The East Carolinian, May 21, 1986






�he lEaHt Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No���&J7 Wed
I � � N
.a 21, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
( in illation 12,000
Degrees Conferred
At Commencement
Graduation
JON JORDAN - EO Photo lab
Two graduating co-eds celebrate their accomplishment. For further details see the related story on
page 1.
WZMB TemporarilySignsOff
By BETH WHICKER
ECU'S campus radio station
VAMB was temporarily shut
down Kir nearly an hour May 1
after a student disc jockey used
exploitive language during the
stations "permanent wave" pro-
gram.
At approximately 10 p.m. the
disc jockey, a junior majoring in
communications, was asked by
the station's chief engineer to
play the sign off tape and leave
the station.
The situation was brought to
the attention of the ECU Public
Safety Department by a concern-
ed citizen who had heard the
broadcast. The officer on duty
alerted WMB's chief engineer.
Both ECU Public Safety Of-
ficers and VYZMB's chief
engineer approached the disc
jockey and corrected the situa-
tion. No force had to be im-
plemented to remove the disc
jockey from the station.
At nearly 11 p.m. the station
was signed back on the air b
newly appointed General
Manager Jeff Chester. Chester
issued a formal apology to
WZMB's listners and the 11 p.m.
disc jockey finished out the re-
mainder of the evening.
Chester also gave two formal
apologies the following day dur-
ing the station's regular news
broadcast.
According to Chester, the stu-
dent disc jockey acted entirely on
his own without any authoriza-
tion from station management or
the university. The remarks of
the student do not reflect the
iews of WZMB or ECL
"The incident caused great
concern, the WZMB advisory
board needs to meet and clarify
their standards in regard to the
"permanent wave" program
said Elmer Meyer, vice chancellor
for Student Life.
According to Chester he has
rewritten several policies, and
designed new policies to clarify
the rules concerning station pro-
gramming.
Chester's new policies have
been approved by the Media
Board.
"We at the station are taking
steps to see that this type of inci-
dent does not happen again
said Chester.
According to Chester, the stu-
dent disc jockey will be punished
for his actions as the station has
pressed judiciary charges against
him.
"WZMB will not face any
charges from the FCC concerning
the incident said Chester.
Chester and the staff at
WZMB, do not know of an
reason for the disc jockey's ac-
tion, there is some speculation
that the student was not pleased
with the Media Board's selection
of WZMB's general manager.
The student disc jockey was a
candidate for the position which
the Media Board selected
Chester.
By MKELUDWICK
News Kdilor
ECU's 77th Commencement
went off with a bang amid poping
champaign bottles, fire crackers,
balloons, and plenty of hoots and
hollars.
The more than 2,600 graduates
filed into Ficklen Stadium waving
to parents friends, relatives, and
(lying banners.
One banner wished moms a
"Happy Mom's Day" while
another thanked Jesus. During
the procession a group of
graduates unrolled a banner
"How do you spell relief? BSN
Distinguished alumnus R.L.
Jones delivered the commence-
ment address to the Class of
1986. He said experenCe with
education is an advantage in to-
day's world which seeds produc-
tivity, good positive attitudes,
and leadership potential.
"Experience with education
Jones said, "will be the edge you
have going for you with the
broad educational background
you hae received at East
Carolina
Jones advised the graduates
they have reached a platform in
their life where they have their
destiny and future in their own
hands.
"Do not be disillusioned he
added, "that you are recieving a
ticket to immediate success on an
easy life. You can, however,
count on your college experience
and your degree as a platform to
do great things for yourself in the
future
Jones said our nation is giving
us more opportunities than
anyone has imagined. But he cau-
tiond that life is completion and
throughout life we will meet,
"barriers, crossroads, and uncer-
tainties
"If you can find the job en-
vironment that can be fun ad-
vised Jones, "you will have
achieved on of life's greatest
blessings
Also during the ceremony
Chancellor John Howell said
ECU has made tremendous pro-
gress in private-sector fund rais-
ing and alumni relations.
Howell pointed out the doubl-
ing of the ECU Foundation, the
University Scholars progra
and the Robert Dillard leer
Distinguished progessorship
the School of Business.
"East Carolina University is
now coming into its own
Howell, "This is the time to
flourish, to draw up on our rich
resources, and to enhance
programs as we provide leader-
ship tor a region that is on the
threshold of its most challenging
era
"We have thee two necessary
ingrediants: a sound herita
the willingness and ability
move ahead" Howell said.
Howell confered M.D. degress
to 62 candidates, a record
number, and three PhDs in
basic medical sciences.
According to the Registrar,
Howell confered 635 graduate
degrees and certificates al
with 1.912 bachlor's degrees
I lie cmmencement ;
ceedings began with a bai
cert lead bv Herbert Carter,
professor in the E I' Sc I
Music.
Summer Employment Found
By PATRICK ON KIL
staff Writer
Summer means vacations and
summer school for some
students, but for many others it
means going to work to help
defray or cover college expenses.
Job hunting is a difficult and
often frustrating task for these
students.
The availability of jobs is the
major problem, says Frankie
Becker of Manpower Temporary-
Services, Inc. The number of
people available for employment
in the summer dramatically in-
creases creating a smallet job
market, consequently many
students are unable to find work
Temporary service agencies
such as Manpower aid students in
finding summer work, which may
include industrial work, offwe
and secretarial work, or outdoor
work. These jobs pay according
to their job descriptions but may
last from one day to three mon-
ths, depending on the needs of
the employer.
The Cooperative Ed
program offered by the un
also assists students in finding
career oner,red work.
This program al t er i
semesters of work will
ol school. Each, semes
is in a career related
student receives a salary deter-
mined by the employer to covet
living expense- and
for the next semester when enr.
ed in school.
See SUMMER Page 2.
State Department Lodges Formal Protest
President Stalls Veto
WASHINGTON (LPI) � Presi-
dent Reagan, advised to stall tor
time, is wailing to see if he has
won any support before deciding
whether to veto congressional re-
jection of an arms sale to Saudi
Arabia today or wait until mid-
night Wednesday.
Senate Republican leader
Robert Dole suggested Monday
that Reagan wait until the
deadline Wednesday night, argu-
ing that a last minute signing
would delay a final showdown
over the $354 million missile
package until Congress returns
from its Memorial Day recess.
With more time, Reagan may-
be able to reach more senators in
lobbying for approval of the sale
the administration considers vital
to U.S. interests in the Middle
East.
The resolution to bar the
missile sale passed the House by a
vote of 356 to 62 and the Senate
by a vote of 73 to 22, both well in
excess of the two-thirds ma-
jorities needed to override a veto
by Reagan and kill the deal.
The president arranged to meet
with a group of 35 Jewish leaders
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds12
Editorials4
Features7
Sports10
Knowledge is the treasure,
but judgement is the treasurer,
of a wise man.
� William Penn
late this afternoon to "explain
Middle East policy to them
deputy press secretary Larry
Speakes said.
Some Jewish groups have
displayed resentment, fearing
they have been set up by the ad-
ministration to take the blame for
the expected defeat of the
weapons sale at the hands of
Congress.
Dole said Reagan would go
ahead with the the veto today-
leading to an override attempt
before the start of the Memorial
Day recess - if assured of 35
votes, one more than needed to
sustain his veto.
"I don't think we have 35 votes
right now Dole said, complain-
ing the issue had become entangl-
ed with "an awfully lot of
politics including the fall con-
gressional elections and a recent
wave of anti-Arab sentiment.
See REAGAN Page 2.
Washington (UP1) � The
Reagan administration condem-
med South African raids on
suspected black nationalist
targets in three neighboring states
and may summon the U.S. am-
bassador home to underscore
American displeasure.
The State Department lodged a
formal protest Monday with the
South African Embassy, and the
White House with South Africa's
neighbors expressed a "sense of
outrage" over the attacks.
"We vigorously condemn these
attacks by South Africa said
White House spokesman Larry
Speakes. "Our diplomacy in
South Africa had been aimed at
stopping cross-border violence.
Such efforts have had results
The white minority Pretoria
governmant said its forces hit
suspected African National Con-
gress targets Monday in Zambia,
Zimbabwe and Botswana � its
largest strike acress borders ever
against the black nationalist guer-
rillas.
In addition to the public White
House condemnation, South
African charge d'affaires Andre
Kilian was summoned to the
State Department to recieve an
official L.S. protest from Assis-
tant Secretary of State Chester
Crocker.
State Department spokesman
Bernard Kals said the administra-
tion had no advance work of the
raids.
L.S. Ambassador Herman
Nickel was summoned home last
June to protest a similar raid on
Botswana.
Asked whether Nickel would
again be brought home to protest
the latest South African forays,
Kalb said, "We are reviewing
further steps at this time He
refused to elaborate.
I. William Zartman, director
of African studies at the Johns
Hopkins University School of
Advanced International Studies,
said the impact of the L.S. pro-
tests in Pretoria should not be
underestimated.
"The South Africans are ex-
tremely sensitive to any kind of
pressure, much more than we
would think Zartman said.
Zartman said summoning
Nickel would be heard loudly in
Pretoria, and he expressed hope
the United States would join in
any U.N. Security Council con-
demantion, rather than abstain-
ing.
The administration imposed
limited economic sanctions
against South Africa last year to
protest apartheid, the system us-
ed to segtegate and disenfran-
chise the black majority. It is
seeking a negotiatied settlem
to the fighting in southern Afi
among various factions.
Pretoria considers the African
National Congress, which seek?
equality for blacks and seeks to
overthrow the South African
government, to be a terrorist
group. The group was banned in
1960.
Kalb, however, called the ANC
"an important political organiza-
tion that must be a factor in
negotiaions over South Africa's
future
The East Carolinian
New General Office Hours
10 a.m. � 5 p.m.
Monday � Friday
No business handled before 10 a.m.
CAST CAROLINA university
LITTLE & ASSOCIATES
rm PI .11� �� IS
�rr' 1CP & CClNCgj
f
Construction Continues �� ����� - �� o�.
ECU'S General Classroom building begins to take shape behind Austin. The new building will con-
tain 65 classrooms and house 180 faculty offices.
A
�V�� �v





.THE EAST CAROL IN! AN
MAY 21, 1986

Announcements
Five Injured In Tornado
TWISTER
There will be a m�M,ve Tw.ster game
Pi�r�J at 4 p m on Thursday May J2nd
(during the intermitsion of the Soul Train
conc.rt) on the Mendenhali Student Center
Patio The Twuter game i� being sponsored
by the Student union Recreation Committee
SEANC
The ECU Chapter Meeting of SEANC will
b� on Tuesday, may 27 in Brewster B 10? at
5 30 p m This will be a business meeting
Members are urged to attend
NEWMAN CENTER
siosT,5 "V Sch�"� or "nrner ses
�S3E 10th St. Greenville. NC Call 752 4214
EATING DISORDERS
SUPPORT GROUP
The Eating Disorders Support group for
women with bulemia, anorexia nervoM, or
bulimarexia will continue this summer Ses
sions will be held on May 27. June 10. and
June 24 from 4 5pm in room 120 at the Stu
dent Health Service
1
Another Semester
J.B. HUMBERT - East Carolinian
An ECU student watches closely as her bill is totaled for the semester's books.
Reagan Lobbies For Time
Continued From Page 1.
Secretary of State George
Shultz also will deliver a strong
pitch for the sale to GOP
senators today at the Capitol.
While Reagan could use the ad-
ditional time to press for enough
votes to have his veto upheld in
the Senate, few observers on
Capitol Hill or at the White
House rated his prospects
anything but bleak, regardless of
when the final decisive point
comes.
Insisting Reagan was making
progress" through occasional
lobbying over the last week, Dole
said, "Anything over zero is pro-
gress
Speakes told reporters that lin-
ing up votes has been difficult,
but said the gap was closing
.omewhat. Senate GOP leaders
planned to deliver a head count
today.
"We don't have the votes
Speakes acknowleged. "It is a
long haul and lots of convincing
needs to be done
Of the 12 votes Reagan needs
in the Senate to salvage the sale
of 2,600 air-to-air, surface-to-air
and anti-ship missiles � to
replenish supplies of the same
weapons now in the Saudi arsenal
� one will come from Sen. Nan-
cy Kassebaum, R-Kan who was
absent for the first vote.
Of the four other senators ab-
sent for that vote � three
Republicans and one Democrat
� at least two have signaled op-
position to the sale. None ot the
other 29 Republicans who voted
against sale, including 13 up for
re-election this year, indicated in
a spot check Monday any
readiness to back Reagan on the
veto override attempt.
Sen, Gordon Humphrey.
R-N.H also absent on the first
vote, emerged as a possible se-
cond additional vote for Reagan.
Aides said Humphrey had not yet
taken a position on the arms sale
of the veto override.
RAEFORD, NC. (UPI) - At
least five people were injured
Monday when severe
thunderstorms spawned one tor-
nado, destroying mobile homes
and leaving residents without
power in a region devastated in
1984 by killer twisters.
"I seen a tornado twisting up
above the trees, rising over the
trees said Tammy Bullard,
whose home was left untouched
by the tornado. "It sounded real
fast, and the wind was blowing
real hard, and it was raining real
hard
Summer
Work
J A vailable
Continued From Page I.
One advantage to this pro-
gram, stated Betsy Harper, the
director of ECU's Cooperative
Education program, is that after
two years a student gains one
year of college education and one
year of practical experience in
their respective field.
The most rewarding benefit,
she stated, is that most co-op
students receive job offers before
graduation.
Most students are not aware of
what opportunities are available
for them, but there exists many
avenues to help them. The
newspaper advertises job oppor-
tunities available to the public.
Teachers, friends, and parents
may also have contacts who are
in need of employees.
Many students believe that
businesses will not hire them, but
the opposite is true. If a
businessperson notices someone
working hard trying to find a job,
he or she may be impressed with
their motivation and determina-
tion.
Bill Niven with the Hoke
County Emergency Management
Agency said four people with
minor injuries were transported
to Cape Fear Valley Medicai
Center in Fayetteville, about 20
miles northeast of Raeford.
Nivens said the four were at a
mobile home park on N.C. 211
when the twister struck.
A hospital spokesman said the
three children and one adult at
the medical center's emergency
room suffered mostly cuts and
bruises. A fifth person also was
reported injured but refuse;
go to the hospital, Niven said
"There were a couple
mobile homes destroyed, dan
to a lot of trees Niven sa I
"We had a top of one turl
house blow off
Give a hoot.
Don't pollute.
Forest Service, U.S.I .A
��������"���MIHIHIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMHIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIIIMIIHIIIIIMIIIIIIIHIIIIIIHIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIf.
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�LU
A N
Tfc - '
i
7h,
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rwr
I want to take anabolic steroids
to increase m weight lilting per-
formance. Is there an danger in
taking steroids
v al
morse, thai
tissues upon whicl
hough te'
Jered a p
is r. .
athlete-
effects :
: i n -
Ana
used b we -
players, pole a
The Health C olumn H
Man Klesha dams
throwers with the I
cing performance. Gymnasts
use them with the delibe
tention of stunting - VI isi
athletes get these substance
sources other than medi
viders and use them in
much greater than recommer
levels.
Benefits of anabolic stei
include increased muscle mass,
euphoria and a sense of decreased
fatigue-more energ and en-
durance. Studies hae shown,
howeer. that those athletes who
train intensively in hea resistive
activities such as weight lifting
will see an increase in muscle
mass. A special die; must be
coordinated with exercise and
steroid use am benefit.
The trade i these
minimal) beneficial effects are
possibly serious 5
eluding gynecon
ly large breasts
decrease in I
testicles, enlargement ot the r
state gland, nausea, dia

- fB
I





Tornado
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 2! 1986
.�ison also was-
refused to-
Nun said.
�re a couple of;
ed, damage
Niven said
of one turkey
Give a hoot.
Don't pollute. :
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Dinner 4 p.m9 p.m.
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IINNER
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� Entree � Drinks
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Ill Day Sunday
UR PRISE!
College Budget!
April 29
5:10 p.m.
A Scott dorm resident reported
the larceny of his wallet from his
room.
April 30
2:19 a.m.
Scott dorm residents reported
that unknown person's had
broken into and ransacked their
belongings.
1:50 p.m.
A Scot; dorm resident reported
the breaking and entering of his
room and the larceny of money
from the same.
2:15 p.m.
The larcenj of a bike was
reported. The bike had been in
the Belk Dorm bike shed.
3:05 p.m.
A Greenville resident reporied
that the back window of his car
was shattered while parked south
Oi Tenth St. across from
Brewster.
7:10 p.m.
An Aycock resident reported the
1 want to take anabolic steroids
to increase m weight lifting per-
formance. Is there an danger in
taking steroids?
Anabolic steroids are hor-
mones that resemble testosterone
which accelerates growth in
tissues upon which it acts.
Although testosterone is not con-
sidered a pure anabolic steroid, it
is being used more frequently b
athletes due to its potent anabolic
effects and the difficult) ol detec-
ting it through laboratory testing.
Anabolic steroids are sometimes
used by weight litters, football
players, pole vaulters, and discus
The Health Column By
Man. Klesha Adams
throwers with the hope of enhan-
cing performance. Gymnasts may
use them with the deliberate in-
tention of stunting growth. Most
athletes get these substances from
sources other than medical pro-
viders and use them in doses
much greater than recommended
levels.
Benefits of anabolic steroids
include increased muscle mass,
euphoria and a sense of decreased
fatigue-more energy and en-
durance. Studies have shown,
however, that those athletes who
train intensively in heavy resistive
activities such as weight lifting
will see an increase in muscle
mass. A special diet must be
coordinated with exercise and
steroid use to show any benefit.
The trade off for these
minimally beneficial effects are
possibly serious side effects in-
cluding gynecomastis (abnormal-
ly large breasts in men), a
decrease in the size of the
testicles, enlargement of the pro-
state gland, nausea, diarrhea,
and in women, hirsutism (ex-
cessive hail growtl in unlikely
a reas- f ace, c h es t), and
muscularization that maj i be
reversed Anabolic steroids rna
cause progressive liver destruc-
tion, 'here is a possiblitily that
liver cancer may, be a result of
steroid use. In addition, the in-
crease in strength and muscle
mass disappears once anabolic
steroids are discontinued.
Because the side effects and
the limited beneficial use of
anabolic steroids, the American
College ol sports Medicine has
discouraged their use.
attempted larceny of his bicycle
and vandalism to the bike while
parked in the bike rack north of
Aycock.
10:45 p.m.
Jan Michael Tolson of Aycock
dorm was served with a warrent
for arrest for Felonious posses-
sion of a controlled substance.
May 1
2:20 a.m.
Mark Brown of Ayden was ar-
rested for DWI and driving
without a license south of
Memorial Gvm.
8:50 a.m.
Garrett dorm resident reported
the larceny ot his bicycle from
east of Garrett dorm.
10:40 a.m.
A Greenville resident reported
the larceny of her bicycle form
southeast of the Raw! Building.
2:30 p.m.
A White dorm resident
reported the larceny of a bicycle
from Southeast of White Dorm
which occured early in April.
May 2
12:30 p.m.
A Jones Hall resident reported
the larceny of his bicycle from
West of Jones Hall.
8:30 p.m.
An officer reported the larceny
and recovery of a bicycle South
oi Jones and Northeast of
Aycock.
May 3
12:01 a.m.
Wayne Monschen and Patricia
Suggs both from New Bern were
banned after the car in which
both were passengers of was stop-
ped on Mall Dr. and marijuana
was found in the same.
2:35 a.m.
Fredrick Carr Davis was ar-
rested for DWI on Mall Dr.
11:30 a.m.
An Aycock resident reported
the vandalism to his vehicle park-
ed east of Avcock Hall.
12:55 a.m.
An L'mstead resident reported
:he larceny of his wallet from his
room in L'nstead.
2:01 p.m.
An Aycock resident was found
in possession of pyrotechnics and
controlled substance in his dorm
room.
:45
� Tvler hall resident had her
car vandalized while parked in
the 14th andiieikley parking lot.
Mav 5
12:45 a.m.
A Greenville resident reported
the larceny of his bicycle from
north of Joyner Library.
12:45 a.m.
A Jarvis dorm resident
reported the larceny of her bike
from West of Jarvis dorm.
3:30 p.m.
A Belk dorm resident was serv-
ed a warrant for assult on a
female.
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Greenville Square Shopping Center
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Balloons For A11 Occasions
6:35 p.m.
A Newport resident reported
the breaking and entering of his
vehicle while parked north of
Tyler and the larceny of jewelry
from the vehicle.
May 6
4:00 p.m.
A Jones dorm resident
reported the larceny of his bicycle
from the bike shed East of Jones.
11:00 p.m.
Four Jones residents and two
Tyler residents were found in
possession of paraphernalia and
pyrotechics in a Jones dorm
room.
May 7
10:30 a.m.
An Aycock dorm resident
reported the larceny of his bike
from the North side of Aycock.
May 8
10:20 a.m.
A Scott dorm resident reported
the breaking and entering of his
room and larceny of personal
items by ah Aycocjoresident.
10:30 a.m. V
A vehicle reportedly owned by
a Jarvis resident was vandalized
while parked South of Belk
dorm.
12:59 a.m.
A medical student reported
vandalism to her vehicle while
parked in the Northwest
registered parking lot at the ECU
School of Medicine.
6:30 p.m.
A vehicle operated by an
Aycock resident was reported
broken into and entered. The
vehicle was parked in 14th and
Berkley freshman parking lot.
May 11
2:35 p.m.
An Aycock dorm resident
reported the breaking and enter-
ing and larceny of items from his
room.
May 12
5:05 a.m.
A Greensboro resident
reported the larceny oi his
father's painting from Room 205
Jenkins Art.
May 15
11:30
Hence Ray Bryant oi Warren-
ton was found in possession of a
weapon in his vehicle while on
campus. Mr. Bryant was banned
from campus for suspicious ac-
tivity and carrying a weapon on
campus.
5TH STREET
IMPORT SERVICE
WE REPAIR TOYOTA, HONDA, VW,
FIAT, PORSCHE, VOLVO, DATSUN,
LOTUS, MERCEDES. BMW, AUDI
AND OTHERS
DIAL
758-1534
lt7 E. 5TH
GREENVILLE
Stop hurting
the trees
you love.
A Unique Taste To The Area
Special Sandwiches
CORNBEEF-
A Baltimore favorite. The beef is slowly cooked
with a blend of spices served on a delk is rye or
white bread 2.50
PHILLEY STEAK
-Philadelphia's famous sandwich. Steak covered
with melted cheese and smothed in onions on a
roll 2.50
CRAB CAKE-
A Maryland tradition. This recipe from the eastern
shore will have you telling your friends about the
only real crab cake in North Carolina 2.50
SHRIMP-
A sassy combination of Chesapeake spices, deli-
cious shrimp served on your choice of bread. 2 25
SAUSAGE-
A taste of the State Fair. Hot. length italian sau-
sage, topped with sauteed green peppers and
onions1 50
Also
6 oz. Hamburgers
Subs with Extra Meat
Northern Style Pizza
752-9106
100 E. Tenth Street
&&qq�&






A ward Winning Ice Cream
Comes To Greenville!
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream










321 Tenth St. (near Wendy's)
Picked as one of the Top Five Ice Creams in the Nation two years in a row!
Featured on PM Magazine
Selected for inclusion in "The Very Best Ice Cream" by Warner Books
"The Store's Strawberry Ice Cream was the winner Akron Beacon Journal
4
J � the kinds of frozen desserts that people brave blizzards for Carol Robbms T










and Herbert Wolff, authors of "The Very Best Ice Cream'
Patricia ' 'Hank ' Steele, the founder of Hank 9s Homemade
Ice Cream is bringing her nationally acclaimed flavors
to Greenville
Old Fashioned hard ice cream made right in the store.
The very best ice cream, using the very best ingredients.
1�� In 1984 and 1985, Hank's participated in the National Ice Cream contest sponsored by the National Ice Cream Retailers
1� Association. Both years Hank's was selected as one of the top five ice creams in the U.S.
? Hank's uses a custom built ice cream machine to make its delicious desserts. Modern ice cream machines turn the dasher too
quickly which puts a lot of air in the ice cream. Many of the ice creams you buy are half air. We had our ice cream freezer
Ij� specially built to turn the dasher at the speed of the old fashioned hand-cranked freezers so we can get the same rich pure
tl� flavors.
? A speciality at Hank's is the BLEND-IN. You pick your favonte ice cream flavor, and your favonte fruit or candy and then
we put them in our special blend-in machine and combine them into your own personal flavor The blend-in machine breaks up
J� the candy or fruit into small pieces and mixes it into the ice cream. It tastes great because the candy or frui' doesn't get frozen
!�, so it still has its full flavor while the ice cream stays frozen, so you get the best of both.
Hank's will be open from 11 a.m. lo 11 p.m Monday through Saturday, and 12 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Sundays.
Special Introductory Offer
We want you to find out for yourself how
good ice cream can be. So bring a friend
and come on down to Hank's and take
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McDonalds and Wendy's.).
11:00-11:00 MonSat.
12:00-11:00 Sun.
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321 E. 10th St. (next to Wendy's)
BUY 1 Sundae or Blend-In
Get One
FREE
Coupon good through
Tuesday, May 27, 1986






"
� - � ��, � ,





Stye iEaat (ttarnlmian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom LuvENDER,GWa.M��
Daniel M aurer, v� �
Mike I udwick, v,� s��or Steve Folmar, d� ia
Scon Cooper, sporae�� Anthony Martin, �� (-1M.��r,
Joh n Sh wnon. ,w �,� meg Needham, a �anagtr
DeChanile Johnson, �����, Shannon Short, !�� Mmmtrr
Ma 21, 1986
TIPINION
Page 4
Scruples
Where Do You Keep Yours?
Scruples. Have you ever
wondered about them? Of course
not, you're a college student. You
hae more important things to
worry about, like how to finagle
yourself a free Domino's pizza.
Stop a minute and think about,it.
Are the scruples you exercise at
school the same as those you use on
the home front?
Hell no!
Would you hang out your
bedroom window at home yelling at
the passing women while rating
them with olympic-style score
cards? Probably not.
Would you attempt the world's
beer bong consumption record with
your parents looking on? Hardlv
likely.
Hov about those frank sexual
discussions with your friends. You
know, the ones that go like this:
'Yeah we (censored). Then 1 (even
more censored). And 1 have pic-
tures, too Would you attempt
such a conversation with good ol'
Worn an' Dad? Not unless you have
a death wish.
So what happens to our scruples
when we leave the nest? I have a
theory. You see. 1 believe college
students store their scruples in an
old shoe box and hide them away in
the back of their bedroom closets.
Don't laugh. I'm serious.
Think about what it's like to
return home after just two months
al school. You get home and right
awa you reach for your hidden
shoe box. Quickly, you slip into
your scruples, only to find they
don't fit like they used to.
For instance, when Dad proudly
pats you on the back and hands you
a Bud, instead of saying thank you,
you find yourself reaching for the
beer bong.
And how about this scenario?
You sit down for a heart warming
talk with Mom. Much to your sur-
prise, you finds your vocabulary has
deteriorated and you must struggle
to refrain from punctuating your
sentences with vulgarities.
You know it's bad when your
parents say something about it, and
they undoubtedly will.
Your Dad might say something
like, "your mother and 1 worked
hard to give you those scruples. The
least you could do is wear them at
the dinner table
A little far fetched, perhaps?
Perhaps, but not far from the
truth. No matter what it is, there
will be a difference between the way
you act at home and the way you
carry on at school, and that dif-
ference will be signifigant.
I'm not here to tout the scruples
of our parents. Celibacy and sobrie-
tv are no! my favorate past-times.
In tact. I rather enjoy hanging from
my dormroom window and
shouting at the pretty women on oc-
casion. What bothers me about it is
this: which set of scruples would I
want my son or daughter to have?
S)��i�ei(7�)vSvA3SI-o7Sir
Chernobyl Disaster Is Irrelevant
To The Stars Or Bust!
The American space program is
still in its infancy, and like any in-
fant, it should be treated with
understanding. The Challenger ex-
plosion was tragic and the Delta
rocket mishap unfortunate. The
unending barrage of criticism that
NASA has received, however, is in-
excusable.
Since the Challenger disaster, the
Presidential Panel of inquiry has
been investigating, and the shuttles
Columbia, Atlantis, and Discovery
have been grounded, as well they
should be. These are simplv nec-
cessary steps on NASA's road to
recovery.
Unfortunately, there are a few
gentlemen in Washington who
would like to see them grounded in-
definately. They're a trifle miffed at
having millions of dollars burn up
in the atmosphere, not to mention
seven Americans as well. This is
understandable. On the other hand,
giving serious consideration to
replacing maned space flights with
unmaned flights is a little tougher to
swallow.
Sending robots into space instead
of men is equivalent to cheating on
a final exam. You get results, but
the sense of accomplishment is lost.
We wouldn't be reaching for the
stars, but rather sitting behind com-
puter screens. Let's not send a
machine to do a man's job.
Q. In connection with the Soviet
fiasco-tragedy at Chernobyl, we hear a
lot about "containments What is a
"containment and why such an
awkward word?
A. To the second question, there is
no answer. It's like complaining about
the word "discussant" to designate an
academic participant who analyzes a
paper. But the word has a technical
meaning. A containment is a reinforced
On The Right
By WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY JR.
concrete structure whose purpose is to
contain all but trivial radiation leaks in
the event of an accident in nuclear
power plants.
Q. Isn't it true that there are
American nuclear plants that, like
Chernobyl, are without containments?
A. No. At least, no in the alarmest
sense in which you raise the question.
Containments are needed for protection
against nuclear plants of the kind that
can generate heat of a particular (i.e
dangerous) level. Those American
plants that do not have containments
are not engaged in generating that kind
of heat.
0- Sounds sophistical to me.
A. Listen, if you want to take the
position that because the Soviet Union
had a nuclear power accident, the
United States should discontinue
nuclear energy, go ahead and take that
position, but please stop asking me
questions, because I know what I'm
talking about and you probably don't,
so if you aren't in the mood to learn,
just go away.
Q. What are your credentials, Mr.
Know-It-All?
A. I read reports from non-
ideologized sources. For instance, here
is something that appeared in a book,
The War Against the Atom, in 1982, by
Samuel McCracken of Boston Universi-
ty. He wrote: "The absence of an anti-
nuclear movement in the Soviet Union
was (attributed) to the superior safety
of the People's reactors. What was
not generally reported was that most
Soviet reactors have no containments.
Had a Three Mile Island-tvpe accident
happened at one of these uncontained
reactors, there would almost certainlv
have been very serious releases of
radioactivity
Q. Are you saying that the lack of
containments in Chernobyl poses
special problems that we in the United
States don't need to worry about0
A. In a way, yes. Where we do not
have containments, we are not in the
business of producing the high-heat
nuclear energy made dangerous by the
lack of containments. Brace yourselt,
and let me use scientific lingo. Cher-
nobyl and her sisters are, as Dr. Mc-
Cracken points out, "worse than un-
contained reactors: they are uncontain-
ed, water-cooled, graphite-moderated
reactors, a design used tor power
generation nowhere but in the Soviet
Empire
Q. So?
A. So, what happens in such un-
protected nuclear mechanisms is that
they tend to develop hot spots (the
scientists call them "Wigner energy")
within their core. When that happens,
you need to cool them, and this requires
very delicate manipulations. Mc-
Cracken reminds us that graphite burns
at temperatures sufficient to dissociate
the oxygen and hydrogen in water, and
this produces an explosive mixture of
Scandals And Collese Sports
great power. As he put it: " I �
that water can be as unsa
gasoline for putting out a gra;
The explosion that appear
devastated Chernobyl l
been the result of trying to exi t
graphite fire with water
Q. But it was still an a
v-idents can happen here a- �-
can't thev'1
A. Sure. But when you U
cident, bear in mmd ea . j
are saying. It was an ace
Soviet Union that was the I
of Soviet failure
precautions. It was an a.
same sense that a vie tin
driving can be said to have I
cidental victim
Q. Well, if you wan: l
minology, isn't it possible
United States we might ais
cident of the drunken-dr
A. No, actually. Becau M
Cracken points out, we
graphite power reactor- ha
by water The only graphite r
tor we have is cooled not b
bv helium gas. which is
stuff, never reaching the
Wigner enetgy. Lverv sing
power plant in the United S
containment.
Q. You are concluding thai
nobvl has no relevance for U.S
energv planning?
A. I conclude that it ought i
relevance because it is scicntificallv
apposite It will have political eff(
because it truckles to the anti-n
lobby in the United States, whicl
tinues to prefer 20,000 per vear
from the burning of coal, whose to :i
ty is a matter of record, to zero
from the use of nuclear energv.
Proposition 48 Does Little To Help
sw6arouim mL
ASTCAMSTER
ACC0RP(M6TD
OURTRAPlTiOAi,
OFFICER JONES
MU READ WO
WOR RIGHTS
By MALCOLM GLADWELL
The New Republic
Jan Kemp, an instructor in Universi-
ty of Georgia's remedial education pro-
gram, was fired from her job in 1982
because she refused to give preferential
treatment to athletes. Kemp sued, and
over the course of the trial � which she
eventually won � an astonishing,
though not atypical, picture of the ex-
ploitation of college athletes emerged.
Perhaps as few as 15 of the 20 blacks
who have played sports for Georgia
since the color line was broken in 1969
have graduated. Nine football players
flunking out of a remedial studies
course were mysteriously allowed into
the regular curriculum stream in order
to remain eligible for the 1981 Sugar
Bowl championship.
When Kemp refused to change the
failing grades of six "student athletes
another university official told her:
"Who do you think is more important
at this university, you or a very promi-
nent basketball player?"
The answer is obvious. Big-time
athletic competition is far more impor-
tant than education at many major
public universities, and nothing is likely
to change that.
Perhaps most disturbing is the way
college athletics systematically exploits
black youths. Memphis State Universi-
ty, for example, has earned much fame
and substantial television revenues for
its successful basketball teams, but in
the oast 12 years not a single one of its
many black players has graduated.
Nationwide the graduation rate for
black athletes is roughly 25 percent, and
three-quarters of those who do
graduate have physical education
degrees.
In the 1960s the universities used the
rhetoric of racial progress to justify
their treatment of black athletes. Offer-
ing scholarships to ghetto kids was bill-
ed as an enlightened form of affir-
mative action. But the dozens of recent
scandals have made it clear that the ma-
jor sports powers care little about
educating blacks.
At the University of Georgia, blacks
dominate the locker rooms, but make
up a tiny 4.5 percent of the student
population. In the Kemp trial everyone
stopped pretending. Hale Almond, an
attorney for the University of Georgia,
explained to the jurors: "We may not
make a university student (out of an
athlete). But if we can teach him to read
and write, maybe he can work at the
post office rather than as a garbage
man
The old liberal rhetoric of affirmative
action has been succeeded by the
Reagan-era rhetoric of education
reform. In January the 700 member
schools of the National Collegiate
Athletic Association adopted a
measure, known as Proposition 48, that
apparently would toughen admissions
standards for incoming student
athletes.
Under the old rules, athletes had to
have a mere 2.0 high school graduating
grade point average. Proposition 48
calls for a 2.0 average in 11 designated
"core" courses, and stipulates that
athletes score at least a combined 700
on the SAT.
The bill has its opponents, many of
them from predominantly black schools
who call it a form of "apartheid Jesse
Jackson, Benjamin Hooks of the
NAACP, and the National Association
for Equal Opportunity in Higher
Education have all at one time or
another pointed out that since the me-
dian SAT score for black male athletes
is below -00. Proposition
discriminates on the basis of race Bui
they are overwhelmed by the bill's s
porters, who have been loudlv con-
gratulating themselves on their conn
ment to "academic excellence
But it's no coincidence that the
strongest supporters of the new rule are
those colleges � such as Georgia -
that have been most guilty cA
defrauding athletes of educations in
past. For these schools, Proposition 4f
is simply an opportunity to posture
about academic excellence without ac
tuallv having to take anv meaningfu
action.
Consider the academic standards that
Proposition 48 establishes. You score
400 points on the SAT simplv bv sign
ing your name. If you randomIv fill oul
the answer sheet, you can get a 460. A
700 SAT score hardly signifies a tough
stand in favor of acadmeic excellence ot
a stern warning to high schools and
elementary schools.
Proposition 48, at best, will require
that athletes be literate before entennf
college - radical by NCAA standards,
laughable by any other.
Moreover, Proposition 48 doesn't re-
quire that the colleges clean up their act
at all. The scandal is not only who gets
into college, but also what happens to
the student athletes once they're there.
Despite all the pub�ic preening about
"excellence the NCAA has three
times rejected a modest proposal that
would require student athletes to main-
tain a minimum GPA sufficient to
graduate with a C average.
As for the complaint that Proposi-
tion 48 will cause "apartheid it is
simply a more pathetic version of the
same cynicism.
Can
How do vou tt about tl
Jatkie Britt
Seniir ommunuaUnn
"1 tee
in the V
the tour-
have a '�
Mm
Bret Patlon
Sophomore. Musk
"I think we
because we have i .
prograrr.
Conserve Hater
Shower
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OVERTO
CONNEC
Choose from a
items including
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SA
I

M





I HI I AM AKOI INIAN
MAY 21,
!Vft
MO
IRAPIATION
Irrelevant
" I his means
actory as
graphite fire.
ippears to have
1 may have
extinguish i
dent, and a
. .1- well as there,
ii an aci
Jem m the
direct result
�jmentary
� in the
' drunkei
have been an ac
use that ter
ai m the
� ave an a
. 'vanetv?
tuse as Mc
we have no
- thai are cooled
wet reac-
water but
ative kid-
E problem ot
igle nucleai
5 ates has a
. g thai Cher-
� l s nucleai
:al effects �
� anti-nuclear
v. which con-
ei -ear dead
w hose toxici-
zero dead
ttle To Help
1
position 48
basis oi race. But
. he bill's sup-
been loudlv con-
.� on their commit-
- excellence
cidence that the
he new rule are
ich as Cieorgia �-
isl guilty of
es ot educations in the
K, Proposition 48
munity to posture
excellence without ac-
iake any meaningful
id
' e academic standards thai
'�� establishes. You score
� " n the SAT simply by sign-
c If vou randomly fill out
mswer sheet, you can get a 460. A
re hardly signifies a tough
: in favor of acadmeic excellence or
rn warning to high schools and
elementary schools.
Pi p ttition 48, at best, will require
that athletes be literate before entering
ege radical by NCAA standard?,
laughable by anv other.
Moreover, Proposition 48 doesn't re
quire that the colleges clean up their act
at all. The scandal is not only who gets
into college, but also what happens to
the student athletes once they're there
Despite all the public preening about
excellence the NCAA has three
times rejected a modest proposal that
would require student athletes to main-
tain a minimum GPA sufficient to
graduate with a C average.
As for the complaint that Proposi
tion 48 will cause "apartheid it if
simpiy a more pathetic version of
same cynicism.
M
1
Campus Voice
How do you feel about the ECU Baseball Team being denied a bid to the NCAA playoffs?
Fewer Will Receive Aid
Jackie Britt
Senior, Communications
"I feel if they're qualified to be
in the NCAA they should be in
the tournament especially if they
have a better record than other
schools
Bill kern
Graduate Student, Industrial
Technology
"We got overlooked; we have
good potential and 1 think they
went with the big name teams like
they usuallv do
Waller Young
Senior, Hroadcasting
"With the recent success of all
the sports I think the sports
should get more respect
Bret Patton David Havens
Sophomore, 1usic Senior, Economh
"I think we should have gone, "Well, it sounds like ECU
because we have a good baseball again was put down b its party
program and should have gone reputation "
Crej Smith
Junior, Economics
"I don't think it was fair. They
deserve to no
(CPS) � Fewer students should
be able to get tederal student aid
in the future, savs a report by the
conservative Washington think
tank that has supplied the Reagan
administration with most of its
college policy ideas.
Aid policies now waste U.S.
tax dollars by "throwing good
money after bad students the
Heritage Foundation's latest
policy report claims.
The report, which also suggests
taking aid away from students
earning less than a C average, ad-
vocates a major revamping u the
Higher Education Act now
before Congress.
A major problem, the report
concludes, is that "federal stu-
dent aid has provided anyone
who wants with the means to
finance a college education
The last time the Heritage
foundation issued a new
blueprint tor higher education in
I980, the administration adopted
most of its suggestions m bills it
proposed to Congress in 1981 and
1982.
The latest report, "A Seven-
Point Strategy for federal Aid to
Higher Education was written
by Eileen Gardner, a foundation
fellow who holds a doctorate in
M.ral Education and Human
Development trom Harvard.
Gardner argues the Higher
Education Ac the bill now in
Congress that literally will define
the federal government's role in
financing colleges and their
students during the next five
years � needs "sub
changes
Gardner concedes her pro-
posals foi the aci ate even m
radical than the administration's.
which she savs shy away from
"tampering" with ideals about
providing "education for all
(jardner proposes that students
needing remedial classes or earn-
ing less than a C average in col-
lege be cut off federal aid.
"College is nol for everyone
she reaw ns. "It doesn't mean
you're a bad person (if you get
bad grades). You jus; need to go
somewhere else "
"I would love to find a good
mechanic she adds as a sugges-
tion.
By giving federal aid only to
"quality" needy students, the
government will remove the
"perverse incentives" that have
encouraged universities to replace
core curricula with sub-college-
level courses, she savs.
"Colleges are competing for
the federal dollars linked to
remedial studeni she says.
"Easy money encourages colleges
to increase cost and to cut quali-
ty"
At leas one other Washington
scholar disagrees.
"It's no big trick to take a Na-
tional Merit scholar and graduate
turn. Our universities' challenge
is with the inner-city kids savs
Boh Aarons of the Nationa
Association of State Universitie
and Land Grand Colleges and a
lecturer ai Georgetown Universi
ty.
"It K (kindergarten) through
12 hasn't done the job, and if wi
can salvage that individual at the
college level, that studerr
deserves to be saved
Gardner, however, maintain
that the low-quality student is
costly investment with little pro
spec! ot repaying society.
"The academically poor studn
won't get that much better (in
college) she claims. "He'll just
undercut the quality of everyone
else's education
The essence of the issue seem
to be whether universal access to
education is a right or even im
portant, Gardner concludes.
Education Secretary William
Bennett has yet to reply to heT
study, and it may be too late for
Oardner's ideas to be incor-
porated into this year's Higher
Education Reauthorization Act,
she condedes.
"But I hope it will encourage
some provocative discussion in
the future she says.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 21, 1986
f �
Business Community Donates To Colleges
(CPS) � Gifts to rh nafinn'c nf.nM;nn,
(CPS) Gifts to the nation's
colleges and universities reached
a record $6.32 billion last year,
footing about $516 of the average
student's education costs, the
Council for Financial Aid to
Education reports.
And the business community,
for the first time, became the
largest donor. As a group, cor-
porations gave $1.57 billion,
which was 23.8 percent more
than the previous year.
Many hope the increase signals
a trend in private support that
could allay the damage done to
college programs by recent
federal and state budget cuts.
"Business is responding (to
government cuts) by taking a
larger role says council presi-
dent John Haire in the report.
In all, private donations
covered about 6.6 percent of the
$7,801 schools spent on the
average student in 1984-85.
Private generosity hasn't been
that high since 1950, when gifts
comprised 9.6 percent of college
costs.
Donations, moreover, rose at a
faster rate12.9 percent-than the
Higher Education Price Index,
which measurs the cost of goods
and services purchased by col-
leges and universities.
The Higher Ed Price Index
went up by 6.7 percent last year.
But not all campus programs
benefit from corporate support.
Faculty at Indiana University,
for instance, are concerned that a
disproportionate amount of its
foundation's money is specified
for athletics and programs linked
to specific business interests.
IU's proposed clinival science
building, for instance, alreadv
has accumulated $7.5 million in
pledges, while other priority pro-
jects such as a theater building
and a culture center have yet to
win significant funding.
Indeed, businesses donate
mostly to meet their own needs
for graduate-level engineers and
business majors.
International Business
Machines, one of the largest cor-
porate donors gave $55 million in
1985 to business, engineering and
physical science programs.
And the American Electronics
Association reports record sup-
port of its education fund last
year, despite the industry's recent
downturn.
The foundation pumped more
than $2.7 million into graduate
programs to retain faculty and
graduate students who otherwise
might leave school for high-
paying jobs in the industry, ex-
plains Jeff Parietti of the Elec-
tronics Education Foundation.
"We realized we couldn't keep
taking (bachelor-level students)
without putting something back
into the (education) system
without our quality eventually
suffering Parietti says.
Gifts of company products
also have taken on new impor-
tance, accounting for 15.1 per-
cent of donations, the council
reports.
Computer companies, in par-
ticular, view product gifts as in-
vestments. They often provide
computers to college students in
hopes they'll continue to buy
them in business and private life.
On the other hand, University
of Texas alumnus Robert Ded-
man recently donated $10 million
tor undergraduate liberal arts
s-holarships, describing it as a
"pump primer" to encourage
others to support the liberal arts
with no strings attached.
Alumni such as Dedman were
colleges' second-larges source of
gifts, donating $1.46 billion in
1984-85, compared with $1.3
billion in 1983-84. Non-alumni
individuals contributed $1.42
billion, up from $1.2 billion
And non-corporate founda-
tions gave $1,175 million, com
pared to $1,27I million the year
previous Unlike in years
previous, foundations' stock
portfolios accounted for little of
the increae, says council
spokeswoman Joan Lundberg
Foundation contributions
roughly equaled what they, in
turn, had received from outside
sources last year, she says.
Though the Council on Finan-
cial Aid to Education didi
what type t programs rece
support, it did list which st
reported the largest donar.
The top 10 were: Har.
S145 billion; Stanford, Si: �
million; Columbia, $93.4 mil
Cornell, $91.9 million; V
$85.4 million; Princeton, J
million; Massachusetts nstil .
of Technology, $78.3 mill,
hnois, $70J million; and
University oi Pennsylvai
$66.0 million.
Commuters Receive Less Aid
Reports Of Female Abuse
Rise On College Campuses
(CPS) � "It's a huge, hidden
population on campus says
Ohio State University counselor
Barbara Fisher of the number of
battered women on American
campuses.
"We have just begun to peel
the onion she adds.
Although she has no statistics
to confirm her notions about
"relationship violence" on cam-
puses. Fisher contends the pro-
blem may be on the rise. "I really
don't know if it has increased,
but my sense is that it has
Fisher and colleague Hattie
Johnson-Nails started a program
on the campus last fall because,
"Of my (female) clients, more
than half have been abused
Currently, Fisher and
Johnson-Nails counsel ten OSU
women.
But at the University of Min-
nesota, which has just started a
program for battered women,
counseling service director
Elizabeth Wales isn't sure rela-
tionship violence is increasing on
campus.
Society, she savs, is less
tolerant of battering, and that en-
courages more women to report
abuse.
"Sex violence is embedded in
the culture, but the culture is
changing Wales says.
Where Wales sees positive
cultural changes. Fisher finds
decay and danger.
"It's the Rambo complex;
everything can be solved through
violence Fisher laments, ad-
ding the current conservative
mood may facilitate a rising pro-
pensity toward violence.
In her counseling of battered
women, Fisher says the pattern
begins with boyfriends verbally
abusing their mate, either by
degrading the woman's intellec-
tual ability or attacking her sex-
ually .
Physical violence would
follow. Fisher savs.
The victims then "dissociate.
the) numb out to w ha: is happen-
ing Fisher adds. They often
den there are problems in the
relationship.
The tendency toward denial
and books suggest that 60 percent
of married women will be bat-
tered once in their lives leacK
Fisher to believe the problem is
grow ing.
Hsher also estimates 80 percent
ol the cases involving the battery
ol women are alcohol related.
Site Explored By ECU Staff
KCT News Bureau
An Indian village site in Hyde
County that appears to be the re-
mains of an Algonkian village
visited by English explorers in
1585 will be studied this summer
by archaeologists from East
Carolina University.
With funding from the
America's 400th Anniversary-
Committee, archaeologist Paul
R. Green will continue the study
that discovered in 1985 the village
site near Lake Mattamuskeet.
The site conforms to early maps
and written accounts of the
village called Pomeiooc provided
by the English explorers from Sir
Walter Raleigh's expedition to
Roanoke Island.
Green says the site appears to
date to the late 16th century and
may well be the village of
Pomeiooc. "Test excavations at
the site last summer recovered a
variety of compelling evidence in
the way of artifacts and features
which supports this possibility
he said.
The village is best known and
illustrated in the maps and draw-
ings of John White, an artist with
(CPS) � Commuter college
students often do not get their
fair share of federal aid money,
claims a new study commissioned
by the American Council on
E:ducation (ACE )
The aid sstem, education son
sultant Scott F. Miller found in
the ACE survev of 15,000
students, tends to punish com-
muter students because it doesn't
let them count ail their off-
campus living costs as expenses.
As a result, the students can't
get as much Pell Grant money as
they need, the studv concludes.
Most of the students affected
attend community colleges,
where officials estimate more
than 90 percent of the students
commute.
Miller traces the problem to the
late seventies, when college lob-
byists failed to get Congress
protect commuter students when
it adopted new formulas -
distributing financial aid.
"We were no; in the (lobbying i
game ear) enough concurs J
Robledo, director t financial aid
tor the I os Angeles Community
College Distru:
"The big schools cleaned up
the grant market" b getting an
earlv star adds Andrea Boll
of the American Association of
Community and Junior Colleges.
Commuter students also gel
hurt because aid programs don't
consider the needs of "nontradi-
tional" students who may be
parents, older than 22 years or
hold part-time jobs. Miller savs.
"This is a new and emerging
population on college
campuses he observes.
Nevertheless, federal aid for-
mulas do not include childrearing
expenses in calculating how much
grant money students need
But the lower tuitions of the
two-year schools don't mean
commuter students can do
without aid money, savs Arthur
Cohen of the University of
California at Los Angeles.
"We are low cost Boiling
savs. "but we have extraordinary
need" because main of
students come from low-income
backgrounds.
The new Higher Education
Reauthorization Act now in Con-
gress includes several proposals
that would help solve commuter
students' problems, says
Wolanin, staff director
House Subcommittee
Postsecondary Education
But the bill's outcome is unci
tain because severe bu
' cstramts
chanj aid lead (
kill �
"People are being caul
Boiling says. 'W I
lose the whole boat
Oapd
What's New
Posters and Poster Frames � Tee
Shirts � Cards � Prisms � Hand-
Crafted Jewelry � And Much
More to Surprise and Delight You
;
i
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756-7235
iMUs
Open 10 to )0
Mon-Sot
Sir Walter Raleigh's 1585 expedi-
tion and the appointed governor
for the ill-fated Lost Colony of
1587.
White visited the village on Ju-
ly 12, 1985 in the company of Sir
Richard Grenville, Ralph Lane
and Thomas Hariot who were
among those commissioned bv
Sir Walter Raleigh to establish a
colony in the land that had been
claimed for England in 1584.
After exploring the region,
Roanoke Island was chosed as
the site for a colony but two
subsequent settlement attempts
failed.
Green said the village site is
"largely intact" and that
preliminary excavation last year
revealed soil stains from post
holes and several refuse pits con-
taining shellfish, fish bones, tur-
tle shells, deer bones and pottery.
An unusual "ditch" some two
feet wide and two feet deep was
also oberved. Green said the
ditch may have been a refuse pit
but it could also have supported
the circular palisade that White
illustrated in his drawings of the
village.
Work planned at the site this
year includes extensive excava-
tions to expose and define the
orientation and relationships of
buildings and features within the
site and to provide the types of
information necessary to deter-
mine whether the site is actuallv
Pomeiooc.
Presents
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Miner Card Hi Visa art accepted
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S11 EVANS ST.
GREENVILLE, N.C. 1UU
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Summe
The ECU Summe-
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award-wmning Americ u
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ECU campus tl
a company ol
way. Television and H
Season tickets are curreni
sale in the Messick 1
Center, or may be resei
telephone with VIS
y ai d charge b calling
Headlii
four-time Emmy
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on the popu
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"Nurse 1 eai
ac
Prize-Win
By JOHN MIWNON
V f�iure� rdif�w
As
another swelte
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come as a relit
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manager Mary Jean Boonr
prepares a fresh waffle com, the
ultimate vehicle for an ice cream
called "one of the very best" t�
hJ





) Colleges
didn't track
v ams received
schools
a ions
Harvard,
�i. $125.5
VvJ 4 million,
ion; Yale,
ceton, $79.4
isetts Institute
P8.3 million; H
and the
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YNITE
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rill EAS1 l Roi INIAN
Features
MAY 21, 1VW)
I'age 1
At Least One Club Likely To Survive Law
By DAVID BRADSHAW
S4�ff Hrll�r
Straight from the 1985 North
olina Session laws. Chapter
(I, House Bill 101 (Read it and
ecp)
N AC 1 TO RAISE THE
MINIMUM AGE FOR PUR-
HASE, POSESSION, AND
NSl MPTION OF MALT
VERAGES AND UNFOR-
1 11 111) WIN!
: 's right, they're really go-
do it to us Beginning
Septembei 1. W86 � at least
y're giving us the first week of
�es to get looped legally � the
nimum ace for drmkine an
beverage wil
1
- new law means that most
ihmen and sophomores will be
gal (at least when they drink).
1 his new status means that these
ticular persons will not be able
go downtown to drink. So
ha1 does this mean0
For starters, it means a lot of
uble dnd a revamping of the
lowntown bar scene lorn
Haines, owner of the Attic, says,
"The industry is going to change
dramatically. There's no doubt
about it
Hames is currently in the pro-
� �1 gearing the Attic up for
u ge I he ttic became a
private club on May 1 and is now
serving wme and liquor in addi-
beer. You must be 18 or
Ider
he
member, and
memebership fees are $5.00.
The Attic has also been
physically renovated � 1 mean
really renovated. Most people
think they're in the wrong place
when they walk and feel a nice,
soft carpet beneath their feet.
They know they're in the wrong
place when they head for the
foosball tables only to find a o
lounge area tilled with several
big, fluffy couches. (These
should be great for passing out
on). This area looks like it could
be somebody's living room ex-
cept that it's a lot nicer than most
people's living rooms.
Overhead, there v a low.
acoustically built ceiling with a
number of ceiling tans to keep
everybody cool. The acoustics in
the remodeled Attic are so good
that you can sit and carry on a
normal conversation even when a
band is playing.
As you near the stage area, the
Attic looks more its normal self.
I his part is nice because you can
get a taste of the old as well as the
new. The floors in this area are
Still wooden, so it' you have to
dtop a cigarette or a beer, you do
it up front!
Hames explained that the cost
of remodeling and turning the
Attic into a private club was
around $40,000. He also explain-
ed that there are more changes to
come, consisting mainly of for-
mal attractions rather than
physical ones.
Beginning in late August, there
will be some major format
changes. Haines is using a
"target marketing" approach in
an attempt to reach a diverse
clientele. There will be specific
nights for specific musical for-
mats; thus, there will be
something for everybody. Some
of these nights are already
undergoing trial runs � for in-
stance, tonight is "Wine, Women
and Wednesday featuring
original music by Off Center and
Soul Train.
Haines added, "There will be a
lot more activity, most of which
will start in the fall. We want to
involve people on a more per-
sonal basis
Haines also explained that this
period is the "most frustrating,
apprehensive, and scariest time"
he has faced in the nearly fifteen
I. MUM HI Mimi lk�iilu�l,i
This lounge area Is but one improvement made by the Attic recently. As a response to new drinking
age laws, the Attic has become a priate club and remodeled extensively. 18 ear olds and over are
eligible for memberships, which cost $5.
years the Attic has been open.
However, he is confident that the
solutions will overcome the pro-
blems.
But what about other night
clubs and bars in Greenville and
throughout the state? Many bars
in North Carolina are already
closing their doors � they just
can't cope with the changes. It is
possible that the nightlife in
downtown Greenville can still
prosper, but many people are not
so sure. Mark Saieed of Rafters
thinks the new law will have some
negative repercussions. He said,
"I definitely think it will hurt
business Unlike the Attic,
where a great deal of the
customers are already 21. Rafters
serves many 18 to 20-year-olds.
Furthermore, many of the
night spots downtown are only
bars, whereas the Attic also in-
cludes an entertainment schedule
to draw larger crowds.
Thus, the battle will be a tough
one, both for the club owners and
the patrons, and it is something
that we will have to endure until
the provision is declared un-
constitutional or otherwise in-
valid.
As for students under 21 who
are considering fake I.Ds: make
'em good because bars will con-
fiscate them and turn them in to
the Alcohol Law Enforcement
(ALE) agency. This action could
cost you a fine andor the loss of
your license.
Summer Theatre Boasts Brilliant Sche dule
The ECU Summer Theatre has
announced a season of tour
award-winning American com-
edies to be performed on the
ECU campus throughout July by
a company of stars from Broad-
way, Television and Hollywood.
Season tickets are currently on
sale the Messick Theatre Arts
Center, or may be reserved on the
telephone with VISA or Master-
Card charge by calling 757-6390.
Headlining the season will be
four-time Emmy Award-winner
Michael Learned, long-time star
the popular CBS television
series, "The Waltons" and
"Nurse Learned will lead a casl
oi veteran actors in the produc-
tion oi ladies in Retirement
Monday through Saturday. July
12, at 8:15 p.m with a special
matinee performance on Wednes-
day, July 9, at 2:15 p.m. Appear-
ing with Learned will be Holt
Wilson, who will be taking time
off from playing the role of
Bruce Emery on ABC's "All Mv
Children Wilson's Broadwav
credits include the current Neil
Simon hit, Biloxi Blues. Also
featured in the cast will be Broad-
wav. film and television veteran
Mavis Rav, who has performed
and choreographed for the Sum-
mer Theatre for twenty years
Iadies in Retirement is a
comedy-suspense-thriller about a
housekeeper who murders her
employer in order to find sanc-
tuary for her lovable, eccentric
sisters. Written by Edward Percy
and Reginald Denham, the play
opened in New York in 1940 and
was hailed by critics as the hit of
the season.
The second offering of the
summer season. The Foreigner,
will star Jerry verDorn, who
plays the role ol Ross Marlar on
the CBS television series. "The
Guiding Light Production
dates are set for Monday through
Saturday. July 14-19, at 8:15
p.m with matinees at 2:15 p.m.
on Wednesday, July 16, and
Saturday, July 19. VerDorn ap-
peared with Liza Minnelh on
Broadway in Are You Vow,
Ih � You Tver Been, and with
Jack Tanner in the highly ac-
claimed production of Man and
Superman. He is also known as
the television spokesman for
many of the nation's largest cor-
porations, including Sears,
Johnson and Johnson and Sports
Illustrated.
The Foreigner, which is still en-
joying its New York run, is also
an award-winning comedy, hav-
ing received Best New American
Play from the New York theatre
critics. Best off-Broadway Pro-
duction and two Obie Awards
las; year. Written by Larry Shue,
The boreigner revolves around an
Englishman who checks into a
Georgia fishing lodge and per-
suades the locals that he speaks
no English. He makes up his own
language and proceeds to gel in-
volved in preposterous goings-on
which involve a scheme by the Ku
Klux Klan to set up headquarters
in the lodge. He foils the bad
guvs and finds a new romance in
the bargain. Edith Oliver of The
Sew Yorker reviewed The
Foreigner as "Hilarious. I laugh-
ed from start to finish
Opening on Monday, July 21,
and continuing through Satur-
See STARS, page 9
Museum To Host
French Collection
Prize-Winning Ice Cream Has Arrived
By JOHN SHANNON
r�lurrs tdiiur
�s students settle in for
ither sweltering summer in
Greenville, visions ol ice cream
me as a relief a reminder oi
childhood priorities and a
motivation for getting up in the
morning. Most will gladly take a
break from studying to replenish
their bodies in a luxurious way,
and even the most diet-conscious
will come to realize that in the
case of ice cream, moderation
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
manager Mary Jean Boone
prepares a fresh waffle cone, the
ultimate vehicle for an ice cream
called "one of the very best" by
more than one reliable source.
Hank's will celebrate its grand
opening within the next two
weeks.
rather than abstinence is the key
to healthful living.
It is therefore not too surpris-
ing to find that the old Famous
Piza building, so long a burned-
out eyesore on the corner of
Tenth and Charles Streets, has
been transformed into Green-
ville's first "super premium" ice
cream parlor.
Mary Jean Boone, vice-
president of operations and
manager of Hank's Homemade
Ice Cream, says "the opportunity
was definitely here. There are no
other super-premium ice creams
in Greenville. There are also no
other blend ins Super
premium? "We make all our ice
cream here, from all natural in-
gredients. It costs a little more,
but that's due to the natural in-
gredients
Hank's already has an im-
pressive history, though the first
store was opened only in August
1983. Patricia "Hank" Steele, a
nurse and teacher for fifteen
years, decided to go into ice
cream because "it looked like a
good opportunity
She subsequently travelled a
good bit of the globe in search of
the best ice cream flavors. She
found them, but since ice cream
makers are naturally reluctant to
give up their recipes, "Hank"
created original recipes herself,
recipes which brought her ice
cream to the attention of the ice
cream world, according to
Boone.
"Less than a year after we
opened. Hank's was chosen by
the National Ice Cream Retailers
Association as one of the five
best ice creams of 1984 said
Boone, "specifically, our vanilla
and strawberry flavors. We were
chosen again in 1985. We were
featured on 'P.M. Magazine'
twice, and were featured in a
book published by Warner called
The ery Best of Ice C reams
"E.T. is our key to success
said Boone. "E.T. is what we call
our ice cream machine. It
duplicates the action of the old,
hand-cranked ice cream
makers which turn more slowly
and thus make creamier ice
cream.
Another feature unavailable
elsewhere is Hank's "blend in
Boone explains, "there is tradi-
tionally a problem with adding
ingredients to ice cream. The ice
cream has to stay frozen, but
other items, such as candy or
fruit, lose their flavor if they're
frozen also. At Hank's you can
choose from a variety of candies
or fruits and we'll blend them
with the ice cream right then, so
you can really create your own
flavors
As soon as a new freezer ar-
rives, Hank's will serve sorbets.
"Sorbets are pure fruit, no milk
products, mixed in the ET with
water and sugar Hank's has a
special frozen drink similar to the
sorbets which will be named in a
special contest when the freezer
arrives, and Hank's will have its
grand opening.
"1 was searching for a location
for the store in North Carolina
said Hank. "I drove into Green-
ville last August, on a hot, hot
day. I just liked it. It seemed
clean, a good university town.
And the townspeople seemed to
support ice cream
Anyone who's been in Green-
ville in the summer before has
seen what can happen to struggl-
ing new businesses � they tend to
shrivel in the unrelenting blast of
the furnace. Time and the
weather will tell if Patricia
"Hank" Steele and Mary Jean
Boone have judged correctly, if
Greenville dreams of ice cream, if
students are ready to loosen up
and refresh themselves.
A selection from one of the
country's finest collections of
French paintings, that of The
Chrysler Museum in Norfolk,
a will be presented in a major
exhibition at the North Carolina
Museum of Art. "French Pain-
tings from The Chrysler
Museum" is scheduled May 31 to
September 14.
The exhibition includes 45
works ranging from the early
17th century through the early
20th century, but is especially-
rich in works of the 19th century,
including Impressionist pain-
tings.
f he paintings were collected by
Walter P. Chrysler. Jr , son of
the automobile company founder
and one of the most astute
private collectors in America dur-
ing this century, according to Dr.
William J. Chiego, chief curator
of the North Carolina Museum
of Art, who has organized the ex-
hibition. In 1971, Chrysler began
giving his collection to the Nor-
folk Museum of Arts and
Sciences, which was subsequently
renamed for its benefactor.
The Chrysler Museum is cur-
rently renovating and expanding
its building, making it possible
for the French paintings to be
loaned for the exhibition for an
extended period of time. The ex-
hibition will also be shown at the
Birmingham Museum of Art in
Alabama.
Among the 17th and 18th cen-
tury masters represented in the
exhibition are La Tour, Chardin
and Boucher, whose "Pastorale:
The Vegetable Vendor" is con-
sidered one of his finest works in
the U.S.
The early 19th-century artists
represented include Gericault,
Delacroix and Corot. The great
academic painters are well
represented, from Ingres and
Gleyre to Gerome and
Bouguereau, as are the leading
painters of the Barbizon School,
including Millet and Rousseau.
Among the works by later
19th-century independents are a
notable group of early paintings
by Manet, Pissarro and Cezanne
and later works by Renoir,
Boudin, and Fantin-Latour. The
exhibition concludes with a ma-
jor group of post-Impressionist
and early modern works by
Degas, Gauguin, Matisse and
Braque.
The exhibition is accompanied
by a fully-illustrated catalogue,
written by Jefferson Harrison,
researcher at The Chrysler
Museum. Also available will be a
free gallery guide written by
Chiego with David Steel and Mit-
chell Kahan, curators at the
North Carolina Museum of Art.
The Raleigh showing of
"French Paintings from The
Chrysler Museum" is made
possible, in part, by the sponsor-
ship of North Carolina Chrysler-
Plymouth Dealers.
In conjunction with the exhibi-
tion, a lecture series on French
painting will be presented Thurs-
day evenings, June 5 to July 10.
Free films on French art will be
shown Sundays, July 27 and
August 3. Concerts of French
music are scheduled on Sundays,
June 8, 22, 29, July 20 and
August 10.
Two feature film series also are
scheduled: "Singin' in the Seine:
Musicals of Paris" on Friday
evenings, June 6 to July 18; and
"The Chase is On: Fifty Years of
French Crime Films" on
Wednesday evenings, July 16 to
August 30. "Festival Francais
a free family day, will take place
on June 21. Also scheduled
throughout the summer are
workshops for adults and
children.
Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. Wednesday through Satur-
day; 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday; 12
noon to 5 p.m. Sunday; closed
Monday and Tuesday. Admis-
sion is free. For information, call
(919) 833-1935.
K





1 HI I AST CAROI INKS
MAY 21, 1S86
BLOOM COUNTY
Band In Review
New Van Halen Rocks Hard
B DAVID MATTHFW
Maff �nwr
li uas about 6:45 last Friday
night, a little more than an hour
before Van Halen would crank
up a! the Greensboro Coliseum.
nd they were all there � the
faithful followers vho brought
an Halen to the top.
Suds were flowing in the
dollar-per-car parking lot. If the
wind happened to blow in a per-
son's general direction, a whiff of
the killer weed could be absorb-
ed The wind didn't needio blow,
come to think of it.
Bachman Turner Overdrive
(BTO) opened the show with
.� down home brand ol rock
and roll. The "O" in BTO should
stand tor "Overweight" instead
ot "Overdrive These southern-
tried fa; bou did the majority o
the crowd a favor by finishing oft
their set m about thirty minutes
BTO knew what the crowd
wanted. They wanted to see the
boys: Eddie, Alex, Michael and
Sammy. They wanted Van
Halen'
Perhaps the most
?n that the .� d of
around 15,000had i � i minds
was whether or I th
would play some Van Halei
tunes from the pre-Sammy Hagar
Ves rhe crowd hit the rool
.1 percussi i isi lex Van Halen
and his drum so: rose from
md the rest
ot the band torn ed the Col-
iseui �. they opened with the
. ty anthem. " ou R
I Me
ie of the
Van Halen : a � ever
their current 5150 1 P
1' : "Inside The lead
oca: Sammy Hagai were
�� lessfor most of the night ex-
�� p � ' iring "G
lih� young lady in the
t n�" v aught Samrm's eve
�i she lifted her skirt and
very lear to him that she
w a s wearing no underwear.
Hagar ould not sing tor nearly a
minutebecause of his breathtak-
ing v lev
rhe Pau also gave the crowd
some Van Haien oldies like
"Panama" and "Ain't Talkm'
'Bout love" while spicing up
the encore by borrowing tunes
from I ed Zeppelin and The Roll-
ing Stones.
The highlight of the concert
was when each member o the
band performed solos. Eddie Van
Halen was beyond description in
his twenty minute composition,
which included past classics like
"Eruption "Cathedrals" and
"Mean Street The guitarist
even gave a heavy metal twist to
one of Beethoven's classics.
Sammy Hagar did a good job
with his guitar, but it was hard to
appreciate him after King Ed-
ward had claimed the Coliseum
as his throne for the evening.
However, when Hagar climbed to
the top of the lighting system
near the ceiling and belted out his
famous tune, "I Can't Drive
55 the audience, for the mo-
ment, was all his.
An excellent drum solo was
performed by Alex Van Halen.
At its pounding conclusion,
fireworks were set off to the
crowd's delight.
But the man of the hour was
bass guitarist Michael Anthony.
Some of us can't help but like a
man with a beard who likes to
chug Jack Daniels in front of
thousands of people. Anthony
rocked the crowd with his
thunderous base and his evil
facial expressions as he literally
took the stage by force. Michael
Anthony with guitar is like Ram-
bo with machine gun: you just get
the feeling that they were meant
for each other.
Okay, okay, I know what
you're thinking. You want to
seems to be a great amount of
warmth and respect among the
group, something not seen at
previous Van Halen concerts.
Near the end of the show,
Hagar walked out on the stage
wearing, of all things, a David
I ee Roth t-shirt. After being
severely booed, Eddie and Mike
took care of business by ripping
Book Update
know if Van Halen was better
with the absence o' that gigolo
who's crav from the heat: David
1 ee Roth. Hell Yes-
Sammy Hagar seemed to be
much better at communicating
with the audience than Roth. He
also appeared not to care if the
spotlight was not on him at every
moment, unlike Roth. There also
the piece ot trash completely ott
of Hagar. The Coliseum locked.
All in all, it was a great show.
Everyone left the Coliseum
knowing that Van Halen is here
to stay and better than ever since
ridding itsell of that blond-
headed disease. Perhaps one
t-shirt sold at the concert said it
best: "Van Halen kicks ASS
This StyU From
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Nebula Award Stories
d PI) � Like fine chocolates,
good science fiction short stories
should be savored and dipped in-
to time and again.
Such is the case with ebula
4 nards 20 edited by George
Zebrowski and F.arth and
Elsewhere by Kir Bulychev and
others
The stories in ehulu Awards
20 have all been judged as the
finest by the Science Fiction
Writers of America even though
the 1984 anthology does not in-
clude all the winning stones.
The opening story, "Blood-
child by Octavia E. Butler, is
what many readers might con-
sider science fiction in its pure
form. A different world, new
characters, different languages
and lifestyles all are presented in
a believable package.
Humans � known as Ierran
� are almost considered pets on
preserve ruled by the Hie
government.
The story focuses on one fami-
ly and a creature, T'Gatoi, that
controls it and the youngsters
w ith motherlike instincts
Lucius Shepard's "The Mai:
Who Painted the Drag
Griaule" is intriguing as it weaves
a tale of artistic obsession and
love in 185 The coloi and
description lives within this ta
But it's "Press Enter" that will
most likely hook the reader into
the collection. It is a thrilling tale
of a computer genius who
volves the nextdoor neighbor he
never saw in a world ! computer
crime and intrigue.
It is the tale ot' an everyman
who gets seduced hv
microchip world and a woman.
In this age ot computers,
storv will give any keyboard user
dreams greatness and fears ot
the power on the circuits.
Also deseiv mention are
Gibson's "New Rose Hotel" a
"The lucky Strike" by Kim
Stanlev Robinson.
larlh and fl.ewhere bv Kil
Bulychev and others provides an
interesting insight mo visions t
the future by writers from the
Soviet Union.
Kir Bulychev is only one of five
writers in the collection. But Ins
Frankenstein-like version oi ex-
periments with human cloning
demonstrates win he is so
cessful.
The Wa lo
Amalteia" by Boris and rkady
� itsky to lead ott the volume
is perte, I
I he Sti igatskys study the
human character's tear as a
nine mission to one
Jupiter's moons goes awry and
ship's tean rd cer-
death.
"A Pa W -rid" by
Sevei Gansovsky is equally cap-
tivating a- ii presents a major
� iet city . I
the tali
ie bod !ds his
original bra
For the student
1
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t
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1
Lb
Woodsy Owl says
No Noise Pollution Here1
Give a hoot.
Don't pollute.
? SLEEPING BAGS
Jbackpacks tents cots SMovtcs ha
�MOCKS MESS KITS CANTEENS fATlQJES V
?BOOTS RAINWEAR TSHMTV ENMClftt
�OtSHES WW� CBJTHES 2100 DtfMtfKT Tts
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I ARMY-NAVY STOtl
1M1S.I -





y
This Sfyl� From
With Singl Vision Rx
lenses roc only
$27.95
Bf Frames
t0 OFF
e of RX Lenses
30 OFF
CW�r good through 6-6-86
n Mot -Fri 9o m fi! 5 30 p m
ILOOM COUNTY
by Berke Breathed
I HI-LAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 21, 1VH6
�7
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Copyright 1986
Krog�r Sav On
Quantity Blunts Reserved
None sold To Dealers

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Ey JARRELL & JOHNSON
Continued from page 7
day, July 26, will be Frank
Runyeon, starring in the comic
thriller, Deathtrap. Matinee per-
formances are scheduled for
Wednesday, July 23, and Satur-
day, July 26, both at 2:15 p.m.
Mr. Runyeon is best known for
his continuing role as Steve An-
dropoulous on the CBS daytime
drama, "As the World Turns
He is also an accomplished film
and stage actor. His major mo-
tion picture credits include Sud-
den Death and Bolero, and New
York theatregoers have seen him
in The Birds and Last Summer in
Chulimsk. As a result of his wide-
spread popularity he has ap-
peared on all three major televi-
sion networks, having been inter-
viewed on "I he Today Show
"Good Morning America and
"The Phil Donahue Show
Co-starring with Runyeon in
Deathtrap will be Joseph
Mascolo, who is also in the soon-
to-be-released motion picture.
Heat, with Burt Reynolds. His
other film credits include Jans 2,
Sharkey's Machine, and Yes,
Giorgio Mascolo is the host o
"Inside Soaps a syndicated
television talk show. Other televi-
sion appearances by Mr. Mascolo
include "Hill Street Blues" and
NBC's "Days of Our I ies " He
appeared opposite Burt Reynolds
and Sally Fields in The Rain-
maker, with Karen Volenti in
Gemini and with Peggy Cass in
C heaters.
Homicide and humor are the
ingredients o Deathtrap. The
play features a mystery writer
with a problem. He has not had a
hit in 17 years and announces
that he's willing to commit
murder to remedy the situation.
Out of this proposal emerges a
tangle of homicidal schemes,
plots and counter-plots that in-
volve a European clairvoyant and
a pompous New England lawyer.
Walter Kerr oi the New York
Times called Deathtrap "an ab-
solute knockout o a suspense
melodrama
William Christopher, known
for his role as Father Mulcahy on
the popular television series,
"Mash will co-star with Broad-
way veteran Ronn Carroll in the
final production of the season.
Greater Tuna. Scheduled is a six-
day run, Monday through Satur-
day, July 30 through August 2, at
8:15 p.m with a 2:15 p.m.
matinee performance on Wednes-
day, July 30. Even though
Christopher is best known for his
role on "Mash he has made ap-
pearances on a number of other
television shows including "The
Andy Griffith Show "Hogan's
Hereos "Gomer Pyle "Alias
Smith and Jones and "The
Men From Shiloh His Broad-
way debut was in "Beyond the
Fringe and film roles include
the Shakiest Gun in the West,
and The Fortune Cookie, among
others.
In addition to appearing in
Greater Tuna, Ronn Carrol will
also direct the production. It is a
job for which he is well suited,
having replaced the performing
authors in the original New York
production. His Broadway plays
and musicals include The Rink
with Liza Minnelli and Chita
Rivera. Peter Pan, On Golden
Pond, and Promises, Promises.
He has appeared in a number
of major motion pictures, Fri
day, the 13th (1,2, and 4) and
House, and on television, "Hail
to the Chief "Spenser for
Hire "The Edge of Night
and "Ryan's Hope
Greater Tuna is a homespui
comedy about the charms and
quirks of people in the third
smallest town in Texas � Greater
Tuna. All of Tuna's residents �
male, female, young, old, crazed
and half-crazed � are played bv
Christopher and Carroll.
Commenting on the season.
Producer � Direct or Edgar
lessin said, "We've chosen
four great American comedie
that are all prize-winning plays
Each is headed by a major a?
performer from television and
Broadway. We teel this will be an
exciting landmark summer
season for our theatre
The Hottest New Singles' Game In
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Starting May 22 (Thurs.)
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I Ml I s ! kI MAN
Piral
victo
Winfn
� 0 hi
Triangle A rea To Host
State A mateur Games
By S ()! I COOP! R
and
RICK Mil ORMA(
Ncys

3
1
.
heir
state
( a
the ;�� per
� -
te
I
s
re tr
L .S. )lv in
eld in 1' i hapel ' � areas July are turning to
.rex where
. act : 1ist tw months rtunately, North residents will he able to
1 i � on as ise 110 hours
i i 1�� �� iooi luding 9 hours oadcasts.
Sports
M Vt 2
Sues Denied NCA A Bid
Richmond Downs Pirates
' his Ml career with 35 pitching
Pirate records.
By TONY BROWN
SporU Writer
The Pirates battled valiantly
through the loser's bracket of the
Colonial Athletic Association
tournament to reach the cham-
pionship game on Sunday, but
then fell one rally short of the ti-
tle in an 8-5 loss to the Richmond
Spiders.
The title match started off
good for ECU as the Pirates
smashed their way to a 5-0 lead in
the top of the first against Rich-
mond, but Spider hurler Keven
Sickinger and company kept
ECU scoreless the rest of the way
while gathering eight runs to take
the game.
In the first inning. Pirate short-
stop dreg Hardison tripled with
one away, then came home on a
very slow rolling infield single b
Chris Bradberry. Winfred
Johnson singled him to third and
a hi' b Mike Sullivan made it
2-0.
Jav McGraw cleared the bases
with a three-run homer for a 5-0
Pirate lead, but that ended the
EC I scoring as Sickinger and
relieve C.P. Richardson combin-
1 shut down the Pirate scor-
ing after that, getting seven
keouts while allowing only
five hits and walking three after
first frame.
The 5-0 ECl lead started to
melt away in the bottom of the
firs: when Rob Reid got on via an
: with one away, dreg Har-
dreu a waik from ECL
started Jim Peterson, then a
fielder's choice left runners on
rst and third with two outs.
� e by Bubba Paris gave the
Spiders 'heir firs; run of the day.
The Spiders added a run in the
third, then a five-run outburst
followed in the fourth, which
proved to be enough for the win.
Peterson struck out the first bat
ter, then walked John Knvak.
Stu Brown struck out, as did
Brian Jordan, but the wild pitch
Jordan swung at went to the
screen, allowing him on first and
sending Knvak to third.
A double by Rob Reid made it
5-4, then following another walk,
Andy Malloy slammed a three-
run blast for a 7-5 lead. The final
Spider tally came in the fifth on a
solo homer by Pete Engels.
McGraw's three-run hornet
paced the Pirate attack, while
Winfred Johnson had two hits in-
cluding a double. Hardison's tri-
ple was the only other extra base
hit for ECU, with Bradberry and
Jim Rilev adding a pair of singles
apiece.
Jim Peterson finished the vear
on the mound at 12-4, Johnson
came in on relict in the sixth and
held Richmond scoreless, but it
was too late.
Sickinger picked up his second
tourney win against E I I, raising
his season mark to 8-3. His per-
formance on the mound and at
bat earned him the Most
Valuable Plaver award for the
tournament.
ECU finished the season at
40-10, which is a new school
record for most wins, but was not
named to an at-iarge spot in the
N AA plav -offs. Ironically .
V( State, which fell to IU
twice in three games this year,
was named to the N AA field
First Round: ECU s Richmond
The tournament started out
like a repeat ol las: vear. wl
be U was quickly elim
Sickinger kep; the Pirate
very quiet throughout the game,
giving up only three singles and a
double as the Spiders cruised I
4-0 win.
Richmond picked up three ru
in the third when Brian I
W� .1 -
homered and Bubba Par,
two-run shot with 'wo awav I
5 0 Spider lead.
Richmond added one m n
the ninth when Rob Reid singled.
went to third on a wild pit
�ed on a hit b Sickinger
Winfred Johnsi
for ECl , with lake
hing well in relic
six in the last four frames.
Loser's Bracket: K I vsJMI
In the fit "
game on Saturday. ked lii
curtains for ECl as the g
went to the to
Pira
v kepi
tourney hi �pes i .
James Ma
: ! '
Wilmingi n Fi
was
Vt PIRATES, pax II
iV
Sports Fact
Wed. May 21, 1930
fter hitting three home runs
against the Philadelphia Vs,
Babe Ruth elects to bat right-
handed in his final turn at the
plate. Ruth'sattempi at switch-
hitting proves a failure as he is
struck out b Jack Quinn.

AlthouKh the Pirates were denied an NCAA hid. the 40 w.ns were the most m the schools history.
ECU Tracksters Qualify For NCAA's
-
nh POM PI LI, pa-e 11
Bv RICK McCORMAC
�� Nfx.M r din
I e ECl men's track team
qualified competitors in two
re events for the NCAA
( hampionships over the weekend
in the Wolfpack Twilight Invita-
tional in Raleigh.
1 ee McNeill captured first
place in the 100 meters m a time
of 10.23 seconds. McNeill's time
qualifies him for the 100 meters
in the N( AA Championships in
Indianapolis held June 4-7.
McNeill had previously qualified
in the 200 meters.
Pirate Coach Bill Carson was
somewhat worried that McNeill
wasn't going to qualify for the
nationals in the 100 in this meet.
"At the 60 meter mark I
thought he might win the race but
1 didn't think he was on a fast
enough pace to qualify for the
NCAA's Carson said. "But
with 40 meters to go 1 ee changed
gears and pulled away fron
field
Also qualifying tor the na-
tionals was the four 100 relav
team. The team of McNeill.
Eugene McNeill. Chris Brooks
and Nathan McCorkle finished
seecond in the Wolfpack invita-
tional to N.( State. However,
their time of 39.66 not only
qualified them tor the NC AA
Championships, but also is a new
school record.
The mile relay team of Phil
Estes, Ruben Pierce, Kelwyn
1 oveand Julian Anderson finish-
ed third with a time of 3:08.14.
They too are on the veerge of
qualifying for the nationals as
they only need to trim three
seconds off their time to make
the NCAA field.
Eugene McNeill finished sixth
in the 100 meters with a time of
10.52 seconds, d
bad sta
Rounding out the Pira
he Wolfpack I .
tionaJ w, quarter-miler Juliai
Vnderson, who
with a time of 37 34.
Pirate coacl Bill C arson was
pleased with the whole team's
'7 hos really pleased with
the effort of the entire
team. "
� Bill (arson
performance, especially wit
absence ol sprintei Henry
Williams who has departed for
the Memphis Showboats.
"1 was really pleased with
effort of the entire team Cat
son said. "I think Henry's leav-
ing affected the team � I ee Ver-
non (McNeill) was forced to run
more
n wei
kend n
IC4 A' s
' We
Is ' � '
V . . .
and expei iment v.
Brooks
happens
Despite the early seas
juries. Car
about .
prepare for their I
ol the season.
1 ee Mc V s curr
ed in the -op eig
both the 100 and 20
while the 4 x 100 rela
ranked 14
Pirates next meet �
weekend in the K 4A's
Villanova. Pa. before
out the seeason in two weeks
the NCAA Championships
Falcon Kevin Walker, h�8 career a, ECU all-time leading scorer, signed a iSZSLTStifTJ "h� "��
Senior third
plaved then
Pompili,
For 1987

i
i
Moniqm P


V
1
ECU si
Hours
SWIMMING Pool
Men
Mon-1
Mon-1
M
Mon-Fri
:
WEIGH! ROOMS
v'
Fi

Sun
Mim
M
Ol IDOOR KK Rl x 1 ION
Mon -
1 ' f
1
hOl IPMIMIII! K-Ol 1
(MG 115i
Mon-Ihurs llam-pm
Fri 11 am-ft pm
sat 11 am-5 pm
un 12 noon-5 p
RACQl'ETBALl
RFSrRN VTIONS
M Fri
Mon-1 �
(,iM IRII PI U
Men
Mon-Tfiurs
1 r;
Sat
Sun
Woodsy Owl says
Stash Your Trash
Sot
A





s Pirates
:N hit a
! a
Hrw
and
JMl
kft
ke
rHEEAST AROI.INIAN
MAY 21, 1986
11
K 1 h V pae 11
r

4.
5 xj
!he school's histon
3r NCAA's
hat
lulea 'hey
��
ank-
iiion in
' . � meters,
team is
Aiil be
C4A's in
� rush

ips
�n
.
W
I
t

T
r
ontracts
fowl last year, was a sixth-round pick of die
mp Bay Bandits. Jeff Heath, who finished
it contract with the Kansas City Chiefs.
Pirates Comeback On JMU
Senior third baseman Mark CockreU (23)
piaed their last name for the Pirates.
is one of six seniors who have
Pompili,
For 1987
( untinued from pae 1(1
:ali. two representatives
E( I will have major i
. l mpic 1 estival. 1 ad
stai M
as selected b the
11 Baf
Gennarelli
Olympic
toi Hob Gennarelli along with
1 N( 's assistant MD I)ae Lohse
been selected by the U.S.
Olympic Committee to serve as
� ts publicity coordinators dur-
ing the Houston Feestival '86.
I he 1 S(K selects on 45 of the
finest SID's each year to work the
Continued from page 10
when Madison's Glen Deren
singled and later scored on an er-
ror.
ECU tied it up in the fifth
when Mike Sullivan was hit by a
pitch, sacrificed to second and
scored on a Steve Sides hit.
JMU picked up two in the bot-
tom of the fifth on a two-run
homer by Rod Boddie, but ECU
took the lead in the sixth. Greg
Hardison hit a two-run homer,
then Sullivan singled, McGraw
walked, and a hit by Sides made
it 4-3 ECU.
A solo homerun by McGraw
made it 5-3, but then it was
JMU's turn to rally, taking the
lead with a three-run eighth.
With two runners on, Scott
Mackie singles to knot it up.
Then another single by Mike
Mathews put the Dukes up by
one.
It appeared to be over for ECU
in the ninth as the first two bat-
ters went down, but Mont Carter
and Greg Hardison singled and
Chris Bradberry got hit by a pitch
to load t he bags. Winfred
Johnson came through with a
clutch double, driving in what
proved to be the winning runs in
a 7-6 decision.
Jim Peterson picked up a
school record 12th victory, going
Chosen
Festival
department prior to coming to
ECU, will handle the hockey and
track events.
"It will be a good experience
� getting to deal with the top-
amateur athletes in the country
Genarelli said. "In addition. I'll
get to work with the United
Siaies Olympic Committee.
"If 1 do a good job, I'll work
the Olympic Festival here next
year Genarelli added, "and
possibly go to the '88 Olympics in
Seoul (Korea)
US OLYMPIC
FESTIVAL-87
ES
NORTH
ZAROUNA
m
Moniquc Pompiii
; v I 5-11 forward
m I ayetteville will join Duke's
M reland in competii .
tm.
p fon lirec
Hours
SWIMMING POOLS
Mem on a!
�Fri Sam
i-Fri 11 ani-1 pm
Minges
M n-Fri 4 pm
- Sun 1-5 pm
WEIGH! ROOMS
Memorial
i-Thurs 11 am-7 pm
I 1 am-6 pm
II am-5 pm
12 noon-5 pm
Minges
Mon-Thurs 3-7 pm
01 DOOR RECREATION
Mon 1-5 pm
1 -5 pm
11 am-2pm
EQUIPMENT CHECK-OUT
M(, 115)
Mon-Thurs 11 am-7 pm
Fri Uam-6pm
sat llam-5pm
sun 12 noon-5 pm
RACQUETBALL
RESERVATIONS
Mon-Fri 11.30am-3pm
Mon-Fn 12 noon- 3 pm
GYM FREE PLAY
Memorial
Mon-Thurs 11 am-7 pm
f-n llam-6pm
Sat 11 am-5 pm
Sun 12 noon-S pm
i
Bob Gennarelli
Olympic Festival events. Gen-
narelli, who attended the Univer-
sity of Texas and worked exten-
sively with the University o!
Houston's sports information
Although many of the athletes
will be particpating for their own
enjoyment, they will also be
receiving some national recogni-
tion, according to Hill Carrow.
"We are very pleased to bring
amateur athletics to the Triangle
Area after such a long absence
Carrow explained. "Top quality
athletes will come to the state
dreaming and working for a na-
tional title, providing our local
sports fans with good entertain-
ment
' ��'
�WWW
WJWWWJWWWW
. .�� .t �� �; fti. c.
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mm
� v? �'?�. v'iv
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��nil Hi Hi ii � I in I i II I I i I I
the distance even though being
tagged for 10 hits.
Hardison led ECU with three
hits including the homer, with
Carter picking up three as well.
Sides added a pair of singles to
the Pirate attack.
Loser's Bracket Final: ECU vs
UNC-W
The Pirates were under the gun
again on Saturday afternoon as
UNC-Wilmington appeared to
have a victory sealed up only to
see ECU rally late again to pull
out an 9-8 win.
ECU picked up a run in the
first as Carter singled and later
scored on a doubleplay, but the
Seahawks came back with three
runs in the bottom of the inning
behind two singles and three
Pirate errors.
The error-filled game con-
tinued in the second as McGraw
got to second on an error and was
wild-pitched to third, later scor-
ing on an out for a 3-2 Seahawk
margin, but a homer by Rod
Jones in the third quickly made it
4-2.
In the fourth ECU's Mark
Cockrell reached on a fielder's
choice, then Riley and Carter
singled, scoring Cockrell.
The Pirates tied it up in the
fifth when Bradberry doubled
and later scored on a doubleplay.
Johnson's 18th homer of the
season gave ECU the lead in the
eighth, but it didn't last long.
With two away in the bottom
of the eighth, Eric Hall walked
and John Catalano got on second
when his fly ball was lost in the
sun, scoring Hall. Johnson came
in on relief, but a single by Mike
Meadows scored Catalano.
Tim Langmeyer singled
another run in and a wild pitch
later scored Langmeyer, giving
the Seahawks an 8-5 margin.
Just as the fans were writing
off the Pirates again, in the top
of the ninth, pinchhiter Dean
Ehehalt walked and a Hardison
blast narrowed the lead to one.
Bradberry worked his way to a
full count, then slammed a
monstrous homer to tie it up.
It stayed that way all the way
to the top of the 11th. The Pirates
got an opening double from
David Ritchie and Carter sacrific-
ed him to third. A two out infield
hit bv Bradberrv gave ECU an
9-8 lead.
UNC-W got a runner on via an
error in the bottom of the 11th,
but ECU held on to gain the win.
Craig Van Deventer was rock-
ed for 10 hits, but still kept ECU
in the game. Winfred Johnson
got the win in a relief role,
finishing the year at 11-4.
Bradberry paced ECU with
three hits, while Carter, Johnson,
Hardison and Sides picked up
two each.
Finals Game One: ECU vs Rich-
mond:
On Saturday night, the Pirates
rolled over Richmond 12-8 to
force the deciding game on Sun-
day. ECU seemed to have gained
confidence with the performance
earlier in the day as they rushed
out to a good lead.
Woodsy Owl says
Stash Your Trash
nAdrOthOll Greek Owned and Operated
Restaurants Since1979
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Ritchie led off with a double
and later scored on a double play,
then Johnson picked up his 70th
career homer to give ECU a 24)
advantage.
In the second inning. Sides
walked, stole second and went to
third on a bunt single by Ritchie,
who then came home on a hit by
Hardison.
The first of three Greg Harding
homers narrowed the lead to 4-1,
but ECU tallied eight times in the
fourth, which finally proved to
be enough for the win.
Cockrell singled and went to
second on a sacrifice, then Rit-
chie walked. Cockrell scored on
Hardison's hit, then Bradberry
got on via a fielder's choice.
Johnson and Sullivan walked to
j X X X X X X Jv X "Xr X A ,X X
jp i T v t T v v X t v v x T T i


-
-

-


-
-


-
-
-
-

-

X-











-


-


-





-




-




�X

-

-
lo ! the bags. McGraw reached
on an error, which scored one
and a Sides single brought in two
more. A three-run homer by
Cockrell ended the Pirate scoring
lor a 12-1 lead.
Richmond rallied with four
runs in the fifth, including a
homerun by Harding. Jordan
homered in the sixth, then a third
Harding homer which made it
12-8 in the eighth, but that was it
for the Spiders.
Jack Jacobs finished the year
at 44) on the mound, with Craig
Van Deventer earning a save with
four innings oi work.
Johnson led ECU with a
homerun and a double. Ritchie,
Hardison and Cockrell each had
a pair of hits as well.
X X X -X' "i L" � X X X� X i "A 'A X "i W
�"� y� � - �� � �� �� F- Jf� �� - T� - - "f
Come By and See the Latest
in Summer Fashion
and the
1 Indoor Tanning System
Open until 9 p.m.
The Plaza
756-6200
$2.00 OFF
ALL SERVICES
Good thru June '86






�X
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�X-
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EAST CAROLINA
FITNESSCENTER
Formerly Nautilus
ONE MONTH FREE!
When you join our special summer
fitness program.
A $75.00 value for only $50.00
SAVE $25.00
758-9584
1002 Evans Street
Greenville, NC
ALL NEW PRIVATE NAUTILUS
ROOM.
Olympic Weights Tanning Bed
COUPON EXPIRES: 6-31-86
Sauna
k





, �-
12
1 Ml I AM i Kt ll INI M 2! ��
IRS Summer School Activities
B SCO! 1 � OOPhK
1 he In: i ,i Reereattona
Service will
assoi
tivitii it both; immei
Here gs lot men's
S .k (ivities, deadlines
lates (as well a co
a ich will be
rsi suininci ses
and 2 1 foi first session and June
25, 2ri and 2 lot second session
Below is the days,
providing an places foi the various classes
Mis and a,
erobics
Mon Wed 4 pn M i (
i 118
I ucs . l hui s 4 pn i NI

( 11 in
i�i m iNt
Mon.Wed.Kri. 5:15 pm M(, 1(18
lues Ihurs. 5:15 pm M(. 108
lIH sal. 10 am M(. 10
I lining
I uc I hurs 5 Is pm MG 112
Mon , Wed. 6:30 pm M 108
qua-Robics
! Wed 5 15 pm Memorial

Holtace prim indicates classes
that are ottered during both
Ml i lasses Verobics, I aning
md qua-Robics art
av ailable on a drop in ba
is a men S 'v pei � lass
BK.INs
Mav 21 Mas
I Mav 26
. Mav 26
27 Jane 3
June 5
lune 12
18 lune W
( O KM PRO(.KM
S Mav Mas 2"
Mas r
I hese voung ladies show their aerobic talents in an earlit-r workout. Work ll!
;RN

�v. �
s
Mav
v d
t h e IR S
av
SAT MAY 24 AT
�SSSB5fW th
WAiriHOilM
ritnts
OIUMM HH1
and 0�Al
Plus Double Coupons
(See store for details)
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli, Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current Week Food
Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality.
T
�!�
SWIFT
.
Hostess Ham

s
HIGH IN VITAMIN A A C
jumbo
size
asei
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Mav 19, 2'1
COUNTRY PRIDE � FRESH
Pick & Chick
2-
o ��.
Paper Towels
PURE CANE
Dixie
Crystals
GOLDEN YELLOW
Sweet Corn
low in sodiumi
1 'Y
ears
SALE
jvrJl
UMTT TWO WITH AN AOOmONAL
PUNCMAK AT EVEMVDAV LOW PRICE
PITT BULL PUPPIES FOR SALE
4 male eft raG to go now, for
fc C a eekCa in afternoon
I ev( is at '58 2393
FOR SALE l gold love seat tweed
� ��. ears) con
. '��.�' � re sitting couch
� � apt or dorm living.
� i 122. asr
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TOMATO
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V
32 oz.
LUNCHEON MEAT
Armour Treet
FOR SALE
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: : iTionds, reclmer

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! A prices negotiable For mfo
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Title
The East Carolinian, May 21, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
May 21, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.475
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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