The East Carolinian, June 18, 1986






(She
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 Norf�x
Wednesday, June 18, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 5,000
School Of Education
Expands Department
Wr -vt
School Of Education
El LEN MURPHfY � Buccaneer
ECU's School of Education has been reorganized and expanded. Administrators hope to make ECU
the leading center for teacher education. See the related story on page 1 for further details.
Oral History Adds Heritage
To Costa Rican Children
By VIRGINA LIVINGSTON
Staff Writer
Paula Palmer, after spending a
decade collecting oral histories,
said she was surprised at the reac-
tion of the children involved in
the study.
"What surprised me most was
that the children said they en-
joyed the chance to get to know
their grandparents and the older
people of the community said
Palmer.
Palmer was the featured
speaker at the workshop on "The
Use of Oral History to Promote
Ethnic Identity in School and
Community Settings" that was
held Monday at the Willis
Building.
Holly Matthews of the
sociology department said
Palmer's work in the Talamanca
region came from her work as a
Peace Corp worker in community
development. She found the in-
habitants of Talamanca, Bri-Bn
Indians and the decendents of
Carribean Blacks who had come
to work on railroad construction,
to be a group of people with a
rich and fully developed culture.
Palmer also found these people
were facing cultural extinction.
Because of dense jungle, the
people of Talamanca were never
integrated with the rest of Costa
Rica and were left to develop on
their own. Then in the 1960's the
Costa Rican government saw
Talamanca as a region for poten-
tial growth in the tourist and
lumber industry. The Costa
Rican government did away with
the schools and clinics started by
the Talamancans and replaced
those centers with government
centers staffed by Spanish speak-
ing Costa Ricans.
When Palmer arrived in 1974
she found the Talamancan
children were losing sight of their
heritage and sought a way to
reverse this process.
She began a classroom project
where students interviewed the
elders of the community and
recorded the different folktales,
histories, and legends that these
people knew. The result was
What Happen: A Folk History of
the Talamanca Coast.
The response this book
generated was unexpected. The
Talamancans were proud of this
history and cultural cohesion
resulted. Committees were form-
ed to deal with economic
development and cultural
developments.
The Costa Rican government
started sponsoring the project
and used material from the stu-
dent's research to publish
Nuestra Talamanca Ayer Ymoy a
magazine used as a textbook in
Costa Rican classrooms.
The sponsors of the workshop
hope that similar techniques
could be applied in area schools.
Matthews sees such a project as
a tool to motivate minority-
students to explore their own
histories.
KC'l News Bureau
An administrative reorganiza-
tion of the School of Education
at ECU, designed to streamline
its management and increase effi-
ciency, has been approved and
placed in effect.
Two major divisions � cur-
riculum and instruction and a
division of services � have been
created and a new degree pro-
gram added. Recommended by
an eight-member planning com-
mittee appointed last August, the
changes followed discussions
with the entire School of Educa-
tion faculty, ECU administrators
and the university's Long Range
Planning Commission.
Angelo A. Volpe, vice
chancellor for Acadmic Affairs,
said the goal is greater excellence
in teacher preparation.
"The preparation of teachers.
administrators and other school
personnel is now and always has
been a major concern for East
Carolina University Volpe
said. "It is vitally important for
eastern North Carolina and
beyond that our program be the
very best anywhere
Charles R. Coble, dean of the
School of Education, said the
reorganization is part of a com-
mitment to make it "the top
school of education anywhere.
"I truly believe that we have
the best opportunitv to rebuild all
of our programs based on the
new research base for teacher
education Coble said. "This
ambitious goal is achievable
because of the climate for change
in the school, and the suport for
change by the administration and
the larger community
Details of the reorganization
include:
� In the Division of Services will
be: Student Teaching and Field
Experiences, Field Services,
Wahl-Coates School Liaison, the
Rural Education Institute and
Grants Research Specialist.
In the Division of Curriculum
and Instruction will be: Depart-
ment of Special Education,
Department of Counselor Educa-
tion, Department of Educational
Administration and Supervision
and two additional re-named
departments. Elementary and
Middle Grades and the Depart-
ment of Foundations, Research
and Media.
The divisions will be headed by
directors selected from the facul-
ty. Coble announced that Betty
Levey will serve as director of the
Division of Services and William
C. Sanderson will serve in an ad-
ministrative position as director
of the Division of Curriculum
and Instruction and Assistant
Dean.
Thomas Chambliss, who has
served as assistant dean and
director of Student Teaching, will
become acting chair of the
Department of Foundations,
Research and Media, Coble said.
Other assignments of leader-
ship and management respon-
sibilities under the reorganization
include:
Marjortc Calhoun as coor-
dinator of Student Teaching and
Field Experience.
Parmalee Hawk as coordinator
of field services.
Helen Logan to continue to
serve as Wahl-Coates School
Liaison.
Christine Fitch to continue to
serve as GrantsResearch
specialist.
John Richards to continue to
serve as chair of the Department
of Special Education.
Florence Weaver to continue to
serve as chair of the Department
of Counselor Education.
Vila Rosenfeld to serve as
coordinator of secondary educa-
tion in the Department of Foun-
dations, Research and Media.
Patricia Terrell to continue to
serve as acting chair of the
Department of Elementary and
Middle Grades Education. The
faculty will vote in August for a
department chair.
Wilton Joyner to continue to
serve as acting chair of the
Department of Administration
and Supervision.
The new degree program,
transferred to education from the
School of Home Economics, will
be part of the responsioilities of
the coordinator of Secondary
Education. The REAP program
will continue to be in the Depart-
ment of Special Education.
A search will begin to fill the
position created by the resigna-
tion of Roy Forbes as director of
the Rural Education Institute and
Coble said an acting chairperson
will be appointed for the Depart-
ment of Educational Administra-
tion and Supervision, a posi
formerly held by Sanderson.
See CURRICULUM Page 2.
Medical Programs Pass Screening
By RUSTY HARRINGTON
Staff Writer
ECU's Medical School has had
their Continuing Medical Educa-
tion programs re-accredited by
the Accreditation Council for
Continuing Medical Education
for a six-year period.
According to Edwin Monroe,
senior associated dean and direc-
tor of continuing medical educa-
tion, the re-accreditation means
the programs have met the stan-
dards of the national CME ac-
creditation body, as well as give
recognition to the program itself.
The CME program provided
about 600 courses and was at-
tended by about 10,000 health
care professionals in 1985-86.
The community based program
sponsors continuing education
programs, as well as joint ac-
tivities with the ECU school of
medicine.
According to Monroe, the ac-
creditation process involves
evaluations based on standards
adopted by the American
Medical Association, the
American Hospital Association,
and other medical societies and
organizations which sponsor the
Accreditation Council.
New Center Offers Supervised Health Care For Elderly
By PATRICK O'NEIL
Staff Writer
A new program offering a
supervised health-oriented day
care environment for adults
opened in Greenville last week.
The Creative Living Center of-
fers care to middle aged and
elderly adults who require limited
New Food
medical support each day. The
participants include stoke vic-
tims, individuals with functional
deficiencies caused by old age
and adults who require daily
medical attention.
The concept of adult day care
originated in the 1950's but did
not effectively catch on until the
1960's. Connie Kuenzi, the direc-
tor of the Creative Living Center
cited funding as the reason for a
slow beginning.
Pitt County offers some sup-
port for the program as well as
Medicaid and some insurance
program.
Once in the program, the par-
ticipant undergoes an assessment
of capabilities and a goal is
established which is reached
through activities planned
especially for the individual.
The program offers par-
ticipants a sense of community by
interacting with members of their
own peer group, and new
methods of completing daily ac-
tivities. It also helps to restore
much of the participants self
esteem.
Families of participants also
benefit from the program, allow-
ing them to spend more time pur-
suing their interests and giving
them more time to spend with
other family members.
The program also offers
something for students at ECU.
The Center will serve as a place-
ment tor students in the
Cooperative Education program
whose field of study is geron-
tology.
Currently, the facilites for the
Center are provided bv St. James
United Methodist Church. In two
to three years, the Center hopes
to rehabilitate or build new
See SUPPORT Page 2.
Canteen Gets Contract
By MIKE LUDWICK
News Editor
Service America, otherwise
known as Servomation, will no
longer serve ECU after August 1.
Servomation lost the food ser-
vice contract bid to Canteen.
An ad-hoc committee set-up by
Elmer Meyer, vice chancellor for
student affairs chose Canteen
over 12 other companies who of-
fered bids.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds10
Editorials4
Features6
Sports8
As a vessel is known by the
sound, whether it be cracked
or not, so men are proved, by
their speeches, whether they be
wise or foolish.
�Demosthenes
Rudolph Alexander, dean of
University unions said the com-
mittee, composed of represen-
tatives from campus, chose
Canteen because of the quality of
food they would offer, prices,
returns to the university, and
potential for expansion. Among
the criteria used to evaluate pro-
posals were the types of food, it's
presentation, number of entrees,
and grades of food.
Assistant to the vice-chancellor
Rob Warren said Canteen has
proposed changes for the Galley
and the Snack Bar in
Mendenhall.
Warren stressed that any pro-
posed change would have to be
approved by the university.
Canteen proposes to change
the decor in the Galley and ex-
pand the menu by offering pizza.
Also, Canteen hopes to add a
fresh baked goods counter and an
international coffee area in
Mendenhall's Snack Bar.
"I think most of the changes
look pretty good to the commit-
tee as a whole said Warren.
"The committee didn't want to
limit the Galley's menu or just
make it a pizza parlor he add-
ed. Warren said the changes look
good, because they are
enhancements.
"All these things are fine
said Alexander, "We have to see
how the students like them
Alexander said there always
needs to be some variety in opera-
tions and services � "to never
stand pat
The returns from the food ser-
vice operations are used for
facilities expansion, said Warren.
Warren said the monies ac-
cumulated over the past few years
will go toward Mendenhall's ex-
pansion.
The contract lasts for an initial
period of three years with an op-
tion for two 1-year extensions.
Freshman Orientation
� LLBK MURPHIY - ������?,
These soon to be first semester freshmen take time out to scan the ECU Transit System. Freshman
orientation began this week.
m
4 � 4
� ��-�.��4 - � - -
'
ih
A





Ill 1 S c AROl INI
Jl SI IS, ls8ri
Announcements
NASA Cited By Pilot's Wife
BIBLE TALK
EMPLOYMENT
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
EATING DISORDERS
� � �
-
N 7t34 � � j
EP'SCOPAL CAMPUS
MINISTRY
' �- il
Mr P(r
' HuuSf .�. inviting Ah
guests for a Happy Birth
f at 9 X) f, 10 Rt,



.4 nnouncements
Former Governors FavorPlant
N
noi s have come
v ,
Ha (a
i
- w ipapei

1
New
day.
Curriculum, Instruction
In Program Revamped
tinued F rum Pa


es.
T'iJxi
ACKPACICS. TCMT5. COTS. SHOVtLS. HAMl
MBS WTV. CANTONS. FATNaUf&V
. RAMWCAIt. T-SHIRTS. ENAMELWA
. WORK CLOTHES. 2100 OFFEMNT ITEMS.
ARMY-NAVY STOftI
1S01S.EVOM J
i
ONSOLIDATED
"HEATRES
Adults s2oc
5:30 I ANYTIME
�wmj?
MVJI�
756-3307 �Greenville Square Shopping Center
"gffin Manhattan
J
r-
Raw
Deal
Project
,
Robert Rt
Shurt C ircuit

f
Legal
Eagles pg
S$U Space Camp !
WAKE UP ECU

It's
Virginia Crabtree's
SUNRISE SALE
SATURDAY JUNE 21st AT
8:00 AM
F
VIRGINIA
C
aJttee
Carolina East Mall
Greenville, NC
756-9955
We will close at 7:00 PM Friday to prepare
for this great event
evacuation plan in the event of a
�ear accideni.
But the former governors' let-
ter contendsarea residents' safety
been considered b federal
ensing agents.
"Clearly nucleai plants musi
have adequate evacuation plans
case ol accidents 01 disasters.
I he plan tot the Mains plant
been developed b professionals
government who are trained
equipped to respond to
emergencies the letter sa
tate mus! contit en-
sure plans are adequate
and work with local governments
i end
1 a; night e Hillsl
Boat rown Commissioners
' the )v incil,
� apel Hill
I
nmissionei s in passing resolu-
tga
Ol unanimou 'ted

vers
i . . I to a
��
See M CLEAR Page 5.
HOUSTON (UPI) - The wife
of the space shuttle Challenger's
pilot today criticized NASA for
showing "shockingly sparse con-
cern for human life" in ignoring
warnings against launching the
doomed orbiter.
In a statement issued from the
home oi relatives in Charlotte,
N.C Jane Jarrell Smith, wife of
pilot Michael Smith, said she
avoided reaching any conclusions
aboul the Jan. 28 tragedy until
the completion ol the Rogers
Commission investigation of the
incident.
Smith said the commission
report, released June 9, "ap-
peared to be thorough and ac-
curate Her statement was the
first public comment about the
commission report by any-
relative of the seven crew
members killed when Challenger
exploded.
The report stemmed from a
four-month probe of the disaster
commissioned by President
Reagan and headed by William
P. Rogers, former secretary of
state and attorney general.
The report reflects incredibly
terrible judgements, shockingly
parse oncem tot human life, in-
stances ol officials lacking the
courage to exercise the respon-
sibilities of their high office and
ne very bewildering 'bought
processes she said
"We hope that from this
� edy we have learned above all
to hold ince to
sacredness an life, to have
the .outage to place safety first,
and : it those who have die
ruth
ssed her statement
was issued "only on behall ol my
family" and "after very much
June Set bee, wife
lengei ommandei 1 ranees
). - Scobee, said Smith's
group's
consensus Scobee, who has
acted as spokeswoman for the
crewmembers' families, has
declined comment on the com-
mission report.
In praising those with "the
courage to place safety first
Smith told The Washington Post
she was referring specifically to
Allan McDonald and Roger Bois
joly, Morton Thiokol Inc
engineers who argued against lit
toff in a launch eve conference,
out of concern the low
temperatures at the launch site
could cause the booster joint to
fail.
Smith also told United Press
International her husband would
have placed safety first in
deciding whether to launch the
shuttle.
"I think he would have been
very much for safety she said
"Being a test pilot, having been a
test pilot instructor, having been
with airplanesI think he would
have encouraged safety "
Patrick Smith, a brother ol
Michael Smith, said those who
failed to heed shuttle saletv warn-
ings "will suffer for the rest ot
their lives in their own minds
" I hey had no backbones
Smith told the Houston I
cle from Beaufort, V( "The)
all ougi. be made
sheepherders somewhere.
"I'm very disappointed in
NASA, as I'm sure Mike would
have been I oi an agency thai
always preached safety firs'
obviously wasn't a prime eon
sideration on Jan. 28 "
I he Rogers Commission repori
concluded the Challenger's s
rocket boostei joint tailed, per
mitting hot gases to escape and
bathe the shuttle's external I
atastropl
rhe report further concluded
that failed booster joint
poorly designed and that offic
at the National Aeronaut.
Space Administration and at
Morton rhiokol, the b
builder, ignored eight years
warnings about it.
Support Provided By
Adult Day Care Center
Continued From Page I.
facilities.
I his (enter will serve
�pe for future centers,
Kuenzi. She said !i;ev hope '
eventually open another centei
Ayden Griftoi Farmville
area.
Theenter's il des a
nurse, an occupational era;
a social worker, and
leaders All interac
pants daily No pi
tfl i
Howeve
Waltei l P
.� 1I
Medicine
14. He
H
CO KROCERINC FOR ALL YOUR
Tailgate Party
Needs!
SIP
y�
loOOjooci' �
IX I A ii i i
Gal
Ctn
KROGER CHILLED
Orange
Juice
99
i l i i i i I l i I i I : I i
' I11XXXXXX
i x� x x x i O Vi
UUIIIIIlIliI
ESRS
xW.YA
W.V,Y,
� t�l. od �
VnJ fresh fried daily
12-Pc. Wishbone
Fried Chicken
$
Pc
599
1 � 11111 11 1 1 I
I I I 11 I I I I I I I I
1 I 11111(11 I �.
OOOOOOOOuo
I I I I I I I !
I I I 1 I I I 1 I I I
1 I � I I 1 I I I I
rVx x.j 11111
000000a u
11111111 11
111 I I 1 I I 11
UOCx l 1 1 1 1 1
CXX1�1 � � � t
1 I I I 1 1 I I I
OoO x� 1' 11
X X � I I ! I
� (' 11 11111
mm
1 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 t,
, 1 I I I I I 1 I I I ! 1
� I I I I I I I I I 1 I I
v3.iYiY
it F 1 1 1 �
� 11' � -1151111111r.
. I I I 11 � ,V.II
� � 11111111
� ' ' ' " XJf J '
T I I 1 I
m
, �� 1 OOOOOOO
, 1 1 1 1 i 1 i 1 1 1
A'vW ���� �
1 11 1
I 1 I 1 I ! I I I
; i I i i : 1 i 1 i
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 �
l 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1
- Y'iWiW
.WWW
iYiYAYM
Mm
X l0 I X X
' � U I I I! )
xxii o ��
II11 11
I I I 1 ' I �
NRB
DIET COKE CHERRY COKE
CAFFEINE FREE COKE OR
Coke
Classic
89
CAROLINA PRIDF
HOT OR MILD
Pork
Sausage
PKC
89�
KROGER r
Lowfat
Milk . .
CREAMY
Gal
Jug
$-49
Mrs. Filberts
Mayonnaise .
Ql
79
4-6 LB AVG WGT
PICNIC STYLE
Fresh
Pork Roast
Lb
58
FIRST OF THE SEASON
California
Cantaloupe
O
IN OIL OR WATER
Chicken of The
Sea Tuna
Ea
79
6 S
O
C�n
35
Video Movie Rentals
991
Hundfd ot favorite movies
to choose from!
KROGER
V Multigrain
�� Bread
mm s kW 5
ASSORTED FLAVORS
ALL NATURAL
Breyer's
Ice Cream
ADVERTISED ITEM POllCY
Eacn of thesp aavertiseo
items n required to De
readily avaliaOle for sale in
eacn Kroger Savon enceot
as specifically noted in tnis
ad if v�e do run out of an
item we will offer you your
choice of i comparable
item when available
reflecting the same say
mgs or a rainchec� which
win entitle you to pur
chase the advertised item
at the advertised once
within 50 days Only one
vendor coupon win be ac
ceoted per Item

Go Krogering
160c
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
Greenville Blvd Creenvi
N.C
Funds
h ii

I he Chamber otommerce
Heminu, familv in !
in Is
Od
You Couli
Call.it If a v 4 1
Check
Out
The
Library
10
OFF
Ne
SPEC!
MARYLAN
CORN BE
10
OFF
Tas
subs
ch 1 1
1






If T� o
s Wife
. safet warn-
e resi oi
minds
backbones
! � ston Chroni-
N "The
b made
ed in
M ke would it
i i on-
report
� vlid
er-
md

ei concluded
als
md
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 18, !986
"ovided By
Care Center
Coke
Classic
89
i i r ! i i i t
. I I � I � I I I I I I
I 1 I 1 1 1 I I 1 I1
� 1 I 1 I
� 1 I I I 1 I I I I
, i . i r
i � i i i ' i i i i r
� ' i i i i l
i i i I i i i i i
V.VAVY
ii OOOOOOOoO
t i r i i i �
I 11 I
i l I I : I I 1
i ! i I r i i i
i i i � s r i j )
I I i t I
i�111 OjOC
r i i i
Filberts
tyonnaise .
79c
"1
Multigrain
Bread
99
RAl
Breyer's
Ice Cream
)uancHv Slants ��'v�3
" To 0�iars
on
�f
N.C. Arts Council
Funds Summer Shows
B 111 1 MORGANwhicl become available duringproduction entitled Ladies in
Matt Writertwo granting periods each year. 1 he General ssembly ap-Retirement starring four time Emmy Award winner Michael
1 (U's Si i heateihaspropriates the money thai is givenI earned of The Waltons.
�24 - fromthethe North Carolina Arts Coun-Also starring this season will be
V S th( .In turn, the council ap-Jerry Ver Dorn known as Ross
rantppriates the monej to variousMarler on the continuing CBS
!salariesandgroups throughout the state.soap-opera The Guiding Light.
1 'iperating suppoiScott Pat kei. general maiFrank Runyeon (Steve An-
.21the Summei Theater, and adropoulous) from As The World
;s these-professor here at ECU said. " TheI urns, and Father Mulcahy from
evei tobemt indica i i eesM��S�H William
i, , 1 t V .his yearthethe value oi what we're doing,Christopher will also appear in
iea ei w.in grai: of course we are delighted bc ireenville this summer.
1 $20 0 brineai v"We are bringing in these well
v 4 �"his EC! s doingknown actors not only foi
�ifesmonetary purposes said
sional e is do-Parker, rhese people are ex-
1�) talented performers who
r d Uwill improve the quality ot our
!�productions. 1 he work tins sum-
L t �e c;jly 7 with amer will be superb.
Greenville's Chamber Of Commerce
JIM LEU TO ENS
Th E all Carolinian
I he Chamber Of C ommerce's historic homt is located on 5th Street. The structure was built b the
Heming family in 1901 and has 11 foot ceiling as well as the original stained glass windows installed
in IsHH.
Open Space
You Could Be A dvertising Here I
Call 757-6366 For More Information
f
K
1
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
I
i
I
I
i
I
I
1
I
I
I
I
I
l
I
Hanks Homemade Ice Cream
321 East 10th Street
Call: 758-4896
Tim Coupon Good for
50 OFF
Any Blend-in or Blend-in Sundae
t coupon per order please
. . thru 1 mdi June P I9W
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
321 East 10th Street
Call: 758-4896
This Coupon Good fo�-
50 OFF
any mini or large tundae
1 coupon per order pleaae
. � thru Tuesday lunc 24. IV80
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
10
OFF
CLIP COUPON
See-ge's
10
OFF
New To The Area
SPECIAL SANDWICHES
MARYLAND CRAB PHILLEY STEAK
CORN BEEF 6 oz HAMBURGER
10
OFF
Taste the difference in our cold cut
subs � 16 slices of meat & 4 slices of
cheese. We also have pizzas with a
northern flavor
CLIP COUPON
10
OFF
New Philippine Government
Begins Suit Against Marcos
LOS ANGELES (UPI) � A
federal judge has frozen nearly
S12 million in property belonging
to ousted Philippine President
Ferdinand Marcos until a lawsuit
accusing him of bilking his coun-
try of $1.55 billion can be tried.
The restraining order was the
first legal step in a $54.6 billion
racketeering lawsuit filed Mon-
day by the government of Presi-
dent Corazon Aquino against the
deposed Philippine leader.
The new government is also
trying to seize properties in New
York and Texas that may be own-
ed by Marcos.
Lawyers for Aquino's govern-
ment requested the court order to
stop Marcos from disposing of or
hiding the assets heiore a trial on
the lawsuit, which accuses Mar-
cos o looting his country oi
Si.55 billion during his 20-year
rule.
Monday's order covers a $4
million home in Beverly Hills,
$797,000 in currenc) in a bank
account under the name ol
former first Lady Imelda Mar-
cos, and jewelry worth an
estimated $7 million that the
Mar coses carried with them after
they fled the Philippines on Feb.
25 into exile in Hawaii.
U.S. District Judge Mariana
Pfaelzer excluded from her order
millions in dollars in cash and
bonds that the Marcoses brought
to Hawaii. Marcos sued the
Customs Service after that pro-
perty was impounded, and a
federal judge in Hawaii ruled he
was entitled to get the assets
back.
Pfaeler scheduled a June 25
hearing on whether to issue a
preliminary injunction to keep
the assets inaccessible pending a
trial.
suii accuses Marcos, his
ife and several aides with
racketeering under the wide rang-
ing federal Racketeer Influenced
and Corrupt Organizations Act,
which allows plaintiffs t recovei
to triple the amount allegedly
stolen, or $4.6 billion in this case.
It also seeks $50 billion in
punitive damages.
"If there was ever an enterprise
perpetuated through gangsterism
and racketeeringthis is it said
Richard Kendall, a lawyer for the
Aquino government.
He said the home in Beverly
Hills was transferred between
"shell corporations" secretly
controlled by Marcos to hide the
property.
John Bartko, a lawyer for
Marcos, said Pfaelzer had no
jurisdiction to hear the suit and
accused the Aquino government
of "trying in our courts whether
the former president of the
Philippines acted properly during
his presidency
Arguing for the emergency
restraining order, Kendall ex-
pressed concern that, pending a
Customs Service appeal, Marcos
could soon have control ol the
jewelry and other assets
pounded when he arrived ii
Hawaii.
Pfaelzer agreed to include the
jewelry in her order, but let1
the cash and bonds be.ause thev
already are being sough: ii
previous suits filed in Hawaii b
the Philippines National Bank.
A federal judge in Manhattar.
also has barred the sale of five
buildings, including a la
estate on Long Island, allegedlv
owned by Marcos and his wife
pending a trial.
, � � � � � � � � � I �Jil'l � l�:i � ������
IREEDS
14K
Gold
Chains
and
Bracelets

off
ii�ii�n�iiiiiiii�ii�ii�!i; � � � � � �)� �n�n�n�nii�'ioii�ni:
Carolina East Mall
10:00 to 9:00 MonSat.
ATTnTJ
752- JUNE
7303
18 WED
WRA THCHILD
19 THUR
�� at . . - �
20 FRI �21 SAT
Nightwatch
J. t$t v t
22 SUN
Grateful Dead
The Band video
24 TUES
Lahn and L of tin
Every Thursday Night Is
TACO NIGHT
Two Great Tacos for only.99
60 oz. Pitchers SI.99
Offer Good From 7p.mJ p.m. � Not Valid on Deliveries
Even Tuesday Night Is
COLLEGE NIGHT
Free Delivery for $5.00 & Over Purchases
7 p.m. to 11 p.m.
99C SUBS
YOUR CHOICE
Ham & Cheese Bologna & Cheese
Ham, Salami & Cheese Pepperoni, Salami & Cheese
Turkey & Cheese Ham, Turkey & Cheese
NOT VALID ON DELIVERIES
60 oz. pitchers SI. 99
includes tax
ALL DAY FRIDAY
32 oz. Bucket of Your Favorite Draft
99C
215 E. Fourth Street
752-2183
Presents
Draft Nite
Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, June 16, 18, 19, 23, 1986
Admission $1.50 Guys $1.00 Ladies $1.00 Orientation Students
Doors Open at 9:00 p.m till 2:00 a.m.
1K DRAFT
ALL NITE
.
� a? 4 0 ?
al � � � 4 4 �
Jt j � a
,
i





�iu �aBt (Euvalinmn
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender, om ���,
Daniel Maurer. �����
Mike Ludwick. ,��
S on Cooper, �
John Shannon, �.�
DECHANU l Johnson, 4,
STEVE FOLMAR, Otnctoro) AJvenmng
Anthony Martin, ���� . � Mmm
MEG NEEDHAM, ilnulm�m Vanae,
Shannon Short, product,� ,
mjSmilDTHISnASRAM
pPTMTH SAMH WPHAGAR
AC0B 566PT 0W7H 66AH ANP
Mffl�L,ut6AM SLEPT Wm,�
June 18, IsiSs
Opinion
Page 4
Tax-Reform
Saying No To IRA Deductions
n t o� Rr;
Senators Alfonse D'Amato of
New York, Alan Cranston of
California, Chris Dodd of Connec-
ticut, and Frank Murkowski of
Alaska are leading the charge to
restore the IRA deduction to the
tax-reform bill.
To pay for this ten-billion-dollar-
a-year item, they want to "tem-
porarily" suspend tax indexing. It
would be hard to think of a more
insidiously regressive trade-oft.
Although millions of people have
IRAs, the benefits are heavily skew-
ed. High-income people are more
likely to have IRAs, contribute
larger amounts, and � since
they're in a higher bracket � save
more in taxes for each dollar they
deduct.
Indexing also benefits everyone,
but the overwhelming benefits goes'
to low-income people. The stan-
dard deduction and exemption play
a much larger proportional role in
determining their tax burden than
the tax burden of those who are
better-off. To let inflation erode the
value of these deductions in order
to finance IRA deductions is the
height of unfairness.
Reagan's SALT II Policy Positive
eV3BMt;fl�rfttnc ovrrm?f&irn��r &JV-
50RRV ROWVE
Bur top you
tIKE A WQ OF
m Mem msR
S1AR TE666RAPH
PD5TAM0WAN
66086 0BS6RV5R
times wwm
S5NTIM61 ?
BEMGPAUIVOICKER
S0M6TWeSI 60 (MTO
APKPPgRReSSOAI.
TWEN m W0RIP5
TEMPERATURE RI&S
WWPOLMM
4
while pollution
&JT100KAT
M BRI6HT
S!P��,

iruAaaEN
0UTIFW6WMJ
AAlUOeAR
�So5335CrS
Mr. Reagan's anouncement thai we do not intend to feel
bound by SALT II unless the Soviet Union shapes up on the
matter of compliance was a wonderful tonic not alone
because o' the effect on the Kremlin, which is apopleuu a
this official public acknowledgment of its cheating.
The other effect the announcement has had is to flush out
full statements of the superstitions we live h, or at lea
that Americans live by who earnestly believe the way to
On The Right
B WILLIAM F. BKKIKV JR.
SS-18; new SS-24s
prevail in the struggle for the world is have three disarma-
ment treaties per year with the Soviet Union
These notoriously result in nothing. We may as well re-
enact the Kellogg-Bnand Pact. Remember'7 That was the one
in the late '20s in which all the signatories forswore war as an
instrument o policy. It was the black mass that preceded
World War 11.
Sen. Albert Core Jr. o Tennessee has taken front and
.enter in the controversy and gives, in a prominentlv featured
op-ed piece in the New York limes, five reasons why what
Mr. Reagan did was not only wrong, but so wrong that
history will record it as his greatest error.
Don't you see. Mr. Gore writes, the Soviet I nion has a
"hot" production line for the production o intercontinental
ballistic missiles, "and can quickly expand the number o
warheads on its already deployed SS-18 heavy mi,Mies. Bv
contrast, we have one 'lukewarm' production line and no real
abilitv to quickly increase the number o warheads we have
deployed
But surely this is beside the point at this juncture We have
heard it said now for almost fj vears that we are talking
about redundancy, that we have enough inventory to destrov
the Soviet Union 10 times (or whatever) and that the Soviets
have complementary inventory. So that if thev increase it,
why should this worry us?
Already the Soviet Union has what it needs to destroy our
land-based missiles, so that in any event we are depending on
the other two legs ot our triad: the bombers and the sub-
marines. Unless the Soviet Union figures out a wav to develop
a missile that will find our bombers in the air and our sub-
marines in the ocean, it will not seriously alter the balance bv
increasing its invei
SS-25s.
'he extent 'ha: ii is a contest in technology, we are di-
mmed, with or without SAl ! II, to pursue The deveiopn
� a Stealth bomber, and it we think we can have time enou
to launch an MX, then we should get on with its deployme
And we are always tree, even under SAl I ii. to devel
mobile missile. So what afraid of?
Well, he has other points. He say i 1 ALT II,
Russians would have to dismantle and dt "fai rr
launchers than we will in the next several vears" Right. �
that is merely a subtraction from redundancv. isn't n? In
pas- 10 sears or so. �� e s, ,ei � . ,n lias increased it's inve
tory bv approximately 8,000 warheads and we have rec
ours b about 8,000. So that it such a polarization was volun-
tarily countenanced, what harm can come - � n increase i
provided the United States stavs above the thresh,
necessary to assure deterrence
What about the point that the Soviel Union,
totalitarian state, can crank up the assembly line :
we can. hampered as we are by democratic misgiving
economics enforced bv Gramm-Rudman? Again, we w
assured we do noi need more of what is assembly line
What is not vet on the assembly line is theSDI,
space shield; and the American people h . j save
� uled out its developme
Bu: the senator's most vulnerable is his suggestion
that our own misbehavior contributes to Russian obstinacy.
"President Reagan has called into que ABM treaty
with what many believe is a preposterous reinterpretation of
one ol its important provisions governing new and exotic
defensive systen
There is a subtle point here, though it works against the
senator's thesis. It is true that the interpi ABM
treaty we recently played with � that it does not govern Star
Wars, because Star Wars technology was not among the
technologies the development of which is p he
ABM treaty � sounds shifty, a little eristic, t use c lui
Meg Greenfield's favortie word. But that is a reason I
scrapping 'lie ABM treatv. which has been an anachronis
tor years. It Mr. Reagan will go tuli circle and renounce
tangle ot cobwebs, then we can have a full holiday. V
stands, we should declare a half-holiday.
Populism: Straddling The Fence
By ROBKRTKITTNKR
lh Sro KipuMi,
The vogue of populism, that
peculiarly American blend of the con-
servative and the radical, continues to
grow. Republican conservative con-
gressmen Jack Kemp, Newt Gingrich,
and Vin Weber, among others, think
they have a formula for a right-wing
populism, called the Conservative Op-
portunity Society.
Twenty-eight Democratic members
of Congress, who are unashamed to
run and win as economic progressives,
have formed a left-wing Populist
Caucus. The parties are outdoing each
other to champion that stunningly
populist cause, tax reform.
Is populism fundamentally liberal or
conservative? The question was
debated recently at a one-day con-
ference sponsored by the New Populist
forum, a nonprofit offshoot of the
Populist Causus. As political analyst
William Schneider and conservative
strategist Kevin Phillips agreed,
populism is "ideologically
ambiguous anti-elitist, economically
left-wing, and socially right-wing.
William Jennings Bryan, who began
his long career as an economic radical
and ended it defending religious fun-
damentalism, was the quintessential
populist. As a political tendency,
populism comes to the fore whenever
large regions or sectors of the economy-
find themselves left out of a generaliz-
ed prosperity and unable to cope with
larger economic forces. Today that
might describe farmers, industrial
workers, miners, working mothers,
small fry in the energy industry, and
much of the Midwest and Southwest
generally. No wonder populism is mak-
ing a comeback.
Politically, though the Democrats
seemingly have the more natural claim
to populism, neither party really own
it. Neither is consistently economically
radical and socially conservative.
When Democrats emphasize their
economic populism, culturally conser-
vative small-town or urban Catholic
voters are willing to forgive
Democrats' more liberal social views,
and vote for the Democrats on
economic grounds.
Conversely, when Republicans com-
bine their usual cultural conservatism
with some sensitivity to the economic-
needs of the common citizen, they can
win the allegiance o the non-rich,
despite their upper-class hard core.
Seen through this lens, the political
turmoil o' the past two decades
becomes easier to interpret. In the
1970s, according to Wiliam Schneider,
the Democrats stiayed from their
bread-and-butter economic populism
and embraced both statism and the ex-
perimental cultural values of the
wayward upper class � both fatally-
alienating to populist voters.
The federal government, which in
the 1930s was a vehicle of anti-
establishment empowerment, had
become the quintessential establisment
institution. The Republicans mean-
while managed to contrive both an er-
satz economic populism (an economic
recovery based on military Keyne-
sianis, tax relief, and a co-optation of
progressive economic icons such as
Roosevelt, Truman, and Kennedy) as
well as a more overt appeal to cultural
conservatism (religious and family
values, jingoism).
The 1984 election was the apotheosis
of this trend. The two Democratic
front-runners both had a glimmer of
the old populist economics, but both
fumbled it. Gary Hart perceived a new
economic out-group: the young.
His slogan � "the future" � was a
way of telegraphing empathy with the
worries of the baby-boom generation
that they might never live as well as
their parents. But Hart failed to fill in
convincing details, and in his haste to
distance himself from Walter Mondale
he succeeded only in alienating other,
more traditional populist constituen-
cies, such as blacks and blue-collar
voters. Mondale, for his part, had the
traditional constituencies, but he was
so intimidated by the economics ol
budget-balancing that he failed
deliver anything for the populist voters
save some old-time rhetoric and the
promise to increase their taxes. And he
was so beholden to the Democrats'
own business allies that he failed to
take up winning populist issues such as
tax reform. Each leading Democratic
candidate played to his weakness
In short, the public-opinion polls
seem to suggest that the Democrats
need to move right on social and
perhaps defense issues, but left on
economics. But the big-time
Democratic pols, reinforced by the
need to raise campaign-finance dollars
from the upper class, mistakenly decid-
ed to move right generally. And that
would be a serious mistake, as nearh
all the conferees at the Populist Forum
agreed. Democrats seem to do best in
elections when they stand for the
economic well-being of the common
man and woman.
Although President Reagan ana
Senator Packwood win populist points
for embracing tax reform, the coming
Senate debate will be instructive. Near-
ly all of the Gucci crowd, mounting a
last-ditch effort to put back some
loopholes, will be Republicans. If
Democratic legislators can resist the
fatal temptation to ingratiate
themselves with interest groups, they
can sit back and let Republican
senators demonstrate just how populist
the GOP really is.
1986 will be a good year for
Democratic populists in one respect.
Influence-peddling, Republican stvle,
is back in fashion. Kevin Phillips
observes that the Republican habit of
running against the federal establish-
ment falls fiat this year, because they
have become the establishment. He
even offers Democrats their slogan:
"Could you afford to hire Mike
Deaver?"
Sowe
IOHANNI SBI R
Africa (UPI) - rhe .
said today that II p
during M
strike by u;
- the 10
I k upr
Soweto.
Bia. I
tor.
absr
areas, includit .
abou' 40 r.
empi
I :
New spapt
1-5 acI
the a
(i emmet.
Jur
-
breaking
her vehicle wh
day
e ft
A '
ne :
ECL
bre � .
I
June 7
3:45 a
Dei
jeune t
in.
trat
a � .
June 9
5 44 -
A
reported that I
vandal.
Clement d
June 10
2:10 p.m.
A Fleming resident rep
the larceny of his b
bicycle rack we'
Hall.
June 1 5
:26
Henry Higgs c
Greenville was an
tied
Tyler Dorm.
June 16
12:30 a.m.
mai
thw. (ireene D
was believed I
kidnap and rape ca
Greenville Police I
12:20 p.m.
.A Fleminj
reported the tare
jewelry fron
8:22 p.m.
A Greenville
the larceny
bike rack southeas
Dor it1.
June 17
2:30 a.m.
A Greenville reside;
rested for DW l and one
street viola
Dorm.
Police Chief J
wants to alert stuck
specific crime problems
pus. One main problem
students are the continued brew-
ing, entering of and larceny from
vehicles being parked in the com-
muter lots. The lots having the
NO NEWS
IS BAD NEWS
not pimiiI HilI -
-

-
HhA
M m
.�-� .
ttWioKMts-
� '


t
- �

k






THE FAS I AkOl (MAN
II JNI 18, 1V86
Ut$�.A$RAM
iRAHAAIPflAGAR
f7W i�AH AD
ACfc�PTM7H
4
S
J
,VV
li
cv Positive
�V"
BM
The Fence
I

dollars
. dec id-
d that
early
1 'am
: besi in
the
mm on
K igan and
lints
e coming
be instructive. Near-
mounting a
ick some
ms. If
in resist the
g r a t i a t e
selves with interest groups, they
back and let Republican
demonstrate just how populist
I P really is.
1986 will be a good year for
Democratic populists in one respect.
Influence-peddling, Republican style,
is back in fashion. Kevin Phillips
observes that the Republican habit of
running against the federal establish-
ment falls Oat this year, because they
have become the establishment. He
even offers Democrats their slogan:
"Could you afford to hire Mike
Deaver?"
SowetoAnniversary Leads To Violence
JOHANNESBURG, South
Africa (UPI) � The government
said toda that 11 people died
during Monday's nationwide
xirike by up to 1.5 million blacks
to mark the 10th anniversary of a
black uprising that started in
Soweto.
Blacks returned to work in
force today but continued
absenteeism was reported in some
areas, including Durban, where
about 40 percent oi black
employees stayed home for a se-
cond das
Newspaper reports said about
i 5 million blacks struck to mark
i he anniversary.
Government spokesman Leon
Mellet told a news conference in
Pretoria today that authorities
managed to prevent major
violence on the anniversary of the
June 16 uprising in 1976.
"Nowhere in the country was
there one big mass of violence
he said.
Mellet said 11 people died in
what he called "isolated in-
cidents pushing the death toll
to 42 since President Pieter Botha
invoked emergency rule on
Thursday.
Mellet said at least two of those
killed were shot by police in the
Port Elizabeth townships oi
Kwazakele and New Brighton.
Two blacks were knifed and
burned to death by other blacks
in Kwandebele, north of Johan-
nesburg, and two more in
Daveyton. Blacks also were killed
in Umlazi, Munsieville, Port
Alfred, Fort Beaufort and
Balfour, Mellet said.
He said the government's na-
tionwide security clampdown
prevented a major outburst of
violence.
"Planned violence that the
African National Congress work-
ed so hard on did not
materialize he said. "The in-
cidence of violence was nowhere
near what was anticipated
The Business Day financial
newspaper, drawing on reports
by employers and the indepen-
dent Labor Monitoring group,
put the total number of strikers at
about 1.5 million.
Soweto residents said traffic
today out of the township of
more than a million people was
almost normal. Roadblocks and
traffic checks were evident on the
main access and exit roads.
Buses picked up passengers
under escort, and trains to
Johannesburg were almost full.
Monday, they carried less than a
third of the usual commuters,
and many bus stations were
deserted.
In Cape Town, reporters said
commuter traffic from black and
Nuclear Site Discussed
student reported the
:aking and entering oi her
vehicle and larceny of items from
vehicle while parked in the
da loi on College Hill Drive.
June f
� JO a m.
Greenville resident was ban-
ned from campus after being
erved acting in a suspicious
iner near Memorial Gym.
An ECU student reported the
aking into and entering of her
icle and larceny from the
e. I'ic vehicle was parked in
the da lot on c ollege Hill Drue.
June
3:45 a
Dennis Graves oi Camp Le-
:s ted foi DW 1, drh
without a license and
most vandalous activity are the
ones located on Tenth Street and
on College Hill Drive. Chief Rose
explains that both reported
larcenies involved valuable items
which were visible to passing peo-
ple. Students should lock
valuables in the trunk or remove
them from the vehicle, advises
Chief Rose.
There have also been problems
involving unescorted males in
girls dorms. Girls ate warned to
pay close attention to males
entering dorms, it a male looks
suspicious, girls should not
hestitate calling the i t I Public
Safety Depart men' and report
what they see.
Another problem involves the
larceny ol bicycles from dorm
Continued From Page 1.
CP&L Vice Chariman William
Graham told the newspaper that
he drafted a letter, sent it to the
governors and Hunt wrote
another draft to which all the
governors agreed.
"It's a joint product Hunt, a
Democrat said of the letter.
"We're saying the procedures
(for starting the plant) have been
followed legally and
responsibly
Graham said 1961 Gov. Terry
Sanford, a Democratic nominee
for the U.S. Senate who has voic-
ed oppostition to the plant, was
not asked to sign the letter
because he governor before
CP&L began its nuclear plant
program. Republican Gov. Jim
Martin was not asked to sign the
letter because of his public suport
for the plant, he said.
mixed race areas early today was
normal.
But in Durban, Chamber of
Commerce spokesman Ken Hob
son said absenteeism was 40 to 50
percent among black workers to-
day, and the Natal province
Chamber of Industries said about
30 percent of factory workers did
not report.
In a new restriction on the
foreign media working out of
South Africa, the government to-
day barred live satellite television
interviews.
Sakkie Burger, director of
news at the state run South
African Broadcasting Corp said
the SABC was ordered by the
government information bureau
to relay only prerecorded
material.
"The reason is to determine
responsibility for what is broad-
cast outside South Africa
Burger said.
U.S. television producer Mike
Gavshon said the government ap
parently wanted to ensure thai
foreign networks could be held
responsible foi reports that con
travened the emergency ban u
"subversive statements "
"The SABC has the only
satellite facilities he said
"There is no way we can ge'
around them for live transmis
sions
Michael Hornsby
Foreign Correspondents Associa-
tion said, "This is just another
screw in the censorship ol news
media, which we deplore
Bureau for Information
spokesman Leon Mellet Monday
said the government preempted
planned disruptions ad disorder
nationwide bv emergency
measures it imposed.
Send a smile!
insp(
a brok
jpintuous
seal. The
9th and
m r
w i n d i
liquor
arrest
James
rm.
.
2:10 p.m.
A Fleming resident reported
the larceny of his bicycle from the
bicycle rack west of Iteming
Hall.
June 1 5
5:26
Henry Higgs Goodson of
Greenville was arrested and ban-
ned from campus for being in
possession of a weapon south of
Tyler Dorm.
June Ifi
12:30 a.m.
A man was apprehended nor-
vest oi Greene Dorm, the man
a as believed to be a suspect in a
kidnap and rape case through the
Greenville Police Department.
12:20 p.m.
A Fleming Hall resident
reported the larceny of her
jewelry from the dorm room.
- 22 p.m.
A Greenville resident reported
larceny of his bicycle from the
bike rack southeast oi Fleming
Dorm.
June 17
2:30a.m.
A Greenville resident was ar-
rested for DWI and one way
street violation south of Fletcher
Dorm.
Police Chief Johnny Rose
wants to alert students about
specific crime problems on cam-
pus. One main problem of
students are the continued break-
ing, entering of and larceny from
vehicles being parked in the com-
muter lots. The lots having the
NO'NEWS
IS BAD NEWS
racl s
Publ
Regis
police kee
recover. C !
suggestions
md sheds Chiei Rose sug-
� udents register
hikes through the Il
satet Depat: merit
.�ring bikes helps campus
n eve on them, plus
bikes are taken,
.sill make them
ace and possibly
�t Rose hopes these
will help students
have a crime-tree summer while
here at ECU.
Two of ECU Public Safety of-
ficers were awarded the Advanc-
ed I aw Enforcement Certificate
by the North Carolina Training
and Standard Commission. Of-
ficers William R. Reichstein and
Jame Willis received the Cer-
tificate, which is the highest
award given to police officers in
North Carolina, for a combina-
tion oi outstanding education,
training and years ot service.
Chief Johnny Rose comments,
"We're extremely pleased that
these officers have obtained this
professional certification for
their hard work and dedicaton to
their chosen profession
hat is the difference between
lice, crabs, and scabies? How do
you get them and how do you get
rid of them?
Three species of lice are known
to infest humans: the crab louse
(also called the pubic louse), the
body louse and the head louse.
The crab louse is shorter than the
other two types and can be found
in hairy places other than the
pubic area (armpits, beard,
eyelashes, etc.). The head louse is
almost always found on head
hair.
Head and body lice are
transmitted by sharing combs,
towels and other personal items.
Pubic lice may be picked up from
objects as well as by sexual con-
tact. Both adult lice and their
eggs (nits) can be seen by the nak-
ed eye upon close inspection.
Scabies is a skin disease caused
by an organism not visible to the
naked eye call the "itch mite
Scabies is spread by direct con-
tact with another person who is
infested including shaking hands.
Exchanging clothing or sharing a
bed or towels is also a means of
spreading scabies, however the
scabies mite does not survive long
in clothes or linens.
It is usually best to seek profes-
sional help for the diagnosis and
treatment oi lice, crabs, and
scabies. The most commonly us-
ed prescription medication used
for treating all three conditions is
Kwell. The person may also need
medications to relieve itching.
Several non -prescription
medicines are available including
RID, Triple X, and R & C Spray.
Ask a pharmacist how to use
them properly. Other measures
that should be taken to prevent
reinfestation include:
� Wash clothing, towels, and bed
linens in hot water (dry cleaning
is also effective).
� Non-washable items can be
sprayed with disinfectants con-
taining pyrethin-piperonyl butox-
ide such as Raid and Black Flag.
� Other people who might be in-
fected (roommates, friends, sex-
ual partners) must be treated at
the same time to avoid reinfesta-
tion.
Hi-Brow Cards
Central Book and News
Greenville Square Snooping Center
Balloons For All Occasions
Subscribe
Stye iS.mt (Karaltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925

ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OE PREGNANCY
$195 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at
additional cost. Pregnancy Test, Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For
Further information, call 832-0535 (toll free
number: 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5
p.m. weekdays. General anesthesia available.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
.
BB&r
24
�Ptu
MURELRY
Your Bank at ECU Mendenhall
BBA r offer, K I neiu�iK PI IS . .
Itll PIKUHH Ks
E I Vm
F1RS1 PI KM I CHECKS
A.RI I KK �'ih VOUT IW�
hba i aaafaagaataaai
tKHHit KIM,
Vu at v.ur tarr.ilv fcrrp
iSJU in a BBa I RtguUi Sa
mgs .ctounl and wu gc(
IKH hiking
I l�
tKtl 14 HOI H BXNklM.
Wt new; ,harge viu !or using oul
HBA1 24 machine Vn.1l receive yow 24
hour card when wiu open youi checking
or BsVHaJI aCCOUttl
bb&t
Is MivThan A tank.
h's An Attitude.
KOXM IHI t Ml Kl SH
Open your account now
�nd have your perionalicd
PtrctM Check, before ftm
cl��Ca begin Stop bv one ol
MM convenient location or
4 �
919-752-89
.SA ri'N DTDULS
At an. of .�ur fuil �n-vi.r
OrrenvUie locations
mnifuN4rg H �J
Special
85 Item
Salad and
Hot Bar
All You
Can Eat
$2
4 yteit place t& eatf
STEAK HOUSE
4 �
� �.
7- �
���





I IU I ASM koi INIAN
Lifestyles
JUNE 18. 1V86 PAOt- ft
More Than Black And White
By JOHN SHANNON
I Jt�l�ta Mllor
Other Bright Colors will appear at New Deli Fridaj night. Members
are ilett to right) lorn Pafford, James Funsten, Brian Butler and
Joe Jaw.rki.
The band scheduled to play
this Friday night at New Deli,
Other Bright Colors, will not ap-
pear in this article due to limita-
tions of time and space. In its
stead, bassist Tom Pafford will
present and retract far-reaching
statements about religion,
erotica, headlines and beer.
"What do 1 listen to, when I'm
just listening to music? Robert
Johnson. That's a deep musical
experience. It's kind of
possessed, you know?"
You mean, occult or
sornething?
"I mean he's the type who
would get down on his knees and
confess his sins � and he has sins
to confess! He kind of lays down
the law
It's funny, bui I don't hear
much of a blues influence in your
music
"Well, there's not much sense
playing blues anymore. It's like
these rockabilly bands. I don't
like revival rockabilly. Who
wants to hear revival rockabilly?
It's been done before.
"I want to listen to Captain
Beefheart. We want to listen to
Captain Beefheart. But it's kind
of hard to listen to. His band
sounds they sound like they're
trying really hard to dig their way
out of a hole, a hole somebody
dug for them, or one they dug
themselves, I don't know.
"But 1 don't think about
what's going on in music today
very much. I think about certain
songs that stick in my head I
like Judy Garland
What about an album don't
you pLn to release an album
soon ?
"Erotica is another important
thing, a very important thing. We
plan to do a lot of shows where
we'll be naked
Are you serious?
"Pretty serious. Maybe at the
New Deli Friday. I believe you
have to give people something to
get excited about.
"It's like the news. It has to be
news, or people aren't going to
be interested in it. Like writing a
story on a band coming to town.
So what? What's newsworthy
about that? 'Other Bright Colors
To Play At New Deli Fridav'
Where's the news?"
Well, I was thinking about
maybe an informative article,
sort of about who you guys
are
"An idea that's been kicking
around in my head lately is
'Bloody Battle In New Deli
People, when they're reading the
paper, a lot of times they're pret-
ty bored.
"Like how about 'Musical
Legends Come No, people
are bored with musical legends,
too. Maybe a headline like 'ECU
Students Have Reason To Fear
God, Says OBC Band Member
That might do it
was going to ask you whether
you like to play in Greenville, and
what you like about it. Is it the
people?
"The firs! time we played at
New Deli, it was like being a
Christian in a Roman coliseum.
There was a religious difference
between us and a lot of those peo-
ple � people were reaching up
and touching us, and throwii .
things a lot of people seem to
get really drunk in Greenville.
"But as far as a news event
before the band gets there,
there's no news. It's while the
band's plavmg that there
It seems like then
to say for providing inforn i
though
"Take great spoi
They're like great pulp
They say the el
other team, and you
them, you trust them.
"But in a features
can't trust the faith of the
You have to have a fran
you see Apocalypse Von
beginning of thai mov
wakes up and say s "Saig
shit, I'm still in Sa;g �n
the rest of the movie he'
to get out of Saigon. v
article, you could be tryii t
whole time to get .
you could say 'b
read this, Other Bright
will have come an I i
would prot
have to a � h
takt :r
"Well, n
is beer. Beer can m
craz I
�ma!
That �
Set' OU 1 r
Eat More Than You Can Lift; Chow Down At Manchow
B
PA I
�til�1 i.
MOI.I.O
fe�tUr htfttuf
Manchow Re-
.

ceiling, i
i e a as 3
VI
: are
become wilted
�ked

perfectly . providing an exotic, yet
humble nuance to the meal.
I astly is the fruit tray. And the
Manchow restaurant is to be
commended on this � no other
restaurani in Greenville seems to
thought of this idea. Along
he buffet, one may select
slices of watermelon,
cantelope, and honey dew melon
� these are the perfect end to a
nese meal.
"he service at the Manchow
finitely wasn't what it could
have been. The restaurant was
somewhat under-staffed; only
i e waitress was serving the three
dining areas. Though she did a
decent job for one person, a pay-
ing customer shouldn't have to
wait ten minutes for a glass of
water. This was the onl flaw in
the experience.
The prices range from a hefty
$9.70 for Lobster Cantonese, to a
mere S.80 tor an egg roll (which
can definitely be counted as a
meal).
Also i fered are daily dinner
specials tor $1.99. for this.
may choose from a select
different entrees, includi i
Mem and Chow Meine.
The Manch �w R
:n sevei
from 1 .
I
Ice ou
epted
Summer Movie
Hughes Film Is A Winner
pi
i
watern elon
a e.Theh iffei
11:30 a.m 3 ;
-e are foi
Each
one is � el
er halt a I
ai e g ��� d. mag
eatmg e . mem.
The fried chicken didn't fare as
well, leasing something to be
desired, something intangible �
but fried chicken isn't exactly
wn one eats Chinese in the first
Casino Night
It you've neer been to Casino Nighi. you may want to try it. The
Student I nion will hold a Casino Night Thursday at 9 p.m. One
dollar will bu Sl.ooo worth of plav money. There is a three dollar
limit. Prizes will he auctioned off.
B KDTOSHACH
Vaff �Mlr
Tough day. It's hot, humid;
maybe it's given you a headache.
What can you do?
Here's what you do: go to the
Plaza Cinemas, buy yourself a
Coke and a big box of popcorn,
and sit down in a cool, dark
theater to see Ferris Beuller's Day
Off � the best movie so far this
summer.
A John Hughes film, Ferris
Beuller's Day Off stars Matthew
Broderick (War Games, Lady
Hawk) in the title role, and Alan
Ruck as Cameron, his best
friend. The movie follows Ferris,
Cameron and Sloan (Ferris's
girlfriend, played by Mia Sara)
through the most wonderful day
of hookey-playing since Tom
Sawyer. We, by the way, are
along for the ride and Ferris
often takes a moment to talk to
us � elaborating on themes, in-
troducing characters, etc. � a
device that works well.
The entire movie, in I
works well. From the beginning,
Ferris Beuller's Day Off is laugh-
out-loud funny, but that's far
from being its single virtue. The
movie can be at times slapstick
and at other times quietly mov-
ing.
FILM
It is a visually effective movie
also, and its slickness is a credit
to its director, Hughes, who also
gave us Sixteen Candles and The
Breakfast Club I'm beginning to
wonder if we shouldn't be sen-
ding him thank you notes.
That said, however, the crown-
ing achievements of Ferris
Beuller's Day Off are the perfor-
mances of Broderick and Ruck as
Ferris and Cai
F : Broderic k
i departure fi
k kid he pi a ai
Games; Ferris is e:
He is aggressi e,
.
lericl
believably, and
funny stuff works, he . .
skimp on ferris's hun le �
at the movie's beginning Ferri
just another teenag
the end he cannot be en.
To describe Alan Ruck in the
role of Cameron, take eve
just sa:d about Broder
multiply it by five oi six. R . -
great! He has an incredib
of comic timing, and at times
can be devastating!) real. I
hope we will be seeing
soon.
So if you need a c
hours of high-qualitv escapis
go see Ferris Beuller's Day
You'll be glad you did
Local Musicians Depart For Germany
B JOHN SHANNON
UfmivlA hdi'u'
Light years ago, Daniel Penn-
ington was experimenting with
hesiers in Mt. Holly, N.C.
Tracy Cain was just giving in to
friends who insisted that the
guitar should be played upright
rather than flat on the lap. Both
musicians have come a long way,
and neither would ever have
guessed that they would be taking
their collaborative musical effort
to Germany in the summer of
'86.
The two played in their group's
first incarnation in July, 1985,
opening for Other Bright Colors
at the Milestone in Charlotte.
Pennington says, "We like Other
Bright Colors a lot. We've
travelled to see them, and we've
played with them four times.
They're a big influence
For a while after that first gig,
Daniel and Tracy were the only
stable core around which several
bands collected. "In the past
year, I've played with six bass
players, four drummers, seven
guitarists and one other keys
player said Pennington, "and
we had bands with all those peo-
ple
One of the guitarists turned out
to be ju � the group �
Rob Frayser. "The band opened
op a whole new door for me. gave
me a chance to play electric guitar
in a group context said
frayser. "What I tried to bring
the band is my philosophy
on loose jams, which I think add
spontaneity to the music and
make it more fun
Pennington said he is a
classically trained pianist and
vocalist. He sang with the
Charlotte Opera, and originally
came to ECl to study voice and
piano in the School oi Music.
Pennington writes most of the
band's lyrics as well as arranging
and doing some producing on the
band's recorded work.
"We've recorded live songs
recently, hopefully for an EP
said Pen rung'on. "We recorded
here in Greenville at EBDB
Sound. David Blount, the
engineer, did a really good job
Three of the recorded songs were
written by Pennington and Cain,
one by Frayser and one by Penn-
ington and Frayser.
The current line-up of Dirty
Little Secrets includes drummer
Dan Davis, who has been a core
member of the group since
January and bassist Bill Pridgen,
who joined the band a month
ago.
"Dirty Little Secrets as the
group is currently dubbed, plays
mostly original music. Penn-
ington describes their sound as
"free-form, very free-form. We
like to jam, and that's pretty
much what it is � we get out
there and jam But that doesn't
mean their sound is esoteric or
dischordant, as the term "free-
form" might imply. Instead, says
Pennington, "our music is pret-
ty. I think that's a rare quality
these days
When Cain and Pennington
move to Germany, they drop
the name "Dirty Little Secrets
Cain said. The pair are moving to
Karlsruhe, in West Germany,
where Pennington's wife lives.
Pennington is leaving June 26,
and Cain is going later, probably
in August.
Asked about his musical goals,
Cain said, "I want to keep going
until it gets to where it's not fun
anymore. Money is not my
motivation. I plan to play outside
the band, too. There's music I'd
like to play that would be too
weird to do with the band
Once settled in Karlsruhe, Pen-
nington plans to attend college, a
goal shared by Cain. But a lot
depends on what happens
musically. "We'll be looking for
a drummer when we get there
said Pennington. "We already
have a keyboardist lined up.
"We want to make a living at
it. That's the bottom line. 1 see
our music taking on a more pro-
gressive edge we're still trying
to find our groove
"I'd even like to play in the
streets said Cain. "There's a
great street-music scene in
Europe. People seem to like that
over there
Both musicians plan to spend a
lot of time composing and
redefining their sound. But Penn-
ington believes they will find an
audience and succeed, because
Europeans respond to music like
any other people. "It's f6lk
music, basically, because, when
you get down to it, that's what
you have to write about � peo-
ple
"I want to be true to music. I
want to be liked. I want to enjoy
it most of all said Pennington.
Perhaps Europe will be the
place for Pennington and Cain to
realize their ambitions. Mean-
while, the group will be playing
their final performance tomor-
row night at the New Deli. Open-
ing for them will be Denouement,
a keyboard-oriented new music
act. Come out Thursday and bid
Dirty Little Secrets bon voyage
and luck with their future plans.
Dirty Little Secrets (left to right: Daniel p.��i . rk"� 5 �
Rob Frayser, Tracy OUn and ImtTSS BUI Prid�n
night at the New Ddi. Detioaent . ' " 'Ppemr 1"J
mostly originals, will open for the Secrets " bDd p,1m
wenm � " '
BLOOM COUNT
-
1
i
L
r -
I
V
1
�4
E
" i
Man-O -mi

1 � f s 1It r � '
rfy rnyfrji
��T Bsm. M

rtic .
I. ndertoveraK
:
Sfeill
-t� -4 - - - -
OPINION
by SUE
1 -





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 18, 1986
BLOOM COUNTY
White
Manchow
A Winner
I

Beui ei I tax Off
Id )J�8n fenninKton- Bill Prldgen,
by Berke Breathed
Book Review
U� 'MR AMtXlCA
'ACOCCA a
�iASi J v
tU&J AF
"VV"
WU�A v
� . wtcm
WHS -
off mm ueexry'
ffOCMfi polka ! fmioric
TAPIOCA , fj
m'5 WH0ri5MYjC.
vcxon
WAT ItAb
5IMPLY-
AWHJL
MS
Tfigrf
L.
Maverick Solves Riddle
� ,j -� mWH'V �WHEt,
n - v-i v. -� fii
1

N
p&
wL �
2i
W�7 t�6S� �P!XAir EMbJltS
HC m STJU SINGU at e SIX
HAW ONLY A 3 CHANCe Of-
0TJM
5(X?
7N6 CANT ee ' THt5
cantb� " m pie an
OLP WATERFOWL MfiP "
OH.imHI
AWReif?fT-
Y�AH I RBbRei W5
tws ' m THBf PIJM3
WGOCCA BPi'r 1 �
� �
� � -
: I WibU.
� �.
"
AJ�Jt
I

V.1'
3
&&&�&? fiW MY
jz ncKMf
50 �������'

iZv-
-��-�� ftM -ok mow
mMCTWCr A A KAN
UNt nm vm � rvf
� �-��' - etbtm -
By WIL RAYMOND
arid
JOHN SHANNON
Marcello Barbieri's new
semantic principles of life have
two important characteristics:
one, an important frontier has
been established; two, the
elucidation of these principles is
clear and concise. An expert
biochemist, Barbieri entertain-
ingly enlightens those willing to
pursue an understanding of life's
continuity from Big Bang to cur-
rent day.
The Semantic Theory of Life
delves into this most mysterious
event, the beginnings of life. Bar-
bieri's arguments, as Rene
Thorn's preface attests, "concen-
trate on bio-chemistry, which his
discription renders intelligible
and almost enjoyable � no mean
feat
Arguably, the book contains
professional material establishing
its scholarly importance. Never-
theless, Barbieri is extremely
careful to connect with the scien-
tific novice.
Aristotle's Great Chain of Be-
ing implies continuity in the chain
of life. Yet, current evolutionary
theory inadequately explains the
origin of life from primordial
biochemical building blocks.
Life uses sophisticated organic
processes. These efficient pro-
cesses out-perform current
echnological abilities. How,
then, were these complex struc-
tural organizations assembled in
a simple chemical bath?
Barbieri's genius involves
detecting the semantic element in
nature's fundamental syntax.
Life's beginnings can't be
delineated; animate matter is on-
ly the visible product of gradual
physical effects.
Barbieri spans the chasm by ex-
plaining the transformation of
common organic units into the
diversity of life.
His judicious display of con-
temporary thought illuminates
the intellectual synthesis Barbieri
has achieved. The puzzle pieces
displayed, rearranged and jux-
taposed lead the reader naturally
to conclude, as Barbieri has, that
early life evolved from simple
ribosomal entities.
Stanley Miller in 1953 created a
synthetic primordial soup. Its in-
gredients represent the basic
organic compounds necessary to
construct and maintain life. In-
cluded were amino-acids, consti-
tuents of proteins and nucleic
acids, the basic units of
ribonucleic acid (RNA) and de-
oxy ribonucleic acid (DNA).
Barbieri maintains cellular life
is a trinity, three compounds
which self-assemble and inter-
act: RNA, DNA and proteins.
Proteins effect metabolism in all
cellular life; DNA stores
hereditary information for pro-
tein synthesis and RNA is the in-
terface.
Ribosomes are the kernal of
life. Utilizing the four unique
properties (polymerization, self-
assembly, polymorphism and
self-amalgamation), they are
responsible for all the basic diver-
sities of life. Constructed of pro-
teins and RNA, these chemical
factories control all cellular
metabolism.
Teetering on the edge between
inanimate factories and function-
ing biological units, Ribosomes
constitute the continuum which
must exist.
Barbieri's radical departure
from current theory has resolved
several biological mysteries.
Three esoteric issues addressed in
this book � the preellular split
of prokaryotes and micro-
eukaryotes; the relation of
ribosomal molecular weights to
nucleoli creation; and the dif-
ference in prokaryotic and
eukaryotic DNA manipulation �
represent cutting-edge inquiries
into modern bio-chemical theory.
Possibly the most important
revelation is the refutation of
natural selection as the leading
dogma of evolutionary science.
Natural conventions, exemplified
by life's use of right-handed
sugars over left-handed sugars,
are the fundamental modifiers of
biological activity. Natural
cycles, created by these conven-
tions, supersede the secondary ef-
fects of natural selection.
The final chapter translates
biochemical evolution into
linguistic evolution. "Life is the
language Nature learned to
speak Barbieri is intrigued
by this duality.
Syntax and semantics, physical
law and natural conventions �
his mind fuses the two in a grand
intellectual experiment.
Barbieri's language is poignant;
the momentous import of his
ideas is easily belied by his suc-
cint style of elucidation.
Doubtless, Barbieri's paradigm
will supplant current dogma.
Feature Writers Needed
Summer And Fall At The East Carolinian
! Apply No
0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
w
Man-O-Stick
3 JAkRELL & JOHNSON
COMING ATTRACTIONS
Undercover Cats
i '? -� 5
v -
Thursday, June 19, 1986
9:00 p.m. $1.�� Admission
per $1000, Limit $3000
Casino Night
Blackjack, Craps, Roulette,
Trivia, Solitaire, and High-Low
Prize Auction and
REFRESHMENTS
MSC Multi-Purpose Room

Tooth
�Em
Monday, June 23, 1986
3:30 and 9:00 p.m. FREE
with I.D.
FLASHDANCE
Hendrix Theatre
a
OPINION
KSUE
CRASH
ering place
, �
. tj i :
��'
�� ���






I HF FAST C AROl INIAN
Sports
JUNF 18, 1986
Page 8
Pirate Notes
Boyette
Academic
All-America
Stacey Boyette, a pitcher on
the ECU softball team, has
been named to the 1986
Academic All-America softball
earn.
The selection of Boyette
marks the third consecutive
Near she has received Academic
II America honors.
I he Hopewell, Va native
graduated this past spring with
i 3.9 grade-point average in
chemistry. She will be atten-
ding graduate school at the
University of Florida.
The team is selected annually
by the College Sports Informa-
tion Directors of America
under the sponsorship of GTE.
Ml plavers selected must be
starters or key reserves and
maintain a minimum grade-
point average of 3.2.
Boyette was selected as the
only pitcher on the first team,
a huh includes nine other
players. No other player was
chosen from the state of North
rolina
"I'm very proud of her.
- been an academic leader
as well as a leader on the
'� ECU softball coach Sue
Manahan said, "She was our
leader this year � as far as pit-
� -tie was the most
�nt. She certainl)
brought notoriety to us
Assistant
Named
�:i I ewte� has been named
assistant basketball coach at
I C L, Dr. Ken Karr, director of
athletics announced Monday.
I ewter. 28, joins head coach
:ie Harrison and assistant
� the 1986-8"
tte coaching stafl
I ewtei comes to ECU after
iervii is head basketball
coach at Southern Nash High
ol in Bailey, N.C. He has
been head coach of the
�Us' program tor the pas!
ur seasons, including a
chool-record 18-8 season in
1984
"We are very pleased to have
Stan join our program at East
Carolina Karr said. "He has
some line credentials as a coach
and should fit in well with our
staff
I ewter was an honorable
mention All-America selection
a' Atlantic Christian College
during his senior season in
1980. After a brief professional
stun in Europe, he returned to
concentrate on coaching.
Lewter was a high school
standout at Siler City High
School, where he was coached
by ECU alumnus Mack Hern-
don.
"It's a dream come true for
me to accept this position
Lewter said. "I hate to leave
Southern, but this opportunity
was one that 1 could not miss.
E( U has a history of having
outstanding assistant coaches,
and I'm proud that my name is
now on that list
Giardina
Director
Frank Giardina, a two-time
recipient of the West Virginia
Sportscaster of the Year award,
has been named director of
electronic media at ECU.
Giardina, 31, replaces Ken
Smith, who resigned in April to
become media director for
North Carolina Amateur
Sports in Raleigh. Giardina
comes to ECU after serving as
director of promotions and
broadcasting at Marshall for
the past two years.
He has been the voice of the
Thunderin' Herd' since 1978.
"We felt the Frank was the
right choice for this
position ECU Athletic
Director Ken Karr said. "He
has the experience in promo-
tionsand is an excelle play-
by-play announcer.
Henry Preparing For Final Season
By JANET SIMPSON
SpurU Wrilrr
It has been said that all things
have their own time and place.
Well, now is the time that most
college students can be found on
the beach. School is the last thing
on their minds and the closes!
they've gotten to a hook is walk-
ing past the mall bookstore. Yes,
this is the life; the sand, the surt,
and the sun.
However, not quite everyone is
taking it easy on the water's edge.
A dedicated tew are even gracing
ECU's campus by attending sum-
mer school. One of these tew is
Marchell Henry.
Henry is giving up his fun in
the sun days for academic
reasons as well as athletic ones.
"1 have a couple of reasons tor
being in summer school stated
Henry. "I'm here to pick up
credits towards graduation, as
well as to work on basketball
Henry, who is one of si
seniors on the team this season, is
really keeping busy. Monday thru
Friday is always the same
seven hours ol class and an al
noon work-oul consisting of an
hour and a half at the ECU
Strength Complex lifting weights.
and an hour and a half a: Minges
playing basketball
"I'm working a lot
dividual pans oi my game
stated Henry. "Everydav I take
about 200 jump shots from dif-
ferent areas on the floor and I
work a lot on my inside moves
Lifting weights is something
Henry definitely believes in. "It's
kind of difficult at 6-5 to play
power forward if you're not
strong noted Henry. "Last
season I was able to get shots off
inside that were difficult the year
before, but I still feel I'm not
strong enough to play the posi-
tion I play.
"This was evident in certain
situations Henrv continued.
against one who may be bigger
than he, if he's playing power
forward.
When asked who would play
the power forward position if he
were moved, Henry couldn't give
a specific answer.
"It's going to be tough to
decide who will play that posi-
tion offered Henry. "It's really
hard to say, as well as to early to
say. Hopefully I will be, as I said,
at the small forward
Henry feels chemistry will be a
major factor in the team's success
4 77w working a lot on the individual parts of my
game Ever day I take about 200 jump shots from
different areas on the floor and I work a lot on my
inside moves
�Marchell Henry
"For instance, the games against
Duke and Kentucky. Also against
Navy my shooting percentage
was horrendous. Hopefully this
vear I'll move to the small for-
ward position
Fhe position oi' small forward
ler than powei forward is
definitely more suited to Henry.
His size, speed, and strength
would be more effective there (at
small forward). He could take
advantag oi a smaller, slower
man. rather than having to go up
in the upcoming season. "I agree
with an earlier comment by
Coach Harrison: 'that we can be
very good if the chemistry is
there Henry stated. "I think
that it is very important that we
come together early. Once our
roles are accepted and we play in-
to those roles, we will be a pretty-
good team
Leon Bass, Keith Sledge, and
Henry are going to make up the
base that the 1986-87 Pirates will
be built upon. The three of them
are seniors, as well as being the
only returning starters
"I do think Leon, Keith, and
myself are going to be counted on
heavily for leadership, along with
the other seniors Henry ex
plained. "But considering we are
the only returning starters, 1
think there will be a lot put on
our shoulders
Henry feels he may even have
more responsibility where leader
ship goes. "I like the idea of hav-
ing the responsibility of being a
leader said Henry "I am a
returning captain and I feel I
should have more responsibilities
as far as leadership is
concerned
Being a team leader last year
can only help Henry be a better
one this year. "At the beginning
o last year I think my major pro-
blem was that I was trying to lead
more verbally than by example
explained Henrv. "By the end of
the season, 1 was leading by ex-
ample rather than by wrds �
and my teammates were ;es;
ding more. 1 feel this II carry
over into the upcoming season
Bass, Sledge, and the rest ol
the returning players will be
counted on even mon ear.
according to Henry.
"We're going to have to count
on Leon this year, m
we did last vear he said. "I
think Leon has to believe
himself. Coach Harrison has
that Leon can be as good a'
wants to be. and I believe thi
think it's up to Leon to realize
that this is his last year and I
he has the potential to be a I
good player. All he has to d
believe in himself
Sledge's move from smal
ward 10 big guard is an nnpor �
one. Sledge is going to I
on and his transition is v
be crucial.
"Keith is going to be counted
a lot more this year said He:
"He will be working on his I
handling all summer and I th
he has the determination to
See HENRY. pa�e 9
Sports Fact
Wed. Jane 18,1941
Heavyweight champion Joe
Louis stops former light-
heavyweight title holder Billy
Conn in the 13th round. The
smaller Conn is ahead on
points when he unwisely
decides to try for a knockout
and is dropped in the process.
Of Conn, Louis says: "He can
run but he can't hide
Kobe's Season Outlook
Swimmers Look Powerful
B sconOOPFR
"We should del have
a inning season and he rig
tor the conferei
championship sa:J ECl
coach Rik Kobe
squad's upcoming campaij
The Bucs return 23 swimi
from last year's men's and
women's conference champion
ship teams. And in addition.
Kobe is bringing in 24 newcon
who should provide an im-
mediate impact
"It's the bes; recruiting
we've had at Las: ai ilina
Kobe said. "Everyone ol
kids is good. Ail of them will help
us immediately � without a
doubt
As far as the me: im goes.
10 swimmers return. The most
promising returner will be junior
Bruce Brockschmidt. Other
returners include sophomore
David Killeen and juniors Patrick.
Brennan, Ronald Fleming1.
Laney and Lee Hicks. The three
returning seniors include Kevin
Hidalgo, Stratton Smith and
Richard Wells.
The women return 13 girls as
senior Caycee Poust should lead
the way for the ladies. Joining
Poust as the only other senior will
be Lori Livingston. Four return-
ing minors include Joelle Ennis,
.le:m: Piers n, Jane Wilson and
Becky Kerber while sophomores
an Augustus. Sherry Camp-
bell, Patricia (nand. Brenda
Horton, Denise Pott. Susie Wen-
' ai . ngela Winstead also
u
ugh Kobe is pleased with
the healthy allottment ol return-
ing talent, he is looking forward
to the competition that his
newcomers may bring.
"The freshmen make it fun.
It's mce to have new freshmen
Kobe said happily. "It's going to
be verv competitive next vear �
n someone is pushing for a
spotthe freshmen are hungrv.
"We've always had the motto:
'you're only as good as your
ihmen class Kobe added.
"You can't gel faster if you don't
get taster students coming in.
That's how you keep the program
on the upswing
lt hough Kobe is excited
about bus new talent and the up-
coming season, he doesn't see
any glaring weakness. However,
he knows that newcomers may
lack experience and are untested
at the college level.
"I don't see any weakness he
said of the upcoming season.
"But we have a lot of freshmen
and even though they're good,
they're still freshmen � we're
untested
After a successful campaign a
year ago, Kobe felt the team had
to perform under pressure. "This
(past) year was a lot of pressure
he said. "We were uptight over it
(winning the conference) � we
were so nervous it hampered our
performance.
"Now that we've done it, we're
a little more relaxed Kobe con-
tinued. "We've got one under
our belt
Kobe stressed some goals that
he and his swimmers try to
achieve from year to year.
"We want a winning season
and want to win our conference
championship he explained.
"Also, we want to qualify in-
dividuals for the NCAA National
meet.
"We have academic goals �
we want our kids to do well in the
classroom Kobe added. "Out
of five seniors (last year), we had
three on the dean's list
As for the season as a whole,
Kobe tries to maintain the consis-
tent success from year to year and
is optimistic about the upcoming
campaign. If last year was any in-
dication of what's expected in
their 1986-87 campaign, then you
can look for ECU swimming to
continue their winning tradition.
Marchell Henry, shown here shooting over George Mason's Kennv
Saunders (5), is possibly otng to be moved to small forward.
Colonial Enjoys Prosperous Year;
Healthy Future For Young League
David Robinson (50), returns for his senior year at Navy. Robinson
was the leading shot blocker in the nation last year.
The Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion has recently completed its
first year of existence. The eight-
school league formerly known as
the ECAC-South, left the ECAC
last May to form the CAA, an in-
dependent conference organiza-
tion.
In the year since then, they've
hired their first commissioner,
former NCAA investigator Tom
Yeager, and first head of of-
ficials, Dan Woolridge, a former
ACC official.
In the short year since that
June 6, 1985 resolution that set
the Colonial apart from the
ECAC, a lot has been ac-
complished. The conference has
been awarded several automatic
berths into NCAA play, such as
in men's basketball, baseball and
soccer. It has set up a central of-
fice and has crowned 12 cham-
pions.
"We've had some significant
accomplishments both through
hard work and a little luck
Yeager said. "Getting an
automatic bid (in basketball) is a
paramount objective for any con-
ference, certainly a new one. It
establishes your identity with
other conferences � gives you a
measure of respectibility, and
gives your teams incentive.
"The basketball bid was our
main objective from day one
Yeager continued "Receiving it
was the payoff to a lot of hard
work by the leagues athletic
directors. It was a big boost to
our credibility
Not only did the league get an
automatic bid into the NCAA
tournament, filled by the U.S.
Naval Academy � and premier
player David Robinson � but the
league also had runner-up Rich-
mond picked as an at-large team
in the NCAA and George Mason
was chosen for the National In-
vitational Tournament.
The Midshipmen defeated
Tulsa, Syracuse and Cleveland
State before finally losing to
Duke University in the Eastern
Regional finals. Navy's win
marked the sixth time in a row
tha that a team from the old
ECAC-South or the CAA has ad-
vanced past the first round of the
tournament.
Richmond fell to Atlantic-10
champ St. Joseph in a one-point-
game in the opening round while
George Mason downed Lamar
before losing to Providence in the
second round.
"We were happy knowing in
advance that we would have one
team playing in the NCAA tour-
nament Yeager said. "We were
ecstatic with three teams in post-
season competition
Robinson, an All-Amencan
selection averaged 22 points.
rebounds and six blocked s
per game, leading the nation in
the last category. In fact, he
blocked more shots than all but
one team (Louisville) in the entire
Division I.
And Robinson will be back as
senior next season young
man of his stature is a ran'
Yeager said. "We're tortunaie
he's with us "
Another All-Amencan ap
peared in American University
soccer star Michael Bradv Hi
was named the Collegiate Player
of the Year by Soccer America
magazine and Adidas honored
him with the Adi Dasler Award,
also recognizing him as player of
the year.
Brady joined George Mason
Sam Sumo and Mike Reynolds
on the National Soccer Coaches
Association of America's first
team all-America list, also nam-
ing American's Pete Mehlert as
the coach of the year
American advanced to the
NCAA finals before finally los-
ing a 1-0 battle with UCLA for
the title in the longest game in
tournament history. The contest
went etght overtimes before final-
ly bang decided
NCAf m aS�n also in t
��� COLONIAL, pagtl0
Beckylements, who led the ma
Henry Wo
( ontinued from pa

Man hell Mt
Daugher
B Rf( K Met ORVfAt
And
s OFTOOPFR

v re
ed
�he Clevela
He
roun
State
ege elij
pro.
State Vv �
Guard Johnny Daw!
Duk
the 1
Devil eammate M -
picked N
Nuggets
Tw
'he :
elude Maryland's
Bias i B
Tech's J
11th
"is
"1 ,v cl dl
mine to play a
Daughen
'hroug college,
mind as a goa!
me pik
Cleveland presented Daug
with a N 55 Cavai
just after his select
Daugherty, wl
Carolina
sidered bv many
draft's most versatile i The
footer played ca
Tarheels but is projev
power forward in the NBA
"I'm delighted Brad has beer
I
1 2 Piece Chicken Cor
(Original Recipe" o
Extra Crispy
1 Small Mashed Pofc
& Gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
I
We Do
Expires 8-20 $6
mm� '� -�"�- - �
- �
� -
-





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 18, 1986
eason
Sports Fact
Wed. June 18.
Heavyweight chan
mer Ught-j
er Conn is ahead on
sn he unwis
k out
he process j
Of Conn, Louis says "He ca
Jru can't hide
mali f
perous Vein
oung League
E
� �
-
I
magazine and
ltic-10
point-
while
.dinar
in the
ing in
te one
tour-
were
pest-
le ii can
Brady joined ' .
Sam Sumo and Mike Reyi
on the Nati
Associa'
team all-America list, .i
ing American's' Pete Mehfc
the coach of the year
American advaru
NCAA finals before finallj
ing a 1-0 battle will f0,
the title in the longes: game in
tournament history. The contesr
went eight overtimes before final
ly being decided.
George Mason, also in the
NCAA field topped Virgiaa in
Set COLo.sul, pag, 10
Pirate Tennis Teams
Return Veteran Squads
JIM LEUTGENS Th�E��t Carolinian
Becky Clements, who led the ladies with an 8-1 record in '86, returns.
Henry Working Hard
Continued from pane 8
)rove u
1 think the other returning
'avers will be counted on more
o for their experience cont-
inued Henrv. "They've boon

Marchell He tin
� e and 1
funk
wc
ls
e's trying to Jo
trying to ac-
New o important
any team md Henry feels
rw playei g to
fit in fine. "With the guys we
have coming back, and the guys
we have coming in, practices are
definitely going to be different
stated Henry. "There will be
more competition, more people
pushing others for positions and
for time on the floor.
I think "Blue" (Theodore Ed-
wards) and Howard (Brown) are
going to help us right away
continued Henry. "You're talk-
ing about two junior-college
transfers that are talented. 1 think
we're going to be stronger inside
this year with the help of "Blue"
and 1 taccv King Tracey is tough
on the boards and "Blue" is a
strong player inside who is going
be tough in there on offense
Herb Dixon, who transfered to
Cleveland State, will truly be
missed. "Herb Dixon was a fine
point guard stated Henry. "I
tuiess he had his reasons for leav-
ing; however. I think we're going
:inss trim a lot
So, going to summer school
with a purpose isn't so bad after
all. Marched himself summed
things up pretty well, "The beach
will be there next year, my college
:areer won't
By RICK McCORMAC
( o-tiporta Kdllor
The ECU men's and women's
tennis teams enter the 1986 fall
season hoping to play their entire
schedule without the injury pro-
blems that hampered last year's
squads.
The men's team posted a 4-6
record last fall, but improved lo a
7-7 record in the spring for a
overall record of 11-13.
The women, did the exact op-
posite of the men, finishing 7-2 in
the fall. However, due to injury
and a tougher schedule, the
women went 4-9 in the spring for
a overall record of 11-11.
Both the men's and women's
teams are coached by Pat Sher-
man, and she felt the mjuns
played an important part in the
team's spring slide.
"We had problems with
chronic injuries all season
Sherman said. "We lost Ann
Manderfield for one-and-a-half
months, which forced our other
players into different positions as
well as costing us our number-
one player
Indeed, the loss of Manderfield
was costly, as it came in the Lady
Pirates' first match of the spring
against Campbell.
Among the standouts for the
women in last spring's dual team
matches for the women were:
Becky Clements (8-1), Lisa
Eichholz (7-2), Holly Murray
(8-0) and Susan Montjoy (6-3).
In doubles, Manderfield and
Eichholz had a near perfect 7-1
record, while Montjoy and
Clements weie 5-1.
In the women's CAA tourney,
Mandefield came away with a
third-place finish at the number-
one singles. In team standings.
ECU finished well behind the top
three teams, (William A Mary,
James Madison and Richmond)
but was only one-and-a-hall
points behind fourth-place
American.
The men's improvement from
fall to spring was impressive con-
sidering the fact thev lost two o!
their top six players in the in-
terim.
"We lost two of our top six
players, as well as suffering in-
juries Sherman said. "I was
very pleased with the perfor-
mance, especially the non-top six
players, to compete well
One player who did not see ac-
tion last fall had the best winning
percentage on the team in spring
singles play. Todd Sumner went
7-2 for the spring for the best
record of the season, despite not
playing in the fall.
The highest finisher for the
men in the CAA tourney was
John Melhorn, who finished the
year with a 20-14 record on the
year.
Sherman was pleased with the
play of both teams, especially
considering the injuries.
"1 think considering all of the
injuries, both teams did a good
job Sherman said. "Although
we didn't pull off any major
upsets we didn't lose to anyone
we shouldn't lose to
One change in the schedu.e tor
next year is that both the men's
and women's conference toui-
naments will be played in the spr-
ing. In the past, the men played
their tournament in the fall.
We're really happy to be play-
ing both our tournaments in the
spring Sherman said. "This is
something we've wanted for a
long time now
The future looks bright for
both the men's and women's
teams, as the majority ot the key
performers return for both
teams.
lor the men, John -nthonv
was the only key loss to gradua-
tion as junior Pat Campanaro.
seniors Dan LaMont and dreg
Loyd and sophomore Ion
Melhorn will return to lead the
men.
The women will be led in the
fall by senior Ann Manderfield.
lunior Susan Montjoy ana
sophomores Beckv Clements,
Lisa Eichholz, Amy Ziemer and
Hollv Murrav.
JIM LEUTGENS " � 11
Sophomore Amy iemer will also return for Pat sfun
Tequila Bar Weekly Specials
Sunrise Sunday: ; oo pet set
Xlelo- Mondays: $2 25 per serve
Toasty- Tuesday: $2 00 per sen e
Wednesday: $1.75 Pirates Cane Mu:
Tonic Thursday: si 75 per serve
Fried Friday: Get Fried Earh 1 ur ne U
mem how � W end (he night uDside down!
Saturday ight Specials
"House Drink � leqiala Blues
(look for our new "I ajoon" Bar)
ocated httside
TEQUILA
l� �!h s 1 mMIm.m
752 8926
Daugherty Top Choice In NBA Draft
By RICK McCORMAC
And
SCOTT COOPER
Md I PI Vlrr kri�T
The heralded Atlantic Coast
Conference made it one. two,
hree in yesterda) 's NBA draft as
North Carolina's Brad Daugher-
�y realized a dream when he top-
ped the draft lisl and headed to
he Cleveland Cavalie
He was joined in the first
�ound by four other player' from
North Carolina schools. N.C.
State's center Chris Washburn,
vho gave up his remaining two
vears of college eligibilitv to go
pro, was the third player selected
n the draft, going to the Golden
State Warriors.
Guard Johnny Daw kins ot"
Duke headed to San Antonio on
he 10th pick overall, and Blue
Devil teammate Mark Alarie was
picked No. 18 by the Denver
Nuggets.
Two other players chosen in
he first round from the ACC in-
clude Maryland's No. 2 pick Len
Bias (Boston Celtics) and Georgia
Tech's John Salley, who was the
: 1th pick, went to the Detroit
"istons.
"It's a childhood dream of
�nine to play a pro sport
Daugherty said. "When you go
�hrough college, it sticks in your
mind as a goalto be the number
me pick
Cleveland presented Daugherty
vith a No. 55 Cavaliers jersey
lust after his selection.
Daugherty, who entered North
Carolina at the age of 16, is con-
.idered by many scouts to be the
draft's most versatile player. The
footer played center for the
Tarheels but is projected as a
power forward in the NBA.
"I'm delighted Brad has been
selected number one in the NBA
draft said Tarheel head coach
Dean Smith. "Fortunately, he
moves well and can plav forward
in addition to playing center. He
does have fine offensive skills,
great hands and a work ethic
towards defense that will help
him
Daugherty averaged 20.2
points and 9.0 rebounds a game
during his senior year. He was
seventh on the Tarheel all-lime
scoring list and was the school's
fourth-leading rebounder. He
was their mosi accurate shooter,
hitting 61.0 percent of his shois
from the field.
"I'm confident he will con-
tinue ihe rapid improvement he
made each year he was here and
go on to become an outstanding
NBA player Smith said. "He's
very fundamentally sound, and 1
feel confident his transition to
professional basketball will be
relatively smooth
To get the top pick and the
right to choose Daugherty, the
Cavaliers sent forward Roy Hin-
son to Philadelphia.
Washburn, a 6-11 powerhouse
from Hickory, N.C, averaged
16 points and 6 rebounds for
the Wolfpack last season.
Forward Alarie said he was
chosen by his team ot preference
in his round ot preference.
"My first choice was to go to
Denver the Scotsdale. A
native Alarie said. "There wasn't
much chance 1 would be picked
earlier, and Denver seemed to be
the best situation for me. My
stvle of play and the fact that I'm
the product of a great program at
Duke make me very suited to
playing for Denver
Blue Devil coach Mike
Krzyzewski said: "To have two
first-round picks is just tremen-
dous. When something really
good happens to people from
your own family, you feel good
For a younger Juke player,
seeing two of his teammates nab-
bed in the first round was an in-
spiration.
"I think anybody who plays
the game of basketball has the
dream of making il in the NBA
said sophomore forward guard
Billy King. "That's the highest
level of achievement. In my deal-
ings, it makes me want to worn
even harder. It gives me
something to measure my ability
and waht it takes to make it at
that level
Two Wolfpack players saw
second-round action. Guard Nate
McMillan headed to Seattle on
the 30th pick and forward Par
ragigtis "Pano" Fasoulas headed
to Portland on the 37th selection.
In third-round selections,
Duke guard David Henderson is
headed to Washington on the
58th pick.
Two Tarheels were nabbed in
fourth-round picks. Center War-
ren Martin was selected No. 73 by
Cleveland and guard Steve Hale
headed to New Jersey on the 81st-
COARJWQ"
Wednesday
fjsdbb
(LPmhw
nresents
Thursday
seLectuocution
Computer Game for Singles
with 25 DRAFT ALL NIGHT
Don't drive. Call the Liberty Ride
& for more info call 758-5570.

StfMMl
Stani
r.vuuuACc-
Sl'HHl
Stlflfttl
r
CONTACT LENSES
$105.00
$ 145.00
DAILY WEAR
EXTENDED WEAR
includes exams, lenses, care kit ar3 follow-up tor one month
Student ID No other discounts apply
OPTOMCTWC
�Y�CAR�C�KT�R
Dr Peter W HolNs
Gfeenville. NC 27834
,O0
i PA
The Tipton Annex
228 Greenvllte Blvd (919) 756-9404 j I
I
6
ce
STUDENT STORES
Wright Building
Owned and Operated by East Carolina Univers
SUMMER SIZZLER
SALE
�a
i
2 Piece Chicken Combo
(Original Recipe or
Extra Crispy�
1 Small Mashed Potato
& Gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
coupon
OR
V
d
o

�ks
6 Kentucky Nuggets
Kentucky Fries
1 Large Drink
$1.99
We 0o Chicken Eight
Expires 8-20-86
COUPON
GREA TL Y REDUCED
Sale Starts June 18
I
plus tax
.
SUMNt
CviAJU
&2id Stfnut ' svmtt
cxiUUacf
B
� s -r
v
i
I






10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 18. 1986
Colonial Athletic Assocation Earns Respect
Continued from page 8
the first round before being
eliminated by American.
In men's cross country, Navy
won the league title and went on
to finish seventh in the NCAA
meet. Richmond topped regular
season winner ECU in the CAA
baseball tournament to advance
to the Midwest Regional in
Stillwater, Ok.
In women's basketball, cham-
pion James Madison advanced to
the NCAA tournament, winning
Classifieds
MttMJJS
TO THE FAMILY OF ANNA TED
JADINATA: The International Stu
dent Association wishes to express
deep sympathy over the loss of your
loved one, Anna She was well liked
and respected by her peers, and, as
a member of the international stu
dent family she will be greatly
missed.
KAPPA SIGMA: Congratulations to
the following Kappa Sigma Brothers
who will graduate first session! Lan
ny Wilson, Dwayne Wiseman, Scott
Peroyea, Rob Strauss and Dean Mc
Crickard
two games, including a shocker
over the East Regional's top seed
Virginia.
Among individuals who stood
out nationally were Wiljiam &
Mary's Keith Halla, who won the
league cross country title and
placed 18th in the NCAA meet;
William & Mary's Namratha Ap-
pa Rao won the women's singles
tennis title and went 1-1 in the
NCAA field; James Madison's
Ingrid Hetz and Chris Gillies ad-
vanced to the NCAA tournamnet
in women's doubles; and George
Mason's cross country runner
Carol Parietti competed in the
NCAA meet.
Overall, the Colonial crowned
seven men's and five women's
championships this year. Seven
of the eight conference schools
came away with at least one
championship.
Richmond's John Davis show-
ed that it wasn't all athletics as he
won a post-graduate NCAA
scholarship and became a Rhodes
Scholar candidate.
"We may not always have a
soccer team go to the national
finals and basketball teams go
that far in the NCAA tourna-
ment Yeager said. "But we
should always have our share of
successes. Maybe our baseball
champion will advance in the
NCAA's, maybe we can get a
basketball team to the NIT at the
Garden.
"We can't control perfor-
mances on the court or the field.
But we can provide our teams
with a positive atmosphere for
competition. We can try for
another automatic bid, we can
work to increse attendance at our
basketball tournament. We can
offer to host an NCAA cham-
pionship or a regional tourna-
ment
The CAA has begun work on
trying to offer a better at-
mosphere for basketball. Next
year's � and those in 1988 and
1989 � basketball tournament
will be held at the Hampton Col-
iseum. The league has already
reached an agreement with Home
Team Sports for a third season of
basketball coverage.
The hiring of an officials'
director, the move to Hampton
for the basketball tournament, a
proposed move to Richmond,
The Diamond for baseball, and
the HTS television contract are
just single steps in making the
Colonial an attractive package
"It just gives us :he opportuni-
ty to show more and more people
in our region, and sometimes in
other parts of the nation jus: how
good we really are Yeager said,
"And that's the whole idea
PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH SAT . JUNE 21 AT SAV A CENTER IN GREENVILLE
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES
JlIlIIlllllTTtTTTTTI
RANDALL LOUIS JAMES (th
calculus-less lifeguard): Well, th
(day has finally arrived. YOU Re
FAMOUS Your name has bee
published in The East Carolinian!
Women will be beating down the
back house aoors iust to se who the
j real Ranaali James" really is. Try
, no? to let the all of the attention go to
your ���ead1 Have a good summer
I Love, Shannon.
"ROBERT TAYLOR HALE: Con
J grate al ns on your graduation
P � � . Acre going to miss ya Big
cGu�; G g �e Wendell hell1
WANTED
WANTED: Pemaie grad student
needs 1 bdrm apt for the fall
semester or before Leave a
message for Cheryl. 752 4973
RIDE NEEDED TO RICHMOND
VA For the weekend of the 20th
Can leave Friday (20th) after n
am. will help with expenses. Please
call Pat at 757 0009 or 757 6366.
INTERNSHIP: Want to know how to
get to the head of you class without
being the head of the class? Sign up
for an internship while still in school
with Northwestern Mutual Life
Gain valuable business experience
while in school. Great for your
resume Potential for $9 an hour
plus. Call Bill or Dee at 355 7700 to
apply.
1986 GRADUATES STILL LOOK-
ING FOR A JOB?: Consider a
career with Northwestern Mutual
.te We offer a training program
unmatched in the financial world.
Contact us now to enroll in our
August training school! Send
resume to 217 Commerce St Green
ville, N C 27834
ROOMMATE WANTED: For 2nd
session and fall Pool Ask for Jack
que or Rnonaa 757-0551. Rent, $132
plus ' a utilities
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED: To
assist wi activities for Science
Track Enhancement Program
(STEP) STEP is designed to en
courage interest in math and science
careers among women and
minorities Participants are rising
9th graders. Contact Gloria Grimes,
Volunteer Coordinator, 757 6856.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Male or
female to share 2 bedroom house off
Mumford Rd 5125month rent, $75
deposit, '2 utilities and cable. Call
757 1160 and ask for Reagan.
&sam
and OW
Plus Double Coupons
(See store for details)
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli, Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality
PACK
(
SALE
WORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
perience in typing resumes, theses,
techical documents, and term
papers. We manage and merge your
names and addresses into merged
letters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards Our prices ar extremely
reasonable and we always offer a 15
percent discount to ECU students.
S&F Professional Computer Co.
(back of Franklin's) 115 E. 5th St.
757 0472752 3694.
FOR RENT: Large 2 bedroom
duplex near hospital. Washerdryer
hook ups, patio Available June 22.
$315month. 355-7225, leave
message
FOR SALE: 1982 Knox Trailer
Home 3 br V� bath, air, dryer.
$500 and take up payments $176.95.
Call after 6, 758 1559
FOR RENT: Available July 1. Love-
ly 2 bedroom townhouse. Equipped
heat pumpac, 1 year lease,
$315month, l month deposit. Leave
phone number at 756-8549.
FOR SALE: Single bed, comforter
wmatching dust ruffles, pillow
covers, curtains, chair, hamper and
basket, NEG. 758 4682
FURNITURE FOR SALE: Sofa and
dining table. Good condition. Price
negotiable. Call 758 5489 after 2 p.m.
OR WATER
tisco1
48 oz.
can
WITH AN
1
6.5 oz.
LIMIT ONE WITH" AN ADDITIONAL
I PURCHASE AT EVERYDAy LOW PRICE
Mar
m f9F lilll AH
Margarine Qtrs. j?5 �
1 lb.
pkg
BEEF-CHICKEN. TURKEY
A&P Pot Pies
8oz.
pkgs.
0PENSUNDAY7 A.M11 BM. g�i7,AK: 703 GREENVILLE BLVD. � OPEN 24 HOURS
V V

B





10
hAST R l INI
n m 18
Colonial Athletic Assocation Earns Respect
i ontioued from par 8
fil si
t oum
hetoie heiiiL
eliminated b mei ican
nen 's cross country . Na
vo; eague title and went on
in the M A A
mond topped regulai
season v innei III in the CAA
urnament to advance
Midwesl Regional in
- basketball, chain
. - Madison advanced to
. vsinning
Classifieds
two games, including a shockei
ovei the Easi Regional's top seed
irginia
Among individuals who stood
out nationally were W illiam &
Mary's Keith Halla, who wen the
league cross country title and
placed ISth in the NCAA meet;
William & Mary's Namratha p
pa Rao won the women singles
tennis title and went ! 1 in the
N. field; lames Madison's
Ingrid Hetz and (. hris Gillies
vanced to the V . ,
in women's doubles, and
Mason's cross country runnei
' Parietti competed in the
N( A meet.
(verall, the c olonial crowned
seven men's and five women's
� npionships this seat Se
ol the eight conference schools
� ame away with ai least
npionship
Richmond' Davis show
ed thai ivasn'1 all athletics .is he
won a pos graduate N
a ship and became a Rhodes
�lai candidate.
"We may i i always have a
soccei team go to the nati
finals and basketball team
that tar in the N A A toui
ment Yeagei said "But
uld alw e out snap
successe Maybe
impion will advance in the
N A, maybe we i an g
basketball team to the Nl I at
"We an't contn l
le field,
in provide out teams
with a positive a ere for
.petition v c can try
another automatic bid. e
work to itk rese attendant i
basketball tournament We
i ffei ti � ; an m A a
pionship oi a regional
ment "
rhe CAA ha � -
- �
yeai
ba -
will be held the Ha
iseum 11
reached ti
1 ea
Han

HI
a
PERSONALS
i FAMILY OF ANNA TED
MNATA
� stu
� ��
KAPPA SIC
FECTIVETI UNI NTER IN GREENVILLE
WE RESERVE THE RIGH1
I
V
LOUIS JAMES ; tM
" '1
-
� i
ist cai
mmnimnn
0R HALE
mniiniir
RANTED
DED TO RICHMOND
' " �
. � iftei
� s Please
i Or 757 6366

� "
�SSBfSS
Slllll t�"1 Plus Double Coupons
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat. Produce, Deli, Bakery & Continuity Bonus items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Egual Quality

ADUATES STILL LOOK
NG FOR A JOB?
' ' ' �
ROOMMATE A'ANTED
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
n
U.S.D.A CHOICE BEEF
� � W 6856
WANTED lAale or
' $75
Cubed Steak
U.S.D.A.
CHOICE
flip)
lb.
198
SALE
LUNCHEON MEAT
Armour Treet
DUKE S
Mayonnaise
c
78
LIMI1 ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
RED RIPE FAMILY PACK
Tomatoes
AORD PROCESSING Me offer ea
and term
and merge our
nto merged
opes or roloaex
es ar extremely
Ae always offer a 15
� , ECU students
Computer Co
E 5th St
12 02.
I
El DIET PEPSI � MT. DEW � SLICE
A Pepsi Cola
P&Q
can
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
2 liter
bottle
m�$
Paper Towels
REGULAR OR BUTTER FLAVOR
FOR KlST

FOR SALE
Large 2 bedroom
jpital Washer aryer
A ailable June 22
3 S 5 7225. leave
MJ2
Crisco Shortening
LIMIT ONE
48oz.
can
WITH AN A
jing W
8 ;
.7.1� Wl� " ADDITIONAL
A&P
DDiTlONA
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY lOW PRiCE
Shortening fvEjktfQ
Macaroni & Cheese
3 � 89e
OouDie. u
ox Trailer
. � at! air crer
lk ,fc pamenrs Jl 76 95
iftei ' f58 1559
forrfnt Ava able July 1 Love
� � " � ' ouse Equipped
� f?ir lease.
;posit Leave
�� 'SA 8549
FOR SALE J e bed, comforter
a dust ruffles, pillow
rta hair hamper and
�� � '51 M82
FURNITURE FOR SALE Sofa and
� - �: ondition Pnce
'�able Can 758 5489 after 2pm
sjfljfc
DOUBLE Q IN OIL OR WATER
Chunk Light Tuna
48c
Margarine Qtrs
6.5 02
can
BEEF CHICKENTURKEY
A&P Pot Pies
i i
802. ,
1 pkgs. I
0PENSUNDAY7 A.M11 BM. WSklflk 703 GREENVILLE BLVD. OPEN 24 HQI IRS





Title
The East Carolinian, June 18, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 18, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.480
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57825
Preferred Citation
Cite this item
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of ECU Libraries. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy