The East Carolinian, Summer 1986






�he �aHt (Uarolintan
Serving (he East Carolina campus community since 1925






Hb EAST CAROI INIAN
M Mll K Is-Xf,
�C� Leaders Welcome '86 Orientation Class
readj to succeed in youi chosen
majoi. 1 am looking forward to
meeting you and helping you in
any wa
Sincerely,
Ron Speiei
New Student (i ienta
tion
Ron Speier
Deal New Student:
1 he experience of attending
college foi the first time can be
likened to traveling in a foreign
4
oiiuti v
Ih
travele
eip
become familiar with new
customs, mores, and more
portantly, a new language I
new student must deve
awareness lo a new way �l
Pre iev '86 is an attempt
levelop an awareness
new cull in e. mores, ai d
ahulary ol college tei
ises
you w
meet othei new students wh w
be attending ECl this fall:
ai ions placement tests - icl
assist you in planning �
course load; become f;
with the campus facilities i
vironment; registei foi
classes; aii d meet fat.
students and staff, rhis ;
ntended to help u n �
� transition into uni � �
life
During the orientation pro-
?ran you will feel overwhelmed
�'v the amount ol primed mattei
will receive, and the p
procedures that vou
required to know and foi
� '�' ceed
in a specific area please I
to ask questii �� � f the
facu �
.iors r administratie stafl
When v. . ea1 e ECl
' '��' ' ild be fu
1 hmr Meyer, Jr.
Deat -
v �
dent � i ��; . at you
�'� '
k wit . .
as you
' I I ;)'s i.SSU
E 2
I �
i. Watt rhe
1 ast Cai
idei
� , �. � � m pr ove
i
�To understand some culture
and time othei than our own
� lo understand the issues of
life, the problems of society and
the value systems tor conduct in
ordei to allow commitment.
� lo learn lo live in a diverse
community; to treasure - not
just tolerate � a difference of
opinion; to form some lasting
friendships
�To develop skill, precision
and competence in a chosen area.
�To experience some creative
opportunity.
I hose goals can be attained
both in 'he classroom and outside
'he cl� isroom. Strive to attain
them. It you do, vou will be get-
ting the most out o vour years tl
ECU.
gain, those ol us in the Divi
M Student I ife and vour
own elected student leaders want
to heai from vou so that we cai
all worl eetl ei to improve stu-
dent life a: 1I iwavs feel free
to ask us questions and make
comments on how we can work
and foi you.
Ik's; wishes foi a successful
I 986 87 experience.
v icerely,
I Imei Meyer, h
x i Student 1 -
(acuity is excellent and dedicated
to students. 1 ast tall S. e
and World Report listed ECU a-
one of the top ten comprehensive
universities in the South and
border states. In a poll ol 158
university chief executive officers
in the region (our competitors)
1l was seventh. I hese officials
were asked to consider strength
ol undergraduate curriculum,
quality ol teaching, relationship
between faculty and students and
atmosphere tor learning. It
vou have problems, check the
validity of the ranking bv seeking
help from faculty 01 stafl rhe
program and the faculty
were rated last fall are here this
fall, and they will be here !
after you have completed your
bachelor's degree.
There is much here besides a
tine academic program. You
enjoy main addition . pus
activites which help in tl
development ol a rich lil
good citizenship. I urge you I
take full advantage ol all tl ai tl -
University offers a
mines ottered in music, at' .
entertainment, enjo the
spirit of athletics, eithei as a pai
ticipant or observer.
I am happy thai vow will be a
part of our Universii � fan
You liave my best wishe I i a
successful and pleasai
M H
� r

I
Dear New Students,
On behalf ol the Student
Governmeni Association and the
student bodv. we congratulate
vou on vour acceptance to out
University, We are confidem that
vou have made the best choice in
selecting Ea I c arolina
A University education otters
the recipient many unique op;
t un1111 es and challenges.
Acaden lub as
tivities abound f pective
stud � rhese activitii pen
to all individuals bui the respon-
sibility foi involvement resrs
upon the student rhe options
open to i a any and we
courage every enterinf I man
become involved I; -
University
you receive du
years is directly pi ip rtional i
vour inv olveme

n(S.G.A.)isthi
� �
leni S.G.A
� : i pot
tor ha n expei

e led a
We ui .
;
Gov c
t
� i
H,
Dear New 1(1 Stude
On behalt
Union, I would lik
you to East Carolina I
While ou a
will seek out all that 1 I
ave .i complete c
perience. We, ai " e l-

1 ' I because we i
� � . new � �
and ;
mizatii i
i
into joii i .
because it aw
derful � :
periences. We -
grammii .
pus.
a 'Aide vane1 I ;
run a

i
as n rts a '�'

Bai �
By �

.
. -

k

socie �
urseives, out
nmeni
John M. Howell
Deai Entei ing Stud
Welcome to 1 asi at
Unix ei sity! We are pleased
ave chosen to pursue
ge , areei witl us,
� ill find thai I e ECl
e a
.
"reachu .
Meveunanan
I i Deupree
I � �
r4
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PIZZA
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includes Pizza & Salad
$3.45
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5
8
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ion Class
: I . S udent:
he Student
keto welcome
1University.
1 hope you
ECU offers
college ex-
he Student
iappy you
c are alwavs
� t ?wices to add
t to our
. to look
� I nion
th many
and ex-
pro-
n cam-
�ed in
fessionally
� the pro-
be seen
-uch
M ges Col-
lies on
Night.
- debates,
I -ailed
. a id many
� the Stu-
ffered an
pie from
5, and
� mittee
respon-
can
areer

trad
�nal
V
. �� m :ee
av e.
ke vou
Stu-
e made it a
e knowledge
they have
always.
usly waiting
begin a
lonal career.
success for
. me arid remember
. Unin will be
ng out to serve you
Sincerely.
Liz Deupree
.dem Union President
FFLER
TS7 1
5 J
8 1
triplet e7 1
' Service6 J
larters7 1 6 1
eenville, NC 27834
o ho
s
Line
amera
99
.B.E.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SUMMER 1986
)
Minority Organizations Offer Fellowship
By VIRGINA LIVINGSTON
Staff Writer
As incoming freshmen,
meeting people and establishing
contacts is a top priority. After
standing in long lines to add
classes, to pick up checks, and to
buy books, you may want to find
a place "Where everybody knows
your name
ECU has many clubs and
organizations that provide need-
ed extracurricular activities, and
many are centered around
minorities and their needs.
One of these clubs reaches out
to a group of students not often
considered a minority but who
are indeed not members of
mainstream society.
The Sign Language Club is for
deaf students and those who are
studying sign language. It allows
these students to explore sign
language communications out-
ride of class and put it to prac-
tical use.
They do this by holding silent
retreats which enable hearing
students to understand the world
of the deaf better by depriving
them of sound and voice com-
munications.
The Sign Language Club also
sponsors Fantasy; a group that
performs popular music by sign-
ing lyrics. Fantasy performs
throughout Eastern North
Carolina and has performed at
campus functions such as the
Health Awareness Fair.
Fraternities and sororities are
the classical mainstay of the col-
lege social scene and eight of
these organizations serve the
minority population of ECU.
Kappa Alpha Psi, Alpha Kappa
Alpha, Phi Beta Sigma, and
Sigma Gamma Rho are examples
of these organizations.
Refrigerators
Offered
By JILL MORGAN
Staff Writer
The dominant question on
every freshman's mind when he
or she arrives on campus is how
to keep the brewski cool in the
dorm room.
ECU's Student Government
Association provides an answer,
though it does not with the intent
to chill only beer.
At the beginning of each
semester the SGA provides
refrigerator rentals to dorm
students.
SGA's refrigerator rental is
designed to benefit dorm students
by extending low rates and conve-
nient places to pick-up and return
the refrigerators.
See FRIG Page 4.
All are service organizations
and perform many activities in
the community such as, Sigma
Outreach where Phi Beta Sigma
Brothers go into local schools to
serve as tutors. Alpha Kappa
Alpha holds Operation Sun-
shine, which is for under-
priviledged girls. Operation Sun-
shine takes underpriviledged girls
on field trips and sponsors par-
ties.
All of the above organizations
said their pledging procedures are
tough but quickly said they are
against hazing. Thomas Sims of
Phi Beta Sigma said his fraternity
appoints a brother to a pledge to
guard against hazing. Crystal
Fray of Alpha Kappa Alpha said
the pledges know pledging will be
tough but laugh about it once it is
over. She added that some pro-
cedures such as social probation
are necessary so the pledges can
do their work.
Most of these organizations
will not except freshmen until
they have established a GPA and
some will only accept
sophomores as pledges.
Of course the Greek life does
not appeal to all students. Many
students who come to ECU wish
to continue their religious prac-
tices and consequently seek out
campus ministries to do so.
One such ministry is the Foun-
tain of Life ministry. Fountain of
Life is a nondominational
organizaton which meets to study
and celebrate the teaching of
Christ.
They have meetings on
Wednesday nights and a Sunday
morning service once a month.
Guest speakers and student
speakers are featured. While
Fountain of Life does have a
minority population, all are in-
vited to attend according to Vice-
President Rosie Standifer.
The Hillel is another Campus
Minstry set up to serve the needs
of the Jewish Student Communi-
ty. Besides helping students
mingle with the Greenville Jewish
Community, Hillel provides din-
ners on the High Holidays and a
Student Sedar during Passover.
Rabbi Bonnie Koppel is the
organizer, and provides counsel-
ing services. She will teach a
beginning Hebrew class in the
Fall.
Students who are interested in
gospel music might want to
become involved in the East
Carolina Gospel Choir. There are
no auditions � you just attend
practices.
The Choir presents concerts in
the fall and spring on campus.
The big event for the choir,
though, is their Spring Break
lour. Last year they sang in
churches and schools m New
York. Washington D.C
Maryland. Philadelphia, and
Virginia.
The Choir also participated in
the Carolina Gospel Fes; and
placed second out of 155. The
Choir does some fundraising so
students do not have to pay much
when they trael.
Another organization that
serves a minority interest on cam-
pus is the International Studeni
Association.
The ISA's purpose is to pro-
mote cultural exchange among
American and foreign students
on camous. 1 he do this through
CAFETERIA
The Plaza
�. It I I V I I I �
Opening Soon
The Smorgasbord
by Caitlynn's
Self-Service � All You Care To Eat
Breakfast � $2.99
Lunch � $3.89
Dinner � $4.99
The Plaza � 756- 7529
Great
Special
85 Item
Salad and
Hot Bar
All You
Can Eat
$2
4 ynettf filtiee t& eatf
STEAK HOUSE
international dinners, festivals,
and exhibitions. The ISA also
assists in the orientation for
foreign students. This helps the
student become adjusted to
American life and allows them to
be with others who have had
similar experiences adjusting.
In the 1970's, the ISA obtained
a house for the University to be
used as a foreign students
residence. In the early 1980's the
International House became a
part of the University Residence
Association, Central Campus.
For the upcoming year the ISA
plans to hold a barbeque, sports
activites and hope to set up an
emergency loan fund for its
members. They also plan a tall
break trip to the Biltmore House
in Ashville and plan to elect their
first representative to the Student
Government Association.
The ISA, as with the other
minority groups on campus en-
courage non-minorities to
become involved in their
organizations. The ISA en-
courages students who are in-
terested in their ancestors native
land to come by and speak to
students trom that country.
Welcome
New Students!
Fabricate Too Carries
Casual as well as
evening wear in all
natural fabrics. Also
the most elaborate
collection of
Handcrafted Jewelry in
Greenville
Specializing in Natural Fiber
Clothing for Women
919 A Redbanks Road
fon Tues tri Sal. 10:00-5:30
Yed Thurs. 10:00-8:00
-M
COlPON
2 Piece Chicken Combo
(Original Recipe" or
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1 Small Mashed Potato
& Gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
OR
6 Kentucky Nuggets
Kentucky Fries
1 Large Drink
$1.99
We Do Chicken Right
plus tax
Expires 8-20-86
COUPON
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A ward Winning Ice Cream
Comes To Greenville!
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
321 Tenth St (near Wendy's)
Picked as one of the Top Five Ice (reams in the Nation two years in a row!
Featured on PM Magazine
Selected for inclusion in "The Very Best Ice Cream" hy Warner Books
"The Store's Strawberry Ice Cream was the winner Akron Beacon Journal
the kinds of frozen desserts that people brave blizzards for Carol Robbins
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�j In 1984 and 1985, Hank's participated in the National ke Cream contest sponsored bv the National Ice Cream Retailers
2� Association. Both years Hank's was selected as one of the top five ice creams in the U.S.
ji Hank's uses a custom built ice cream machine to make its delicious desserts Modern ice cream machines turn the dasher too
T quickly which puts a lot of air in the ice cream. Mans of the ice creams sou bus are half air. We had our ice cream freezer
lj speciaJly built to turn the dasher at the speed of the old fashioned hand-cranked freezers so we can get the same rich pure
fl� flavors.
l A speciality at Hank's is the BLF.ND-IV Vou pick your favorite ice cream flavor, and sour favorite fruit or candy and then
T we put them in our special blend-in machine and combine them into sour own personal flavor The blend-in machine breaks up
jjj the candy or fruit into small pieces and mixes it into the ice cream. It tastes grei: because the candy or fruit doesn't get frozen "�
t)t so it still has its full flavor while the ice cream stays frozen, so you get the best ol both.
Hank's will be open from II a.m. to II p.m Monday through Saturday, and 12 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Sundays.
and Herbert Wolff, authors of "The Very Best Ice Cream" JL
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Patricia ' "Hank Steele, the founder of Hank 's Homemade
Ice Cream is bringing her nationally acclaimed flavors
to Greenville
Old Fashioned hard ice cream made right in the store.
The very best ice cream, using the very best ingredients.














Special Introductory Offer
We want you to find out for yourself how
good ice cream can be. So bring a friend
and come on down to Hank's and take
advantage of our introductory coupon of-
fer(we're on 10th Street between
McDonalds and Wendy's.),
�icu�t
11:00-11:00 MonSat.
12:00-11:00 Sun.
Hank's Homemade
Ice Cream
321 E. 10th St. (next to Wendy's)
BUY 1 Sundae or Blend-In
Get One
FREE
Coupon good through
Tuesday, July 6, 1986
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THt
EAST CAROLINIAN
SUMMER 1986
SGA Promotes Student Involvement
B PATRICK O'NEIL
Muff Writer
"It you don'l get involved
(while in college), then you're a
little sheltered when you get
out said Steve Cunanan, presi-
dent of 1 CU's Student Govern-
ment ssociation. But how can a
student become involved on a
ge campus?
The Student Government
Association offers many oppor-
tunities to students who wish to
become involved in a student
organization.
The SGA of ECU is considered
one of the top student govern-
ments in the nation. As the
largest organization on campus,
it represents the students in
university matters and allocates
money to campus organizations.
The Student Goverment is
comprised of three branches; the
legislative, the executive, and the
judiciary And many committees
which operate the Student Tran-
sit Services, refrigerator rentals
I he Pirate Walk Escort service'
and provides free legal counsel-
ing.
The most important aspect of
J H HI MHtRI ra-l arolinian
Making The Decisions That Affect ECU
Transition To College Life
Easier With Counseling Center
ble
Dir
BIUN WEAVER
Muff Writer
he s' � : 'ounseling Ser-
ith any kind o pro-
�mes through the
ned Vv irbei i Ball,
of the Student Counsel-
to deal with
Fridge Rentals
A vailable
'intinued From Page 3.
1 iting a dorm sie
" m SGA is $25 per
� : � the whole
� ��' Students are re-
quired � I a SlOdeposil
is refundable when the
is returned. Since
most "mini-fridges" are priced
SHK) the economic
SGA are obvious.
K " - rators will be available
during the first few days of
classes at these convenient loca-
ns:
� ' �n the hill, in front ot Scott
� m.
� On the mall, behind Jaris
dorm.
� On the circle, between Greene
and Garrett dorms.
1 or more information on SGA
' rentals contact the
SGA office in Mendenhall Stu-
dent (enter or 757-6611.
all kinds of student's problems,
from the very simple ones to the
serious imes. Ball said the C enter
mostly answers questions like.
"How do I live with my room-
mate?" and "How can I develop
better study habits?
The Center also otters help to
students who are having pro-
blems deciding on their majors.
The Center has career decision
kits, plus now i! has a test
students take on a computer,
which prints out their interest
and offers them ideas on deciding
on a field to study.
Counseling programs on anxie-
ty, life planning, and time
management are offered to the
students by the Center
throughout the year. The pro-
grams are advertised in The last
arolinian and in the dorms.
said, "The students are
our interest here. We teach peo-
ple how :ollege I he may
not teach a student how to beat
the system, hm they do show
m h �w to get through it and
keep sour sanity added Ball.
rhe Center's staff knows that
college is supposed t be fun, but
they are there to help student's
through the difficuli times, he
said.
I he Counseling Center is
located on the third floor of the
Wright Building. Students are
welcome to walk in or they can
call to make an appointment at
757-6661.
This Style Frame
With Single Vision Rx
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$27
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All Other Frames
30 to 60 OFF
with purchase of RX Lenses
RAY BAN sunglasses30 Qpp
Offer good through 73086
315 Parkview Commons
Across From Doctors Park
752-1446
Open MonFri. 9 a.m. til 5:30
ictans
New Students
Welcome to East Carolina and to
the Catholic Student Center
K
Newman
Catholic Student Center
953 E. 10th Street
Greenville, NC 27834
(919) 752216
Sunday Mass Schedule
11:30 a.m. � Biology Bldg. Room 103;
(May 15 � August 25)
9:00 p.m. � Newman Center
Serving the spiritual and social needs
of the ECU Community
We invite you to join us for fun
and fellowship
The Newman Center is open to all students,
faculty and staff at ECU
DOCTORS PARK APTS
Office 16 Beasiey Drive
PIRATES LANDING
Cm.ce 3 ?00 VV 8th Street
830-1145
CAPTAINS QUARTERS
RIVER OAK
WOODSIDE
WESTHILLS GREEN RIDGE
JOHNSTON STREET APTS
CYPRESS GARDENS
the SGA allows students to voice
their opinions in a proper man-
ner. The SGA may pass bills or
resolutions on major social or
political issues, or on university
matters, based on the opinions ot
the students.
The resolution is then sent to
the North Carolina Student
Legislature or to the Governor's
office where our opinions can be
heard.
The SGA is an organization
not only beneficial to the general
student population, but also to
those students directly involved.
Those involved become more in-
formed in campus issues and im-
prove their communication skills
in interpersonal and formal en-
vironments.
"Get involved in something
offered Cunanan, or you may
short change yourself in the long
run. For more information on
getting involved with the SGA or
the services it offers, call or come
by the offices .
AEO
Choosing a Fraternity
Is an important decision!
Members of Alpha Sigma Phi
Enjoy:
� Dedicated Brotherhood
� Established Lil' Sis Program
� Various Social Functions
� Remodled Fraternity House
� Competitive Athletic Intramurals
� Academic Achievement
AI0
mvsK
756-6001
27 SINGLE LOAD WASHERS
6 DOUBLE LOAD WASHERS
20 DRYERS � �
CHANGE MACHINE
DETERGENT MACHINE
CEILING FANS
CABLE TV
M
Largest Laundromat
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The Closest to
ECU
514 East 14th
7,
CANNON COURT
TREETOPS
SHE NANDO AH TOWNHOMES
10
11
QUAIL RlOGEWINDY RlDGF
BROOKHIIX
CEDAR COURT
� AvaNatM all untie
Avaitatta m some units
12
13
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� �
� �
� �
o
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CENTAL CENTER
remco
east;
inc.
E1INHI. NC
758-6061
If veu are apartment hunUno,
let us talk with you about ttie
411 units vtemanase and rent
In the Greenville area. Cur
professional staff can evaluate
vour rental needs and Place veu
In the area and unit best suited
for veu.
Call or come bv our office
Honda v- f rtdav for the easv av
to relocate.
Menden
BHUHUHI KrH
fcMtttam ews y,
fe
campui
and
Stuck;
tion -
hav
ing
Mende
the sc-
.
this
to e

fee'

pur;
enla .
are -
que
I
I
:
History, H
Found Insl
Bv HROl I) JONNKK
Maff Writer

.
as well rea
Once an
e early �
English-ad
In 761

need a county sear, bul
state assen
rhe charter.
Later. in 1771, a
sas made 1
Josiah Ma 1
Mar -
tin)
) 74
-
1 ling a :
habna:
needed a name .
The dec
tie
name

W ar Genera! N
gh the years
es was lost a: j
Greenville.
As a reiatiei
! house town, (tree
finally pulled
Van v inkle"
dustnal Revolu
C01
the state, as well a- .
KJuction, though tobaa
� become popular, �
The Civii War em:
ts Confederu
off to fight for theii
land. There uere 828
res n Greenville in 861
Sigm
Epsi
Welco
Freshman
Come by
Ru





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SUMMER 1986
EO
ing a Fraternity
portant decision!
t Alpha Sigma Phi
Enjoy:
Brotherhood
w t ii sis Program
ial Functions
raternit House
. thletic Intramurals
Kchieement

vl C
1
undromat
envilleand
e Closest to
ECU
514 East 14th
I MI I
m Him iit tiuntinu,
tti mii dlMiit ttie
rndfidcedndrent
ille cirea. Cur
Utt can evaluate
mK and placeycu
id unit be�t suited
? cur cffflce
iv f c r ttie easy way
Mendenhall Houses Information, Fun
B BETH WHICKER
Assistant News Kditor
Few buildings on the ECU
campus can provide the services
and conviences that Mendenhall
Student Center offers in one loca-
tion. Consequently, students
have named Mendenhall the "liv-
ing room" of ECU.
Mendenhall provides many of
the services needed daily of'the
growing campus community. It is
this growth that has led to plans
to expand Mendenhall in 1987.
"We plan to add 30,000 square
feel to the structure according
to Rudolph Alexander, director
of University Unions.
Alexander explained the main
purpose of the expansion is to
enlarge Mendenhall's dining
facilities. Other plans call for
more office and storage area for
the cafeteria, facilities for the
campus radio station, VYZMB, to
be housed in the Center, a social
area, more meeting rooms, and a
large great room for large ban-
quets and dinners.
The Department of University
Unions, a department within the
ECU Division of Student Life,
operates Mendenhall.
Mendenhall offers a variety of
services to assist students and to
provide leisure activities for
students and facultv.
A Ride-Riders board is located
in the main lobby where students
can complete cards either re-
questing rides or seeking rides to
any desired location.
The car pool board is available
for students who commute to
campus and desire riders or rides.
The student organization
booth is found on the main floor
and is used by student groups to
give and obtain information, and
a main lounge features a comfor-
table area to relax or study. There
is also a reading lounge in the
main lobby where current
newspapers are available.
The busiest place in
Mendenhall is the Information
Center where students can use the
locater service to find addresses
or phone numbers of enrolled
students. A newstand and
postage machine can also be
found near the Information
Center.
The Central Ticket Office, also
located in Mendenhall, is open
weekdays from August to May.
Tickets for popular concerts,
cultural programs, music pro-
grams, and athletic events are
sold to students, staff, and facul-
ty with valid ECU ID's.
The ECU Student Bank is
located in the North Wing of
Mendenhall. The bank offers no
interest, no fee savings accounts
as well as check cashing services.
For 24-hour banking conve-
nience, there are automated
tellers from both Wachovia and
Branch Banking & Trust located
near the Student Bank.
Mendenhall's snack bar offers
a delicious alternative to fast
food at minimum cost, and game
tables for cards, chess, checkers,
and backgammon, and other
games are available for check-out
at the Billiards Control Center
downstairs.
The Billiards Center, table ten-
nis rooms, and bowling center
can be found on Mendenhall's
ground floor and are open
throughout the school year.
A darkroom, metals and
jewelry area, woodworking facili-
ty, a weaving room, and a
resource library can be found in
the Crafts Center located on the
ground floor.
Throughout the year, the
Crafts and Recreation area offers
a variety of non-credit classes
ranging from crafts to cardio-
pulmonary resuscitation. The
courses run five to six weeks, and
are available to all Mendenhall
Student Center members and
their guests at a minimal cost.
The Art Gallery and Exhibition
Cases found on the second floor
of Mendenhall are used by the
Student Union for local and na-
tional shows, and different
academic schools on campus, in-
cluding the Schools of Art and
Home Economics.
The Student Government
Association offices are also
found on Mendenhall's second
floor. The SGA provides a
refrigertor service for dormitory
students as well as a campus-wide
transit system.
The Student Union, second
floor, is composed of volunteers
from the entire university com-
munity who are interested in pro-
viding entertaining programs.
Located in the North Wing of
Mendenhall is the music listening
center. In addition to music, a
comfortable reading room with
current magazines is available.
Mendenhall is located on West
Campus beside Joyner Library.
The phone number for all ser-
vices offered is 757-6611.
COME
CHECK US OUT
AIO
tj
at the
AEO
Alpha Sigma Phi
Fraternity House
1 12 blocks from Downtown
422 W. 5th St.
IQlh Si.
"3
5lh St.
History, Heritage, And Culture
Found Inside ECU's Hometown
ehesori's
FAMILY BUFFET
By HAROLDJOYNER
staff Writer
You're far from home and you
still keep asking yourself how a
town like Greenville ever entered
your life.
While you're here, you might
as well realize that Greenville has
enjoyed a long heritage of ex-
citing events.
Once an Indian reservation in
the early 16th century, the area
wa stumbled upon by an
English-adventurer.
In P60, an important lan-
dholder decided that Pin County
needed a county seat, but the
state assembly would not approve
the charter.
Later, in 1771, another attempt
was made to Colonial Gov.
Josiah Martin � no relation to
the present state governor Jim
Martin � to name the area Mar-
yborough. The proposal was
finally approved in 1774.
The Revolutionary War was
coming to a close when in-
habitants decided Martinborough
needed a name change.
The decisive victory at the Bat-
tle of Moore's Creek Bridge led
to the name of Greenesville in
1787, in honor of Revolutionary
War General Nathanial Greene.
Through the years, though, the
es was lost and hince the name
Greenville.
As a relatively small cour-
thouse town, Greenville was
finally pulled out of the "Rip
Van Winkle" period by the In-
dustrial Revolution in the 1850s.
Cotten gins sprung up all over
the state, as well as agriculture
production, though tobacco had
not become popular, yet.
The Civil War ended the new
progress as Confederate men set
off to fight for their southern
land. There were only 828
residents in Greenville in 1860.
Two years later, there were 200
less. That was probably the last
time Greenvile ever experienced a
major slowdown in productivity.
Education has always played
an important role in the expan-
sion of Greenville. One of the
first schools in the area was the
Male Academv, which for many
years served the area with
students who were studying
medicine, Latin or mathematics.
In 1903, however, a group of
dedicated individuals decided the
area needed a school that would
assure both a material and
cultural growth and improvement
of the quality of life in eastern
North Carolina.
A proposal was passed March
8, 1907 to build a state-supported
institution in Greenville.
The founding fathers of ECU
included Gov. Thomas Jarvis;
W.H. Ragsdale, superintendent
of Pitt County schools and State
Sen. James L. Fleming.
As the campus began to ex-
pand, many of the administrative
and classroom buildings were
later named to honor these men
and women who fought to have
ECU built in Greenville.
The doors of East Carolina
Teachers Training School were
opened Oct. 5, 1909. Represen-
ting 32 counties and four states,
104 females and 19 males arrived
by train and trailed through mud-
dy streets to begin their college
career.
The buildings on the campus
then were impressive. Already
there was a boys' and girl's dor-
mitory, an administrative
building, a kitchen and a dining
hall. There was also a laundry
and infirmary, and the power
plant provided lights and water to
these students and 13 faculty
members.
Keeping with the President
Wright's philosophy of keeping
Sigma Phi
Epsilon
Welcomes the
Freshman Class of
1990
Come by for Fall
Rush
personal responsibility, no iron-
clad rules were set during the first
year ECTC opened. As the year
progressed, however, rules were
made as situations arose, and the
rules were strictly enforced.
Buildings continued to spring
up and more academic courses
were offered to students, offering
them a better variety of educa-
tion. In 1929, graduate courses
were added to the curriculum and
the first set of master of ans
degrees were conferred.
In 1951, permission was
granted to rename the school
I as; Carolina College and in
1967, to East Carolina Universi-
ty. Services were expanded in all
areas and the once small, rural
school had now become the third
largest institution of higher learn-
ing in the state.
Today, ECU has more than 60
major buildings, with the
building of a new general
classroom under way behind
Rawl Building.
The continued growth of ECU
is dependent on the adminstra-
tion knowing what the original
desires of this small group of men
and women were at the beginning
of the 20th century.
500 West
Greenville Blvd.
355-2172
rT"
Lunch 11 a.m3:30 p.m.
Dinner 4 p.m9 p.m.
� Open AllDay Sunoay 11 a.m. U9 p.m.i
featuring - Help yourself home cooking
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469
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Dessert � Salad Bar � Vegetables � Entree � Drinks
Lunch 11 a.m3:30 p.m. � Dinner 4 p.m9 p.m.
RememberWe're Open All Day Sunday
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Welcomes
&ss of 1990
Orientation
Students
Admitted
$1.00
Special Prizes Each Nite
Must be 18 to Enter the Club
Must be 19 to Consume Alcoholic Beverages
- ?� -





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SUMMER 1986
Difficult Career Choices Made Simple
By MIKE LUDWICK
News Editor
Even entering freshmen need
to begin thinking about their
future careers, said James
Westmoreland, assistant director
of the Career Planning and
Placement Office.
The Career Planning and
Placement Office mainly serves
graduating seniors. It conducts
workshops on resume writing and
interviewing skills and techni-
ques.
The office also gives
graduating seniors a chance to in-
terview with various companies
by coordinating on-campus inter-
views. For students registered
with the office, the Career Plan -
ing and Placement Office
publishes a monthly job-listing of
positions currently open in-state
and out-of-state.
Westmoreland said freshmen
are welcome and pointed to three
specific rooms that would help
new students plan their careers.
"Any student can walk in the
door and use the self-service
rooms said Westmoreland.
The first room is the Career
Decisions Room. It contains
boxes of information on the
various majors and departments
here at ECU. The Career Deci-
sions Room also has information
pertaining to different careers.
The Occupational Outlook
Handbook, located in the Career
Decisions Room, lists various oc-
cupations and careers and gives a
job description for each. The
book also includes a prospectus
for each career.
The Career Planning Room is
the second room Westmoreland
said would be helpful to
freshmen, especially as seniors,
but even now searching for a
summer job.
The Career Planning Room
outlines a 13 step process on how
to find a job. Westmoreland said
it could also be viewed as a 13
step process on "how to develop
a career
Some of the steps included in
the process are how to write a
resume, how to write a cover let-
ter, and how to interview.
The final room Westmoreland
mentioned was the Company In-
formation room. This room con-
tains boxes of information on the
various companies that have
recruited at ECU.
Westmoreland described one
other feature of the Career Plan-
ning and Placement Office that
freshmen, or any other student.
would find quite useful.
Sigi Plus, a computer program
for an IBM PC, "helps you
decide on a career by exploring
different career options
Westmoreland said.
The program can aid students
by giving them a chance at self-
evaluation, facts on different oc-
cupations, and the skills needed
for those careers.
Westmoreland added with a
piece of advice for freshman that
would help them in the future.
"Become involved in campus ac-
tivities he advised, "get involv-
ed with a club, anything; the
campus paper would be a good
start
Westmoreland said companies
are not just looking for students
with academic achievements, but
non-academic ones also
Campus Life Enhanced
By Residence Activities
pos�,ons current open .n�a,e lhe "ZZZ iZ, 1�
Bright Future Predicted For Teachers
By MIKE LUDWICK
News Editor
For those freshman arriving on
campus who have no idea as to a
major, but know they want to
enter a human service field �
education could be the answer.
Thomas Chamblis, director of
Student Teaching said becoming
an educator, "has more to do
with a desire to enter a human
services field than making
money He added those who
enter the field of education have
a "commitment to serve
mankind
Chambis said a bright spot in
:he education field in coming
vears will be the job market.
"Right now we have more jobs
than graduates in certain fields
Chamblis said. He added there
will be an increasing shortage of
:eachers for the next six to eight
vears, especially in foreign
language, math, science, and
niddle grades.
"The job market for good
:eachers Chamblis predicted,
"will be excellent; there will be
excellent opportunities
As compensation is concerned,
Chamblis said over the last two
years teacher's salaries have in-
creased 24 percent in North
Carolina. "But we are still in the
lower half in national averages
Chamblis said.
Chamblis said the North
Carolina General Assembly has
taken a responsible look at
education, but its actions are dif-
ficult to predict, especially when
the current General Assembly
cannot commit a forthcoming
assembly to a particular course oi
action.
Even though the General
Assembly has increased teacher
pay, Chamblis questioned the
state's ability to sustain such in-
creases. Nevertheless, Chamblis
said, "the urgency is here, and
the General Assembly will have
to respond and lend good support
to teacher's pay
Speaking on the teacher's im-
age, Chamblis said there would
be a "gradual improvement
He said there are several trends
in education that can lead to a
better image. The state's quality
assurance program for teacher
education, and the beginning
teacher program which gives
local school boards the respon-
sibility for providing new
teachers with appropriate in-
service and support programs,
are two programs that will im-
prove teachers' images.
Chamblis added the trend
toward accountability will also
benefit teachers' images.
"Because of some of the pro-
blems said Chamblis, "young
people now see teaching as a
challenge He added most
students who are entering the
field see an opportunity to make
a significant contribution to
education and young people.
By LYNN WEAVER
Staff Writer
The Student Residence
Association can be a very impor-
tant part of each student's life
while living on campus at ECU.
The SRA consists of elected
members from each dorm and of-
ficers of the Area Council com-
mittees. It is the strongest student
voice of dorm residents.
Associate Dean of Residence
Life, Carolyn Fulghum, advises
the group. She meets with the
SRA president before the official
weekly meeting and keeps abreast
on all the happenings of the
organization, but Fulghum feels
the students and faculty can
organize themselves.
Fulghum urged students to join
and to take advantage of all the
benefits the association provides.
The SRA offers students a
chance to become active in the
university's decision making pro
cesses and gives them a chance to
meet people through the
organization itselt and through
planned social activities. Mike
Kleincrt, a former SR. president
added, "Yes, and it does give
students a chance to partv
A strong student voice comes
from the SRA to those in charge
at the university, which effects
Construction Continues On New Building
ECt News Bureau
Work on ECU'S new 163,729
square-foot general classroom
building is progressing on
schedule, according to an ECU
official.
"I think we're moving along
fairly well said James J.
Lowry, director of the Physical
Plant. "We're a little behind in
certain areas, but a little ahead in
others. In general, it's within the
range of the overall plans
Within two or three weeks, the
structural steel should be in
place. After that, workmen will
begin pouring the concrete decks,
or floors, he said
Construction began earlier this
year on the S10.4 million, three-
story building. This is the First
major building project on the
ECU main campus in 10 years
and is a university capital project
recommended by EC I
Chancellor John Howell and en-
dorsed by the ECU Board o!
Trustees
Occupying the building will be
the departments ol Engl
business education, foreign
languages and literatures, the
honors program, international
studies, and additional offices
and classrooms foi the S ! of
Business. The Branch Banking &
Trust Center tor leadership
Development will also be located
in the building
If the work . i l ues as plan -
ed, the building will be read) for
students bv the Jail semestei
198
the university's methods of deal-
ing with students. "They (the
SRA) basically get involved with
the major contraversial issues
explained Fulghum.
The SRA has organized com-
mittees to represent the students
in many different areas of college
life. Involved students ar?
represented on such university
committees as food service, park
ing and traffic, housing appeals,
and renovations on campus.
The Association also provides
banquets and conferences for in
terested members. The SRA
presents an annual Homecoming
dance for the students. Ail
students are welcome, but non-
members must pay an entertain-
ment fee.
Local businesses join with the
SRA to arrange socials, parties.
and occasionally, reduced admis-
sion prices.
Kleinert said, "Area businesses
seem to be more than helpful in
assisting us with organizing ac-
tivities. '
Another benefit of being a
SRA member is the "Err.ergencv
Loan Fund When students are
down to their last penny they can
borrow 25 dollars from the
Department of Residence Life
The loan, issued onlv
members, must be repaid w;
30 days.
Fulghum said the SRA is an
organization students should
vestigate and join, because for a
small social fee of eight dollar
students have a lot offered
them.
If students have problems fin-
ding information about the SRA.
Fulghum recommended "hev see
'heir Resident Director, who wil
provide all the information
students need to know. Contac-
ting the SRA is also possible
through visiting Mendenhail or
calling 757-6611. The office
located on the 2nd floor in room
224.
KINKS
STUDENT UNION
"�
HEART
pr�"
,
�A
The Student Union
Needs You To Help

� Select, Plan, Promote Activities
� Develop Leadership Skills
� Make Lasting Friendships
F Tr F F Tr V F r r f � f�
Join Our Committees Now:
ST
$fOt
Coffeehouse
Films
Forum
Major Concerts
Minority Arts
Productions
Public Relations
& Publicity
Recreation
Special Concerts
Special Events
Travel
Visual Arts
&�
COLORADO SKIING TRIP
cF
Just See What We're
Doing This Summer:
Session I
May22
May 26
May29
June2
June5
June9
June12
June16
June19
June23
Concert "Soul Train"
Move "Sixteen Candles"
BingoIce Cream Party
Movie "Footloose"
Concert "Lahnn & Loftin"
Movie "Risky Business"
BingoIce Cream
Movie "Back to the Future"
Casino Night
Movie "Flashdance"
3.00 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3.00 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
& 9:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
& 9:00 p.m.
9:00 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
& 9:00 p.m.
Session II
June 26
June 30
July
July
3
7
July 10
July 14
July 17
July 21
July 24
July 28
Watermelon Feast
Movie "Jaws"
Concert "Southern Culture on the Skids'
Movie "Animal House"
Worst Movie Lock-in
Movie "IT
Watermelon Feast
Move "Body Heat"
Mendenhail Olympics
Movie "10"
3:00 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
& 9:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
& 9:00 p.m.
9:00 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
& 9:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
3:30 p. m
Plan to Join Us and
Plan to Get Involved!
Call 757-6611 ext. 210
or Come by our office at Room 234 Mendenhail.
Become a Part of ECU
Theatre
Kick Off
I
ECUStu
B J. n!l) M U1r-W

;
I fol
z
I
�77i
'The Gods Must Be Crazy, K
Kalahari Desert, will be show n in
flee records all over Europe, uni





Life Enhanced
ence A ctivities
THE LAST CAROLINIAN
Lifestyles
���������������i r � ' ���� ��
SUMMER 1986 Page 7
v
she universitv's methods of deal-
students. "They (the
basicall) get involved with
a ntraversial issues
ned ulghum.
SRA has organized com-
represent the students
ent areas of college
Involved students are
ented on such university
ees as rood service, park-
. housing appeals,
on campus.
lation also provides
conferences for tu-
bers. The SRA
annual Homecoming
students. All
come, but non-
ay an entertain-
i
�in with the
socials, parties,
reduced admis-
;ea businesses
� an helpful in
organizing ac-
�being a
he "Emergency
w hen students are
1pennv they can
"sdollars from the
� Residence Life.
only to
be cpaid within
SRA is an
should in-
because for a
eight dollars
offered to
oblems fin-
about the SRA,
cded 'hey see
rector, who will
n formation
know. Contac-
also possible
. Mendenhall or
rhe office is
: floor in room
t We're
lummer:
I
3:00 p.m.
3.30 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:00 pm.
3:30 p.m.
& 9 00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
& 9:00 p.m.
9:00 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
& 9:00 p.m.
l
ii
on the Skids"
3:00 p.m.
3:30p.m.
& 900 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
& 9:00 p.m.
9:00 p.m
3:30 p.m.
& 9:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3 00 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
s and
volved!
210
234 Mendenhail.
f ECU
Theatre Series Will
Kick Off In October
rhe ECl Department of
I niversity Unions has planned a
tremendous season oi stars and
stellai performances tor the
1986-1987 Concert Theatre
Series Additionally, the series
be held in the newly
d Wright Auditorium
which is, in the words of the ar-
in charge of the project,
most beautiful hall in sighi
sound east of Greensboro. It
combination of which Green-
le may be proud,
rhe 1986-1987 Con-
cert Theatre Scncs is comprised
Krtists Series, the
Music Series, and the
rheatre Arts Series. The Artists
Sei ies begins on October 21. 1986,
Suzuki Talent Education
rou ' oup of ten child musi-
cians from Japan whose per tor -
- bring thunderous ap-
plause world-wide vear after
year. America's much-loved Bur!
Ives follows with his performance
v member 5, 1986. rhislegen-
lary performei continues to
diences with his easy,
; low style.
V a colossal celebration, the
Gala Re-Opening of Wright
Auditorium will feature the com-
� ormances of the North
( ai : ECl Symphony
Ore Ovei one-hundred
�.its will perform,
� :al reception will
� November 16. 1986.
��nous Czech
now in its
seas : per for -
will perform on
Fel 12. 1987, under the
bat f Vac av Neumann and
Jet tvek Finally, the
,ile pianist,

i on March 23,
I
�c I he
a ntinue
C : amder
v
Music Series,
Chamber Festival,
ti be held in Hen-
n
�e bu-
with resered
: ons. 1 his
year's season begins October 13
with the Boston Museum Trio
pei � repertory oi Baro-
que assical music. The
Me- S ng Quartet will
perform on November 10 and
demonstrate their award-winning
skills. As a special treat on
January 19, the Gary Burton
Group will perform with the
magic of the xylophone that has
brought Gary Burton two Gram-
my Awards. A concert spanning
five centuries of brass ensemble
music concludes the season with
the performance o the American
Brass Quintet on Januarv 28.
198
Last, but certainly not least.
the Theatre Arts Series is offering
an unusual dance theatre ex
perience, a romantic comedy, a
side-splittingclassical ballet com-
pany, and one of the finest
American dance ensembles. On
November 25. 1986, the season
commences with the Joffrey II
Dancers, the sister company oi
the Joffrey Ballet. Light comedy
and fine dance meet in a wonder-
ful fusion called 1 es Ballets
Trockadero de Monte Carlo on
January 21. 198 The men of
this company dance both the
male and female roles � with
hilarious results. The Rainmaker.
a classic American comedy, will
be the January 29th production
by the Asolo State Theater of
Florida, one of America's leading
touring ensembles. The grand
finale o the year will be the
March 31st performance of an
ensemble whose work has in-
spired new trends and broken
down old barriers. The Pilobulus
Dance Theatre is truly a perfor-
mance beyond words.
Reserved seating (always your
seat), special savings (up to 25
percent savings), and special ex-
tras (receptions to meet the ar-
tists) are jus: a few oi the benefits
you receive buying season tickets.
wide variet) ol sales plans are
available: single series, combina-
tion series, and 'pick your own'
series. The 1986-198" Con-
cert Theatre Series, coupled with
the extraordinary renovation of
Wright Auditorium, is something
not to be missed. For more in for-
mation and your tickets, please
call 757-6611, ext. 266. Monday
� Friday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
BBBBh-
The Joffre II Dancers, sister company of the Joffrey Ballet, will be
one of the mans attractions sponsored b the Theatre Arts Series.
receptions during which one may meet the performing artists, are only
two of the benefits received by purchasing season tickets. For more in-
Reserved seating in the newh-renovated Wright Auditorium, and formation, call 757-6611, ext. 266.
Playhouse To Present New Productions
By JOHN SHANNON
Even if the theatre isn't "in
your blood chances are you'll
find something to please youi
finer sensibilities among the pro-
ductions offered in the con
vear bv ECU's Department
Theatre Arts.
for those who aren'l aware ol
the reputation oi E( I 's drama
program, a surprise is in itore
1 asi year's rmeup of plays proved
what some have realized all along
� the ECL) Playhouse is a pro-
fessional company capable of
producing the highest caliber
drama successfully, and with un-
common flair.
Many remembei the perfor-
mance ot Anton Checkov's three
Sisters as a particularly sensitive
rendering of that classic.
Mohere's The I earned ladies
featured, in addition to fine ac-
ting, spectacular costuming that
would rival the most extravagant
o productions. I as: year's Fast
Carolina Dance Theatre produc-
tion, an annual dance event,
demonstrated to capacity au-
diences the multifaceted talents
ol ECl dance majors, and bore
out the well-deserved praises of
dance instructors here. Perhaps
� prominent in the memory oi
local theatre-goer is last spring's
production of Fifth of July, a
sophisticated comedy o values
and daring con:en; which the
Playhouse pulled oft eloquently.
The upcoming season promises
to be equally exciting. A list of
planned performances should
whet the appetites oi those who
like to watch fine acting and dan-
cing as well as spark the interests
of those dance and drama en-
thusiasts who may wan: to get in-
volved in the actual productions.
A Chorus Line will kick off the
season, running from Wednes
dav, Oct. 15 through Saturday,
( )C! .
20.
18, and also Monday, Oct.
Master Harold and the Boy
will run from Wednesday, Nov.
12 through Saturday, No
(rimes of the Heart is schedul-
ed from Wednesday, Feb. 11 un-
til Friday. Feb. 14.
The East Carolina Dance
Theatre will run for four nights:
Friday and Saturday, Feb. 2" and
28; and Monday and Tuesday,
March 2 and 3.
ECU Student Union Offers Entertainment For All
Bv J.
DAVID MATHEWS
v�ff Writer
Being an incoming freshman
al E U, you probably are
ware of the state's new age limit
on drinking alcohol, right?
You may say to yourself, "1
can't do anything here at school.
I can't go downtown or even
drink m my dorm room. Darn
that General Assembly
I, never fear, the ECL Stu-
l nion is here. According to
Liz Deupree, Student Lnion
President, there is something for
everyone to do. And all students
should take advantage of the Stu-
dent Union. "When students pay
their fees each semester said
Deupree, "they are making an in-
vestment in the Student Lnion.
Each student has a say as to what
goes on
The Student Union is broken
down into twelve committees.
Each one serves ECU students in
a different way, and allows
students to serve ECU in a dif-
ferent way. They are as follows:
Travel Committee � Ever
wanted to take that getaway trip
to the Bahamas? How about
Thanksgiving in New York City?
The Travel Committee could be
your ticket to something a little
doser to paradise than Green-
ville. They sponsor numerous
trips throughout the school year
and during holidays. The com-
mittee also sponsors the Travel-
Adventures Film Series.
Films Committee � Tired of
spending $4.50 for a movie?
Courtesy oi the Films Commit-
tee, you can see free movies every
week at Hendrix Theater. Movies
to suit anyone's taste are offered
every weekend. Also, there are
double features and specials
screened throughout each
semester. Sneak previews of
movies vet to be released are also
shown. Upcoming movies this
fall include Pretty In link. Out
of Africa, and Back To The
Future, among others. Sorry, no
skin flicks.
Productions Committee � The
Productions Committee produces
such events as the Madrigal Din-
ners and Dinner Theaters. This
fall. "The Owl and The
Pussycat will be offered in the
dinner theatre. Seasonal parties
and receptions for all different
See THERE'S. Page 10
finally, Mister Roberts will
round out the season from April
13 to 16. Monday through Thui
day.
Foi those students who stay in
town during summer 'o work or
attend summer school, as well as
for local residents and men
orientation students lucky
enough to be here at the right
time, the Fast Carolina Summer
Theatre provides an opportur
well worth rearranging a schedule
for.
Four award-winning American
comedies will be performed in
Messick Theatie during the
month of July. Performing in
these plays will be a company of
stars from television. Broadway
and Hollywood, including
Micheal Learned (The Waltons,
urse). Holt Wilson All M
Children) and Mavis Ray, all of
whom will appear in I adies in
Retirement, Monday through
Saturday, July 7 to 12.
Jerry verDorn (The Guiding
Tight) will star in The Foreigner,
Monday thiough Saturday, July
14 to 19, with matinees at 2:15
p.m. on Wednesday, July 16 and
Saturday. July 19. Frank
Runyeon (.45 The World Turns)
See Theatre. Page 11
From The Not So Rieht
Just Learn To Deal With It
By PAT MOLLOY
The Gods Must Be CrazyJ
'The Gods Must Be Crazy A comical documentary about a tribe of peaceful Bushmen living in the
Kalahari Desert, will be shown in the fall at ECU's Hendrix Theatre. The film, which has broken box of-
fice records all over Europe, unpretentiously portrays the clash of two cultures with hilarious results.
You just have to deal with it.
That's my sole advice for arriv-
ing freshmen who, during their
stay at ECU, will undoubtedly
encounter such unpleasantries as
football players (may the Lord
help you understand those folks),
professors who feel that all of
Solomon's wisdom was handed
to them by divine right, Green-
ville weather � which, inciden-
tally, will have you tanning the
bod one moment and flash-
frozen the next � and,(though
only God knows why at all), ugly
people.
Me? I'm the campus smart-ass.
I'll be pushing out articles such as
this one bi-weekly simply to chap
your ass. Get used to it.
Well then, now that we've
dispensed with the amenities
on to the pillaging.
ECU football players. What a
fun bunch of dudes. In all
fairness, I can't categorize all of
them in a nice, tight package;
however, I think I can capture the
essence of quite a few. I do this
merely because I was forced to
house with these clowns for two
years. As you'll find, Pat Molloy
speaks nothing but the truth �
he simply speaks it loudly.
As I remember, the typical Fri-
day night unfolded thusly: At 8
p.m. they would gather on the
balcony of Belk and grab their
respective crotches until 8:13. At
8:14, when anything resembling
an animate female walked by (or
as is the case in front of Belk, ran
by), the boys would shout and
holler obscenities at her � much
like someone in shock therapy
?l�" PTJN VOK
would do. Alas, at 8:16 the
frivolity would end, and the guys
would be so pumped up, they'd
have to return to grabbing their
crotches. Hell, nobody else
would.
At sometime during your
career as a student (and make no
mistake, kids, it is a career),
you'll come across a professor
who has studied every Trivial
Pursuit card created. I had one
who thought he could keep role
in his head � he didn't need a
roll book. Yeah, give me a break.
Half of these people are so wack-
ed out on caffeine and valium
they can't take a leak � much
less role.
Of course, there is always the
teacher who'll give you the my-
way-is-the-only-way speech. Lh-
huh. Your way is the only way.
That's why you've been teaching
the same class for sixteen years,
and look where you are. I'll see
you on "Letterman" real soon.
Go climb a rock.
Now we approach Greenville
weather. And we do this ten-
tatively, for there are only two
things more uncertain than this
city's weather: the fate of the
ABC series "McGyver" (for
which I am in panic), and the sex-
ual preferance of Michael
Jackson (when last seen, he was
eyeing the Shoney's Big Boy
rather heatedly).
Forgive me; I'm being silly.
Perhaps it's the people who
forecast the weather who are so
unstable. On channel twelve, we
have a guy named (now get this)
Skip Waters really. His parents
must have hated him like liver �
nobody names their child Skip
unless they want him to go to the
Naval Academy. And we wonder
why Skipper is such a putz?
Sec Pat, Page 8








Ml t s i RO IM s
SI MM! K 1986
Student Comics
Maii-O-Stkk
By VARRiix JOHNSON
to "mi4 TArM
meets me
vv aikm
t he i'Unk
By A GUY
r C CALKIN'THE PLANK!
EVERY THURSDAY i THE EAST CAROLINIAN" fc
featuring: r
Ml IP
�"�fc�i i� � � fin
�� .
�I4E -

. S iveLore &heRn
v
0
ft ,
Vs

W
l 'ndt'itoverats
The Beast Carolinian
'By PARKER '
A I S SO, I
STKKY
M VIM i V. ()M
K VISI I) BY ()l H
iIV KS BIR H I ()
IS WD LIVES!
Snced
OHMYGflWD
8f?HR00M �
ROACHES'
POICK.SOMF.PODV.
GrAt HtRfltD"
Tot? IRT�THLYRE
LRtRDXONME.CHoKE
I 'llnln l I (iltllcl M.illl . r
By BRYANT
Pat Bestows
Knowledge On
Newcomers
Continued from page 7
We're down to the proverbial
"nitty gritty" now. ctually,
we're nisi down to the "gritty
I hat's right, gang; it's time foi
one of iii favorite topics ugh
people
You have to wondei why there
are ugl people. Did the doctor,
n seeing the baby, think ii
was a troul and club ii ovei the
'iead' Did Madonna, urn
di unken night, mistake B ,
ie rge foi Sean Penn, and latei
ave his children? t arid
here's the theory i I
subscribe are they my
I mean, it the 're n .it's
understandable Some psy
ick is merely inseminating not
in a I wo m en with the
chnmosomes i�' a bai 11
be coi rect, lor no person b
� a,unan could look like 1 i
Borgnine it's simply
plausible.
As I near the end ol 'Ins article,
another subject crosses my mind
thai you, as freshmen, will have
dea ��� 1 at is alcohol.
tually, because ol youi age.
you'll have to learn to
without it. Because ol this, many
' . j will find yourselves hang-
:i" at the liqu i store wail .
' : ��� �m uch as myseli who
- ol age to buy you a bottle
V ell. I'm here to tell you
n'l . ' cap.
Be prepared to spend upw
� thirty d illai for e of
� dka Firsi ff, 1 buy i
the best - that's 'en I �
Mere. s lly, thei
i porta 55 I � � �
rhud : ere'
Iac I ha
, j
a nding SI!
lation ft a o
-eon sp � o vuch:
as yourselves. But foi SI5, I :ai
: ith 1
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18, 19 & 20
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DM
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r
A 1 Ai
Met , " � iceiet I
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Because it's beautiful, because it's a Buiova. and
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See more comics, page 11
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GREENVILLE T7h56� KINSTON & JACKSONVILLE
She Jon
IT'S BULOVA WATCH TIME AGAIN.
The
DoW Z2�
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Alpha Sign
o
Sigma Phi
Phi Kappa

Zeta Bet
i
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c
?09
in Si
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ail
to
kind
FREE
Membership
To The Attic
18, 19 & 20
year-old students
will be allowed
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alter Sept. 1, 1986
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SUMMER HM t
The Fraternity Experience is
VII You Can Kat &
specials Include
linment
eranda I ounge
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nations
�i" ba and a trip to
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rdinar!
-appointed
! p.m.t
.
3ittrr3Traterntty Council
June 1986
Welcome New Male Students:
On behalf of the Inter-Fraternity Council, it is my privilege to
welcome you to East Carolina University. I would like to take this op-
portunity to inform you of our fraternity system's official recruit-
ment period, "RUSH This is the tune set aside to let the fraternity
system at East Carolina demonstrate the main positive attributes that
can enhance one's college experience.
The fraternity system at East Carolina has much to offer the am-
bitious college man. Opportunities exist in leadership, fellowship,
academic achievement, community service, campus involvement, in-
tense athletic competition, and numerous othei areas which can help
one attain personal achievement goals. A greatet number oi men are
realizing these benefits as fraternity membership climbs at last
Carolina, as well as nationwide.
Beginning the week of September 14, many fraternities will be hav-
ing "open" rush parties for all interested men wishing to affiliate with
a fraternity. An opportunity is being provided foi sou to visit all the
fraternity houses in search for the group that best suits you. To aid
you in your search, buses will be running to all the fraternity houses
from the College Hill bus stop. We ask that you please take advantage
of this service.
Sincerely,
David Oupree
IIC President
: -1 tHKHAlD I1DI, �
(�AST CARD! ISA 1 MVimi
M IS'
WHEN YOU JOIN EAST
CAROLINA'S GREEK SYSTEM, YOU
GET A LOT OF BENEFITS, SUCH AS:
A scholarship program
�through friendly encouragement and planned activities,
vou can realize your academic potential.
A community service program
�by helping others less fortunate, you will develop the
qualities that build character.
A social program
�by exposing you to various social situations, you will
learn how to conduct your self in any social encounter
in the future.
A leadership program
�the hierarchy of the fraternity and the Inter-Fraternity
Council both provide the opportunity to excel as a leader,
as well as numerous opportunities in Student Government
An intramural sports program
�through organized competition, you will learn the meaning
of unity and sportsmanship.
The most important benefit of all is
�the building and developing of friendships that will last longer
than your college career.
yi
w
j�L- "i
uate
Bulova
Alpha Sigma Phi
Beta Theta Pi
Delta Sigma Phi Tau Kappa Epsilon
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Pi Kappa Phi
MP
Pi Kappa Alpha Sigma Tau Gamma
V- y

B it
iqr to
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s
�TV -n
allery
�00 p.m. Closed Sunday
N & JACKSONVILLE
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Phi Kappa Tau
Theta Chi
Sigma Nu
A sense of belonging
Zeta Beta Tau
Kappa Alpha
Kappa Sigma
Lambda Chi Alpha
f "�i if
mtmimm �tmmmiiii00mi fy





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SUMMER 1986
'
There's Fun For Everyone At ECU
Continued from nao 7 -t-l

�LOOM COUNTY
Continued from pgge 7
occasions are also hosted by the
committee. The Production
ommittee is also responsible foi
the decorations in Mendenhall.
( offeehouse Committee �
! ooking for an alternative to the
rowded, downtown bars? Both
imateur and professional per-
.Ttners are presented in the
ndeiground, which is located
�n the ground floor of
Mendenhall. Good news tor
hose under the drinking age �
lock cocktails (mocktails) are
ierved.
Recreation Committee � For all
f those lazy days when you think
here is absolutely nothing to do,
.heck out some of the events
sponsored by the Recreation
Committee. Whether it's
Milliards, bowling, hackey sack oi
ing-pong, there is something for
�veryone. The Recreation Com-
nittee also sponsors special ac-
ivities such as Bingo Ice Cream
Parties, Watermelon leasts and
( oliege Bowl.
Forum Committee Students
vill be entertained and informed
the lectures, debates and sym-
posiums provided by the Forum
Committee.
Major Concerts Committee �
Even Greenville has a major con-
:ert once in a while, thanks to the
Major Concerts Committee. Pas:
:erts have included rbto,
fimmy Buffet, James Brown,
Charlie Daniels, the kinks and
more. The committee is currently
working on another major con-
cert for November.
Special C oncerts (ommittee � If
you are looking for an alternative
to nightclub bands and major
concerts, the Special Concerts
t ommittee probably has
something unique for you. The
featured groups include jazz per-
formers, regional artists and na-
tionally recognized groups such
as Mainstream, Chairman of the
Board, and Maynard Ferguson.
Public Relations and Publicity
C ommittee 1. sing all media
outlets available, the Public Rela-
tions and Publicity Committee
keeps students informed oi what
is going on at the Student Union.
I hev specialize in marketing and
public relations.
Minority Arts Committee � The
Minority. Arts Committee spon-
sors suc.h programs lis Interna-
tional Week and the Jewish and
Black Arts Festivals. Thev also
introduce programs dealing with
multi�cultural arts. In the spr-
ing, the Student Star Search com-
petition allows talented students
from different backgrounds to
perform.
Visual Arts Committee lour
ing exhibits from museums and
artists are brought to campus bv
the Visual Arts Committee. The
committee also sponsors the an-
nual Illumina an competition for
students. Since ECU has one oi
try, it is only natural that the Stu-
dent Union is involve in visual
arts.
Special Kvents Committee �
Comedians, magicians and other
novelty attractions are just a few
of the events sponsored by the
Special Events Committee. The
very popular "Barefoot on the
Mall a rite of spring for all
ECU students, is also coor-
dinated by the committee.
All incoming freshman are en-
couraged to become a member of
one of these twelve committees.
Deupree believes that a lot of
things, such asleadership and
organizational skills, can be ob-
tained through one of the Student
Union's committees.
For those of you wishing to
find out more about the Student
Union when you are on campus
for orientation, drop by the
booth that will be set up at
NSICO (New Student Initiation
of Campus Organizations). Or,
stop by Room 234 at Mendenhall
Student Center during the fall
and find out about the fun going
on right here in your own back
yard.
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schools in the coun-
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Good ihru June '86
"1
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The Kappa Sigma Fraternity
Welcomes The New Pirates
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The East Carolina University Chapter of
The Kappa Sigma Fraternity Provides
An Excellent Opportunity For Athletic,
Leadership, and Scholastic Advancement
Also Famous For The Biggest
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Come by and see the finest house on
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Located 700 East 10th Street, Beside DarryFs
RUSH KE STYLE IN THE FALL
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FALL
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SUMMER 1986
11
BLOOM COUNTY
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Theatre
Continued from page 7
will star in Deathtrap along with
loseph Mascolo (Jmws II,
Sharkey's Machine), Monday
through Saturday, July 21 to 26,
with matinees at 2:15 p.m.
Wednesday, July 23 and Satur-
day, July 26. Finally, William
Christopher (Father Mulcahy of
Mash) will co-star with Ronn
Carroll in Greater Tuna, Monday
througl Saturday, July 30 to
August 2, with a matinee showing
at 2:15 p.m. Wednesday, Jul 30.
Suinmei Theatre evening per-
formances will begin at 8:15 p.m.
rickets may he purchased in the
box office of Messick Theatre
Aits Center oi reserved by
telephone with VISA or Mastei
Card by calling 757-6390, also the
number to call foi more informa
Men about the Summer Iheane.
St. Paul's Episcopal Church
WELCOMES YOU
401 East Fourth Street
The Rev. Lawrence P. Houston, Jr Rector
The Rev Middleton L. Wootten, III, Associate Rector
Mary Gartman, Episcopal Campus Ministry
FALLWINTER SCHEDULE OF SERVICES
Sunday
7:30 a.m. � Holy Eucharist
9:00 a.m. � Holy Eucharist (First, Third, Fourth Sunday)
Morning Prayer (Second Sunday)
10:00 a.m. � Christian Education
1 1:00 a.m. � Holy Eucharist (First, Second, Third Sunday)
Morning Prayer (Fourth Sunday)
Wednesday
L
7:00 a.m. � Holy Eucharist
10:00 am � Holy Eucharist and Laying-On of Hands
s 30 p.m. � Holy Eucharist and Student Fellowship Supper
Overkill
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AS OWE Of OlOVlA HAaJOFVI Of "MCASm MBA
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MMa�UlN� i �r.v-j.�5 t,





1 HI I ASTAROl IN1AN
Sports
SLMMF-R 1V86
Page 12
1986 Season Preview
Bucs Seek Improvement
Coming off back-to-back 2-9
seasons, the ECU football squad
is looking to a brighter future
under second-year head coach
Art Baker.
By RICKMcCORMAC
and
SCOTT COOPER
j
�IB HI MBtRl fas, arolin�
Second-year head coach Art Baker awaits another tough schedule as
his team attempts to rebound from last year's 2 season
Va Tech Added In '87
1 c I
' � HOA 11heH :� posted a 6-5
du t�acl Bill
- vaking an
�vB �� appearance : � � ' have 1 �.� such an a qu;
� ingKa one more
s 1988-excellence
Sept i1i. 1988.
1 .ei ' s iH the potential P ; � hare s ithern info tball status.
.ember of the
; all other
Although another tough
schedule awaits, the Bucs look
optimistic for what lies ahead.
Coach Baker feels the biggest dif-
ference may lie in the team's
depth.
"I felt there was as much dif-
ference between this year and last
� as night and day Baker said.
"After spring practice, we either
have one of two things. We either
don't have depth, or we have bet-
ter depth than last year
One area that needs the most
improvement, according to
Baker, is the passing game. "One
ol the most glaring weaknesses
we had a year ago was our inabili-
ty to throw and catch the foot-
ball Baker admitted. "We
must establish a quarterback that
can be a leader and put us in the
endzone. That lias not been
established yet.
"We aNo need a corps of
receivers who are dependable and
who know secondary coverages
who can get open and catch the
ball Baker added. "Those are
our glaring weaknesses
The man most likely to be call-
ing the signals tor the Bucs next
season is sophomore Berke
Hoi' claw (5-10, 165).
Holtzclaw, from Valdosta, Ga
became a starter near season's
end last year � passing for 2S4
yards in four games. Baker teels
confident with Holtclaw's pass-
ing ability, but says lie needs
work in other areas.
"Berke Holtclaw came along
at the end of the season and
showed some promise as a
passer Baker said. "But he
needs to work more with the op-
tion game
Another quarterback can-
didate emerged in the annual
Purple Cold Spring football
game. Freshman Travis Hunter
(5-10, 175), from Winter Garden,
Fla earned co-offensive player
of the game as he rallied the Pur-
ple squad fnm behind, before
losing 21-14 to the Gold.
Another impact freshman who
emergeu in the spring game was
wide receiver Walter Wilson
(5-11, 175). He teamed with
Hunter in getting co-offensive
honors as well as returning a
kickoff 95 yards for a touchdown
in the annual intrasquad contest.
In addition to Wilson, ECU
returns split ends Tony Smith
(5-10, 171 junior), William
Carver (6-2, 210 sophomore),
Harry Howard (6-0, 185
freshman) and JC transfer Jackie
Armstrong (6-2. 190 junior). At
the flanker spot, senior Amos
Adams (6-1, 196) returns and will
be joined by (redshirt) freshman
lettin Benedict (5-11. 155),
sophomore Don Gaylor (6-0.
185), heralded JC transfer Andre
Fields (5-10, 175) and Wilson
The Pirate ground game, even
with the loss of tailback Tony-
Baker (the school's second
leading all-time rusher), remains
strong. Junior fullback Anthony
Simpson (5-10, 226) returns to
anchor the Buc ground game.
Simpson, who gained 488 yards
last season, is the leading return-
ing rusher. Tim James (5-10. 225)
is a more than an adequate back-
up at the fullback slot.
Sophomore Jarrod Mood)
(5-10, 212). who sparkled in the
spring game, senior Dwight
Richardson (6-1, 195), who
played well in ECU'S last game
against LSU, sophomore Reggie
McKinney (5-10. 185) and junior
Terry Paige (5-10, 192) return at
tailback. All have a chance at
starting, but you can bet that all
will get their time at tailback.
Coach Baker plans to use the
one-back offense, similar to that
of the Washington Redskins in
order to give the Pirate's more
options both rushing and pass-
ing.
Perhaps the biggest plus for the
Bucs. according to Baker, is the
strength of the returning offen-
sive line. Returning starters in-
Pirates Win 40; Graduate Mainstays
;
yeai
sen
thi
i
the
60
hall �
sprt� va.
ace ot
" a! sport.
i mark notched
' ' �d was iargeiv
eff rt s i �t s i
finished theii col-
his pas! 40-ld
e departing
numbei
our bal . � this pasi
acl ' ' r better
:rage 1I together,
ected 43 ol the team's
8( , along with over
ibles ECU hit.
I iieir efforts spurred a large
numbet ol all-time single season
r the Pirates, both as a
m and individually. Those in-
clude runs (361, was 331), hits
(475, 462). RBIs (314, 284).
hies (96, 83), homers (60, 5 31
bases ("60, 710).
One team record EUC would
er forgel was a new record
tor number ol errors, the second
ve year mistakes cost
the dearly in post-regular
r 6esi loss for ECU ob-
vioi is Winfred Johnson, a
pitcher first basemandesignated
hitter who has led the Pirates in
ing statistics since his
arrival in 1983. He has set virtual-
ly every offensive individual
record for both career and single
season hitting and was recently
named first team All-America.
The most noted of Johnson's
stats is the one for homers. He set
a season record in '84 with 18,
bettered that to 22 last year, then
blasted 19 this year, putting him
in first, second and third-place all
The powerful Johnson had
already established a new career
mark in homeruns in '85 with 51.
His performance this year raised
that record to 70, with the
second-place record of Butch
Davis only 26.
n marks set
h ; ude: most tuts
' and 3rd), total bases (1, 2,3),
walks (3rd), doubles (1), RBIs
(1,2,3), batting average-97 AB
(1,3) and slugging percentage
(1,2).
m include:
(493), runs
and RBIs
Career highs
hits (23-1).
(148). doubles
(221).
I he loss
not the onlv
Dases
(4)
Johnson's bat
IS
game to suffer with his depar-
ture, however. He also proved to
be a strong performer on the
mound, winding up with a career-
record 35 wins. While not often
totally over powering his op-
ponents, he usuallv got the job
done.
The departure of centerfielder
Chris Bradberry (.33) and short-
stop Greg Hardison (.311) will be
hard to overcome as
w e.
aspect of the Pirates' Bradberry joined the team a
s a
JIM LEUTGENS - E�� CroH.M
Pirate Pitcher Jim Peterson set a school record for wins in a seaso
(12-1) last year and was named to the CAA all-conference team.
walk-on in 84, then became a
starter part-time that same year
and went on to an excellent career
at ECU. His .405 average in '85
was good for the number two all-
time spot behind Johnson's .432
mark the same year.
Hardison's strong point was
hitting doubles, collecting 43 in
three years of play. He trails only
Johnson again, but the latter had
four years to do it in.
Third base will be another hole
to fill as Mark Cockrell will be
gone. He knocked in 31 runs and
got 33 hits in '86, including five
roundtrippers.
Other losses to graduation are
leftfielder Mont Carter and utili-
ty infielder Robert Langston.
Playing in 36 games Carter got 23
hits while walking 25 times, the
only Pirate to reach base via
walks more than hits.
Langston has been a steady
defensive stalwart in the infield
during his career. Last year he
stepped in for an injured Steve
Sides to cover second base the en-
tire season. His ability with the
glove will be sorely missed next
year as ECU attempts to cut
down on the large number of er-
rors of the past two seasons.
With such talent only a recent
memory, it seems ECU will be
hard-pressed to match the 40-10
year amassed this year. It remains
to be seen if the '87 version can
continue to dominate the con-
ference as the Pirates have in the
past few years.
On the bright side, the perfor-
mance of freshman Jake Jacobs
on the mound proved to be a
pleasant relief this year. He
should be a key moundsman next
season. He notched a perfect 4-0
record and added a pair of saves.
His 2.49 ERA was second only
to another freshman, Keith
Schaffer, who also collected a
perfect 4-0 mark, while compiling
a team-low 1.07 ERA.
With a year of collegiate ex-
perience behind them, they
should help make up for the loss
See PETERSON, page 14.
elude seniors Greg Thomas (6-1,
251) and Paul Hoggard (6-1, 257)
at guards. Starters also return at
center and one tackle position.
Ken Bourgeois (6-0, 250) and
Curtis Struyk (6-3, 256) will play
center and tackle repectively.
Other returning tackles on the
offensive line are Robert Alex-
ander (6-3, 261 senior), Tim Orr
(6-2, 255 sophomore), Andy
Schebal (6-7, 287 sophomore),
Mark Minshew (6-5, 264
sophomore) and Shawn Brady
(6-2, 268 senior).
4 7 felt there was as
much difference bet-
ween this year and last
� as night and day. "
�Art Baker
Five returning guards re
they include: Leon Hall (6-5, 2
junior), Rich Autry (6-4, 261
senior), Kyle Condrev (6-3, 250
sophomore), Stewart South all
(6-1, 24h freshman) and Joe
Molineaux (6-3, 245 sophomore!
Brad Brown (6-4, 230
sophomore) and Rich McMahan
(6-2, 254 junior) return to bad
up Bourgeois at center.
The tight end pos 'he
sure hands of senin Mike (d:ne
(6-2, 210) Gaine) started I
games last season, arid
ECU's leading reciever .��
catches and one tou;
C ednc Rav (6-3 215
sophomore), David Carr (
220 freshman), and transfet Be
Billings (6-2. 220 iunior) w
vide some depth at the tig
position
"Last year was
frustrating offensively
said. "Perhaps t h
frustrating I've ever experiei
on offense. I'll put a �
tion of that burden (the p
game) on mv shoulders �
ich rhe quarterbacks th
I do expect to be better
passing game.
"Offensively we
problems that need to be
but I feel prettv confide: at
he added.
rder fot
ceed, the defei also ha.
i
-
the defensiv
Junior Bubba '���
208) returns �
linebacker �: t, w
ing � Brua 5im �
See DEFENSE, page 13
JIM LEI TCENS - Emt imlimir
Sophomore Berke Holtclaw (15) hands to junior Anthony Simpson
Hoopsters Improve;
Harrison Excited
The ECU baskteball team
has been improving steadily
each of the past three seasons.
After winning just 11 games in
By SCOTT COOPER
and
RICK McCORMAC
1983-84 seasons, the Pirates
won 13 games last year and, for
the first time, finished in the
top-four in the conference.
The Pirates' hopes this year
rest in the capable hands of
senior forward Marchell
Henry. He.iry a second-team
CAA perfromer a year ago,
averaged 15.6 points per game
and led the team in rebounds
(5.5 per game).
"Marchell didn't get the
recognition he deserved head
coach Charlie Harrison said.
"He was solid all year long, as
was Keith (Sledge)
This upcoming season, as
opposed to season's past, Har-
rison will have the experience
that is needed to win. In addi-
tion to Henry, five other
seniors will anchor the squad.
Center Leon Bass (6-10, 215),
forwards Jack Turnbill (6-9,
205) and Derrick Battle (6-6,
195) and swingmen William
Grady (6-2, 185), and Keith
Sledge (6-3, 195) return for
their fourth year of college
competition.
Other returnees for the
Pirates include sophomores
John Williams and Manuel
Jones, who was voted Outstan-
ding Newcomer by his team-
mates last year. Redshirt
freshman Gus Hill also returns.
Hill still has four years of
eligibility after injuring his
knee in preseason drills
season.
"John (Williams) is talented,
it (playmg time) depends on his
summer. Manuel (Jones) is a
ver competitive Kid Harr-
sion said of the two
sophomores. "Gus (Hill), I
don't know whether or not his
knee will hold up, but he's
ahead of schedule on his
rehabilitation. He's a helluva
offensive player
Newcomers to the Pirate
squad include junior-college
transfers Theodore "Blue" Ed-
wards and Howard Brown. Ed-
wards, a 6-4 forward earned
second-team NCJCAA honors
and has two years of eligibihtv
left, while Brown, a 6-4 point
guard has three years remain-
ing.
The remainder, of what Har-
rison called his best recruiting
class, are all freshmen. The
four are: Reed Lose (6-3. 190)
guard, Harrisburg, Pa Luther
Tutt (6-6, 200) forward,
Rockaway, NY Traeey King
(6-6 , 215) forward, Hampton,
Va and Stacey Clark (6-6) sw'
ingman, Martinsville, Va.
"They are a pretty damn
talented recruiting class � as
athletes and as basketball
players Harrison said. "We
signed six players and all of
them can help us, but some
(Brown and Edwards) can help
right away
"They all will be good one
day, but freshmen can't carry
you. Freshmen are freshmen
are freshmen Harrison con-
tinued. "However, they're in a
situation where they can blend
in with our returning players
S1 HREE, page yt
Man wa
By JAM- I sIMPson
During ihe 198! -�
ECU I ady Pira
went 23-7
Women's
Tournamer
has been
1986-87 sea
How an
to perforn v,
win t�
plav
the
Greenville ����
answe
Return i
ly M
w h i
These are
Flhs. Del
Millei
Defense
( ontinued from pa.
junii
last . u
Othei retu
He !
Hard-hitting Hlis DiHahunr iy� ,UI
Three Starts
( ontinued from pat
and
He
l
34
Pira
as -
start
H �w
move 5
posit
i the
point-g
wit 1
Howard B
Howe-
such a
fguat
- v 3
"i
�gone :
pos "

ling
ou d
�plae-
Harris
�the adjustment, I
some w
�job againsi
! plav i -
Harrison
Tpc: H
his ball handling
plav big guai
Harrsion feels tl a
i
mosphere within ve P
�squad. He beliet
; be more
. Ithe team
"It's going to
tice time he said. "1
� he a situation in which everyone
.wants to plav, but there are
: jfive positions t's going
�very competitive "
j The key, according to Har-
Brison, is tor his placers
1-jhard during the summer. "I am a
� firm believer thai vou have to
I work on the individual par
H 'our game during the summe-
1 you will be left behind Ha-
nson said firmly "As a coach,
you have to make a decison on
your playing rotation in
vember, so it's important for
the players to be ready to play.
"W7e're returning a good
4
V
i
k





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SUMMER 1986
13
ovement
four
was
w it.
own
1 s
i rS
Ben
pro-
: end
Maker
por-
ting
some
olved,
about
I sUC-
have to
Jen. A
.ads
ok-
See 1H YY Nsf , pae 13
1 ml
JIM I H H,t S h-
hands to junior nthonv impson.
it
ers Improve;
on Excited
AC
V
� .
Bl le" Ld-
HBr iwn. Ed-
: earned
.
a 6-4 pom:
remain-
:nence
add;
ither
quad
215
(6-9.
le (6-6.
William
Keith
irn for
college
the
mores
Manuel
lutstan-
team-
jdshirt
let urns.
trs of
his
fwl at Har-
ecruiting
nmen. The
Reed Lose (6-3, 190)
irg, Pa . 1 u
'Aard,
cawa, "ra e King
(6-6 . 2i5) ' Hampton,
Va and Stacey dark (6-6) sw-
ingman, Martinsville, Va.
"They are a pretty damn
talented recruiting class � as
athletes and as basketball
players Harrison said "We
signed six players and all of
them can help us, but some
(Brown and Edwards) can help
right away
"They all will be good one
day, but freshmen can't carry
you. Freshmen are freshmen
are freshmen Harrison con-
tinued. "However, they're in a
situation where they can blend
in with our returning players
See THREE, page 13.
Manwaring Looks For Twenty Win-Season
By JANET SIMPSON
SpofH U ulr.
During the 1985-86 season the
ECU 1 ady Pirate basketball team
weni 23-7, receiving a bid to the
Women's National Invitational
"Tournament. Now the hourglass
as been turned over and the
1986 87 season is approaching.
How are the I ady Bucs going
io perform"? Will they once again
win twenty games- Is post-season
,i m the cards for them? When
e winds of March blow through
enville we will have our
answers.
Returning for head coach Emi-
y Manwaring are nine players, of
which only two were starters.
1 hese are Alma Bethea, Cathy
Ellis, Delphine Mabry, Rose
Miller, Chris O'Conner, Gretta
O'Neal, Monique Pompili, Jody
Rodriquez and Pam Williams.
Add to these, five freshman and
one junior college transfer, and
you will have the 1986-87 edition
of the Lady Pirates.
However, missing from this
latest group to wear the purple
and gold are three important peo-
ple. Gone is last season's Col-
onial Athletic Association
Player-Of-The-Year Sylvia Bragg
who averaged 13.4 points and 3.9
rebounds a game. Also departed
is the 14.1 points and 8.0 rebound
average o' all-conference for-
ward Lisa Squirewell, along with
that of Lorraine Foster, which
was 11.1 points and 3.5 re-
bounds.
"Success is going to rest on the
returning plavers and our
freshman recruits as well as our
one junior college transfer
stated Manwaring. "Next year's
success is going to be dependant
upon starters Delphine Mabrv
and Alma Bethea being good
floor leaders and good team
leaders. Also the improvement ot
Monique Pompili
Bethea and Mabrv will be an
as well.
When asked whom she felt
would come through tor her
Manwaring once again came
back to Mabry. "Delphine
Mabrv, probably is the quickest
player on a basketball court in
the whole United States and is a
great defensive player Man-
'Success is going to rest on the returning players and our
freshman recuits as well as our one junior college
transfer
�Emily Manwaring
excellent base to build a team
around. Bethea averaged 10 2
points-per-game last season, as
well as 6.5 rebounds. Mabry's
stats from last season also shined,
She averaged 8.1 points a game
and 2.9 rebounds, while aquiring
a team high "8 steals. The Rocky
Mount native passed out 82 assits
waring said of her senior stan-
dout. "She's also going to have
to come through scoring wise and
pick up the slack there
"Also we have a sophomore
Pam Williams, whose shot is
looking much better. She is going
to have to be a scorer for us. In-
side we also have Gretta O'Neal.
Defense Returns Experienced Players
Continued from pane 12.
tor) to fill the spot vacated bv
asi year's standoul and leading
tackier Roberi Washington.
let returnees include 1 arry
Berry (5-11, 240 senior) and Ron
JC
245
on-
Gilliard (6-3. 238 junior)
transfer Billy Michel (6-4.
junior) should also make a
tribution.
The Bandit (also called drop-
end) is perhaps the strongest and
deepest position for the Bucs.
J.B. Ht MBKRT - Fast arolinian
Hard-hitting Ellis Dillahunt (19) sticks Miami's Alonzo Highsmith.
Three Starters Return
Continued from pajje 12.
and give us somequalitv minutes
Henry. Bassand Sledae all
' last season as did Grady
in his 1983 sacampaign. The
Pirates will have to replace the
starting backcourt ot a year ago.
as Scott Hardy and three-year
starter Curt Vanderhorst.
However. Harrsion plans to
move Sledge to the off-guard
position � to take advantage of
the new three-point shot. The
point-guard position is still open,
with junior-college transfer
Howard Brown being the only
true point guard on the roster.
However. Harrison dosen't feel
such a need for a true point
guard.
"M really think the game has
gone to bigger people at every
position, although there is still a
place for the little man Harr-
sion said. "Teams now are pass-
ing the ball to bring it upcourt �
� 1 take advantage of situations.
You don't have to designate one
player at the point.
Harrison feels Sledge can make
the adjustment, but may need
some work. "Keith did a sound
job against some of the better
players in the country last year
Harrison said of his defensive
stopper. "He needs to work on
his ball handling � he needs to
plav big guard
Harrsion feels that the influx
of new talent will create a new at-
mosphere within the Pirate
squad. He believes that there will
be more competition � within
the team.
"It's going to fun come prac-
tice time he said. "It's going to
be a situation in which everyone
wants to play, but there are only
five positions. It's going to be
very competitive
The key, according to Har-
rison, is for his players to work
hard during the summer. "I am a
�firm believer that you have to
�work on the individual part of
;your game during the summer, or
;you will be left behind Har-
bison said firmly. "As a coach,
you have to make a decison on
your playing rotation in
November, so it's important for
the players to be ready to play.
"We're returning a good
nucleus oi players Harrison ad-
ded. "The biggest thing is going
to be our chemistry � and how
good the fellas think it can be
ECU'S basketball team will try
to continue their steady climb in
the CAA conference standings in
their upcoming campaign.
Hopefully, they are hard at work
this summer, as coach Harrison
said, "On October 15, they wi
start earning time
Juniors Vinson Smith (6-0, 219)
and Essray Taliaferro (511, 205)
return along with sophomore Ken
Taylor (6-1. 225). Manning the
other defensive end position arc
sophomores Willie Powell (6-4.
224) and Shannon Boling (6 3,
236).
The defensive line should pro
vide experience as well as depth
this season with the return ot
four starters and two talented
newcomers. Senior David Plum
(6-3, 243). juniors Medrick Ram-
bow (6-0, 236) and John William-
son (6-3. 235) all return at the
tackle spot along with sophomore
Walter Bryant (6-3. 240).
Junior-college transfers Mike
Donohue (6-3. 260) and J
O'Driscoll (6-4. 260) should pro-
vide depth, it not immediate
help.
Other talented returners are
Carl Carney (6-2. 2.5 freshman),
seniors Joe Or mage (6-3. 255)
and William Jennette (6-5, 272)
and Rodney Glover (6-6. 236
sophomore)
"We're going to be a yeai
older, a year stronger and a year
more experienced Baker said ot
his defensive line. "We've got
people coining back like Grinage
and Jennette along with people
who were redshirted like Carney.
And both Of the outstanding
junior-college linemen were here
tor the spring � we'll get some
definite help from those two
The secondary, consisting of
returnees Ellis Dillahunt (5-11,
192) (who was defensive MVP in
the spring game), Gary 1 ondon
(6-2. 19"), Roswell Streeter (6-0.
190). Flint McCallum (5-11. 188),
lewis Wilson (5-10, 190) and
1 vnn Porcher (6-2, 189) all saw
action last year. These backs wil
provide experience and depth as
well as a hard-hitting sty le ol
play.
They will be joined by
freshmen Barriet Easterhnu (6-3.
204) and Ricky Iorain (5-9, 170)
along with JC transfer Robert
Martin (5-10. 175).
Baker feels thai the secondary
has made definite strides, but are
not quite where he wants them to
be. However, "r'ie secondary
turned out to be better than we
thought Baker admitted.
Handling the punting chores
will be returning sophomore Tim
Wolter (6-3, 10), who averaged
;s 5 yards pef kick last year He
downed 13 punts mside the op-
ponents' 20 (yard line) and had
no punts blocked in 68 attempts.
With the absence of ECl 's all-
time leading scorer Jeff Heath,
there is a huge hole to fill. Craig
to (5-11. 220). a sopl
transfer from Appalachian State,
was the onlv true kicker during
spring
I ' e Pirates will hope to im-
prove on last � ar's record as
�hey will once ag 1 ' tee some
stifl competition from the na-
� . � mong the 'earns
ECl ill face include Pent:
Stat . v burn, Miami our
ised ' rhai ng nigh;
on W I BS) and Southarolina.
sec the 1986 schedule foi more
details. (See page 14.)
(4.4 points, 3.1 rebounds last
year) who will be the biggest
player on the court at 6-2 con-
tinued Manwaring. "Gretta,
Alma Bethea, and Monique are
going to have to be scorers inside
for us
The five incoming freshman,
Sandra Grace, Sarah Gray, Irish
Hamilton, Christi Harris, and
Tammie Laney, as well as
Louisburg Jr. College transfer
Val Cooper need to come in and
help the team as much as possi-
ble.
"I hope they will, they'll have
to be able to contribute said
Manwaring. "How much right
now, it's hard to say
Manwaring plans to keep
things just as they were as far as
style is concerned. "I don't think
our style will change any. We will
want to have a fast-paced game
and we will still want to play ag-
gressive defense she said. "Our
scoring may come from a dif-
ferent area on the floor. Maybe it
will be more of an inside game
for us next year than outsid
game
As usual, the Lady Bucs have a
challenging schedule. They will
face the likes of Old Dominion
and Cheyenne State at home, a
well as N.C State, Duke
1 airleigh Dickenson and LaSalk
on the road. This is in addition u
the games with conference foe
Richmond, William & Marv
-Wilmington, American.
Oeorge Mason, and lame
Madison.
Once again ECU will also host
the Lady Pirate Classic. Par
ticipates this year include Ten
nesse Tech, East I ennesse Stat'
and Manst.
Coach Manwaring herself sum
med things up pretty well. "On
success has generally beer
measured by a 20-win season
which we've been able to ac
complish the last two years. How
quickly we can play as an ex-
perienced team (this season) will
be the kev
AEO
Alpha Sigma Phi Fraternity
Welcomes
The Few!
The Proud!
The NEW Men
Of ECU!
AIO
710 North Greene Street, Greenville, N.C.
Take-outs 752-0090 Sundav-Thursdav MA.M
Welcomed
9:00 P.M
Fridav 11:00 A.M10:00 P.M.
Sundav 4:00 P.M10:00 P.M.
ALL YOU
CAN EAT
Seafood Buffet
& Salad Bar
$5'
99
Fried Shrimp
Steamed Shrimp
Fried Flounder
Fried Trout
Fried Clam Strips
Deviled Crabs
Crab Cakes
Fried Chicken
French Fries
Slaw
21 Item Salad Bar, 6 Dressings
Sunday-Monday
Tuesday-Wednesday
5-9 P.M.
Lunch Special
$3.35
includes beverage and tax
Choice of
1 Meat and
2 Vegetables
Meats and Seafood Vegetables
Luncheon Buffet
Daily
$3.95
Includes Beverage and Tax
6-8 meats
8 vegetables
All You Can Eat
11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Sunday-Friday
Shrimp
Trout
Oysters
Deviled Crabs
Crab Cakes
Clam Strips
Flounder
Fried Chicken
BBQ Chicken
Country Style Steak
Veal Cutlets
Hamburger Steak
Barbeque Dinner
Catfish
Beets
Slaw
Boiled Potatoes
Potato Salad
French Fries
Yams
Black-eyed Peas
Collards
Rice
Mashed Potatoes
String Beans
Applesauce
Brunswick Stew
Cabbage
Seafood Delight
$3.99
Choice of Three Seafoods: Shrimp,
Oysters, Clam Strips, Trout, Flounder,
Crab Cakes, Deviled Crabs, Bay Scallops
& Catfish Nuggets
� �; . r 31 �' ' " " "
' ��-w V9Mfi
!






14
THE EAST CAROt INIAN
SUMMER 1986

A
A
Peterson Returns For Pirates
Continued from page 12
of Johnson on the mound, who
as of now is the only pitcher not
returning.
The head honchos on the dia-
mond for ECU should be Jim
Peterson (12-4) and Craig Van
Deventer (8-1). Peterson set a
new season win mark this season,
while Van Deventer showed great
improvement over his first two
seasons.
Peterson led the staff in strike
outs, but also gave up new career
highs for runs and earned runs.
One reason for this dubious
distinction is the fact that he pit-
ched a season-record 12 complete
games and 120.2 innings.
Danny Culpepper picked up
the other win among the staff,
but didn't see much action
despite being the only lefty. Two
more freshmen, Lennie Mollo
and Paul Hill saw little action as
well.
Hopefully, Daniel Boone will
be able to overcome an arm in-
jury which put him out of action
almost the entire season. The ris-
ing senior six-footer posted a 5-1
mark in '85 and had been ex-
pected to be number two man on
the staff this year.
With so many positions to fill,
it will be harder than usual to
predict the line-up for next year,
but we'll give it a try.
The coaches are on the
recruiting trail in Greensboro, so
the following prognostications
are straight from the mind of this
writer, using two years of cover-
ing the team as an excuse for any
foul-ups, bleeps or blunders.
First base is set with an ex-
perienced senior, Mike Sullivan.
He anchored that position while
Johnson was pitching and also
served as a designated hitter. His
.314 average will likely make him
the clean-up hitter or the number
three man.
Mike Sullivan
i Steve Sides returns at second,
but he will need to cut down on
mistakes, having committed 25
errors in 86. His .341 batting
average might move him to a
number two or so batting spot.
He tied for second among
returners for game-winning RBIs
with four.
At catcher, veteran Jim Riley,
another rising senior will be back
and will be expected to continue
his solid playing. Batting .253, he
played in every game in '86, but a
strong number two man will still
somewhat of a question mark.
Junior Jay McGraw will be an-
choring right field as usual, with
some stints as a relief catcher still
possible, though hopefully one of
the back-up catchers will progress
enough to not make that
necessary.
His 10 homers tied for second
this year and is first among
players returning. He tied for se-
cond with Sullivan in RBIs,
knocking in 36 runs this year.
David Ritchie (.277) will pro-
bably take left field. His perfor-
mance as a freshman during the
early season led to a number of
games as a starter. He will likely
continue leading off on offense
since he had a good on-base
percentage with 26 hits and 19
walks.
Centerfield will be a true
unknown, since Chris Bradberrv
has played virtually every inning
there for years.
Senior Dean Hhehalt is the only
other player currently listed as an
outfielder, so presumbably he
will move there, although the
outfield may be juggled to put a
more seasoned player there.
Ehehalt led the team with a .412
average, but played in just 15
Four Pirates Named AH- CAA
East Carolina's Winfred
Johnson earned Colonial Athletic
Association Player of the Year
honors as the Pirates placed four
players on the 1986 CAA all-
conference team.
Johnson, who was also named
the team's designated hitter,
finished the 1986 regular season
with a conference-leading 1"
home runs, 68 RBIs and a team-
leading .406 batting average dur-
ing the 1986 season.
Johnson, a native of
Ehzabethtown, NC, also became
the first player in NCAA baebal!
history to hit 60 career home runs
and pitch 30 career victories. He
currently owns "0 career home
runs and 34 career victories.
Other ECU players earning all-
conference honors were first
baseman Mike Sullivan, out-
fielder Chris Bradberrv and pit-
cher Jim Peterson. Peterson set
an ECU single-season record for
victories with 11 (11-3) as the
Pirates ported a 57$ regular-
season record, the most wins by a
Pirate team in school history.
ECU also finished the CAA
regular season with a 13-5 record,
sharing the championship with
James Madison.
This marks the third straight
season Johnson has earned all-
conference distinction and the se-
cond straight for Bradberrv.
Prior to 1986 the CAA vsas
known as the ECAC-South.
1986 CAA All-Conference Team
First Base
Second Base
Shortstop
Third Base
Outfield
Outfield
Outfield
Catcher
Pitchers
Designated Hitter
Player of the Year
Coach of the Year
Mike Sullivan
Mike Mathews
Jeff Garber
John O'Keeffe
Glen Deren
Chris Bradberrv
Paul Grzvb
Eric Hall
Jim Peterson
Mike Stout
Winfred Johnson
Winfred Johnson
Brad Babcock
Junior
Senior
Sophomore
Senior
Senior
Senior
Senior
Senior
Junior
Junior
Senior
Senior
East C arolina
James Madison
James Madison
William & Mary
James Madison
East Carolina
American
UNC- Wilmington
East Carolina
James Madison
East Carolina
East Carolina
James Madison
Intramural-Recreational Services
Coming to a rather large
school in an unfamiliar town and
being surrounded by "unknown
bodies" can be a frightening ex-
perience. You leave some of your
best friends behind you at home
� no more Sunday afternoon
football gatherings or shootin'
the hoop at night in your favorite
gym. Right? Wrong!
The Department of
Intramural-Recreational Services
at ECU can provide you with
many excellent opportunities for
social interaction and recrea-
tional activities.
Throughout the year, over 30
intramural sports activities are
offered through the men's,
women's and co-rec programs.
These activities range from con-
ventional and traditional, such as
football and basketball, to the
unique and intriguing, such as
Almost Anything Goes and
Frisbee Golf. By gearing the pro-
gram towards "something for
everyone" the intramural pro-
gram encourages participation
and tansforms spectators into ac-
tive participants.
If you're not an organized
sport person but enjoy recrea-
tional pursuits with a few close
friends, we have just as much to
offer you! The Informal Recrea-
tion program is leisure oriented
drop-in play. Students can jam in
the gyms, splash in the pools and
roll out the racquetballs from the
time school begins in the fall
through the last day of finals in
the spring and during both sum-
mer sessions.
Over 30 Sports Offered!
t
If you really want to play rac-
quetball but don't have a rac-
quet, just come by the Equipment
Check-Out Room in Memorial
Gym. All you have to do is show
your ECU ID and activity cards
and you can check out any type
of sports equipment free of
charge!
We know you have been work-
ing out hard to slip into those
summer swim suits, and you cer-
tainly don't want to lose that
beautiful body! So let us keep (or
get) you in shape through our
Aerobic Fitness Program. Ap-
proximately eighty calsses are of-
fered in Aerobics at various loca-
tions throughout campus, in ad-
dition to non-credit classes in
Aquarobics, Toning and Weight
Training.
For you ambitious potential
triathletes and frequent joggers,
our Pepsi Physical Fitness Club
could be very rewarding. This
program is designed to recognize
those people who put in miles
walking, running, biking, swim-
ming or pushing a wheelchair.
The great part about this club is
you can exercise on your own
around your busy schedule, log
your own mileage and become
eligible for a T-shirt, running
shorts or windbreaker. How's
that for a little motivation?
Now for you Outdoor 'Adven-
ture lovers Whet her you want
to hang glide from the cliffs,
windsurf in the sound, shoot the
rapids or hike a mountain, we
have an adventure trip planned
for you. Lots of information is
available in our outdoor recrea-
tion resource center; and a varie-
ty of equipment for camping,
backpacking and canoeing au aits'
your check-out.
If you want an opportunity to
compete against other teams and
universities and to travel along
the entire east coast, the ECU
Club Sport Program is for you.
Clubs are active in Rugby, Soc-
cer, Frisbee, Surfing, Lacrosse,
Racquetball and Karate. Ali
students, faculty and staff are
welcomed to join a club team.
If you are worried about hav-
ing enough pocket change to do
all you want, and you enjoy a
recreational setting, come to the
intramural department. Annually
over two-hundred students are
employed on a part-time basis
within our Department. So if you
are a lifeguard, official, aerobic
instructor or trainer please apply
to be a part of our team. Many
other positions exist for in-
tramural sports scorers, timers
and supervisors, as well as artists,
photographers and office
assistants.
What better reasons to check
out the Intramural-Recreational
Services department than for fun
fitness, adventure and money'
Our offices are located in
Memorial Gymnasium on 10th
St. beside Brewster Building We
are anxious to meet you when
you arrive on campus, so gather
up your friends and come olav
with us. y
games and batted only 17 times.
Third base and shortstop are
real question marks, as the only
returning player who had a high
batting average (.400) but ap-
peared in only seven games, with
five at-bats.
It seems likely that a newcomer
should have a good shot at one of
these spots, barring the possibili-
ty of a current player switching
positions.
At this time the list of recruits
signed for the '87 season has not
been released, so it is not yet
known what new players may
become starters or get a lot of
playing time.
The prospects of possibly star-
ting should be a tantalizing lure
for head coach Gary Overton,
who is now hard at work trying to
find top-notch recruits. With the
large turn-over due to graduation
continuing next year, it appears
to be a "prime time" for new
prospects.
Despite the loss of the six
graduates, you can always count
on a good Pirate baseball team.
The only losing season since 1951
was back in 71. ECU has amass-
ed an amazing 739-347 record
during that period.
See you at the ball park!
Pirate coach (,ar Overton led ECU to a school record 40 wins
1986 ECU FOOTBALL SCHEDULE
Opponent
N.C. State
W. VIRGINIA
Auburn
Penn State
SW LA.
Temple
Ga. SOUTHERN
South Carolina
SO. MISS
CINCINNATI
Miami-Florida
Date
Sept. 6
Sept. 13
Sept. 20
Sept. 27
Oct. 4
Oct. 11
Oct. 18
Oct. 25
Nov. 2
Nov. 15
Nov. 27
Location
Raleigh, NC
Greenville, NC
Auburn, Ala.
University Park
Greenville, NC
Philadelphia, Pa.
Greenville, NC
Columbia, SC
Greenville, NC
Greenville, NC
Miami, Fla.
The
KAPPA ALPHA
FRATERNITY
East Carolina's Oldest and Most Prestigious
Fraternity would like to welcome all the
new students to East Carolina University
and invites you to come by and visit
The Home of Southern Gentlemen
500 EAST 11TH STREET
na
The Brothers of the Epsilon Mu Chapter of
THE PI KAPPA ALPHA FRATERNITY
would like to welcome the new students to
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
BE PART OF THE NEWEST TRADITION
PIKA
Succes
B scorn ooptR
"We should del
winning season an
for the confernencc
ship said I
Rick Kobe about
coming campa
The Bucs re' ,
from lav! yeai
women's confer
ihip teams V :
Kobe is bringii .
who should �
mediate imj
"It's the bH -
we've had a: I a
Kobe said. "Every
kids is good A
us immedia
doubt
As tar av tl �
10 swimmers re
promising returi
Bruce Bi
returner
Softballers
By SCO ITOOPrN
It was a
seasoi :
Jteam wei
Regional rani s
highest 'earn GP �
of ECU athlei
� re
ihead coacl -
"They really pulle
was a
I: was a g
the ladies are g
the sen ices
:from lasi year
" W.
Jstaff,
centerheld head
Manahan
senior, we
p
However, Ma
eyes set on th�
the returning
feels that the
land one trai �� ;i
next year's quad.
"It's exciting. I . .
freshmen and a transl
s

M .
Tiaut
8,000 L
New Pi
Sun

btvv ,





a Nihool record 40 wins.
SCHEDULE
l ocation
Raleigh, NC
Greenville, NC
Auburn, Ala.
University Park
Greenville, NC
Philadelphia, Pa.
Greenville, NC
Columbia, SC
Greenville, NC
Greenville, NC
Miami, Fla.
LPHA
NITY
id Most Prestigious
o welcome all the
rolina University
me by and visit
rn Gentlemen
STREET
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SUMMER 1986
15
Success Awaits Kobe's Swimmers In 1987
;
By SCOTT COOPER
"We should definitely have a
winning season and be right there
tor the eonfernence champion-
ship said ECU swim coach
Rick Kobe about his squad's up-
coming campaign.
1 he Bucs return 23 swimmers
from last year's men's and
women's conference champion-
learns. And in addition,
Kobe is bringing in 24 newcomers
who should provide an im-
mediate impact.
"It's the best recruiting class
Ac"e had at East Carolina
Kobe said. "Everyone of those
kids is good. All of them will help
us immediately � without a
doubt
s far as the men's team goes,
10 swimmers return. The most
omising returner will be junior
Bruce Brockschmidt. Other
returners include sophomore
David Killeen and juniors Patrick
Brennan, Ronald Fleming, C.J.
Laney and Lee Hicks. The three
returning seniors include Kevin
Hidalgo, Stratum Smith and
Richard Wells.
The women return 13 girls as
senior Caycee Poust should lead
the way the ladies. Joining Poust
as the only other senior will be
Lori Livingston. Four returning
juniors include Joelle Ennis. Jen-
ni Pierson, Jane Wilson and
Becky Kerber while sophomores
Susan Augustus, Sherry Camp-
bell, Patricia Grand, Brenda
Horton, Denise Poff, Susie Wen-
tink and Angela Winstead also
return.
Although Kobe is pleased with
the healthy allottment of return-
ing talent, he is looking forward
to the competition that his
newcomers may bring.
"The freshmen make it fun.
It's nice to have new freshmen
Kobe said happily. "It's going to
be very competitive next year �
when someone is pushing for a
spotthe freshmen are hungry.
"We've always had the motto:
'you're only as good as your
freshmen class Kobe added.
"We should definitely
have a winning season
and be right there for
the conference cham-
pionship.
�Rick Kobe
"You can't get faster if you don't
get faster students coming in.
That's how you keep the program
on the upswing
Although Kobe is excited
about his new talent and the up-
coming season, he doesn't see
any glaring weakness. However,
he knows that newcomers may
lack experience and are untested
at the college level.
"I don't see any weakness he
said. "But we have a lot of
freshmen and even though
they're good, they're still
freshmen � we're untested
After a successful campaign a
year ago, Kobe felt the team had
to perform under pressure. "This
(past) year was a lot of pressure
he said. "We were uptight over it
(winning the conference) � we
were so nervous it hampered our
performance.
"Now that we've done it, we're
a little more relaxed Kobe con-
tinued. "We've got one under
our belt
Kobe stressed some goals that
he and his swimmers try to
achieve from year to year.
"We want a winning season
and want to win our conference
championship he explained.
"Also, we want to qualify in-
dividuals for the NCAA National
meet.
"We have academic goals �
we want our kids to do well in the
classroom Kobe added. "Out
of five seniors (last year), we had
three on the dean's tist
As for the season as a whole,
Kobe tries to maintain the consis-
tent success from season to
season. He is optimistic about the
coming season. If last year was
any indication of what's expected
in their 1986-87 campaign, then
you can look for ECU swimming
to continue their winning tradi-
tion.
Softballers Blend New And Old
b scorr cooper
It was an impressive 1986
season. The lad Pirate softball
cam went 31-18. received a
Regional ranking and had the
ighesl team GPA average in all
� 1 CU athletics
"It represented the sort oi ef-
fort that the girls gave all year
� cad coach Sue Manahan said.
They really pulled together. It
as a total team effort
I; wa. a good year indeed. But
adies are going to be without
services ot five senior leaders
from last vear.
"We lost our entire pitching
staff, shortstop, second base and
centerfieid head coach Sue
Manahan said. "In the five
seniors, we lost a lot oi leader-
P
However, Manahan has her
eyes set on the future. Along with
the returning talent. Manahan
- that the incoming freshmen
(and one transfer) will add '
next vear's squad.
"It's exciting. I can count eight
freshmen and a transfer and I'm
sure we'll have a couple of walk-
ons she said smiling. "We also
have a blend of leadership com-
ing back
Some of the returning talent in-
cludes 1486's leading hitter, Jean-
nie Murray. Also Diane Lund-
sford, Eva Hughes will be looked
upon as senior leaders, according
to Manahan. Julie Farrow, who
was on the all-tourney team in the
S.C. Inviational, also returns for
the Lady Bucs.
Other returners include senior
Mona Jackson. Linda Barrett
and sophomore Micki Ford.
Some oi the new freshmen in-
clude Chris Byrne, Cathv Shrage
and Leslie Kramer. Shrage and
Kramer competed against each
other in the Regionals as their
respective teams were highly
ranked in the tough Northern
Virginia area. Also, Tracy Kee.
the younger sister of the departed
Sandy Kee. will "hopefully be a
good one for us said Manahan.
"We've got some people thai
can I elp a: some positions
Manahan said. "If the freshmen
can beat 'em (the returners) out,
that makes us that much stronger
and will gives us more depth. It's
going to be interesting
The biggest question mark for
the ladies will be in the new pit-
ching staff. W'ith the graduation
loss of Stacey Boyette and Robin
Craves, the Bucs will be looking
to youth and inexperience on the
mound. However, Manahan
seems to see a bright spot in the
situation.
"The good thing about the pit-
ching Manahan said, "is that
our catchers will be returning.
I'm hoping that Robin (Graves)
will spend time with the pitching
staff too
Manahan is hoping that some
of the new talent can blend in
with the returning players and
form a good-team unit like that
oi the past season.
"We were able to play a lot of
people early in the season (last
vear) she said. "They all got
some time. They seemed to have
a very positive attitude coming
oii that bench
"The attitude was good and
that was the key to achieving the
30 wms Manahan added.
The Pirate swim team will combine 24 newcomes with some experienced returners.
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lo
rHE EAST CAROLINIAN
si MMI R l�Mft
Greeks Stress Activities,Academics
K JII I MOKC.AN
staff VNriler
his: one o( man) decisions
11e vho will he arriving ai
II in the fall, will face is
01 not to "Goireek "
ro "Go Greek" means, simp-
oin one oriel 's 19 social
01 12 sororities. O!
ose 31 organizations ECl pro-
udl exhibits foui predominantly
: ities and fraternities.
During the second and thud
weeks of September, each ol
e Greek organizations will tn
then hardest to convince new
students to "rush' then fraterni
t oi sorotity.
lr ad it ion all) rush is
associated with a lot ol good hard
partying this tall, however,
ECU students will have the thud
official dry i ush.
Although rush will he dry.
man) are predicting a larger than
ever Greek population I he
predicted increase in "rushes" is
reflected b the raising oi the
legal age to drink in N.( to 21
Man) Greeks see the positive
aspect oi dtv rush l)iv iush
allows the fraternities and
sororities to weed out those run
so-serious rush candidates. !o
man) Greek organizations this is
becoming more and more impoi
tant.
Fraternities and sororities offei
a lot more than a party. Ronald
Speier, Associate Dean oi
Students and advisor to the
fraternities here on campus noted
fraternities and sororities have
foui mam objectives:
"Brotherhood and sisterhood.
an increasing emphasis on
academics, to provide the univer-
Student Mediums Inform
ECU Campus, Community
Bv Br 111 WHK'klK
vMvUrii f�s fr dilor
wid variety oi
be
Even '
� �
Bucai
E( I 's football schedule as well
,i- the ' esl oi E( 1 's spoi ts pi i
t m
N ide � . an read I a
� il editoi als
I issues ,i ��
( ampus Foru w here
voice theii
a rd . Dai Ma
ng edit I Die I ast
. "we v t act .i- .i
. � �� body. A
as tde
e offei
every aspei
� ew spapet p I
Whi ; Hasl
. tields of adv ei i
ing, management, editing and
layout design, along wit!
valuable organizational skills.
" I hrough it all we try our besi
maintain a professional ai
ide said Mauret.
Sen ing the various prim n
ECU's photo lab winch staff
six students -
"1 veryone has a diffei
specialty viw Jon Jordan,
manager of tl e l; iio 1 ab
I he Idiom sei es as ECU's
ew :i � -
fain? nteniews, editoi .
and features
I he Rebel, ECU's literary and
tgazine follows a forn ai in-
cluding student ai I w ii k. poi
i 11 s 1 r ies
i ! Va
a 1 :
ai 1 M dia
"v ZMB's foi ges fro

�a a �
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( arolinian ol
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1M1S.E
nAdrCttlOn Greek Owned and Operated
Restaurants Sin"1979
SUBS
Pizia Menu
S - ' � �
I Musi
v. � .
� � � . h F in
H in
� . , . . :
Greek Dishes
GYROSandw,ch
Souvlaki Sandwich
GYRO Platter
Marathon Special
Athenian-Stvie Chicken
I �-
S3 4i
5 � ?!
i � 4!
! �
i � ���
S3 45
$3 4!
� 4
S � ?!
I ' 4
S3 35
$335
$3 95
$3 95
$3 95
SMALL .
CHEESE PIZZA
ANY I ITEM
ANY 2 ITEM
ANY 3 ITEM
ANY 4 ITEM
ADD'L ITEMS
MUSHROOMS
C3EENPEPPERS
ANCHOVIES
HOT PEPPERS
LARGE 16'
$4 00 $6 00
$4 65
$5 30
$5 95
$6 60
$85
$6 85
$7 70
$8 55
$9 40
$' 00
SAUSAGE
ONIONS
PEPPERONI
OLIVES
GROUNDBEEF
MARATHON DELUXE:
12" 16"
$8.00 $1100
Pepprroni, Onions, Ground Beef
Mushrooms, Green Peppers
� � Wi1
I
Soft Drinks Small 60C Large 70C
French Fries Small 55c Large 65c
560 Evans Street
Greenville, N.C 27834
FAST FREE
DELIVERY
752-0326 or
752-3753
Miy and communit) with various
services, and social activities
Speier added, "fraternities .
sororities are often called upon to
provide manpower when the
communit) oi university is in
need "
ro "do Greek" means dif-
ferent things to different people.
Stuart Sloan, Assistant Alumni
Advisor foi the Kappa Su
fraternity here at EC I said, "be
ing in a fraternity builds
character, a sense ol belonging
and friendships that lasts a life
time " Stuart also noted, "the
bonds developed throughout
your college years as a (.reek can
also be beneficial to you later in
life, in a business sense "
I he benefits oi being (.reek are
not all tree oi course. Monthly
dues must be paid as well as
various other expenses. Monthly
dues range anywhere from $10.00
to S50.00 pei month with othet
tees also being incurred. Another
Creek assured skeptics that "the
dues aren't a means oi buying
anybody's friendship a
mailer ol supportii
organization thai you t
about
Proper Immunization
Required For College
Hv SUM 1 YM( K
News Editor
Effictive luly 1, 1986,
1 i n a General
Assembly requires all college
students in Not than ilina to be
properly immunized before atten-
ding classes, said k,r. VanN
wick, di -rive manager
tot the Student Health Service
Directot ol Studeni H i
Ser ices lame Met allun
"We have been try g I I
veal- "Foi aid M
( allum. the lhas tried
student ted bui
been
Vftei pted
1(1. VanNortw i i
the
aw ai i
would receive

sllS explaii
how to comply.
v ncluded is a cer-
i I i page three 1 the

tion
i ites,
Mc

an entire sec-
- ac
:
DIM .
i :
i : Van Nort w j �
emphasized thai the immuniza
n record must be signed bv the
student's physican or stamped bv
i local Health Department
Mc allum said. " I he 11 �
ii ri)list be documented; there are
� :eptims
Nortwick said ai
SHS reserves the stude:
� ati t i : pe te 1
tre any defic �; �
It a personal lettei
lent outlining the I
i d how to con
; complete the
(ificate
"W hile the freshmen
eii ID's
Mendenhall, we will
tion set up where they cai

sure they are complete
Nortwick said She added tl
will be a doctor arid a
tbl j lent i
f they lesin
I
I Van Not
Mc � �
tudei
it are und
( ome Rv And Sev vhy Bond's
Is Your 1 Sporting doods Stor
?R Arimqto" B'
SPORTING GOODS
East Carolina's
1
Sporting G
Store
COUPON
10 HB B m
Bond's
� i �
ds
1000
Come Bv And See Why Bonds
Is Your 1 Sporting Goods Store
Coupon good for
10 off an item
in the store
I
I
I 10
I
SPORTING GOODS
OUPON-
I
I
Expires September 30, 1986
I
I
10
PET
VILLAGE
DONNA EDWARDS
Good Selection of Reptiles
and Saltwater and Fresh water Fish
We Carry A Complete Line
of Dog, Cat, and Fish Supplies
Master Card and Visa are accepted aad fiaaaciitg b
available.
511 EVANS ST.
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27134
PHONE 754 WM
Excellent Investment
Outstanding Location Near To Campus
Introductory Prices
Ready For July Occupancy
REGENCY HOUSE
CONDOS
Call Foursite Realty 355-7300
Ask For David





Title
The East Carolinian, Summer 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 21, 1986 - September 23, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.478
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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