The East Carolinian, May 28, 1986






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darolitttart
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No.0 Jf Wednesday, May 28, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 5 ,000
ECU Drops Monitor
Research, Preservation
Afternoon Delight
JIM I Mil.INS IW h�,i( .roll
Sitting on the porch with a glass of iced tea and company of the opposite sex is a southern tradition
here in North Carolina. Kiplanlemmons and Lisa Peterson recreated this tradition by sitting on the
porch outside Cotten Hall Tuesda to enjo the Heather.
Enrollment Rises
Students Gain Edge
By JILL MORGAN
Staff Writer
The ECU Maritime History
and underwater research pro-
gram will phase out their involve-
ment in the research and preser-
vation work associated with the
USS Monitor this summer due to
insufficient staff and facilities.
ECU has worked with the Na-
tional Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration to co-ordinate
studies at the wreck site of the
USS Monitor. The site is located
about 16 miles south east of Cape
Hatteras.
In 1983 ECU was involved in
an expedition to the site which
recovered the anchor of the civil
war vessel. The anchor is the
largest artifact to have been
recovered from the site.
Until the beginning of this
month the anchor had been at
East Carolina undergoing preser-
vation. According to Gordon P.
Watts Jr an assistant professor
in the ECU maritime historv and
underwater preservation pro-
gram, the preservation of the an-
chor was virtually complete ex-
cept for some final touch up
work when the anchor was mov-
ed to the University of South
Carolina at Columbia. The
preservation process will be com-
pleted there. Watts said it was
more practical and economical to
send the anchor to USC.
The decision by ECU to phase
out their Monitor related ac-
tivities was based primarily on
the need to focus on other
research projects and teaching
duties in the Maritime History
and underwater research pro-
gram.
William N. Still Jr co-
director of the ECU program
pointed out that ECU did not
have the staff or facilities needed
for further Monitor work. Still
was also quoted in the Sews and
Observer saying, "1 will be the
first to say that losing the
Monitor is going to hurt us. It has
brought lots of credibility and
visibility
When ECU pha
Monitor related activities, no
other state agencies or institu-
tions will be directly involved
with the project.
David Brooks, head of the
State Department of Cultural
Resources' Archaeology and
historic preservation section, said
his office had completed their
NOAA sponsored research pro-
jects and reports last summer
Now it will be up to the '
government to determine
should be done
site and with articles
it.
Despite the
ECI - Wa
continue
technical c
with Monitor Research.
The aforen
scheduled
Greenville in late i i
displayed f �� iev t
it is to be sent to &
the NOAA.
B RUST HARRINGTON
siaff Writer
This summer there will be
4,888 students attending the first
summer session of summer
school � almost 350 more than
last year's .otal of 4,547.
There are many reasons wh)
they are taking advantage of the
opportunities offered by the
University's summer program,
from boosting their GPA to "ad-
vancing" themselves, and even to
escape a "five year plan" as one
student put it.
Whatever reasons students
have for attending summer
school, they are the ones that
have the most to show tor it.
ccording to c . G Moore,
Vice-Chancellor for Business Af-
fairs, the summer school pro-
gram allow v for summer employ-
ment for the faculty. The tax-
payers, he added, can get some
use out of the facilities they
finance through 54-percent of
their tax dollars, sai 1 Moore.
It is estimated summer school
will cost 1.6 million dollars in
1986. with an estimated $900,000
coming from tuition reciepts and
the remaining sum from alloca-
tion of State tax revenues. Moore
stated the funding is brought
through the State treasury, where
a budget is proposed for the
operations of the University
system. The schools then are
allocated the funds on a three-
month basis.
Moore said in the case of the
summer program it, "operates as
an auxiliary enterprise � what it
takes in is what it spends on the
allocation He also added the
funding spent on education by
the State is the combined total of
revenues generated by Income,
Sales, and Use taxes.
Remedial Courses Offered
Summer Instructors Chosen By
Priority System, Course Demand
B BETH WHICKER
Assislant News Fdiior
Students who are returning to
school this summer may find the
same instructors in their depart-
ments as were there last summer,
due to the priority system that
most ECU departments use to
determine summer school in-
structors.
According to Trenton Davis,
associate vice chancellor for
Academic Support and coor-
dinator of Summer School, the
specific department determines
what instructors will teach the
courses offered. Previous sum-
mer demand determines the
courses offered by each depart-
ment.
"Only courses in demand are
taught although we have to offer
enough courses to give a student
a good selection said Davis.
"It's all a matter of demand.
As a university we have to be self
supporting he added.
Davis explained very few
graduate students are able to
teach during summer school due
to the priority system.
"Ninety-five percent or more
instructors teaching in summer
school have a nine month con-
tract. The other five percent
teaching have just signed a con-
tract that does not start until the
fall explained Davis.
There is a total of 277 mstuc-
tors who will be teaching the
summer sessions.
Davis said ECU is the only in-
stitution in the UNC system that
determines summer pay by
percentages of the base salary-
plus receipts.
"Last year the average summer
school instruuetor made $4,200
per session he said.
"Compared to other schools in
the UNC system ECU pays better
than most said Davis.
According to Davis, over 90
percent of the budget, which con-
sists of student fees and a smail
state allocation, goes to instruc-
tor's salaries.
For the upcoming second ses-
sion, Davis said the types of
couses offered will change,
because of the diffrenttypes of
students expected to enroll.
Business and Education classes
are predominate because many-
teachers and businesspeople have
the time to attend classes.
"Still the bottom line is to of-
fer the courses needed by the
students said Davis.
RALEIGH, N.C. (UPI) � One-
fourth of the freshmen enrolled
in the University of North
Carolina system last fall took a
remedial math or English course,
which officials say shows flaws in
public education and the system
itself.
They say the numbers also
reveal major differences in the
way remedial programs are ad-
ministered within the 16-campus
system and the universities' at-
tempts to recruit more minorities
by accepting students with low
Scholastic Aptitude Tests and
then providing them with
remedial courses.
"We have an obligation to ex-
tend the university to those who
would benefit said CD.
Spangler Jr UNC system presi-
dent and former state Board of
Education chairman. "Just
because they haven't got the
basics (in high school) doesn't
mean they couldn't by good
university students
Spangler predicts that the
system, which now must "direct
abnormal amounts of attention
to remedial instruction will
show improvements in four years
because "we are going to see a
much better student coming from
the public schools
Spangler bases his optimism on
new requirements in public
schools and tougher college ad-
mission standards, but other
educators say the state must I
more drastic action to stop what
they call a steady erosion of the
value of a college degree.
study
Regional Education B
North Car
follow the
Southeastern states
working to produce studei
See MORE Pagt 2.
Residents Link To
Raise Needed Money
(UPI) � North Carolinians join-
ed hands Sunday and formed
spiritual links with the nation-
wide Hands Across America
chain to raise money for the
hungry and the homeless.
A chain of more than 2,500
people � in some places two peo- than a mile,
pie deep � snaked around the
State Capitol in Raleigh and spill-
ed onto nearby sidewalks. People
of all ages joined hands under
overcast skies on the tree-shaded
Capitol grounds, singing "We
are the World" and "America
the Beautiful
About 2,000 people lined an
11-mile stretch in Charlotte.
More than 100 people joined
?
hands around the Cap
lighthouse and even mor
the beaches of the Banks.
Organizers oi Hand- A
Elizabeth City esti $3,50
was raised at a water;1
festival, which stretched m
The North Carolina
coincided with the su
4, 1 5 2-mile Hand- c
America chain stretching
New York to Call tor ma. whi
organizers hoped to produce ! 0
million. Money raised in North
Carolina was earmarked for I
tood banks and community
shelters.
See HANDS Page 2.
World Leaders Confer To End Crisis
Wall To Become Border
BERLIN (UPI) - The three
Western Allies occupying Berlin
fear East Germany is seeking to
make an international border out
of the Berlin Wall that divides the
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifiedsio
Editorials4
Features$,
Sportsg
� Scott and Rick analyze the
NBA player draft. See page 8.
The youth of America is its
oldest tradition. It has been
going on now for tree hundred
years.
� Oscar Wilde
city into Western and communist
halves, an allied spokesman said
today.
But West Berlin based Allied
officials could not confirm news
reports citing other Western
allied sources in East Berlin that
the allies might be provoked into
severing relations with East Ger-
many over the latest Berlin
dispute.
In Washington, a senior State
Department official said the
United States is making "inten-
sive efforts" to see whether East
Germany has added border con-
trols in Berlin that would con-
stitute an internatinal frontier.
The official in Washington
said American diplomats are
crossing in and out of the western
See WESTERN Page 5.
(UPI) � Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev conferred with
Libya's second in command in
Moscow today and Syrian Presi-
dent Assad visited Greece's prime
minister in apparent stepped up
efforts to resolve the crisis of
American, French and British
hostages held in Lebanon.
In Beirut, the war of nerves
over the fate of 21 hostages
heightened when an anonymous
caller claiming to speak for the
Islamic Jihad organization said
the group will execute all its cap-
tives. Political sources said they
doubted the authenticity of the
telephone threat to Christian
Voice of Lebanon radio station in
East Beirut.
The sources in Beirut said
Islamic Jihad usually com-
municates by typewritten
statements with accompanying
photographs. The sources also
said a telephone call Monday
purported by the pro Iranian
Jihad said the group would
release two of its French hostage
and none were released.
A total of 21 foreigners, in-
cluding five American s and nine
Frenchmen, have been abducted
in Lebanon. In addition to the
Frenchmen and American, two
Britons, an Irishman, and Italian
and a South Korean are missing
in Lebanon.
The Islamic Jihad pro Iranian
Shiite Moslem extremists claim-
ed it was kidnapped eight of the
Frenchmen and killed one of
them, and has taken responsibili-
ty for kidnapping the five
Americans.
In Athens, Syrian President
Gorbachev
Harez Assad met Tuesday for
four hours with Prime Minister
Andreas Papandroeu for talks in
which he dencounced terrorism
but distinguished it from
"resistance against colonialism
"It was a very interesting
analysis, We discussed all the
problems of the Eastern Mediter-
ranean Papandreou said after
the talks on the second day of
Assad's three day visit.
Syria is influential with
Lebanon's Moslem militias, and
a high ranking French envoy has
been in Damascus since Saturday
for talks regarding the hostages.
Diplomatic sources said the
earliest any development in the
hostage case could be expected is
Thursday, the day after Assad's
scheduled return from Greece.
Other sources said the process
could take another week or two
weeks, if not longer.
Talks were proceeding also in
Damascus between Omran
Adhan, a Syrian born Paris
businessman who some news
reports said received telephone
calls form Mitterrand's Elysee
palace after arriving in Syria.
The French Embassy imposed
a news blackout on the activities
of the envoys, most of whom ar-
rived in Damascus Saturday.
In Moscow, Soviet leader
Minhail Gorbachev conferred
with Abdel Salm Jalloud, the se-
cond most powerful member of
the Libyan government, shortly
before the secheduled arrival of
the vice president of Syria , Abdel
Halim Khaddam.
The official Tass news agency
said Abdel Salair Jalloud, who
had already held talks with Prime
Minister Nikolai Ryzhkov, be.
talks in the Kremlin with Gor-
bachev.
The Meeting continued the
high-level access given the visiting
Libyan since his Monday arrival,
underlining the importance at-
tached to the talks bj Moscow
Western diplomatic specula-
tion on the purpose oi the sur-
prise visits centered on efforts to
coordinate policy in the fact of
the U.S. threat to retaliate for
terrorist attacks.
In Beirut, the anonymous
telephone caller told the Chi
tian Voice of Lebanon radio sta-
tion: "We will execute all the
Americans, four French and a
British hostage today and we will
dump their bodies somwhere in
(Moslem) West Beirut
An official at the Christian east
Beirut based radio station said he
could not authenticate the call.
Islamic Jihad, which began ab-
ducting Westerners in Moslem
West Beirut in March 1984, has
demanded changes in U.S. and
French policy in the Middle East
and the release of 17 people jailed
for a series of bombings of
Western targets in Kuhait on
Dec. 12, 1983.
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JHE EAST CAROLINIAN
MA1! 28, 186
Announcements
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
I' t� . fid fcnnu�l f as' � are Sdk a Olyrr
� SotttM Maratt � vci'Eia-s
�ar� n G-ee-v r � Saturday & Snaa,
� & .v: '��� v � s wofif s ana coea
am� trcr Easv Norm Carolina or
etl g n &reev ;e Do pa� ca tor t"
� . 'aM'iDON roungsters mc aouits in
ssV' - C 'as' f-a-e "as 'eaevi jp a ft
�r e Rp'pfl' o" ac Park
taper t merit lo put on t I � ec sc�'ca
event wi ' �� �s( fund 'c sodpch" � �
spec a � 'i CS scc's onyj'a'i Tere
�� be is - - r. � � rr �� jcre
� :e � a t si � s
rtiu ugi eat hanca tor a rou igmm
students s - - � es �� a's
�eoc MM rj � ge' a grea' MfltMl a
'f' I you 0� � 'ea a'e e'es'ec
' P'a - S tottba ntravega ta
-veasr i ee - e Recreation and Partis
It -5: �137 � �t � tor more rM
v. ' - -e' - � . i - - . a. ' v
. -
SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE
NURSING
iTEN OSNiRSiN&VAjODS Bever
� Enterprisaa announces � met t set
s" os tot Fa I9M ' � �� scftoiarsriips
Pr ���'JM te nurs.ng n-a.ors '
oeots"a'e academi � fvpn ana a-
n'ees n turSvj'ng ge"ontotOG a rs .
I'SOfpO r'Ufirrw-s FOT furl
formation ser V Va� a' OH ce 24? Scnooi ol
. � Farranca ottica tM ScH�
Nurs
BIBLETALK
s
EATING DISORDERS
xe Eang D.soroers Support Group for
women tn bul'm.a anoreaa Tervosa or
' are�.a �in continue tn,s summer Ses
s ons Mln oe heia on May 2' June 10 ana
� .4 tr0m 4 5 p -T- ,� room 120 8t the Stu
der" Mea'tn Server
EASTGALLERY
Nev. Water. �SD, A �. ngu Ar
s s 'Kep' on Sunaa, vta, i8 �. , -
�- i !��
�h.t,t�� uaec �,
sponsored b, me Green e Museum � Art
isi ,a er, M A( tor BxevaP0
- � - NC 8J4 0 . -M WJ7
Vore �7VC System Freshman
Require Remedial Courses
Continued From Page I.
mee! higher standards set b
' 'ieir colleges.
In an article in The News
�bserer of Raleigh Sunday, the
ewspaper released findings ol its
' ugh the UNC systen
mong " e findings ere thai
wed ' devc- p -v a
� al pn gra resu e in a
dge ' i irses, sta
irds and rep ning metl ds thai
� e statewide com pai - n ind
were ep
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the test,
s V
In iQfi
Li ' e ' can puses
ed have be ov,
. i p
I k owesi
lasi fall 902 Ihe ac-
f fres v -
ei ��, i a
� 2t
nculum.
rwo years ago, when Spangler
vas Education Board chairman
lamented that high schools
were sending too many graduates
l 'liege without preparing them
ege work.
'We s h ou Id not keen
Hands Stretch
Across State
Continued From Page 1.
"It's too early to say how
much money wee raised said
Greg Kirkpatrick, organizer of
Hands Across the Capital and
director of the Food Bank of
North Carolina.
Kirkpatrick estimated 2,500
people attended the Raleigh func-
tion and predicted participants
would leave the event with a new
sense of responsibility toward
others. Kirkpatrick urged them to
gel involved in community ef-
forts to aid the needy.
'I think an event like this can
change people's lives because it
-Tens them up to others
Kirkpatrick said. "We're not just
being hip by being here. We're
here to express our abiding con-
cern tor Americans and
Carolinians who are hungry and
homeless
Live music and balloons
drifted through the tree-and-
ue-lined Capitol grounds.
Several participants said the
ed the eei � j enhance
social awareness
What's New
Posters and Poster Frames � Tee
Shirts � Cards � Prisms � Hand-
Crafted Jewelry � And Much
More to Surprise and Delight You
Gai?da!fs
"The Best Lo � � Place In Town'
756-7235
Open 10 to 10
Mon-Sat
ai ses al

imposs b
' pro-
tuai � e si id ' s w � � ave to
remed i n in col-
Spangler -aid at a January
;4 board meeting.
"It's �� the responsibility ol
. versit ss;
bac k

Resea
� e a
f $70 a si
tii le "
& I
e.x-

Give a hoot.
Don't pollute.
s
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arah lavlor
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Sophomort. t
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"I
Henard Manlev
Senior, Industrial Tec �
"Whitney H
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Angela Centanm
Senior, Interior Design
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 28, 1986
vV
dalfs
Sew
Frames � Tee
� Prism � Hand-
And Much
nd Delight You
dalf sr
Campus Voice
Who is your all-time favorite rock singer or group?
Open 10 to 10
Mon-Sat
N.C. Study Shows Racism Across U.S.
Sarah Tavlor
Junior, English
"The Stones, They got a better
heat. I don't like the newer
stuff
Chris Buck
Sophomore, L ndecided
"I like them all. Each one is
different and thev all add to
life
17
5
8
ilete7
?rvice 1PTK6 7 6
le( NC 27834
Bridgette Thompson
Sophomore, Elementary
Education
"1 have a lot of favorite
groups, not just a particular
one
Michael Purvis
Senior, industrial Technology
"Luther Van Dros. Because I
like mellow music, and 1 think
Luther is the number one mellow
artist
�'



Reward Manley
Senior, Industrial Technology
"Whitney Houston. She has a
real good voice, and I like her
body. Her music isn't too fast
nor too slow
Angela C entanni
Senior, Interior Design
"Bruce Springsteen. I really
don't know � his music is good,
and everyone can enjoy it
(UPI) � More blacks arrested
for serious crimes are sent to
prison than whites similarly
charged � and race appears
more a factor in such cases in
northern courtrooms than those
of southern states, a university
researcher says.
A recent study showed all 39
states with blacks making up at
least 3 percent of the state sent a
higher percentage of the minority
population than whites to prison.
"There has been a tendency to
locate racism in the south and ig-
nore it in others, but this implies
there is racism in the court
systems of all states Darnell
Hawkins, an associate professor
of sociology at North Carolina
and co-author of the study, said
Monday.
For example, blacks in New
Jersey and Michigan are arrested
for 37 percent of the major
crimes. But, in both states, blacks
make up more than two-thirds of
the prison populations. In North
Carolina, blacks are arrested for
50 percent of the major crimes
and make up 55 percent of the
prison population � a closer cor-
relation between crimes and
sentencing.
The study examined only the
imprisonment after arrest for a
major felony, ignoring misde-
meanor and traffic offenses.
Hawkins used an elaborate for-
mula to calculate what he called
the level of imprisonment unex-
plained by the arrest numbers.
States with the highest percen-
tages of disproportionate senten-
cing, according to Hawkins,
were: New Mexico, 78 percent;
New Jersev, 74; Arizona and
Washington with 60 percent; and
Michigan, 62 percent.
States with the lowest percen-
tages of excessive black imprison-
ment, according to Hawkins,
were: Missouri and Indiana, each
with 4 percent; Mississippi, 10
percent; Tennessee, 12 percent;
and North Carolina, 19 percent.
Next in line were Georgia, West
Virginia and Alabama.
"The difference in the
numbers appears to be the treat-
ment of whites, not blacks
Hawkins said.
Hawkins noted some states
might send 2,000 out of every
100,000 blacks to prisons, but on-
ly 60 whites per 100,000. A
typical southern state might im-
prison 2,000 blacks but also 300
whites per 100,000.
The difference in states' im-
prisonment rates could be due to
several interweaving factors that
include economics and religious
histories, Hawkins said. He sug-
gested southern states were more
willing to send whites as well as
blacks to prison for crimes
against property, while other
states did not incarcerate many
whites for such crimes.
"You used to hear people say
that blacks in one state were more
likely to commit certain crimes
than blacks in other states, i find
that basically racist said
Hawkins. "I don't believe tracks
in one state are more likely to
commit a crime than othei
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Putters 15 Off
Men's Reebok T-Shoes 25 Off
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Plus - Thursday is
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r � r





31j� �aBt (Earoliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Mlki 1 I )VV K. s
Scon Cooper. s
Jons Shnnon,
1)1 CM MI I li HNSON,
TOM 1 l VENDER, Cm � �����
DANIEl Mai ri r. ��
Steve Foi mar, dw � ��,
Anthony Martin, hm,�,� Hb
Ml 3 NEEDHAM, . vta n Mntr
i . � . Shannon Short, ����,�,� �,��,
Mav 28. 1986
Opinion
Page 4
Teaching
How Should Teachers Be Taught?
What's one of the biggest pro-
blems with the American education
system today? Teachers � more
specifically, teacher education.
The debate over teacher educa-
tion has been raging for sometime
and there is no doubt it will con-
tinue to do so far into the future.
Some, like American Educational
Research Association President
David Berliner, believe the key to
producing good teachers is educa-
tion courses.
1 he opposing camp, of which
Education Policy Studies Director
Denis Doyle is a member, feels too
much emphasis has been placed on
education courses and not enough
on subject matter.
rhese two professionals met last
rhursda) to debate their positions
at UN( Chapel Hill. But what
can one sa about such a debate
when both sides are in the right?
I et's look at both positions brief-
ly. During the debate. Berliner said.
"in general, knowing one's subject
matter does nol neccessarily make
one a good teacher
How true Man is the time we've
i across a brilliant professor or
a knowledgeable high school
teachei onlj to discover they lack
the tea skills to communicate
then knowledge.
Doyle, however, claims, "you
can't teach what you don't know
1 his brings back memories o the
coach teachers man of us en-
countered in high school. For those
ol you fortunate enough not to
e me: them, these are men for
whom teachii quiremeni for
coaching. Thev an n assigned
not v
unlike
Out
either
ilth or histor) classes, classes
the subject matter taught is
al tor college admissions,
Math or English,
point is this; too much ol
one ol these schools ol
thought can produce an unprepared
teachei and prove detrimental to
students' education. So why not
akc the best ol both worlds'?
Time magazine reported on the
release ol a stud) done by the
Carnegie orum on Education and
1 conom) concerning the upgrading
ol teachei training and salaries. In-
cluded in the suggestions made by
the stud) was a proposal to
eliminate undergraduate education
degrees. Instead, students would be
required to complete Bac-
calaureates in arts and sciences
followed by a proposed Master's in
Teaching.
This would assure a fine balance
between education courses and
courses in the student teacher's
field of concentration.
Also proposed in the study was
the establishment of a board to set
nation-wide teaching standards for
teacher certification. At present,
certification is awarded by in-
dividual states according to varying
criteria. This places teachers in an
akward position as certification in
one state may not be recognized in
another until certain additional
training is complete.
lor instance. North Carolina's
Teacher Certification is readily ac-
cepted in onl) 26 states. An educa-
tion student seeking work in one of
the remaining 24 states may be re-
quired to complete additional re-
quirements set forth by that state.
Finally, The study proposes that
teachers who display progressive
levels o' skill be rewarded with an
average sal an of $35,500. Increas-
ing teachers' salaries is one o the
biggest steps we could take in im-
proving oui education system. As
the National Education Association
has stated time and again, the quali-
ty of education is linked to the level
of teachers' salaries.
The teaching profession has lost
many prospective educators to
private industry (especially in the
Math and Science fields) due to in-
adequate salaries. Few people are
w tiling to commit their lives to a job
worth, according to marketing
perceptions, S25.25" a year.
Do these proposals sound
idealistic'7 Do they present more an
educational Utopia than practical
steps to improve education in this
country? If so. then it may well be
to our advantage. Keep in mind,
one must know where he's going
before he sets out on his journey,
and believe us, the American educa-
tion system has quite a trek ahead
of it.
If we only make it half the
distance to this goal, then it is still a
long way from where we stand now.
And at present, from where we're
standing, the view is not very good.
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Pretoria Just Fighting Terrorism
"U.S. Reacts With Outrage Files
Formal Protest" was the headline in
Los Angeles last Tuesday, the lead story
describing the raids by South Africa on
three neighboring capitals. Spokesmen
for the American administration had a
mosi difficult lime making their points
exactly, and some of the most difficult
questions weren't even asked.
The first question, of course, is
whether the government ot South
Africa is expected to tolerate terrorist
activity.
On The Right
By WILLIAM F.BLCKLFA JR.
A bad season to ask that question,
here in the United States, but ot course
the State Department took the offen-
sive. There is absolutely no compai
to be drawn, its spokesman said, bet-
ween what we did to Libya and what
South Africa did to Zimbabwe. Zambia
and Botswana. The difference is ob-
vious: I ibya is the headquarters of the
international terrorism directed by
Moarnmar Khadafy, whereas the
African slates attacked by Pretoria are
peace-loving neighboring countries.
The trouble with that dismissal is that
it presupposes thai South Africa was
launching an attack against three peace-
loving neighbors. But it wasn't doing
that. It was attacking � or trying to a:
tack � terrorist depots that had taken
sanctuary in those countries.
When, a few months ago. Israel at-
tacked Tunisia, it was not attacking a
moderate and relatively friendly North
African state. It was attacking tenons;
concentrations couched in that country.
The difference is not hard to perceive.
Well, was there prima facie justifica-
tion for suspecting terrorist activity
m here the targets lay'1
I he director of the University ot
Pretoria's Institute of Strategic Studies,
Mike Hough, is . so tar as we know, a
scholai a professional apologist.
He has reported that the number of ter-
rorist incidents m South Africa increas-
ed to 136 in 1985 from 44 in 19H4, and
that so fai in 196 there have been "0
such incidents.
But how on earth do South African
revolutionaries get hold ot the relatively
sophistuaTed weapons needed to carry
on tenons- attacks ?
I he weapons used bv the terrorists
have st every case been of Soviet
manufacture.
"Il is obvious that RusMan mines and
weapons can be brought into South
Afric nc route only, through our
neighboring states the Defense Force
ol Pretoria was quoted. "These states
have repeatedly been requested not I
provide ass.stance to terrorists. Urgent
appeals have been made to them to
cooperate in this regard
s where are we
When I sered (briefly) in the United
Nations, one ot my assignments was to
seek to wrest from the Third Committee
of the General Assembiv a comprehen-
sive statement condemning terrorism. I
gave a couple o uplifting speeches on
the subject, and everyone would
solemnly nod his head in agreement
that terrorism was to be condemned.
But o course, anyone who blew up an
Uraeli athlete, as in Munich was not a
terrorist, he was a freedom tighter. Ana
anyone who blew up a Portuguese
soldiei in Mozambique or Angola was
run a terrorist � he too was a freedom
fighter. And. a fortiori, anyone who
knocks off a white South, African is a
freedom tighter
I here is a sense il
rather becomes, true Hi
polemic of the victors, ir is � �
repeated. Nobody thinks I V
Begin as a terrorist, huT the Br
certainly did in the immediate :
years, when he was head ol i
What the government I v
is telling the world is quitt
that although the
� government, '
going to let terrorists
replacement. Meanwl
Department, in il
significant polemical problen
I mean, did the episi �� �
have to burden tl
Robert Mugabe Zin I
prime minster, h
multiracialism in S �utl I - .
engaged in removing the
chise in his own country. H
as having spoken, "his
with emotion to deplore the
caused by the South, V
count? Two dead. 10 injur
what did Mugabe vome out
said that the time had come I i
babwe to give "more repeat "n
support to "the African Nationa
gress and other liberation mov
fighting m South Africa
How would you feel, if
State Department, and you hast
finished saving that the peace
neighbors in South Africa were n.
porting the terrorists' Robert M .
was an accomplished terrorist
fight to control Rhodesia, and he
and now he is a statesman. I .
American public needs to recognize
to condone the struggle against tei
rorists by Pretoria is not the equivalent
of condoning apartheid.
Network Interview Aids Terrorist Leader


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In J, Bowyer Bell's book The Secret Army: The IRA,
1916-1974 there is an extraordinary sequence o photos (not
taken by Bell) titled "Bomb attack on Shipquay Street in
Derry, 21 March 1972 The first picture shows three men
leaning into the trunk of a car, "loading the bomb for
delivery The second shows a quiet Shipquay Street
"moments before the explosion The third is a picture of the
same street, taken from the same angle, with the bomb ex-
ploding, people running for cover. The fourth and las: picture
is a close-up of "the damage done There are no dead bodies
in sight, but even if not one was killed, that could hardly have
been known before the bomb went off.
Was it naive of me, when I first came upon these photos, to
feel that something was very wrong? Do I misunderstand the
photographer's trade? What did this man think he was doing?
Why didn't he call the police � or, at least, warn the people in
the street?
Overwhelmed with questions, I watched for reviews of the
Bell book, but so far as I know no one said anything about this
strange performance. To me it seems clear that the
photogrpaher was a terrorist accomplice. I'm not sure what to
say about the silent reviewers.
All these questions came back to me when I watched the in-
terview with Abu Abbas on NBC television. Here was a man
wanted for murder calmly facing the camera and promising t
commit more murders. That much was well worth seeing, o
the general principle: know your enemy. But it is also impoi
tant, as any military strategist will understand, to knoM m
your enemy is. This knowledge NBC chose to conceal. I: .
concealment was part of its bargain with Abu Abbas
granted the interview on condition that NBC sas no
�about where it took place, nothing about Abu Ab deout
or about the government that provides it. Slav be I S
telligence already has this information. If not, its a
should begin to follow NBC reporters
Still, the concealment was an act of complicity, dnl it v
Abbas keeps his promises, it will have to be said that NBc
helped him do so. Does anyone think this is courageous
nalism? Once the deal was struck, surely no American ii
Middle East was safer than NBC's correspondent. Abt.
bas, after all, was getting exactly what he wanted, and had no
reason to be angry. The rest of us, however, who are not ter-
rorists have reason enough.
Campus Forum-
Professor Acknowledges 1986 Initiates
On April 30 42 students were in-
itiated into Beta Gamma Sigma the
Business Administration honorary
society. To the best of my knowledge,
Beta Gamma Sigma is the largest,
oldest, and most restrictive honorary
society on campus. Only about 20
percent of the Business Administra-
tion programs in the United States are
eligible for Beta Gamma Sigma
Chapters. Only students majoring in
Business Administration are eligible
and then only after they have attained
junior status and completed 30 credits
at ECU. Only 5 percent of the juniors
and 10 percent of the seniors are eligi-
ble for induction. Since less than 50
percent of the students who declare
business as a major ever enter the
school of Business, the selection is
made from a select group of students.
I feel strongly that these outstan-
ding students deserve public recogni-
tion. The participation of Chancellor
Howell, Vice Chancellor Volpe, Dean
Uhr, and James Bearden (Assistant to
Chancellor Howell and National
President of Beta Gamma Sigma) in
the induction ceremonies attests to
the recognition of these students by
the University.
On April 17, 13 days before the in-
duction, I asked The East Carolinian
to recognize these fine students along
with the 1986 honorary initiate.
Dispite the letter and three phone
calls 1 do not believe these deserving
students were ever recognized in The
East Carolinian. 1 would like to take
this opportunity to acknowledge the
outstanding academic efforts of the
1986 initiates.
Dr.Robert Schellenberger
Decision Sciences
Campus
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view, 1ail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the en-
trance Oj Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted. Students,
faculty and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they are limited
to one every five issues.
Western
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Terrorism
Western Allies Seek Border
(Ontinued From Page 1.
rtion ol the divided citj to
determine what controls have
been added by the communists
authorities. "The fact is. the
on is unclear at this point.
said the official, who requested
anonymity.
The delicate status of the city is
governed by a 1971 four-power
pact between the United States,
France, and Britian, who control
the western secotors, and the
W hat new with toxic shock
syndrome?
It has been six years since toxic
ck syndrome (TSS) made the
eadlines when Rely tampons
amoved from store shelves
s e o t their
The Health C olumn H
Mar Flesha Adams
link with TSS Foxic
ck svndrome is a serious
� is is. oiproblem that is
Hist rj ia thezed b the follow me
tirelessljims:
� Menacl� idden tc ei
most� omiting and disease
tie postwar�dizziness when standing up
' Irgun.� ti resembles sunburn
V�severe muscle aches
�� a)
lesp -��. ated eyes
Five percent ol the population
isk ol developing 1
S"ase has struck men.
ess,nen;
� - have been
M
eaprtm�Seven out ol ten cases ol 1 ss
babwe'sing women who
�on users and I ss has
Africa,been rep rted af let
fran-erv and in a few
e diaphi
t)1 e symp-
e carnagef TSS i pea; on the
The' u da period.
i henprevent
Herss

� re '
�alternate tampons with
sanitary pads during periods
�use the least absorbent tam-
pons that will control menstrual
flow
�do not wear tampons longei
than 6-8 hours without changing
them
�do not use the contraceptive
sponge during your period
�be aware ol the warnig signs
ol 1SS. Do not delav seeking
medical attention if you develop
symptoms of 1 Ss
soviet Union. The Western na-
tions still consider all of Berlin an
occupied city even though the
Soviet Union ended its occupa-
tion in its sector, now East
Berlin, and transferred authority
to last Germany.
The trouble began last Thurs-
day when the Fast German
Foreign Ministry informed
Foreign missions in East Berlin
that starting Monday diplomats
would need to show their
passports to cross between East
and West Berlin.
In the past, foreign diplomats
accredited in Fast Berlin could
move freely through the Berlin
Wall checkpoints with their small
red diplomatic passes issued by
the Fast German Foreign
Ministry.
On Monday, communist
guards still permitted diplomats
from the three Western occupa-
tion powers, the United States.
Britian and France, to proceed
with only their red pass. But
diplomats from other countries,
including West Germany, Italy
and Denmark, were turned back
when they tried to cross without
passports.
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rHt hASI CAROLINIAN
MAY 28,
IV86
rt.i. m �&
May 21
12:02 a.m.
Greenville resident was banned
from campus after being observ-
ed acting in a suspicious manner
near the Wright Building.
May 22
1:50 a.m.
A ECU student was arrested
for DWI.
May 23
2:30 a.m.
A Washington, N.C. resident
was banned from the west end of
campus.
4:40 a.m.
A officer reported discovering
the door glass to east entrance of
Clement dorm smashed by
unknown persons.
May 24
12:15 p.m.
A Greenville resident reported
the larceny of a bicycle from
South of Brewster Building.
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were
n his
on,
11 e
e thai
rrorist Leader
and
por-
� � here The he
1 S. in-
agents
' Abu : BC
;
n the Abu Ab-id had no
� ter-
986 Initiates
Campus
Forum Rules
� tiers
' � � - Mail or
in the Publica-
Bu from the en-
r purposi � nation, all let-
the name, major and
fication, address, phone number
ignature of the author(s). Letters
e limned to two typewritten pages,
e-spaced or neatly printed. All
tters are subject to editing for brevi-
. obscenity and libel, and no personal
tacks will be permitted. Students,
cutty and staff writing letters for this
ire reminded that they are limited
one every five issues.
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Western Allies Seek Border
n
i ontinued From I'a I
� i ficial, who requ
anonvmit
iei I nion I he v estei n na
us still considei all ol Bi'tlm an
i
rhedelicat� ity is occupied cit even though the
verned b a 1971 torn power Soviet I nion ended its occupa
vestei
I inited Stai
itrol
tors, ai1 the
f W vs 11
vlto, k
Mai i lesha Kdains
in its sectoi. now East
Bi rlin, and transfei red authoi it
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ible began last 1 hut s
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May 22
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I HI ASI (. AROI INIAN
Lifestyles
MAY 28. 1YH6
Page 6
Head For The Gorge
Linville Falls
One of the state's more scenic locations. I.insille Falls attracts
sightseers and soul-searchers alike with its combination of beaut.
grandeur and accessibility.
BvJAY STONF.
Something awful, loathesome
and downright odious descends
on a college student at the close
of a semester and the end of final
exams. Call it burn out, depres-
sion or any number of other ad-
jectives meant to suggest an im-
balance of brain chemistry and
you might be getting a rudimen-
tary grip on the thing. But it is
really something more.
To cut right to the bone of the
matter, then, at the close of this
past spring semester 1 was feeling
spiritually void and emotionally
numb. I decided that the best way
to deal with these symptoms was
to take a road trip to a place verv
different from Greenville. The
trees had to be different and so
did the weather. But what was of
the utmost importance was that
the spirit be elevated and in-
vigorated rather than sucked
down into the swampv mo;ass ot
anomie.
I decided on the North
Carolina mountains and, more
specificaly, Linville r a
varietv of reasons As an
unrepentant hippie friend of
mine told me a few days back,
every place has its own energy.
Mountains, he claimed, have a
different effect on a man's
psyche than do swamps or
beaches. In retrospect, 1 think he
was right.
Linville Gorge is actually a
small canyon that has been cut
out of the N.C. mountains by the
Linville River. It is located just
outside of Linville Falls, about 35
miles north of Morganton and 22
miles south of Boone.
The Linville River ambles
sometimes placidly and
sometimes frenetically over a rug-
ged rock-strewn landscape. Near
the end of the Gorge it cascades
magnificently in a series of water-
falls which give the area its
reputation as a tourist spot. The
1 ails plus the Gorge's close prox-
imity to other tourist attractions
such as Grandfather Mountain
and rweetsie Railroad make it an
ideal stopping point on any tour
of the Blue Ridge Parkway.
On checking into camping
regulations 1 discovered that it is
necessary to have permits from
. Forest Service to spend
any weekend night in the Gorge,
though weekday nights are open
to all. On the particular weekend
that I planned to go to the moun-
tains I was disappointed to find
that all 45 of the permits which
the forest service gives out had
been claimed. Consequently, 1
reconciled myself to camping in
the Federal Park Campground
which borders the gorge.
As it turned out, however, it
was just as well that I stayed in
the campground even though it
cost $6 per night. Beginning the
first afternoon it rained off and
on during my whole trip.
And yet I didn't feel that the
trip was ruined. The
thunderstorms in the mountains
are beautiful. I watched from the
Blue Ridge Parkway as lightning
arced in long jagged talons into a
valley below. And later, after the
storm had abated, 1 pulled ovei
to a spot marked as a "see
view" and watched clouds :
past beneath the peak I was stan-
ding on. I believe it would have
been enough to restore an
atheist's faith in a higher force
had one been there to see it
When I ventured into the gorge
itself, which is populated with a
variety of wildlife, including
bear, hawks, deer and some sa
even mountain lion. 1 found
several trails requiring different
levels of skill. On one side all the
trails were meticulously sculpted
and laid out so that seniot
citizens and small children can
navigate them with little difficul-
ty. On the other side there are
more strenuous trails leading
down to the river and ample trout
fishii
Huge fir and spruce trees jut
boldly out from the walls of the
Gorge and perfume the air
Mountain laurel and rhododen-
are also plentiful.
maielv the rain did drive
me � the Gorge. But I
entertain thoughts of going back
with a tent, supplies and a fly, �
and hunkering down for a m
w such excursions
serve to put a foundation under
and reconnect you with the
things that are truly important.
But I didn't mean to wax
losophical. Suffice it to sa
e Gorge is a lot like what
; people tl when they
the ideal camping trip
their
� �"�� ,x' 'lu inv.ii, v�nik.ll is puputaicu wiin a
PBS Portraying Carolina Indians Positively
(LPl) 'American bearing gifts but their real eoal is dians whn tri. iii
(L P1) 'American
Playhouse" consistently, dishes
up the best PBS has to offer and
the t h r ee-p ar t m i n i s er i e s
"Roanoak" is the jewe of the
playhouse season.
I he mini (which aired its first
segment Monday. lav 26 and
will air : ext two Mon-
days, June 2 and June 9. at 9
p.m.) is fat with splendid
c i n em at ogr ap h y, exq u i s
costuming and crisp writing.
a bonus of an aceI si
story to boot.
I he story begins in 1584 when
English explorers dispatched by
Sir Walter Raleigh cross the
Atlantic and meet the natives of
what is to become the "Lost Col-
ony " o Roanoak.
As the Brits meet the natives, it
is clear that these are no ordinary
Hollywood-type Indians. They
are civilized, eloquent, educated.
wary of the white man's ways,
and they even have a sense of
humor. Indeed, it is the "civiliz-
ed" English who come of! as
savages
The intent of the maker-
"Roanoak" was to bring to
the story of the first attempt to
establish an English colon) on
this continent. Accuracy was
paramount, and that is why the
actors speak the Indian language
ol Ojibwa, translated in subtitles
When the English explorers ar-
rive in the Carolinas, they are
welcomed by the Roanoak and
Croatoan Indians, tribes that are
now extinct. The English come
Summer Flick
beating gifts but their real goal is
to locate a deep water harbor for
fleet to haul away treasure
and supposedly fight off the
"thieving" Spaniards.
I he Indians are wary of these
strangers but in an effort to learn
more about them, the natives
make them welcome.
"They smell like rotten meat
says one Indian woman.
"More like dead snake says
another.
When the Indian women at-
tempt to bathe the strangers, they
dont't know how to take it.
"Either this woman means to
teed us or to eat us says an
Englishman.
When the time comes to return
to England, the explorers bring
back two Indians, who agree to
go m an attempt to discover the
strangers' strengths and
weaknesses.
The next year the English
return with 600 men, mostly
soldiers, whose attempt to found
a settlement ends in bitter hostili-
iv between the English and In-
dian tribes.
I ed by John White, another
party arrives in 158 but the In-
dians greet them with distrust.
When the colony's crops fail.
White leaves for England to
restock supplies. He returns to
find the colony abandoned, the
people gone.
It is White's drawings that in-
spired the story of "Roanoak
Ting Juarez, a young actor
who plays Manteo, one of the In-
'Short Circuit
By FI) TOSCHAC H
M.ft �nir
Short Circuit, John Badham's
new movie about a sophisticated
military robot that comes to life,
may not be perfect, but it's enter-
taining.
Short Circuit follows the
adventures of Number Five, one
of several robots designed by in-
ventor Newton Crosby (played by-
Steve Guttenberg) for Nova
Robotics to be the ultimate kill-
ing machine.
Number Five is just another
robot until a stray bolt of lighten-
ing brings him to life, and into
the life of Stephanie Speck (Ally
Sheedy). Stephanie is a caterer
who also seems to be a one-
woman SPCA. Her house teems
with stray animals that she has
adopted. Once convinced that
Number Five is truly alive, she
helps him run from Nova
Robotics � who want him
destroyed.
Like Badham's previous hit
War Games, Short Circuit is a
visually entertaining movie that
touches the audience on an emo-
tional level, telling us that "life is
not a malfunction
Unlike War Games however,
this film is written in a way that
may tire more mature viewers.
Inconsistent dialogue makes it
difficult to believe in Number
Five. In one scene, he expresses
complex ideas with impeccable
grammar, and during the next he
barely has Tarzan's grasp of
English "Not disassemble
Number Five he says;
"Number Five alive
Fisher Stevens plays Ben
Jabituya, Guttenberg's fellow
scientist. Ben is an Indian who's
poor understanding of American
slang provides a few laughs.
"Bimbo says Ben at one point,
meaning "bingo Some of the
lines Stevens is given are inspired,
but the affect is diluted by the
fact that every word he utters is
an attempt at this type of slang.
Despite its faults, Short Circuit
is a movie worth seeing Sheedy
and Guttenberg are endearing in
their roles; but even if they
weren't, the antics of Number
Five would save this film. Move
over E.T.
dians who travels to England,
said that when he read the script
he knew he had to be a par- ol
"Roanoak
"As I became involved in it I
found out more .o.A more the im-
portance ol this project said
Juarez. "It would otter Indians
the opportunity to see themselves
portrayed in a very realistic, very
humble manner and in a verv
positive way .
"This is verv important tor In-
dian people, particularly in ;
'act that we have been ;
'rayed so negatively :
and so badly in the past by
Hollywood.
Haircut Humor
" - C verv . very proud
"
�, up in southern
nia and studied literature
ai - rd University before
stt ROANOAK, page 7
Just A Little Off The Top, Please
By J. DAVID MATTHEWS
Si.ff �r,ir,
Just what in the hell is going on
here? I was riding through San-
ford a few weeks ago. when I
came across a sign that read,
"Haircuts: Children, $5; Adults,
S10 Would someone please ex
plain this to me?
I don't have a working
knowledge of the world ot hair,
but it seems pretty stupid to me to
charge an adult twice as much as
a kid for a haircut.
Look at it this way. A grown
man goes in to get his hair cut.
styled or whatever (I'll get to that
kettle of fish in a minute). He
usually sits fairly still and allows
his hair to be trimmed. No pro-
blem, right?
Then, some little yahoo who
looks like Opie Taylor climbs in-
to the chair like a tornado on the
prowl. The barber has to chain
the kid down in order to get a
halfway decent 'doo on the
clown. Ever wonder why some
little boys sport the Moe Howard
look' Because the barber will
save a couple of tingers and a ton
of energy by simply putting a
bowl on the patient's head.
And thev oniv charge half for
that?
Back to this so-called hair styl-
ing business. Whatever happened
:v the good old American hair-
cut Every other Saturday morn-
ing when I was little, I would ride
my bike down to Uncle Pete's
Barber Shop tor a haircut.
Nothing more, nothing less. God
forbid if Uncle Pete ever caught
one o those rat tails in his chair!
But the haircut is an old
dinosaur now. Today, a person
must get his hair teased and styl-
ed and put some Mr. Moose on it
and all of that crap. It's a cryin'
shame, isn't it?
And these salon persons don't
just offer haircuts anymore. For
starters, they now insist that your
hair be washed before thev will
pull out the scissors. They say bv
doing this they can better "style"
your hair. Don't be taken in by
this communist propaganda. It is
just a neat little way for them to
comb another five bucks out of
your wallet.
Some of these places even have
sun tan booths. Now I know I'm
going to cry.
Boy, 1 sure do miss the barber
shop. I feel like a damn fool in
those salon things. In a barber
shop, a man can:
(a.) Talk about politics and of
important subjects,
(b.) Talk about those of the total-
ly opposite sex.
(c.) Participate in the releasing
all types of bodily noises without
being stared at.
(d.) Play checkers,
(e.) Talk about the Friday night
high school football game and
the post-game fist-fight with
which you swear you had nothing
to do.
Perhaps the greatest tragedy
that has evolved from the new
it of hair styling is the fact
that if a person wants to get his
ears lowered these days, he has to
tke a $:�&'? appointment!
Never in my life have I heard of
such a :hmg.
p o i n t m e n t s are not
necessary at a barber shop. Just
walk in, sit down, and shoot the
breee with everyone while
waiting your turn in the chair.
Never call a barber shop and ask
for an appointment. Something
like this will happen if you do:
"Hev boys, some wimp wants to
make an appointment
"HaHaHa laugh the boys. It
could scar a person for life.
What this country needs are
some old fashioned, back-to-the-
cs, down home barber shops.
All of these salons and hair villas
are literally nothing more than
clip joints. Do America a favor,
gosh darnit. Get a haircut. But go
easy on the sides.
Short Circuit currently playing �t the Buccaneer Theater, Introduces a new character Into the already lame aill� �
who stor In films; Number Five Is this one's name. In the scene above, Fisher Stevens, Steve Guttenburg .�J, J? IL�! "?
believe Number Five is alive, try to coax the robot into trusting aaaL Shedy� who
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 29, 196
BLOOM COUNTY
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Roanoak
Settlers
continued from page 6
moving to New York to pursue
an acting career.
He is a Yaqui Indian. Also on
the cast were Cherokee, Sioux,
Pueblo and Navaho Indians.
"Everyone who has screened
the film has loved it Juarez
said. "It was interesting to hear
some people mention how this
film made them feel guilty. Hot-
blooded, red-blooded, blue-
blooded Americans teel guilty
about tins film.
"I don't think that was the in-
tention but it was an interesting
result. I think it will help the
understanding of the Indian
situation today m America
I he Indians of the set did more
than, act during the 48 davs of
filming. The mimseries was
originally scheduled to be pro-
duced in 1984 in North Carolina,
but a hurricane blew away the
set. year later, a new set was
structed in South Carolina
but again a hurricane, this one
named Gloria, threatened to halt
production.
1 he Indians took matters into
ti own hands.
"We prayed for the hurricane
to pass us b 'uld
continue with the journey
luarez said "W I Indians
l :is there:
Ch� � Sioux, Yaqui,
Navaho, P
"We all prayed and ottered
. Greal Spirit and
we were helped. I he hurricane
didn't strike. Wewerever happ
lat and we continued with
"R � le marve
irney, one that educates as well
as entei tains.
a
Tequila Bar Weekly Specials
Sunrise Sunday: 12.00 per serve
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Fried Friday: Get Fried karlv at oar nen Attitude Adjust
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At Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theater
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rHE KASTC AROl INIAN
Gennarelli
Leaving
For Texas
ECU Sports Information
Director Bob Gennarelli has
resigned his position effective
Mas 30, 1986 to become editor of
the I onghorn Monthly, a
magazine about Texas athletics.
Gennarelli, a graduate of the
University of Texas at Austin,
has been SID at ECU for two
years. Prior to coming to ECU,
he served as Senior Assistant
Sports Information Dirctor at the
University of Houston. During
his tenure at Houston, Gennarelli
worked closely with the Cougar
basketball team that made two
consecutive appearances in the
NCAA Championship game.
"I've enjoyed my two years
here Gennarelli said. "It's been
a lot of fun and I've experienced
a lot of new things
While Gennarelli enjoyed the
opportunity of working at a
university striving to become a
major football independent, he
feels the magazine will also be a
rewarding experience.
"It's been a challange to be
with a program like East
Carolina that is building from the
ground up. It won't be long
before ECU will be able to play
with the big name schools year in
And year out Gennarelli said.
"However, it will be just as big a
challenge starting a magazine
from scratch. Being a UT
graduate, I know the interest in
Texas sports is there and it won't
take long before it (the I.onghorn
Monthly) can become a great suc-
cess
The Sports staff at the East
Carolinain would like to thank
Gennarelli for all of his help in
the past and v ish him the best of
luck with his future endeavor.
Johnson
Featured
ECU's Winfred Johnson was
featured in the May 26. 1986 edi-
tion of Sports Illustrated.
Johnson appears in the laces in
the Crowd section for becoming
the first piayer in NCAA history
to hit 60 homeruns and pitch 30
career victories.
Sports
MAY 28, 1986
FageS
Cycling Team Busy
In 1986 Campaign
The Bicycle Post Cycling Team consists of from left to right): David Hawkins. Will Enecks ndv Wilson
Mark Bailev and Kevin Moran. Not pictured is newcomer Ray Irvin.
ECU Track Team Places Seventh
B RICK McCORMAC
The ECU men's track team.
led bv an outstanding perfor-
mance by sophomore sprinter
Tee McNeill, finished in seventh
place in the IC4A this past
weekend in Villanova, Pd
McNeill, who set a meet record
in capturing the 200 meters in a
time of 20.67 seeconds, scored
15-and-a-hali ol the Pirates' total
31 points. The 15-and-a-half
points were the most scored bv
any individual in the meet.
McNeill also finished fourth in
the 100 meters with a time of
10.25 seconds, and he ran the an-
chor leg of the Pirates' third-
place 400-meter relay team.
However, to label the Pirate ef-
fort a one man show would be an
error, as nine of the ten runners
on the trip made it to the finals oi
their events.
The 1,600 meter relay team oi
Phil Estes, Ruben Pierce, Kelwyn
Love and Julian Anderson were
declared the winners after
Villanova was disqualified for
making an improper exchange.
Ihe Pirates' winning time was
3:07.99, and according to Pirate
coach Bill Carson, ECU forced
the Wildcat mistake. "We forced
the error in the 1,600 Carson
said. "Thev were expecting to be
out there all bv themselves and
we pressed them on the anchor
leg. On the final exchange, thev
missed and the baton just Hew up
in the air
Freshmen Eugene McNeill and
David Parker made the finals in
100 meters and 1 10-meter hurdles
respectively. They were the only
freshmen represented in the top
eight of either event.
McNeill, brother of Lee,
finished in sixth place in the hun-
dred, with a time of 10.56
seconds. Parker finished eighth
in the hurdles with a time of
14.34.
The 400-meter relav team
finished in third place in the com-
petition with a time of 40.74
seconds. The team is made up of
the McNeill brothers (lee and
Eugene), Chris Brooks and
Nathan McCorkie.
"It was a good performance
finishing seventh Carson said.
"We beat Manhattan, Seton
Hall, Rutgers and George Mason
and they are people we haven't
beaten in the past "
According to Carson. II
could have placed even higher in
the standings. "It was strange
because we lost some points we
had figured to get and picked
some up that we didn't expect
Carson continued. "We had a
double error in the 400 meter
relav . We made an error in the se-
cond exchange and then we miss-
ed the exchange on the anchor
leg
In addition to those mistakes,
Lee McNeill slipped coming out
of the blocks in the 100 meters,
ee TRACKgTEgS, page 9
Bv SCOTT COOPER
( -SporU Htun
The Bicycle Post and Down
last Cycles are both sponsors of
the Bicycle Post Team as they
have been busy in competition in
a variety of races throughout
their 1986 campaign.
The Bicycle Post team is made
up of six members who race com-
petitively. The Cycling Club, on
the other hand, is a group oi
about 25 who race for the enjoy-
ment and relaxation � not on a
competitive basis.
"We've done pretty good this
year said club president and
team member Will Enecks about
the team's performance. "We're
one of the best new teams
around
Pretty good may be an
understatement. In seven races
thus far this year, the team has
picked up four first-place
finishes, a second place and three
third-place finishes � in their
respective categories.
The United States C vcling
federation is the governing body
ol the U.S. Olympic Cycling
I cam and thereby handles the
team- from all around the nation.
The US I tries to insure fair
competition in both amateur as
well as professional cycling. Fur-
thermore, there are four
categories in which each racer
stands. I he are:
1 - Internationa! C hampion.
2- National Champion.
3 senior 111 (when you place �
first, second or third in at least
six racesi.
4- Beknnnmk! Cateaorv.
Danbury Road Race � Bailey.
3rd. Moran, 7th in men's Sr. IV
Hanes Park nterium,
Winston-Salem � Bailey,
Moran 5th in men's Sr. IV
John Peterson Men
Spruce Pine � Bailey,
Moran 6th in men's Sr. IV
Greenville Time Trials
Barry Scott, 3rd. Bailey, 4th
David Hawkins, 5th in Men's Sr
IV.
Perhaps freshman Mark Bailev
has achieved the most success as
of late. Bailev, who hails !�
layetteville, was named an V
American in the men's Sr 1
division and was immedia
moved to the Sr. Ill categ
when he won the 52-mile (
Aiken Bicycle Criterium in
Aiken. S.C.
To the cyclists, the :
racing is one of excitemi
gratification, competition
fun, according to Enecks.
"There is a certain pleasure to
be had in riding fast and
the body to its limits i
wrote in a statement. "Tl
thrill to being in the mid
mass of bicycles and riders
speeding along at 30 miles
hour, and there's a real
worth that comes from hai I
fort and physical achievemei
The sport of bicycle racii
very much a tea . ncept as well
as a strategic battle, as Enecl
plained. "We work I
other, we work for the srinters �
Kevin and Mark
"They stay behind us � thev are
our fastest sprinters. Thev
save 25 percent ol their energy
"We've done pretty good this year. He're one of the best
new teams around. "
�Will Kneck
Sports Fact
Wed. Mav 28, 1951
Willie Mays collects his first
major league base hit, a home
run off Milwaukee's Warren
Spahn. It will be Mays' only hit
in his first 26 at-bats. Bv the
time he retires in 1973, Mays
will ammass 3,283 career hits
and 660 home runs.
Here are the 1986 Bicycle Post
leant standings and individual
placings:
Griffon Shad Festival Race.
Grifton Will Enecks, 1st in
Veterans (over 35). Mark Bailev.
1st men's in Senior IV. Kevin
Moran, 2nd in men's Senior IV
lour De Moore Road Race,
Southern Pines � Bailev. 1st in
men's Sr. IV.
Capital City Criterium,
Raleigh � Moran, 3rd in men's
Sr. IV.
(during a race)
For those of you wl
think the sport is danger
think again. In the 52-mile Co
Aiken Criterium, for example,
there was a bad crash in the
300 yards of the race. Enecks ex-
plained that there were
broken collarbones and a number
of broken vertabraev
The next action for the -
will be this weekend when tl
host the Greenville Downtown
Criterium.
B RICK McCORMAC
and
SCOTT COOPER
What's wrong with being the
'Big Man On Campus?' Hell, if
we were playing bigtime college
basketball, we damn sure
wouldn't leave the trim-mings,
not a second early! Realistically
though, money may have the lure
in pulling these 'blue-chippers'
into the NBA.
This year seven talented college
underclassman will be giving up
their remaining year(s) of
eligibility for the bright-lights of
pro hoops.
The big men usually attract the
most attention and this year is
certainly no different. N.C.
State's Chris Washburn is giving
up his last two years while Mem-
phis State's William Bedford
forfeits his remaining senior cam-
paign.
The forwards make up the big-
gest category as LSU's John
Williams relinquishes two
season's under Dale Brown and
Walter "the Truth" Berry leaves
Big East power St. Johns's after a
sparkling junior year. University
of District of Columbia (D.C.)
and former Georgetown Hoya
power-forward Michael Graham
exits for the big leagues (who
knows how many years he has
left at D.C). A less heralded pro-
spect from Georgia, Cedric
Henderson, bolts three years ear-
ly after being declared ineligible"
in the wake of over 30 NCAA
rules violations.
The sole guard needs no in-
toduction other than the
"Pearl Syracuse's Dwayne
Washington exits the shell of the
Carrier Dome after two years
under the wing of Jim Boeheim.
The decision to leave is not an
easy one for any of the players.
LSU standout Williams described
his feelings in an earlier news
conference.
"Tm doingone of the most
Hardship Cases; NBA Draft
rtDUAr �:� .u: i r
painful things I ever did in mv
life Williams said. "1 am
resigning from LSU to pursue a
pro basketball career
Williams, a 6-8 forward from
L.As Crenshaw High School,
said "1 am doing this for one
reason and one reason onlv: i
have to support my mother and
grandmother
Some other reasons for leaving
are the simple dislike of the
academic rigors of college. And
even others see it as a quick way
of gaining fame and fortune.
While some see instant success
in the NBA, others have seen the
reality of a tougher-than-
anticipated career. For every
Michael Jordan, Isiah Thomas or
Earvin "Magic" Johnson there
are the Dwayne Scales' (who left
LSU after the 1980 season to play
in Atlanta), Rob Williams' (who
left Houston after his junior
season) and Freeman Williams'
(who departed from Portland
State after leading the nation in
scoring after a brilliant junior
year) who are no longer in the
NBA.
However, there are a handfull
of players who have left early and
have reached the pinnacle of suc-
cess. Heck the Lakers start three
hardship cases. "Magic"
Johnson, James Worthy (from
North Carolina) and Byron Scott
(from Arizona State) all left
school before their time.
Some other stars who were
hardship cases include U-Mass of
Amherst's Julius 'Dr. J' Erving,
DePaul's Terry Cummings and
Mark Aguirre, Maryland's Buck
Williams and Brad Davis,
Dominique Wilkins from
Georgia, Iona's Jeff Ruland and
Bridgeport's African import
Manute Bol.
The jury is still out on a few of
the latest hardship cases.
Oklahoma's Wayman Tisdale,
Creighton's Benoit Benjamin,
LSU's Jerry "Ice" Reynolds and
Wake Forest's Kenny Green are
vet to have li.ed up to their press-
clippings after their initial
season.
While this year's class of early
exits should continue the success
of past hardship rookies, there
are always one or two who should
have waited out their time.
If it were up to us, college
would be the homestead for four.
I ike fine wine, time can only
refine. In other words, college is
a time for maturing � both on
and off the court. Come on
fellas stick around � we got
next up. Who's gonna' shoot the
die.
NBA Draft
Analysis
With the NBA Playoffs win-
ding down, next up is the annual
Player-Draft which takes place
early next month.
The draft order begins with the
seven-team lottery, followed by
the remaining 17 selections mak-
ing up the first round. These
teams pick in reverse order of
their finish, in theory. However,
trades may allow a team an
earlier pick or an extra selection.
The following is our attempt at
an NBA draft analysis. For brevi-
ty, we will limit ourselves to the
opening round.
Philadelphia (from LA Clip-
pers): Brad Daughtery, L NC .
Philly has Moses, but good, in-
telligent big men with good hands
are hard to come by. They can't
pass him up.
Boston (from Seatle): What do
they need0 Maybe a guard, it so
� Johnny Dawkins. Red (Auer-
bach) will want raw talent, but
whatever he does you can bet it
will work. How about
Maryland's Len Bias?
Golden State: Joe Barry Carrol
is improving, he just needs some
help on the boards. Kenny 'Sky'
Walker of Kentucky could fit in
well.
Indiana: Chris Washburn from
N.C. State is too hard to pass up.
This franchise has lost its chance
on Sampson and Olajuwon and
needs a big man with Wayman.
New York: If anyone needs a
guard, it's Hubie Brown's
Knicks. Dawkins of Duke is the
best of the lot and should be able
to get the rock to Patrick and
Bernard.
Phoenix: If a center still re-
mains, the Suns will not set
without him. Memphis State's
'Bedrock' Bedford should ease
JIM LELTGENS - East Carolinian
Sports editors Scott Cooper (right) and Rick McConnac (left) discuss
the first-ever NBA PlayerDraft Preview in Tht East Carolinian
the rebounding load on Nance
and could hit 'Sweet D' on the
outlet.
Dallas (from Cleveland):
Donaldson is doing the job, but is
not the championship center. The
Slavs are solid everywhere else. If
a center should be around �
great. If not, go with best
available pick. Auburn's Chuck
Person.
Cleveland (from Dallas):
World B. needs a backcourt
mate. Miami's Ron Harper could
do the job.
Chicago: Air Jordan and com-
pany desperatelv need a center.
Georgia Tech's John Salley runs
the court well and would certain-
ly add height in the paint.
San Antonio: A center-
forward would be perfect. How
about Michigan's Roy Tarpley ?
Detroit (from Sacramento):
Laimbeer seems to fill the mid-
dle, although he could use a hand
on the glass. Guards are more
than adequate. No lie, a power-
forward is 'The Truth. St.
John's Walter Berry that is.
Washington: The frontcourt is
well stocked with Manute and
Ruland. With a strong pair of
guards, a young John Williams
from LSU would be enlightening
if still around.
New Jersey: With the absence
of Michael Ray, a guard is need-
ed to push the squad. What better
than home-boy "Pearl"
Washington.
Portland: The Blazers need an
outside shot and a backcourt
mate who looks to fire away. Del
Curry from Va. Tech is the player
for Kiki and Co.
Utah: The frontcourt seems to
be taken care of. A bomber like
Ga. Tech's Mark Price would en-
joy his return to the west.
Denver (from Dallas): Who's
gonna run? What better than a
thoroughbred from Louisville.
Billy Thompson could fill the
lane for Doug Moe's high-
powered offensive Nuggets.
Sacramento (from Detroit): In
dire need of a big man, but
what's left? Kansas' slow, bu:
huge Greg Dreiling could be the
answer.
Denver: Another first-round
pick for Moe. He dosen't select a
stooge. UNLV's Anthony Jones
loves he open-court offensive
style here.
AUanta: Coach of the Year
Fratello wants someone to
alleviate the scoring burden on
Dominique. The Hawks mav
want to take the chance with
Michigan State's Scott Skiles.
Houston: Their best year ever.
However a point guard is needed
and L'AB's Steve Mitchell should
be available.
Philadelphia: The 76ers would
use their second pick in the open-
ing round to get hometown pro-
duct Harold Pressey of
Villanova. Could be a sleeper.
Milwaukee: Like many teams.
a center wouldn't hurt. No
desperate needs for Nelson's
Bucks, but a defensive stopper
and Mike McGee clone would be
nice. Georgetown's David
Wingate should be available.
L.A. Lakers: A real sleeper
here, unless you talk to CAA
coaches. Richmond's John
Newman is a player. Enough
said.
Portland (from Boston via
L.A. Clippers): Duke's Mark
Alarie is enough to spell Kiki. A
heady player who would add to
Jack Ramsey's patterned offense
(provided Ramsey is still there)
This concludes the opening
round. However there are still
quite a few names worth men-
tioning. Illinois forward Efrem
Winters and guard Bruce
Douglas, Louisville guard Milt
Wagner, Syracuse swingman
Rafael Addison, N.C. State
guard Nate McMillan and Kan-
sas' guard Ron Kellog and for-
ward Calvin Thompson and
Duke swingman David Hender-
son round out the list.
Nathan Met orkie
McCorkie competed
Second Col
Trick Ski
Greenv
� el98 Ma
tor '
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Ga a
to a
Calla

the �
women i .
the
tourn
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overall c
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re!ecast in Julv
1 3
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IRS Hours
sWIMMIM, POOI -
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Fri
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28 WED
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31 SAT
1 SUN
Bike Race
Video
4 .





ream Busy
Campaign
I HI 1 ASIAKUI INIAN
MAY 28, 1986
I Kni
viewed
i dKt
land
m
the
tioning. II - ward
�no guard Bruce
Douglas, Louis iard Milt
Wagner, Syracuse swingman
Rafael Addison, NState
guard Nate McMillan and Kan
sas' guard Ron Keilog and for
ward Calvin Thompson and
Duke swingman David (lender -
son round out the list.
Tracksters Head For NCAA's
( (intituled from page eight,
causing him a bad stai i.
( arson blamed hi� team's ei
rors on a lack ol practice nine,
due to the current resurfacing of
Bunting 11 a
"We jusi hav en'i had a ti ai k
to prac tice i �n and host were
-ed b lac k ol
Carson said "Wi
i ' in
prav
ible low

Still, Carson wa i

"1 i
aid.
' .
� .
1 I ee
McNeill foi his efforts M Neill
in in eight race in two daj
despite an injured ki.ee. si
record in the 4x met
his eighth ra
Hi iwevei, his t
100 meters

'ii
" 1 ee went th
(tu inding straij
hundred. It wa
s leanii .
i
rreshma llei Par!
ied special mention from the
ich. "I was really proud of
David Parker
"Hi k a iver the
fust hurdle that hurt him. But
14 J4 is not a bad time. I jusi feel
bad thai he did not finish in the
ix .old win a medal
Ihe future looks brighi for
arson's squad, however, as
Parker was one of t o ui
lassmen scoring tor the
Pirates. Eugene McNeill and
Julian Anderson are both
treshmen while l.ee McNeill is
just a sophomore.
ECU'S next meet will be June
4 7 at the N AA Championships
in Indianapolis, Ind (Qualifiers
tor the Pirates are I ee McNeill in
the 100 and 200 meters, and the
4tj0-meter relav team.
Nathan Mc orkle (left) receives advice from coach Bill (arson trighu.
McCorkle competed on the third-place 400-meter relav team
Second Consecutive
Trick Skiing Title
K:
f
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
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each Kroger sav on except
as specifically noted in this
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reflecting the same sav
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Copyngm 1986
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OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd Greenv
'h
1





10
Ml M l KU1 IS! N
M 28, WSis
Track, Swimming, Volleyball Recruits Sign
t l women's rack coach smith, from South Granville it I swuiimnu' coach Ri,k vv it . i .
Wayi t
L' ! 1 kl , �
of intent
rhe
Dawn S
i k coac
uiik ed the
itters
Brasw
anessa
i Wi
,i spi
e upcom
smith, tiom South Granville
High School in C reedmore, is
ranked as the numbei two
spimter in the state and, accoi
ding to Miller, is also considered
oi the top prospects in the
"I am ver pleased with this
year's signees Millei said "I
would vi the) are the
since I've been here e've
to attract some good
letes in the pasi. -i .� Smith is
out first re.d hiue v hipp
I i l swimming coach Kuk
Kobe has announced the sign
ol three more athletes to lettei
� 't intent to sworn tor the Pira
next fall.
And) lohns comes to ECl
after a two yeat stay at Brevai i
Community oliege
Hollywood, r la I he Hollywi
native earned junioi college A I
meiua honors last season
swimming the distance freest
and butterfly events
c raig Faircloth : ounds out the
Pirate men tor next veai ! � �
W " thington, �ruo nati
junioi national qualifiei
Kxt and 200 yard breaststoke
lennifei Dolan completes the
list ol I ady Pirates foi next yeai
rhe Baton Rouge, I A produci
was also junioi national qualifiei
with the sprini freestyle events
listed as tier sti ongesl
"These three complete out
recuriting foi the year
Kobe "1 think ii s the best
recruiting class we have had a!
foui ye I hae
been here I hey should earn
� ! � " aditj hi ol Pirate
ming
t t I women's volleyball

i s
Imogene I urnei announi i .
sign . ' ' ndy ' ia e
111
ial(, a 5
name lia, Md , and
red for Annapolis Hij
, a loy i McKay (iale
named all-county las' fa
dition to
Most V a
as the squad
Id for the
Sports Fact
ki
M.
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DE
SOV ICELAND
SALE
PP'ES FOR SALE
. i .
�E NT
.����� 1 SAT MAY 31 AT
ami OWAiii iui
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Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli, Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current
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ise SI25 a month
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ROOMMATE WANTED To share 2
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MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
for summer Furnished apt. $no
a 2 utilities Personal
�'ea a Oakmont Apar'
all Tin at 756 5794
OR 1 FEMALE ROOMMATES
NEEDED F ir set jg session sum
mer school ' � oed duplex in
quiet ne'ghborhooo 1 mile from ECU
campus $93 75 tilities Please
can 752 0319
2 ROOMMATES NEEDED AT
RIVER BLUFF $90 mo , ,
j' lities Bedroom, is unfurnished Dut
i can help in getting furniture Apt
overlooks pool and has ECU bus ser
call Tommy at 758 2403 or
752 7017
LOST German Sheppard puppy on
campus Monday, May 26 He wears
a coiiar with the name Storm on it If
found, please call 758 2924
MUTUAL SUPPORT: Are there any
GWM's on or off campus who would
benefit from a mutual support net
work? Write to me in confidence
P.O. Box 4273, Greenvi
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Chunk Light Tuna
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Crisco Shortening
IMITNE WfTH AN ADDITIONAL
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1703 GREENVILLE BLVD. � OPEN 24 HOURS
.OPEN MQN. 7 A
CLOSE SAL 11
liS (JPEN8yNDAf7A.ni-1l1M.l
I





Title
The East Carolinian, May 28, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
May 28, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.476
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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