The East Carolinian, July 16, 1986






�te i�nzt (HutolMnn
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 Nod- CL
Wednesday, July 16, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
Circulations.000
8 Pages
'


Community Programs
Planned For Future
Howell Reflects
J B HUMBERT The Ei) Carolinian
Chancellor John Howell will be retiring in 1987. During Howell's reign as Chancellor ECU became
known as one of the most recognized schools in the south and added to it's facilities the ECU Medical
School. See related story page 1.
Study Abroad
By MIKE LUDWICK
News Editor
In the upcoming years, ECU
will strive to adapt its existing
programs to better serve eastern
North Carolina and even the na-
tion, said Chancellor John
Howell in an interview Friday.
Howell said serving the people
around an institution and prepar-
ing students in those institutions
is the key to surviving in the
future.
"We are at a transition stage in
higher education Howell said,
"We have to prepare our
students to solve problems our
professors don't even know-
exist
"This is a tall order he add-
ed, but if ECU does this well then
eastern North Carolina will
flourish. Howell said if eastern
North Carolina flourishes then
ECU will flourish.
"ECU is attuned to eastern
North Carolina and its people
he said, "We want our professors
to go out in the community and
offer their expertise
Applied research is the majori-
ty of the research conducted at
ECU explained Howell. Applied
research is applying one's
knowledge to a situation. "We
need to do a lot of it for eastern
North Carolina Howell said.
When Howell became
Chancellor in 1982 there was a lot
of in-state opposition to ECU.
Howell said, though, that this
situation is now coming to an
end.
"What we have had
throughout our history is some
fiery opposition by people who
thought they would be disadvan-
taged by the advancement of
ECU Howell said.
The last big battles, Howell ex-
plained, were over ECU's univer-
sity status and it's Medical
School.
"There is a change in opinion
about ECU � not in excellence
he said. Howell added in the last
five years the faculty has publish-
ed the same amount as had been
published in the preceeding 10
years. In other words, the facul-
ty's publication rate has doubled.
Howell is optimistic abou the
future too. He said ECU has
established itself, has a wide
range of programs, and commit-
ted faculty and students.
"We have a solid foundation
for the future Howell said,
"and we have the mind set to
develop
Another importan factor,
Howell said, is the attitude of the
students. "Students come here to
get an education he said,
"They come to prepare
themselves for a career and this
See ECU Page 2.
Italian Exchanges Planned
By HEI'H WHICKER
Vivian! Se�N rdiior
Be. fall ECU will
rec-yea an of in-
struct with the
Universitj ��� Fi il
Eugene Ryan, dean of Arts and
Sciences, described the program
as "an exchange agreement
which provides for the develop-
ment of cultural and academic
relationships between the two in-
stitutions.
Ryan explained the idea to
a program arcd in-
struction has been in the making
for four years. During the pro-
cess oi developing the program
he met with officials oi the
Italian campus in planning the
final details of the project.
'We wanted to develop closer
ties with this program and Fer-
rara was the logical choice said
Ryan.
lor several years ECU has
sponsored a summer school pro-
gram in Ferrara, where American
students spend several weeks at
the Italian campus, participating
in arts, humanities, and social
science classes which emphasize
European culture in general and
Italian culture in particular.
"We planned to get a group
together this year, but due to ter-
rorism abroad, there wasn't
enough interest Ryan said.
In the past two years students
have visited Italy through the
summer exchange program.
"It's a great program for
undergraduate students studying
the arts, science, or history.
Graduate students can benefit by
doing research in Italy com-
mented Ryan.
Not only will the exchange pro-
gram be offered to students but
to administrators, librarians, and
technical staff as well.
The program includes the ex-
change oi publications and spon-
sorship of occasional "joint
symnposia The agreement will
be in force for three years.
ECU will gain much from the
program with the University of
Ferrara. According to Ryan ECU
will add another dimension to its
curriculum by offering the ex-
change program with the Univer-
sity of Ferrara.
"In coming years, a number of
students will experience life in a
different culture � Firsthand
Ryan said.
Rapist's Death Scheduled
RALEIGH, N.C. (UP1) �
Convicted murderer and rapist
John Rook is scheduled to be ex-
ecuted Sept. 19 for the 1980 slay-
ing of Raleigh nurse, Ann Marie
Roche.
Judge Robert Farmer set the
date in a 15-minute hearing Tues-
day in Wake County Superior
Court, where Rook, 27, was con-
victed and sentenced six years ago
for the kidnapping, rape and
murder of Roche. Roche was
beaten with a tire iron, slashed
with a fishing knife, run over by a
car and left to die in an isolated
field.
Rook had been scheduled to
die by lethal injection Valentine's
Day this year, but the Supreme
Court granted him a stay of ex-
ecution Feb. 10 � the third time
his execution date had been
postponed.
The new execution date was set
after the Supreme Court denied
Rook's appeal July 7. State law
requires an execution date to be
set 60 to 90 days after the
Superior Court hearing.
Two death row inmates have
been executed in North Carolina
since the death penalty was
remstituted in 1976.
David Rudolf, Rook's at-
torney, has said he believes the
issues raised in his client's appeal
have merit. Rudolf had hoped to
argue before the Supreme Court
that a taped confession was il-
legally obtained and therefore
unreliable. He also claimed the
trial judge erred in instructing the
jury and that death penalty op-
ponents were systematically ex-
cluded from the jury.
Rudolf also planned to argue
Rook was an abused child, who
the stale failed to help. As part of
the appeals process, Rudolf in-
troduced as evidence that Rook
would have qualified as a Willie
M child. In 1980, state officials
agreed to provide appropriate
treatment and education for such
problem children.
Rudolf also had argued in
Rook's case that the death penal-
ty discriminated against the
murderers of white victims.
Before adjourning for a three-
month break, the Supreme Court
last week decided to review
whether the death penalty is im-
posed in a racially discriminatory
way as presented in a Georgia
case.
Based on that ruling, Rudolf
asked Farmer to hold off the ex-
ecution date until after Oct. 6,
when the Supreme Court is
scheduled to reconvene.
Extreme Caution, Awareness Cited In Rape Prevention
By LYNN WEAVER
Maff Writer
Recent studies by the
Behavioral Science Unit of the
FBI Academy in Virginia, made
it clear that there is no valid in-
formation about what women
can do to defend themselves dur-
ing a sexual attack Doctors inter-
viewed men who had raped ten or
more women and results were not
only surprising, but also con-
tradictory.
The rapists advice to women
was so different that the doctors
decided it could be hazadous to
offer the advice.
Although the results to the
study seemed negative, Lt. Keith
Knox, Crime Prevention officer
at ECU Public Saftey and Officer
James Tripp, Juvenile Division
of the Greenville Police Depart-
ment, both feel there are actions
that can be taken.
They agree the use of general
caution and alertness can help
prevent the risk of being attack-
ed.
Considering the recent rapes in
the Greenville area, women are
advised to keep alert to where the
rapes have taken place and use
extreme caution in these areas.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds10
Editorials4
Features6
Sports8
Win if you can, lose if you
must, but learn to take your
whippings without a whimper.
� Walter Camp
Knox and Tripp advise women
to use general safety tips such as;
don't travel alone at night, keep
doors and windows locked, and
be alert.
Another tip they add is to keep
keys in hand when walking,
because if needed they could be
used as a weapon in self defense.
Even when extreme caution is
used, women still have a chance
of being attacked.
National studies state that one
out of every three women is sex-
ually assaulted.
When a woman is attacked she
should keep her thoughts straight
and reflect on any self defense
tactics that could be used in her
particular situation.
According to May Lystead,
chief of the National Center for
the Prevention and Control of
Rape, there is little truth to the
myth that resistance will increase
a woman's risk of being injured.
Lystead states, "Two new
studies found that women who
resisted an attack were more like-
ly to escape, with only slight
bodily injury
She added women who acted
passively and cried made
themselves look unappealing and
defenseless, which made their at-
tackers seem more powerful. In
short submissive victims are more
likely to be raped and the resis-
tant victims were more likely to
escape.
Although the FBI's studies are
contradictory, they have to be
taken into account. The men who
had raped mass amounts of
women proved to have many dif-
ferent motives and ideas about
the rapes and the victims.
"Some of the rapists said, 'Tell
them to scream, fight, and claw
like hell but others said, 'Tell
women to give in, because the
guy is going to rape her no matter
- �
what he has to do states the
report.
Knox explained there are many
different factors involved with
each situation. Specific advice
can not be given to women unless
a specific situation can be made.
Victims should try to figure out
the rapist's motives and then
decide which approach they
should take, whether it be
resistance or submission.
Surviving a sexual attack is the
most important thing to
remember.
When followed, the above ad-
vice could help prevent an attack.
If by chance a rape happened
to occur here are some steps to
follow:
�The victim should try to gather
her thoughts, stay calm and get to
a safe place. Call or alert so-
meone that help is needed. The
Police Department is available to
help. A victim is not obligated to
prosecute.
�If the authorities have not
already been notified, report the
attack as soon as possible. If
there is physical injury go im-
mediately to a local hospital. Do
not change your clothing or clean
yourself off. Do not apply
medication.
�Victims are advised to receive
pregnancy and venereal disease
testing.
�Even if the woman decides not
to prosecute, she should seek
psychological counseling. (in
Greenville rape victims can call
the Pitt County Mental Health
Center at 752-7151 or East
Carolina Student Counselina
Center at 757-6661.)
Most victims will be advised to
prosecute, but just reporting the
sexual assault is a vital step in fin-
ding and arresting the rapist.
Knox stated although it may
be difficult for the victim, thev
��?�,�
might include some small detail
of information about the attack
that would help the police locate
the rapists.
A rapist will usually repeat his
sexual attacks against women.
"Virtually there has never been
a one time rapist added Knox.
Considering the increasing
amount of local rapes, people
should know how to report a sex-
ual assault or rape they might
hear or see. Citizens should give
their precise location, who they
are and the phone number of the
phone the call is being made on.
The witness should describe the
individual as completely as possi-
ble, which will help with locating
the rapist for arrest.
"If you come upon an actual
sexual assault or rape taking
place, start shouting as loud as
possible while approaching the
scene cautiously advises Knox.
Get as good of a mental
description as possible of what is
happening and of the rapist. The
witness should also try to gain
other's attention, by either call-
ing the police or alerting
neighbors.
Knox alerts people to, "If you
see any woman being grabbed or
pushed and she seems reluctant
inform the law enforcement
agencies, because this report
could possibly prevent a rape
from actually taking place
Rapes can easily be prevented
either by the women themselves
or by another citizen.
Dress Rehearsal
i � HUMBERT -Th�e��tCro(ini�n
Boniu Williams and Olivia Scott, costume assistants are shown above working on a "mock-up" of a
costume to be used during the East Carolina Playhouse production of " Greater Tuna The produc-
tion is scheduled to run July 28 through August 2.






y
(HI 1 M i R(U IM-W
Jll Y 16. 1986
Announcements
Summer Games
Ushers Needed
ECU's Expansion
i.

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Mess . � � �� � h ding I H � ' �'
qutremei is are posted �� " sigi up sheet'
Please . I �� -� a v
Watermelon Feast
� � �
Chinese Language I.
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us �ti dv - ' �� '
Tfinjg vo seeVi" o let v ' fl
n 'he d�S skills of i lerstai � � - speak
S reading and writ g ����� "
be able to understand oat eseand
sir vi-s as a excellent prepare'
ed study or for a pi -i a
wl � understanding ot Chma s ess
' �. ���. will be 'a ' ' � � � �
Unjfv ' im 1 OG pn
Brewsipr C30?
Japanese Language
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icadi

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( ontinued From Pay,? '
makes a good educational set
ting
Howell added the Med School
will continue to grow
He said the Med Sch
hospital h.a ��� ompleted
theii tits! phase, "die basics
and w ill mm expand
v mg vs it h an expand �
medical park, he said. will K
developmeni ol all the periferial
setKCs thai grow up along side a
major medical pai H well
this will nol only improve
As H I grows. Howell -�
plained, the fund raisinj
a E l will have to continue
nl in die iasi tew vear- I
'�rsines realized tl I
need � money
�(
How
and slatted an instltutioi
H �-

Mi H iwell' � � live
a � e univei
Campus
Voice
l(i you think state, local, or na-
tional governments should
legislate morals?

M9W
s.
JL.�
N.�-
1 auricHillis
Senior, Socu H�rA
V- ausea peihou
set�
PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH SAT JULY 19 AT SAV A CENTER IN GREENVIl LE
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IESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES aa'Bt aflLWS
waiikwmisi:
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Plus Jouble Coupons
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Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli, Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current Week Food
Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items ov Eqral Quality.
Richard Pond
Senior. History
"Yes, there should be a basis
and it should start with the
government instead of a tree-tor -
DUKE'S
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i69
Mark Pepper
Junior, Physical Education
"No. The reason is 1 think my
parents brought me up right to
where I can choose my own
morals
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10





I HF EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 16. 1986
ECU's Expansion
1 t-rom Page 1.As ECU grows. Howell ex-
ducational set-plained, the fund raising efforts
at EC I will have to continue.
c Med SchoolOnly in the last few years have
; gro�universities realized that they
e Med School andneed to raise private money.
a . inpleted��Onlv in the last tew years
the basksHowell said, "have we organized
and slatted an institution to raise
expandingmonev
will be theHowell, who plans to retire in
the perifena!1987, said ihe one unique aspect
g side aoi his tenure as Chancellor has
i k Howell Naidbeen Mrs Howell's involvement
� ovewith the universitv
i econom)
!��
too
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or details.
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BiVOOPEN 24 HOURS
North Carolinian Named As Candidate
WASHINGTON (UPI) � A
black North Carolina
businessman, who may become
the next U.S. Ambassador to
South Africa, draws high marks
from the unlikely duo of the Rev.
Jesse Jackson, a Democrat, and
Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C.
Robert Brown, a former Nixon
White House aide who runs a
public relations firm in High
Point, N.C won praise from
both the left and right Monday as
government sources confirmed he
is a candidate for the job.
"1 know Bob Brown and have
known him for years said the
arch-conservative Helms. "Cer-
tainly I would welcome a chance
to support him
Jackson, a civil rights leader
and 1984 Democratic presidential
candidate, called Brown "a de-
cent man with integrity and great
ability. If, in fact, appointing
him as ambassador is a forerun-
ner of a change of policy, h
would be a step in the right direc-
tion
But Randall Robinson, co-
chairman of the Free South
Africa Movement and a leading
critic of the administration's
policy toward the racially torn
nation, dismissed the idea of ap-
pointing Brown as a public rela-
tions tactic.
"I don't think it serves any
useful purpose to put a black face
on what is perceived globally and
particularly in South Africa to be
an anti-black policy Robinson
said.
Brown, 51, is a Republican
who has participated in the State
Department's Working Group on
South Africa. He could not be
reached for comment Monday,
but a spokeswoman stressed he
was "not job hunting
The administration is review-
ing its South African policy in the
wake of escalating racial violence
and a state of emergency imposed
on the nation by the white-
minority regime in Pretoria.
Secretary of State George
Shultz is expected to detail the
policy review July 23 in congres-
sional testimony, but officials
have said President Reagan plans
to stand by his policy of "con-
structive engagement" � leaving
diplomatic channels and U.S. in-
vestment in South Africa intact in
order to retain influence.
White House and State Depart-
ment spokesmen declined to com-
ment on whether Brown would be
tapped to succeed Ambassador
Herman Nickel, a former jour-
nalist.
If appointed and approved by
the Senate, Brown would not be
the First black diplomat in South
Africa. The U.S. consul general
in Capetown, John Ferguson, is
black, as are several foreign am
basadors.
In Atlanta, Mayor Andrew
Young, controversial ambasadoi
to the United Nations during the
Carter administration, said
Brown had his "highest endorse-
ment
"I can't think of anybody
more qualified to represent this
country in such a difficult situa-
tion Young said. "In fact, he is
probably the only person Jesse
Helms and I could both
endorse
Hank's Homemade Jce Cream
Financial A wards Reduced For Fall
WASHINGTON, DC (I PS)
� About 290.(XX students won't
get Pell Grants and another
500.000 will get smaller grants
during the next school year if the
U.S. Dept. of Education persist
in believing in a number that
many education lobbyists sa) jusl
isn't accurate.
The department expects
students wil! qualify tor some
$369 million more in Pel! Gi
than Congress appropriated for
the program.
As a result, the depai
says it'll start reducing and even
eliminating Pell Gram awards
starting at the end of June in
order to keep within its budget.
Bui the American Council on
Education last week said the
"shortfall" is probably closer to
S million than to $369 million.
1: so, fewer students would
fer aid cuts.
It ACE calculated that the
governmenl had used $3 -is
billion oi its !98 fiscal vear Pell
Cirani htuige! through May, while
I ducation Dept. estimated it
speni $3 75 billion.
"We are skeptical oi their (the
My boyfriend lias a "bad.
back" and constant!) remjures
himself. How can 1 keep the same
thing from happening to me1
It's estimated that 8 oul ol 10
Americans will have a bak in-
jury sometime during theii lives
The Health Coiutnn By
Man Flesha Adams
Preventing back injuries .an be
as simple as learning proper lif-
ting and moving techniques,
eliminating excess bod weight,
strengthening neglected back
muscles, and adopting good
posture habits at work, home,
and plav.
Proper lifting includ
�Get a firm footing. Keep your
feet apart for a stable base with
the toes pointed out.
�Bend your knees. Don't bend
at the waist!
�Tighten your stomach muscles.
Abdominal muscles support your
spine when you lift.
�Lift with your legs. Let your
powerful leg muscles do the work
of lifting, not your weaker back
muscles.
�Keep the load close to your
body; the closer it is to your
spine, the less force it exerts on
your back.
�Keep your back upright.
Whether lifting or putting down
the load, don't add the weight of
your body to the load. Avoid
twisting because it can cause in-
jury.
Other ways to decrease the
possibility of back injuries in-
clude:
� Reduce stress. Your spine is
sensitive to muscular tension that
builds up during a stress-filled
day. i earn to relax and unwind.
� 1 ose weight. The farther a
ellj juts out in front, the
more force it puts on the back.
� 1 xercise. Eight) percent of
back pain can be traced to lack of
exercise.
� Avoid sitting for long periods
of time. Gel up, stretch and walk
around occasionally.
� At your desk, work at a com-
fortable height that doesn't make
you slouch or reach.
� S eeping rests the back Use a
firm mattress. Sleep on youi side
with kees bent or on your back
th our knees elevated.
Education Depts) estimates
ays Patricia Smith of the At 1
"They have been wrong several
times before
"We mst want to hold their
feet to the fire she adds.
The department remains un-
bowed. "We are holding to our
estimate says spokesman Bob
Jamroz.
The Education Department
uses past financial data to project
how much money it needs for
Medical
Receives
H Rl STY HARRINGTON
staff Writer
I wo tacuity members from the
ECU school of medicine have
been awarded research grants
from the North Carolina
Biotechnology Center for pro-
jects that seem "promising" in
the fact that they may increase
the state's economy through their
findings in the biotechnical field.
Henry Stone and E.J.
Stellwag, both oi the ECU
Medical School, were awarded
$25,000 and $18,500 respectively
for their proposed research pro-
tects.
Stone's research project, entitl-
ed "Cloning of the Newcastle
Disease Virus Gene for Fusion
Protein involves the develop-
ment oi a newer, more powerful
vaccine to prevent Newcastle
disease, a major killer of poultry
and wild birds. The development
"V
0NS0LI DATED
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:Adultss2.oo5
CHILDREN
ANYTIME
BUCCANEER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
Ends Thursday
Legal
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Wednesday July 16, 9:30 p.m.
WRQR & Record Bar present
Sneak Preview
Showing of
ALIENS
Robin Williams & Peter O'Toole in
��m Club Paradise
Week pc13�
0'
Rob Lowe in
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v About Last Night
ff 2:00. 4:30, 7:00, 9:15 �R�
i i I in i
iiililiYiiTiiV4
Presents
Draft Nite
Wednesday & Thursday, July 16 & 17, 1986
9:00 til 2:00 a.m.
Admission: $1.50 Guys $1.00 Ladies
10C DRAFT
ALL NITE
� � �
���
- �
Pell Grants.
If the projections are higher
than the amount Congress ap-
propriates for Pell Grants, the
department must reduce the
number of the awards to
students.
Consequently, "If the
estimates are inflated, we'll have
to keep scratching for more
money Smith reports.
School
Grants
of this vaccine, besides being a
deterrent to new strains of the
disease, will also be a help to fur-
ther the state's poultry industry,
which is one of the largest in the
nation.
In his proposed project,
"Microbial Detergent Compati-
ble Lipases Stellwag hopes
to isolate microorganisms that
produce lipases, which are
biochemicals that digest or
degrade certain fats, common to
grease stains on clothing.
Stellwag plans to add these
lipases to laundry detergents and
see if they are able to replace cur-
rent additives which are damag-
ing to the environment.
This could affect the detergent
manufacturing industry by allow-
ing for shorter wash cycles and
lower washing temperatures, thus
making an impact on the
household.
121 HSI 1�� STRUT
4M4m
This Coupon is aood for
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any Blend-in or Sundae
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CLIP THIS COUPON
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:iis
OD
Pa
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228 GteenvIHe Blvd (919) 756 9404
134
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I
SHre Caat (Earoltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender. -n if num
Daniel Maurer, .�,����,�,
M.KE LUDWICK. v �� STEVE FOLMAR. �AmmmM
Scott Cooper, ,�� �. Anthony Martin. .� �,
John Shannon. � �� Meg needham. a, w
DeChan.le Johnson. m .�� Shannon Short. ��. ���,�
July 16. 1986
Opinion
Page 4
Pornography
Meese Commission On The Warpath
Hr Sr� Rrpuh'u
In the conservative dialectic that defines
the Reagan counterrevolution, the report
of the Meese commission � known of-
ficially as the Attorney General's Commis-
sion on Obscenity and Pornography � is
designed to be the antithesis of its
ancestor, the notorious 1970 report of the
federal Commission on Obscenity and
Pornography.
The two reports and the two commis-
sions are indeed antithetical, and not only
in the ways Meese intended. If the old
commission was the federal equivalent of
Playboy, the new one is the equivalent of
Hustler � low-budget, weak on fact-
checking, unsubtle, and fascinated bv the
perverse.
The 1970 commission had a budget of $2
million, a staff of 22. and two years to
complete its mission. That mission, as
defined by Congress, was to analyze the
obscenity laws, to study the effects on the
public of the traffic in obscenity and por-
nography, and. if necessary, to recom-
mend ways to "regulate effectively the
flow of such traffic The 1970 commis-
sion sponsored a wide range of original
research by reputable scholars,
psychologists, and universities.
The 1986 commission, by contrast, had
a budget of $400,000 (the equivalent in
1970 dollars of around $150,000). a staff
of nine, and one year to complete its mis-
sion.
That mission, as defined by Ed Meese,
was to study the impact of pornography
and to recommend "more effective ways in
which the spread of pornography could be
contained The 1986 commission spon-
sored no original research, and its con-
sultants were mostly policemen and an-
tiporn activists.
By all accounts the 1970 commission ap-
proached its duties with an open mind.
Two or three of its 18 members had taken
public positions on pornography, but the
rest had not.
The 1986 commission has been stacked
to prevent unwelcome surprises. Of its 11
members, six have well-established public
records of supporting government action
against sexy books and films. One of the
commissioners, for example, is a Fran-
ciscan priest who has condemned Dr. Ruth
Westheimer, the chirpy radio sex adviser,
for advocating orgasms in premarital sex.
The Meese commission lacked the finan-
cial and staff resources of its predecessor.
but since its conclusions were preordained,
it didn't really need them.
The Meese report will recommend a long
list of stern measures. They include chang-
ing obscenity laws to make any second of-
fense a felony rather than a misdemeanor,
with a mandatory one-year jail term; pro-
secuting the producers of porn films under
the prostitution laws (because the actors
are paid for their work); changing the
forfeiture laws to permit the government
to confiscate the assets of any business
found in violation of the federal obscenity-
laws (allowing, for example, the seizure of
a whole convenience store for the sale of a
single dirty magazine); and a big enforce-
ment push, including the appointment of a
"high-level" Justice Department task
force on obscenity cases.
Where the pornography in question is
too mild to bring the obscenity laws into
play, the report somewhat cautiously
recommends "private action" �
picketing, boycotts, and the like.
The Meese commission will encourge the
kind of local crusaders for decency who
are forever trying to bar supposedly dirty
books from schools and libraries. One
doesn't need to exaggerate the likely im-
pact of this sort of thing to understand that
it will be real enough for the
schoolteachers and librarians forced to
choose between their consciences and their
jobs.
Finally, the commmission will probably
succeed in its goal of encouraging local
prosecutors to do their worst. Given the
commission's loose definition of harmful
pornography and the advent of the Rehn-
quist Supreme Court, their worst might
ultimately turn out to be quite bad.
The commission's report will be widely
reau, because even a government book
about sex is still a book about sex. And it's
especially irresistible if it's as fat, as
obsessed with kink, and as full of inadver-
tent humor as this one.
A final apposite example of the last:
After a long section on the problem of
"underprosecution the commissioners
conclude, "We urge that many of the
specific recommendations we suggest be
taken seriously
How wonderfully lame. The logically re-
quired corollary of course, would be this:
"We urge that some of the recommenda-
tions we suggest not be taken seriously
Though insufficiently inclusive, this
seems wise.
I'M 60AI6 007-77J P0WPBR Mr N0SBSMBM SEAT,
Political Protocol
A Politician By Any Other Name
Jimmy Carter was in the news last
week � he walked out on an affair in
Zimbabwe featuring an excoriation by
Zimbabwe's foreign minister of the
United States for our failure to declare
war on South Africa.
Last Monday, the former president,
who had flown to Chicago to build
On The Right
By WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY
Might Makes
another low-income house, was on the
"Today" show, explaining that it
wasn't what the foreign minister had
said about U.S. policy toward South
Africa � Carter agreed with all that �
it was the circumstances in which the
criticisms were made (Fourth of July,
bad manners, that sort of thing).
But what arrested attention wasn't
Jimmy Carter's views on South Africa,
which are the same as Amy's. It was
that Bryant Gumbel. the sophisticated
and trend-smart anchorman of the "To-
day" show, twice referred to Jimmv
Carter as "Mr. Carter
If this is indeed a trend � the re-
republicanization of America � then it
is very much worth paying attention to.
It happens that I knew Herbert Hoover,
and in the half-dozen times I was with
him, I heard no one refer to him as
"Mr. President He was either "Mr.
Hoover" or "Chief
The tradition is of long standing.
Thomas Jefferson could not wait until
he could once again be called "Mr. Jef-
ferson The antagonism of the Foun-
ding Fathers to titles and all that titled
British foppery stuff deeply influenced
idiomatic usage.
My impression is that it was Harry-
Truman who more or less let it be
known that he expected to be called Mr.
President until the day he died. For all
the hoopla about his origins as a man of
the people, Harry Truman was the most
rank-conscious president in memory.
Twenty years after the event he was
still riled that Gen. MacArthur did not
initiate, or else did not reciprocate �
something � when they met on Wake
Island to discuss the Korean War.
That kind of thing is the mark of in-
security, and if President Carter has
given out the word that he wishes from
now on to be "Mr. Carter then that is
a healthy development. One likes to
think that Cincinnatus, after turning his
sword back into a plowshare, told his
fellow Romans they could stop ailing
him "Dictator just plain Cincinnati
would do.
The protocols are not fixed on the
matter. And as often as not, they are set
not by the principal, but by courtiers
Not necessarily for ignoble reasons, but
in search of courtesv
I can think of two people who call the
office 1 work in. If the call is announced
by their secretay or telephone operator,
one learns that "ambassador" so and s,
is calling. If ambassador so and so is
calling himself (herself), then one hears,
"This is Mr. X calling, or this is Mrs. Y
calling
Some people, for reasons that don't
necessarily relate to vanity, retain their
titles generations after they exercised
the appropriate office. Thus the late
Gov. Charles Edison was Gov. Edison
30 years after he was governor.
One runs into people who occupy.
many offices one has to pause-
wonder which honorific they prefer:
Elliot Richardson could be called am-
bassador (Great Bntian), Mr. Attonie
General, or Mr. Secretary (secretarv oi
HEW, secretary of defense). He goes b
Mr. Richardson.
Nelson Rockefeller preferred
"Governor" even when he was Mr
Vice President, Mr. Vice President con-
suming, as it does, a most egregious
number of syllables.
The case for permanent titles can still
be made. John Adams once remarked
that a country is better off draining per-
sonal ambition through titles than
through power. But of course titles are
for the most part utter phony balonev in
any serious sense.
G.K. Chesterton said in effect that six
men are given a pick and a shovel, and
the one who finds coal becomes Lord
Northumberland. It continues to mean
a great deal in Britain: to conservatives
because they want to reaffirm their
belief in The System (thus Harold Mac-
millan finally relented, at age 90, and
accepted a hereditary earldom and
Winston Churchill, who could have
been made. h. qui
red)
And socialists like beca
within a ver put
to like personal p
ake recent 1 I
Wilson as Sir Haroid. ai
leader of the H
fted gertol
reeling me, "I ord V
Of com c I wa .
the balance
glad, if he wanre
( arter Mr Presid
kesr seen
�hile at it. he c
a and
name: James
Buckley is Editor
prestigious poliu
Campus
Spectrum
Rules
In addition to the
Forum" section
Page. The bv c a
established the "Campu -
This is an opinion column
gues: writers from the
and faculty. The cc
the "Campus Spectrum" w
current topk
pus. community or nan
The columns are restric ed
tent only with regard
grammer and decencv. Pe:
mitting columns must he �
accept "by-ime" credit I
torts, as no entrys from ghosi
will be published.
Persons interested in particip
or seeking further inforn a
contact Daniel Maurer, ma:
ednor of The East c a
757-6366, or stop bv our ofl .
the second floor of the Pub .
Building
Tkt Mm IfefaMk
"We can expect Qaddafi to go all out in seeking
revenge. We have not seen the end of thisThe
use of such force is much more likely to promote
and expand terrorismWhat we've really done
is weaken the moderate, pro-American factions
within the Libyan eliteNo onediscerns light
at the end of the tunnel or believes that this latest
escalation of violence is more than another loop in
an endless cycle of war in which Colonel Qaddafi is
only one, minor, if temporarily prominent, figure
These sentiments are what a high-ranking FBI of-
fical, an editorial writer for the Nation, a professor
of government and Middle East specialist at Har-
vard, and the leader of the British Labour Party
had in common as the smoke cleard from Tripoli.
What they have in common now is little embarrass-
ment.
It seems that the immediate fears of even the
Reagan administration were premature. Its most
realistic expectation � a short-term wave of
retaliatory terroist activity � simply has not hap-
pened. The opposite has: since the raid, State
Department sources report a major decline in the
number of terrorist incidents against Americans.
In the three and a half months since, there have
been two wounded and two murders. Of the two
deaths, one was an immediate reprisal in Beirut and
one an unconnected death in kidnap custody in Col-
ombia.
It can't be proven that the raid deterred terrorism
that would have otherwise occurred. But it can no
longer be said that retaliation inevitably escalates
the level of violence. If the raid was supposed to
deter, these figures could hardly be better.
Still, most opposition to the raid was not based
simply on a fear of reprisal. Critics pointed to the
splits in the Atlantic alliance that unilateral in-
Since the raid (on Tripoli),
State Department sources
report a major decline in the
number of terrorist incidents
against Americans.
tervention would allegedly precipitate, to the
counterproductive impact the attack would have
within Libya, and to the impossibility of striking ef-
fectively at a vast network of terrorism, mostly
perpetrated from Damascus and MoscowOn all
three counts, the case has gotten weaker as the days
have gone by.
In Europe, anti-American rhetoric has been
suspended by a flurry of antiterrorist activity. The
trench, for example, condemned the raid but
somehow managed at the Tokyo summit to approve
a tough antiterrorist communique of a kind they
had rejected at all previous top-level meetings.
Italian prime minister Craxi's protestations were
followed by a move to transfer Italy's oil
dependence from Libya to Nigeria and the North
Sea, just as the Reagan administration had been
urging him to do. These shifts were complemented
by three breakthroughs: the conviction of the
Brighton bombers in Britain, the Achille Lauro trial
in Italy, and the slow easing of the French hostage
crisis in Lebanon.
Even the long-delayed Anglo-American extradi-
tion treaty finally passed the Senate. If all this ac-
tivity represents a "crisis in the alliance we could
do with more of them.
The real surprise of the last few weeks, though,
has been Libya itself. The predicted upsurge of na-
tional unity behind Qaddafi has failed to
materahzc. Instead, his disappearance and subse-
quent blustering and incoherent televised addresses
point to an acceleration in his decline.
He was both personally shaken and politically
destabilized by the affair. Qaddafi has retreated in-
to seclusion before and managed to survive, but his
recent addresses have been greeted with what must
be ominous public indifference.
The impact on Hafez al-Assad of Syria is much
more difficult to gauge. It is undoubtedly too much
to expect that his denunciations of international ter-
rorism on his recent trip to Greece (after bear-
"ugging Papandreou at the Athens airport) were
any less cynical than usual, but they may just reflect
new calculations of American resolve.
In any case, for the moment at least, Assad has
more pressing priorities than terrorism, the collapse
ot his own economy under the pressure of falling oil
prices and serious domestic disorder (inch
bomb attacks) make adventurism less seductive
And Soviet support is not as reliable as i ona
was. The Sov.et SA5 missiles, which Ass
rely upon for Synan defense, performed poorl) in
m i "V thC S�V,ets look are to to�"
� uS Libya after the raid
I he West may yet be subject to retaliatory
moves. But ,n the aftermath of Tripoli, one central
lnJ(S'�n remain&- Direct m.l.tarv intervention
SUfrT,Sm �an have an mediate and
S � 'r " Ca,n b�'h instantI' dr and. over a
2v�'lme' � th balance ,n diplomacy and
security against the momentum of terrorism.
"F?��10"3! arumenI dist.guishing between
rorismr Z" approaches to ter-
TrirSi ZrZ 3 a'SC dichoto" The lesson of
amnLi t m,hlary Strikes and constitutional
clusivTaI nHeg,CS' far fr�m Wn� �"allv ex-
clusive are indispensable complements.
beleaLr"1 nat,�n �f Regies reminds
calculation! �k lerronst Power. Terrorists make
the cllrlf- Ut thC COStS of thc" activities, and
these calculations can be changed by force.
bv - � demonstrates that regaining the initiative
the m �hV StnkC may hc,P ��r t"at hinder
ed to annZ terCf,CSSentiai' Prcss � are us-
ihe �SJ � ?" dKf�r ,h0S� stiU unain about
month ho ih ' thC UnCasy calm of th t few
months should carry at leat some moral weight.
Charlie Baker 'Jem verF�
suits concerning his mol
and is plaving tonigi
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Summer Movie
Muppets
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heard of named George
In Labyrinth, a
named Sarah (Connelly) w
in frustration that
brother betaken bv Gob
is horrified when he in fa.
taken by Jareth (Bowie), the �
Goblin King She seel
baby brother back and
transported to Jareth's w
where she must get through the
Labyrinth that surrounds
Jareth's castle before her brother
is himself turned into a goblin
Labyrinth is at times very fun
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pteK
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9PH
SEAT,
Other Name
H
V.
C jus
Sp urn
Rules
i
� . i i
.
: ii ta
.
eir ef-
� writers
pa ting
. may
oliruan a;
offices on
ublica
n Terrorism
let (including
luctivc.
e as ii once
sad has to
ed poorly in
distance
retaliatory
one ventral
intervention
ediate and sus-
and, over a
nacy and
rism.
anci i�
Thi
beieag
in
S ushing between
' approaches to ter-
The lesson of
kes and constitutional
. Ur from being mutually ex-
li pensablc complements.
'rategies reminu
nere is nothing uniquely
vincible about terrorist power. Terrorists make
calculations about the costs of their activities, and
these calculations can be changed by force.
it also demonstrates that regaining the initiative
by a sure military strike may help rather that hinder
the more mundane, if essential, pressure we are us-
ed to applying. And for those still uncertain about
the ethics of force, the uneasy calm of the last few
months should carry at leat some moral weight.
ltd l AS! (ARl)l INIAN
Lifestyles
JULY 16. 1986 Page 5
Play Wins Ovations
Charlie Baker (Urn verDore) listens politely while Owen Musser (Stuart Ward) taunts him with in-
sults concerning his mother. 1 he Foreigner' is a presentation of the East Carolina Summer Theatre
and playing tonight, Ihurvdav, i ridav and Saturda nights at 8:15 p.m.
Bv JOHN SHANNON
Simon Suggs says, "It is good
to be shifty in a new country
Charlie Baker, The Foreigner's
hero played by Jerry verDorn,
assures us that the motto still
holds true.
The premise of this tightly
structured comedy is established
in the first scene: a British Army
demolitions expert, "Froggy"
I.eSueur (Joes Pollock), has
come to Georgia, presumably on
some mission, and convinced
Charlie Baker to come along and
stay a tew days in an inn Froggy
knows. Baker was reluctant to
go, because even though his wife
doesn't like him and thinks he's
boring, he has been keeping her
company in the hospital as she's
been given just six months to live.
Since Baker is extremely anx-
ious about making conversation
with strangers. Froggy tells the
proprietess of the inn that Charlie
is really "Char-u-lee a
"foreigner" who neither speaks
nor understands English. Before
Charlie can back out of the
scheme he has overheard
something he shouldn't have, and
decides that it's in his interest to
remain a foreigner.
From then on the play becomes
steadily funnier. As Charlie
grows into the role of the
foreigner, scenes of genuine
hilarity abound: Jay Theriault, as
the simple but lovable Ellard
Sims, eats breakfast with Charlie,
who apes every move Sims makes
until the two end up dancing like
crazed monkeys and Betty Meeks
(the proprietess, played by
Kathleen Claypool) breaks in on
them � "Ellard, stop making
fun of Charlie's foreign prac-
tices
When Charlie and the
loathsome redneck Owen Musser
(convincingly portrayed by Stuart
Ward) are alone together, Charlie
capitalizes on Musser's
superstitious hatred of foreigners
by pretending to cast a spell, flut-
tering his fingers and mumbling
about "when the bees come
down Musser flees, and brings
back the Reverend David Lee (a
descendant of Robert E. Lee
played by Holt Wilson) to witness
the "voodoo talk Charlie in-
sists that all he said was, "Will
you please calm down?"
The element of surprise is im-
portant to this comedy; to reveal
too much would spoil it. Suffice
it to say that Rev. Lee is trying to
deceive nearly everyone, in-
cluding Catherine Smms (Molly
Fix), whom he plans to man .
her money.
There is no doubt that this play
rates high on the humor scale. It
takes a special kind of funniness
to make this reviewer laugh out
loud and repeatedly in a crowded
place, and although it's easier
when everyone else is laughing,
that's not why one laughs here
The puns and gags were well-
paced and well-delivered, Jerry
verDorn was altogether unpredic-
table, and the surprise ending left
me feeling a bit loony hut
pleasantly satisfied
The rest of the audience felt the
same way, judging from the stan-
ding ovation.
Theatre Season Continues With 'Deathtrap'
ll

'


I
-
M

wit twi addi
pei '� imane e: � 2:15
vv ednesday
I - and 26. in McGinnis
are
� � and 1 sepl
Mascolo. Runyeon is best known
� his continuing role as Steve
Andropoulous n the CBS series,
1 Ihe World Turns He is also
implished film and stage
actor. His major motion picture
credits include Sudden Death and
Hot Spots In Greenville
Bv R HXKRIM.ION
� vour
a
� ��

� -
i

V l he Attii
Ii esday
( entaur On Thu
heavj Morriah.
Mannekm
with �rbc)
Ihe Bili I yerly Blues Band
Mess a hi ties
Mid
B .
the 1
Sheraton Mell-
Down . �
V erandd
Jo lHdd eve
thtough Saturday
Of( (enter will plav at the New Deli Friday night.
week IW's continues us Friday nighi I his
ntertainment with the
t omedj one n Wednesday and
1)1 John Moore and his famed
Beach Party Saturdav night.
New Deli will kick out the yup-
pies this weekend and bring in
foul bands: Nocturnal Emissions
from Chapel Hill will open the
weekend Friday night for local
band Off (enter; then on Satur-
y outhful Terminal
Depression will open f u Soul
I rain in what promises to be a
rollicking evening.
V Mat's hot'
lave to be Ofl
My choice would
Center at the Deli
will be theii
last live show tor a good while,
but inside information has it that
Off Center is planning a re-union
in the fall a' a benefit foi an
unknown cause. The band's
latest accomplishment, besides
having Nocturnal Emissions as
an opening act, is to submit a
tape to a contest which could put
them on a compilation album.
The members include a guy nam-
ed Morad Rowshan-araghi on
bass guitar (reportedly strung
with Roto-sound strings); Scott
Patterson on drums; John Shan-
non on guitar; and David Blount
on guitar, keyboard and vocals.
Holero. and New York
theatergoers have seen him in Ihe
Birds As a result of his wide
spread popularity, he has ap-
peared on all three major televi-
sion networks, having been inter-
viewed on The Today Show,
Good Morning America and The
Phil Donahue Show.
Co-starring with Runyeon in
Deathtrap will be Joseph
Mascolo, who is also in the soon-
to-be-released motion picture
Heat, with Bun Reynolds His
other film credits include Jaws 2
and Sharkey's Machine Mascolo
is ttie host of "Inside Soaps a
syndicated television talk show.
Other television appearances by
Mr. Mascolo include "Hill Street
Blues" and " Days Of Our
I ives
Also appearing in Deathtrap
will be area favorite and Broad-
was . mole and television veteran
m hei own right. Mavis Ray. Ray
also appeared in the tits; East
Carolina Summer Theatre pro-
duction this season, ladies In
Retirement, with Michael Learn-
ed, and received excellent
reviews.
Homicide and humor are the
kev ingredients of Deathtrap,
which is a suspense-thriller about
a mystery writer with a problem.
He hasn't had a hit in 17 years
and announces that he's willing
to commit murder to remedy the
situation. The story begins with
the writer's discovery of a sure-
tire hit written by one of his
students in a college seminar. His
intention is first to collaborate
with the student and, if
necessary, kill him and steal the
story.
Out of the proposal emerges a
tangle of homicidal schemes,
plots and counter-plots that also
involve a European clairvoyant
and a pompous New England
lawyer. Ah this transpires in an
attractive Conneticut countrv
home decorated mainly with
grizzly murder weapons that are
souvenirs of the writer's early
stage successes
The humor in the plav is an
essential ingredient. Playwright
Levin has given his characters
jewels of dialogue that dart in
and out of the story line, such as,
"Cathy loves Vassar, and Vassal
versa and "Nothing recedes
like success Diane Judge ol the
V. Y. Daily es reviewed
Deathtrap when it opened in New
York in 1978 and wrote, "One o
the funniest, most heavenly,
entertaining evenings I've spent
in years. 1 laughed when 1 wasn't
smiling, and chuckled when J
wasn't marveling. I screamed
twice, and once was so scared my
bottom raised at least fout inches
from my seat
Tickets are still available for
most evening performances and
may be purchased at
Theatre.
Poor Man's Olympics
Try Your Luck And Skill
Summer Mo vie
Muppets Make Funny Film
B PAT MOLLOY
wiimi Ijfnlttn tdllo
On Thursday, July 24, the
ECU Student Union will sponsor
the Mendenhall Olympics. The
even: is open to all currently
enrolled FC'L students, currently
employed ECU faculty, staff,
and their dependents 13 years and
older.
Ihe events are as follows:
I able lennis - Ihe person who
scores the most number of legal
hits in a one-minute time period
will be declared winner.
Milliards � The participant
who can clear a 15 ball table the
quickest with two or less fouls
wins this event.
Bowling � Competitors will
bowl one ball on ten consecutive
lanes with the highest scorer win-
ning the event.
Trivia � For this event, the
Trivia video game will be used.
The person scoring highest wins
the event.
Galaga � Again, a video game
will be utilized (thanks Rick) to
determine the winner of this
event.
Ring Toss � Eight rings will be
tossed, and the high-scorer will
win this contest. 10 points will be
awarded for a direct hit, 5 points
if the ring is leaning on the peg.
and two points it the ring is
touching the base.
Darts � Contestants will
throw a full set ol darts one time
The highest scorer will win.
The top five scorers in each
event will receive ribbons and
points toward the overall top
three scores. First, second and
third place winners will receive
medals.
Contestants must register by
Tuesday, July 22 in the
Mendenhall Billiards Center.
There is no registration fee.
Video participants must pro
vide their own quarters.
B El) IOMl( H
Niaff U nie
fn � fhe M SI v
and the
Dark rstal. we mighl a-k Jim

U next is abyrinth, a
urring David
Bow . I mnelly
By and company"
ludes I erry Jones ol
m, and an executive
producei you just might have
i ol tianfJ George I ucas
In labyrinth, a young girl
named Sarah (Connelly) wishes
in frustration that her little
her be taken bv Goblins, ana
�rrified when he in fact is
taken by Jareth (Bowie), the
Goblin King. She seeks to get her
baby brother back and is
transported to Jareth's world
where she must get through the
Labyrinth that surrounds
Jareth's castle before her brother
is himself turned into a goblin.
labyrinth is at times very fun-
ny. Henson takes his penchant
creating entirely new worlds
and infuses into it the tongue-in-
cheek humour that was missing in
The Dark Crystal. Some of this
can be accredited to the
screenplay by Terry Jones, who
has brought a Pythonesque style
to muppet humour, but up until
The Dark Crystal, the Muppets
have always been funny anyway.
Speaking of Muppets, those in
abyrinth are all brand new,
created for the movie They range
from a talkative worm (cater-
pillar?to a 15-foot animated suit
o armor. Henson has really out-
done himself with these muppets,
which were operated by as many
as five people at a time. Sarah's
main sidekick in labyrinth is a
wrinkled little gnome named
Hoggle, whose eyes anc face
movements seem a miracle. A
particularly endearing character
is Sir Didymus, a small fox
terrier-knight with the voice of a
gentleman and the heart of a lion.
Didymus is wonderfully
courageous; at one point he tells
enemies who've surrounded him
that if they surrender they will be
treated well.
Also, long-time muppet fans
will be happy to see that Henson
has finally perfected the giant
muppet in Ludo, an incredibly
life-like eight foot tall creature
that looks something like an
orangutan. Previously, Henson's
giant muppets have looked
scarcely better than the guy in the
Scoobie-Doo suit at Carowinds,
but in Ludo the idea finally
comes together.
Also bringing a large reservoir
of talent to Labyrinth is David
Bowie, who has written five
original songs for the film. His
songs are great; his acting more
than adequate (though not his
best).
What makes Labyrinth such
good fantasy, however, is that it
provides adult wit and humour
without losing an overall tone of
innocent heroism. No matter how
much you laugh at the antics of
these characters, you will believe
in them, and what's more you'll
root for them. Go see Labyrinth
'Labyrinth' star David Bowie, as Jareth, tells co-star Jennifer Connelly (Sarah) that she only has lj
hours to rescue her baby brother, who has been taken by goblins under Jareth's command. The
goblins are played by muppets under Jim Henson s command. 'Labyrinth' is currently playing at the
Plaza Cinemas.
T
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(UP!) � An increasing number
ol female college students say
they have received sexual ad-
vances by professors, but ad-
ministrators "would usually
prefer to have students cope
privately" rather than
acknowledge the problem.
Glamour magazine says.
One in six female former
psychology students who
responded to a nationwide
I niversity of Missouri study last
year reported having sex with her
professor, very often her thesis
ad-isor or her supervisor, the
magazine reported Monday.
Of those who had sex with pro-
fessors, 28 percent said they fell
coerced when it happened and,
when they reflected on the inci-
dent, the number leaped to 51
percent,
"Thirty-one percent of the
women reported sexual advances
from a professor while in
graduate school said
psychologist Joseph Thorpe.
"Some acknowledged the pass �
others didn't, and 45 percent of
the 31 percent said that when thev
refused sexual propositions they
received some punitive action
Thorpe and graduate student
Robert Glasser sent surveys to
1.04" women and recieved 464
; espouses.
The article also cited a 19S4 In-
diana University national survey
that found 25 percent ol all
female graduate students could
expect sexual harassment from
either a facult) member or an ad-
i
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ministrator during their college
years.
In addition, a 1983 Harvard
University student survey found
41 percent of female graduate
students suffered some form 1
sexual harassment from a faculty
member or administrator during
their college years, the magazine
said.
But some women questioned
b Glamour praised mutually
desired sex between students and
teachers and others interpreted a
sexual advance from a person
with authority as a chance tor
gam. the magazine said.
"It the deal is a lay for an A.
then that's what I'll do these
women say,
reported.
the magazine
But students who object to sex-
ual harassment often are ignored,
the magazine said.
"Administrators would usualK
prefer to have students cope
privately said Cynthia Enloe,
professor ol government and
coordinator of women's studies
at Clark University in Worcester,
Mass.
he Casl Carolina Summer I heat re
presents
Now You Know
(UPI) � The heaviest non-
diseased human brain on record
was that of Russian author Ivan
Sergeyvich Turgene at 4 pounds
6.9 ounces. An average adult
male brain weighs 3 pounds 2 2
ounces.
Ira L
evin s
DEATHTRAP
Monday � Saturday. July 21 � 26. 8:15 pm
Wednesday & Saturday, July 23 & 26, 2:15 pm
McGinnis Theatre 5tl �. � Gree- . �
For Reservations: 757-6390
COMING ATTRACTIONS
Thursday, July 17, 1986
3:00 p.m. FREE
Watermelon Feast
Central Campus Outdoor Mall
Monday, July 21, 1986
3:30 p.m.
"BODY HEAT"
Hendrix Theatre
Thursday, July 24, 1986
Mendenhall Student
Center Olympics
3:00 p.m. in Recreation Area
Free registration by Tuesday, July 22, 1986
in Billiards Center
Test Your Skill At:
Billiards, Table Tennis, Bowling, Video
Games, Darts, and Ring Toss
Sports
Notes
t
ho
Jackson Homers
PI) � Bu Jackson hi! I
me run as a pro Sunday The
Memphis Chicks' righl fielder
connected in the first inning t
a man aboard In four other plate
appearances, he flied -salIc-
ed, struck out and product
sacrifice fly. In 14 game.
Jackson is bar
homer and four rbi's. He has
seven hits in : 14
games. He has walke
and struck out 24
Quotes of the I)a
"I don't think some guy
themselve- hard enougl v �
mentioning names, I'm tire
people saying
how hot it is. I'm
hear people sav thev have a
toe, their shoulder
gives a flying cow .hip l! vou're
hurt, go on the disbabled I
Detroit outfielder K �
said about
"We're definitely
division Hopefully,
thquakc
to the i � ��
perfect
rig now
manage: Steve Be
Padre rr ved
of 'he first-place Giai
same dav an ear
Southern C a
Overlooked People
Despite leading the -i
.579 sluggi
ranking in the
runs (20), rbi's (61) ai 1
percentage (.407), M
first baseman Kent Hrl �
not in H
Game because Mai
fiowser selected Doi M
of the Yank B i
Eddie Murray v a
ly Joyner i Calil
Al 's Oil Can Boyd
Dykstra were overlooke
Smith C enter As Host
North Carolina'a Dcd:
Smith Center has been re
mended to host firsi a a second-
round play in the 1988 N
men's basketball tournament
The NCAA's men's baske
committee made recomme
lions for the first tw
regional action at a
Monterev. Cain . last week.
The Greensboro C
also recommended
and second-round i
1989 tourney.
Poly nice Loses Scholarship
Virginia center (ld
has lost his
Atlantic Coast v. onference s
has rescinded I
the 6-11 star, who was :
of stealing a sei f stei
phones
Pols nice ca
he qualities foi asch lars
ed on need.
Zoe!
u
Major League St
I.AM
National I eague
W-l Pet
New Yorkvy;
Montreal46 '�-
Philadelphia42
Chicago$6-48
St. Louis6 ;
PittsburghJ
WISTW-lI!
San Francis48-40
Houston�r-i!
San Diego4- -I'
Atlanta4jt
Cincinnati40 44
Los Angeles40-48
American1 faun
EAMw 1Pd
BostonS4V�r�44
New Yorkv)
Cleveland is)u
Baltimore46 41
Toronto4" 4�
Detroit4t 444sM
Milwaukee41 4�
WESTNN I.
California4S s)
Texas4' 41
Chicago4t� 46.s
Kansas City404S
Seattlets si�
Minnesotat '
� OaklandU S6s
'��





fes Women
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and
Josepr
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ffiHTRAP
21-26, 8:15 pm
f 23 & 26. 2:15 pm
757-6390
FACTIONS
986
FREE
n Feast
Dor Mai!
986
EAT"
ieatre
24, 1986
Student
ympics
reation Area
-2, 1986
kill At:
, Bowling, Video
d Ring Toss
gathering place
THE EASTC AROl 1NIAN
Sports
JULY 16. 1986
Page I
Sports
-
Notes
Jackson Homers
(I PI) � Bo Jackson hit his first
home run as a pro Sunday. The
Memphis Chicks' right fielder
connected in the first inning with
a man aboard. In four other plate
appearances, he flied out, walk-
ed, struck out and produced a
sacrifice fly. In 14 games,
Jackson is batting .140 with a
homer and four rbi's. He has
Nt'en hits in 52 at-bats over 14
cames. He has walked four times
and struck out 24.
Quotes of the Day
"I don't think some guys push
hemselves hard enough. Without
mentioning names, I'm tired of
people saying they're hurt and
now hot it is. I'm hurt, too. I
hear people say they have a sore
toe, their shoulder is stiff, who
olives a flying cow chip0 If you're
hurt, go on the disbabled list
Detroit outfielder Kirk Gibson
said about his teammates.
"We're definitely in the right
division. Hopefully, the next ear-
:hquake doesn't slide San Diego
to the East Coast. We're in
perfect position geographically
ight now said San Diego
manager Steve Boros after his
Padres moved within three games
of the first-place Giants on the
same day an earthquake hit
Southern California.
Overlooked People
Despite leading the AL with a
579 slugging percentage and
ranking in the top six in home
runs (20), rbi's (61) and on-base
percentage (.407), Minnesota
first baseman Kent Hrbek was
not in Houston for the All-Siai
Game because Manager Dick
Howser selected Don Mattingly
of the Yankees and Baltimore's
Eddie Murray to join starter W al-
ly Joyner of California. However
AL's Oil Can Boyd and NL's I en
Dykstra were overlooked as well
Smith Center As Host
North Carolina'a Dean E.
Smith Center has been recom-
mended to host first- and second -
round play in the 1988 NCAA
men's basketball tournament.
The NCAA's men's basketball
committee made recommenda-
tions for the first two rounds and
regional action at a meeting in
Monterey, Calif last week.
The Greensboro Coliseum was
also recommended to host first-
and second-round action in the
1989 tourney.
Polynice Loses Scholarship
Virginia center Olden Polynice
has lost his scholarship. The
Atlantic Coast Conference school
has rescinded the scholarship of
the 6-11 star, who was convicted
of stealing a set of stereo head-
phones.
Polynice can stay in school if
he qualifies for a scholarship bas-
ed on need.
Defending Champs Struggle
Rookies Performing Well
Heisman Trophy winner Bo Jackson chose pro baseball over the NFL
Zoeller's Game Back
W II I IAMSBURG, Va. (UPI) -
Fuzzy Zoeller's golf game is back
on again, thanks to a feu weeks
o.
Zoeller won his third tourna-
ment of the year over the
weekend, capturing the S500.000
Busch Golf Classic by two
strokes, to stamp himself as one
of the favorites for the upcoming
British Open.
"1 like to think there's more to
come the 34-year-old Zoeller
said. "I'm still a young man and
figure I've got a lot of golf left
Zoeller's win in the Busch,
which pushed his earnings to
S332.883 for the year, came in his
first tournament since the U.S.
Open in June.
"1 took a couple of weeks off
after the Open (where he tied for
15th), then figured it was time to
get busy again said Zoeller, the
winner of the 1979 PGA and the
1984 U.S. Open.
Zoeller's Busch win was, as
usual, a hit with the crowd.
"When you play with Fuzzy,
especially on the weekend, you
have to expect a large and noisy
crowd said Joev Sindelar, who
played in the same threesome
with Zoeller Sunday. "But he
never lets it get out of hand
Zoeller said he is still occa-
sionally troubled by his back but
is not letting it affect his golf.
"I have gradually learned to
live with it he said. "I've learn-
ed that I can't afford to do much
practicing, that I have to take it
easy except when I'm actually
playing a competitive round.
Zoeller was one o' the few big
names to play in the tournament.
Many of the top pros took the
week off to prepare for the
British Open, which opens
tomarrow at Turnberry.
"We keep Imping we can get a
better date said a tournament
official. "So far, even though we
have the purse up to S5(X),000,
and will add another SI 12,000
next year, it's been hard to get the
sort of field we'd like to have.
"Too many o the top goiters
feel it's too much to play here this
week and then rush to the British
Open the official said.
By SCOTT COOPER
AND
RICK McCORMAC
SporU Mi lor i
As Major League Baseball
takes it's traditional mid-season
All-Star break, both of the defen-
ding league champions are strug-
gling to regain last year's form.
The St. Louis Cardinals,
defending champions in the Na-
tional League, are in next to last
place in the Eastern division with
a woeful 36-50 record. They lead
last place Pittsburgh by only one-
half game, and are a distant 24
games behind the division-
leading Mets.
The defending World Cham-
pion Kansas City Royals are do-
ing only slightly better than their
cohorts from Missouri. With a
40-48 record, the Royals trail
America, League West leader
California by eight-and-a-half
games.
While last year's pennant win-
ners are struggling, so to are the
other division winners from last
season.
The defending Western Divi-
sion Champion Los Angeles
Dodgers, who have been
hampered by a number of in-
juries, are currently in last place
in the National League West. The
Dodgers trail the surprising San
Francisco Giants by eight games
in a division that any of the teams
could win if they get hot during
the final half of the season.
Last season's champion in the
American League East is also
struggling to regain their cham-
pionship form. The Toronto Blue
Jays are in fifth place in arguablv
baseball's toughest division (AL
East), trailing the Boston Red
Sox bv 10-and-a-half games.
While the favorites have not
fared so well thus far, there have
been a number of good perfor-
mances by teams not expected to
contend.
In addition to division leading
Boston and San Francisco, the
Cleveland Indians and Texas
Rangers have also played well.
The Rangers have led the AL
West for most of the season, and
currently trail California by only
one-and-a-half games. Cleveland
is seven games over five hundred
with a 46-39 record and is only
nine games out of first place.
Without a doubt, the most
dominating team in 1986 has
been the Amazin' Mets. Not only-
are they leading second-place
Montreal by 13 games in the NL
East, but have placed four
starters (and a reserve) in the All-
Star lineup.
While the Mets have been the
most dominating team, Bosox
pitcher Roger Clemens (15-2,
2.48 era) has been doing it in-
dividually � taken the majors by
storm. Clemens, with his over-
powering fastball won his first 14
games, and set a major league
record striking out 20 batters in
one contest.
Rookie sensation Jose Canseco
heads the AL hitters with 23
home runs and 78 runs batted in.
However. Canseco was denied a
starting position on th American
League team by Dave Win field.
Winfield is currently terrorizing
AL pitching with a .232 batting
average (which is sure to have
Dwight Gooden shaking in his
boots, huh&).
Another first-year standout is
California first baseman W'ally
Joyner. Joyner is the first rookie
in the history of baseball to start
in an All-Star game. However, he
is deserving of the honor as he
has 20 homers and 72 rbi's with a
.297 batting average.
Leading the American League
in hitting is the ever-present
Wade Bcggs. Boggs, who recent-
ly has been in a slump after the
death of his mother, has flirted
with the .400 mark and is current-
ly hitting .363.
Heading the National League
pitchers is the Mets" Sid Fer-
nandez (yes. El Sid) with a 12-2
record and a 2.67 era. Gooden is
next with a 10-4 mark and a 2.77
era. With Met starters Bobby
Ojeda and Ron Darling currently
sporting 10-2 and 9-2 records
respectively, the Mets could be
the first team since the 1969
Orioles to have four 20-game
winners on one team.
Houston's Mike Scott leads the
majors in K's with 167.
Leading the hitting department
is Leti Dykstra of you guessed it
� the Mets. However, Dykstra,
who is hitting .349, may not get
enough at bats to qualify for the
league crown since he platoons
with Mookie Wilson in center-
field.
If Dykstra falters, All-Star out-
fielder Tony Gwynn is right on
his heels with a .341 batting
average.
Just as in the American
League, a rookie is leading the
National League in homeruns.
Astro first-baseman Glenn Davis
has 20 homeruns. and leads Phil-
ly third-baseman Mike Schmidt
by one homer.
Schmidt is leading the league in
rbi's with 66, leading the Mets
Gary Carter by a single rbi.
Check the bottom of the page
for both the National and
American League standings
through the All-Star break.
Houston Taking Pride In City
MajorLeagueStandings
National League
FASTW-LPet.GB
New York59-25.702
Montreal46-38.54813
Philadelphia423.49417.5
Chicago368.42923
St. Louis36-50.41924
Pittsburgh35-50.41224.5
WESTW-LPet.GB
San Francisco48-40.545�
Houston47-41.5341
San Diego453.5113
Atlanta426.4776
Cincinnati404.4766
Los Angeles408.4558
American League
EASTW-LPet.GB
Boston56-31.644
New York50-39.5627
Cleveland46-39.5419
Baltimore46-41.52910
Toronto4743.52210.5
Detroit43-44.49413
Milwaukee4145.47714.5
WESTW-LPet.GB
California48-39.552�
Texas4741.5341.5
Chicago4046.4657.5
Kansas City4048.4558.5
Seattle39-51.43310.5
Minnesota37-51.42011.5
Oakland34-56.37815.5
HOUSTON (UPI) � Housto-
nians have taken to wearing their
pride on their shirts these das
That's how far down in the
dumps people are around here.
When Texans have to weat
T-shirts telling everybody that
they're proud, you know
something is wrong.
Yet T-shirts with the slogan
"Houston Proud" are a common
garb worn by the local citizenry.
This is definitely a city with a
complex, and it's a good idea
major-league baseball chose it to
host the 57th All-Star Game.
Forget the grim fact the game
will be played indoors for the se-
cond straight year. You can't
play baseball outside in the sum-
mer here anyway. If the heat
doesn't suffocate you, mos-
quitoes big enough to wear a
leash will devour you.
This is the perfect place for
baseball's midseason carnival
because this is a city badly in need
of a party. There is trouble in a
place many people believed was
paradise only five years ago.
Signs of decay are everywhere.
Taxis, which once sprinted back
and forth to the airport to collect
the hordes of dreamers coming to
seek their fortune, now sit idly by
the curbs.
Skycrapers, which once had
waiting lists for occupancy, now
stand empty in the downtown
area. One estimate states there
are 64 such vacant buildings, un-
fortunate monuments to more
prosperous times.
"We are in a very serious reces-
sion right now admits Jim Mc-
Conn, the city's mayor during the
boom years from 1978-81 and
now an assistant vice president of
marketing for the Houston
Sports Association.
"A lot of people have lost their
jobs. We are a city closely tied to
the petroleum industry and when
the price of oil dropped so
drastically it really hit us hard
Lost jobs lead to lost pride and
McConn sees the All-Star Game
as an important step in helping
Houstonians feel good about
themselves again.
"The All-Star Game is going to
help McConn said, "and 1
don't mean just from the money
it brings into our economy, l
don't think anybody gets too big
or sophisticated to host an event
like this.
"It stimulates interest not only
in sports, but it does something
for the psyche. Houstonians can
say, 'hey, here we are hosting an
important event like this And
you don't even have to be a
sports fan to be caught up in it
Sports already has helped con-
siderably in these troubled times,
McConn said.
The Rockets, led by Akeem
Olajuwon and Ralph Sampson,
reached the NBA finals and
baseball's Astros are challenging
for first place in the National
League West.
Later this month the city will
play host to the National Sports
a
Festival, which brings together
the nation's best amateur athletes
in varied competition.
"Sports, especially winning
sports teams, has a way of taking
people's minds off their
troubles McConn said. "It
turns a town on. This past winter
the Rockets were the major topic
of conversation no matter where
you went "
McConn also is hoping the All-
Star Game will get people's
minds attuned to baseball again.
Despite their solid first-half per-
formance, the Astros have not
been doing well at the box office.
"The success of the Rockets
really hurt the baseball atten-
dance in the beginning o the
year McConn said. "When the
baseball season started, the
basketball playoffs were in full
force and everyone was tuned in-
to the Rockets. The Ail-Star
Game, because of all the hoopla
See SPORTS, page 8
Lefty" Recalls All-Star Memories
HOUSTON (UPI) � Vernon
Louis "Lefty" Gomez, who
started five of the first six AU-
Star Games and won three, draws
one of his fondest memories from
his first at-bat in the mid-summer
classic.
Gomez, a lifetime .147 hitter,
drove in the first run in Ail-Star
Game history.
"You know, as lousy a hitter
as I was he said, "I drove in the
first run in an All-Star Game. I
think probably 800 people
fainted
It was the second inning of the
1933 game and, with one out,
Jimmv Dykes and Joe Cronin
drew walks off loser "Wild" Bill
Hallahan of the St. Louis Car-
dinals.
Rick Ferrell lined out for the
second out before Gomez drilled
a single over shortstop Dick
Bartell to score Dykes.
Gomez also threw the first
pitch in the initial All-Star Game,
which was held in Chicago.
"I don't remember whether it
was a ball or a strike said the
76-year-old Gomez before the
workouts by the American and
National League teams.
"Mr. Mack and Mr. McGraw
were the managers then Gomez
said, still respectful of
Philadelphia Athletics owner-
manager Connie Mack and New
York Giants manager John
McGraw.
"I remember before the first
game, Mr. Mack gathered us all
together and told us, 'Gentlemen,
we're out to win. Maybe some of
you won't get in the game.
Maybe you will. But we want to
win
"They didn't score off me in
the three innings I pitched. Babe
Ruth hit a home run and made a
spectacular catch
Gomez, who was elected to the
Hall of Fame in 1972 with a
lifetime regular-season record of
189-102 with a 3.34 ERA in 14
seasons, compiled quite a mark in
All-Star and World Series com-
petition.
He was 6-0 in seven ap-
pearances covering five World
Series and 3-0 in five All-Star
Games.
Sports Fact
Wed. July 16, 1941
Joe DiMaggio has three hits
against Cleveland to extend his
hitting streak to a new 56-game
record, considered by many to
be the most impressive in all of
sports. The streak is finally
snapped the following day.
Look for articles previewing the 19S6 version of Art Baker's
Pirates in upcoming editions of The East Carolinian.





til S I Kol ISi N
II I i 16. 186
f

SALE
L S S I N G

-
FOB
FOR SALE

TOWERS V �
S8 k � �
IR KENT
E NT i ON
HELP WANTED Cocktail
waitresses needed at the Ramada
inn Apply in person between 1 5
p in Excellent opportunity to make
qood money
FEMALE ROOMMATE Female
� � 1 for partially fur
d 1 bedroom apartment, rent
Si 17 month 8. utilities Studious.
table n smoker preferred
'57 3640
ROOMMATE WANTED Room
"are 2 bedroom townhouse
e private bedroom AC cable,
bus servue fully turn shed
lus utilities Ad ' i
186 or 7 52 3765
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Female
roommati eeded for i� bath
. bdrm meed bdrm
� � � � � Ie1 . Club, prefer
" �i profess $175 'iio &
� . � � � � es 756 9583 after 6
ROOMMATE WANTED R
I � � �
� � K ft
: ibh led
montl � at'er 9
fqRSQNM5
LOST L is1 S ber a" Hus
Reward
��- � r84
THE SHERATON CREW �
�' �� BE S " N.J
irag witl � , What an I �
. � � � �.�. ima somi
. �
: - nte mi . � -
MELANIE
� f i - . � �
����
WANTED
ATE NEEDED
sunc
752-
7303
JULY
16 WED
Centaur
'�� �
!
COTS. SHOVELS.
MESS MTV CANTONS. FATIGUES.
RAINWEAR, T-SHIRTS. ENAMELW
WORK CLOTHES. 2100 WWERENT rTEMS.
ARMY-NAVY STORE
17 THUR
MORRIAH
18 FRI
Mannekin
��
19 SAT
THE BIl I
L YLERL Y
BLUES BAND
MESS A BLUES
Kver Thursdav Night Is
TACO NIGHT
wo Great Tacos for only.99
60 oz. Pitchers SI. 99
� Good I
11 p.m � Not X'ahd on Deliveries
r.er Tuesda) Ni�ht Is
COLLEGE NIGHT
ree Delivery fr $5.00 & Over Purchases
p.m. to 11 p.m.
99C SUBS
�H R CHOKE
Haiti A ' � Bologna & Cheese
Ham, Salami A Cheese Pepperoni, Salami & Cheese
Turki l Aheese Ham, Turkey & Cheese
SOI VALID ON DELIVERIES
60 oz. pitchers $1.99
irnludes lux
ALL DAY FRIDAY
32 oz. Bucket of Your Favorite Draft
99C
Sports Help Houston
C ontinued from pa�f 7
and all that's being written aboul
it, will gel people thinkii .
baseball
"During the second hall
season, as long as the Asti sta
in the race, we'll see som
good turnouts
Unless there is a sudden
naround in the eeom
however, a surge in basebal i
tendance does noi seem likeK
People here are worried al
theii future.
"In all fairness, 1 g �
wold have to sa the e
had an effeel
McConn said "A loi
have been laid ofl am '� �
othei places
rathei thai

,
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V I
ian





H
� ii
kaHje Saat (Earflltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community stnee 1925
needs
WRITERS
and
TYPESETTERS
for I he fall semester
Apply in person at the
East Carolinian
between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m.
tS1 ABORTIONS if' H TO 12th WEI K OF PREGNA VC1 w Pregnant) Test, Bil
1 ' 1Jw
�! 0 & Tvi m
1 'RALEIGH WOMEN'S H HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS
K M
Windsurfing
feel the freedom and
exhileration of windsurfing
GO FOR IT!
You can master the basics of
windsurfing in 4-6 hours and
gain a lifetime of enjoyment
Classes now forming and include
� Certified Instructor
� Free use of Board
� Instructional Materials
� - �
Hamburger
Buns ,
89
California
Plums
79
Orange
Juice .
99c
215 E. Fourth Street
752-2183
Serve 'n Save
Wieners
RIPE
12
Oz
Pkg
69
.riSAVK
wieners

K
ALL VARIETY
&�� Morton
TV Dinners
For
2
California
Cantaloupes
77�
WISE REGULAR
OR NO SALT
Cottage Fries
Potato Chips
Oz
Pkq
4 29
VHS Video Movie Rentals
99
flHV �F 24 Hour
I. BbW "�"��'
Hundrad of fmvorlia movta
to chooBa from!
v-��
fe
FRESH FRIED
15 PC WISHBONE
Fried
cbic Chicken
6�9
is
Pc
Bo
ADVERTISED ITEM POllO
Eacn of tnese advertised
items is required to De
readily avanaoie for sale in
eacn Kroger Sav on encept
as specifically noted in tnii
ad if we do run out of an
item wye win offer you your
cnoice of a comparable
item wnen av
reflecting tne same sav
iogs or a ralnctw
yylli entitle you to pur
rnase tne advertised ire,v'
at tne advertised price
witnm 10 days Only one
vendor coupon Will ne W
cepted per item

OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 16, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 16, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.484
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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