The East Carolinian, June 4, 1986






She
(Earnlmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 N 07-7
Wednesday, June 4, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
8 Pages
Circulation 5,000
High School Students
Learn Leadership Skills
Spinning The Tunes For ECU
JIM LEUTGENS
� East (. arolintna
YYZMB disc jockey Mike Kelly works hard during his afternoon airshift to please his listeners.
Under new rulings approved b the Media board disc jockeys at WZMB have been handed tighter
rules to work under. See related story page 1.
Speier Selected To Fill Post
By JILL MORGAN
Maff Writer
Tiie Associate Dean of
Students and Director of Student
Services, Ronald P. Speier, has
been elected vice�president of
the American College Pennine!
Association.
rhe ACPA is a j:ision of the
American Association of
i out seling and Development
7,000 college
Students To
In Ventures
By Rl TV HARRINGTON
staff Wnier
EC I will be one of five sen
state to participate i
State-sponsored program for
high school students.
The Summer Ventures in
Science and Mathematics pro-
gram will allow for 110 high
school Sophomores and Juniors
to s:udv in the areas ot Math and
Science for five weeks at ECU.
Floyd Mattheis, Director of the
Math-Science Education Center
and Director of the Summer Ven-
tures program at ECU, said the
program, in its second year, will
teach the students, "not the con-
ventional subjects, like they're
taught in high school
According to Mattheis, the
students will spend from June
30th to August 1 at ECU. with
several weekend field trips
scheduled. The students will be
housed in White dorm with stu-
dent counselors who would show
them different aspects of the
Universitv.
and university student affairs
professionals. The members of
ACPA represent the functional
areas of student affairs, such as
admissions, financial aid,
counseling, career services, com-
muter programs, residence life,
student activities and health ser-
vices. "1 will be co-ordinating 15
commissions that are the func-
tional areas of student affairs
said Speier.
Speier was installed at the AC-
Participate
Program
Mattheis said 'he program will
hopefully, "give the students a
taste of college life, and we hope
they like what they see here at
East Carolina
Part of the appeal of -lie pro-
gram is the incorporation of com-
puters into the student's cur-
riculum, which, Mattheis said.
should interest the students, as
well as give them something to
augment their high school
studies.
Some of the classes offered to
the students, who are chosen by
their aptitude and their interest in
the areas of math and science, in-
clude Field Geology, Computer
Techniques in the Chemistry
Lab, 20th Century Physics, and
Logic Programming�Computer
Science.
.Also included in the courses is
a class in research, that will be
held at the ECU School of
Medicine. Mattheis believes the
incorporation of the Medical
School will greatly help the pro-
gram because of its extensive
facilities.
PA national conference this past
April down in New Orleans. Says
Speier. "1 am delighted to have
been eleued bv over 7.000 of my
colleagues
speier came to ECU in the fall
!S84. He has held the post of
Dean of Student Affairs at La
Roche College in Pittsburgh;
ssociate Dean of Students at
Radford University in Virginia;
and Director of Campus Ac-
tivities and Student Union at
Ashland College.
Speser holds a doctorate in
i c a f i o n from Virginia
Polytechnic Institute,
and the MS in education from the
State University of New York �
Genesco.
By MIKE LUDWICK
News Editor
Three hundred junior and
senior high school students will
attend a leadership camp at ECU
this summer.
Established by the 1985
General Assembly, the
Legislators' School for Youth
Leadership Development is
designed to develop leadership
potential among North
Carolina's high school students.
The ECU Rural Education In-
stitute will conduct two three-
week sessions toward achieving
that goal.
The camp's purpose, said Roy
Forbes, director of ECU's Rural
Education Institute, "is to help
those young students who
teachers, principals, and school
counselors identified as having
leadership skills, and if given an
opportunity can develop those
skills
Forbes said the Legislators'
School is similar to the more
renowned Governor's School but
quite different in many respes
Governor's School, which
meets in Winston-Salem, is
specifically designed for North
Carolina's GT students and
primarily involves classroom in-
struction.
The Legislators' School, ex-
plained Forbes, is based upon an
experience model. Moreover, the
Legislators' School specifically
excludes GT students.
The school's major curricular
thrust is to develop leadership,
communication, and thinking
skills.
Forbes said all the planning has
not been finalized, but the first
four days students are at
Legislators' School, they will at-
tend basic introductory seminars.
After the seminars, the
students will participate in dif-
ferent activities and extended
field trips.
The Rope Course is one of the
many activities in which students
will share. The rope course's
purpose is to develop teamwork
and enhance problem solving.
Project directors present
students with, various tactical
problems, such as crossing a wide
stream. The student's only tools
are a length of rope, brainpower,
and imagination. "It trams
students to reahe that different
situations need different solu-
tions said Forbes.
Destinations for the extended
field Hips, said Forbes, includes
Manteo, Ocracoke Island, and
Raleigh.
On Ocracoke, students who are
interested in photography will
receive instruction and practical
experience.
A political day is scheduled tor
the trip to Raleigh. Students will
have a chance to meet state
legislators and -ee close-up h
the legislative process works
Throughout the three-week
camp, said Forbes, students will
have the opportunity to develop
video and or written reports on
their travels and activiti
Students selected for the
Legislators' School were chosen
at random from a pool created by
nominations from teachers, prin-
cipals, and counselors.
According to Forbes, the
legislation that created
Legislators' School mandated a
three-to-one ratio of rural to ur-
ban students. Forbes said the
students cl ittend ECU
meet this criteria.
The sessions are schedule
June 22 to July 11 and Ju
August 1.
Western Carolina Univei
Forbes said, is the other state
universitv participating in the
Legislators' School for Youth
Leadership Developments
Residents Endorse Death Penalty
CHAPEL HILL, N.C.(UPI) �
Two-thirds of North Carolinians
polled support the death penalty,
and 37 percent believe it may be
appropriate for capital crimes
committed bv offenders less than
18 years old, a survey says.
Of the 585 respondents t
Spring Carolina Poll, 67 percent
said they favored the death penal-
ty. 22 perceni were opposed and
11 percent had no opinion.
The results of the March
survev were
in 1984, when 65 percent ot the
respondents said they favored the
death pena.
See NORTH Page J.
Co-Op Program Useful In Job Search
By PATRICK ON EIL
Staff Writer
"But I do not have any ex-
perience exclaims a young
graduate. The door slams and the
dejected job hunter slowly
ambles to another job interview.
This scene could have been avoid-
ed if the graduate had been in-
volved in a cooperative education
program while in college.
Co-oping, as it is commonly-
called, is a program in which
students receive career related
work experience before gradua-
tion, preferably with pay. There
are two kinds of work
assignments: parallel, in which a
student works and attends school
in the same term, and alternating,
in which a student alternates
semesters of full-time work and
school.
ECU's Cooperative Education
program was created in 1975 on a
five year federal grant. In 1980,
the program showed impressive
results and began to receive fun-
ding through the university. In
the 1985-86 fiscal year, the 657
students in ECU's co-op program
earned over $1.1 million in salary
and more than 666 credit hours.
Of those students in the co-op
program only an extreme few do
not graduate. Many others,
however, are offered jobs before
graduation, receiving higher pay
and a higher starting position.
Pay and experience are not the
only rewards of co-oping. It also
helps students discover the
strengths and weaknesses in their
abilities. Others realize why they
are in school as they learn about
the real world or discover they
are no longer interested in
something that had originally ap-
pealed to them.
Jane Maier, a coordinator of
ECU's co-op program, believes
the program offers more, "A co-
op position will often tell you
what you do not want to do
She also explained some students,
once exposed to the working en-
viroment may even change their
field of study.
Employers of co-op students
also reap benefits of the co-op
program. The low cost of train-
ing employees often creates a
positive working atmosphere.
Maier added the students work
well for the employers as in-
dicated in evaluations of the pro-
gram.
Cooperative Education has ex-
isted since 1906 and was built on
the ideals of earning a degree and
work experience. ECU's co-op
program offices are located in
313 Rawl.
According to Maier, "I reallv
feel like we do change student's
lives
Campus Radio Station Reclarif ies Rules
By BETH WHICKER
ECU's campus radio station
WZMB has reclarified its rules
and procedures in an effort to
upgrade its programming and
level of professionalism among
the student employees.
General Manager Jeff Chester
updated the old rules and added
new regulations which were
designed to combat new pro-
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds8
Editorials4
Features5
Sports7
The teacher is the real
soldier of democracy. Others
can defend it, hut only he can
make it work.
�Omar Bradley
blems WZMB would encounter
in its future.
The rules were approved by the
Media Board at the end of the fall
semester. "We're screening the
applicants more carefully now.
We're looking for students with a
serious professional attitude
toward broadcasting said
Chester.
Chester stated the station has
been monitored closely for the
last month due to the May inci-
dent in which a student disc
jockey used explicit language
during the station's permanent
wave program.
"Under the new regulations,
new employees and guest
speakers will be made aware of
station policy concerning what
can and cannot be said or ex-
pressed on the air said Chester.
EMsc jockeys will be required to
follow the scheduled programing
and rotation schedules. No devia-
tion from the listed programing
will be allowed.
According to Chester only
authorized and current WZMB
staff will be allowed in the station
after 5:30 pm unless the situation
warrants and prior permission
has been obtained from the
General Manager or Program
Director. The policy holds also
for weekend hours.
"This WZMB's office is a
business office, it's small, with
groups of people in here things
could possilby get out of hand
said Chester.
Under the new rulings, Chester
explained a guest in the station
after regular business hours is the
responsibility of the staff
member who brought him in.
"The staff member is solely
responsible for their guest's
behavior. This includes any theft
or damages the guest could inflict
on the station states Chester.
According to the new rulings,
WZMB's front door will be lock-
ed at 5:30 pm everyday.
The new ruling also states no
more than two people will be
allowed in the control room
unless the situation warrants
otherwise.
Announcers at WZMB are re-
quired to be licensed by the FCC.
Announcers on the air are
responsible for all activities
which take place in the control
room studio during the time that
he or she is signed on the log ac-
cording �o the new regulations.
According to Chester, pro-
cedure for disturbances pertain-
ing to WZMB will be handled by
university officials or outside
agencies not taking action before
contacting the General Manager.
If the General Manager cannot be
reached the official or agency
should contact the Program
Director, Chief Engineer or Pro-
duction Manager in that order.
University officials and ap-
propriate personnel will be issued
these names, addresses and
phone numbers at the beginning
of each semester.
"Students who do not adhere
to these new rules and regulations
will receive appropriate punish-
ment said Chester.
The Great Search
JtM LEUTGENS
East Carolinian
��- w� vasm� mm
Finding a job after graduation isn't easy, it can be quite a chore
for the unprepared student with no experience. Students who co-op
may And employers knocking down their doors before graduation.
See related story page 1.
mm m .�-
- . � . ,
' - �f -
.� K j - � -
W 9
��. - - - - �m' 'm'm-
4 gamm
A





I HI t.ASI c'AKOl INIAN
JUNE 4, 1986
Announcements
BIBLE TALK
a practical, mformai d.scuss.or, of me B,
ble � applied to our lives todey Guy, �
Garret, ,� Coec m Jarv.s JV�
iOed Librer, inroom H�at9 � Th�f,�
�vary Tuasday Everyone waicome!
What is the best wa to net a
safe" simian?
Getting that perfect suntan is a
summertime goal foi main of us,
before you spend all youi time
soaking up the rays, however,
there are a few things thai are
good to know.
I iv lo avoid tanning from 10
to 2 pm when the sun is the
most intense 1 he burning com
pom til �' sunlighl and ultraviolet
light is not filtered h clouds, so
it is possible to gel tanned and
also burnt oi a cloud) da)
re are now sunscreens that
.u screen oui harmful UV light
PABA i Par a minobenzoic
acid) compounds range from 1
111 w e ito 2 5 power;
'he Healtholumn H
Vfar Htsha Adams
e !5 powet will totalh block
iV lightwith 1 p. iv�( a ii
1- lighi I he powers
e alsoreferred to as the Sun
ion Faci m
; tpresents a multiple of the I
lakes t1 get a minimal sunburn
i youskin You should ' that often a sunburn show up until hours hav v- m ei ' mside
Everyjlexions and kin type tha id should use a SP1 of
rk haired and darkei SPI ol : Sevi - are now watei pi i p Bi i; e s ire :� � , watei � at " skiing, w nid r swimming, the water screens are a musi' tion can cause reactions
-�.sed to sun Women on
.ime, an
ed areas Other drugs
itivity are
a ipazine.
a �e any quest i ns about
are taking, ask a
trmacisi or othei I ea
i he worst thing about sum ex-
ore is that damag( kii
builds up. Physicians arc
� effects or sui . � -are
iecutive year ski;
itl t and tout Ft�
Trade Surplus
Threatens Ties
rOKYO (I PI I ! e Japanese
� ernmeni today called tor a
"Major change of course" in the
try's export-oriented
economy, warning its huge trade
surplus threatens ties with other
nations and hinders global pro-
sperity.
But in an annual white paper.
the Ministry of International
Irade and Industry also backed
away from predictions the trade
surplus would begin to show a
decline by late tins year, saving
the impact of the rising yen
would not be reflected until 1987,
I he report, the ministry's chief
policy statement, showed a mark
ed departure in tone with blunt
acknowledgements that Japan
faces isolation unless it takes a
more responsible global role.
I he stunting of growth in the
1 S economy has meant it can
no longer fuel world expansion
alone, the report asserted.
"The party sponsored bv the
U.S. economy is over said
Mill Research Director Ryuhei
Wakasugi.
The report reflected the first
official endorsement of findings
by a private panel, appointed last
year by Prime Minister Yasuhiro
Nakasone, that urged a restruc-
turing of Japan's economy away
from its postwar reliance on ex-
ports toward an emphasis on
domestic consumption.
Japan posteu a record $56
billion overall' trade surplus in
1985. The surplus with the
United States was a record $49.7
billion, increasing calls in Con-
gress for retaliation or protec-
tionist legislation.
main years of sunning. l
radiation can cause recurrence o
herpes, both oral and genital,
which can be prevented by using
hp sunscreen and avoiding pro
longed exposure. I exposure
can also cause solat keratosis,
which is a noncancerous growth
on skin but has a low chance of
becoming malignant Enjoy youi
time m the sun but please
remembei to use moderation
The Student Health t entei ha
a brochure on "sunning" that
provides more detailed informa
tion about medication sensitivity
and sun protection factors, t all
as at 757-6841 or drop bv it you
need more information.
EATING DISORDERS
The Eating Disorders Suppor' Cup for
women wtn Potimia anorexia nervo�a or
buiimareiea will continue trus lurnmer Ses
sioni will Be neio on Mar 27 June 10. ana
June ?4 from 4 5 p m in room 120 at the Vu
den' Healtn Ser yie
NO NEWS
IS BAD NEWS
SLEEPING BAGS
s. Titm: COTS. SHOVl
ACK PACKS TEHeTS. COTS. SHOVELS H�"
CKS. M�SS KITS. CANTEENS. FATIGUES
ITS. RAINWEAR TSMWTS ENAMELW,
?DISHES WORK CLOTHES. 2100 DIFFERENT ITU
�rowaejr W '
ARMY-NAVY STORE
1M1S.I
Give a hoot.
Don't pollute.
?rest Service, I LS.D.A.
ABORTIONS UF
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
Si95 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at addi-
tional cost Pregnancy Test. Birth Coouol, and
Problem Pregnancy Counseling For further
information call 832-0535 (ToU Free "Number
1-800-532-534) between 9 AM and 5 PM
weekdays
HaJMN WOMIM-S
HEALTH
OftOAMOATlOMa
? 17 Wat Mirpaai b
.MC
: CONTACT LENSES
Tequila Bar Weekly Specials
Sunrise Sunday:
Xfelo-Mondays: .
- �
Toasty-Tuesday: .
Wednesday: Si 75 Pirates one Vtuitm
Tonic Thursday:
Fried Friday: Get - ;
menl hour 4:30, end the night u
Saturday Mght Specials
"HouseDrink' iequtla Blues
(Look for our new "Lagoon" Bur)
Located Outside i i
TEQUILA m
BAR
Ca
Vo
109 E. 5in St
752S9.

9IO5.OO DAILY WEAR
V 145.00 EXTENDED WEAR
�e: e ji

we kit ano 1 .v
kOD
1 PA
oPTOMerwc
�Y�CAR�C�KT�R
i J T.DtonAnne, eenv.ile NC 27834
Ji 228 Greenv iii I ?10Wvs 0
9 '
9 I
i'
s �
' I
I
I
t
2 Pieces of Chicken
(Original Recipe" or
Extra Crispy-v
1 Small Mashed Potato
& Gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
rovpos
OR
$1.99
6 Kentucr ,
Kentucky Fries
1 Large Drink
i i la
We Do Chicken Right
Expires 8-20-86
CO KROCERINC FOR ALL YOUR
" Party
-C'Ol PON
Needs!
Mm
mm
BUDVVEISER OR
Budweiser
Light
12$
Or
499
FRESH FRIED
8-Pc Wishbone
Fried Chicken
$
Pc
Bkl
399
�1 OowOOoi MLStxVxxi ;WAV,V � "
� I I I I I I I l"l I I't
' I I I I I I I I I I �
11111 1Y1 ,1 i 4bV 'auw I'liiiniuii
1 1 1 I 1 1 1 I 1 1 kj , BS ' I 1 I I :
lj�.�il W?i VxxSxXrxX'
I I I I I I I 1 : 1
1 � I I I I I I I I 1
NRB
vw-fil
DIET PEP V
Pepsi
Cola
119
$
KROGER JUIV.B'
All Meat
Franks
99c
CAMPBELL S
Pork 'n O 4
Beans& cans
BATHROOM
Charmin
Tissue
- waafilfet. .idjPes.
m v
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICV
Each of tnese advertised
items is required to oe
readily available for sale In
each Kroger Savon except
as specifically noted in this
ad if we do run out of an
'tem we win offer you your
choice of a comparable
item when available
reflecting the same sav
ings or a ramcheck which
win entitle you to pur
chase the advertised item
at the advertised price
within 50 days Only on
vendor coupon win be ac
cepted per item

Mi
m Havt-N
Math, Sen.
"1 think you iea-
summer �
intense i
time and





I HI J AS IAKOl 1MAN
JUN1 4. i986
rww& T T fTTI
SLEEPING 1AGS
KPACKS. TIMTl. COTS. SHOVCLS ham!
KS MtSS WTY CANTEENS, FATIGUES V!
S, UAINWtAH. TSHtUTS. �NAJ�LWAREI
S. WORK CLOTHES. 2100 DIFFERENT ITEMS
ARMYNAVY STORE
???-�???????????
lar Weekh Specials
LA
BAR
y
$Pi
rVW,
.MAW
79C
White
Bread
99
xas Gold
Cream
79
esprved
ro Dealers
on

Campus
Voice
Do ou feel that during summer school you learn the material as
well as ou would during a regular semester, or do you feel summer
school is too condensed?
�'� �
North Carolinians
FavorDeath Penalty
Paula Portie
Fashion Merchandising, Senior
"I'm taking .i d splaj class
which is a 1 ects so I
1 think it's too condensed
Don Stroud
Finance. Senior
"1 feel you learn the material
better because it's at a faster pace
because you don't have time to
off
Eric Hughes
Banking, Senior
"& el course I'm tak-
ild ave already eat ned
n a erial, so with this course
s � at I'm supposed
Continued hrom Page 1.
Phil Meyer, a University ol
North Carolina journalism pro
lessor in charge ol the poll, said
I"uesday that the results in 1984
and 1986 were statistically the
same, since the margin ol error in
the survey wa 5 percent.
Asked if they thought tht-
death penalty was evei v
propriate tor people less than 18
years old, 37 percent said yes, 44
percent said it would never be ap
propriate and 19 rx
respond.
"wo o' the 56 inmates on
North Carolina's death row were
in 18 hey
committed then crimes.
Fhe 1984 ask
respondents il they favored the
death penal � '
1s yeaj s old.
The percentage ol North
c arolinia I he
penalty was smal
numbers oi S lerners supp 1
ting it in .1 January 19 !up
Poll. In 1 a survey, "4 per,
of the Southernei
penalty. 19 percent were
and 8 pei
The p 55
ol Re: � supported
death p pared 62
ONSOUDATED
"HEATRES
;Adultss2.ofl5!CANvLTTE
-
Wm
m&KflwmMZEnm.
756-3307 � Greenville Squere Shopping Center
i1 u- y ��.
Filter the Dragon'
-� �- - �
GGER
vK
vol
le system gave
h 1 m
'The Protectory �
LAST WEEK:
15-1:15-5:15
HE I I) OlER
AllV SH6tr
V
'fMQfOr
SHORT CIRCUIT
5th Smash Week .c
ralife is nod a malfunction.
2 4 30
7:00-9 15
HELD OVER
4th
Stnash Week
WEET
l
5TH STREET
IMPORT SERVICE
David Bustle
'ursing, Sophomore
"1 think that you spend a lot
more time in class and 'hat helps
than in a fall semester
'Misan Moulton
ursing, Sophomore
"1 think you learn more
because you're under more
pressure and have more time to
study
WE REPAIR TOYOTA, HONDA. VW,
FLAT, PORSCHE, VOLVO, DATSUN,
LOTUS, MERCEDES, BMW, AUDI
AND OTHERS
DIAL
758-1534
1M7 E. 5TH
GREENY Oil
Amy Hayes
Math, Senior
"I think you learn more in
summer school because its more
intense. I take one subject at a
time and concentrate
Thursday Night Is
TACO NIGHT
Two Great Tacos
for only 99-
60 oz. Pitchers $1.99
Offer Good From 7 p.m11 p.m.
Not Valid on Deliveries
ALL DAY FRIDAY
32 oz. Bucket of Your Favorite Draft
99C
215 E. Fourth Street
752-2183
percent of the Democrats and in-
dependents.
Fewer blacks than whites and
ver women than men favored
death penalty A 77 percen-
tage ol the male respondents
favored it, compared to 58 per-
ceni ol the women. Of whites, 75
ent favored it, compared to
28 percent of the blacks.
Other demographic differences
such as area oi residence or
church attendance - did not ap-
pear to be statistically significant
in the poll, said Meyer.
ATTIC
JUNE
4 WED
FIRST S
trike
? ?
5 THURS
Ice Water
Mansion
6 FRI
M 1 m
Producers
HoIIiday
tor all of life's special moments
Central Book and News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open 7 days a Week
Balloons For All Occasions
COMING JUNE3
;a
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
321 Fast 10th Street
Call: 758-4896
Thi� Coupon Good for
50 OFF
any mini or large sundae
1 coupon per order please
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Presen ts
Draft
Nile
10
Wednesday & Thursday, June 4 & 5, 1986
9:00-2:00 A.M.
Admission $1.50 Guys $1.00 Ladies
DRAFT ALL NITE

eatP�ce
Lunch
Special
MON-FRI 11-3
5 oz. Sirloin
with Baked
Potato, Toast,
and Salad Bar
$3,99
s4 yieU fubice t eat
STEAK HOUSE
r
m I
�S i .






w
Qtye Eaat &ar0lttuan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender, amm
DANIEl MAURER.MkwfMvCMiiw
MlKl 1 I DW1CK, ���
Seen i Cooper. v.�w
John Shannon, mtamsm
DeChanile Johnson. 4�owc�
STEVl h()l MAR. Oattior of WvcrfOMI
Anth )N Martin. �u,� i i�-m�
Meg Needham. mxx m�
Shaw n Short. �� ����.
June 4, :s�Sr
Opinion
Page 4
77 e Press
Does It Hurt As Much As Help?
More often than not, the press
has criticized the government for
withholding information from the
American public. They call
themselves the watchdog of the
people, as well they should be. But
in their zealous crusade to bring the
truth to the people, it seems they
have, too often, made a bad situa-
tion worse.
A prime example is Time
magazine's June 2 article on the
abuse of Crack, a new and more
dangerous form of cocaine that is
smoked rather than snorted.
Granted, the story was insightful.
The horrors of the highly adictive
drug and the increased number of
young people using it shocked us.
We did think, however, that the
explanation of how crack is made
was unnecessary. There are too
many irresponsible people out there
who, unaware of the consequences,
will attempt the recipe courtesy of
Time. This may result in additional
addicts or possibly severe bodily
harm.
Other instances in which the
public has been over-informed in-
clude the time President Reagan
ordered an anti-commando Delta
Force to the Mediterranean during
the TWA 847 hijacking last sum-
mer. Once the press released the
story and the terrorists were tipped
off, the rescue mission had to be
scrubbed.
Did this information prove to be
necessary? Some say yes. We say
no.
So why would the press insist on
printing this type of information?
They say it's the "public's right to
know
Bull shit. They print these stories
to boost ratings, increase listener-
ship, or help circulation. In short,
they do it to make money, to give
their careers a shot in the arm or
just to scoop the other guy.
Many members of the press stress
professional journalism. We stress
ethical journalism. Another exam-
ple of what we consider unethical,
aside from such publications as the
en York Post, is printing names
of minors.
Time was guilty of this in their
article on crack when they publish-
ed the name of a 16-year-old who
murdered a relative in order to get
money for the drug.
Here at The East Carolinian, it is
our policy not to print the names of
minors, even though the law says
we can. We also respect the request
of ECU's campus police to
withhold the names of rape victims
as well.
Other newspapers have similar
policies. Recently, the Daily Reflec-
tor received a report that a four-
year-old was molested. If the
Reflector were adhering to Time's
editorial policy (as far as we can tell
by the crack story) the child's name
would have been published.
Naturally, the Reflector declined.
At The East Carolinian, it is the
judgement of the editorial staff to
decide whether or not to publish a
name, or in Time's case, whether
we should describe roughly how to
make a dangerous drug.
Naturally, we make mistakes �
sometimes. But for the most part,
we are here for the students, not for
our careers, increasing advertising
revenue or boosting our meager cir-
culation. If we, a simple student
publication, refuse to tolerate
unethical journalism, why
shouldn't the professionals?
Loose Lips Just A Part Of Policy
By FRED BARNES
PW Nr- tLrpmUi
OOCKf MTaI.
NCHfr.MEA
SBlCE! THE FINAL FRONTIER! THE�E ARE TriE VoYAGES
of THE UNMANNEP PRo&e "compromise. " rrs
MISSION To EXPLORE gTRAUGE tfEW WORLPS, To SEEK
OUT NEW LIFE ANP NEW CIVILIZATIONS � WTHcUT
WAVING to ASK ANYSoPY To TAKE ANY RtSKg�To
Go WHERE MAN � No LONGER B�LP ENotJSH To Qo
oms HAPe
CM6G)A�DSbU
M7UE USA
z3&
vtow'MW 'COtPHfre
ft APWCBMM
AfcAMBWNVWf!
I ffCL
i pea i
i
9&8fcaaK.
Nothing extraordinary on the
Washington news front on Tuesday,
April 19. Only the normal volume of
leaks. The Associated Press, quoting
"Pentagon sources reported that the
administration had dispatched a third
aircraft carrier to the Mediterranean,
where Libya's been acting up.
The h York Times disclosed a
foreign policy zag by 'he Reagan ad-
ministration, namely a plan to terminate
the American military alliance with New
Zealand if that country bars visits by
nuclear-armed or nuclear-powered
ships. This information was attributed
to unnamed "State Department of-
ficials
The Wall Street Journal, meanwhile,
reported that a confidential Pentagon
study had raised doubts about the cost-
effectiveness of the Lavi, the new jet
fighter that Israel is developing with
U.S. financing.
Oh, yes, Tuesday, April 19, was also
the day that Michael E. Pillsbury got
canned as assistant under secretary of
defense for policy planning. The firing
offense: leaking sensitive national
security information to the press.
Pillsbury was accused of informing
the Washington Post and columnists
Evans and Novak of the
administration's decision, privately
reached and never announced, to send
Amencan-made Stinger missiles to an-
ticommunist rebels in Angola and
Afghanistan.
Defense officials told the Vh York
Times that Pillsbury had flunked a lie
detector test when asked about the
Stinger leak. The Pentagon was feeling
downright huffy. "Sen: jr policymakers
had become increasingly irritated by the
appearance of information in the press
about Libya and a large variety of the
administration's covert programs the
Times was told.
President Reagan rails against leakers
at his nationally televised press con-
ferences. Nevertheless, the firing of
Pillsbury is world-class hypocrisy. I
haven't the slightest idea whether
Pillsbury leaked or not. But suppose he
did. If every leaker in the adminstration
were to get the Pillsbury treatment,
Reagan would have to fire practically his
entire Cabinet and senior staff, and
possibly resign himself.
No administration really opposes i
unofficial, anonymous disclosure
government information ("leaks")
What every administration opposes are
leaks that don't serve its own purposes
If the political system in the Soviet
Union is built on lies, as Reagan is fond
of reminding us, his own administration
is built on leaks. O.K O.K. No! entirely
built on leaks, but an incredible amount
of information is conveyed to the
.American public through leaks. And
guess who does most of the leaking,
especially of national security ini
maiton such as an aircraft carrier move
ment, a policy shit: on New Zealand, or
an evaluation of a jel fighter? Seni
ficials at the White House, Pentag
State Department, and CIA, ho.
These are the same folks who are i
"increasingly irritated" b) leaks
Libya and covert aid to anticommui
guerrillas
There are three type- ol leaks
policy leaks, what might be called a
policy leaks, and old-fashioned
tongue leaks.
Policy leaks are handled
ficials or by their surrogates. I hese leak -
are designed to promote an administra-
tion policy. High government offu
spend hours every day plotting I w l
affect the "spin or presentation,
news stories. The strategic leak is a key
part of "spin control
After Reagan decided in April to con-
tinue adherence to the SAI I II ti
scrapping two Poseidon submarines.
several reporters at the State Depai
ment were quickly informed. There was
no public announcement, only leakec
formation, just as in the Stinger case in
which Pillsbury is accused. The same
was true of the shift in policy toward
New Zealand.
Yes, there's a legitimate distinction
between leaks of delicate national securi-
ty information and leaks of less sensitive
stuff. But the biggest jeopardier of na-
tional security is the administration
itself.
The classic example oi a vital govern-
ment secret is information about
military movements � troop
deployments, plane departures, warship
formations. When the press disclosed
last summer that the anti-commando
Delta Force had been sent to the
Mediterranean dm
itsell I � �
una ted.
It's
Israe figrn
i
Pet � lls Wi
American fun linj
I leaks,
i g to do w i11
� subvei
bably '
-
ill
at ex . iman 1
Most ofi
i �

Rep . .

�- i
the
wa . In his case

a as the
The A g
�s � md Cuba �
the truth anyway
Stingers being used
V with osi " tng -
men; would like
cern was how the informal i
C:i the poiitica: debate in th
rather than how it might
military g a - ibi �ad
Anyway, reporters c
.
ed about
they were put into use S
Pillsburv crime1 He sp �
and without ol
dav he departed the Defense
Department. I chatted with a young con-
servative who haJ j from
conferring in Angola with th m-
munist rebels. Had the Stingers gotten
there0 1 asked. Oh sure, he out
on. You couldn
Battling Ho-Hum Anti-Terrorism
The Israeli ambassador to the United Nations is, as most
Israelis are on the vital questions, strictly no-nonsense on the
matter of terrorism. His recently published book, Terrorism:
How the West Can Win, has a sad-fascinating provenance. It
almost slips the memory, so much has happened since, that in
1976 an Air France plane was hijacked and taken to Uganda.
What followed was the legendary Entebbe raid. A
squadron of Israeli airplanes set out in the dead of night. Mis-
sion: rescue the passengers of the airplane. They did this, but
of course there were a few casualties. One of them was Lt.
Jonathan Netanyahu.
On The Right
In his memory the Jonathan Foundation was founded. It is
an Israeli think-tank devoted to devising means of combating
terrorism. And the book by the dead man's brother, Ben-
jamin, is a keenly edited report of the most recent meeting of
the Jonathan Foundation, in Washington in 1984.
It becomes important, along the line, to define terrorism.
Netanyahu's definition is a very good start. He defines ter-
rorism as "the deliberate and systematic murder, maiming
and menacing of the innocent to inspire fear for political
ends
Flashback. In 1973, at the United Nations, the U.S. delega-
tion, myself included, struggled to get the General Assembly
to deplore terrorism in a comprehensive way. The great wind-
bag of the U.N. in those days, and indeed in every day in the
quarter-century in which he figured in the U.Ns history, was
Jamil Baroody, the ambassador of Saudi Arabia.
I kid you not when I tell you that he offered the following
amendment to the simpler definition of terrorism backed by
the United States and a few allies. The resolution, Am-
bassador Baroody said, should read, "Measure to Prevent
Terrorism and Other Forms of Violence Which Endanger or
Take Innocent Human Lives or Jeopardize Fundamental
Freedoms, and Study of the Underlying Causes ol 1
Forms of Terrorism and Acts of Violence Which 1
Misery, Frustration, Grievance, and Despair and Vv
Cause Some People to Sacrifice Human Lives, Inclu
Their Own in an Attempt to Effect Radical Changes "
Well, that will buy you a franchise rue
McDonald's, if you are Burger King. And, of course
movement to condemn terrorism in a comprehensive wav
ed, even as it continues to fail today The measure of the
failure isn't the U.Ns paralysis (the U.N. is forever paralyz-
ed on important questions)
It is the apparent paralysis of the free world to make com-
mon cause, the explosive example of which came when, in
April, the United States did take modest action against
Gadhafi in Libya, only to awaken the next day to pro-
nouncements in West Europe that gave the impression that we
had bombed not Libya, but England, France. Spain, Italv
and West Germany, and maybe even Bethlehem.
Netanyahu believes it is a challenge of focus. His point is
that it is creepingly self-evident that there is no excuse for ter-
rorism, and that terrorism can't be dealt with by dilettantes.
He says it right out: 1) No concessions: never acquiesce in ter-
rorist demands. 2) No appeasement of easygoing countries
that tolerate transient terrorists, let alone resident terrorist
training. 3) Insist on common policies among allies (he
means, obviously, try to insist). 4) Diplomatic sanctions
(close down the appropriate embassies). 5) Economic sanc-
tions against terrorist sanctuaries, including bovcott and em-
bargo.
This commentator sees Ambassador Netanyahu, and raises
him one. What are we going to do about the Soviet Union? It
is, by all the authors who contribute to his volume, concede
that the Soviet Union is, really, the principal engine or, bet-
ter, nuclear power reactor behind international terrorism.
So does that leave us chopping off the hydra's coils, leaving
the head forever immune? Ah, but that is the challenge of the
era, the challenge of how to deal with the evil empire
Buckley vs. L
In Defen
44-yeai
-
On The Rig hi
Bv VMJ i (AM F H! K


I
Syria's A
Bv l)MU
I

v. d
ss
5

Jevs
Desc s ;

k
ma�
Turk. K

be
destroyed i ebai
Thus
the sma
mun
or military
underclass rhe
Arab landlords
Alawites were so pv V or
hired out their daug
cities, a deeply si a i eful pra
Aiawites
When Syna became an indepci
naturallv the Sunn: trabs who
Ironically, discrimination served
next quarter centurj
Exclusion reinforced the
at the same time that it ke.
struggles then raging among v u
nis repeatedly purged one a
ranks
This ascent culminated in reb
Alawite officers came to power i
government ever In a coup d'e
fighting around the residence ol
strongman, Assad's MippOi
outcome.
The impact oi the Aiawr.cs a
- � � -





y
Of Policy
aim-
.tten
hout
-Terrorism
� I hose
1 ;e in
uding
. the
�� is fail-
.f the ralyz-
a e om-
:n, in
against
pro-
� impression that we
d, France, Spain, Italy
� B ' ehem.
His point is
a use for ter-
by dilettantes,
never acquiesce in ter-
easemeni I easygoing countries
resident terrorist
jmmon among allies (he
I 4) Diplomatic sanctions
i pnate embassies). 5) Economic sanc-
a manes, including boycott and em-
I ees Ambassador Netanyahu, and raises
le e going to do about the Soviet Union? It
li rs who contribute to his volume, concede
lion is, really, the principal engme or, bet-
r reactor, behind international terrorism.
us chopping off the hydra's coils, leaving
r.mune? Ah. but that is the challenge of the
of how to deal with the evil empire.
THl l AS! AROl INJAN
Opinion
JUNE 4, 1986
Buckley vs. Liberals � A$mn
In Defense Of An Honorable Man
"he resistance to Daniel Mamon as
iudgc is mostly ideological oppor-
tunism, but there is an odor there of
lething else, and that is the war of the
secularists against religion.
First things first. Daniel Manion is a
44 seai-old lawyer who has tried more
han 30 cases, is a member of a small
irm, was an active legislator, and is a
,in greatly admired personally. He is a
eran of the Vietnam War, a sometime
c senator who quit his office to
On The Right
By WILLIAM F.BUCKLEY JR.
te his energies to fighting multiple
sis, which he conquered; a genial,
id-humored, intelligent man who has
gorousl) expressed himself on public
Lies, and has done so intelligently and
;sponsibly.
Now there are two obvious factions
his confirmation as a federal
idge ro begin with, there is what one
night call the Big Firm Legal Lobby.
These are the legal heavies who dis-
.�ndidate for the judiciary who
pracl ced in a firm with fewer than
K partners. They cannot find suffi-
iit judicial cosmopolitanism out in the
in the little firms.
lustice Department's answer on
lis question is that the "Mh Ciruit to
ch President Reagan has named
Manion already has its share of
professors and lawyers who have
en involved in federal casework, and
. a well-balanced judiciary should in-
ide lawyers from outside the great
: ipolises
second faction is just plain
. His opponents do not like it
that Manion, a conservative, should be
designated to the court. Some senators
are remarkably frank on the subject.
"1 think you are a decent and
honorable man a ranking Democratic
member of the Senate Judiciary Com-
mittee said to Manion at his second
hearing, "but I do not think I can vote
for you because of your political views
that is a senator who is sworn to defend
the Constitution, which gives to the
president the perogative of naming
judges. You can't slide a piece of tissue
paper between the political views of
Daniel Manion and Ronald Reagan, and
Reagan's political views were applauded
by 60 percent of the American people
only two years ago.
The opponents of Daniel Manion
reason that if they succeed in blocking
his nomination, that would be the first
time a Reagan nominee was turned
down. If it can happen once, some
senators reason, then perhaps a coalition
of liberal Democrats and liberal
Republicans can build a Berlin Wall bet-
ween the White House and the judiciary
� never mind the Constitution.
But a third faction is moved, or so it
would seem, by a passionate desire to
punish someone who has disagreed with
the Supreme Court in its various rulings
progressively excluding religion from the
schools.
When the Supreme Court voted (by a
narrow margin of 5-4) against permit-
ting the display of the Ten Command-
ments in the public schools of Kentucky,
then-state Sen. Daniel Manion joined
with an overwhelming majority of
Democrats and Republicans in the In-
diana Senate to propose a voluntary
display of the Ten Commandments in
the public schools.
His critics hae whooped and hollered
over this one, maintaining that it was a
flagrant act of contumacy, an invitation
of defiance of the Supreme Court. But
the proposed bill specified, "If this sec-
tion is determined to be unconstitu-
tional, all copies of the Ten Command-
ments displayed by authority of this sec-
tion shall be immediately removed when
the judgement becomes final There
was no hint there of any appetite to
subvert the judiciary.
Moreover, the court's church-state
rulings are, by the concession of almost
everyone, utter chaos. (Moynihan, 1979:
"In Wolman v. Walter (1977), Mr.
Justice Blackmun on behalf of the court
found it constitutional to provide non-
public-school pupils with 'books but
unconstitutional to supply them with
'instructional materials and equipment
In other words, a book may be provided
but not a map. The Court has yet to rule
on atlases, which are books of maps)
If you want to know whether the
Supreme Court would have authorized
the proposed Indiana law, you could as
well consult a Ouija board as a panel of
judicial scholars. But the forces of
secularism are not easily appeased. They
want Manion eaten alive by the lions.
The Rev. Theodore Hesburgh, the
longtime president of the University of
Notre Dame, a political liberal and
perhaps the most highly honored man in
America (he has more honorary degrees
than Herbert Hoover, the runner-up),
has said of Manion: "I believe he will
bring dedication, integrity, and a keen
knowledge of the law to that position.
His life has been one of service and com-
mitment to justice. I beliee he will ex-
hibit the same qualitites sitting on the
federal bench, and that his appointment
will be a strong one
Syria's Assad Has Imperial Dream
kes '
.
B DANIEL PIPES
speech last February, President Hafez al-Assad of
�utlined his policy toward the Golan Heights, the
n region of Syria that was lost to Israel in 196
lelis vs rk to put the Golan within their
e warned, "we will work to put the Golan in the
Syria and not on the borders As the most overt
in some years � it implied the annexation of all of
Syria � Assad's remark prompted strong verbal
rom Israel.
turn, made further warnings. Events since then
ave nl made Syrian-Israeli hostilities more likely, and
many observers now speculate that the two countries are
g for war.
fter the United States retaliated against Libya for ter-
Berlin nightclub, it became clear that Syria had
masterminded the attempt to blow up an El Al plane leaving
London s evidence of Syrian complicity emerges, the
likelihood of Israeli reprisal against Syria increases. But do
Syria's hostile moves mean that it seeks war with Israel? Or is
id indirectly trying to maneuver Israel to the bargaining
;abie�
Assessing Assad's motives poses many problems for the
Syrian Arab Republic is one of the most tightly closed coun-
in the Middle East. Even so, two points stand out.
ke Israel's other neighbors, Syria still seeks to destroy the
Jewish state. As the Syrain foreign minister, Abd al-Halim
Knaddam, puts it, "liquidating the Zionist presence" is the
only solution to the Arab-Israeli struggle.
Second, Assad's bellicosity results not from strength but
, weakness. He depends on anti-Zionism to reduce the
tffection of the Syrian people from his regime.
Describing the area east of the Mediterranean more than 50
vears ago, the Syrian writer Omar Djabry noted the paradox
that the region's distinctiveness lies precisely in the diversity
ts population.
With good reason, he dubbed ethnic heterogeneity the
rademark of the Levant. In Syria, Arabic-speaking Sunni
Moslems make up 50 percent of the population and minorities
make up the other half. Islamic heresies � Alawite, Druse,
Yazidi � constitute 16 percent. Christians, ten percent,
divide into ten sects. Bedouins make up ten percent, and
Turks, Kurds, Palestinians, and Shiites make up the rest.
With a long history of ethnic hostilities, Syria could easily
be engulfed in the kind of vicious enmities that have
destroyed Lebanon.
Thus the fact that Assad and most of his aides come from
the small, isolated, impoverished, and despised Alawite com-
munity has enormous importance.
As poorly educated peasants lacking political organization
or military strength, Alawites long formed an economic
underclass. They typically worked farms belonging to Sunni
Arab landlords, receiving only one-quarter of the produce.
Alawites were so poor after World War 1 that they routinely
hired out their daughters as domestics to Sunni Arabs in the
cities, a deeply shameful practice among Moslems and
Alawites.
When Syria became an independent country in 1946, it was
naturally the Sunni Arabs who dominated its political life.
Ironically, discrimination served the Alawites well during the
next quarter century.
Exclusion reinforced the Alawite sense of ethnic solidarity
at the same time that it kept them out of the ruinous power
strugIes then raging among Sunni military officers. As Sun-
nis repeatedly purged one another, Alawites rose through the
ranks.
This ascent culminated in February 1966, when a group of
Alawite officers came to power in Syria's bloodiest change of
government ever. In a coup d'etat marked by hand-to-hand
fighting around the residence of Amin al-Hafiz, the former
strongman, Assad's support for the rebels was decisive in the
outcome.
The impact of the Alawites' taking power can hardly be ex-
aggerated. An Alawite ruling Syria is like an untouchable
becoming maharaja in India or a Jew becoming c.ar in Russia
� an unprecedented development shocking to the majority-
population.
Today, the observant traveler entering Syria for the first
time is startled as he goes through passport control and sees a
military map of the country on the wall, for this map contains
several obvious anomalies. It shows the province of Hatay, a
part of Turkey since 1939, included in Syria. It shows the
Golan Heights under Syrian control, though it has been oc-
cupied by Israel since 1967. Svria's boundaries with Lebanon
and Jordan appear not as international borders but as
something called "regional" borders. Israel does not even ex-
ist on this map. Instead, there is a state called Palestine. And
Palestine is separated from Syria by a line designated as a
"temporary" border.
The maps' inaccuracies reflect the Syrian government's
profound unwillingness to accept the country's reduced size.
They remember that until 1920 "Syria" referred to a cultural
region that stretched from Anatolia to Egypt, from Iraq to
the Mediterranean Sea.
In terms of today's states, it comprised Syria, Lebanon,
Israel, and Jordan, plus the Gaza Strip and Hatay. This larger
area is now known as Greater Syria, to distinguish it from the
Syrian state.
The present borders within Greater Syria date back only to
1918-23, when Great Britain and France divided the area into
many new polities.
The imperial powers created these polities with an eye to
helping their friends in the area, most of whom were infidels.
Palestine went to the Jews, Lebanon to the Marointes, small
regions to the Alawites and Druse, and Jordan to a British
protege, leaving Syria to the Sunnis. The Alawite and Druse
districts were later incorporated into Syria. In the eyes of
Syrian Sunnis, these were all usurpers who excluded them
from their patrimony, the whole of Greater Syria.
Although Greater Syria includes many regions, Palestine
attracts most of Assad's attention. The reason is simple: there
is no Palestinian polity � only the state of Israel.
Israelis are not Syrian, not Arab, and not Moslem. Indeed,
they are Jews, and anti-Semitism has become a powerful
political force in Syria during recent decades. Fighting Israel
now symbolizes Arab and Moslem resolve. Strength will be
achieved, many Arabs believe, through its destruction. Anti-
Zionism is the operative part of Pan-Syrianism.
Assad needs militant anti-Zionism for three reasons. First,
minorities in the Arab world take little interest in the conflict
against Israel. Maronites, Greek Orthodox, Druse, Shiites,
Kurds, and Copts typically have more pressing concerns than
whether Israel exists, expands, or disappears. So have the
Alawites. Before coming to power in 1966, they ignored
Israel.
Second, rejecting the existence of Israel offers Assad a way
to appeal to Sunni emotions. Sunnis have a special regard for
Palestine; they felt most aggrieved by Israel's creation and
they expect to inherit Palestine should Israel be eliminated.
Finally, anti-Zionism provides a bludgeon to hold over
Syria's neighbors and to enhance Assad's power in Middle
East politics. Syrian leaders argue that as "the heart of
Arabism and the lungs of the Palestinian resistance
Damascus has historically guided the Arabs.
Syria lead the fight against Zionism, showing the way to the
other Arabs, including the Palestinians, and correcting them
when they stray. Continuing the fight against Israel permits
Assad to impose his will on the other Arabs.
Assad so much needs Israel as an enemy he is willing to en-
dure whatever costs anti-Zionism entails, including military
defeat and economic sacrifice. So long as an Alawite-
dominated Syrian regime faces widespread Sunni opposition,
it profits by seeking Israel's destruction. The implication is
clear: the Arab-Israeli conflict will continue so long as Hafez
al-Assad rules in Damascus.
CONSPIRACY THEORV 126
WP5IRHAM5lRHAN,ieeHARVW
OSWALD AMP JOHM HINCKLEV
ALL HAVE ONE POWERFUL GROUP
SPENDING MILLIONS TO HELP THEM
OBTAIN GUNS ?
�23 tfSSHkaos-
f (F TEAMSTER
&0S5,JACK!�
PRe556R,6ET5
CONVICTED,
wouiP W
86 WILLING
TDSERV6
OUT HIS
TERM? I
CoUege Press Service
HKW AftjtfW 0 A bit) �N Ottsr A, WBH Afcueitort
�� �
�" -��!� ff- �� L ,
A





I HI- EASl t AKOI INIAN
Lifestyles
BLOOM COUNTY
JUNE 4, 1986 Page eS
Summer Flick
Poltergeist II
B EDTOSHACH
sun Writer
From Right: Cm T Nelson, Oliver Robins. Heather ORourke, JoBeth Williams, and psychic
T angina Barroas idda Ruhmsteim are drawn into a climactic battle arkn �
'Poltergeist II: I he Other Side' ,n
When it came out in 1982,
Poltergeist had quite a bit going
for it. It was well written, ex-
tremely well directed, and it had
great special effects.
Now Poltergeist II is here and
it has great special effects.
Poltergeist II is set shortly after
the first movie ended; the family
that had been through so much
has now taken up residence with
Morn's mother. Dad seems to
have given up the real estate
business to sell vacuum cleaners
and no, they still haven't bought
another TV.
Suddenly, things start getting
very weird again. A preacher that
could be a recent offering from
ghoul-of-t hc-mont h starts
following Carol Anne. An Indian
shaman comes to live with the
family and tames all the local
butterflies. The house starts
? nig. toys start Hying around,
and soon little Carol Anne is tell-
ing us "they're back . "
Poltergeist (the original) work-
s well as it did because it gave
us a family we could believe in;
they could have been any
American family. We saw kids
at the breakfast table. We
saw a little girl bury her pet bird
in a cigar box.
Poltergeist was well
written, well directed
and it had great special
effects. Now Poltergeist
II is here and it has
great special effects.
Because Poltergeist showed us
these details, we could believe in
the family it depicted. They were
a common family surrounded by
circumstances that were anything
but common. If none of us had
ever lived in a haunted house,
after seeing that movie we knew
what it was like. Poltergeist u.as
sometimes scary, sometimes tun-
ny and always credible.
Apparentlv, somebody wasi
watching.
Poltergeist II spends very lil
time uiakn us he! �
fan
dons the idea
unusual. u
grandmother, we qu
have p
whv a whole
has followed them hall
the country. Poltergeist I!
not especiallv belie
seldom funny, b I
were lots i I
In Poltergeist II I I
saw ten
the i apped
wagon; ;
around, and a boy ittaci
� �
better spec
wa-
it
I ' -
Nei
excellent oi
and n ��
O'Rourke i
eve-
Oldei
imp
B
e s p.
Poltergeist II

� - � Poltergeist II.
Lahnn And Loftin Scheduled To Play Patio
B DAVID BRADSHAW
and
JOHN sIJAWON
B luced by
the output
v ovals
their
l
;anv
Bee
I ree H isc
V rong V
rega I w e .
re, people will
heat rial the musics 'ear.
Lahnn and Loftin is back. Theii
w, scheduled for Thursday at
3 p.m. on the patio
Mendenhall, will mark their fifth
appearance on the ECl .ampus.
The duo have

. arc no: y
hai ' ians are
ters a- well.
area

S it � 'ern col-
rcuit and beyond, playing
at dozens of campuses from New
York to Mississippi. A testimony
'heir talent is the fact that at
nearly all of their performances,
they are asked for a return
engagement.
Chaz Lahnn, the duo's lead
vocalist, also plays rhythm
guitar, usuallv a twelve string
acoustic. J.K. Loftin provides the
bulk of instrumental texture
the
� ners
ir from it.
a p n i
"tieir
he pursuit of a unique
sound which can
d live by just the tw.
imply
Thev
avaiiai
. .
and f
reprod
then
The computers enhance and
aid Lahnn and Loftin's m
without creating the "plasl
.ad that ma' tech bands
of the eighties have. Lahnn and
Loftin have consciously avoided
the techno-pop -yndrome by a
developing
ap-
- as
al func-
md

Vic-
heir
on
e North
Miller
Talent Sea 0f-
� first
tern United
- lam
ban . en�
lly wens na.
n and Loftin's
- on a special
produced as a
' he North Carolina com-
ind J K. Loftin
are fied with
stasis in their careers. ! fie two are
now branching m perfor-
ming by becoming, in all
seriousness, educators. They
nave held workshops and
seminars on aspects of song-
writing and performing with
computer-controlled equipment,
bringing knowledge of these new
musical tools to college audiences
who are most likely to benefit
m and appreciate the mforma-
Despite their interests on the
side, Lahnn and Loftin are
primarily performers. Their
choice of covers reflects a wide
range of influences, especially
from artists of the sixties such as
The Beatles; Steppenwolf; Pink
Floyd; Emerson, Lake and
Palmer; Crosby, Stills and Nash;
and Bob Dylan. Their covers
contemporary artists include such
Bruce Spring
Aga i will
p r e s e n

'� EC I lei
p.m. on the pal
If it ra . n in
Hendrix Theatre, -v
free.
Prime Time Soap Scenario
B J. D ID MATTHEWS
staff Writer
Restaurant In Rpvjpu,
American Classics
As most prime time soap opera
fans know, the creators of the
t BS series "Dallas in a last
ditch effort to revive its show-
back to the top of the Nielson
ratings, have decided to bring
back from parts unknown, Bob-
by Ewing.
A few days ago, I ran into Bob-
by down along the banks of the
Tar River. 1 was granted an inter-
view by the revived oil tycoon on-
ly because I was wearing a Lone
Star Beer t-shirt. Here is what
happened:
Dave: "Yo Bobbv. What's up
Holmes?"
Bobby: "My nipples, Dave.
It's cold as ice six feet under
Dave: "I can't believe it Bob.
Those bigwig city slickers out in
Hollywood are actually going to
revive a dead man for ratings,
and ultimately, money
Bobby: "For my next trick. I'll
walk across the Tar River
Dave: "Be for real, Bob.
Seriously though, don't you
think that all of this hocus pocus
is in violation of your viewers'
moral codes?"
Bobby: "Our viewers have no
morals, Dave
Dave: "Oh yeah. Well, in the
last episode, you ended up in the
shower. How come?"
Bobby: "Try living in a box
that has cracks in it and see how
clean you stay! It's a jungle down
there
Dave: "I see. So, are you plan-
ning to surprise JR and Miss Elly
like you did with Pam?"
Bobby: "I'm going to scare of
JR right out of his BVDs. As for
mama, well the shock just might
kill her. I sure hope we can rent
that cas
Dave: "I
mean. Hey jm-
:wing
dmger
Jan had I r j
Bobbv. "Yea roo bad I
couldn't s-e a:
Hell, the only sound 1 . -ear
over ail that cryin' a:
tion was the clinking of ice cu
in JR's drink
Dave: "What � ke not
being here on earth for a while
Bobbv: "Weii. 1 don't know
exactly where 1 was at, but it was
great, k tike a haven
Texans. Ai! the beer , uld
drink, all the ribs you could eat.
and a whole herd of fine thangs
to hogtie! I've never 'Yeenaaed'
so much in my life. Or is that
death'1"
Dave: "Sounds like a helluva
rodeo to me, cow bo "
See BOBS, page 7
B PAT MOLLOY
4mi�Iim rralurn f fct,�
Reflecting back upon a meal
eaten at See-Zes could be an
afternoon-long event � a plea-
sant, afternoon-long event. See-
Zes is a new restaurant located at
100 fc. 10th St. (where Szechuan
Gardens once stood), and the
portions they serve are more than
generous. They are also quite
good.
Seen from the outside, See-Zes
(its name plucked from the utter-
ings of the owner's seven-year-
old son) looks more like a large,
green warehouse than a
restaurant; however, the
semblance ends there. Inside is an
atmosphere that would make
even the grumpiest lunch-time
mealer feel welcomed.
Once inside, one may either be
seated or order to go. If the deci-
sion :s to be seated, a waitress will
arrive with a smile and a menu of
American cuisine ranging from a
Maryland crabcake sandv
($2.50) to a New Yorker hotdog
� complete with relish, on.
and mustard (Si).
The ambience that See-Zes of-
fers is almost as good as the food.
The restaurant is remarkably
clean, and there are no irritating
people who push brooms by
patrons while they dine. Indeed,
there was no need for a broom.
There was no need for dining
music, either; the sound of con-
versation between the other
guests was sufficient.
The other diners seemed to feel
quite at home while they ate. en-
joying very mellow bantering
with the waitresses and the
owner. The owner stopped by
every table in order to check on
the food and further assist the
gUCsts.
x dress code was
People wore
thes ranging from coat and tie
and sandals. The
folks in the sandals seemed more
aptly suited for the experience
than did the others. That is not to
take away from the sense of
cleanliness that one feels upon
entering the restaurant.
See-cs is reminiscent of the
classic American deli restaurant.
I heir menu features regional
foods from all over the United
States
From Baltimore they have a
cornbeef sandwich served with
either rye or white bread($2.50).
And of course they feature the
now-famous Philly-steak sand-
wich covered with melted cheese
and onions($2.50).
See SEE-ZES, page 7
�'�i �"�� witfM -imwmfrnj
New Restaurant In Town �mTC�-
See-Zes, Greenville's newest restaurant, is located at 100 E.lOth Street Ooen WM.
from 11:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m they are serving the finest in American cune" MCepl Sund�

Man-O-Stick

See-Zes
Restaurant
Reviewed
( ontinutd from page 6

Greenville
them,
igre
clan a s -
i
s

U '
may bite h
a ca
arg
everything
per
-
Ih; J m II a
and call-in
the student on a
budj g j
food and
! 10
OFF
New
SPECIE ! MARYLAND j CORN BEEF
i ioTaste th subs � cheese.
OFF

. .
" -

1





t I
til
Patio
P Scenario
"




s-r BOB'S, pa.
�merlctn cuisine
BLOOM COUNTY
W
by Berke Breathed
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JUNE 4, 1986 7
-4 77
M?i�x sum
hotel wcmwrth
4 FChHTUSS
HmxfWL
sprr'
�- h �
'
i -v
I
D
r
Noee
H.OS5
�(f ��
V

wtoi �
cert -
H'r WP'
-v
1
, �ft
.V- �
� m i�
W decAuse were
PVE TV FC� COMtftt
VJK 7 AMP Ue FIB. KOL
, r� anp falsify
50 ASMOT Hr60 n
FTSON FOR BMgezZLl
�ffT OF WBUC FiAPi
-y
�&
�. -V"
- �
wen i�T5 uusr
MAK� IT A F(U PAV
wrc?c dumHNC-
UflP

���
f
w i i �
�j

A
WM
� -
�IOnK
4vr ah Affwr us one
MlUIAfF R�5�AXCH
xmtmn me
cicvFMimn
I
i
:ffi
T
.
iSfflsy
Am? Htw
THIS FFLUV.
S UttfK'M- �"
C
I?
y.
n V
l
T
Jm
5S
.
5W
It iW
eees
7F
v
�,

Man-O-Stick
By JARRELL & JOHNSON
Bob's Back
In Dallas
Continued from page 6
Bobby: "Yup
Dave: "Did you run into Jock
while you were down there?"
Bobby: "Sure did. Daddy's
still the same, too. Still drinkin'
and cussin and fightin and
screwin' over his friends
Dave: "What a man. Is he go-
ing to come back on the show
also?"
Bobby: "When I asked him to,
he threw his drink in my face. But
after I apologized for making
him spill his bourbon, he said he
might reconsider on one condi-
tion
Dave: "What's that?"
Bobby: "If 'Oilcan his horse,
can come back also and have a
irot-on part on the show
Dave: "Maybe they'll give him
a part in a stampede
Bobby: "The Can doesn't care
what he does as long as he and JR
aren't in a stable scene together
Dave: "What's this I hear
about that drama on ABC bring-
ing back one of its deceased
also?"
Bobby: "You mean DieNasty?
I think they're trying to bring the
Rock back
Dave: "Do you think he'll
come back?"
Bobby: "Only if he can por-
tray a certain character that is
special to him
Dave: "What's the character's
name?"
Bobby: "King Pac-Man
Dave: "Oh really?"
Bobby: "Sure thing. And Jim
Nabors gets to make a cameo ap-
pearance anytime he pleases
Dave: "Shazam! Well Bobby,
what's ahead in the near future
for you?"
Bobby: "Money, of course.
You don't think I'd come back to
television just so I could get my
mug on the cover of People
Magazine, do you?"
Dave: "You really kill me,
Bob. Later dude
Bobbv: "You know it
See-Zes
Restaurant
Reviewed
Continued from page 6
The suhs that See-Zes offers
being united as the "largest in
Greenville and after seeing
m, one might definitely be in-
clined to agree with the pro-
clamation, lor S2.50 one may
select a small coldcut, steak,
hamburger, Italian or spiced
shrimp sub 1 lie large subs cost
$4.00.
Of course, the American fare
includes pizza, also. And it comes
at an agreeable price. For $4, one
may bite into a 12" cheese pizza.
And for an additional 65 cents, a
topping can be added. The price
for a large 16" pizza with
everything is S 10.25 � hot pep-
pers are free.
See-Ze- is open Monday
through Saturday from 11 a.m.
to 9 p.m and call-in orders are
accepted. For the student on a
budget who enjoys eating good
d and much of it, this is a
restaurant that must be visited.
lllillllMIIIIIHIHIIIIIII!l!lllHI)lllllllllllllllilinnillilll!lllllllllljIHIIIIIIIIi!llilllllllinilllll!IIIIIIHIItlllllilLt
Stock Clearance Sale
IBM XT
Regularly Now
?(1) IBM lOmeg hard drive
256K, (1) IBM 360K drive $3116 $2395 Cashl
IBM XT
256K, (2) IBM 360K drives $2056 1755 Cash!
I IBM PC Portable
J256K, (2) IBM 360K drives 1800 1 595 Cash
Only 1 Left At This Price
I Check Out Our New IBM PC Prices

presents
Thursday
scl.netrx v ;
Computer Game jjr Singles
Don't drive. Call the Liberty Ride
& for more info call 758-5570.
&
105 Airport Road
Greenville
758-0327
Tar Landing
Seafood
Fried
Shrimp
All You Can Eat
$599
Crab Legs
or
Steamed Shrimp
or combination of both
COMING ATTRACTIONS
EE
IBM PC
J256K, (2) IBM 360K drives 1596 1 295 Cash
Plenty PC's Available
B
I Student Stores i
Wright Building (
East Carolina University
ilUlllllllllinHHtlllllillllllllllllllllllllimillllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIIHIIlllliillllilllllllllIIIMIIIIIIillllllHF
CLIP COUPON
See-ge's
10
OFF
New To The Area
SPECIAL SANDWICHES
MARYLAND CRAB PHILLEY STEAK
CORN BEEF 6 oz HAMBURGER
10
OFF
10
OFF
Taste the difference in our cold cut
subs � 16 slices of meat & 4 slices of
cheese. We also have pizzas with a
northern flavor
CLIP COUPON-
10
OFF
Thursday, June 5, 1986
3:00 p.m. FREE!
Lahnn and Loftin
Concert on the Patio
Rainsite: Hendrix
Monday, June 9, 1986
3:30 p.m. FREE
with I.D
Risky Business
Hendrix Theatre
�XHM& OUT TO W�V VOU
W m . m T
- - ��
� � �





HI I ASI K(INI AN
Sports
IRS Hour
�V (MM!
H M - �� H��e �
New Records Set
Bradley Wins Tournament
golfer Mike Bradlev �on the Durham mati
week, setting tournament records alon the �
B KICK Mi(()RMA(
i � idii
I he summer has gotten off to a
d stari ' r Pirate golfer Mike
Bradley, as he has won the
Durham Amateut Golf Iourna-
i em in addition to capturing
Qualifying Medalist honors in the
south Invitational.
Bradley, a rising senior who
been team MVP each of his
ee years at ECU, set a tourna-
i" winning the
Din ateui with a five
undei par total ol 208
Bradley also set a tournament
a single round when he
:d the Duke golt course
�pening round 67.
idley 's rounds i �1 67-70 7 I
field, as the ncxi
a as eighi stroke
pace
Bradle carried a six shoi lead
sing round and no one
an) closei
I he v hole thing was a battle
: place finis!
5 � use said. "The
already won
e Duke gol!
pring AUii fall
II petes in tour-
e knew
�und
lead slip away
� "1 was playing so good I fell
like it would take a course record
to beat me Bradley
Mike Bradlev
"Bel
. .
ler I He
said thai nd f 71
ild ii
ope i �
71 s was t y . � be j 1
tgl
H - a .
Ste(
D u r h a 11 Si
posl. f 72-73-7!
220
Moran Wins First Criterium
place
1 arliei his summer, Hradiev
Hired qualifying Meda
honors in the prestigeous North-
South An !
Pinehurst's tamed number
course.
Bradley shot 70 "2 in the tw
qualifv. . inds, !
the low qualifier before I
� rid of ma
"My main goal wa
'�� . fiers 1
play Bradley said
72-7
ment lit
it thrill. There t
la
� ' : ued. "Ii
ap
Brad � �

��
He
i
.1
le Ea
' OTTCOl)

�� pai :d to the and th
st
citing re re
a lot of (
Michael Paimer

sr I, II and III
.id i eDuc

-

Veterans
Jim Minder
Bi own
i J i eeuw
Juniors

Mat! Kratzon
Women
Nagel
I aurie V ai
1

Si
The intramural department sponsors horseback riding for groups at
reduced rates. For more information contact IKS.
Celtics Down Rockets; In
Driver's Seat For Remainder
Alter the Boston Celtics took
�so games of the NBA
best-of-seven Championship
Series, it looked as it" it would be
ake-walk for the heralded men
green. However, the Rockets
squeaked out Came three and
ked like they would be able to
even the series at 2-2 � due to
their three-game homestand.
By
Scott Cooper
&
Rick McCormac
TV Side
Indoor Sports
Playing pool in Mendenhal) Student Center is one activity to help pass
the time during summer school. Mendenhall also has a bowling alley
for those who prefer to beat the heat in the air conditioning
Not to be so. In the most bit-
terly contested game of the series,
a three-point field goal from all-
everything Larry Bird was just
enough to give the Celtics an in-
surmountable 3-1 lead as they
topped the Rockets, 106-103 last
night in Houston.
Although the Rockets have lost
just three of 47 games (prior to
last night) in the friendly confines
of the 16,000 plus Summit, a
scratch-and-claw Celtic squad
would not be denied the win and
another possible banner for
Red's already banner-filled
Boston Garden.
However, the Celtics might
have won the battle but the future
belongs to the Rockets. Let's face
it, this hasn't been such a great
year for rockets anyway.
With a talented twin towers as
a foundation, Houston can't be
far from a title or two. Ralph
Sampson's emergence as a PTP
(prime-time player) in the las'
two games speaks for itself.
Throughout last night's con-
test. Houston crushed the
boards, Sampson, Jim Peterson,
and Mitchell Wiggins go: off on
the glass
However, you have to give
credit, where credit is due. Bird.
Kevin McHale, Robert Parnsh,
Danny Ainge, Dennis Johnson.
Bill Walton. Jerry Sichting and
even Greg Kite did what it took.
If wasn't terribly pretty, but
Mews was right � they're
awesome.
We're not saying the series is
over or anything, but it does look
good for the guys from the Nor-
theast. Even with one game still
remaining in Houston, the Celtics
still have two home games re-
maining (should the series go
seven � fat chance). Boston has
won 42 consecutive games and
has not been defeated in The
Garden since the Blazers did it
back in December of '85.
Another convincing note is
that the Celtics have won 15 NBA
titles in 17 final-appearance at-
tempts. In other words, they're a
shoe-in. (Hey, Houston fans
don't take this wrongly, we have
to write stuff like this, you know
� unbiased. But, if the unex-
pected should occur, we'd be the
happiest fellas around. In fact, if
the Rockets win, save this article
and we'll have a small celebration
at Pat's � he's a Celtics fan.)
What makes the Celtics so darn
good anyway? Is it Bird, K.C.
Jones or just tradition? Probably
all three.
Boston has to be the Carolina
� the NBA Nobody passe-
ball that much, or that well. They
epitomize the term "team con-
cept Their unselfishness .�
canny.
"Unselfish. We're unsdfisl
Bird said. "You see some
selfishness around the league, but
teams that do that don't get
far
Since Bird has won his third
MVP award, he is undisputably
the best in the business, although
he dives for lose balls like a
rookie trying to make the team.
But does that make everyone else
belter? According to former
Celtic championship team
member and current coach of the
Milwaukee Bucks, Don Nelson,
the answer is yes.
"I hope all the other Celtics
realize what a privilege it is for
them tc play with Larry Bird
Nelson said. "They are all very
fortunate young men
The hick from French Lick is
nothing short of unbelievable.
As far as K.C. Jones and tradi-
tion go, they seem to go hand in
hand � due to the fact that Jones
is a former Celtic and was a part
of that winning tradition. But
Jones definitely deserves his
credit. He seems to get the BPP
(best possible performance) from
anyone he puts on the court. He
also makes whatever lineup is in
fit together like a perfect jigsaw
puzzle.
So it looks like this is another
year for the lucky Shamrocks of
the Boston Celtics. They proved
without a doubt that they are the
class of the NBA, at least for this
year anyway.



.

. . M( 11' M
V"

" Has playing
good I felt like
would take q
course record to
beat me, M
�Mike Bradi
V

Intramural
Activities
Offered
'


w ed
�;T'
d

Wha l gi a
� V


able

.
. �
75-6387 �


reg
-
Golf c i
�-
c. ountry (
�Trail Rid
available : . ps
ti real coui
;sis all the (u :
tion Cento;
These are jus! a few
main a
s summei Dro
.iassc- are
many hours are av .
formal free play .
( all Intra-Action 757-656:
facility h o u r s
Memorial Gym 204
formation.
Sports Fact
Wed. June 4,1974
The Cleveland Indians try to
entice fans to the ballpark with
a .10 cent beer night promo-
tion. In the ninth inning with
the score tied 5-5, imniry fans
come onto the playing fictd and
disrupt the game. Fights break
out between fans and players,
and when order cannot be
restored Cleveland forfeits to
Texas. Several players and um-
Pjreaare injured in uw melee
(Djptte rumors, Mr. Cooper
mnd Mr. McCormac had
F with the incident,
V not being able
to the festivities.)
Z�M)NAj
M
WANTED
ROC
WAN
-
TAX
1 Ot
NEE
!ALL
A Ok
reas

S&c Pi
. ba. �
FOR SALE
home 3 b
and taKe ud pa : ts S
FURNITURE FOR SALE
cesser and ti
conation Can -se S4.s
FOR SALE hm
air T-anresv A ��
reoa r K � we t �
women s 10 spee S





rnament
Intramural
nf
I HF I AS I f AHOl INIAN.
tfS Hours
IMH(, POOI S
GYM FREE PLA
Memorial
Mon 1 huts 11 am-7 pm
Fi ii am 6 pm
s.i 11 am pm
12 noon 5 pm
ECU Football Update
Next Week
�"�"�"ppwp"
i I KOIlMs
MMIK Kl t Kl i:�)
M(HI( KOI !
- U V I IO
PERSONALS
. j TO
SORO
enepqu conservation,
lLl�lj,)!HiliW.iHlfi.il.IU rUJ ,���;���,���� J
� �
STATE GAMES
Of HObtHCA ft&ttHA

PRICES EFFFCTIVF THROUGH SAT JUNF 7 AT SAv A ENTER N
WF RESERVE THf �� M ' . an'
XSSSSSR WUfg
and f�M J �0V
" iSee store
Double Coupons
for details'
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli, Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current Week Food
Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality.
f
Sports Fact
Wed. June 4, 1974
The Clevela
entice fans to the b.
a .10 cent beer night
tion. In the ninth inm
the score tied 5-5, unr fans
S come onto the playing field and
disrupt the game. Fights break
out between fans and players,
and when order cannot be
restored Cleveland forfeit
Texas. Several players and um-
pires are injured in the melee
(Despite rumors, Mr. Cooper
and Mr. McCormac had
nothing to do with the incident
but they regret not being able
to participate in the festivities )
WXNTkJD
-TED
� �
ED:
. ANTED FOR
OOMMATE S
SALL
&.
U.S.DA CHOICE SHOULDER
London Broil
U.S.D.A.
CHOICE
flfflU
lb.
900
MG
ii
� .� � -� .

-opes or roto
. . . ,
a-is offer a 15
ECU Si '
Computer Co
" S
F OR SAL E 1982 �

' ike up pame' I H76.9! Call
559
FURNITURE FOR SALE
i xm table Good
ill 758 5489 after 5
FOR SALE Heavy duty full Size
. sag and
� Jhl 26"
s 10 speed, S75 Call 758 1454
UFA' v BAH B
Beef Spare Ribs
Breast Quarters
E SEM B Nl
Leg of Lamb
Pork Sausage
E A I AMI, I PA' �
Fryer Leg Quarters
Round Roast
NA PRIDE MEAT OR BE! I
Sliced Bologna
I BONELE5
Round Steak
� HOK F BONELESS FUi
i B
lbs
ib
12 oz
pkq
-joo
-JOO
2oo
-JOO
-joo
2oo
-joo
2�
SAVE ON
Duke's Mayonnaise
32 oz.
i
UNIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL PURCHASE
AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
MARKET FRESH
FIELD RIPENED JUMBO
Ground Beef r Cantaloupes
(3 lbs. or more)
rm
GRADE A A&P
Medium Eggs
FKfcH
VMI
��(��
2100
doz. I
, , ' I WITH ADDITIONAL PURCHASE AT i . El
Budweiser $
&f2- 12 oz. Cans
Save 5K
Paper Towels
LIMIT TWO WITH AN ADDITIONAL PURCHASE
AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE.
high In
vitamin C
III
SWEET RED RIPE
rWatermelons
half
melon
159
.M -
Salad Tomatoes
s WHITE
Mushrooms
(REs- A RNIA
Broccoli
CUCUMBERS � PEPPERS � RADIS
Mix or Match
Ham
12 PM
Fried Chicken
H SLAW- MACARONI OR
Potato Salad
Al PINE
Swiss Cheese

IRGINIA
IPS
ib
-joo -J29 -JOO -JOO O00 600 200 400111
OPEN SUNDAY 7 A.M11 RM.
OPEN MON. 7 A.M.
CLOSE SAT. 11 PM
703 GREENVILLE BLVD. � OPEN 24 HOURS





r-
10
1 HI EASTC VROI INI N
H M 4. IY8f
Two Tennesee Gridders Declared Ineligible
'ZT jo anend games only as a regular �ould have given him priority ville and Gatl.nburg. from any association with The biggest problem that the
KNOXVH LE, Term. (UPI)-
rwo University of Tennessee
otball players were declared in-
jible and a public reprimand
v�.as recommended for coach
Johnny Majors for violations of
NCAA regulations, school of-
als said yesterday
i: internal committee in-
vestigating the Tennessee athletic
program also recommended the
school "eei all contact' with
boosters and return an
58,000 donation to one of those
supporters.
The interim report found
evidence ol "six probable viola-
�is but discovered no
evidence of any violations con-
cerning recruitment or cash given
to athletes. The violations hap-
pened in the areas ol "extra
benefits" to athletes and im-
use of admission passes to
football games.
wo playe - placekicker
Kevei and linebacker Kel-
ly 2 eglei were deemed ineligi-
foi violating regulations
g complementary game
ses.
Reveiz and Ziegler may
abie to piav during the !9S6
I he four-member univer-
panel recommended IT pcti-
the N( A to reinstate
ittee released the
:ument on its investigation,
'ed ui February after
aced
t
Scheurei h .haired I
ressed at a news
spon vva
"� ei � a gcd
B
I a "w
epi . .
� quarterb
use of a car
ooster Dr. Robert
t. of Know
� ee
.
�ied the car l
� "
� about the

d repon may have been given
'he 1982,
Ma n and
the arrange-
neurer said the coach
'ed it to Bob
A w as athletic
the time
"He Ma �k what he
� was prudent action
"He felt that he
ad taken care - I he particular
tter. We � exception to
and a he should

In 1
urer said I
plavers �ple who were
family members or students
�tend one game. Reveiz allow-
ed two people to attend the
Alabama game on the com-
plementary pass and Ziegler let
people use the pass for the
Vanderbilt contest, Scheurer
said.
rhe committee recommended
the plavers give up their passes to
the first three games of the 1986
season.
The committee suggested the
miversity disassociate Overholt
from the program, allowing him
CHECK OUT THE.
Classifieds
757-6366
Woodsy Owl says
No Noise Pollution Here!
Give a hoot.
Don't pollute.
o attend games only as a regular
ticket holder. The panel said
verholt also let Robinson live in
his house during the summer of
184, another "extra benef
violation.
The committee also suggested
Overholt's $8,000 donation that
would have given him priority
seating in the new basketball
arena be returned. Also recom-
mended disassociated from the
program was booster Trent
Richie, who has said he gave
players free or reduced rates for
rooms in his two motels in Knox-
ville and Gatlinburg.
The panel's eight recommenda-
tions will be in a final report to
UT President Ed Boling and
Chancellor Jack Reese.
Currently, the NCAA, or more
specifically the CFA is trying to
eliminate university booster clubs
from any association with
recruiting. With the past viola-
tions charged to such schools as
Texas Christian University and
Florida, both coaches (Jim
Wacker and Galen Hall, respec-
tively) feel that something needs
to be done
The biggest problem that 'he
NCAA is trying to iron-out is the
enforcement of such new regula
tions. The NCAA's investiga'
staff is already greatly over �
ed, and unable to handle the vast
amounts of alleged violation:
intercollegiate athletes
Fresh Daily
FOOD LION
GROUND
BEEF
5 Lb. Pack
Or More

Prices in
this ad
good thru
Sunday.
June 8.
1986.
iX
:
yf.
X
Grade A
Holly Farms
V
Family
Pack
y.
uV-�
Large
CUBE
STEAK
$158
I Lb.
USDA Choice Family Pack
Each
BONELESS
CHUCK ROAST
Lb.
USDA Choice Bee!
HANGING
BASKETS
$499
"� Each
Beautiful 10"
APPLE JUICE
64 0z.
Carolina Gold
WATERMELONS
Sweet Ripe
YELLOW CORN
Ears
'?-
Sweet
20-21
Lbs.
.
$429
1.5 Liter - Lambrusco. Bianco. Rosato
$269
Pkg. of 6 - 12 Oi. Cans Reg. & Lt.
$115
2 Liter � Diet Pepsi. Pepsi-Free,
Diet Pepsi-Free
Old
Milwaukee
$419
Pkg. of 12 12 Oz. Cans
FROZEN DINNERS RINSO DETERGENT BOUNTY TOWELS
2 Lb. - Freezer Queen
Large
W (,KA &
bSMlSBt K
EXTRA LOW
100 Off
hi:





Title
The East Carolinian, June 4, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 04, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.477
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy