The East Carolinian, June 11, 1986






�he
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No:5�-�
Wednesday, June 11, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
8 Pages
Circulation 5,000
1 II
ilMIH U.lNs
� hi rj�t 4 jriiruan
A Touch Of Pain
ECU student Brian Baines recieves required vaccines at the infir-
mary from nurse June Sellars in order to meet the new immuniza-
tion requirements for college student which go into effect July 1.
See related story page 1.
WZMB To Appeal
To Wider Audience
By BETH WHICKER
Assistant News Editor
Due to response from the
students and community campus
radio station WZMB has changed
it's sound.
Campus surveys compiled by
marketing students last spring
prompted the change which
WZMB's General Manager Jeff
Chester described as "less new
wave
"It's not an entire format
change, but a change that will ap-
peal to the students and com-
munity said Chester.
According to Chester, the spr-
ing marketing survey indicated
WZMB's listeners wanted a
change from the old format
which was getting progressively
new wave.
"We've started playing more
rock-n-roll without playing top
40 music. Being an alternative
FM station we were set up to be a
change from the top 40 stations
found on the dial said Chester.
Chester added, some radio
listeners find top 40 boring and
repetitive because the stations on-
ly play one song off an entire
album.
Chester explained WZMB
plays cuts other than the hit
single from popular albums so
listeners hear more of a selection
from a particular artist.
"Another change in the format
is playing music recorded by local
and regional bands Chester
said.
WZMB has been playing cuts
from albums by Sidewinder, The
Producers, Robbin Thompson,
and Sugarcreek.
"Listeners can relate to this
music because the bands are in
the area regularly for live perfor-
mance stated Chester. He add-
ed otherwise these bands might
not get much exposure.
For now WZMB is in a period
of transition which will last until
the fall semester when WZMB's
new sound will be complete.
Chester said WZMB is focus-
ing inorder to appeal to the taste
of the incoming freshman as well
as the entire student body.
"As for the future, all sorts of
great things are coming up in-
cluding more promotions,
giveaways, and interviews said
Chester.
N.C. Legislature Requires
Proper Student Immunization
BMl!&Ufiw,CK
Effective July 1, 1986, the
North Carolina General
Assembly requires all college
students in North Carolina to be
properly immunized before atten-
ding classes, said Kay VanNort-
wick, administrative manager for
the Student Health Services.
Director of Student Health
Services James McCallum said,
"We have been trying to do this
for years For years, said Mc-
Callum the SHS tried to get
students immunized but have
been unable to enforce the rule.
VanNortwick emphasized this
law pertains to any student who
enters for the first time or
reenters a N.C. university.
"If they were here in the spring
semester they don't have to
worry said VanNortwick, "on-
ly those who have a break in
enrollment She emphasized
summer is not considered a break
in enrollment.
There is a good basis for the
law, VanNortwick said. But she
maintained the big problem will
be verification.
McCallum and VanNortwick
emphasized the immunization
record must be signed by the stu-
dent's physician or stamped by
their local Health Department.
McCallum said, "The law states
it must be documented, there are
no exceptions
VanNortwick expects the older
students will have the most dif-
ficulty in providing proper im-
munization documentation.
The SHS will absorb the cost
oi immunizing students this year,
said VanNortwick. "We got the
vaccines from the Health Depart-
ment, but I don't have any idea
as to how much it will cost she
said.
McCallum said the SHS had to
hire a records person specifically
and increase their computer ex-
pense. "Next year VanNort-
wick said, "we will have to
evaluate and see if we can absorb
the cost
VanNortwick said this law will
mainly affect freshman.
Therefore, after students are ac-
cepted to ECU, she said, they will
receive a letter from SHS explain-
ing the new law and how to com-
ply.
Also included is a health cer-
tificate. On page three of the
health certificate an entire section
is devoted to the student's im-
munization record. The vaccines
that must be documented are:
T)PT, tetanus, polio, measles,
mumps, and rubella.
VanNortwick said after the
SHS receives the student's health
certificate it is inspected to deter-
mine if there are any deficiencies.
If so, then a personal letter is sent
to the student outlining the defi-
ciencies and how to correct them
and complete the health cer-
tificate.
"While the freshman are get-
ting their ID's made in
Mendenhall, we will have a sta-
tion set up where they can check
their health certificates to make
sure they are complete Van-
Nortwick said.
She added there will be a doc-
tor and a nurse available to give
students a vaccination if they so
desire. "We will not force them
to get a shot explained Van-
Nortwick.
Both McCallum and VanNort-
wick agreed the new law has the
right intent but is poorly written.
McCallum said, "The law
poorly written. It does not allow
for medical judgement and will
force some students to be reim-
munized
VanNortwick added, "Com-
munity colleges are exempt from
this law. I don't think this is fair
because it's a large population
"This law was written bv
lawyers said McCallum. If doc-
tors had had input, maintained
McCallum, then these problems
would have been eliminated.
Blue Law Repealed By City Council
By PATTI KEMMIS
Vssislant News Editor
At a public hearing Monday,
June 9, the Greenville City Coun-
cil voted 4-2 to revise Greenville's
Blue Law.
The two council members voting
against the revision were Janice
Buck and Bill Hadden.
The original law prohibited the
selling of certain items on Sun-
day.
Included in the prohibited
items were clothing, furniture
and business items.
According to Loretta Lewellyn
of the city manager's office,
DormsUndergoCooling,
Cleaning, AndPainting
The only major maintenance
job being done in the dorms this
summer, according to Dan
Wooten, director oi Housing
Operations, is adding air condi-
tioning to one wing of Scott Hall.
which includes approximatelv
192 beds.
Wooten said the job would not
be completed by the beginning of
the 1986 Fall Semester, but shoud
be finished by the end of
September.
In the last two summers, Flem-
ing and Gotten were renovated
and air conditioned.
Three dorms, Aycock, Flet-
cher, and Greene are being re-
painted this summer. Wooten
said every dorm is repainted on a
five year scheledule.
All basic cleaning is done by
the regular house keepers.
"Valuables found in the dorms
See SUMMER Page 3.
businesses allowed to operate on
Sundays were groceries, con-
vience stores, drug stores, hotels,
restaurants, newspaper stands,
entertainment and recteational
businesses(movie theaters and
bowling alleys,etc.), and service
stations.
The new law allows all business
to operate and sell all merchan-
dise between the hours of 1 p. m.
and 1 a.m. on Sundays.
"I think it is a positive move
for the city said Mayor Les
Garner. "The law was unfair and
I think the revision will be good
for Greenville and will help it
grow
Thomas Fisher of the ABC
Board stated the new law will
have no effect on Greenville's
ABC Stores since state law pro-
hibits the sale of liquor on Sun-
days.
"I'm dissappointed to see the
law changed said S.J. Hopper,
manager of J.C. Penneys in Pitt
Plaza. "1 feel shopping can be
NISCO Gives Welcome
Starting the 16th of June, the
SGA will be sponsoring a pro-
gram aimed at informing new
students about campus organiza-
tions.
The program, which was
started by former SGA President
David Brown is called NISCO �
for New Student Introduction to
Campus Organizations.
According to the current SGA
President Steve Cunanan, the
program will involve six sessions,
each coinciding to new student
orientation periods. These ses-
sions will be held in Mendenhall,
room 244, from 1 pm to 3 pm,
June 16th, 19th, 23rd, 30th, and
July 7th, and 10th.
"These programs let the
students see what the campus has
to offer, and the students can be
easier to contact by the organiza-
tions said Cunanan.
Graduates Encourage More Involvement
BM�&Uffi,WICK
Three ECU graduates, who are
making it in the corporate com-
munity, advise today's students
to get involved and set your goals
high.
Glenn Smith, Eric Sox, and
Chris Pennington, all recent
graduates of ECU are now work-
ing for Penthouse magazine in
New York.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds8
Editorials4
Features5
Sports7
To be a schoolmaster is next
to being a king. In the opi-
nions of fools it is a humble
task, but in fact it is the
noblest of occupations.
�Erasmus
Smith, a 1979 graduate, advis-
ed students to get involved with
campus organizations like SGA,
academic fraternites, or business
organizations. He said, "It
teaches you how to work with
others, because you have to learn
to work with other people in the
business world
Sox counseled students to get
practical work experience
through co-op programs or rele-
vant summer jobs.
The 1986 graduate also said
students should set their goals
and achieve them. "Set academic
goals as high as you can and
achieve those goals said Sox.
Pennington, who graduated in
1981, also said students need to
set proper goals. He added,
however, that students should let
nothing get in the way of achiev-
ing those goals.
Pennington said while students
are achieving their goals, "have a
good attitude and a good time
while doing it
All three praised ECU for
preparing them as well as possi-
ble. Sox said, "ECU gave me a
very well rounded education and
gave me opportunities. The
school helped me to develop the
people skills along with the
academics.
Smith agreed saying ECU did a
good job, but he maintained col-
lege in general does not prepare
one for a job. He added, "You
find everyone in the working
world has a degree He said to
go ahead and earn a masters, "a
masters gives you an edge
Although all three only had
good things to say about ECU,
they did have a few negative com-
ments.
Sox believes the two most im-
portant skills today are oral and
written communication. He said
there needs to be an emphasis on
speech and communication skills.
"It's not just ECU didn't prepare
me said Sox, "there just wasn't
the big emphasis on communica-
tion
While Sox said the academics
at ECU did not emphasize the
proper areas, Smith felt ECU
lacked a social life. "ECU is
kind-of no-where's-ville. There
was no social life that could
prepare me for life
Pennington, Sox, and Smith
agreed there was a big adjustment
between college life and the
business world.
Pennington thought the biggest
adjustment for him was not being
able to socialize as much as he did
at ECU. Moreover, he added he
had to develop a corporate per-
sonality and a business attitude.
Sox felt there is more pressure
to succeed in the business world
than at school. "At school he
said, "you can flunk a class and
take the class over but in the
business world, if you screw-up,
you can be reolaced
Sox summarized by saying the
biggest adjustment was "you
work
"I miss the days when I could
miss a class reminisced Smith.
done on the other six days of the
week
Hopper saiJ Penntvshas no
immediate plans to open, but will
wait and see what the other stores
do and what the consumers want.
Harvey Lindsay, manager of
Carolinia East Mall, said the
stores in the mail had made no
decisions.
"The law was restrictive and
discrimitive said Lindsay. "I
think revising it was the right
thing to do
Lindsay said a lot will probably
depend on what the main depart-
ment stores (Belks and Sears)
decide to do.
Greenville Banks, manager of
Belks, said the store has no im-
mediate plans to open but there is
a possibility in the future.
Sears has made no decision.
"People who have invested in a
business have the right to use it
seven days a week if they choose
to said Lindsay.
JIM LIUTQINS - �t C.roi.m.n
ECU's New Classroom Complex
Work on the new 163,729 square-foot building is progressing on
schedule. The new building is expected to be completed by the fall
of 1987.
4M� �-�������
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I HI EAS1 c AROl NIAN
It M II. ls8f.
Announcements
EATING DISORDERS
t .v "y Disorders Support C.ro.
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irexta m . n �� sun a
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' . m m root
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NORTHERNTELECOM
ingle Park � �. �
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BINGO ICE CREAM
cream party 5 .
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
� ISA is we.com,�g all member, and
ents who are interested in sooaM no
w.m Internationa. Student tor Mo, ,?
Mo,ne,ooKou.par,ySat me uth ?�
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Stop hurting
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ONSOLIDATED
'HEATRES
Adults S2 00
CHILDREI
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756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
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Held Over for
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7:00, 9:15
THE MANHATTAN
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RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
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To the Familiar
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BAGS
ACKPACKS, TENTS. COTS. SHOVELS HAM
"XS. MESS KITS. CANTEENS. FATIGUES V
TS. RAINWEAR. T-SHIRTS. ENAMELWARE
�S. WORK CLOTHES. 2100 DIFFERENT ITEMS
ARMY-NAVY STORE
1501 S. I
Camp,
i

Mexican Pest'ni-
521 Cotanche Stretj
757-1666
Wednesday
rtgjfl-
fEb$
(LpMEnv
Thursday
For Father's Day
1986, (,ive Dad A
fj Sff Cool
w h Stool
s unupu . it sfun
' only S18.0V

for the Dad
i: � �
Qandalf's
MALPASS MUFFLER
AND PARTS
Your Complete
Speedometer
Testing
Headquarters
2616 East 10th Street � Greenville, NC 27834
8
selectuocution
with 25 DRAFT ALL NIGHT
Don't drive. C Liberty Hide
&for mart info rail 758-5570
SALE STARTS TODAY!
RACK ROOM
branded shoes
GREENVILE BUYER'S MKKl I Memorial Drix
SEMI-ANNUAL SHOE
FANTASTIC VALUES
for the entire family
including jellies, barefoot san-
dals, canvas, dress and casual
shoes and handbags.
GREAT LOW PRICES
Our prices were low,
but now �
they are lower than ever
SAVINGS UP TO
CO KROCERINC FOR ALL YOUR
Tailgate Party
Needs!
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SINGLE TOPPING THIN CRUST
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For
Coke
Classic
NRB
Serve n'
Save Wieners .
79c
KROGER GRADF A
Large
Eggs . . . .
Do
59C
QUARTER S
Mrs. Filbert's 0 -
Margarine � 99C
"Prices so great you'll
have to see to believe"
USDA CHOICE HEAVY WESTERN
GRAIN FED BEEF CENTER CUT
Boneless
Round Steak
RED RIPE
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Lb
California
Strawberries
O
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ALL VARIETIES DELTA
GOLD OR
O'Grady's m
Potato Chips �j
$
Video Movie Rentals
KROGER A
OR , �
V
Buttercrust
Bread
59
Summer U
On Dc
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6'j-7
Oz
Bag
ASSORTED .
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Ice Cream
$
ADVfffTISfD ITEM POlIC,
Fjfh o� tnesp advertisi �
items is required
fediiy avMrjie tor saie in
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ao it we do run out ot an
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reflecting tne same s)v
mgs or a raincner wnm
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cnase tne advertised item
M tne advertised price
witnin 50 days Oniy one
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repted per item
WeDoChicj
Expires �
�1





THE LAST AROI INI AN
JLNL 11, 186
Familiar
uanl
Campus Voice
What would you change about ECl'?
21 C Dlaniht' Street
"51666
-It
FLER
Shades To Fit
Everyone's Needs
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
Larr Woolurd
Senior, Management
"Stricter guidelines for those
who ride bikes on sidewalks on
campus. They ought to be given a
ticket
Rob Henderson
Industrial Technology. Senior
"I would change the way cam-
pus police tickets cars, and their
attitudes toward students and not
tow awav cars all the time
plete
9�tt.
rters
7
5
8
7
6
7
6
ville, NC 27834
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Coke
Classic
89
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Filbert's
icarine . .
2 99o
Buttercrust
Bread
59
)RS
Texas Gold
Ice Cream
. 'i�af.i(
Catharine Hofmann
Business, Junior
"The way parking is done. For
commuters it nothing. It's kind
of bad to park in Grifton to get to
class "
Van Alston
Business, Freshman
"The curfew in the dorms,
think it's too strict
How do 1 pick out a good pair of
sunglases?
Are you looking at the world
through rose-colored sunglasses?
If so, you may not see the next
traffic light you encounter. Other
brightly tinted sunglasses such as
red, yellow, bright orange, blue,
and purple can also interfere with
the wearer's perception of basic
traffic light colors.
The Health Column By:
Mary Klesha Adams
.dcring buying a
new pan of sunglasses, there are
several tips to keep in mind:
� lenses should be large enough to
shield most angles oi vision
(above, below, and either side)
� prescription sunglasses are bet-
ter than clip-ons for those who
wear glasses
� sunglasses protect contact lens
wearers from excess light, dirt,
dust and wind
� sunglasses are beneficial for
people who have had cataract
surgery and are more sensitive to
hi ighl light
Evaluate the quality of non-
presenption sunglass lenses by:
� examing the glasses in and
lins ghl for scratches,
ibbies. blurs or other
flaws
� hold the glasses at half an arm's
length. Focus on an object with
strong vertical and horizontal
lines
� move the glasses slowly up,
down and sideways
If the lines waver, this indicates
a lens distortion; lens distortions
are not harmful; however, they
can cause the eyes to work harder
resulting in squinting, blinking,
tearing, slight headaches, nausea,
and dizziness.
For more information about
sunglasses contact the Student
Health Service or send a self-
addressed, stamped, business-
sized envelope to: Sunglasses,
National Society to Prevent
Blindness � North Carolina Af-
filiate, 1033 Wade Avenue, Suite
208, Raleigh, North Carolina
27605.
'ATTIC
li
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
321 East 10th Street
Call: 758-489 .
Thi� Coupon Good for
50 OFF
Any Blend-in or Blend-in Sundae
1 coupon per order pkeae
( .Jup � - : : I �-nJ hj IC I VHf-
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
321 East 10th Street
Call: 758-4896
Thi� Coupon Good for
50 OFF
�ny mini or large tundae
1 coupon per order pleaae
Alan Questell
Graduate, MB i
"The parking. It's hard to find
parking ai nigl You hae to
especia
girK who have k ai light
far ofl campus
SummerWork
On Dorms
Continued I-rom Page 1.
afte:
usually
until tl
ing Fall Semester.
Wooien added,
appears to be of major value and
we know who it belongs to, we
JUNE
11 WED
86
. 1 � Imp-rue �"i� Kfw-
12 THURS
ENTICER
Hea � -le:j ! hw,
13 FRi
�C areweii t oncgr "f
i'4'SAf
High Risk
15 SUN
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Thursday Night Is
TACO NIGHT
Two Great Tacos
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Offer Good From 7 p.m11 p.m.
Not Valid on Deliveries
ALL DAY FRIDAY
32 oz. Bucket o' Your Favorite Draft
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752-2183
�ETINGS
emester are
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! the follow-
ed Wooten.
ii something
Greeting
Cards
for all of life's special moments
Central Book and News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open 7 days a Week
Balloons For All Occasions
Presen ts
Draft
Nite
the owner.
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2 Piece Chicken Combo
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� "
r





atije iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender, i,m����
Daniel Maurer. Ma&&�
Mike Ludwick, �� e�� Steve Folmar, .� o4�6�
Scott Cooper. �� emm Anthony Martin, ��,�� o�, m.�
John Shannon. ,�� Meg Needham, omaauai Mana�,
DeChanile Johnson, � bm� Shannon Short, w� v
June 11, s�6
Opinion
Page 4
JV4&4
Putting The Pieces Back Together
When seven astronauts met their
demise on Jan. 28, American
dreams of conquering space were
shattered, the future of NASA's
shuttle program left uncertain.
Now, with the release of a report by
the Rogers Commission, America
can start picking up the pieces and
forging ahead. But where do we
start and where do we go from
here?
The commission, lead by
Presidential appointee and former
Secretary of State William Rogers,
sighted the mechanical failure of
the O-ring seal on one of the shut-
tle's two solid rocket boosters as the
cause of the disaster. Subsequently,
they recommended that the seal be
redesigned.
In addition, the commission
recommended a complete overhaul
of NASA management and launch
decision policies. According to the
commission's report, NASA had
become a bureaucracy with faulty
lines of communication.
In the future astronauts and
engineers will take part in the final
launch decision. Considering it is
the astronauts' lives on the line and
they are riding in a vehicle designed
by engineers, one might ask why
this policy wasn't standard in the
past.
The commission did an excellent
job and made logical and necessary
recomendations. But there was
something more. Aside from
mechanical and communications
failures there was another factor in-
volved � the government.
It began when the government
expected the shuttle program to pay
for itself by the late 1980s. Con-
sidering the tremendous costs in-
volved, this was a ridiculous re-
quest, one that should never have
been made.
Naturally, in order to comply,
NASA was forced to take on an
overly optimistic flight schedule.
Maintaining such a schedule soon
became primary and safety factors
took a back seat.
To make matters worse, govern-
ment funding for NASA was gross-
ly insufficient. NASA has an an-
nual budget of $8 billion a year.
Each shuttle cost the program $3
billion to construct and millions
more to service. NASA was so short
of funds they were often forced to
cannibalize a grounded shuttle so
that another may launch on
schedule.
The government then put an ad-
ditional strain on NASA with its
backlog of military payloads, which
included SDI (Strategic Defence In-
itiative) research and spy satellites
to keep an eye on the Soviet Union
and the Middle East.
With all these outrageous
demands, it's no surprise that
NASA is in such poor shape. What
is surprising is the attitude of Con-
gress. The Rogers Commission
chose not to point fingers at in-
dividuals but to find the cause and
recommend a solution. Congress
meanwhile is out for blood.
It seems that if the government
just got off NASA's back, allowed
them to implement the Commis-
sion's recommendations and sup-
plied them with additional funding,
the shuttle program would see a
quick recovery.
And once NASA has sufficiently-
recovered, it should resume the role
it played during the Apollo pro-
gram, that of research and develop-
ment, not a mass transit system for
the military.
Did You Know?
Did You know that the
U.S.S.R. has placed their first
space station, called Mir (Peace),
into orbit, yet the U.S. has not
fully committed itself to develop-
ing such a permanent space plat-
form?
TJUQAns65�
i -iVMTW COMMISSION
REPORT OW
PORNOfiRAfW
C0M6 M ,
�WS5g7TCfiKM?

WW
Editorial Columnist Wanted:
The East Carolinian is presently seeking regular student columnists to
represent opposing points of view. Interested parties may stop by our
offices in the publications building or call 757-6366.
New College Aid Bill Has Faults
Concerning the student loan bill, a
few observations:
1. One tends to distrust bills that pass
by a vote of 93 � 1. Why Because there
is a sense of demagogic passion in the air
when that kind of thing happens. If it
was such a good idea for the federal
government to stand by with $6.5 billion
for student aid and direct loan pro-
grams, how come the federal govern-
�ment did nothing for student loans for
On The Right
By WILLIAM F. BLCKLE� ilL
so many years? Were all congressmen
and senators stupid back in those days?
And are all congressmen and senal
suddenly bright today0 Ir is recorded
that Sen. Jesse Helms ot N rtharolina
voted no.
About 35 years ago, the presidents of
Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Stanford.
Brown and other colleges issued
manifesto warning against federal aid to
education. Their pom: was thai such
inevitably meant federal control, and ol
course they were correct. Federal d:d
now means that colleges like HilKdale
College in Hillsdale, Mich have to
swear up and down that they do not
discriminate against women, never mind
that Hillsdale never discriminated
against women, having admitted then
the day the college was founded in the
19th century. And ot course there is the
whole business of affirmative action,
and the record-keeping that, one major
college has complained, takes about Si
million a year of clerical time to com-
plete.
2. But federal control to one side.
there is the question ot fedesral loans to
students viewed as a revolving fund. It is
not a major deal to appropriate money
e, in the knowledge that it will serve
for all time the same purpose. That was
the original idea: The federal govern-
ment would come up with a few billion
quaranteed dollars, which would be lent
to students at a fairly modest rate of in-
terest. The students, over the next eight
or 10 years, would gradually repay the
loans, the repaid money would then be
lent to the next generation of students,
and so forth.
Well now, this has not actually work-
ed out. Sen. Phil Gramm (of Gramm-
Rudman) pointed out that $4.3 billion
(that's $4,300,000,000) in student loans
are in defalt. That makes a lot of
idents who did not major in ethics.
e current bill has a few more teeth
tl an the preceding bills, permitting the
federal government to sell bad loans to
collection agencies, and authorizing the
government to garnishee salaries paid by
federal agencies to any deadbeat former
student. The need to guarantee, at this
point, another $6.5 billion is for all in-
tents and purposes to give up on the very
idea of a revolving fund.
3. And here is another wrinkle. If stu-
dent's parents earn $30,000 per year
after taxes, the student does not qualify
for a loan.
There is a lot wrong with, this picture.
to proceed on the assumption that a
family with joint income of $30,000 even
after taxes can afford to send a child to
lege is probably correct. What is no:
correct is to assume that such a couple
can send two children to college, let
alone three or four. Students of the
S -cial Security problem tell you that the
great problem that besets us is the birth
2
rate. Whereas before the ba
average American family procreated
children, that rate is reduced to an
traordinary 1.5. And if you
from the figure the increasing nu:
unmarried people, you see a
decline in the total figure of An
who are going to be matriculating
lege down the line. Are we subtly
ing in discouraging the larger fai
The student loan bill will have a
ple.x effect on the next genera
college-goers. Whereas studei
ed to take a means test, they are n
ed to take any other test � at lea
at the time they matriculate The) �-�
asked, at the end of their sopl
year, how they are doing, if thev d
meet the standards of the c
they will not qualify for
grants.
But we may have succeeded
isolating lower-middle-income stud
and leaving them in a true
bind, while in effect encouraging
income students who do not ;
a higher education to go on to c
for a taste of Animal House
18-year-old, though utterly u:
in learning, sees $2,5'X) offerd I
that his older brother pocketed a
no intention of repaying, then ob
things tend to happen: Some .
pie are going to college who
go, and some young people are kepi
of college oecause they can't afl
go.
The whole thing was not
through. That is often the case ���
votes are lopsided, whether it
of Tonkin resolution or aid
students.
Bankers Are Just Giving It Away!

B JAMES K. CLASSMAN
IV Sr- KrpxMk
A friend of mine has become, almost overnight, a tycoon in
one of the hottest businesses in the country right now �
perhaps the hottest business. My friend does workouts. By
this, I do not mean that he spends his time exercising to Jane
Fonda aerobics tapes. I mean that he owns a company that
cleans up after borrowers who have defaulted on their loans.
Most workouts are in real estate. Companies like my friend's
(Victor Palmieri, who salvaged Penn Central, is another big
player in the workout game) usually take over a failed pro-
ject, cut costs, spruce it up, and sell it. The object is to get a
bank or a savings and loan association off the hook, to reduce
its losses, or even to get the entire loan back.
Lately the biggest client of workout companies has become
the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation, which
at the end of last year held more than three billion dollars'
worth of "non-performing" (a banking euphemism for
foreclosed, or about-to-be-foreclosed) real estate assets. The
FSLIC (pronounced "fizz-lick") acquired these dubious
goods in its capacity as receiver of last resort for failed S&Ls.
The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, which plays the
same role for commercial banks, has more than ten billion
dollars in non-performing assets � although not all in real
estate. A conservative estimate is carried on the books of
banks, S&Ls, and the federal insurance agencies. Bank of
America alone has more than one billion dollars' worth of the
junk.
The workout business is the only happy consequence of a
nervous affliction that has seized bankers over the past few
years. Another friend, who is part-owner of a large savings
bank in New York, calls it "the compulsion to lend
Bankers, who used to hem and haw and scratch their chins
when suupplicants knelt in front of their desks to ask for
money, today are shoving it down the throats of practically
anyone who will take it: "Here � have some! Now
It's not easy today to get turned down for a loan. At least
once a month, I receive a letter asking me, please, to accept
this or that Visa card, which carries check-writing privileges
of $2,000 or $5,000 or $10,000. And I can write these checks,
of course, whether 1 have any money in the bank or not. An
S&L in Maryland wants me to accept a Lifetime Account,
with a "personal, unsecured line of credit, up to $5,000 to use
as you wish These guys have never even met me. But, says
their letter, "You are already approved! No lengthy applica-
tions to fill out
So why are bankers thrusting cash at customers � especial-
ly at real estate developers and small borrowers? Because it's
practically the only way they Figure they can make a decent
living these days. Competition from the big investment
houses and the lifting of federal ceilings on the interest rates
paid to depositors have ended the cheap-deposit era.
Ten years ago h wasn't unusual for a bank to pay nothing
at all for most of its deposits. Today look at a typical
such as Washington's American Security: only $528
of its $3.5 billion in deposits last year came from n
checking accounts. In 1981 the bank had onlv $132
worth of money-market accounts and consumer cei
of deposit. In 1985 the figure was $663 million.
Banks make their money on the spread (or difference!
ween what they pay out in interest on deposits and what
get in interest on loans and other investments. And to e:
more on interest, they have to make riskier loans � loans to
people they haven't even seen, and pieces of loans initially
made by banks far away (the source of the Penn Square-
disaster.)
Big corporations are doing their own borrowing - with the
help of investment bankers (who are quite another thing from
the bankers I'm talking about) � in the commercial paper
and junk-bond market. And a loan on the books to an oil
speculator looks almost as bad as a loan on the books to Mex-
ico or Brazil. So where do bankers, driven bv the compulsion
to lend, turn? Mostly to real estate developers.
Despite a 20 percent vacancy rate for office buildings in
many large American cities, banks and S&Ls continue to lend
money to develop more.
The problem isn't exactly deregulation. It's deregulation
plus regulation plus greed. Deregulation provides the
pressure, the compulsion to lend, but regulation, or more
precisely, the federal insurance system, provides the protec-
tion, the sanction, to make risky loans. Federal insurance
removes the market pressure that would otherwise keep
depositors from putting their money into banks run bv
reckless drivers and shady operators. Since virtually all
deposits are covered by federal insurance, people tend not to
be choosy when picking a place to put their money.
Depositors go where they can get high interest rates. Thev
couldn t care less about their bank's risky loans. As a result
the safer banks - the ones that don't make risky loans -
have no edge on their competition.
But the worst poblem of all is greed. Deregulation has
opened new vistas, especially to S&Ls, which used to make
mundane home mortgages. Now owners of S&Ls - who,
typically, aren't even beholden to outside stockholders - can
do practically anything they want. This means, in many cases,
lending money to their pals for dubious real estate deals.
Deregulauon has also brought the opportunity for making a
quick buck by selling your little bank to a bigger bank,
perhaps in another state. Many banks today are owned bv
speculators, waiting for the bid from Citicorp that will let
them retire in style. In the meantime, they dish out dough to
their law partners and golf partners.
Bankers who hemmed and hawed and made borrowers
grovel weren't sweet characters. They reveled in a false moral
authority, but given the choice, I prefer them over the new
class of bankers, who push loans as if they were drugs
Art Sho
B JOHN sHWSos
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Sylvester Stallone and wife
Rambo-esque movie 'Cobra
who takes the safety of a cit






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And to get
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ace to put their money.
nigh interest rates. They
bank's risky loans. As a result,
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petition.
lem of all is greed. Deregulation has
pecially to S&Ls, which used to make
fgages. Now owners of S&Ls � who,
olden to outside stockholders � can
g they want. This means, in many cases,
:ir pals for dubious real estate deals.
brought the opportunity for making a
ig your little bank to a bigger bank,
fate. Many banks today are owned by
�r the bid from Citicorp that will let
the meantime, they dish out dough to
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led and hawed and made borrowers
haracters. They reveled in a false moral
the choice, I prefer them over the new
push loans as if they were drugs.
�Ht t ASM AROMNIAN
Lifestyles
JUNE 11, 1986 Page 5
Art Show At Gray
H JOHN SHANNON
I i foil l� tatun
relaxed pace of summer in
villc was apparent in Cray
j Fi ida night at a recep-
?i the artists whose work
be on display until July 26.
show is called "Fragments"
features the an ot six ECl
ini and one non-alumnus.
. show is remarkable for its
sitj a greater variety of ar-
v styles could hardly be im-
led Nevertheless, there are
le unifying factors among the
rhej know each other,
some work together at the
Street Gallery downtown.
gh this c
similarity
issociati
;s noi
ision or in-
from it, in fact. The K
tings ol Allen 1 ee could
few wall-mates less like them
an Hob Ray's spare statement
ced media. I ikewise, Larry
poem-photo marriages
n to operate on a different
of the brain than James
Beaman's exclusively visual ex-
ations ol shape and texture.
In of scale, Kuit
Vandervere's minutely detailed
collages are at an opposite end of
i lie spectrum from George
McKim's colossal installation,
which is constructed of house-
paint on cardboard and serves as
a sort of centerpiece for the
show. And while Vandervere,
lean, Ray and McKim work
largely in black and white, Gary
Nemcosky's reduction prints
display vivid colors in startling
combinations.
Despite its eclecticism, this
show achieves an informal
balance that makes looking at it
easy and enjoyable. The gallery-
goer has a chance to take in ex-
amples from differing artistic ap-
proaches without feeling over-
whelmed, and conversely to see
enough of each artist's work to
gain an appreciation for his uni-
que talent. Few viewers will leave
"Fragments" without wanting to
complete the picture sometime in
the future, and most will want to
return again and again to solidify
their vision o these compelling
portions.
Gallery hours are Monday-
through Saturday, 10 a.m. until 5
p.m and on Wednesday until 8
p.m.
For more information, contact
Pern Nesbitl at 757-6366.
� T JON JORDAN - ECL PfcolO lib
"Along Came Betty9
JX�Z ?�lnardboard Ls T S provides an oppor,uni,y for peop,e in GreenvU,e � �
snow rragmenis, wmen win remain up through Julv 26. I he show graduates of ECU.
are
Othermothers Play Energetic Music At Deli
B RISn HARRINGTON
siiff Wnift
Greenville .wi-
the "bad boys of
i 11 c e v c 1111
-
Tram set the pace I i the
idline act w hen Al
wett took he
� 5 ul 1 tain s
1 A p( � e n ked them
befing into "Ram
Vo Place I ike
Homeieir recently released FP.
Coweigs, oi rather, 1 all the while flailr
al; ue a
aining.
5 backed b brothers
rom, on drums, and Dan on
keyboards, "he string section is
.tided out by Steve King and
Randall McCorquedale.
The "Mothers" stand apart
from other bands by virtue o
incorporates
humor, actual circumstances,
and a hard and last approach.
Dan Cowett defined their music
as "poking fun at humans, who
ai e m ammals tr y ing t o
reproduce
Such humor, as well as subtle
sarcasm, appears in songs like
"Rodeo .88 seconds "W hat U
Want "Ram Down "I Have
Seen Youi Mother, and 1 Know
What You'll I ook Like When
You're Old "Santa Clau- Is In
The CIA" and the satirical song
about Apocalypse Vow and Viel
Nam. "Napalm Beach
"Rodeo88 Seconds" x
about the Greensboro Massacre,
a rather shocking incident in re-
cent state history But the band's
views are well-rounded, as
evidenced by such songs as
"Space Junk about several
kinds o liquor mixed with, as
Dan Cowett put it, "something in
a green frozen can, we liked it, so
we wrote a song about it and
"Rain Down a song about
guitarist Steve King's one-time
love affair.
According to Al Cowett, who
writes most of the songs, future
plans for the band include writing
new material and possibly play-
ing in England. This possibility is
backed up by drummer Tom
Cowett, who states that he loves
playing on the road. Cowett also
can be quoted as saying, "It
Greenville keeps its ways, it could
be the coolest city in the state
Long-range plans for the
"Mothers" include looking tor
better management and possibly
landing a record deal.
Friday's show ended with a
brawling encore which allowed
Steve King to put down his
hollowbody guitar, stop bobbing
like a drinking bird, and sing
their version of Led Zeppelin's
"Rock and Roll The result
made Richard (Psychedelic Furs)
Butler sound like an operatic vir-
tuoso. The wildness was
perpetuated throughout the five
song encore,
tumultuously.
which ended
After the show, when asked
about further developments, lead
guitarist Randall McCorguedale
asked back, "Where's the fast
cars, the fast women, the glamor,
the bright lights, and the hard li-
quor drinks?" To which Al
Lowett replied "Yeah
Bangles Headed To The Top
(l PI) � Vicki and Debbi Peter-
son, Susanna Hoffs and Michael
Steele were all well under 10 years
old when John, Paul, George and
Ringo invaded and conquered the
United States.
But, nearly two decades later,
the four women �- now known
as the Bangles � are still reeling
from the impact of the music of
the Fab Four and other '60's
groups that they admit they heard
second-hand.
"My mother used to bring
home the Beatles records the
week that they came out
guitarist Hoffs said as the group
waited in a Nashville hotel room
for a recent publicity appearance.
"I still have her Beatles
records. And her Jud Connins,
Dionne Warwick Hoffs added.
"We were lucky that our
parents really loved rock 'n' roll
music added lead guitarist
Vicki Peterson. "It wasn't like
'Turn that down The radio was
on 24 hours a day, like Debbi and
I were in the backyard pulling
weeds and my dad would have
the radio on
It's a good thing the Bangles
enjoy that music, because they
have been compared to every
Summer Flick
group from the Beatles to the
Byrds, from Creedence Clear-
water Revival to the Mamas and
the Papas.
But the all-female band �
Vicki Peterson and Hoffs, with
Debbi Peterson on drums, Steele
on bass and all four on lead
vocals at one point or another �
doesn't really mind the com-
parisons.
See ROCK, Page, 6
Rambo's Back
By EDTOSHACH
Staff Wiilrr
Sylvester Stallone and wife Bridgitte Nlelson star in the new
Rambo-esque movie Cobra Stallone portrays a trigger-happy cop
who takes the safety of a city into his own hands, and once again
beats seemingly insurmountable odds. 'Cobra is now playing at
the Plaza Cinema, Monday through Friday at 2 p.m, 7:20 p.m. and
9:10 p.m. AU seats are $4, except for the $2.50 matinee.
Cobra's the kind of cop that
every American city needs: a
muscle-headed tough guy with
hand grenades on his belt and a
laser-assisted machine gun.
Sylvester Stallone wrote and
stars in Cobra, the story of detec-
tive Marion Cobretti's war on a
gang of heinous serial murderers.
Also starring in the movie is
Stallone's wife, Brigitte Nielsen,
whose acting talents rival those of
Bo Derek or Pia Zadora.
Cobra begins with a very nas �
man taking over a grocery store
with a shotgun while his fellow
gang members clack double-
edged axes together in an eerie
subterranean ritual. While the
police try to coax him out with a
magaphone, he shoots one of his
hostages. Realizing that the entire
police force including the
S.W.A.T. team will not be suffi-
cient for this crisis, Captain Sears
(Art La Fleur) calls on his trump
card, Cobretti � or Cobra �
who walks in and hurls a knife in-
to the murderer's chest.
The idea behind Cobra is that
crime has gone out of control,
and the legal b reaucracy offers
no help with its slap-on-the-hand
policies. Cobra then is needed to
balance the scales. Some movie-
goers will be pleased to see such a
fresh, innovative approach to
film making. Those viewers
haven't seen The Enforcer, Death
Wish, Mad Max, Death Wish II,
Dirty Harry, and Sudden Impact.
Cobra may be cliche, but it br-
ings with it new heights of absur-
dity. The movie depicts anyone
who disagrees with Cobra's
methous as a sniveling wimp, and
as such, fair game to be roughed
up. A reporter questions Cobra's
methods and is slung around by
his collar and then has his face
shoved up against a corpse.
One scary aspect of this movie
is that Cobra often tortures his
enemies to death, a fact that the
film not only justifies, but
glamorizes. In one scene a
psychopath is shooting at Cobra
when gasoline spills all over him.
As the screaming psycho claws at
his eyes, Cobra says, "you have
the right to remain silent and
drops a match on him.
George P. Cosmatos directed
Cobra and another Stallone Film,
Rambo: First Blood Part II. The
two have much in common. In
both movies, Stallone is trium-
phant against incredible odds,
often standing out in the open
and mowing his enemies down
with a machine gun. Both movies
give Stallone an extensive, high-
tech arsenal with an endless supp-
ly of ammunition. In both movies
the villains are evil, sweaty
slimeballs whose actions vin-
dicate all the gratuitous violence
in the world.
Cobra might have more ap-
propriately been named First
Blood Fart III: Rambo Goes to
the Big City. It would have saved
them some work � and us an im-
pending sequel.
T
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m �
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A
Rock-N-Roll Women
Continued from page 5
"It's nice to be compared with
all those other groups, 'cause
they're great bands said Debbi
Peterson.
"And they were or are our in-
fluences added Hoffs.
Comparisons are unavoidable,
in a way, explained Vicki Peter-
son.
"If you're going to try to ex-
plain what the Bangles sound
like, you're going to have to
throw in some of that stuff,
because many of the things we do
come directly or indirectly from
those other bands she said.
"They were what we listened to
as children, what we liked as
children. It was something that
struck us very heavily.
"It was one of the things, for
instance, when I first met Susan-
na, that we had in common was
we were about the same age
group but we had both listened to
and loved music from preschool
years. It was wonderful to find
someone who shared that love
and had experienced it
The Bangles joined forces in
January 1981, in their original in-
carnation as the Bangs, with An-
nette Zilinskas on bass.
"Actually we (the Petersons
and Hoffs) met in a kind oi con-
voluted way through an au in the
paper Hoffs recalled. "We just
exchanged tapes and things and
we all had the same ambition,
which was pretty much to g
the top and get as far as we could
with it � not just play on
weekends in local bars, but we
wanted to get on the radio and
play good music
By the end of their firs! yea
the group was on its wa with a
solid following in Los Angeles
and a record on their own
Downkiddie label, called "Get-
ting Out of Hand
Zalinskas left the group after a
couple of years and the group
changed its name following com-
plaints and threats of a suit by
another group of Bangs in New
York, which has since, to the
Bangles' glee, broken up.
They also added a contract
with Columbia Records and
released "All Over the Place
which sent critics into a frenzy of
name-dropping praise.
It was a record full of jangly
guitars and � you guessed it �
'60's era harmonies. And, while
it wasn't a major seller, it
garnered the band a place in the
hearts of critics and college radio
stations.
So it was a bit of a surprise
when "Different Light the
Bangles' second album, appeared
replete with keyboards and a
glossier sound. Some hard-line
revivalists moaned, but the band
is happy with the change.
"I think a part of it was sor
a natural growth process, because
we learned a lot of what we
wanted to do and what we didn't
want to do from making the first
record Steele explained.
"And then there was also a
conscious effort to make the
sound bigger, to make a kind of
grander sound, a sound that
would hold up on the radio
without compromisingwhat we
did
"And in some ways the songs,
like 'Manic Monday (written by
Bangles fan Prince) had a
keyboard riff in it and there was
no way, even though we're not a
keyboard band that it could be
done differently, Hoffs added.
"1 think the guitar's going
make a big comeback on the n
album Steele said.
But to deal with the prese:
the Bangles added a keyboard
player and their first male per
fomer, Walker Ingleheart. em
phasizing the change was for the
tour only.
The next album may have
few more surprises. t;
predicted.
"I think we're thinking atx
sort of like exploring the
tremes of the Bangles . .
Peterson said. One side of the
album will be "our ver
side, the little Joni Mitchells in all
of us. And on the other side
she laughed, "the rock 'n' -
sluts that we really are
Tequila Bar Weekly Specials
Sunrise Sunday: s; , serve
Melo-Mondays: $2.25 per serve
Toasty- Tuesday: $2.00per s�
Wednesday: Sir5 Pirates Cane Muitney
Tonic Thursday: si 75 per serve
Tried Triday: Get Fried Earl) a; our new Altitude Adjust-
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Saturday Mght Specials
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(Look for our new "Lagoon" gar)
ocated Outside
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109 E. 5th St jBAJR
752-8926
1
COMING ATTRACTIONS
with I.D
Thursday, June 12, 1986
3:00 p.m. $.25 ADM
BingoIce Cream
Party
MSCMulti-Purpose Room
Monday, June 16, 1986
3:30 & 9:30 p.m. FREE
Back To The Future
Hendrix Theatre
Thursday, June 19, 1986
9:00 p.m. $1.00 Admission
per $1000, Limit $3000
Casino Night
Blackjack, Craps, Roulette,
Trivia, Solitaire, and High-Low
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MSC Multi-Purpose Room
' OUT TO MWVT WOU
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Have Mo
Bs H( K M(( ORMA
sc onOOPLR

I
"V.

.




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leith Sledge (left, 24), shown here vhooi
tason, while Marchell Henry irtghi ;






Women
I Ml J AiSl l KO! INIAN
Sports
JUNE 11, 1986
Page 7
Baker's Gridders
Have More Depth
By KICK Mc (IKMM
S on OOPER
hi joined bv (redshirt) freshman
Icttm Benedict (5-11, 155),
sophomore Don Gayloi (6-0,
k 2 9 185), heralded JC transfer Andre
tball squad Fields (5-10, 175) and Wilson.
future The Pirate ground game, even
:oach with the loss of tailback
Bakei (the school's second
ei tough leading all-time rusher), remains
Bucs look strong. Junior fullback Anthony
ihead Simpson (5-10, 226) returns to
anchor the Biu I game.
pson, who gained 488 yards
last season, is the leading return
ing rusher. 1'im James (5-10, 22)
is a more than an adequate hack-
Hake; said. up at the fullback slot.
'her Sophomore Jarrod Moody
5 10, 212). who sparkled in
spi i ig game, senior Dw
Richai dson (6-1, 195), who
ived well in ECU's
against 1 si - � e F
McKinney (5-10, 18.
fern Paige (5-10, 192
tean
� cat and last
peciais
y
"4
i
�( oach Bakei
� � w eone-back offen � na as � Redski Pirati . - a s s -Per ha1mmrl
Buc s, a
streng . R ' - ta 6-1. 2511 and Paul Hoj. 1, 257) guards. Starters also re . 1 i � Bourgeoi � - 25 6-2, 255
Schel ' 2y7Juniorfullback n
Kroundgainer, � hile
See VETERAN, page Hdingi) tht
Soph Sprinter McNeill
Receives A-A Honors
J B HUMBERT Es' C�rohn,�n
v lEutoens East Carolinian
horn Simpson (top returns as KCl s leading
Vinson smith (bottom) is one of man outstan-
defensive unit.
By RICK McCORMAC
( u-SaurU rOMiK
ECU's Lee Vernon McNeill
overcame u bitter disappointment
in the 200 meters, to finish in
third place in the 100 meters at
the NCAA Outdoor Track&Field
Championships last week.
McNeill was narrowly edged
out of the top-two spots by Lee
VKRae of Pittsburgh, who ran a
10.11 and Missouri's Chidi Imoh
who's time of 10.14 seconds was
the same as McNeill's. However,
Imoh was credited with second
place after the judges looked at a
photo finish.
"1 thought Lee (McNeill) was
second Pirate track coach BUI
Carson said "I protested and
asked that they review the pic-
ture. When you have two people
with the same time like that �
it's just about impossible to to
tell who crossed first. Imoh is
6-3, and apparently he dipped his
right shoulder enough to take se-
cond, even though Lee got to the
finish line first
The ironic thing about the 100
meters is that McNeill and
McRae grew up together in
Roberson County, with the two
living only 15 miles apart.
McNeill, who was undefeated
in the 200 meters this year, did
not make the finals in the event.
In the trials on Wed. June 4, his
shoe came off as he was leaving
the blocks, robbing McNeill of
the chance to make the finals.
. running with only one
shoe, McNeill turned in a respec-
table time t 21.00 seconds.
"L was a shame he didn't
ake it to the finals Carson
said. "He would have finished no
worse than third
"The meet was a case of
ly ecstasy. We were bitterly
disappointed that his shoe came
off in the 200 Carson con
tinued. "But, we were back on
top of the mountain after his ;
formance in the !00 He did a
great job of coming back it
shows what type of kid he is
By finishing third, McNeill
earned All-America honors foi
the third time (twice outdoors,
once indoors) in his two yeai
ECU.
In addition to McNeill's
formance, ECU's 4 100 meter-
relay team also made a good
showing.
The team, consiting ' i
McNeill, Lee McNeill,
Brooks and Nathan M
finished in 11th place out ol 17
teams that were good enoi g
qualify for the meet.
"I thought the relay U
well Carson said. "1 wa
of them
The future looks brig
Pirate track, as all oi the run:
who competed in the mi
return next year. The only
for the Pirates will be qi
milers Ruben Pierce and (
White.
While the track
eluded tor EC1 . I ee McNei
summer is jus! g�
McNeill is going '
the Track Athletic (
Championship this
Eugene, Ore.
Carson said McNeill is
ly in the top-five in the 100 me
in the United States along �
McRae, Emmit King. Cat
and Kirk Baptiste.
A good perfomance
TAC meet could earn k -
another European trip like
summer or possibly even a
the Goodwill Games wl
be held in Moscow.
McNeill is
pete in the National
Festival to be held in Ho
Roller Named SID
1986
FREE
Future
1986
admission
ilette
gh-Low
oom
� af I.
i
mm
J"M
gathering place
Bon Roller has bet
'ew 1 C I sp. rts Informa-
Dirt

' e K
Roller, �� � eplace
SID Bob G(

ECU
aftei t! eSID
( Vv p,
ith� at I NC - , Roller sen t Pirates in 198 ' "w e are very please B � m our
, EClEast C ai olina Kai
:� 1 Smith"We have followed hi
Williamgress at Wilmington and h we could lu back ti
d (6-0, 185pr
IC1The 25-year-old Roller ,
�:). Atgraduate of Virginia Tech
AmosPearisburg, Ya native was in-
ns and willvolved in the sports informa-
PL
� .
ram
S1DA. the
i il i mation
1
"Kick
.
i feet
'
I
are a
Hoopsters Steadily Improve
Three Starters Return
Keith Sledge (left, 24), shown here shooting at Richmond, is expected to move to the big guard position next
season, while Marchell Henry (right, 25) led the Pirates in scoring and rebounding last year.
B SCOIT (OOPER
&
RICK McCORMAC
ECl baskteball team has
beer ;�� ving steadily each of
past three seasons -ner w
ning 11 games in 1983-84
seasons, the Pirates won 13
games last year and, for the first
time, finished in the top-four in
the conference.
The Pirates' hopes this year
rest in the capable hands of
or forward Marchell Henry.
Henry a second-team CAA per-
fromei a yeai ago, averaged 15.6
points pet game and led the team
in rebounds (5.5 per game).
"Marchell didn't get the
recognition he deserved head
.oach Charlie Harrison said
"He was solid all year long, as
was Keith (Sledge)
This upcoming season, as op-
posed to season's past, Harrison
will have the experience that is
needed to win. In addition to
Henry, five other seniors will an-
chor the squad. Center Leon Bass
(6-Hi, 215), forwards Jack Turn-
bill (6-9, 205) and Derrick Battle
(6-6, ls5) and swingmen William
Grady (6-2. 185), and Keith
Sledge (6-3, 195) return for their
fourth year of college competi-
tion.
Other returnees for the Pirates
include sophomores John
Williams and Manuel Jones.
Jones was voted Outstanding
Newcomer by his teammates last
year. Redshirt freshman Gus Hill
also returns. Hill still has four
years of eligibility after injuring
his knee in preseason drills last
season.
"John (Williams) is talented, it
(playing time) depends on his
summer. Manuel (Jones) is a very-
competitive kid Harrsion said
of the two sophomores. "Gus
(Hill), 1 don't know whether or
not his knee will hold up, but he's
ahead of schedule on his
rehabilitation. He's a helluva of-
fensive player
Newcomers to the Pirate squad
include junior-college transfers
Theodore "Blue" Edwards and
Howard Brown. Edwards, a 6-4
forward earned second-team NC-
JCAA honors and has two years
of eligibility left, while Brown, a
6-4 point guard has three years
remaining.
The remainder, of what Har-
rison called his best recruiting
5, are all freshmen. The four
are: Reed Lose (6-3, 190) guard,
Harrisburg, Pa I uther Tutt
ift-6, 200) forward, Rockaway,
N Y . Iracev King (6-6; 215)
forward, Hampton, Va and
Stacey Clark (6-6) swingman,
Martinsville, Va.
"They are a pretty damn
talented recruiting class � as
athletes and as basketball
players Harrison said. "We
signed six players and all of them
can help us, but some (Brown
and Edwards) can help right
away
"They all will be good one day,
but freshmen can't carry you.
Freshmen are freshmen are
freshmen Harrison continued.
"However, they're in a situation
where they can blend in with our
returning players and give us
some quality minutes
"We're returning a
good nucleus of
players. The biggest
thing is going to be our
chemistry � and how
good the fellas think it
can be. M
�Charlie Harrison
Henry, Bass and Sledge all
started last season as did Grady
in his 1983-84 campaign. The
Pirates will have to replace the
starting backcourt of a year ago,
as Scott Hardy and three-year
starter Curt Vanderhorst have
departed.
However, Harrsion plans to
move Sledge to the off-guard
position � to take advantage of
the new three-point shot. The
point-guard position is still open,
with junior-college transfer
Howard Brown being the only
true point guard on the roster.
However, Harrison dosen't feel
such a need for a true point
guard.
"1 really think the game has
gone to bigger people at every
position, although there is still a
place for the little man Harr-
sion said. "Teams now are pass-
ing the ball to bring it upcourt �
to take advantage of situations.
You don't have to designate
player at the point.
Harrison feels Sledge can
the adjustment, but ma n
some work. "Keith did a sou
job against some ol the be
players in the country last yeai
Harrison said o' his del
stopper. "He needs to work
his ball handling � he need-
play big guard
Harrsion feels that the influx
of new talent will create a new ai
mosphere within the Pirate
squad. He believes that there will
be more competition within
the team.
"It's going to fun come ;
tice time he said. "It's coing to
be a situation in which everyone
wants to play, but there are only
five positions It's goi s be
very competitive
The key, according to Ha-
nson, is for his plavers to work
hard during the summer. "1 am a
firm believer that you have to
work on the individual par:
your game during the summer, oi
you will be left behind Har-
rison said firmly. "As a coach,
you have to make a decison on
your playing rotation in
November, so it's important foi
the players to be ready to play.
"We're returning a good
nucleus of players Harrison ad-
ded. "The biggest thing is going
to be our chemistry � and how
good the fellas think it can be
ECU's basketball team will try
to continue their steady climb in
the CAA conference standings in
their upcoming campaign.
Hopefully, they are hard at work
this summer, as coach Harrison
said, "On October 15, they will
start earning time
Sports Fact I
Wed. June 11,1895
Emile Lavassor of France
wins the first automobile race
in history. Driving a Panhard-
Lavassor with a 3VShorsepower
engine, Lavassor wins the
732-mile race from Paris to
Bordeaux and back in just
under 49 hours. His average
speed it 15 miles per hour.
Lavassor, Jr was said, was
stomped several occasskms
for driving under the influence
� owmqi it stul unknown.)
9b





R 11MAN
Veteran Offensive Line Strong For Pirates
y ontinued from pant
(6-5, 264 b
Shawi Brad
W
lude I eon a
Ricl Vu (6-4 261
3
48 a - loe
. Senioi David Plum
Medrick Rain
236) and J hn William
eturn ai the
g will sophomore
(6 v 240)
�liege transfers M
!60) and John
� i '�
� immed
ai e
(6 2 shman),
255)
� - 272)
and Rodney Glover (6-6, 236
sophomore).
S e're going to be a year
oldei . .1 yeai stronger and a year
more experienced Baker said ol
defensive line. "We've go!
people coming back like Grinage
and Jennette along with people
were redshirted like Carne
�v both of the outstanding
college linemen were here
we'll get some
�: om those two
secondary, consisting ol
es Ellis Dillahunt (5-11,
192) (who was defensive MVP in
the spring game), Gary London
(6-2, 197), Roswell Streetcr (6-0,
190). Flint McCallum (5-1 1. 1HK),
lewis Wilson (5-10, 190) and
1 vim Porchcr (6-2, 189) all saw
action last year. These backs will
provide experience and depti
well as a hard-hitting style ol
piav .
They will be joined by
freshmen Barriet hasterling (6-3,
204) and Rick) rorain (5-9, 170)
long with JC transfer Robert
Martin (5-10. 175).
Baker feels that the secondary
lias made definite strides, but are
not quite where he wants them to
be. However, "the secondarv
turned out to be better than we
thought Baker admitted
Handling the punting cl
will be returning sophomore Tim
Woltet (6-3, 190), who averaged
$8.5 vards per kick last year He
downed n punts inside the op-
ponents' 20 (yard line) and had
punts blocked in 6H attempt
With the absence ol ECU'
�line leading scorer Jeff Hea
there is a huge
Losil 5-11, 220)
the onl true kicker dui .
the sprit .

they will � �
ECU v
uburn, M
.
WTBS) and ;
1
Ra
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T





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 11, 1986
Veteran Offensive Line Strong For Pirates
Continued from page 7.
Mark Minshew (6-5, 264
sophomore) and Shawn Brady
(6-2, 268 senior).
Five returning guards return,
they include: Leon Hall (6-5. 255
junior), Rich Autry (6-4, 261
senior), Kyle Condrey (6-3, 250
sophomore), Stewart Southall
(6-1, 248 freshman) and Joe
Molineaux (6-3, 245 sophomore)
Brad Brown (6-4, 230
sophomore) and Rich McMahan
(6-2, 254 junior) return to back-
up Bourgeois at center.
The tight end position is in the
sure hands of senior Mike Gainey
(6-2, 210). Gainey started four
games last season, and was
ECU's leading reciever with 13
catches and one touchdown.
Cednc Ray (6-3, 215
sophomore), David Carr (6-5,
220 freshman), and transfer Ben
Billings (6-2, 220 junior) will pro-
vide some depth at the tight-end
position.
In order for the offense to suc-
ceed, the defense will also have to
carry their share of the burden. A
solid core of linebackers heads
the defensive unit.
Junior Bubba Waters (6-1,
208) returns to one starting
linebacker spot, with Baker look-
ing to Bruce Simpson (6-2. 218
junior) to fill the spot vacated b
last year's standout and leading
tackier Robert Washington.
Other returnees include Larry
Berry (5-11, 240 senior) and Ron
Gilliard (6-3. 238 junior). JC
transfer Billy Michel (6-4. 245
junior) should also make a con-
tribution.
The Bandit (also called drop-
end) is perhaps the strongest and
deepest position for the Bucs.
Juniors Vinson Smith (6-0. 219)
and Essray Taliaferro (5-11, 205)
return along with sophomore Ken
Taylor (6-1, 225) Manning the
other defensive end position are
sophomores Willie Powell (6-4.
224) and Shannon Boling (6-3,
236).
The defensive line should pro-
vide experience as well as depth
this season with the return of
four starters and two talented
newcomers. Senior David Plum
(6-3, 243), juniors Medrick Rain-
bow (6-0, 236) and John William-
son (6-3, 235) all return at the
tackle spot along with sophomore
Walter Bryant (6-3, 240).
Junior-college transfers Mike
Donohue (6-3, 260) and John
O'Driscoll (6-4, 260) should pro-
vide depth, if not immediate
help.
Other talented returners are
Carl Carney (6-2, 235 freshman),
seniors Joe Gnnage (6-3, 255)
and William Jennette (6-5, 272)
and Rodney Glover (6-6, 236
sophomore).
"We're going to be a year
older, a year stronger and a year
more experienced Baker said of
his defensive line. "We've got
people coming back like Grinage
and Jennette along with people
who were redshirted like Carney.
And both of the outstanding
junior-college linemen were here
for the spring � we'll get some
definite help from those two
The secondary, consisting of
returnees Ellis Dillahunt (5-11,
192) (who was defensive MVP in
the spring game), Gary London
(6-2, 197), Roswell Streeter (6-0,
190), Flint McCallum (5-11, 188),
Lewis Wilson (5-10, 190) and
Lynn Porcher (6-2, 189) all saw
action last year. These backs will
provide experience and depth as
well as a hard-hitting style of
play.
They will be joined by
freshmen Barriet Easterling (6-3,
204) and Ricky Torain (5-9, 170)
along with JC transfer Robert
Martin (5-10, 175).
Baker feels that the secondary
has made definite strides, but are
not quite where he wants them to
be. However, "the secondary
turned out to be better than we
thought Baker admitted.
Handling the punting chores
will be returning sophomore Tim
Wolter (6-3, 190), who averaged
38.5 yards per kick last year. He
downed 13 punts inside the op-
ponents' 20 (yard line) and had
no punts blocked in 68 attempts.
With the absence of ECU's all-
time leading scorer Jeff Heath,
there is a huge hole to fill. Craig
Losito (5-11, 220), a sophomore
transfer from Appalachian State,
was the only true kicker during
the spring.
The Pirates will hope to im-
prove on last year's record as
they will once again face some
stiff competition from the na-
tion's best. Among the teams
ECU will face include Penn
State, Auburn, Miami (nationally
televised on Thanksgiving night
on WTBS) and South Carolina.
PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH SAT JUNE 14 AT SAV A CENTER IN GREENVILLE
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techical documents, and term
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S&F Professional Computer Co.
(back of Franklin's) 115 E. 5th St.
757 0472752 3694
FOR SALE: 1982 Knox Trailer
home, 3 br , T 3 bath, air, dryer. $500
and take up payments. $176.95. Call
after 6.758 1559
BtC Rf
TOW
LIMIT T
PURCHASE
NEED A
Math, if
758 8023
TUTOR?:
you need
1063 or
a tutor,
1065
call
FOR SALE: 1 sofa, 1 full size mat-
tress. Good condition! Call 830 1714
after 12 noon.
WANTED
A
TWO ROOMMATES WANTED FOR
SUMMER: Semi private room,
$88 33 � utilities. AC, cable TV.
Need bedroom furnishings. Deposit
of 1 months rent is required. Call
Kathy at 758 6224
WANTED: Female grad student
needs 1 bdrm. apt. for the fall
semester or before. Leave a
message for Cheryl. 752 4973.
RIDE NEEDED TO RICHMOND
VA For the weekend of the 20th.
Can leave Friday (20th) after 11
a.m. Will help with expenses. Please
call Pat at 757 0009 or 757 6366
EDITORIAL COLUMNIST
WANTED: The East Carolinian is
presently seeking regular student
columnists to represent opposing
points of view. Interested parties
may stop by our offices in the
publications building or call
757 4364
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
32 oz.
jar
mil
A&P
Margarine Qtrs
CD c-
Mfifvriru
1 lb.
pkgs.
I 703 GREENVILLE BLVDOPEN 24 HOURS SjjSjg OPEN SUNDAY 7 A. M
-11BM. I
r
��� 'y0bf-mBfir � - � - � � m





Title
The East Carolinian, June 11, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 11, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.479
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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