitude.
The committee, for example,
took the approach that realisticly
there would be very strong feelings
concerning the new law and that
those feelings should be considered
while implementing new policies. In
short, the committee didn't make a
move without considering the
students first.
Another plus was the way in
which the committee chose to inter-
pret the new law. Keeping in mind
the new law allows for a maximum
fine of only $25, the committee sug-
gested a moderate approach to the
issue, one of "sensitivity, wisdom,
and reasonableness
This is not to say the University
will turn its back on on those who
break the law; rather it will ap-
proach the situation with
understanding. At least, this is the
philosophy expressed by the com-
mittee, application of said
philosophy is something we'll have
to see for ourselves.
In any case, the University has
taken the right approach. They
understand that college students
will drink what they want when
they please, regardless of the legal
drinking age; and that any change
in drinking habits will come
gradually if at all.
In fact, the committee's report
quotes a survey conducted by Pro-
fessor Jerry Lotterhos with students
enrolled in alcohol abuse classes
here at ECU that helps to support
this point of view.
"Of 200 students surveyed, most
of whom can presently drink legal-
ly, but who will lose that right
under the new law, not a single stu-
dent said they intended to stop
drinking under the new law. Most
felt they would simply drink in
situations where they would not be
likely to be apprehended
Of course, this also means no
public drinking, which, in turn,
spells trouble for downtown mer-
chants. Perhaps the biggest and
most immediate effect the age
change will have will be on local
nightclubs. Most clubs will either
close down or turn private, serving
only persons 21 years of age.
To counter this effect the com-
mittee recommended that the
University support the establish-
ment of a non-alcoholic nightclub
which will offer good food and
quality entertainment; something
few of the nightclubs presentIv of-
fer.
Also, the University has foreseen
increased participation in campus
sponsored programs and athletics
and they will monitor these pro-
grams in the near future to see if ex-
pansion is warrented.
Undoubtedly, the change in the
drinking age will have a signifigant
and lasting effect on the campus
and the community. Fortunately
for us the University has an-
ticipated these effects and has
adopted a healthy, reasonable at-
titude toward working with the
students to deal with them.
�Campus Forum-
Story May Leave False Impression
Dear Editor:
I am concerned that The East Carolinian
readers may form an erroneous impression
based on your article "Profs Harass
Women" in the July 16 issue. The piece
reports on a Glamour magazine article in
which administrators of colleges are said to
prefer that students who are being sexually
harassed cope with the problem privately
rather than acknowledge it.
This may be the case for some ad-
ministrators at other schools but it does
not apply to us. ECU has a policy pro-
hibiting sexual harassment and when such
an offense is reported to us, wc take steps
to insure that the harassment stops. But if
we don't know about the problem, we
can't help. If sexual harassment occurs,
students should report it immediately.
Dr. Mary Ann Rose
Assistant to the Chancellor
for Special Assignments
Campus
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters ex-
pressing all points of view. Mail or drop
them by our office in the Publications
Building, across from the entrance of
Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number and
signature of the author(s). Letters are
limited to two typewritten pages, double-
spaced or neatly printed. All letters are
subject to editing for brevity, obscenity
and libel, and no personal attacks will be
permitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are reminded
that they are limited to one every five
issues.
Kb
Editorial Columnist Wanted:
The East Carolinian is presently seeking regular student columnists to
represent opposing points of view. Interested parties may stop by our
offices in the publications building or call 757-6366.
PROOF OF EVOLUTION:
BRAIN
OF MAN
BRAIN BRAIN BRAIN
OFNEAN- OF HOMO OF APE
P6RTHAL �ReCTUS i
BRAIN
OFCREA-
TIONIST

JHrTttC&nrve�C&�t0rroc
Defending The Porn Commission
The attack on the report of the por-
nography commission continues. Its
weapons are ridicule and simulated fear.
The ridicule centers on the idea of a
dozen investigators traveling in-
dustriously through pornland taking
notes; the fear is expressed in terms of
taking from the people what is theirs
On The Right
By WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY
through the patrimony of the First
Amendment.
It is worth, I think, a moment or two
to reflect on the inherent position of
those who find the whole anti-porn ven-
ture so preposterous. What emerges is a
contempt for those who accepted the
commission � to investigate the volume
of the porn industry and the reaches ol
its perversity, and to inquire whether
that industry induces anti-social
behavior � and a protective feeling
toward the porn merchants.
Here is a nice example. Robert Scheer
ol the I.os Angeles Times and Playboy,
describing the investigative activities of
the commission, came to an on-the-spot
visit to "one of those establishments" in
Houston that sells porn and otherwise
caters to its customers in individual
booths.
"As everyone watched, a bullet-
headed vice cop yanked open the door
(of a booth) and announced in a loud
voice, 'And here we have two men
engaged in an act of oral copulation
The men looked up in astonishment at
the eleven commissioners
Scheer's comment: "What business
was it of a U.S. Commission on Por-
nography to get down and dirty into the
pathetic attempts of some of this world's
most forlorn, desperate and lonely in-
habitants to find a few moments of
whatever brings them as close to joy as
they will get? These were two human be-
ings
It apparently docs not occur to the
critics that precisely it is a concern for
human beings that animates those who
worry about the volume of porn being
manufactured. The scene within the
booth was a pretty clear expression ol
the three-dimentional facilities being
provided by those porn merchants
whose services extend beyond merely
graphic displays of carnal activity.
And the intellectual argument has to
be rescued, that argument being that
society has a stake in what appetites are
being slaked and stimulated by the free
market.
The apparent rubric hv which they are
being guided is as simple as tins: I here is
manifestly an appetite for porn I here
are people willing to cater to this ap-
petite. Why should not the willing buyer
and the willing seller enter into conven-
tional arrangements'1
Surely the reason tor it is that lust is
an appetite that needs to be regulated.
We live in a free society that, just to
begin with, regulates that appetite by
authorizing only a single marriage at one
time. I he mere assertion of the authori-
ty to do so distinguishes the attitude ol
societ) toward sex as a civil relationship
from other appetites
If power is what you wish, you can
work for it subject to the restraints ol
the maket, namely democratic ac-
quiescence. And even then, you are sub
ject to certain denials in the exercise of
power specified by the Bill of Rights
Gluttony would be an example of an
appetite society adopts no legal position
about. Cooking editors and food writers
are free to cater to the obese in such a
way as to tempt them to even greater
obesity.
The only sanction against obesity in
our society is social: People are generally
put off by overweight, which is why
diets and diet books are also an industry.
But a sophisticated society
acknowledges that sex is often an unruly
passion, and for that reason lust is
stimulated with some sense of civil pro-
priety. It is still illegal to wander naked
down the streets, because modesty of a
rudimentary kind is acknowledged to be
a civil interest.
Sex leads to the creation of what Mr
Scheer, with an exclamation point,
would call a human being! A human be-
ing carelessly eventuating from booth-
type sexual encounters is a heavy respon-
sibility, ostensibly of the parents, actual-
ly of the state � abandoned childrei
properly provided tor by the state.
What astonishes is that the porn mer
chants should suddenly find themse
the objects of concern by so mai �
critics. Robert Scheer introduces
member of the commissiion as foil
"Father Bruce Ritter (is) a Car
priest committed to banishing porn ��
rimes Square going on to qi
Father Ritter as opposed
religious, not social science, a
Scheer did not bother t
Father Ritter that he hasde
to rescuing young girls and boys en!
to New York City to practice ;
lion
V hy are we so concerned al
pornographers? Why Jon thcj
the contempt that, p
harnessed now aga
from drugs1 isn'1 ii more
think ol porn merchants a
territory nearer to the dru
that to those who use the Firsi Ame
mem to give us entertainmei ean
ing?
Campus
Spectrum Rules
In addition to the "Campus
Forum" section of the Edit
Page, The East Carolinian ha
established the "Campus Spectrum
This is an opinion column featuring
guest writers from the student I
and faculty. The columns print!
the "Campus Spectrum" will contain
current topics of concern
pus, community or nation
The columns are restricted in i
tent only with regard to rule-
grammer and decency Persons
mitting columns must be willing to
accept �"by-line" credit for the
forts, as no entry's from ghosl writers
will be published.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information mav
contact Daniel Maurer, managing
editor of The East Carolinian a:
757-6366. or stop b our offices on
the second floor of the Publications
Building.
Keeping Latin America Solvent
TW Sr� HrpaMk
The money it's going to take to keep Latin America solvent
can only come from three sources: (1) the United States, other
Western governments, and the multilateral lending agencies
Western taxpayers support; (2) the Latin countries
themselves; or (3) the commerial banks that loaned the money
in the first place.
So far, the first two have been stuck with the tab. Debtor
countries have gotten new credits from the International
Monetary Fund or the World Bank in exchange for adopting
economic austerity measures. These measures enable them to
keep up interest payments to the banks but punish their
already impoverished citizens.
And neither taxpayers north of the border nor campesinos
south of it have gotten much in return for their sacrifice.
Austerity measures have dried up what were once markets for
the goods American workers produce. Latin countries are no
longer able to sustain economic growth.
Meanwhile, falling oil prices once again have brought Mex-
ico near the brink of default. There is still an ominous
possibility that a major debtor, or a group of them, may
simply say "enough" and repudiate the debts.
Faced with the failure of the debt policy that the Reagan
administration has followed up to now. Treasury Secretary
James Baker introduced a new plan last October. Billed as a
comprehensive solution to the debt crisis, the Baker plan call-
ed for $9 billion in new lending by the World Bank and the
Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) to Latin countries
over the next three years and $20 billion in new commercial
bank lending.
The conditions for these new credits would emphasize free
markets rather than austerity. Debtor countries would have to
trim their bloated state sectors, stop protecting inefficient
Firms from import competition, and open up to foreign in-
vestment.
But the Baker plan has never really gotten off the ground.
Even if the new credits it offered were sufficient � which they
probably weren't � relieving the debt burden by piling on
more debt is a dubious idea.
Nationalistic Latin governments bristled at making specfic
economic reforms a condition of U.S. aid, especially given
the harsh austerity they've already had imposed on them. In
any case, commercial banks were reluctant to throw another
$20 billion worth of good money after bad.
Senator Bill Bradley of New jersey has a better idea His
proposal for the debt problem also would have the World
Bank and development banks boost lending by $9 billion ovei
the next three years. But instead of counting on commercial
banks to lend more money, Bradley would require them Jo
slice three percentage points off both the interest and prin
cipal Latin debtors owe. (Government lenders would take the
same hit.)
That's $57 billion worth of relief over the next three years.
$42 billion of which would still have to make internal reforms
to qualify, but the specific measures would be left up to them
This has the advantage of actually reducing the debt burden
the Latin countries carry, rather than just providing them
with an opportunity to go deeper into hock. We're not sure
that it's really possible for the sclerotic Latin economies to get
growing again without taking some of the market-oriented
steps the Baker plan would have required.
It may well be, however, that the countries are more likely
to act if they feel the decisions are their own. And with the
poor already squeezed dry, maybe Latin governments would
take advantage of Bradley aid to go after the biggest untap-
ped source of funds in their society: the billions in capital
flight dollars their elites have socked away in U.S. and other
foreign banks.
But best of all, the Bradley proposal would finally make the
commercial banks pay their share of the cost of managing the
debt crisis. Back in the 1970s, the banks were only too happy
to lend Latin America all the money it wanted, but they have
so far managed to stick others with the losses they deserve for
their folly. It's way past time for the banks to pay their share,
and the Bradley plan would make them do so. After all, a
round of defaults is a bigger threat to them than to anyone
else.
IMl I ASI CAKOl
Frank Kunveon appear- in 'Iteathtrap
for his role as Stee ndropnulous on (
Excav
Despite m
detailed illu; I
l
Nortl Cai
visited by !
yeai
Hyde I
chat- Paul c ii i
ed art
hole stains
outline of wha
the famous an
sire of Pomeio k
the features at the
site fit John H hire's il-
lustration. "
�Paul Green
"So fa
fit John W: I
the Milage) Gre
While was
with the Roanoke Is
tions commissioned by Sir W
Raleigh ro
Everyonj's
On The So
Bv Rl M HAKRIV.ION
Lasi winter. I asked Max
Parker a question tha
musicians ask each o
"You doin' any playing" The
conversation general
everyone is trying to get a b
started � and it in fact
the result is a rundow �ts
going on.
ftei iskin� wha
name ol his band a 1 tuu
ask another question: "What
hell kind ol name is Soul Tra
"Exactly that's wha; we
want everyone to think
Max.
The band, which has b
together since Christmas, is on its
way to developing a
following, who were out in full
force Saturdav night at the New
Deli.
Opening the show for Sou!
Train with an entertaining set
were Jac Cain and his brother
Shannon, who played several
duets of cover songs which they
had previously performed locally
as the Deco Brothers.
Highlighting their set was the ap-
pearance of two members of Soul
Train, who helped round out
their group.
By the time Soul Train took the
stage, the two remaining
members of the band were ready
to play. (Bassist Max Parker con-
Firmed that he was ready, and
vocalist Sandy Jarrell even dress-
ed up for the occasion.)
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Spectrum Rules
Campus
he Editorial
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lumn featuring
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will ontain
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Persons sub-
be willing to
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Maurer, managing
Carolinian at
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� the Publications
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ed at making spec fie
S aid. especially given
i mposed on them. In
� were reluctant to throw another
- nad
sey :ias a better idea. His
also would have the World
lending by Ss billion over
ead ting on commercial
Bradley would require them to
both the interest and prin-
ernment lenders would take the
s-ew
I
t relief over the next three years,
lid still have to make internal reforms
� fie measures would be left up to them.
ie advantage of actually reducing the debt burden
countries .arry, rather than just providing them
go deeper into hock. We're not sure
f the sclerotic Latin economies to get
taking some of the market oriented
uld have required.
well be. however, that the countries are more likely
I the decisions are their own. And with the
Iready squeezed dry, maybe Latin governments would
Bvantage of Bradley aid to go after the biggest untap-
lurce of funds in their society: the billions in capital
Hollars their elites have socked away in U.S. and other
banks.
cm of all, the Bradley proposal would finally make the
ncial banks pay their share of the cost of managing the
isis. Back in the 1970s, the banks were only too happy
Latin America all the money it wanted, but they have
r.anaged to stick others with the losses they deserve for
blly. It's way past time for the banks to pay their share,
Ie Bradley plan would make them do so. After all, a
k'f defaults is a bigger threat to them than to anyone
IHt: FAST CAROLINIAN
Lifestyles
JULY 23, 1986 Page 5
Runyeon Writes For Life
And Laughs In 'Deathtrap'
Frank Runyeon appears in 'Deathtrap' today at 2:15 in McGinnis Theatre.
for his role as Steve ndropoulous onB� "As The World Turns
Runveon is best known
BvEDTOSHACH
Slaff Wrilrr
Monday night at McGinnis
Theatre, Deathtrap, a
comedy murder-mystery by Ira
Levin, opened to a full house.
Directed by Edgar Loessin and
starring Joseph Mascolo and
Frank Runyeon (both of daytime
television fame), Deathtrap is a
proud addition to ECU Summer
Theatre's superlative season.
Deathtrap is a sometimes
tense, sometimes hilarious play-
that centers around Sidney Bruhl
(Mascolo), a has-been mystery
playwright who receives a
guaranteed-hil play in the mail
from young protegee Clifford
Anderson (Runyeon) who desires
Bruhl's opinion on this, his first
pla. Bruhl is envious of Ander-
son's work and jokingly suggests
to his wife Myra (Tracy
Donohue) that he would even kill
for this story. From this beginn-
ing evolves a winding plot that
gives as many suprises as laughs.
The dialogue in Deathtrap �
especially Bruhl's � is witty in a
relaxed, intelligent way that pro-
vides a refreshing contrast to the
anxiety created by the storyline.
Mascolo delivers these lines well,
and with the calm, intellectual
tones that they deserve. Mascolo
really works Bruhl's comic side,
and brings to the role experience
gained in television, film and
Broadway plays.
Also deserving of more than a
few good words is Frank
Runyeon as the young would-be
mystery writer Clifford Ander-
son. Runyeon is most well known
for his role on CBS' "As The
World Turns" as romantic hero
Steve Andropoulous, but adapts
quite well to the sometimes
childlike, sometimes intense and
worldly character he plays in
Deathtrap.
Fine performances were turned
in as well by Tracy Donohue (of
ECU's Theatre Arts Department)
as Myra Bruhl, and Rick Rhodes
as Sidney Bruhl's lawyer Porter
Milgrim. Especially funny in her
role as psychic Heiga I en Dorp
was Mavis Ray, who also teaches
dance at ECU.
The set is an intricate work ol
art designed by Robert lpeTS,
and is well-complemented by
Brad Fields' lighting. All
technical aspects :ame o
flawlessly thanks to technical
director Leonard Darby, stage
manager Sherie Dee Brewer, and
others too numerous to name
here.
This competent production
frames the charmingly violent
storyline and adept acting to pro-
vide a rewarding evening's enter-
tainment. Deathtrap is a
that shouldn't be mi
Excavation Reveals A Lost Village
Despite written accounts, a
detailed illustration and an ama
ingly accurate map. a coastal
i �'� arolina Indian village
visited bv English explorers in
1 585 has eluded searchers tor 400
But an archaeological ex
ttion being made bv an ECU
logist may solve the
"scraping through layers of rich
Hyde County topsoil, ar
chaeologisi Pan! Green has un-
covered artifacts and numerous
post hole stains showing the
outline if what mav have been
famous and unique village
� Pomeiooc.
the features at the
site fit John White's il-
lustration. "
�Paul Green
So tar. the features at the site
fit lohn White's illustration (of
the village) Green said.
White was an English artist
with the Roanoke Island expedi-
tions commissioned by Sir Walter
Raleigh to establish a colony in
the new world. On July 12. 1585,
White, along with Ralph I ane,
Thomas Hariot and Sir Richard
Grenville, visited Pomeiooc.
White's map shows the village
site in what is now Hyde County
between the eastern rim ol lake
Mattamuskeet and Pamlico
Sound. In his famous water coloi
drawing of the village, White
drew 18 longhouses and huts sur -
rounded bv a circular palisade.
At the center of the village was a
large fire pit.
As a caption for the drawing.
White wrote "The towne ol
Pomeiock and true form of then
houses, covered and enclosed
with marts, and some with barcks
ol trees. All compased abowt
with smale poles stock thick
together in stedd ol a wall
Green, working under the
sponsorship of the America's
400th Anniversary Committee,
has uncovered thousands of ar-
tifacts including potterv shards.
broken pipes and arrowheads in a
corn and soybean field along
I s 64 The site is about
hallway between the eastern
shoreline of Lake Mattamuskeet
and the Pamlico Sound, almost
exactly where White's map shows
it to be. Furthermore, Green's ex-
cavation at the site has led to the
Everyone's Riding
On The Soul Train
Bv Rl'STYHARRIM.ION
si.fr �nif
Last winter, 1 asked Max
Parker a question that most
musicians ask each other �
"You doin' any playing?" The
conversation generallv goes as if
everyone is trying to get a band
started � and if in fact they are,
the result is a rundown of what's
going on.
�t!c asking him what the
name ol his band was, I had to
ask another question: "What the
hell kind o name is Soul Train?"
"Exactly that's what we
want everyone to think said
Max.
The band, which has been
together since Christmas, is on its
way to developing a strong
following, who were out in full
force Saturdav night at the New
Deli.
Opening the show for Soul
Train with an entertaining set
were Jac Cain and his brother
Shannon, who played several
duets of cover songs which they
had previously performed locally
as the Deco Brothers.
Highlighting their set was the ap-
pearance of two members of Soul
Train, who helped round out
their group.
By the time Soul Train took the
stage, the two remaining
members of the band were ready
to play. (Bassist Max Parker con-
Firmed that he was ready, and
vocalist Sandy Jarrell even dress-
ed up for the occasion.)
According to Parker, the band
decided to speed up the tempo of
their music, which kept the dance
floor full. Drummer Chip Smith
contributed to the party at-
mosphere, keeping the music
fast-paced and danceable.
Rounding out Soul Train is
guitarist David Poole who adds a
necessary layer of harmonic in-
terest to the beat
After the show, Poole said that
although the band is widely in-
fluenced, they stress their
originality. "If you're doing
something that can be labeled
said Poole, "how can it be
original?"
According to Parker, Soul
Train is planning to play more
dates out of town, and hopes to
get a demo package together with
their new manager, Jac Cain.
They have produced a tape that is
currently receiving airplay on
WZMB.
After viewing the finale of
Saturday's appearance, one must
admit that Soul Train knows how
to close out a show. As an en-
core, the Cains joined Soul Train
for an uncontrolled jam session
which was reminiscent of The
Suspects (a Richmond Band)
whose singer once said, "If
anyone wants to play, come on
up
With a full stage and a full
house, Saturday's New Deli per-
formance by Soul Train and com-
pany burned a sizzlingly hot spot
in Greeenville.
discovery ol the posthole out
lines ol at leas: two longhouses
and perhaps the centet fire pit.
And he has also uncovered what
he thinks may he part of the
palisade.
I he palisade is � lei
tifying the uj tccordii .
Green w orkins
this summer, he discoverd a
semicircular line ol post marks
thai extends along the edge of his
excavation site into a soybean
field at one end and into a corn
field at another. But tracing the
line of post stains will have to
until lall when the field has
been harvested and a tractor can
Sneak Preview Today
Vnthony Michael Hall and
Jenny Wright star in Columbia
Pictures' intense action packed
drama. Out oj Hounds, in a
sneak preview July 23 in Hendnx
rheater, sponsored by the It l
Student I nioi 1 ilms Committee
dmission is free and the show
starts at 3:30 p.m.
1 he film is a fast -paced adven
tine that is set against the
background oi the 1 os Vngeles
after-hours club scene It is tht
story ol a smalltown teenager.
Datvl Cage (Anthony Michael
Hall), who leaves rural Iowa to
get awav from his divorce-bound
parents, and heads to Los
Angeles for a better life with his
brother. When he arrives, he ac-
cidentally picks the wrong red
athletic bag oii the luggage
carousel Withm 12 hours, Darvi
finds himself dodging bullets
when he discovers his brother
brutallv murdered and a million
dollars' worth o heroin in the
athletic bag Not only is Daryl
forced to go on the run from the
police, who think he's responsi-
ble for the murder, but he's also
become a target for the demonic
drug dealer (Jeff Kober) deter-
mined to retrieve his heroin at
any cost. Daryl turns to the only
person he knows in L.A Dizz
(Jenny Wright), a slightly scat-
tered, appealingly off-beat girl he
met on the plane. As the danger
intensities, Daryl and Dizz form
an attraction thai grows stronger
and stronger.
Directed by Richard I uggle
from a screenplay by Tony
Kay den, the film was produced
by Charles Fries and Mike
Rosenfekt. Daryl's odyssey to set
the record straight carries him
through the vibrant new-wave
Los Angeles underground to a
head-on collision with the under-
world Out of Bounds features
exciting music, highlighting the
talents Siouxsie and the Ban-
shees, Tommy Keene, Adam
Ant, The Cult, Night Ranger,
Belinda Carlisle, Lords of the
New Church and The American
Girls, with the score by Stewart
Copeland.
shave away more topsoil.
Discovery of the village site
was made by Green in 1985 after
other searches by professional
and amateur archaeologists were
unable to locate artifact remains.
Information gathered in the
earlier searches, however, were
beneficial to Green because they
helped him narrow the focus tor
his survey. In particular. Green
cites the work done bv Cindy
Cook and Loretta Lautzenheizer
who had surveyed, a year earlier,
several hundred acres
land on the eastern side of the
lake.
See AJmFACTS, pae ft
Anthony Michael Hall and Gary Turman star in 'Out of Bounds
Sequel To 'Alien9
Retains Dark Mood
By ED TOSHACH
Greenville band Soul Train played at the New Dell Saturday.
In a medium flooded with se-
quels, it's easy to dismiss the
newest "part tl" without a se-
cond thought. The regular movie
patron who avoids Aliens,
however, will be cheating himself
out of one of the best science fic-
tion movies in years.
At the end of Alien.
predecessor to Aliens, Ripley
(Sigourney Weaver) had finally
defeated the acid-blooded slob-
bering monster that had killed
her crew, and was settling in for a
trip home in suspended anima-
tion. The creature was vanquish-
ed; everything was hunky-dory.
Aliens begins as Ripley's
escape craft is found and Ripley
is brought out of suspended
animation. We find that while
she had been sleeping peacefully,
the planet where the crew of the
Nostromo had encountered hun-
dreds of eggs � like that from
which the creature came � has
been colonized. Since com-
munications have been
mysteriously cut off with that
planet, the company that Ripley
works for recruits her to accom-
pany, as advisor, a platoon of in-
terplanetary marines assigned to
check out the colony. Without
giving away too much, things get
real messy real fast.
Fans of the dark, serious mood
in Alien will not be disappointed
with the sequel; there are plenty
of scenes with creatures hiding
around dark, high-tech corners.
Like its forerunner. AHens means
business from the word go. The
special effects, although
superlative, are never the center
of attention; rather they are the
natural backdrop for the setting.
Even under such conditions, it is
impossible to take the effects and
futuristic hardware for granted.
The Aliens themselves are im-
peccably lifelike, especially in the
multi-legged stage whe the em-
bryos are deposited in human
hosts. We never look at the alien
creatures as technological con
structions, but accept them as
characters. Mean characters
Another plus for -Miens is a
slight change in overall tone from
the first movie. Aliens is not just
a scary tale about people being
salivated on by malevolent ex-
traterrestrials, but it is the story
of a battle. The characters are
heroic yet human and the plot has
given up some (but not much) of
the stark terror of the original for
the constant tension of a conflict.
The acting is, without excep-
tion, of good quality, and
especially fine performances are
turned in by Weaver as Ripley
and Michael Beihn as Hicks, a
marine who gracefully handles a
command thrust on him by cir-
cumstances.
Much more can be said about
A Hem, but not without giving
away some of its many surprises.
It is one of the best movies so far
this year, so don't miss it.
"
- � � - '
i





fHEEASI CAROLINIAN
JULY 23, 1986
BLOOM COUNTY
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Man-O-Stick
By JARRELLS. JOKNSON
Artifacts
Found Under
Corn Field
Continued from page 5
In May of 1985, Green and
James Holley, a research assis-
tant, set out to conduct a brief
follow-up survey near the area
where the other archaeologists
had searched. After one and one-
half weeks and nearly 700 disap-
pointing acres, Holley found
some small pieces of pottery in a
corn field next to a field thai had
been checked the year before.
The pottery shards were of the
type associated with the late 16th
Century coastal Indian culture.
"They were the first artifacts
from the last portion of the late
Woodland Period (circa A.D.
1500-1650) that had been found
in Hyde County Green said.
Combing the field, they col-
lected more pieces of the pottery
called "Colington Simple-
Stamped Ware The pottery is
characterized by the mixture of
crushed shell in the clay and a
surface that is stamped with a
crude criss-crossed pattern of
lines. They also picked up
numerous pieces of smoking
pipes and flakes of stone that had
been chipped off in the process of
making projectile points and
other tools.
"We felt that it was not a tem-
porary camp site. It appeared as a
good possible candidate for the
village of Pomeiooc Green
said.
With the possible discovery of
Pomeiooc, ECU and Green have
received $10,000 in grants from
the America's 400th Anniversary
Committee for additional studj
at the site. An acre of corn was
purchased and was scraped away
with several inches of topsoil
Beneath the topsoil. Green found
hundreds of dark, round stains
where posts had once been
driven.
Work at the site, this year, will
continue through next week.
Green said that future work will
depend on the availability of fun-
ding.
WWWWWW
cpH?iD (EMEm
CHILDREN
ANY TIME
)
BUCCANEER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
ALIENS -r
1:30, 4:15, 7:00, 9:30
Robin Williams & Peter O'Toole in
"� Club Paradise
PC-13
'nds Thursday
lAbout
,ast Night
�R�
Sa Gene Wilder & Gildna Radner
Haunted Honeymoon
1:15, 3:15, 7:15, 9:15 �PG-
�� �
I Ml II i I I II �� �
The Easl Carolina Summer I h
presents
William
Christopher
Ronn
Carroll
y&t
Known as Father . � . .
or M'A'S'H
Greater
The hilarious satire of small town life in Texas
Monday - Saturday. July 28 - August 2 8 15 pm
Specai Mat'nee P- I
Wednesday. July 30. 2:15 pm
MCoil ��� ��
FOR RESERVATIONS: 757-63'
f�2��d2�n�M�E
COMING ATTRACTIONS
Ttjt rniLi ifiTrriTH
By SoveLove
T6. P - fA 6 ru "� n
rc-P- '�� - rt��i LOOK. '
i
Dadd s bee KorvteJ rlcret kri uc
Ud Im ; � . t.
rJ r
VAmKa5 I ocrs-t need anybody.
I 3o retj anyone but
7oo , rc Battle. Y ari'Me
are. poils. c �ot rvt j
ree A aav ca� . . - ji
D! Ydoc fcpty.rAr title.
Undercover Cats
- R36D1 MOM �-
J � �.�
By PARKER
Wednesday, July 23, 1986
Movie: Sneak Preview
"Out of Bounds
3:30 p.m.

Free Admission
Prizes
Thursday, July 24, 1986
Mendenhall Student
f Center Olympics
3:00 p.m. in Recreation Area
Try Your Skill At:
Billiards, Table Tennis, Bowling, Video
Galaga, Video Trivial Pursuit, Darts, Ring
Toss
Registration deadline extended to noon, Thursday July 24. 1986
in Billiards area.
Monday, July 28, 1986
"10"
3:30 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
IHK r AS! H INlJ
Baker �x



B RIC K McC'ORMAC
And
SCOTT COOPKR
"ru F4Hur.
With the preseason footbaJ
practice set to begin next n
Pirate coach Art Bakei is lool .
ill
III
The sign of the times appears in front ol the
mauling of the Wolfpack in their opener in R
Overton Sig
span. Miff Rqpafli
ECU baseball
Overton announced the
of seven recruits for the
reason, sesterday
Overton. who led the P
a school record 40-10 c i
last year, signeu five fi
and two junior-college trans
The JC transfers are (
Smith, a second-team
America selection a- a
handed pitcher from Bi
JC in Mattawan. N.J and out-
fielder Jon Thomas :
Louisburg JC.
The 198" incoming
class includes Calvin Brow
power-hitting first baseman
North Edgecombe �
in Battleboro, N t
Tommy Yarboroug v
Bern High School.
John Adams from N
Nash High School in Rockj
Mount. N.C and pitchers
Jonathon Jenkins from Culpep-
per. Va and Bnen Ber, �
from Southview H gh Scl
Fayetteville.
"We fell we had a very fin
recruiting year Overtoi
Harrison



s




B RK K McCORM C
And
SCOIT COOPER
Although Pirate basketba.
months away, ECL coach
Charlie Harrison is looking tor-
ward to what the future ha-
store for his Bucs
Coming off his best season in
the conference standing
finishing in the upper half oi the
CAA, Harrison feels his uad
can continue their success p
parently, other sources Street
and Smith magazine) feel the
same way, as the Pirates were
predicted to finish only behind
Navy and UNC-Wilmington in a
battle with George Mason tor
third place
"If we can stay healthy, we'll
be pretty good Harrison said
"I'm really looking forward to it.
"In our league, anybody can
beat anybody on any given
night Harrison added. "1 think
the biggest thing we have in
favor is that we hae some
seniors that have worked hard
d-
Sports Fact
Wed. July 23, 1976
A torrential downpour halts
Ithe College All-Star Game with
the Super Bowl Champion Pitt
jsburgh Steelers leading, 24-0,
tin the third quarter. Sagging at-
jtndance causes the series to be
jGiscontinued after this game
iThe professionals won 31 of 42
Jmatch-ups in the annual series,
including the last 12 in a row.
1
is please
are prac
better v
Henry
I'mversii
Will
compeu
AtlantiJ
York G
Bass pial
in B I
peting :tj
Ha:
timistu
One
working
Sledge
thr
weeks aj
,1





.Adults s21
7T7T33
AN
LDREN
lub uruil
moon
k Preview
ounds
'86
Student
f mpics
kill Ah
I i

T
Y
d
t
n
gathering place
I HI- i-ASl C R() 1NIAN
Sports
iii.v;

Baker Expects More Depth For '86 Gridders
w
B RI(KMc(()RMA(
And
SCOTT COOPER
ith the preseason football
ice Sd to begin next month.
e coach Art Baker is looking
forward to his second campaign
as ECU will once again face some
ol the nation's toughest competi-
tion.
Baker will welcome the
freshmen to Greenville on August
y. while the varsity players arrive
the 12th. Practice officially
begins Ihuis. Aug. 14. Baker is
quite optimistic and feels that a
senioi leadership role may be a
ke in the Pirates' success.
"Senior leadership is a key
Baker said. "We've been getting
-v-
E
INtNG
� �CM
III
Ihe si)n of the times appears in front of the ECl strength complex. iI hopes lo repeat last year's 33-14
mauling of the Wolfpack in their opener in Raleigh on September 6.
Overton Signs Seven Recruits
excellent senior leadership so fai
this summer. We've had a good
summei from an academic stand
point and the players who have
been here have worked really
hard they've shown
unusuall) good attitude running
and lifting weights in this
weal he
�V the Pirates entei presea
drills, tl ere are some quest
that need to be answered at �
numbei �l positions, according
i o Ba k ei Qu arterba �
placekickei and cornerl i
seem to be the biggest uncert
ties at ' � is point.
"We eed -i quai tei bai �
can step in and i un the team
Bakei said "We've .
some v nsistency passing
football.
Soph more Be; ke I i
and freshmen I ra is Huntei
c harlie 1 ibretto have a
working eir throwing
summer, . one
need . forward ' ea i
, . � -
1 he biggest que�
a spot wit lepai
uire of 1(1 's altim
rei lefl Heath 1
playet
lake t ne raig 1
Bake; feel
may I a� e as gc "it
will put ' pressure
Bake explained. It's a
situat n to be in
While 21 ss (

wili rbacl
tions 1 ew is W
Mc
la)
N '
H
.
.

'





.
"W




.
1 !�
. � � .




"we met all ou� a d a two-tim i
ECU 1 i iai �� r the oming sea ;on w! � ���i
. l id the sigipowei. speed,�
the 1987 1 'Yai gh v honoi able
skill no s ! � . . �' -state last
Ovei P rates toKm mg the - -ss -w Bei � . -v here he bat-
d 40-10 campaignPirates �e. 420 will five 1 omeruns and
.e freshmeni Wi n f i22 �� den bases.
ege transfers1 insoi vl arned .iams, who played shortstop.
K transl ure iary� tst veata named the Big East Con-
nferem e cei teri 1P ayei i the Year in
'� as .1Bra Iben s ands 432 with five
hand � � dalei ii eg Hai � lie �v.i- a three-time all-
JC" in Ma aw an, VI. and iference selection and was
Ion 1 honias t �recruiting .lavs, accordingtion all-state last
1 .(Jverton. He led Bi � k da eseason.
8"7 . ming freshmentlBei kma lenkins, both
a le Calvin Brow(, ollege W oi Id V: ies with a 1 t-hai d� 1 i rrs posted ex-
power-hii I : baseman fromrecord and a spai kling 0.96 1 R it bei s a yeai ago. Be; -
Sort 1 dgecombe High 5He was a � e �.�� M P,ed S ithview High
, N.C�veil ill-regioi a�. � . nsei utive ap
Varboi t m Newlislr i ' "t tale playoffs.
Bern Higl v hooi; ortstop�H 1 ; 5 1986 with a i 46
dan � fi om NorthernLouisburg last ason ERA while row ing two no-
High Schcx Rockyes and 10 1lle was an honorable
N.C and pitchers! ative is a 1met ' tati ielection and
Jonathon Jenkins from Culpcp-out 1 ield prospec I itl time all-conference pick as
per, Va and Bnen Berckmanspeed.
V
Southview Higl School in
Fa yetteville.
"We fell we had a very fine
recruiting vear Overton -
Brow is the powei hittei
the future tor the Pirates, act i
ding to Overton. He batted 487
with 11 homeruns and 38 KBI's
knis sported an impressive
9-1 at ulpeppei High
a miniscule 1.01
1 k
Cheer I p Guys
Pirate coaches dary Overton (left
recruiting vear for ECl hasehall.
transfers.
i and Bili Best irinhti have completed what looks to he a successful
mong the Pirate sigmngs are five freshmen and two junior-college
Harrison Optimistic; Reflects On World Title
Bv RICK Mc( ORM (
nd
s( OI I COOPER
SI�U t4lUW,
Although Pirate basketball is
months away, ECU coach
lie Harrison is looking for-
ward to what the future has in
re tor his Bucs.
Coming off his best season in
the conference standings,
'mishing in the upper half oi the
' A. Harrison feels his squad
an continue their success. Ap-
parently, other sources Street
and Smith magazine) feel the
same wav. as the Pirates were
predicted to finish only behind
Navy and L'NC-W ilmington in a
battle with George Mason to;
third place.
"If we can stay healthy, we'll
be pretty good Harrison said.
"I'm realiv looking forward to it.
"In our league, anybody can
beat anybody on any given
night Harrison added. "I think
the biggest thing we have in our
favor is that we have some
seniors that have worked hard
enough to win did want I
out winners
Harrison, who is a firn
believer of hard offseason work.
trengt
by
he time practice
I
Sports Fact
Wed. July 23. 1976
A torrential downpour halts
the College All-Star Game with
the Super Bowl Champion Pitt-
sburgh Steelers leading, 24-0,
in the third quarter. Sagging at-
tendance causes the series to be
discontinued after this game.
The professionals won 31 of 42
match-ups in the annual series,
including the last 12 in arow
Charlie Harrison
is pleased with his players as they
are practicing diligently to get
better. With the likes of Marchell
Henry working camps at the
University of Maryland, John
Williams and Howard Brown
competing in summer league in
Atlantic City, N.J. and New
York Citv respectively, Leon
Bass playing and lifting weights
in Boston and Tracey King com-
peting in the AAU's in Florida -
Harrison can't help but be op-
timistic.
One player who has not been
working out this sifmmer is Keith
Sledge. Sledge underwent ar-
throscopic knee surgery two
weeks ago, but will be back in full
s in i tatobei.
"Keith Sledge was playing hurt
and playing in pain at the end of
last season Harrison said. "It's
a credit to the type oi kid he is
that he kept playing despite it
nother returner for the Bucs
will be sophomore Jeff Kelly.
Kelly, who had left school with
intentions of transferring, had a
change of heart and will be back
for lus second year
"left Kelly convinced me that
he liked lasi Carolina, when he
home he realized just how
much he liked ECU Harrison
said. "He went through what a
lot oi freshmen go through. He's
still just a kid
Harrison teels this may be his
best team since his first year at
ECU. With the majority of the
team working hard this summer,
the foundation is being laid for
what could be a successful season
for the Pirates.
"The guvs have had good sum-
mers for the most part Har-
rison said. "With the right
chemistry and acceptance of
roles, we can be a very good
basketball team � provided we
don't get hurt.
"It'll be fun, 1 wish we could
start tomorrow Harrison con-
tinued. "Not necessarily to what
I'm looking forward to, but to
what the kids are looking for-
ward to � they've paid their
dues
With the United States taking
the gold medal in the World
Basketball Championships
weekend in Mad;id, Spain,
I SA won the event for the '
time since 1954. ECU coach Hat
rison reflected on the victory
European basketball as well.
"We wee fortunate to win.
We weren't a very overpowering
team Harrison said. "We lack
ed really good shooters, especial
ly at the forward position.
"Our defensive quickness is
eventually what won it for us
he added. "It's good for basket
ball here in the United States that
we could winwithout (us) plac-
ing much emphasis on it. There
was some emphasis, but there
was still not as much as we put on
the Olympic team
"We were fortunate to win.
We weren't a very over-
powering team
�Charlie Harrison
Harrison, who has coached in
Europe, feels that the European
mentality is geared for the
offensive-minded individual.
"In f-urope they don't ap-
preciate sou if you can't score
he said. "In America, fans will
recognize a player for good
defensive play"
The biggest difference between
the American and International
style of play, according to Har
rison, is the emphasis on fast
break defense.
"There is a great transition
from offense to defense Har-
rison explained. "They (the
Europeans) are geared to getting
the ball upcourt quickly for a fast
&hot
N
S i
ble.

i la
Marchell Henrv. who is working at the University of Maryland basket-
hall camp, will be the team leader for the Pirates next year.
I
'





8
THfc EAST CAROL IMAN
Jl 1 N 23, 1986
Classifieds
SALE
WORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
perience in typing resumes, theses
techical documents, and term
papers. We manage and merge your
names and addresses into merged
letters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards. Our prices ar extremely
reasonable and we always offer a 15
percent discount to ECU students
SDF Inc. 106 East Fifth Street
752 3694
FOR SALE: 1982 Knox Trailer
Home 3 br V i bath, air, dryer
$500 and take up payments $176 95
Call after 6, 758 1559
RINGOLD TOWERS: Most conve
nient location to campus! Fully fur
nished condos (except linens!
priced from $30's $50 s Some owner
financing available University
Realty 355 5866
ATTENTION: Attention fraternities
and sororities, you booked at "The
Alley Tavern" before, now you can
still book at "The Tavern' for par
ties! Call 757 1227
LOOK GREAT: Look great at super
savings! New Youk trained hair
stylist Paul Mitchell & Chadwick
Hail utting Methods Profes
al Image Hair studio. Hair cuts
for men and women to fit your bone
structure Free hair consultations
Call 756 1945
FOR SALE. 1982 Dawaski K2550
Excellent condition 15,000 miles
Must sell to stay in school $600 Cau
Rob at 752 2051.
FOR SALE Sofa $50, 2 matching
chairs $15 each Twin mattress set
$20. Microwave $l73, muust sell Call
758 7439 anytime
HOUSE FOR SALE. 4 bedroom ?
bath, three blocks form campus
than tenting, perfecl for
students. 110 S Jarvis St Call
355 6500 and ask for Dan Powers
MOBILE HOME FOR SALE: 10 X
50. 2 bed 'ome for sale
es from campus
bel �� � :rd Why pay rent
. jr own place?
IPs inexci I edition and a real
Jin. Can V. ke a' 758 3228
WANTED
CP�
�RETAIL AD A6ENCY
� EXPERIENCE A PLUS
� CREATIVE ENVIRONMENT
� MAJOR BENEFITS
SEND RESUME 4 COPIES 0 WORK TO.
PERSONNEL MGR. STERLING ADVERTISING
SUITE 606,2000 W. FIRST STREET
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. 27IOH EOE
FEMALE STUDENT: Female stu
dent to assist housewife .vith house
cleaning and child care in exchange
for room and board Near campus
Call 757 1798
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Female
needed to share a two bedroom apt
in the fall for the first semester with
two other girls in Tar River You will
have your own room $170month
plus one third utilities. Call 758 4645
FEMALE ROOMMATE Female
roommate wanted for partially fur
nished 2 bedroom apartment, rent
$117 month & 4 utilities Studious,
dependable, non smoker preferred
Call Angelia 757 3640
attici
752- A JULY
7303 (J
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Female
roommate needed for l4 bath
twnhse, priv bdrm (need bdrm
furn), next to Athletic Club, prefer
grad student or profess; $175 mo &
dep and utilities, 756 9583 after 6
p.m.
ROOMMATE WANTEO: Room
mate(s) wanted to share two
bedroom apt. 4 block from campus,
water, pool, cable included
$160month. Call 752 1909 after 9
p.m.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Grad Stu
dent needs roommate. 2 bedroom
apt 1 block from campus.
Preferablly non smoking serious
student. Call 758 4987 after 6 p.m
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 2
tr apt 1 mile form campus Pool,
tennis courts, laundry facilities
SIBOmonth plus' utilities Call Mike
at 756 8312
COMMUTER: ECU day student
commuting from Williamston to
ECU daily would like to share driv
ing with another commuter. Call
792 1902 between 9 30 12 p.m
COLLEGE REP WANTED: Rep
wanted to distribute "Student Rate"
subscription cards at this campus
Good income, no selling involved
For information and application
write to. Allen S. Lowrance, Direc
tor, 251 Glenwood Or , Mooresville,
NC 28115
LOST: Men's burgundy velcro
wallet in Village Green pool area. No
questions asked � reward. Please
call Dale at 758 7056 after 6 p.m.
SUMMER BURNOUT BASHI:
Festivities begin at 10 p.m across
from Travel Express on the dea
dend If you want to understand the
fine aspects to partying, you don't
want to miss this! Come enjoy a
mingling of the minds Get Bent
NO NEWS
IS BAD NEWS
FOR SALE:
Solid Maple Bunk or Single Beds.
Very Reasonably Priced!
Call 752-5598
23 WED
THE PIGZ
BROTHERS
24THUR
25 FRI f
Presents
26 SAT
Nantucket
Draft Nite
Thursday, Friday & Sunday, July 24, 25 & 27, 1986
9:00 til 2:00 a.m.
Admission: SI.50 Guys Si.00 Ladies
10C DRAFT
ALL NITE
CO KROCERINC FOR ALL YOUR
& Tailgate Party
. Needs!
J
i��iuu iiiuuui, ��- mni! O00O OCO m l
an iW nuuiiu v1�� � " xYiYx x x Yx x � I
xi�IJOULxi �Y� nYx �� ir A i i u i u u l u 1111!
I I I I I I I I 1 I I 1 I I I I 1 if� I I I I I 1 I 1 1 I I I I I 1 1
I n u I Iin (PBl 11111111111111111'
XII X IxY" XJ I inn �. ' xx XX X I X X X I IX XJJ
xtYA xV
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� mJr1 i XI ii i iu i xjOC
Every Tuesday Night Is
COLLEGE NIGHT
Free Delivery for $5.00 & Over Purchases
7 p.m. to 11 p.m.
99C SUBS
YOUR CHOICE
Ham & Cheese Bologna & Cheese
Ham, Salami & Cheese Pepperom, SalamiCheese
Turkey A Cheese Ham, Turkey & Cheese
NOT VALID ON DELIVERIES
60 oz. pitchers $1.99
includes tax
ALL DAY FRIDAY
32 oz. Bucket of Your Favorite Draft
99C
215 E. Fourth Street
752-2183
AOVERTISED ITEM POlXv
Each of these advertised
items is required to oe
readily available for sal m
each Kroger Sav on except
as specifically noted in tnis
ad if we do run out of an
item we will offer you vour
choice of a comparaoie
item wnen available
reflecting the same sav
ings or a raincneck wnicn
win entitle you to P"r
chase the advertised item
at the advertised pn�e
within JO days Only one
vendor coupon will o K
cepted per item

OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd Greenville
r ' - '�mmmam
- ' � � .�.�� .jn �wn





Title
The East Carolinian, July 23, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 23, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.485
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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