The East Carolinian, July 2, 1986






J
�te iEetfit Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
ol.60o.64 C�
Wednesday, July 2, 1986
Green viHe.N.C.
Circulation 5,000
10 Pages
Orientation Advisors
Prepare New Students
Helpful Advice
j B HUMBERT - Th E�it Cro(inin
New ECU students have many questions about campus life. Orientation Advisors help by providing
useful information concerning class choices, university policies, and adjustment to college at-
mosphere. Above, Frances Ridley an Orientation Advisor counsels an orientation student.
East Remembered
Service Held In Greenville
By MIKE LUDWICK
Naiwi Editor
Senator John East was
remembered yesterday during a
simple memorial service a; Jams
Memorial Church. Senator East's
body will be cremated.
Friends, relatives, and sup-
porters gathered to pay tribute to
a man, President Reagan said in a
written statement, who "loved
rua country mnd wa�� motivated ky
a deep sense of duty to his fellow
man
East committed suicide late
Saturday night and his body was
found by an aid early Sunday
morning who had come io deliver
East's mail.
Senator East had made plans
to return to ECU and teach in the
Political Science department.
Chancellor Howell said on Mon-
day that East had signed a
preliminary contract and that the
matter would be brought before
the ECU Board of Trustees in a
few weeks.
Chairman of the Political
Science Department, Maurice
Simon, said East was expected to
teach several courses on contem-
porary American politics and
political philosophy.
"Senator East appeared to be
very enthusiastic about returning
to the department said Simon.
"He commented that he felt he
had many interesting insights to
offer to the students, and he was
looking forward to working with
member of the department in
developing our program. He said
he didn't expect any special staff
support or special privileges
Simon added he and East had
discussed how East's return
would "represent a wonderful
opportunity for our students to
have close contact with a former
U.S. Senator who was also a very
well trained political scientist
Monday, Governor Martin
decreed that all flags will fly at
half-staff indefinitely in honor of
Senator East.
In a written statement, Martin
said, "East's death was a tragic
loss for North Carolina and the
people he represented so valiantly
and so well. Our hearts go out to
Mrs. East and their family as we
uphold them in our prayers
Reagan, in his statement, said
East was "never flamboyant or
interested in personal acclaim.
He was a quiet and effective
legislator who never wavered in
his belief in principle and in his
determination to keep our coun-
try strong
See CHURCH Page 2.
By JILL MORGAN
Staff Writer
They're heeere
Once again the campus of ECU
is being inundated with prospec-
tive students. Those "lost souls"
you have seen on campus with
their campus maps and college
catalogues in hand, are here to
learn as much about our Univer-
sity as they can during the seven
two and a half day orientation
sessions being held this summer.
The people responsible for
making these "crash courses"
flow as smoothly and as suc-
cessfully as possible are known as
Orientation Assistants.
There are 16 OAs who are co-
ordinated and directed by Orien-
tation Assistant Directors, Don
Joyner and David Susina.
Joyner and Susina have both
worked as Resident Directors of
Garret! Dorm and Scott Hall
respectively. Joyner is currently-
working in his third summer as
an OA director, with Susina
tackling the position for the first
time.
The two OA directors are
directly responisble to Ron Speier
Associate Dean and Director
of Student Services.
The 16 OA's are all students
here at ECU. They earned their
positions after going through a
selective application and inter-
view process, which narrowed a
total of over 100 applicants down
to the "cream of the crop
Laurie Beck, one of the 16
OAs working this summer said,
"the group chosen to be OAs this
summer is a really neat group of
people. We all have a variety of
backgrounds and interest which I
feel represent a good cross sec-
tion of ECU
Although the 16 OAs have dif-
ferent backgrounds and ex-
perience, Joyner noted, "they are
all a particular type of person.
OAs have a common quality in
that these people love ECU and
project a very positive image of
their University. These people all
possess leadership qualities and
are very intellectually capable as
well
As an aid to the OAs they were
required to attend several train-
ing sessions. The bulk of those
sessions were spent familiarizing
(or re-familiarizing) the OAs with
certain General College re-
quirements that the incoming
freshman will need to understand
thoroughly.
Another session dealt with
"confrontation styles" which
was designed to help the OAs
deal with the kids at orientation
in the most effective manner.
The job of OA is a multi-
faceted one � for which the
students who earn the position
, are handsomely rewarded. A
' salary of $800, plus housing and
meals during the seven sessions is
the booty for their hard work.
Orientation Advisors act as resi-
dent advisors (RAs), scheduling
advisors, proctors for the various
tests given during orientation,
along with a host of other respon-
sibilities.
Beck said, "the time that goes
into this job is phenomenal, it's a
24 hour a day responsibilityit's
hard work, but it's fun
The image projected by OAs
cannot be underrated � it is pro-
bably the biggest part of their
job. Frances Ridley who is als
an OA said, "these kids come it
here scared to death � it's our
job as OAs to bring them out tha
First day and make them feei
comfortable right away, because
they're here for such a short
peod of time
Joyner, Susina, and Beck all
agreed, with Beck adding,
"there's an intensity about orien-
tation � the people are getting so
much information thrown at
them so fast we have to do the
best we can every time.
Sometimes we just do silly stuft
to keep everyone psyched up
On that note Joyner added.
"the job is cyclical � you're
repeating the same things over
and over during seven different
sessions it's easy to get bored. It's
very important that the OAs pace
themselves and show the same en-
thusiasm to each group that
comes in. The OA's have seen
some 1,700 students come in so
far, and expect to see maybe
1,000 more and the last person's
impression of ECU has to be just
as favorable as the first's
The actual results of the hard
work and dedicated enthusiasm
of this summer's OAs will be evi-
dent in the fall. Joyner said, "the
subsequent success or failure of
these incoming freshman is
dependent upon these 16 OAs.
To me this is a rare opportunity
to affect the lives of 2,700 orien-
tation kids through 16 people
who are the personification of
ECU
Student Services Continue To Improve
,J�EMS?fiKF
Recent ECU graduates reveal-
ed in surveys that they are more
satisFied with different aspects of
college life than were earlier
graduates.
The surveys were conducted by
the office of the Vice Chancellor
for Student Life. The par-
ticipants of the survey were ECU
Additional Parking Available
Cable Service Proposed
By PATTI KEMMIS
Assistant News Editor
Using the already reduced
parking places on college hill as
an example, a local Greenville
firm is now examining the main
campus to Find other ways to in-
crease available parking areas.
According to Elmer Meyer,
vice-chancellor of Student Life,
campus parking spaces are being
reduced to accomodate compact
cars. The reduction will create
more spaces.
Meyer said the TrafFic and
Parking Committee has other
suggestions to present to
Chancellor Howell.
Included in the suggestions is
the idea to close off Eighth
Street.
"If we can get the city's per-
mission to close off the street, we
can use it for additional
parking said Meyer.
Former plans to pave the in-
tramural Field at the bottom of
the hill are still on hold said
Meyer.
The administration has also
been looking into the possibility
of installing cable service in the
dorms.
Dan Wooten, director of
Housing Operations, said the
proposal will be considered by
the Resident Life Association in
the fall.
Wooten added if the proposal
is passed the installation would
propably be completed by fall of
1987.
"Technically, it depends how
long it will take to install the
cable into the buildings said
Meyer.
The installation of cable, said
Meyer, would be paid by the
university, but the monthly fees
would be taken care of through
dorm fees.
"Basically we are looking at
about a $30 yearly increase in
dorm fees Meyer said. "It
would work about the same as
telephone services
Wooten said the package
would include the basic channels
and possibly a movie channel and
music channel.
Meyer said he hoped that a
learning channel, something
from the campus, could also be
available through the cable
package,
students in 1979 and 1984.
Students were asked to rate
food service, student health ser-
vices, library services. Financial
aid, and residence halls.
According to Elmer Meyer,
vice-chancellor of Student Life,
food service received low ratings
in the 1979 survey.
The cafeteria has since
undergone renovations. The
renovations improved the
cafeteria's looks and business.
Almost 1,800 more meal plans
were sold after the renovations
were completed.
Meyer expects even more
changes to come in the area of
food services "with Mendenhall
expanding and Canteen coming
in, we expect to see even more
students utilizing the meal plans
and campus food services
Meyer added ECU is one of the
few North Carolina schools that
does not require freshmen to pur-
chase a meal plan. "We don't
have enough space for everyone
to require the purchase of a meal
plan. Besides, we want the stu-
dent food service to offer good
atmosphere, service, and food �
not crowdiness
In the 1984 survey, student
satisfaction in the Student Health
Services was low. According to
Meyer, many changes to upgrade
the Student Health Services did
not occur until 1985,resulting in
dissatisfaction among 198-1
graduates.
"The cold clinic was one of the
greatest improvements in the Stu-
dent Health Services made. Just
this year, the Student Health Ser-
vices purchased an X-ray
machine which is a further conve-
nience to students said Meyer.
Meyer explained that in 1986,
the Student Health Services in-
creased its employees to a full
staff.
"Residence Hall life is con-
stantly improving. Air condition
ing is being added v some of the
dorms said Meyer. "The
lounges are getting new furniture
as well as being air conditioned
In 1985, 96.3 percent of dorm
space was occupied. Meyer added
more space for men is usually
needed during the First part of the
Fall semester when the rooms are
Filled to capacity.
Graduates of 1984 were pleas-
ed with the Freshman Orientation
Program. "With the new on-line
registration, the satisfaction is
high said Meyer.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds10
Editorials4
Features
Sports�
America lives in the heart of
every man everywhere who
wishes to find a region where
he will be free to work out his
destiny as he chooses.
� Woodrow Wilson
Just A Reminder
There will be no classes
in celebration of
Independence Day
Giving The Gift Of Life
j.a HUMIIRT � The Cast CirMuiitn
i.B. HUMKRT � TIM Eatt Carolinian
The Tidewater Regional Bloodmobile made ifi way to Mendenhall Tuesday to collect blood to five
to persons needing transfusions while in the hospital. Seventy-five pints of Wood were collected For
those who missed the Mendenhall Bloodmobile, another Is scheduled today from 10 am until 4 � m
at Wahl-Coates Auditorium . p' '
� � '
' '4f44ter-4
" I-
�- ,fyy
a "�





!Hi KM L ROl INIAN
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Pope Visits Latin American Countries
R All a I'll Pope John Paul
Bog .�. da on a
c wMilbia. a
ican republic cui reni
. ed b guerrilla violence,
g, enormous
al disasters
� 's special Alii;
id apri, leti Rome's
: Da inci Airpoi
EDI foi the 1! houi
, Colomb

pec ted to delivei stinging atl
against Colombia's powerful
drug bai ons and
fightei n. alican sources said
Guerrilla groups agreed to an
informal truce during the Papal
visit, bit: church authorities re-
mained coi bout the
Pope's safet. expecialh
cupied seminaries in Med
and Bucarananga, wh
Pope plans
1 19, the guerrilla faction that
mounted the Nov. 6. IVKS attack
on Bogota's Palace ol Justice
left 95 people dead, sent a
representative to Rome las! week
to urge the Pope to meet vvith
them and help mediate the na-
tion political conflicts
Bui atican authorities � ii I
tied out changing the Pope's
tight schedule 13,000 miles
and 1 1 cities in seven da s
allow him to meet with mien ilia
e Pope made
� . a
he was seen ofl h
Sta Cai
C a sa i
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i iers
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as elected
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the 1 will
leadei s
"It is not in the schedule now
and 1 peisonalK do not see the
possibilit) i F atican
spokesman Joaguin Navarro told
I luted Pus- International.
sen i hi Vatican sources
predicted the Pope's speeches on
political violence and the nati
thriving cocaine and marijuana
�tade would be especially hard-
hitting.
Dining his last tup to 1 atin
America Venez
Ecuadoi and Peru in W'
Jotm Paul delivered a
speech condemning guei
violence and begging 1'
Maoist Shining Path guerril
la) down their aims
In Colombia, the I' ;
pec ted to comment
problems facing I atin
and how the industrialized w
should help solv �
sources said John Paul
U.S. lady
el comes
Immigrants
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PRIO -RUSAT Jt
AT SAv A CENTI R H
WE RESERVE THI M -�� 'IES
the supermarket with
WAiriHOIIM
I'lllCES
&
i
COUPON SAVINGS
SEE STORE iN GREENVILLE FOR DETAILS
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat. Produce. Deli. Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current IrVeek Food
Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY
Sei MUdlMIRs Page 2
Church Service
Remembers
Senator East
( ontinm-ri I mm Page 1.

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ASSORTED VARIETIES
CRISPY N TASTY
Jeno's Pizza
10 oz.
OPEN SUNDAY 7 A.M11RM
OPENMON. 7A.M
CLOSE SAT. 11 PM
703 GREENVILLE BLVD. � OPEN 24 HOURS
Holiday
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self-help as ex
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dslides after
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ASSORTED VARIETIES
CRISPY N TASTY
Jeno's Pizza
10 oz.
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BLVD. � OPEN 24 HOURS

Holiday History Explained
By MIKE LI DWICK
News Editor
The Fourth of July, as every
schoolchild knows, is the dav the
United States declared' in-
dependence from Great Britian.
What every schoolchild does
not know, though, is the Second
Contenental Congress actually
voted for independence on Julv
2.
What's more. Congress
adopted a resolution offered by
Richard Henry Lee, as delegate
from Virginia.
But now one asks, what about
July Fourth? Surprisingly, what
you learned in high school is cor-
rect. Congress adopted the
Declaration of Independence on
July Fourth.
Although Congress had
already declared its independence
from England, Congress had not
yet given its reasons.
It was Thomas Jefferson who
so eloquently set down the
justifications for severing ties
with England, and it was this
document, the Declaration of In-
dependence that Congress
adopted on July Fourth.
In the Declaration Congress
justifies its break with England in
two catagories: first in broad
theoretical terms and second
specific injustices the King of
England perpetrated against the
colonies.
It is the first part of the
Declaration, though, that has
had such a great impact, even to-
day.
Congress, through Jefferson,
embraced John Locke's contract
theory of government and gave it
life. Congress also said that all
men are created equal.
This was definitely a radical
concept but nothing new. The
philosophies of the Enlighten-
ment had developed this idea
earlier on the continent.
It's appropriate that we
celebrate July 4 instead of July 2,
because it was the Declaration,
passed on July 4, that gave mean-
ing and purpose to the Revolu-
tion. The Declaration put down
in words, for the whole world to
see, the principles that have made
this country a great nation.
Minorities Favor
New Court Ruling
RALEIGH, N.C. (UPI) �
Black leaders are calling the U.S.
Supreme Court ruling that North
Carolina's redistricting plan
violated black voters' rights a
major victory.
"We are extremely pleased
with the decision said Julius
Chambers, director of the Legal
Defense and Education Fund for
NAACP which defended the rul-
ing.
"Minorities in North Carolina
will have a better opportunity to
elect a candidate or to have a ma-
jor impact on the electoral
result Chambers said. "Now
they have to take advantage of
the opportunity that has been ex-
tended
State Attorney General Lacy
Thornburg, who had opposed the
districting change before the high
court, said he was "grateful"
that the justices clarified the case
and state policy on such voting
rights issues, the "primary pur-
pose" of the appeal.
"We will now be in a far better
position to give more precise
guidance to officials at both the
state and local level when ques-
tions arise Thornburg said
Tuesday.
In the first test of the amendec
Voting Rights Act, the Court
unanimously ruled Monday that
the drawing of five North
Carolina legislative districts ir
1982 diluted the votes of black
citizens.
"It shows that where blacks
constitute a significant minority
and they are deprived of an op-
portunity to have a person of
their choice represent them, the
district will have to be redrawn
said Rep. Mickey Michaux
D-Durham, who has advocatec
reforms of state election laws ir
the North Carolina House.
A three judge District Court
ruling in January 1984 said tha
North Carolina lawmakers
wrongly used six multi-member
districts to create white majorities
when it would have been possible
to form several black single-
member districts instead.
In the case of one single
member Senate seat, the panel
said, lawmakers split a concen-
tration of black voters down the
middle to create a mostly white
district.
See COURT Page 5.
Choices In Curriculum
i B HUMBERT TIM EMt Carol,n.ar.
With the new on-line
process was with the
registration system freshman at orientation find signing up for classes much easier and quicker than the
old sstem of registration. For more information see related story and photo on page 1.
Leader Pleads Guilty
Hank's Homemade Jce Cream
121 IA Iftk STBUT
7
50 OFF
any Blend-in or Sundae
Coupon Good Thru July 1st, 1986
iCLIP THS COUPON1
I
What is the best wa to have a
safe Fourth of July Holiday?
The Fourth of July signifies
different things to different peo-
ple. For many, it's a time for
fireworks and picnics. For
others, it's school as usual.
Regardless of what your plans
are, there are several principles
that are important on July 4th
and the rest of the summer too!
Fireworks are illegal in North
Carolina. In addition, they can
be extremely dangerous and can
lead to the loss of fingers, hands,
arms, and
The Health Column By
Mary Elesha Adams
other body parts as well as cause
blindness, hearing impairments
or death. "Sparklers which are
thought to be harmless, can ignite
and cause sever finger and hand
burns. If fireworks are part of
your July 4th ritual, it is safest to
watch an organized display such
as the one sponsored by the City
of Greenville.
Picnics are a fun and inexpen-
sive way to enjoy the 4th as long
as foods served do not harbor or
promote the growth of bacteria.
Contrary to popular belief, store
bought mayonnaise does not pro-
mote food poisoning. In fact,
mayonnaise may actually retard
the growth of bacteria because of
the vinegar it contains.
Salmonella organisms cause food
poisoning and gastroenteritis.
The best way to avoid Salmonella
infections is to make sure cold
foods, such as fried chicken and
deviled eggs, are kept cold and
hot foods, like baked beans, are
kept hot until it is time to eat.
Meats and eggs should be
thoroughly cooked. Drinking (or
eating) raw eggs like Rocky does
in the movies is thought to be a
prime method of getting a
Salmonella infection, so be sure
to cook your eggs first!
Symptoms of food poisoning
include diarrhea within 8-48
hours after ingesting the
organism, fever, nausea,
vomiting, and hadaches. If you
should develop these symptoms,
you should try to drink as many
liquids as possible to prevent
dehydration and eat only foods
that are bland.
The symptoms may indicate
other illness as well, if they do
not clear up within 24-48 hours,
you should consult your health
care provider for treatment.
For more information, contact
the ECU Student Health Service.
Have a safe and happy 4th of
Julv!
Give a hoot.
Don't pollute.
RALEIGH. N.C. (UPI) � A
Wake Forest Seminary graduate,
who served as a Boy Scout leader
and summer camp chaplain, has
pleaded guilty to taking indecent
liberties with a minor and runn-
ing a computer pornography net-
work .
Arthur James Manchester, 33,
was sentenced to five years of
supervised probation and fined
SI ,000 after pleading guilty Mon-
day to four of 13 obscenity and
sex offense-charges. Nine charges
were dismissed as part of a plea
bargain agreement.
Wake County Superior Court
Judge Robert Farmei also
ordered Manchester to get
psychiatric treatment, perform
100 hours of community service
and stay away from boys under
age 18 unless accompanied by his
wife or two other adults.
Farmer told Manchester, a self
employed computer consultant,
he must forfeit all the computer
equipment seized by law offices
in his Wake Forest home in
February.
"My calling is somewhere, and
I'm still searching to find where
God will have me serve said
Manchester, who led a Boy Scout
troop of 20 in western Guilford
County from 1975 to 1978.
Manchester was a chaplain in
See SCOUT Page 5.
m
m
United Way
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED HELP?
Why not come by the REAL Crisis Intervention Center: 312 E.
10th St; or call 758-HELP. For Free Confidential Counseling or As-
sistant
Our Volunteers and Staff are on duty 24 hrs. a day, year around,
in order to assist you in virtually any problem area you might have.
Our longstanding goal has always been to preserve and enhance
the quality of life for you and our community.
Licensed And Accredited By The State ot North Carolina
ATTIC
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3 THUR
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CONSOLIDATED
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vjum 5:30 I ANYTIME
BUCCANEER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
m$i
Robert Redford in
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2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:15 PG
$�j Walt Disney's
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12:30, 2:00, 3:45, 5:15, 7:00, 8:30 G
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Rob Lowe in
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2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:15 R
Presents
Draft Nite
Thursday, Friday, & Sunday, July 3, 4, & 6, 1986
Admission $1.50 Guys $1.00 Ladies $1.00 Orientation Students
Doors Open at 9:00 p.m till 2:00 a.m.
10C DRAFT
ALL NITE
&ati "
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Stic East (Earnlfnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender, i�, Manattr
Daniel Maurer, w� bs
Mike Ludwick, �m � Steve Folmar. smm �mw
Scott Cooper, �. & Anthony Martin, �� c ��
John Shannon, y�fwr��(, Meg Needham, � � -r u
DeChanile Johnson. � mm Shannon Short, product, siaw
Julv 2, 1986
Opinion
Page 4
Tribute
ECU Mourns Loss Of Sen. East
Even though our country is based vative views that may have affected
on different political views, we all
share one thing in common � the
grief that follows when someone
dies.
John East's sudden death was
not only a shock to those close to
him, but to those he served during
his capacity as a politician and
scholar.
the students at ECU. But he once
said, however, that he wouldn't
have done anything to harm the
majority, so it must have been
right.
The power of East's ideals were
substantiated by his belief in Jesus
Christ, his Saviour, who often gave
East the courage to execute his ac-
North Carolina's junior senator tions that often brought criticism
kept his ideals straight. He was ar- from his opponents.
ticulate, enthusiastic and fair.
ECU will suffer from the former
professor's death as well. East was
to join the Department of Political
Science in January and share his
wisdom of the democratic process
with students first hand.
For the near-20 years East was at
ECU, he commanded � and got �
respect from his students. He was a
perfect role-model to all ECU
faculty and alumni.
As a teacher, he remained
dignified and knowledgeable
throughout his teaching career. His
wit and eagerness to make others
learn truly made education wor-
thwhile. Former students say he
could be counted on to be in class
every day with a prepared lecture.
He would argue his views with
student, but never with malice.
Once again, he was teaching the
values of our government and the
power of words.
As a politician. East held conser-
We will remember East for the
man he was � a strong individual
who overcame polio as a young
man and a respected political genuis
who knew when to say the right
thing at the right time.
He was a very tolerant man who
enjoyed the input of people with
other opinions, and who stood firm
with his own.
ECU, the state and the nation
have lost a brilliant man who stood
for freedom and for keeping the
treasure of America from slipping
away. He did more in his short life
than most would never be able to
accomplish.
The University will always
acknowledge the contributions
made by East to the academic
reputation of this campus.
Our hearts go out to East's fami-
ly, and to the students who will
never be able to benefit from his
keen knowledge of our govern-
ment.
Campus Forum
Co-Sports Editors Receive Praise
For Editorial Defending Len Bias
of learning for the future.
MrTEPexrz&3
Graduation Day Gets No Respect
By BEMTA GRANT
(EDITOR'S SOTE: Even though
graduation took place almost two mon-
ths ago, we feel this editorial still has
much to say, if not to those who have
already graduated, than to those who
eventually will.)
Approximately two thousand
students draped in black gowns and
wearing black caps had lined up for the
great event. Proud parents filled the
stands hoping to spot their son or
daughter marching to the "Pomp and
Circumstance The air was filled with
screams of joy, laughter, bubbling con-
versations, and the sounds of people
sobbing.
When the music started and the
students began to march, 1 was realU
surprised, as I watched from the stands,
to see bottles of champagne being ear-
ned, faded blue jeans with holes at the
knees, and sneakers worn tc an event
that is supposed to symbolize honor
and dignity.
At commencement ceremonies, par-
ticipants are supposed to carrv
themselves in an orderly and dignified
manner. But, for the commencement
ceremony that was held May 10 at
ECU, order and dignity were given a
good, hard kick in the posterior.
As the students marched to the field,
some were screaming, dancing, drink-
ing champagne and just behaving in a
ery unbecoming manner. Once they
arrived at their seats, I thought they
were going to calm down, but that was
when the extreme wildness was unleash-
ed. It was truly a sight to see. People
were climbing over chairs, chugging
down champagne, taking pictures, and
even square dancing!
No respect was given to the members
of the platform. Although microphones
were provided, it was still a task to hear
a complete sentence, not to mention the
Campus
Spectrum
whole consent of what was being said
by the speakers.
When the invocation was being
given, the only words 1 heard were.
"Let us pra " Whatever po
Chancellor Howell and IV Dawson
said in their remarks was a mystery to
me. At one point, some graduates ac
tuallv tried to get the famous "Wave"
going. As tor the speaker. I was
tranced b the activities ol
graduates, that I neither heard nor ;
any attention to what he said.
When the circus was finally over. I
overheard one person who had
graduated sav, "I have never been so
disgusted in my entire life Another
graduate said, "1 tell like 1 was in the
middle of a war one � corks living.
caps thrown, people jumping up and
down � it was terrible and a waste ol
time From these comments, it is oh
vious that everyone was not a partici
pant in the untimely celebrations.
On the contrary, some of the par
ticipants felt that it was the lack of
organization that caused the "let's par-
ty" attitude. One graduate detensivelv
commented that "The organizers
put the loud speakers behind us facing
the stands, making it impossible for us
to hear. Our response, Oet Rowdy
Although ECU is known tor its
famous party reputation, it was not the
only setting tor this "party
atmosphere The University ol North
Carolina at Chapel Hill was also the
scene of rowdy behavior.
Sororities were "stepping people
were dancing, pictures were taken, and
�pel Hill graduate : e
threw down The speaker �
ceremony, (io lames Mai tin,
the same treatment as E I
NO RESPECT!
On the ' ei hand. 1 sa - �
N c Central
ceren. n on teleision,
students sal entive a �
as they listened to Bisl p ;
Tutu spe �
Commei
posed to involve people w
to handle themselves at
what's going i i Bui '
pres
.
.r. man) seen i
" Who
now M.

with the old " I

In addition to �
set don oj tht I di oria I
( aroliman has re �
"( ampus Spex (rum " ! �
mon column
m the student bod)
columns printed in the "i 0 spec-
trum wilt iontu. � oj
com em u tht
nation.
p columt are rt

0143
lint
will be put
Persor
seeking i
tatI Daniel Maurer, mat aging
The I as' Can linian at
stop b out 'he �
Publications H:
Reviewing The ABM Treaty Pt. II
Hannelore Tripp
Greenville
Forum Rules
East Carolinian:
I wanted to write in to say a few words
about the article which appeared in the
June 26 issue, written by Rick McCormac
and Scott Cooper. It is a change to be
reading about a loss of a human being,
rather than a gain of another drug statistic.
Len Bias was a human being and should be
treated as one even though he is not here The East Carolinian welcomes letters ex-
with us. But the press wants to tear him pressing all points of view. Mail or drop
and his family apart just to get an in- them by our office in the Publications
teresting Ouicy) story. Building, across from the entrance of
Why is this so? Are we as Americans so Joyner Library.
gruesome that all we can read are stories of
rape, murder, drugs and alcohol? If so, For purposes of verification, all letters
then we are the ones to blame for the trash must include the name, major and
that the media spits out at us. classification, address, phone number and
I want to tell Rick McCormac and Scott signature of the author(s). Letters are
Cooper that I appreciate their stand on this limited to two typewritten pages, double-
terrible tragedy. Theirs was a good story spaced or neatly printed. All letters are
with a new point of view � we are only subject to editing for brevity, obscenity
human. We are brought into this world to and libel, and no personal attacks will be
live, love and then die (for some too soon), permitted. Students, faculty and staff
The time we spend between the live and die writing letters for this page are reminded
is a time of learning, and of mistakes, that they are limited to one every five
Hopefully, those mistakes are to be lessons issues.
(EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is the second instalment
of a three part article reviewing the ABM Treaty. Look for
the conclusion next week.)
Under international law, there are two grounds for the
United States to end the treaty it engaged in in 1972 in
Moscow, forswearing anti-ballistic missiles.
The easiest way to do it is to consider the treaty as null and
void on the grounds that one of the contracting parties is in
violation of it, and that therefore the other party is relieved of
any further obligations.
On The Right
By WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY
To do this is as easy as opening the lips and pronouncing
the word "Krasnoyarsk Because there the Soviet Union has
built a phased-array radar facility 470 miles from its nearest
border but oriented toward a border 2,500 miles away, in
clear violation of the treaty. No responsible official this side
of the Iron Curtain would deny that Krasnoyarsk is such a
violation.
The second way to go is almost as easy. It would require
merely a stroke of Mr. Reagan's pen, advising the Soviet
Union that the treaty-specified six-month countdown has
begun, and that therefore in December the ABM treaty will
cease to bind the United States in any way.
Now not only was this an option read into the treaty at the
time it was signed, our representative at the ceremony. Am-
bassador Gerald Smith, said that the United States was going
along with the anti-balistic missile ban in pursuit of general
disarmament.
"If an agreement providing for more complete strategic of-
fensive arms limitation were not achieved in five years said
Ambassador Smith, at the direction of the administration,
"U.S. supreme interests could be jeopardized. Should that
occur, it would constitute a basis for withdrawal from the
ABM treaty
Well, exactly that did occur. In the interval after SALT I,
the Soviet Union added 8,000 warheads, while we subtracted
about the same number. The projected mutual assured
vulnerability was in shatters: The Soviet Union has been busi-
ly engaged in defensive activity looking toward impregnabili-
ty, while we have grown lilies in our old air raid shelters.
We should have spotted the weakness of the ABM treaty in
1977 when the treaty's contractual five years were up; but that
was a year of Jimmy Carter, and we dreamed our way-
through the balance of the decade.
What came then was the declaration of Mr Re
March oi 1983 � that we would develop a Strategic Del
Initiative, looking to the dav wheti we could so effe
protect ourselves from Soviet missiles as. in effect, to mat
progressively suicidal tor the Soviet Union to contempla
first strike.
Well, could we proceed with the space shield, givet
restrictions of the ABM treaty?
On this matter there has been considerable debate. 1
are two ways to read the treatv: One is the so-called restrict
way, the other the permissive wav
There are great ironies here, because when we were
bargaining with the Soviets in 192 we tried very hard ' g
them to agree to absolute restrictions on anti-ballistic missile
activity. But the Soviet Union declined to adopt SU
language.
What emerged from it was something called Agreed S
ment D. Depending on how you read it, and the two clauses
explicates, the United States is not permitted to employ fresl
technology to pursue and test SD1 (the restricted vers
it is permitted (the permissive version).
The irony lies in the Soviets' insistence that the restricted
version is the correct version, given its historical resistance to
the binding version U.S. negotiators sought.
The legal adviser to the U.S. Department oi State.
Abraham Sofaer, is a scholar of some renown (he was the
judge who presided over the libel suit brought by Ariel
Sharon against Time magazine). He testified before the Sub-
committee on Arms Control, International Security and
Science of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs on Oct.
22, 1985, and quite simply demolished the restrictive inter
pretation of the treaty.
However, President Reagan had announced that he would
proceed under the restrictive version, presumably just to be a
good sport. How much did that decision damage the SD1 pro-
gram?
Well, an expert concedes, it is true that if there had been no
ABM treaty, the structure of the research program would5
have been different. He concedes that there have been a fews
"workarounds which is to say, some zigzagging with the55
view to abiding scrupulously by the treaty, as interpreteds
restrictively. 5
The question just when might research be practically im-�
peded by the treaty, particularly if read restrictively, is a sub-J
ject the Defense Department doesn't want to talk about.�5
Because, you see, the question is a political one, and very,5
very sensitive, as we shall see. 5
Camp
What does tl
Jack Whittemore
Senior, Math Education
"Being patriotic, because
that's the time we celebrate the
revolution and independence "
fror
Tanya Wilder
Senior, Special Ed.
"1 think it's a time to be with
family and friends and to reflect
why this country is as great as il
is
Ser
"It's
nat
Federation
JOHANNESBURG. South
Africa (UPI) � Officials oi the senior
country's largest labor federa- Uni
tion, fearing police arrest, met to- tainc I
dav at a secret location to discuss Le
the detention ol their leader and
other union members under the
state of emergency, a spokesman unspec
sajd. nest dett
The government today formal- leade- i
ly repealed 34 race laws making Tuesday
up the "influx control" system "I ca
that severely restricted the
movements of blacks and obliged (emerge
them to carry a "pass" at all spokesrru
times. Lnited
An official of the 5CJ0O strong "A nu
Congress of South African Trade taken. ori
Unions would not disclose the union or
venue of the closed door meeting, ship
citing fears in the executive group dete
of further detentions. Medi
The official, who asked not to tern
be named, said the policy making emerger
committee might issue a state- elude ,
ment W ednesdav statemer
Court Rulil
Continued From Page 3 the case
Two of the districts in question northern
were dropped in the Supreme Nash c
Court case. The state did not ap- Court r
peal the lower court's decision in District
Scout Leader
Guilty To Sex
Continued l-rom Page 3.
1984 at the Scouts' Camp Durant
and its program director last
year. Scout officials had said they
received do complaints against
Manchester who was arrested
when authorities were tipped that
he was distributing obscene
stories, about teenage boys
through a computer program
called "Gay Teen Conference
In addition to pleading guilty
to one count of possession of
obscenity, disseminating obsceni-
ty and disseminating obscenity to
a minor, Manchester also admit-
ted to having "phone sex" with a
15-year-old Raleigh boy.
Wake County Sheriffs In-
vestigate
testified
sexual
tact" bd
those wij
ol takinj
Steph�
fewer ths
the "Ga
had beet
Trwl
2281
-� �
r
� �

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 2, 1986
POiUgrit
r? i
ets No Respect
jm
e pul it, "We
speaker for the
Martin, received
as !U's speaker �
saw a clip from
� graduation
and the
� and dignified
Bis op Desmond
rues are sup-
know how
in proud of
�nie that im-
I hough
as finall)
:ude
crs lets's
ommem
idc goes
:me
The bus;
hed the
an opi-
. uest writers
faculty. The
' jrnfius Spec-
urreni ropics of
immunity or
�:ieni
� gran
� " . uing col-
"by-
rfs, us no en-
� � pubt
pating or
� ay con-
I editor oj
-�- - a.?66. 01
� .� nd floor
1 Treaty Pt. II
Mr Reagan in
. egic Defense
I �o effectiveb
effect, to make it
n to ontemplate a
� e shield, given the
ible debate. There
ailed restrictive
en we were
. : hard to get
isitballistic missile
ed to adopt such
I died Weed State-
two clauses it
nitted to employ fresh
� rei '� ted version), or
i
sistence that the restricted
. resistance to
ight.
S. Department of State,
ne renown (he was the
hbei suit brought by Ariel
He testified before the Sub-
international Security and
� 'reign Affairs on Oct.
ed the restrictive inter -

� igai ad announced that he would
he � e version, presumably just to be a
uch did that decision damage the SDI pro-
an expert concedes, it is true that if there had been no
reaty, the structure of the research program wouldj
ten different. He concedes that there have been a few
irounds which is to say, some zigzagging with the
) abiding scrupulously by the treaty, as interpreted
lively h
5
. question just when might research be practically im-
Iby the treaty, particularly if read restrictively, is a sub-?
le Defense Department doesn't want to talk about.j�
k, you see, the question is a political one, and very.N
pnsmve, as we shall see. 3
Campus Voice
What does the 4th of July mean to you?
Newcomers Welcome
Continued From Page 3 �
region where a majority � 52
percent � said the United States
should welcome poor im-
migrants. Other regions con-
sidered this impractical.
Only 38 percent of respondents
in the Northeast said immigration
should be decreased compared
with 51 percent in the West and
53 percent in the Middle West
nd the South. Northeasterners
ere the people more likely to say
hat recent immigrants contribute
o this country rather than cause
roblems.
Forty-five percent of the
respondents said new immigrants
worked harder than native born
Americans, but 47 percent believ-
ed most immigrants ended up on
welfare. The Times said the Cen-
sus Bureau did not have figures
on the number of immigrants on
welfare.
The poll of 1,618 adults show-
ed a third of the public felt im-
migrants took jobs away from
Americans. But slightly more
than half of those interviewed
said immigrants generally took
jobs Americans did not want.
The poll, conducted just before
the House Judiciary Committee
finished work on an immigration
bill designed to curtail the influx
of illegal aliens, found public
support for two key elements of
the legislation: penalties against
employers hiring illegal aliens
and a program to legitimize the
status of illegal aliens who have
been here for several years.
Despite the widespread desire
to restrict immigration, the poll
found solid support for admitting
political refugees, especially
those from Communist coun-
tries.
Jack Whittemore
Senior, Math Education
"Being patriotic, because
that's the time we celebrate the
revolution and independence
Cindy Krasnoff
Senior, Sociology
"Nothing really, just a day off
from school
Chris Flowers
Graduate, Education
"It means a time of celebra-
tion, being with friends and fami-
ly and remembering what this
country means
Tanya Wilder
Senior, Special Ed.
"1 think it's a time to be with
family and friends and to reflect
why this countrv is as great as it
is
Bracy Hall
Senior, Criminal Justice
"It's the time to celebrate our
nation's independence
Ben Koogler
Senior, Computer Science
"Thinking about the nation's
history, and having a great
weekend
Federation Proposes Tactics
JOHANNESBURG, South
Africa (UPI) � Officials of the
country's largest labor federa-
tion, fearing police arrest, met to-
day at a secret location to discuss
the detention of their leader and
other union members under the
state of emergency, a spokesman
said.
The government today formal-
ly repealed 34 race laws making
up the 'influx control" system
that severely restricted the
movements of blacks and obliged
them to carry a "pass" at all
times.
An official of the 5CJ00 strong
Congress of South African Trade
Unions would not disclose the
venue of the closed door meeting,
citing fears in the executive group
of further detentions.
The official, who asked not to
be named, said the policy making
committee might issue a state-
ment Wednesday.
The Congress's leader, also a
senior official of the National
Union of Mineworkers, was de-
tained without charge Friday.
Leaders of the NUM. the
largest single union in the coun-
try, agreed late Monday on
unspecified "ways and means of
best defending the union and its
leadership a NUM official said
Tuesday.
"1 can not tell you what these
actions are because of the
(emergency) regulations
spokesman Marcel Golding told
United Press International.
"A number of decisions were
taken, on how best to defend the
union organization and its leader-
ship in the light of the
detentions
Media curbs invoked under
terms of the nationwide state of
emergency imposed June 12 in-
clude a ban on publishing
statements widely defined as
subversive or inciting unrest.
Restrictions also ban public in-
dent ificat ion of any of the
estimated 4,000 people detained
under emergencv powers.
The Congress, a mainly black
federation, said in a statement
Monday the detention of more
than 900 trade unionists was
"further proof of a direct and
considered assault on trade union
activities and freedom
The repeal of the 34 "influx
control" laws � including the
hated "pass law" that required
blacks to carry identity
documents at all times � went in-
to effect -automatically today.
Legislation repealing the laws
was approved earlier by Parlia-
ment.
President Pieter Both suspend-
ed pass-law arrests in April. An
average of 250,000 blacks had
been arrested each year for pass-
law violations.
City Workers
Begin Strike
PHILADELPHIA (UPI) �
Picket lines formed at City Hall
and workers staged sit-ins at
hospitals early today in separate
strikes by 15,000 municipal
employees and hundreds of
hospital workers who walked off
the job at midnight.
The strikes threatened essential
services in the nation's fifth
largest city, leaving trash heaped
in summer heat and hampering
non-emergeny medial care. Some
3,000 health care workers walked
out at 12:01 a.m. but only about
200 remained on strike when a
temporary agreement was reach-
ed about 5 a.m.
Hospital officials said addi-
tional registered nurses and ad-
ministrators had been called in to
help cover for the striking
hospital workers, and some non-
emergency services were curtail-
ed.
"(But) no one in need of ser-
vice will be turned away
Osteopathic Hospital spokesman
George Hatzfeld had said.
Blue and white collar city
workers, striking for the first
time since 1978, formed picket
lines outside City Hall, where
Mayor Wilson Goode held a mid-
night news conference to an-
nounce emergeny contingency
plans.
"I think the mayor has slapped
us in the face said Thomas
Cronin, president of one of the
city's two striking unions. "Now
it's time for us to start fighting
back. And that's exactly what
we're doing
Goode said essential services
would be maintained by manage-
ment, supervisors and other non-
striking staff members. We said
police would replace striking
guards at the city's prisons.
But the mayor suspended curb-
side trash collection in the city,
which produces 3,200 tons of gar-
bage each day.
Subscribe
2tt?e �aist Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Every Thursday Night Is
TACO NIGHT
Two Great Tacos for only,99
60 oz. Pitchers $1.99
Offer Good From 7p.m11 p.m. � Sot Valid on Deliveries
Every Tuesday Night Is
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99C SUBS
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60 oz. pitchers $1.99
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ALL DAY FRIDAY
32 oz. Bucket of Your Favorite Draft
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Court Ruling Helpful To Minorities
Continued From Page 3
Two of the districts in question
were dropped in the Supreme
Court case. The state did not ap-
peal the lower court's decision in
the case of House District 8 �
northern parts of Edgecombe and
Nash counties. The Supreme
Court ruled the 23rd House
District � Durham County �
Scout Leader Pleads
Guilty To Sex Charges
out of the decision because
Durham has shown that a black
can be elected in a multi-member
district, Michaux said.
The other areas in the suit in-
cluded state House Districts 21,
36, and 39 � portions of Wake,
Forsyth and Mecklenburg coun-
ties. Two state Senate districts
were cited in the suit: No. 2 � the
counties Hertford and
Edgecombe, plus parts of Bertie,
Gates, Martin. Halifax and
Edgecome � and No. 22, which
encompasses Cabarrus County
and part of Mecklenburg.
The court said that multi-
member districts do not in
themselves dilute the votes of
blacks, but will be deemed
discriminatory if minorities can
prove their numbers are large
enough to win elections if single
districts existed instead.
"1
Continued From Page 3.
1984 at the Scouts' Camp Durant
and its program director last
year. Scout officials had said they
received no complaints against
Manchester who was arrested
when authorities were tipped that
he was distributing obscene
stories about teenage boys
through a computer program
called "Gay Teen Conference
In addition to pleading guilty
to one count of possession of
obscenity, disseminating obsceni-
ty and disseminating obscenity to
a minor, Manchester also admit-
ted to having "phone sex" with a
15-year-old Raleigh boy.
Wake County Sheriffs In-
vestigator R.M. Stephenson
testified that there had been "no
sexual touching � physical con-
tact" between Manchester and
those with whom he was accused
of taking indecent liberties.
Stephenson estimated that
fewer than 10 people took part in
the "Gay Teen Conference" that
had been set up in December.
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THI I AS! (AROI INIAN
Lifestyles
BLOOM COUNTY
JULY 2. 1986 ?��
Reggae Splash Makes Waves In Eastern N.C.
B JOHN SHANNON
I Jf�lv1f� Mil
Sunday's Crvstal Coast Reggae
Splash was a sun-drenching suc-
cess in the minds of hundreds oi
reggae enthusiasts who thronged near Swansboro, a facility best
there Whether the event was sue- known for hosting the historical
cessful in other ways remains to play Blackbeard. Organizer Bill
be seen Sheppard worried that the am-
Ihe Splash was held at the phitheatre's 2000 seat capacity
Crystal Coast Amphitheatre, might be insufficient. "There
Ichelle Cole and Striker's Posse plaved at the Crystal (oast Reggae Splash Sunday.
could be up to 10,000 people
there said Sheppard a few days
before the concert. "Where
would they sit?"
The threat of thunderstorms
may have daunted some; the pro-
spect of a long drive, or the price
of tickets � $10 in advance, $12
at the door � may have in-
timidated others who would have
liked to attend Whatever the
reason, turnout was lower than
expected.
"1 don't know if they even
made enough to break even
said Sharon W'hitehead, co-
manager of the Crystal Coast
Amphitheatre. "The turnout was
about 800 people. But 1 think
basically it went very well
Despite the empty seats, when
the music started the mood lifted.
Ichelle Cole and Striker's Posse
were exuberant from the moment
they checked their sound,
epitomizing the meaning of their
name � "that we are coming
with full force, striking with the
message of truths and rights
according to Cole.
Cole and three other women
fronted the stage, Cole singing
most of the leads and playing a
strap-on synthesizer. The three
back-up singers danced ex-
pressively, hands and bodies
swaying in loose unison, looking
in their red, yellow and green
plumage like bright birds. Thev
communicated in hand
movements a message verbal)ed
by Ccle � "We are Jah children
and we are here to fulfill a task,
to teach the children of Rastafan,
and to unify all breihrens and
sistrens through our music, Jah
music
People began to dance on a
strip of sand in front of the stage,
and the chorus repeated, "Reg-
gae music, for people all over
world
After Striker's Posse cleared
the stage, three rhythmatists
the African American Dance
Ensemble struck up a percussive
field for their leader to dance
over and around in an
hilarating display of controlled
energy. The climax of their per-
formance came when audie
participation was invoked. I
in chanting "Peace, 1
Respect, for Everybody and
then, when individuals were
helped up to the stage
follow: he-leader mass
mance.
Nearly enougl
ed in this simple chant
.ompanying hand movements to
conjure a feeling of solidarity.
but it is a sad reminder of our
tragmented society that it didn't
quite come off. People seemed
slightly embarassed to participate
in what one observer called
"nostalgic idealism
1; some of the crowd simply
were not loose yet, the next act
warmed them ; The Awareness
rt Ensemble is a group of high
ber musicians whose sound is
ighly contemporary. But
: .ugh the technological sheen
em spin: pulsates � hence
. eneric label, "roots reggae
I cad Mnger Olamina explains,
We stay, rooted, but adapt to
the new sounds. You see, 'reggae'
not just a music. It's a way of
life. The Natural Man is the one
who knows his roots and his
.e
"It's not about B.S irrelevant
stuff adds bassist Chuck X.
"It's stuff people need to know
like peace
amina and Chuck X are eas
recognizable as Rastafanans
eir long dreadlocks "Long
thiopian soldiers wore
�:anes as symbols of
Olamina. "Now
set- COAST, page 7
Media Onslaught Captures Liberty Spectacle For Television
d PI) At daybreak Monday,
the light began. The
, microwave dishes and
were powered on, and
jtworks began
� "1 iberty w eekend
-end-all celebra
i Stai at of Liberty's
The partv will run from sunup
to sundown .mi beyond. ABC
plans 17-plus ' television
cove . � rams,
g new s; CBS is doing
about 20 irs; NBC ab n tei .
CNN
Mondaj was th
lay 'I ibertv
Weekend � it officially begins
July 3 � and it offered a hint of
thing- to come.
Over at CBS Morning Sews,
weatherman Steve Baskerville
was in a blimp, while Maria
Shriver and Forrest Sawyer took
theif positions on a roof 13
stones above ground at Gover-
Rebel Wins Pacemaker Again
Bv DllBRAl�HAW
S4�ff Wnu-r
Foi a row,
Rebel, ECl 's art and literary
magazine, h as won the
Pacemaker award.
The Pacemaker is the higl
award given by the Associated
Collegiate Press (ALP), and it is
something foi the students ol
ECU to be proud o.
Tim Thornburg, editor of the
'86 Rebel and associate editor of
the '85 Rebel (which won the
award), agreed. "The Rebel staff
is very honored to receive this
award once again. This tells
others what we have known all
along � that ECU has one of the
finest literary and art magazines
in the nation
This year, there were more en-
tries to the ACP than eve, with
e v -
!
(1) Concept
vting
(3) Grapan J
typ j .
(4) 1i
(5) P. art
1 earn he Pacemaker, the
mastei all ol
these areas, and that is exactly
what the Rebel did.
Speaking o the Rebel, a judge
from the ACP said, "The
magazine is characterized by-
boldness, drama and an effective
use of color with the gallery of art
offering exceptionally pro-
vocative work
Indeed, quality work is
something that has come to be ex-
pected in the Rebel. Since its start
in 195 the magazine has been a
successful publication .trough 28
volumes, with awards being the
rule rather than the exceptions.
Since 1961, the Rebel has receiv-
ed All-American status every year
except 1965 and 1983, and these
two years the magazine received
First Place awards.
Results for the '86 Rebel are
not in, but its reception has been
excellent so far. The results will
be released1 during the Spring '87
semester.
The next volume will be releas-
ed in March 1987, and the Rebel
will be accepting entries during
the Fall '86 semester. As
students, we can be proud of this
publication, and should work
hard to continue creating quality
material to ensure its success. If
history is to repeat itself and
more awards to be won, student
involvement with the Rebel will
be a must.
nor's Island.
Behind them was the Statue ol
Liberty, in front of them was
Cable News Network, below was
David Hartman and ABC's i,ood
Morning America and down to
their left was NBC's emptv stage
"We're here this week to
celebrate America Sawyer an-
nounced, to reintroduce vou
to the Lady of the harbor " But
first, this commercial. ABC paid
$10 million for exclusive rights to
broadcast the Liberty events and
will spend another $4 million on
production, but don't feel too
sorry for the No. 3 network
They expect to take in $30 million
from commercials.
Back to the morning news set
at CBS: Sawyer and Shriver were
doing one of those "what if"
pieces. What do you suppose the
Statue of Liberty's dress would
look like if it were designed to-
day? A designer was brought on
the set as were several models.
One model wore a tight red
dress and atop her blonde locks
was a $20,000 silver crown.
Another model had a Dolly Par-
ton hairdo and wore a low cut
red, white and blue outfit with
American flags for earrings. But
the third model took the prize.
She wore a crown with bananas
as spikes, and her slinky dress
was wrapped over one shoulder
and across her chest, leaving her
So-Called Comedies Long On
Action But Short On Comedy
midriff exposed
Down at ABC , a I
knocked over flowei
were placed
some col
murky Hudson R. -c
Hartman did a si r
i 's Island is a
ii home. "People I.
here Hartman sa:J. sitting
the island withNew Yorl
skyline in the backgroui
feel sate, he explained, be.
onlv those with permis
allowed on the ;sand, w
houses Coast ' ruard emp'
arid their families
Meanwhile. New York M
Ed Koch was d BC
and CBS this moi ning.
"1 et's talk about �I al
wonderful about the
Good Morning America
Joan Lunden, wl
ed crime, dirt and
"It's tar more dai
you're in Detroit the m
said. "This is the place
you wan: to be sate
At ABC. there was
those mandatory TV pie
weird things one sees in
York City. Would � ��u believe
that on one block there are 17
restaurants and they all otter In-
dian food? Then there are
traffic signs that sa "Don even
think about parking here
$29,000 parking space, the man
. gs to walk in the ci-
an whose job is to
�ner people, the
- only bones and the
. get at delis.
BS, Shriver was ask-
Winkler, better known
I ab im-
� I ad Liberty.
oric he offered.
B "We're waiting
for K� g to take us to
the Bronx Zoo
But first this commercial.
Wail a minute. What's going
it NBC�
Bryant Oumbel and Jane
nterviewing a rock
they have a Lady
No. Were they per-
for "Liberty
Weekend?" Nope. In fact, they
do with "Liberty
" The Today show was
� e same old studio, not on
like the other two net-
: hardly a word was ut-
tered about the Lady. What
"We've been doing five
ttes on Liberty at the end of
w for two weeks ex-
ed Today executive pro-
ducer Steve Friedman, "and we
have a special four-hour Liberty
show Friday. Quite frankly, we
thought that would do it. Today,
1 didn't see a whole lot happening
on the other shows
f.
By El) TOSH AC H
This summer has brought two
additions to the actioncomedy
genre. Both of them are long on
action and short on comedy.
The first, Legal Eagles, stars
Robert Redford, Debora Winger,
and Darryl Hannah, and is the
story of District Attorney Tom
Logan (Redford) and his
misadventures with a local lawyer
(Winger). Winger's client (Han-
nah) is accused of stealing a pain-
ting by her father, who was killed
when she was eight years old. She
claims that the painting was given
to her by her father before he
died. Redford and Winger must
decide whether she is telling the
truth, and their investigation
takes them on the adventure of
their lives.
Legal Eagles is advertised as a
comedy, but it works much better
when viewed as an ac-
tionromance. Although the
movie has some funny scenes,
these are seldom worth more than
a chuckle and could not sell the
movie on their own. What does
$ell the movie is an interesting
mystery and some good perfor-
mances by a cast of veterans.
Also appealing about Legal
Eagles is the romance between
Redford's character and
Winger's. These two could make
anything worth sitting through.
It is unfortunate that the same
cannot be said for Darryl Han-
nah. Hannah, who was so
outstanding in Splash, does little
in Legal Eagles beside attempt to
look voluptuous. Her attempts
are successful, but it gets a little
boring after two hours.
A nice extra in Legal Eagles is
the appearance of character actor
Brian Denehey (Cocoon,
Silverado) as a detective in-
vestigating Hannah's case.
Denehey usually shows up only in
supporting roles, but the movies
he appears in are always better
for it.
Another new movie that pro-
mises comedy but delivers action
is MGM's Running Scared, starr-
ing Gregory Hines and Billy
Crystal.
In Running Scared, Hines and
Crystal play two wise-guy
Chicago cops who are working
out their 30 days notice before
they move to Key West and open
a bar. Before they leave Chicago
they mean to nail Julio Gonzales,
who has killed a cop.
Although it is fun and in-
teresting to hear Hines and
Crystal exchange snappy patter
throughout Running Scared,
don't expect to split your sides
laughing � this one isn't that
funny. Although not so
humorous, the chemistry between
Gregory Hines and Billy Crystal
saves this movie, along with a few
striking action scenes, the best of
which is a car chase that ends up
on the el � or elevated train �
tracks. Because the camera angle
constantly puts the audience in
the cars doing these scenes, it
takes on the feel of a roller
coaster ride.
So don't let the advertisements
fool you. Don't expect to laugh
your brains out at either Legal
Eagles or Running Scared. It just
won't happen. However, if
you're looking for a little light-
hearted action, these might just
be the movies for you.
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Chicago for tne rowing of 'Running Scared now playing at the Phtt in Greenville.
A






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 2, 1986
ernN.C.
. and movements to
feeling of solidarity,
id reminder of our
thai didn't
People seemed
i assed to participate
observer alled
d Minply
he next act
n e warcness
a group of high
lose sound is
But
ogical sheen
sates hence
-ieggae
i explains,
but adapt
. 'reggae'
It's a way of
the one
and his
B.S irrelevant
Chuck X
to know
k are easi-
afanans
:ks "I ong
d ers wore
ol
i
eievision
- � n the ci-
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pe pie. the
ts and the
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ake us to
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: : g five
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eeks ex-
executive pro-
; riedman, "and we
� hour Liberty
lite frankly, we
.id do it. Today,
le lot happening
M
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lent between takes while on location in
Ing it the Plitt in Greenville.

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MIG I BORROW MS
Coast Hosts Splash
Continued from page 6
we start dreadlocks when we
come of age, come to
knowledge
The A.A.E. exhibit courage
and knowledge in their music,
which is both political and in-
telligent in execution. Their com-
mand of synthesizer programm-
ing, their spacious arrangements
which leave plenty of room for
improvisation, and their impec-
cable sound (not an easy ac-
complishment for so
rhythmically-oriented a group)
attest to the value of seven years
playing music together.
By the time A.A.E. were
finished playing, time was runn-
ing short for the next group,
Greenville's own Amateurs. But
The Amateurs took the stage
more quickly than any of the
other acts and launched into an
excellent, but sadly short, set.
As clouds massed overhead,
Bill "Shep" Sheppard sang
"Rain, rain � don't let the rain
come down And it didn't, and
the people danced until they had
to quit.
Whther the Crystal Coast
Reggae Splash was a financial
success will not in the final
analysis be important. Everyone
had a day of sun, some new ex-
periences, and lots of fun.
Teen Fathers Learn To Cope
(UPI) � Kevin Morenzi was
excited about the prospect of
becoming a father when he was a
16-year-old 9th-grader with a
pregnant girlfriend.
Now, a high school dropout
with a 5-year-old son to help sup-
port and no job in sight, he is
pulling his life together with the
aid of a New York program for
unwed fathers.
"There were times when 1 felt I
didn't deserve my son because 1
wasn't good enough Morenzi
said. "But I never felt like aban-
doning him. I'm willing to work
in this program, to get a job, to
spend whatever it takes to get
visitation rights, to be a good
father
National attention has focused
on the plight of teenage unwed
mothers who now have a number
of federal and state funded pro-
grams available to help them get
jobs, finish school and care for
their children, social workers say.
But unwed fathers are only just
starting to emerge from the
background.
"They were always thought of
as 'being absent said social
worker Sherree Beau of the
Young Father's Program ad-
ministered by the New York City
Human Resources Administra-
tion.
"Actually there are a lot of
young fathers out there who care
very much for their children
she said. "They realize they have
a responsibility, especially
because in many cases they were
the ones who didn't want their
girlfriends to get an abortion
The program, started on a trial
basis and now permanent, has
enrolled 66 unwed fathers in
vocational education classes and
counseling sessions since it began
last year. The fathers range from
16 to 25 and several have custody
of their babies. Few have jobs.
Beau said the primary aim of
the program is to get unwed
fathers employed so they can sup-
port, or help support, their
children. But it also educates the
fathers on child care, helps them
establish visitation rights and
counsels them on birth control.
"We emphasize
responsibility Beau said. "This
is a voluntary program so every
father here wants to be responsi-
ble. They just need some
guidance, some training and a
break
Felix Esquilin, 21, hopes his
participation in the program will
help persuade family court that
he should have partial custody of
' his toddler, Brenda Lynn.
"1 don't get to see too much of
my daughter but she is a part of
me said Esquilin, whose baby
was born when he was a senior in
high school.
Another young man in the pro-
gram, who asked not to be iden-
tified, lives with his girlfriend and
7-month-old daughter and also
has custody of a 6-year-old son
from a previous relationship. He
joined the Young Fathers' Pro-
gram so he could get help finding
a job, he said.
"There are a lot of people who
have children at a young age and
think of them as being a burden,
but I don't he said. "I feel dif-
ferent when I go out drinking
with my friends because my kids
are always on my mind. I want to
be with them
Beau said the fathers' program
offers job counseling and voca-
tional training and can also help
fathers earn general equivalency
high school diplomas.
"A lot of the fathers in our
program dropped out of high
school to help support the baby
but had difficulty getting jobs
because they didn't have a
diploma she said.
The program also holds in-
dividual and group counseling
sessions where fathers can voice
some of their fears and frustra-
tions.
' We've seen a real change in
attitude in many of the fathers
Beau said. "They really begin
thinking about what kind of
parent they want to be. Many
come from broken homes and
they say they want to be the
father they never had
COMING ATTRACTIONS
Coming A ttractions
Thursday, July 3, 1986
3:00 p.m. Free Refreshments
CONCERT:
Southern Culture
On The Skids
MSC Patio
Monday, July 7, 1986
3:30 & 9:00 p.m. FREE
with I.D.
ANIMAL
HOUSE
Hendrix Theatre
Y��v " v �V v





I Ml I SI i XK i 1NIAN
Sports
Jt 1 2. 1V86 Ha�c
World Cup Soccer
Maradona Leads Argentina
Because rhe East Carolinian
wouldn't pay our way to
Guadalajera, Mex , we were fore
ed to watch the World Cup v
cer final f the tubt
did man) �' ,ur Peers and coi-
legues.
i was one ' the more exciting
soccei n i we've seen in
some time. a the Wesi Germans
overcame a goal del
lose a J-2 hi
breakei werful A i
line chan iquad.
By
RICK McCORMAC
nd
SCOT1 COOPER
W r
big crowds &
even Ho
een some
Beavei x i
I 5,000
B .
O
seemed
e sei
Maradona, but the Worldup's hometxn Hugo Sanchei ol the Mexuan National
: �ho has been plavm in tinamd Worldup Soccer Review through December to gel
le W orldup, led the Mexicans to a spot in the quarterfinals ol this year's exciting action. He is
itching some action during a brut workout prior In Mexico's match against I rugua.
ing fa
�: rive
i

.s �
g the
I � Ma
" i
M
a w
. ' I
deseived and ist I
f Arg �occer
Kftet the
"Mai
i bu
.
"Arg i desen i
is a grea
(although yet unlicensed) Han
Beckenbauer said. "It is not only
Maradona, they have 10 other
great players
rhe Argentines looked to have
the game in the bag after two ear-
ly goals, one by defender Jose
Brown and the other b forward
Jorge Valdano (no relation to
sState basketball coach Jim)
However. West Germany refused
quii as Karl Hem Rumenigj
I Rudi Voellei I
fei Fuzzy) scored eig
minutes ap i
f & tying .2
1 het ligl tning struck
form Burr . a
uititully placed lead pas
Maradona, which exploited tl
(icrman's i lefense B it
caked pas' V e
German goal t e nde r H
Sc I a �' from 10 vards at
� ball in I i
re
Maradona
tines, �
1978
iermans, w ho se�
bad lucl
His tw
.�. ell a �
bala
.
"We
I out
Beckenl think
Ma � � we
m eten't ca I ed
Wl
�' 1
� rtunatcly i thr
. als B �
:
ticularly igl tad
w est G id, a
Argentina gave their share a
well.
Wesi Germany appealed I i
penalty kick when Br iwi
Hans-Peter Bnegel on the ec,
the penalty area in the
minute oJ plav. The referee
awarded a free-kick jusl
the area, and the Germans wasted
a - hances. The ret ordered
first kick retaken after the A
tine wall refeused t
10 vards
Maradona was thei
with a yellow card I
. -
well as mosl viewers, wei
-
me
Sure
� Wesi re
.
' �
H �-
� �
tk ol
�'��

-
Sports Fact
Wed. Jtilv 2. lsTl
Ma
w
Kit
-
sea
Vill Athletes Face Mandatory Drug Testing?
B Kit K M. OHM (
nd
s oil COOPKR
i .
:
N

a
ire d
foi
egoa
l)r Schwai feels very �
about this sul W e will
die drug testit . teous,
class way W e ai
niliate a
.
UCLA
Boston
Mai ager Red
d
'�

1 A.
will i
" 1 " �

al
sI'm
voca
S
V hai we
i
have
tgs,
. a a
con-
reptr versity, the you
tge
" rhe ting will he confide
and is in the tes') best
erest
Perhaps the bes sum up
feelings conci
to control drugs in athletics
comes from Indiana basketball
l iach Bobbv k ig!
Knight
. ad-
V
commented on the recent drug-
related deaths in the sports
a orld.
" It's time l b t� We've
been in a lot ol wars. Many
times we were trying to proteel
�- But young men fought the
v .
"Now �
grcatesi wai ' all � the wa
save � ds
� � �
Editorial
W e :ee: thai testing is a good
idea �� - dime at the
professional le.e It
jusl seems ' he a shame that it
takes a death (or two) gel peo
pie motivau
However, the institutions
seem to be taking steps in the
direction to control whai
may be the biggest danger in
sport- today No matter what the
� competition, the use ol
igs should result in penalty,
s a matter of fact, the spori
ol boxing :s already taking a
lhe Not
America Boxing I ederai
xer David Braxi
. n when cocaine was I
his system after his May 22
. (-i pound title fight in Dcti
This is an obvious ste
will be an a.
over:
c
A- unfortunate as the tw
deaths were, they
problem that .a: be
emphasized B .
especially cocaine ha
capability to take a
However, if the past ex-
periences can be looked up
the proper perspective,
maybe our society can be
through a more r e a!i - �
awareness ol the clangers
drugs.
.
NC State Games To Move From Triangle Area
This �"1 " the in a telephone interview. The July 1987, meaning that the State that it has a good numbei I
Kevin
SBA great Boh
; i �n Rocket
NB 's "Meei the Press"
�. i 1 his n
' iversial topic
ped 1 " ulate the
� I
�ary in
I e -elated
B a and Don
�se might
1 that (man-
testing), only
. . �� ews
and Obserw ' and ' u aters.
State Games ol North
'Una were a weekend success,
hey won't be held in the
ingle area next year because
' the I .S Mympic festival.
sports officials said Monday.
"We plan iO go ahead and
' ave the State Games next year
but I can assure you that Raleigh-
Durham would not be the area
Shirley "Red" Wilson, chairman
ol the Governor's Council on
Physical fitness and Health, said
in a telephone interview
council sanctioned the
The
State
(lames, the first edition of which
were held in the 1 riangle over the
weekend.
Wilson, a former Duke foot-
ball coach, said. "We haven't
made a definite decision (on
which city would host the 1987
State Games) but it (the Olympic
festival) could create a problem
because all the emphasis will be
placed on that
The Olympic Festival, a
33-sport presentation of the U.S.
Olympic Committee will be held
in the Triangle and Greensboro in
Julv 198 meaning that the State
Games, it held next year, would
probablv need to be held earlier,
perhaps again in June
Wilson noted that while the
State Games in the Triangle had
the endorsement of the
governor's council, Charlotte
hosted the second Tar Heel State
Games in June and Winston-
Salem is preparing to hold an
amateur competition July 11-IV
"1 thought the State Games
were verv successful said
Wilson, "but Charlotte also felt
its games were a success and
Winston-Salem, likewise feels
that it has a good number
trants "
Hill Carrow , executive dire
of North Carolina Amateur
Sports, the host organization for
the 1986 State Games and the
1985 U.S. Olvmpic Fesl
earlier Monday had said, "i
no doubts that there will
another State Games We'd like
to be the organization that con-
ducts them, but it is essentially up
to the Governor's Council on
See CARROW. page 10
cry important
aid "When
�. iplc d) ing, 1 think we
; mse
. y visible, we live
� at glass house and there's a
� .��. thai we
se people that aie
ing along behind us � those
; le that we affect I.anier
inued.
�sard Sampson con-
"1 think there should be
�' t testing, no doubt
the UVA graduate said.
' B ause you're going to have to
a way to prevent drugs
netting) into sports so they
(the athletes) can get their educa-
Krnie Mhwar
Locally, ECU'S representative
to the NCAA, Dr. Ernie Schwarz
felt the time has come tor the
drug issue to be removed from
athletics
"It (the drug problem) needs to
be taker, .are of at once. The
public is getting disgusted.
coaches are worrying about their
players and everyone is tired of
drugs in sports Schwarz com-
mented. "Being a former athlete,
I don't like to see anyone destroy
their lite � especially an athlete.
"The NC AA has said that each
institution will have to set up
some kind of drug testing, pro-
bably within the next year
Schwarz added. "If a student-
athlete is determined to be on
Synthetic Turf Leads To More Football Injuries
� PS) A football player
runs a 50 percent higher risk of
injury while playing on a syn-
thetic field than on natural grass,
a recent National Collegiate
Athletic Association study said.
The NCAA, which has been
studying football injuries for the
last three years, also found that
more injuries occur in the third
period than anv other time.
But mnay athletic directors,
enamored by artificial turf's
lower maintenance costs, say the
injuries caused by synthetic grass
usually are superficial. They say
they'll need more data before
they abandon the artificial sur-
faces and return to grass.
NCAA officials also say not
enough data have been collected
to justify a movement back to
grass, and note many of the in-
juries sustained on artificial turf
may be minor.
"You have more abrasions on
an artificial surface says Assis-
tant Athletic Director Bill Goldr-
ing of Indiana State University,
where football is played on a syn-
thetic surface. There does not
seem to be any evidence,
however, of more serious injuries
on such fields, he adds.
While the NCAA study did not
differentiate between serious and
minor injuries, it did show knee
injuries occur about 50 percent
more often on synthetic surfaces.
Other athletic directors seem to
agree with Goldring that, until
there's more evidence the ar-
tificial fields cause more injuries,
they won't go back to natural
grass fields.
Blaming artificial surfaces for
increased injuries is "a common
opinion, but it's not proven, not
scientifically says Clarence
Underwood, commissioner of the
Big 10 Conference men's pro-
grams.
"There haven't been enough
serious injuries to compare
observes Jim Muldoon,
spokesman for the Pacific 10
conference, in which half of the
teams play on plastic compos:
non.
"Verv few players like to plav
on it. They complain about abra
sions and some say it's hard on
their legs. They hurt after a
game Muldoon adds.
"Wide receivers and backs,
some of them like it (artificial
surface) for making quick turns
They say they feel faster on it
notes Muldon.
Some college officials are ada-
mant. "We'll never switch.
Nobody has ever talked about
it states Dave Baker, sports in-
formation director for Penn-
Set FOOTBALL, page 9
Hard-Dri

(UP

A
Miniatur
a:
es

w
v
line .
Kingman
In Mouse L
Oak
Kingn
vv
K s

S
-
T
d
in
Bar;
Football Ex
Disagree Or
( n1inuei1 from pa. 8
sy
Bl I
nive-
St
fa
"(I
Bnnl
a
Bake
t! i
havi- p
n
kth
S
Spao
I
Bat
Artificia
ot $500,00 dollar;
n ntenance
.?pared to kt-ass
jjOoldnng
Many -
Ifields bes ause ol wea
wood adds
Big 10 except Purdue play
puch fields beca . severe
feather ir. the Mid
The Pac 10 schools
ificial grass mostly are located in
the ramv Northwest. Muldon
tenons
t
"1 I
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 2. 1986
L
!S8
Pac8
leads Argentina
sed) ! i an
only
10 other
uv ear-
rose
relation to
i
Argentina gae then share as
well
Wesl German) appealed for a
penalu kick when Brown fouled
Hans-Peter Bnegel on the edge of
the penalty area in the 16th
minute of play. The referee then
awarded a free-kick just outside
the area, and the Germans wasted
iwo chances. The ref ordered the
first kick retaken after the Argen-
tine wall refeused to move back
10 yards.
Maradona was then cautioned
v�ith a yellow card for protesting
that decision vehemently. We, as
well as most ;ewi
We:
tion of w at w as
Vire enough,
is oi West
rs, were on the
with anticipa-
te.
Lothar Mat-
an was
ned in the 21st minute for a
However, the
e match ,
Vrgeni na's s ic
merica
eak of cha
� nament h
e Western Hemisphere. West
e her hand, had
natches to
. v2 and to England back
did not
' hand.
kept alive
's impressive
ips when
as been played
Sports Fact
Ved. July 2. 1971
1 n g o f
c o u n -
- iS-1
Margaret Court,
tr e Wimbledon
i . e a r - o 1 d
beaten Billie
6-4, in the
v up the
d after finding a
I underneath the seat
ruck her father had
- ht.
K .
6-4,
g Testing?
use. The North
Boxing Pederation
e;Daid Braxton's
� en cocaine was found in
ystem after his May 22
nound title fight in Deiroit.
an otrn the
directtnig
�� be idiate
l '
� mfoi' M
glar-
be
�IB d"Ugs,
the
11theex-
�jn in then
'� benefit
i rrreal
he dangers Of
m Triangle Area

cil, '
and Winston-
d an
i -13.
e � iames
f u 1
fell
ess and
rwise feels
'd number of en-
Hill C arrow , executive director
Nortl arolina Amateur
Tganization for
ate Games and the
s Olympic Festival,
earlier Monday had said: "I have
- �� that there will be
another State Games We'd like
" the organization that con-
ducts them, but it is essentially up
the Governor's Council' on
Nee CARROW, page 10
Football Injuries
l that, until
juence the ar-
more injuries,
natural
I surfaces for
I a common
Jot proven, not
Clarence
ussioner of the
ce men's pro-
been enough
3 compare
Muldoon,
he Pacific 10
lien half of the
teams play on plastic composi-
tion
"Very few players like to plav
on it. They complain about abra-
sions and some say it's hard on
their legs. They hurt after a
game Muldoon adds.
"Wide receivers and backs
some of them like it (artificial'
surface) for making quick turns
They say they fee! faster on it "
notes Muldon.
Some college officials are ada-
mant. "We'll never switch
Nobody has ever talked about
it, states Dave Baker, sports in-
formation director for Penn-
S FOOTBALL, pagt 9
A
Hard-Driving Allison: 'A Racers Racer9
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
(L'Pl) � Whether he's slinging
mud on a dirt track on a Saturday
night or hurtling around Daytona
International Speedway at more
than 200 mph, Bobby Allison
loves to race.
Allison. 48. a Miami native
who lives in Hueytown, Ala
eai ned his fame racing stock cars.
He has 82 career NASCAR wins,
including a stirring win at
Manama International Speedway
in falladega in this year's
inston 500, and earlier this year
was inducted into the Florida
sports Hall of Fame.
Net stock cars are just one part
of Allison's racing interests.
He drives between 80 and 90
races each year, including runn-
ing on dirt tracks, road courses
and short ovals.
In 1973 and 1975, Allison ran
some Indy car races for Roger
Penske, including the In-
dianapolis 500 each year. In six
races, Allison earned $36,422 and
said he might consider returning
for a race or two if the situation
was right.
"1 would get right back into
one if it didn't conflict so badly
with the Winston Cup series
Allison said recently at the Chase
Grand Prix at the Meadowlands.
"I think that my racing
background would allow me to
understand the technology and
go racing.
"I enjoyed running Indy cars
and that was when they were ex-
tremely dangerous he said.
"Given the right opportunity, I
would enjoy running one again.
Obviously, they have changed a
great deal since I raced them, but
we had a good time mixing it up
with them
Allison's first appearance at
Indianapolis was a bust. He
qualified 12th but left the race
after one lap when a connecting
bolt snapped. In 1975, Allison
fared better, leading one lap and
finishing 25th when gearbox
troubles forced him out of the
race after 112 laps.
"The first time 1 went to Indy,
we took nine weeks to get
ready Allison said. "And I was
next destination.
"I had avoided the dirt like the
plague Allison said. "But in
the last couple of years I've had
some good cars and you have the
fun cf power, of sliding on the
dirt. I also do a lot of short pave-
ment (races). That's my
background, that's my kick
"Bobby is one of the few guys that has ac-
complished virtually everything in the sportHe
is a racers' racer. "
�Danny Sullivan
trying to run the full NASCAR
schedule at the time. That meant
a lot of sleepless nights
Since then, he has concentrated
on stock cars, but he still makes
time to get to out of the way
tracks in Iowa or Arizona, usual-
ly just flying in long enough to
race and then flying on to the
Miniature
In his early racing days, when
he and brother Donnie would buy
a bushel of peaches with their
winnings to serve as food for the
next few days, Allison set his sites
on the big, paved ovals.
"Years ago, I could always
find a pavement track that paid
as good or better (than a dirt
track) he said. "I always felt
like the future led to the big, pav-
ed speedways, whether it was In-
dy or Daytona
In his 30 years in racing,
Allison's name has become
associated with winning, and his
abilities are admired not only by
NASCAR drivers, but Indy car
drivers as well.
"Bobby is one of the few guys
that has accomplished virtually
everything in the sport said
Danny Sullivan, who, like
Allison, is sponsored by Miller.
"I know he runs 80-90 races a
year and still maintains a rookie's
enthusiasm for the sport, despite
having raced for 30 years. I ad-
mire someone like him who keeps
giving to the sport and to the
fans.
"You also have to admire the
success he has had in so many
forms of racing said Sullivan,
who won Sunday's Chase Grand
Prix. "Whether it is Daytona, a
Saturday night short track, an In-
dy car, a dirt modified, an oval or
a road course, Bobby has done
the job in all of them. He is a
racers' racer
Allison has been enjoying a
resurgence this year and is in
fourth place in the Winston Cup
standings going into the second
half of the NASCAR season,
which begins Friday with the
Firecracker 400 at Daytona.
Allison is the only driver to have
won the Firecracker more than
once this decade, taking the
checkered flag in 1980 and 1982.
The NASCAR circuit is
Allison's meal ticket. But runn-
ing on dirt tracks are the desserts.
"Thirty years ago I tried it (dirt
racing) and it felt strange to me
he said. "But now, the dirt, sit-
ting our there and sliding in the
mud, covering up the people in
the grandstand, that's fun
MYRTLE BEACH, S.C.
(LP1) � It seems main people
have been fooled for years over
what sport is actually America's
favorite pastime.
Baseball.1 No wav.
Football? Forget it.
Badminton Take your shut-
tlecock and get out of here.
Those fade into the shadows
when compared to the big daddy
of all oi the sports.
Miniature golf. That's right.
Putt-putt.
Millions of Americans swarm
all over miniature golf courses,
.especially in the summer and
especially at the beaches, where
jhev � the golf courses and the
millions oi Americans � seem to
crawl out of the sand in great
numbers
v h not
Where else can you carefully
line up a putt and smack a little
golf ball through an elephant's
legs
Miniature golf courses are part
of Americana. You can't find
this stuff anywhere else.
Big goofy animals (here's a tip:
the plastic ones are real, but ask
the furry ones to play through),
putting greens that defy gravity
and little windmills that go
around and around in front of
the little opening that you have
difficulty seeing, much less hit-
ting a ball through, even if the
windmill arms weren't twirling in
front of it.
In the case oi the windmill, a
screwdriver and pair of pliers will
solve that problem in a hurry.
Same goes for the little barn with
doors constantly opening and
shutting. The players behind you
will love it.
Although no one can say for
sure. Myrtle Beach must be one
of the capitals of miniature golf.
There is a course everv six or
Kingman Fined
In Mouse Incident
Oakland slugger Dave
Kingman has been fined S3,500
tor sending a small rat to a
woman sportswriter and will be
released if a "similar incident"
occurs, the A announced last
night.
Kingman had the rodent
delivered in a pink box to
Susan Fornoff of The
.Sacramento fiee during the first
inning oi Monday night's
Oakland-Kansas City game.
The rat had a tag that said,
"My name is Sue
Fornoff said Monday night
that Kingman has told her he
doesn't believe women belong
in the clubhouse and has
harassed her at times since she
began covering the team last
season for The Bee.
"The club has advised
Kingman that if an incident of
a similar nature occurs in the
future, he will be released im-
mediately without further com-
pensation the announcement
Tuesday night said.
Kingman, 37, refused to
speak to reporters after the
game Tuesday night. He wasn't
in the lineup for the game and
didn't play.
"This is very nice, what
they've done Fornoff said.
"It doesn't mean a thing to me.
The only thing we want is for
him to stop harassing me.
There are two ways that would
happen. One, if he's not
around anymore. Two, if he
decides to stop it
Football
Disagree
Continued from page 8
sylvania State University, which
celebrates its 100th football an-
niversary (and will battle ECU on
Sept. 27 in University Park) next
fall.
"Our coaches and trainers
think it (grass) is safer Baker
asserts.
Baker points out, however,
that Penn State is fortunate to
have plenty of land to accom-
modate the schools' wide array of
athletic programs.
Some schools do not have the
space, and find synthetic surfaces
hold up better under heavy use.
Baker adds.
Artificial turf can cost upwards
of $500,00 dollars, but the
maintenance is minimal com-
pared to grass fields, explains
loldring.
Many schools choose synthetic
fields because of weather, Under-
wood adds. All the schools in the
Big 10 except Purdue play on
such fields because of the severe
weather in the Midwest.
The Pac 10 schools with ar-
tificial grass mostly are located in
the rainy Northwest, Muldon
reports.
Experts
On Turf
Some athletic directors prefer
the new surfaces. "We have ac-
tually shown less injuries.
However, I don't think there is
any significant difference says
Georgia Tech Athletic Director
Homer Rice.
"I studied this when I was
coaching (the professional) Cin-
cinnati (Bengals). The problems
we found were mostly when turf
(artificial) was set up for baseball
and football Rice says, poin-
ting out that multiple uses can
pose problems.
Rice adds the new turfs are bet-
ter and may have less injuries oc-
curring on them.
Although collegiate sports of-
ficials do not widely recognize the
higher rate of injuries in third
quarters as a problem needing
immediate attention, some con-
ferences plan to address the issue.
Gene Calhoun, supervisor of
Big 10 football referees, has
recommended the conference
discuss letting athletes have a
longer time to stretch before the
start of the third quarter to lower
the rate of third-quarter injuries.
"I wjll put it on their agenda
for their November meeting
says Underwood.
t
r 0 0 ��
eight feet. One features a giant
yellow Buddha that sits on top of
a hill overlooking the links with
blinking lights for eyes.
First "Dialing for Dollars
now "Putting for Buddha It is
clearly a religious experience, but
Buddha is stingy with the birdies.
Miniature golf, for all of its
any madcap fun. is big business.
Putt-putt Golf Courses of
America Inc. is the biggest and
most organized. The company,
celebrating its 32nd birthday this
year, has more than 430 fran-
chises across the United States.
It's name has become to
miniature golf what Kleenex is to
runny noses.
More than 25 million people
played on official Putt-putt
courses last year. A
spokeswoman estimates the com
pany is worth $100 million.
Since independent courses far
outnumber Putt-putt courses no
one will hazard a guess, but there
must be at least 10 times as many
� it's easy to see why this is truly
America's Game. The numbers,
and occasionally the lines when
there's a group of giggling
deadbeats knocking their shots
into assorted forms of shrubbery,
can be staggering.
Official Putt-putt courses shun
the funny animals and do not
deal with windmills that can be
removed surgically. Those course
are more straightforward and
businesslike.
There is a Professional Putters
Association affiliated with Putt-
Putt that has more than 900
members, a national convention
every year and an annual national
putting championship that this
year earned the winner $16,000.
Most everyone else plays for a
warm beer or a ride home.
But the competition is fierce,
no matter the course.
Invariably, someone who has
never picked up a golf club and
doesn't know a bogey from a
boogie will show up a frustrated
veteran and win the round.
Such frustation occasionally
turns into violence when some
hot headed veteran whacks a put-
ter across the giraffe's knees or
makes the monkey ear a ball.
That's a par the hard way.
The winner who did not know
the bogey from a boogie usually
wears the warm beer on the walk
home.
Things get real fun whenever
there's water involved "Looks
like you could use about a nine-
iron and an oxygen tank in that
cement pond some wiseacre
will say � or six guys who
couldn't get dates to their high
school prom and are spending the
evening smacking a ball around
the course pretending it is the girl
who said, "Who? You&
Yech-o
Of course, it's all in great fun.
Even if the match disintegrates
into something of a hockey game
and the course manager requests
that you quit hitting other paying
customers with slap shots.
However, just once it would be
nice to reach deep down into the
bottomless 18th hole, grab the
startled manager by the shirt and
make him give you the ball back.
That would be the ultimate free
game.
�? U1C ever ear ana an annual national there's water involved "Looks game
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0 - �r r
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HI
I HI EAS1 CAROLINIAN
111 2, IV8f
Carrow Says 'Games Exceed Expectations9
Continued from page 8
Physical Fitness and Health
Since we are hosting the Olympic
Festival next year, though, we
have to be aware of stretching
ourselves too thin
Carrow said he was especially
pleased with the first version of
the State Games, which attracted
more than 3,000 athletes and
1,100 volunteers.
"1 think it exceeded all expec-
tations from the packed house at
Friday's opening ceremorues to
the final event on Sunday Car-
tow said "At 9:30 Sunday night
in the final inning of the final
game of the softball tournament,
one team scored five runs to win.
The State Games were exciting
from beginning to end
Carrow said that while the
State Games provided a trial run
for some aspects of the U.S.
Olympic Festival, others just
couldn't be compared.
"The one thing we learned that
we can use in the Festival is
documenting everything Car-
row said. "There are so main
workers and volunteers, so main
hands involved, that you have to
document everything as far as
procedures 1 think that can be
done better
But there are the phases of the
state competition that can't
equate to an Olympic Festival, he
said.
"In terms oi the festival, we
can plan more because we know
who's coming way ahead ol
time he said. "But it still
doesn't guarantee anything
because it's such a huge event.
We had 10,000 attendance in the
State Games whereas we are ex-
pecting 300,000 next year. That
alone will wake you up
( arrow also noted
State Gau ra
ding performances, including
national record in the Ma
swimming competitioi
three contestants in the
competition will be in this year's
Festival in Houston.
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FOR SALE
r ed oox spr
'aiooPoards.
great conp
" Mattress can
s desired
i "52 1137 (ASK
FOR SALE ! true you can buy
Jeeps for S.44 "rougn the U S
Government? Get the facts today1
Call 1 312 742 1142 Ex' 5271 A.
RINGOLD TOWERS: Most conve
nient cat - fc campus! Fully fur
" shea condos .except linens)
Dr cec from $30 s S50 s Some owner
nancing aaabie University
Realty 355 5866
FG " RENT Three room apt near
cam, s. stove retr g, screened
porch Itilities fern,shed Mature
s'jden or m arred coupie
Available 'Ow - $250 Depovte req .
752 5778
WANTED
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Need
female roommate inon smoker) to
share a completely furnished
3 bedroom townhouse Share
ties Has washer dryer and
pool CaH 752 5929 or 1 346 6916
ROOMMATE WANTED: Male
roommate to share aptm starting
Aug 21. upperciassman or grad stu
dent, $140 month ncludes rent,
utilities, phone, parking 5min walk
from campus, no drinking or smok
mg, cai1 758 6262 3 30 5 30 p m
BABYSITTERS Baoys tters need
ed at various t-mes for two children
Exp- '�nee and own transportation
re- 56 2684
ROOMMATE: Roommate to share 2
bedroom apartment Large private
room, AC , cable, bus service
$150 month plus utilities. July 3 �
on Phone 752 7651















4-


















DO YOU WANT TO WORK
Immediate Job
Openings
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?raining for typists
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Full and Part time temporary
work - Perfect for students
KELLY
SERVICES
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204 E Arlington Blvd.
Arlington Centre Office Complex
Greenville. NC 27834
355-750
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describe
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Sliced FREE
WHOLE TENDERLOIN
398.
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Half Gallon
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1 �129
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i PEACHES
Lbs.
Pepsi
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2 Liter - Diet Pepsi. Pepsi-Free.
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Carlo
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1.5 Liter � Chablis. Rhine. Rose. Pink Chablis.
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$1029
Pkg. of 24 12 Oz. Cans Reg. & Lt
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EXTRA LOW PRICES
JFG
Mavonnaise
EVERDAY
32 Ounce
Food Lion - 8 Oz. RipplePlain
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$159
Del Monte
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79'
32 Ounce
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Food Lion wishes you and your family a safe and happy July 4th holiday.


















































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WWT�WWWWWW:
IJ I
I





Title
The East Carolinian, July 2, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 02, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.482
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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