The East Carolinian, April 29, 1986






Mt
(Earnltnran
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 o5
Tuesday, April 29, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Minority Organization
Denied SGA Funding
A Day Of Fun And Sun J B Hl MBRT - E-1 -
Who needs the beach with all this excitement behind Ringjjold lowers and White Dorm? StudenU
happ to see the sun apain dressed in full regalia to celebrate the eent. PCI students will probably
be soaking up most of the sun in Eastern North Carolina as exam time rolls around.
Sophomore Chosen
Student Studies In Russia
By PATTI KEMMIS
Assistant News hditor
At the SGA's final meeting of
the 1985-86 year, Appropriations
Committee Chairman Dwayne
Wiseman put before the legislator
a budget that granted the Minori-
ty Student Organization no funds
for the 1986-8" school year.
According to Wiseman, the
organization does not fully repre-
sent all campus minorities.
"When they can show merit to
the name they're under, then they
will deserve money said
Wiseman.
SGA legislator Robert Jordan
said, "It was stupid to detund
them, they have membership, so
students are obviously interested
in the group
When the budget was firs:
opened to discussion to the
legislature, the body refused to
yield the floor to the represen-
tatives from MSO. After further
attempts, the floor was yielded to
President of the MSO, W.lliam
Robinson.
Robinson defended his
organization stating the group
was or n to all minorities. Accor-
ding to Robinson, black students
make up 92 percent of the
minority students on campus.
Robinson added, the MSO
serves the students through social
activities, service and as the
motivating force behind unifying
minority groups.
Vice-Chancellor of Student
Life, Elmer Meyer, pointed
the MSO is the official minor
organization on campus. He also
-aid the MSO has a well organiz-
ed official representative on the
Media Board.
Legislator Mark Simon pro-
posed taking S500 from the
Playhouse and gi i .
MSO until tne group vould come
back in the fall and ask the SGA
for additional tunds.
The legislature deeJ e re-
que
"Its wrong to leave -1oup
out. This money ($500) would
give them time to ge- theii I ifl
together and come back next
fall said Simon.
Legislator Brya: La-ser
gested taking the S420 granted l
the NAACP iNj nal Ass Na-
tion tor the Advancement I i
ored People), SI �
Visual Arts Forum, and $10
see SGA Page 5.
Bv l.Al'RA JKNMNs
S pl more Karer Saltei has
mei
Russi
Deen
( ou .
-v the
ud
n e E L � idei � 11 spend
�� ei �eeks at M scow's
- n Institute here she ill
idy the Russian language.
leted four
ECl
in N rtl
Russian,
Salter, wh
semesters of Russiar
I 'tie four universi
Carolina that
believes the progran will ffei
her "a great opportunity to learn
from Russian p: �fessi rs
Out of all the applicants for the
nationally sponsored pr cram,
100 students were selected to go.
In order
:s;dered, the
applicants were askev
essay Ri
about why
study in the S
were als reou
an and in Engiis
ley would like t
pa-
The
a d
e exam.
. ence ma-
�- it
andcrs-

Announcements2
Classifieds11
Editorials4
Features7
Sports 10
There is no duty we so much
underrate as the duty of being
happy.
�Robert Louis Stevenson
Editor's Note
Today's edition includes the
1986 Freewheeler, and it's
contents in no way reflects the
opinion of The East Caroli-
nian or it's staff.
Saltei realizes it will he a
cultural shock a first, hu; she
feels -he will be able to adjust.
Maria B Malb a Russiai
pr fess � at ECU, believes tl ai
altl ugh Salter's experience wi
t juire a lot ol hard work, it will
also be "fascinating, exciting,
and mesmerizing She said that
Salter will be exposed not onl to
the language, but to tl e hisi n
art, drama, and architecture i
the Sov iet I 1 ion
SI e relieve- Salter is ver for-
ate to he able 1 l, "Ri is
place said Malby.
Saltei said that she will no: be
apprehensive about living inside
the sA.e' I nion. Because the
I SSR is a police state and
because the people are constantly
being monitored, there does not
seem to be as much chance of
terrorist attack
"i' will probably he -he safest
place t be all summer said
Salter
Mall Celebration Successful
By CAROLYN DRISCOLL
Staff Writer
Barefoot on the Mall, an an-
nual event sponsored by the Stu-
dent L'nion which :00k place
Thursday afternoon, wa- attend-
ed b approximated 3,500 peo-
ple.
Organized b the Special
Events committee, Barefoot on
the Mail was deemed a success by
Jon Curtis, assistant program
director for the Student L'nion.
who saidIt was very much a
success, even given the risk we
took with the bands we had. It
was a gorgeous day and a real
good crowd come out

Several students agreed v tt tis. "Thi
per, an ECU senior said, "1 ti tables sue he EC! m-
it was put together weii bassadors, se - and
and the comic (Tim Settimn was e kies, and a
really a trip. I hope this is making buttons and e
Campaign To Provide Funds
Salter, a r . tical
jor European studi
believe- he bes. wa
tand '� ei c ui tries is to study a
foreign language This is whv
she ch( ��. ' learn Russian.
"1 believe that it's the language
study now because of
LS Soviet relations said
Salter.
She thinks it is very important
that Americans understand not
only the Russian government, but
also thai they understand the
Russian cultuie and the people
themselves.
In order to get a better
understanding of the people,
Salter feels it is necessary to stay
for a lengthy period of time.
Salter says she will value her
experience of living in Russia for
the summer. "I've read about it
and have seen documentaries on
it, but I want to see what it's real-
ly like for myself she said.
On The Inside
ECL Ne- Burea i
East Carolina's School ol
Business launched a history-
making Golden Anniversary
campaign Friday to seek $2
million in enrichment gifts from
the private sector.
Announcing a campaign steer-
ing committee and listing specific
objectives for enrichment. ECL
officials said it was "a moment
of destiny" for the state's third
largest institution of higher learn-
ing to embark on a fund-raising
campaign.
"I am pleased to announce
East Carolina's first major gifts
campign for an academic unit
John M. Howell, ECL"
Chancellor, told a news con-
ference. He noted that this year
marks the "golden" 50th an-
niversary of the founding of the
School of Business.
David B. McDonald, director
of Institutional Advancement,
said the gifts campaign paced by
an endowment for a distinguish-
ed pr fess rship by the R.
Diilard Teer family of Durham
earlier this month already has
reached the halfway mark and
achieved one of the campaign's
maj : goals.
"Gifts and pledges already
committed total Si ,060,500, as of
this date McDonald said. This
amount includes S500.000 to
establich the robert Dillard Teer
Jr. Distinguished Professorship
of Business which was announced
April 11.
Other major objectives of the
campaign include raising
S500.000 for program
enhancement curriculum needs,
400,000 for computer enhance-
ment, $300,000 tor student
development, S150,000 for inter-
national programs. $100,000 to
establish a visiting executive pro-
gram and $50,000 for student
profesional organizations.
The Teer Family gift in honor
of Robb Teer, 'a 1967 ECU
School fo Business graduate, pro-
vided two-thirds of the half-
million dollars necessary for the
endowed distinguished professor-
ship, the first established in an
academic unit at ECL. The re-
mainder of the endowment is in
state-appropriated matching
funds for endowed faculty chairs
in the University of North
Carolina system under a program
aproved by the 1985 General
Assembly.
.Another School of Business
graduate, Eugene B. Home Jr. of
Siler City, will serve as chairman
of the Golden Anniversary cam-
paign steering committee which
held a meeting on campus Friday.
In the 50 years since its foun-
ding as the Department of Com-
merce, the ECU School of
Business has developed "into one
See SCHOOL Page 3.
something that lasts a long time
at ECU
Bern McCrady, a junior com-
mented, "It was great. The Phan-
toms sounded really good. The
food was great,too
One change from last year's
even; was in the bands which ap-
peared. While the Chairman of
the Board and the Trinidad
Tripoli Steel Band were featured
last year, this year's audience
heard the Amateurs, the Phan-
toms, Xenon, and Vintage Blend,
a bluegrass band.
In addition to the musical
entertainment, there was "lots of
promotional material from dif-
ferent organizations said Cur-
There were also severa
set up selling food, as well as a
' rtune teller, a dunking r th.a
caricaturist,and antique
images a I -e: up tc :aKe
photos of student! Ire ed ip in
old fashioned clothes
The "Rocky Horror Picture
Show "was shown la:er Thursday
eve: . t
"AH in all, I fel: things really
went over well. It was a .
tl summed up Donna San
Marco, chairman of the Special
Events Committee.
In all the event cost the Student
Union approximately $5,000.
Skill, Courage, Joy
At Special Olympics
B BETH WHICKER
The lighting of the Olympic
torch opened the 12th Annual
Greenville � Put County Special
Olympics Friday at E.B. Aycock
Junior High School.
The event, sponsored in part
by the ECU Student Council for
Exceptional Children allowed
handicapped and mentally
retarded children and adults to
experience the thrill of victory.
The 510 participants in tl e
games included exceptional
children and adults from Pitt
County Schools and da pro-
grams in Pitt County designed
especially for their needs. The
participants were brought to the
games on buses provided bv their
schools and programs.
Several dignitaries attended the
games, including Greenville
Mayor Les Garner who opened
See SCEC Page 5.
Fire Reported At
Jenkins Art Center
By MIKE LLDWICK
New Edlloi
The Greenville Fire Depart-
ment responded to a fire alarm
raised by Campus Police early
Thursday morning at the Jenkins
Art Building.
Assistant Chief Don Mills
saidwe received the call at 7:56
a.m Mills added a hot plate
heating element was left on and
was the cause of the fire.
Joseph Caulder, director of
ECU Public Safety said the fire
occured on the first floor west
wing room 103. Caulder said
wooden shelves, a fan, two deep
fat fryers, and one fixture were
damaged including some smoke
and fire damage to the walls.
"We were concerned that some
chemicals were involved but none
were said Mills. He added, "If
we would have been a few
minutes later the chemicals would
have been involved
Chief Allen of the Greenville
Fire Department said there were
alot of ordinary materials that
could have combined to make a
toxic compound. He added there
was so much dust that it was dif-
ficult to know what the dust will
mix with and ignite.
According to Mills, Jenkins
Art Building was evacuated, and
he reported the evacuation went
well. He did, though, mention a
problem with by standers
especially since there was the
possibility of chemical involve-
ment.
The fire was extinguished with
dry chemicals and Mills said he
would rule the fire as accidental.
Accidental Fire
J.B. HUMBFRT � East CaroMaiu
The Greenville Fire Department extinguished a fire Thursday morning at Jenkins Art Building.
The cause of the fire was a heating dement which had accidental!) been left on. For more details see
related story on page 1.
�-
-
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,





Announcements
CAREER INFORMATION
For students wno might uw 9 FREE list or
career books or tools available in Joyner
Library stop at the handouts shelves n the
Reference Room and pick upaCAREER IN
FORMATION handout tor your job Hunt
F older i
BE A PEER HEAl TH
.EDUCATOR
Would you like to gam valuable teaching
eperien.e ana learn more about health
is�oes' Become a part o� this encitmg new
group ot students who are advocates for
rieaim Call Mary Eiesha Adams a' 757 6U1
or come by the STuden' Health Service
Room 107 to pick up an application
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
ATTN All co ops working summer or tail'
An outgoing seminar tor all coop students
who will be working tors summer or fall will
be held on Monday May 5. 4 5 p m ,n Raw!
33� Refreshments w.n be ser.ed Look for
wara to see.ng you' DON T MISS IT!
ATTN BUSINESS PEOPLE
The NC Small Business and Technology
Development Center Announces Market
Research Tips and Techniques For Small
Business Owners" Ivi hr workshop Who is
your customers and competitors? What
products and services they want At the
Regional Development Institute. Willis Bldg
Corner First 8. Read Streets. Greenville.
N C May 14. 19M. t 3O-9.30 pm �15 00 ad
mission fee Call SETDC at 757 6113 or
757 6157
STUDENTS FOR SANFORD
Meet former Governor Terry Sanford
Democratic candidate for u S Senate
Governor Sanford will hold a press con
terence 9 00 am Wednesday. April 30.
mam lounge Mendenhall All are welcome'
CORAL REEF DIVE CLUB
The Coral Reef Dive Club is holding its las
meeting of the spring semester Tues Apri
11 at 7 30 p m in room 221 Mendenhall Yo
must attend this meeting if you plan on div
ing with us this summer Get involved witi
the club mats going somewhere The Cor
ai Reef Dive Club
PRESBYTERIAN STUDENTS
Be sure to pick up your exam survival kits
this week at the Mendenhall Student
Organization Booth These kits are bags of
goodies put together by hand by local
Presbyterian churches Pick up times
Wed , Apr 30, 12 30 p m . Thursday. May 1,
�am 7pm Fri beginning at 1 am Kits not
picked up by Friday at 10 am will be given
while they last to any interested students
Call 752 7240 if you will not be able to pick up
your kit Sponsored by Presbyterian Campus
Christian Life
EXAMSURVIVALKITS
Will be available on Friday. May 2, to any
student who wants one while supplies last
Pick up is at the Mendenhall Student
Organization Booth on Friday, beginning at
10 am until we run out Sponsored by
Presbyterian Campus Christian Life The
kits are FREE!
SRA
SRA semiformai pictures are now in
Come by SRA office In Mendenhall on Tues
day Apr.i 29 and Wednesday April 30
ISA
Thank You from the East
Carolinian and WZMB to
The new executive committee of the ISA
and the International Mouse art proudly
welcoming all members and guests to attend
and celebrate the graduation of all the
graduating International students of the
year 1VM Time �pm on May 3 at the inter
House








a
Service America Corporation
(formerly Servomation)
would like to thank
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
for the opportunity to be your foodservice contractor
for the past 12 years.
Service America is proud of our accomplishments and
the quality of services we provide to the students,
faculty and staff
We would like to thank the Division of Student Life
in helping us attain our goals and hope the success of
the past years will influence their choice for the
future.
ATTENTION
GRADUATES
Do you have Health
Insurance?
Call us for Short-term
Major Medical Coverage
or Blue Cross and Blue
Shield Grange Group
Goodson & Flanagan
Insurance Agency
' 'Insurance of all kinds
758-3183
313 Evans Mall
Downtown Greenville








for generous donations to the ;
I annual softball game I
School
CONTACT LENSES
V 105.00 DAILY WEAP
$ 145.00
EXTENDED WEAR
L
irctuaes exams tenses care kit ana follow-up '
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Or Peter W Hoiks
OD
Pa
The Tipton Annex
228 GreenvlWe Blvd
GreenvtBe NC .
3 -
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$


School Hi
Comedy Zone
Wednesday Nights
$1.00 Off
coupon
Wednesday, April 30
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 29, 1986
��
u from the East
m and WZMB to


I donations to the
"tball game
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Schools Deny Accepting Pentagon Funding
(CPS) A recent report charges
that "more and more colleges
and universities are enlisting in
the anus race" by taking Pen-
tagon research funds, but govern-
ment and college sources involv-
ed m the research sa it isn't true.
Apparently intended to enlist
Students in the debate over the
I S .tinis buildup, the report �
"I ncle Sam does to School by
American Friends Service
Committee � contends that col-
leges "have reversed policies
from the '60s and '70s, and
resumed classified military
research projects
"Absolutely not says
Research Dean Thomas
Wonderlick of Brown University,
one of the schools the reports
says has resumed secret military
projects. "We don't do any
classified research
"Brown, like most universities,
went through a tough time (of
student protests) aroung the Viet-
nam War he adds.
Student anger over Brown's
participation in secret research
ultimately resulted in a policy �
still in effect � against taking
money for classified research.
Most major research univer-
sities around the country adopted
similar policies at the same time.
The American Friends Service
Committee (AFSC), a Quaker
group which was also a very ac-
School Head Towards Future
i on tin tied I-rom Page 1.
Southeast's fines educa-
i rams preparing young
nen for entry into
rporate and business
Home a;1
npaign mai ks another
: destiny' for East
� versit he said.
such campaign for
trea fo the institu-
uch campaign
ecognized peak of
and the first to seek to
i ce even further
as we m e needs of the peo-
( arolina and the na-
added.
"1 believe ter strongly in East
and the
less Home said.
I hr, dean of the
Business, said the
"stands ready to
t II ol destiny, to
in helping to re-
mic thrust of
a He said
e Robert
Distinguished
ij � Business, the
endowed chair.
facult in a
be responsive
th� region
. need tor the
gifts campaign,
ancial resources
i move in that
ne from tax
;r, the) must come
iei tnends.
� and maior
rati ' '�� private and
s
Home, the
ar campaign
ee will include
B Hutzler, Richmond,
ai . Donald B.
fanice B. Buck,
ill am P. Furr,
Charlotte; Joseph Gantz, Green-
ville; Charles E. Strickland,
Charlotte; A.H. "Gus" Tulloss,
Rocky Mount; James A. Walker,
Releigh; Robert A. Ward, Burl-
ington; Henry Williamson,
Wilson; and Howell, Angelo A.
Volpe, ice chancellor for
Academic Affairs; James L.
Lanier Jr vice chancellor for In-
stitutional Advancement and
McDonald.
Home, Hutzler, Mrs. Buck,
Lanier, Tulloss, Strickland,
Walker, Ward and Williamson
are ECU alumni.
A 42-member School of
Business Advisory Committee
which was established two years
ago has endorsed and assisted in
the planning of the Golden An-
niversary campaign, Mcdonald
said.
OH, WHAT A WONDERFUL FELINE!
tive anti-Vietnam War group, im-
plies that more schools are being
tempted to drop those policies to
cash in on the research riches the
Pentagon offers.
The report projects Depart-
ment of Defense-sponsored
research and development will hit
a peacetime high of $39.9 billion
this year.
In an interview, AFSC resear-
cher Tom Conrad clarified that,
while the Pentagon didn't actual-
ly spend $39.3 billion on research
this year, the long-term contracts
it awarded to schools and others
ultimately would be worth that
much over the following years.
The Defense Department says
its research budget this year is
$1,024 billion � just 2.6 percent
of what "Uncle Sam Goes To
School" claims it is � and pro-
bably won't exceed $986 million
for the next fiscal year.
And the number of schools in-
volved in military research,
rather than "skyrocketing has
remained about the same during
the past five years, according to
previous AFSC reports.
"Uncle Sam Goes To School"
is one of a slew of recent studies research off campus have been
warning of a renaissance in war-
related research at colleges and
universities.
For instance, petitions to keep
Strategic Defense Initiative
signed by physics professors at
most major engineering schools,
with scientists in other disciplines
joining the drive.
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� Your credit record, if you
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These Vehicles Are
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Ford: Escort, Escort EXP,
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and vou are eligible for the $400
directly from Ford even if vou
don't finance vour purchase.
Make vour best deal and vou can
use the S400 toward vour down
pavment or get a check from
Ford after the purchase or lease.
Hurrv. If a vehicle is not in
dealer stock it must be ordered
by June 1, 1986, and deliver) oi
all vehicles must be taken b
August 31. 1986.
Call us for complete
program details.
"fs�k�
Ford Motor
Credit
Company
FORD
32i e. Ash st. TOLL FREE 1-800-532-8715 - Goidsboro. n. c
r
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'
31ie Eaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender, cm w��UJir.
Jay Stone, vfdnum� &&�
Mike- Ludwick, ��,s� Greg Winchester. d� ��
Scoi r Cooper. ,� g Anthony Martin. ��,�� , ,��, Ml,w
Daniei Mal'rer. EtoMMisb. Meg Needham. ,�,�� ��,�
Jons Shannon, v�� Shannon Short. ���w�
DeChanh E Johnson. ���,� Dfbbii- Sievi ns �
�pril 29. S86
Opinion
Page 4
30
It has become a tradition of sorts
at this newspaper for the Managing
Editor to write a -30- column upon
his or her resignation. The -30-
symbol, as everyone in the jour-
nalism profession knows, is the
notation that journalists use to end
a stor.
Whether or not anyone beyond a
small cadre of loyalists and friends
reads the -30- column is a matter
foi those who do public opinion
research to determine. But, what is
important is that the column offers
the Managing Editor an opportuni-
ty o assess the problems and ac-
complishments of the preceeding
year and even to philosophize about
newspaper work in general.
During the 8586 year the East
Carolinian has seen many changes.
I ast fall we lost every editor in all
of our major departments. In
features we lost two editors. Thus,
the paper trained an entire new
staff in a one month period. In the
process, to be frank, we put out
some less than satisfactory issues
replete with misspelled headlines
and other such horrors.
Another problem the paper faced
this year was the behind the scenes
political manuevering which had
the aim of putting this editor out of
a job. The efforts toward this end
were contrived by a handful of
right-wing students because of their
fundamental disagreement with the
editorial positions taken by the
paper.
Though the situation had the
makings of farce, it became tedious
when an effort was made to stack
the Media Board and deny the
General Manager of the East
Carolinian reappointment. This ac-
tion would have resulted,
presumably, in the appointment of
someone sympathetic to the wishes
ol those who wanted to purge the
paper of liberal journalists. Happi-
ly these efforts were thwarted. Tom
Luvender, as all on the staff here
will agree, is the best General
Manager the paper has enjoyed in
some time.
There were other problems as
well. For example, the paper in-
herited a budget deficit in 1985 that
prevented us from fixing or replac-
ing obsolete and broken equipment.
But the paper has also made
notable progress and has done some
very positive things.
This year we have printed a varie-
ty of editorial opinion, including a
conservative columnist - William F.
Buckley - as a supplement to the
moderate to liberal .Vn Republic
column that the paper has run for
some time. We also reinstated the
Campus Voice column so as to give
students an opportunity to express
their opinions on relevant topics.
We covered the President's na-
tionally televised speech in Raleigh
and Bishop Desmond Tutu's speech
in Durham. In addition, we have
begun to cover city politics as it af-
fects students more thouroughly,
something which I believe will
become more and more important
as ECU grows. We are also taking
steps to train our staff in the fun-
damentals of investigative repor-
ting.
Of at least equal importance is
the fact that the East Carolinian is
back on a sound financial footing.
The list of accomplishments and
planned improvements that we have
begun making here could go on.
Yet, it is also important to
acknowledge that all of the paper's
problems have not been and will
not be solved by the measures
outlined above. Some of the re-
maining problems are reflected in
charges that some East Carolinian
writers are racist or sexist.
I especially take this charge to
heart because oviously racism and
sexism are repugnant. While any
paper with a dearth of minority and
female staff writers is bound to face
such charges, I must say, that I have
seldom winked with a more decent
and fair-minded group of people. I
think that the people here genuinely
strive to report the facts objective
ly. Still sometimes important facets
ot a story have been omitted, the
paper has failed to cover minority
events or some of our writers have
been in poor taste on occassion. e
must do better by trying to hire
more minority staff writers, though
few have applied here. We must
also be more sensitive to the
perspectives ot minorities and
women than we have been.
I believe that the press lias a duty
to report the tacts to the best of its
ability, to be open to a varietv ol
points of view and to represent the
voiceless. The latter is particularly
important in an age that people in-
creasingly characterize as one of
avariciousness and chauvinism.
In conclusion, there are people
who have made my stay here par-
ticularly rewarding and who
deserve thanks. One ot them is
John Shannon, who shored up the
features section when it needed help
and who has made a great contribu-
tion here. Former SGA President
David Brown has represented the
students of ECT' with dignitv and
integrity. Too often he has been
made to pav for it bv hostile
members of the legislature who
were too blinded by their own bile
to work in the student interest.
All of the editors who have put in
long hours and gotten little recogni-
tion deserve thanks. Scott Cooper
and Mike Ludwick have trained
many new writers here and have
done work that deserves recogni-
tion.
DeChanile Johnson has been a
good friend and on occassion a
technical consultant as well. Harold
Joyner was the first staff person
here who made me fee! welcome. I
wish him all the best. Anthony
Martin always gets compliments
both because he is very good at his
job and because he is a genuinelv
decent person. And Debbie
Stephens, though I don't know her
as well as many on the staff do, has
always impressed me with her effi-
ciency and her ability to do a dif-
ficult job with poise and a sanguine
disposition.
Lastly, Tom Luvender has
defended my job when the chips
were down and demonstrated his
leadership capabilities in a thou-
sand other ways. He deserves my
deepest thanks.
As for Daniel Maurer, the
paper's new Managing Editor, I
have the greatest confidence in his
skills as a journalist. Dan I hope
you have a great year.
There are many others who
deserve mention, but space does not
permit. I hope to express my
thoughts to you all in person.
as

fltotftflowiol
HOW 66RAIP0 RIVERA IS ABOUT 70 0P6M
mm urouchw brain
Campus Forum
Weenie Journalism Is Criticized
i!l �l was in response to
youi printing, on April 24. of
�"I aSalle Remembers the Good Old
Days response to similar ar-
ippeai with nauseating
frequency in tl arolinian In
m opinion, these articles are in-
ive, he. a use they
reP " E( I as
ose chiel interes
onquesi md I quote
retty young
ijs � .hes" of
1 c ' consistently deroj i
'n as sexual objects
��' : � - en credibility because, as
Mi 1 aSalle a few
newspaj willing to lure I Cl
apparently suffer
' exual inade-
ipparently feel the
illenge the East
ar '� i pi tttei in its en
tiret- - isting" us con-
tents, as well as readable photos oY
riich I wore in
my proles; i
1 : na Massey
Senior. English
H e regret (hat we were
unabU ortnt photographs oj Ms
Vfassey ' : ard for lack oj space. I
� ' ' � he writer oj the
er above. Some oj our columnists
do seem to promulgate sexist values
wmi ), v Massey
lakes some vidence for alleged
sexis
Fort amt � i word bitch, which
presumably was gleaned from a col-
umn b) Robert Mazzoh which actual-
ly lampooned sexism and hipocrisy,
was not used in a context which
� caned women. I have
determined where the word
"slut" came from. It was not in the
I asalle column mentioned.
Moreover, the I asalle column could
be taken as u lampoon oj the sexist
values which Ms. Massey and I both
detest.
The bottom line is. however, that
we print a diversity of opinion. If
there is a feminist point oj view which
a student is willing to write for
publication our features editor eager-
ly awaits u.
Heiber Rebutted
1 am writing this letter in response
to a letter which appeared in Tues-
day's (April 22) editorial section of
the EAST CAROLINIAN.
As American citizens, each of us
have the right to v oice our opinions as
long as they don't infringe on others'
rights. Ms. Lisa Heiber voiced her
opinion last Tuesday. The problem is,
she doesn't know what in the hell she
is talking about! 1 consider myself a
co-sponsor ol the resolution express-
ing support for president Ronald
Reagan's administration in military
action already taken against the Li-
byan government and therefore I feel
the comments in Tuesday's paper
were directed toward me also.
Ms. Heiber asked a number of
questions which I would like to res-
pond to.
1) I have seen and even worked
with body bags, Ms. Heiber. I have
pulled the lifeless bodies of my
friends from a burning building and
seen them in an almost
unrecognizable state. I have also seen
(on television) lifeless bodies of inno-
cent American civilians, women, men
and children alike who have fallen
prey to the aimless bombs of ter-
rorism.
2)1 have seen the grief of mothers
and fathers and brothers and sisters
who have just realized that a loved
one lias been lost. I've also seen and
felt the griei ol children who have
just lost one or both of their parents
3) I have talked to people who had
to grow up without their father
because he was killed trying to protect
the freedoms that you and 1 enjoy
everyday and take tor granted
often.
4) I have seen widows receive a Hag
ai the funeral of her husband, I have
also seen mothers of te
children look on, in tears as I
mother received a flag for their
father's heroic life Yet when
tears could be stopped, they held their
heads high and then, as well as now.
were proud to be an American'
1 have not been a bystander and on-
ly seen these things, I have been close
to the families ol many ol these
tragedies and have felt deep grief tor
all of them. SGA does not take a
"casual" attitude when talking ah,
matters ot such importance, so
please, don't feel that we do.
Ms. Heiber, it's people like you
who really don't know what's going
on, that cause so much strife and con-
flict for many people today. Bv not
trying to find out what reallv went on
about this resolution and making an
open-minded decision, you have
hastily and foolishly acted on hear-
say and falsely accused both Mr
Dunn and the rest of the Student
Government Association. For that. I
think you owe each of us an apology.
Bryan K. I assiter
SGA Representative
More On Libya
Reading about the SGA resolution
supporting the military action ol the
U.S. against Libya made me furious.
The legislators of the SGA involved
have in effect used their right to pass
resolutions and the name of their of-
fice to support their political opinion
The implications of student govern-
ment is that it is an elected body that
represents the students of ECU. The
student body elects legislators and of-
ficers to the SGA based on personal
appearance and campus issues. Can-
didates for office do not run on plat-
forms that address the issues of na-
tional politics. The student body a:
large does not know how these can-
didates are politically aligned,
whether they are conservative,
liberal, Democratic, Republican,
whether they are for or against civil
rights or SALT II. And until now. 1
never considered that it made anv dif-
ference.
The purpose of the SGA is to make
decisions and enact resolutions that
pertain to campus life. They are
elected on platforms that
demonstrate how they view issues
that pertain to campus affairs (i.e
student parking, noise ordinance and
alcohol on campus). When a student
body casts its votes, most are ig-
norant of the political affiliations and
tendencies of the candidates. And it is
on these grounds that I strongly ob-
ject to the actions of the SGA on
Monday, April 12, 1986.
While I am forced to concede that
from a legal standpoint as an
organization the SGA has the right to
make and pass any resolution it
wishes, I seriously question the ethics
and motives of such action, especially
since this resolution was mailed to
President Reagan, Governor Martin,
and other government officials.
Again, the SGA a
perceived
' 1 i l IT iwevi S,
elected t represeni the I t
bKis �
campaigi a
federal governn
should cease from sei I
those duely
fie
Tht
ed their
fashioi
I nivei
1(1
� prose: at
: I I
unfortunately supp
Cha v
ler. As
ethics and p
comm -n; howev. �
and one c
md ide
�lve at this lev
Micl t Sides
P. I Student
Shelley
On May loth 1 will be
ECU. 1 have been heavily involve
Student Government since I have a:
rived here four years ago 1 wanu
cave a few thoughts to the 1 reshman
i Sophomores who will be around
tor a few more years.
ou have a unique opportunity
here at ECU. Few schools intru
much to its students. You can run a
Radio Station, a Newspaper, a Bus
Transit System. Refrij Rentals
operation, or arrange major concerts
ere. and be well paid for it whik
go to school. Don't take it for
granted, get involved early, and stick
with it.
Since 1 have been here, the city
Greenville has tried to take over
YOUR transit system. The broadcasi
taculty have tried to take over YOUR
FM alternative. Please don't let
apathy take you over ECU students
can be proud of the actions of earlier
students who worked their rear ends
Ofi to make their dreams come true.
Get involved in your SGA. Thev
will appropriate over $100,000 o
Ol R money with or without your
input. Tired of the parking problems
here on campus'1 Do you want them
to pave the bottom of college hill to
solve the problem'1 If you choose to
ignore the SGA. then your voice is
muted, and the administration will do
hat ever it wants. Think ii will do
what it wants anyway? Wrong'
Thanks to former SGA President
David Brown, the bottom of College
Hill is safe, for now.
Two years ago I wanted to get all
the candidates for governor here on
campus tor a candidates forum
Could a Sophomore pull off that type
of event? You bet. (It went pretty well
too.)
This year the Senior class began
the biggest project ever initiated bv
the students - a Clock Bell Tower
Designed by the students, it w.11 be a
visible symbol of this great university.
fcCU is still young and it needs all the
tradition it can get. If vou are in-
terested in seeing this monument be-
ing created let the SGA know. Get in-
volved to help make this idea and
your dreams come true.
Kirk Shelley
Senior Class President

SGA Api
ontinued from Page 1.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 29,
1986
i nt11
a II do
- �� all
ere on
- �
f thai type
. el!
egan
ated bv
i
mcr.
���ill be a
� university.
eeds all the
ou are in-
�nument be-
know Get in-
nelp make this idea and
Jreams come true.
' resident
MSO Raise Contention
Continued From Pgge 1.
fr�m the Graduate Business
Association and giving it to the
1S()
rh� SGA Speaker Kirk Shelly
asked foi a recess at this time to
get exact information concerning
transfers.
Aftet the recess. Shelly
reported the const nation of the
MSO had been reviewed and
found invalid because the SGA
had no constitution for the
group
According to Shelly, constitu-
tions ot the groups funded by the
SGA are supposed to be reviewed
every two years.
1 he SGA never recieved a copy
1 the MSO constitution since the
group changed their name from
SOULS two years ago.
The MSO did have a copy of
their constitution.
The SGA failed to notice the
discrepancy before Monday
night's meeting.
"I think there are a lot of ques-
tions to be answered said SGA
President Steve Cunanan. "I feel
they (MSO) should have gotten
something. Getting a constitution
is the next step
Robinson said he felt the
SGA's action was representative
of what they've done all year.
"I think defunding us was just
a technicality said Robinson.
"Behind it all 1 think it was ac-
tion against the progressive
moves we've made this year
He added, "the unit is conser-
vative and it seems they do not
want to see the students speak
out
According to SGA Vice-
President Tony Jackson, it was
wrong to single out one organiza-
tion and evaluate its merit
without evaluating all the funded
organizations' merits.
"I think this will serve as a
catalyst to get more minority
students involved said
Jackson.
Cunanan said there are four
options to choose from:
� Not veto the proposed annual
appropriations and accept it as it
is.
� Accept the appropriations and
then fund the MSO during the
summer.
� Veto the appropriations now
and call an emergency session of
the legislature to approve the
MSO constitution and fund the
group.
� Veto the appropriations, go
through and approve the MSO
funding and let the summer
legislature (the executive branch)
redo the appropriations.
SGA Treasurer John Eagan
said they will go back and
reallocate money to see the MSO
gets funded and to make the fun-
ding fair.
"To deny this organization is
wrong said Cunanan. "The
MSO will definately be funded
IIIUIIIIIIIHtllUlttlllllUMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIUIItMIIIMtllllltHIUlllimilllM
SCEC Sponsors
Special Olympics
cAppfie cofcds
iiuiiiiiiMMttuiimiimiiti
a
I
April 24
1:40 a.m
William Warren Jones of Tar-
boro was arrested for DWI.
C areless and Reckless driving and
arting liquor with broken
ollege Hill Drive.
S 50 ' .m.
oi items from Rau!
�a ted by a worker in
Rawl.
5 16 p
I nknown persons removed a
�n a vehicle belonging
. ' ' all resident.
11:19 p.n
X: lous male reported
as a bomb in Aycock
Continued From Page 1.
the 12th annual ceremony.
The participants in the field
day then formed a parade proces-
sional for the spectators.
Balloons were let into the air to
celebrate and mark the
significance of the day.
Greg Kerr, served as emcee for
the game.
Every participant was involved
in at least two events. Some of
the events included softball
throw, races and the frisbee
throw.
As each contestant entered the
finish line they were con-
gratulated and hugged by
volunteers known as "huggers
The ECU Football Team served
as huggers as well as other
volunteers.
"We had a lot of volunteers
and we were very pleased with the
reported that her room had been
broken into and entered and the
larceny of a cassette radio from
her room.
April 27
1:40 a.m.
James Rochelle of Greenville
was arrested for DWI north of
Jarvis dorm
11:10 a.m.
A Belk dorm resident reported
larceny of tires and rims from her
vehicle parked south of Belk
dorm.
6:00 p.m.
An Aycock Hall resident
reported vandalism and larceny
to his vehicle while parked in the
14th Street and Berklev parking
lot.
8:00 p.m.
A Scott dorm resident's car
was reported to be broken into
and entered, larceny was also in-
volved.
10:55 p.m.
A Belk dorm resident reported
if her vehicle
the 14th and
the hit and run
while parked in
Berkley lot.
April 28
12:45 am.
Three students, two residents
of Umstead dorm, were found to
be in violation of possession or
drug paraphernalia, possession
of pyrotechnics and manutactur-
ing of marijuana.
2:15 a.m.
Tony Frizzelle of Farmville
was baned from campus after be-
ing stopped for a traffic violation
and being found in possession of
drug paraphernalia.
12:30p.m.
A Greenville resident reported
the larceny of books from the
lobby of WZMB and the sale of
those books to U.B.E.
According to Lt. Keith Knox it
is typical for ECU students to
report an increase in the larceny
of personal possessions and van-
dalism as the semester comes to
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
i 5
V; Aycock Dorm and a Tyler
res .lent were found to be in
� : on of con t rolled
substance
10:15 a.m.
A Greenville res:Jem reported
ireenty of her wallet from
either Memorial or Minges Gvm.
A ireen Hall resident reported
larceny of her bike from the
ivesi side ol Memorial
G) m.
April 26
3:35 a.m.
Richard 1. Bicknell and Glen-
don c Harrison of Camp Le-
juene were arrested east of Tyler
dorm tor tampering with a
I ylei 's -esidents car.
5:15 p.m.
An Umstead dorm resident
reported the larceny of money
from his dorm room
8:35 p.m.
A Fletcher Hall resident
� 5S.
, We 've Moved! I











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Studying For Exams?
Take a break and buy
Yourself a treat
You Deserve It!
756-1058
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. ,4i ' �
turnout. There was a lot of one
on one action according to
Denise Souther, Vice President of
SCEC.
According to Souther, han-
dicapped and mentally retarded
children look forward to the
special Olympics every year. The
participants enjoy the competi-
tion, the special attention they
receive as well as winning.
"There are no losers, everyone
who participates places in their
event. Every contestant gets a rib-
bon said Souther.
Skill, Courage, Sharing, and
Joy is the motto of the Special
Olympics according to Souther.
"This year we had the greatest
support ever. We plan for the
event to be as successful next
year. The kids loved it said
Souther.
204 East Fifth St 758-1427 Open Mon-Sat 10 AM-9 PM
Albums & Cassettes On SALE This Week
$6.99
VAN HALEN "5150"
ELVIS COSTELLO "King of America"
JANET JACKSON "Control"
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FINE YOUNG CANNIBALS "(1st)"
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nilllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIHIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIllulHHIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIilllliliiiiMiiiliiHiiiliiiiiiniHuimg
an end. Knox cautions students
to be extra careful about keeping
dorm doors locked and not keep-
ing keys unattended or hidden
near the door, since, says Knox.
Bicycles thefts, said Knox, will
increase, so Knox warns students
not to leave bikes unattended or
unsecured. While moving out of
the dorm do not leave boxes or
possessions unattended, and if
any suspicious activity is witness-
ed on or near campus, Knox asks
to report it to the Police
Tequila Bar Weekly Specials
Sunrise Sunday: $2.00 per serve
MelO-Mondays: $2.00 per serve
Toasty- Tuesday: $2.00 per serve
Wednesday: Bikini Contest
Thirsty- Thursday: Drink & Drown
Fried-Friday: Get Fried Early at our new Attitude Adjust-
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FOR MORE INFORMATION
CALL TODAY 758-4359'
A Licensee Of GOLD'S GYM ENT. INC.





HI EAST AROl INI-W
APRIL 29, 1986
Moslem Rebel Activity, Fighting Resurges
iNILA. PHILIPPINES (UPI) The resurgence of Moslem dead. k , . . 0
�Mi . PHILIPPINES (UPI)
Moslem separatist guerrillas
d government troops clashed
eral times during the weekend
the southern Philippines, kill-
seven rebels and five soldiers,
militan said toda.
The resurgence of Moslem
rebel activity followed a week of
heavy fighting between govern-
ment forces and communist
rebels in the northern Philippines
that left at least 21 soldiers, 10in-
surgents and two journalists
T . gathered in a seaside park in The southern Philippines is
i roops also battled the private Manila to press for his return and home to host of the predominant-
my ot a political warlord loyal listened to him c�oir fmm hu lv Rnman rath�i;� �ot;��c ��
army of a political warlord loyal
to ousted ruler Ferinand Marcos,
who fled the South Pacific island
nation Feb. 25 after a military led
revolt.
Today, Defense Minister Juan
Ponce Enrile said the armed
forces was backing President
Corazon Aquino's call for na-
tional reconciliation but that he
doubted "hard core" elements of
the communist insurgency would
heed her appeals "unless it is to
their benefit or advantage
Enrile made the remarks at a
security conference a day after
some 10,000 Marcos suporters
listened to him speak from his
home in exile in Hawaii in a live
radio broadcast.
Marcos urged the crowd to
"double and quadruple" their
ranks and push ahead with a big
rally on Thursday to press for his
return but he appealed to them
not to take up arms.
The official Philippine News
Agency said seven Moslem guer-
rillas from the Moro National
Liberation Front and five soldiers
were killed in fighting last
weekend in the Sulu archipelago
off the strife-torn southern island
of Mindanao.
ly Roman Catholic nation's 3.5
million Moslems. A Moslem
uprising in the 1970s in Marawi
touched off a secessionist was
that left more than 60,000 people
dead.
In other weekend fighting,
soldiers in the southern pro
cial capital of Marawi on M
danao island battled the hea.
armed forces of fired provii
Gov. Ali Dimaporo.
F
�w
m
94 Dickinxn iu. C�MP�-�TE home FjRmsmings
99i '52-3223
Now faying All Household Items
m
What is the differnce between
' xhaustion and heat stroke?
ei and ovei -healing
an he dangerous
nsequenti) .
be aware oi
� I eat exhaustion,
ke (sunstroke).
� ire ridden mus-
sed bj excessive loss
le (NaCl)
during
exercise in hot
treatment is
dunk
Health Column fi
Miu Mesha Adams
Gatorade or
. t fluids
austioi a used h
le bod) to ade-
� the blood vessels
ids to produce
Jed for cooling
vital tissue re-
auses I iaus-
see? M, ex.
vigorous exercise
Syn pi n s in-
- w ea kness,
imes nausea
and the skin
�d hod
below
reatmenl is
imps and
i activity dur-
Emergenc)
ts ol lowering the
rest of
a cold
di Hiking fluids that
rs ol
. bettei known as a
� �� ' IS condition
d) hea; is re-
requires prompt
nent. failure of
le I regulating
itstroke. The
exercises vigorously
heat may sweat pro-
some time and than
lehydrated and fail to
lij :i to maintain body
I he skin is dry, hot,
shed and the person can
ome contused, dizzy,
taint or even lose consciousness.
Sunstroke is a great medical
emergency without prompt
treatment 1(X) percent of those
victims will DIE! f prompt and
vigorous treatment is provide
almost as many will survive.
I reatmenl should start by:
� Moving the person to shade,
preferably a cool room and call
their physician and or rescue
squad al once.
� Try to check the person's
temperature if possible, than at-
tempi to reduce bodv
temperature, a bath tub with
cool watei massaging the skin
vigorously will bring more blood
to the surface for cot)ling
� Spraying the body with a
garden hose and fanning is often
effective
� Ice should be placed on head
and it the person is alert, otter
fluids
It the elevated temperature is
allowed to continue, serious per-
manent brain and nervous system
damage can occur. A
temperature of I05F or more re-
quires treatment and treatment
should be continued until it goes
down to I02F and then checked
frequently for several hours. A
person recovering from
heatstroke can have faulty heat
regulation for days, months,
ears and the rest of his life and
shouid always avoid excessive
heat.
Remember, have fun in the sun
but rest, drink, and don't over
heat!
presents
?s9(� 0 t
Doors Open at 8:30
Show Starts at 9:00
Men A dmitted Free
at 11M0
COUPON
; $1.00 OFF
lP?t?F-Adonis
Don't DRIVEN Call the JliU J?uL
for a FREE RIDE
758-5570
Students
Get your car ready for that
long trip home.
NEW USED
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OUNMON FRI
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Private Club
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5 Conserve Water
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ft Home Away From Home
Coggins Car Care
756-5244
3 20 West Grfriviiie Bivd
( HfcKRS! Km
Want A
Bv
Shower
With A Friend
L
SORORITIES
a key to many opportunities
�GET INVOLVED
Congratulations
to
"Gramps"
JIM COYNE
On a Tremendous Achievement
We 're Proud of You!
Larry, Mary, Don, Sandy, Jenny, Matt,
Patti, Dino, Eric, Joe, jane, Jack, Dave, &
Doug.
The Store "Outlets
Are Envious Of!
Be the "Best Dressed" on the beach
Swimsuits
Gitano � Sassafras
Pierre Cardin � Dunki's
Giorgio � with lots of
cover-ups to coordinate
$12��-$1990
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& Tank Tops
$4.90 & up
Shorts & Jams
by Bobbi Brooks � Sallie Ross
Manssa � Ricki � Hang Ten
with plenty of tops to match
uccess: tC
ISS i
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in
v


MA.S,
I
I
While a
voice wi
a w a .
No Charge Lay away Plan A vailable
10-9
MonSat.
Arlington Blvd.
Across From Buccaneer Theatres
756-1547

The Fn
think oj
ard in and easy man-
ner with igaged �
similar to the mechan.
which permii "freewheeling"
in automobiles and bicycles
reflects the lifestyles at ECU
and the often overlooked little
things that make up college
life.
I i
( i
I
�-�:� MM





esurges
weekend fighting,
southern provin-
Marawi on Min-
ted she heavily
ed provincial
ssts
mf sunr
919) '52-3223
k All Household Items
hat
e fnp home.
�����
sflUKSuuasHcuwsiAi.iN
m
i
IMAM jCM

7S Car tare
244
i
tore Outlets"
nvious Of!
Ion the beach
10-9
MonSat.
�MCHCf
Arlington Blvd.
cross From Buccaneer Theatres
756-1547
ie
FREE WHEELER
A I AB PROJECT OF JOl RNALISM 3200
Vol. 4 No.1
Tuesday, April 29, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
4 Pages
Circulation 12,000
'86 Graduates In Demand;
Employment Outlook Bright
CHEERS! Everyone looks forward to graduation as the culmination of years ot hard work, "here's
alwavs a celebration and seldom does one see a sad face in the crowd.
B PAMELA SWINBURNE
Foi most students graduation
means a new beginning and
hopefully a job to go along with
it. For 198ft, the job market of-
fers an encouraging outlook.
Companies responding to recent
surveys ol job openings report
they are planning to hire as many
new graduates this year as the)
did lat yeai.
Although hiring totals for 1985
were substantial!) above those o(
the year before, landing a good
job ma still noi be easy. Cor-
porate mergers and takeovers
have thrown mam management
el employees into the market
iome of the jobs new
luates might otherwise seek.
V usual, engineers and com-
puter scientists are in demand.
but the demand for liberal �
ors seems relativel) strong as
well ccordine to a survev bv
Changing Times, about one-fifth
of the employers surveyed say
they have jobs available that re-
quire liberal arts degrees
The Changing Times survev
also indicated graduates with
degrees in the physical sciences
are not in strong demand. Only
14 percent of the responding
companies indicated a need foi
physical science graduates.
Among other majors, 22 per-
cent of the employers polled
listed a need tor graduates with
other academic � rounds,
rani ;ical educa
agriculture-related fields.
( loser to home, ECUareer
Planning and Placement Dire.
Furney James said he believes
1986 graduates are in a s-rong
position.
.lames noted an increase in
ools hii achers. "Some
schooU are here hiring that
en'i been o f I in u-arv
Only a tew years ag
market was Hooded with edu
t ion majors, ECU
graduated 900. In 198
were onl v 300 educa
graduate he said.
receni cha been tl
eased emphasis on liberal a
majors. Many c mpai ie
formerly paid little ai .
liberal arts graduates are n
fering jobs to them. Som
banks are - ng liberal a
tuates to: theii managen
trainee positioi
In other field
il indusi
math majors, a industi
engineej
representative :
I tie job
Id graduates, bui remembei
a good job
ne.
Want Ads Often Deceptive; Read With Care
Kv 11 mm whiim w
1 a
clas

I
M.
as innocent as the) seem.
1 oi example, someone in the
apel Hill area wants an "Out-
's.tie- Representative P
ad reads, 'Musi he s , I
tied, well-organized,
ti � willing to assunu
� ibility. " Sounds simple
i: break it down into what
�� realh want. So let's lake
Success: ECU Style
Bv M� H NK
Bi
-�

N n ipel Hi!
966, I
Appeals
in nu
. al and
i er-
VIO
dir
involved in
"Vlumni Award in
ie utsta - i
I - School
and the
reoi gher educa-
olina.
�s Judge
eceived include EC1 's
1981 .
� w a i
uccessful graduate,
Jane Murra) Dillard, a I960
alumnae, has performed with
symphon) orchestras and opera
throughout the United
tes and Europe !n 1971, she
eived the ECU Alumni
Association's Outstanding Alum-
ni Award.
While at ECU. Dillard studied
voice with Gladys White oi the
School ol Music and was twice
awarded grants from "he
The Freewheeler likes to
think of students moving for-
ward in a free and easy man-
ner with gears engaged �
similar to the mechanisms
which permit "freewheeling"
in automobiles and bicycles. It
reflects the lifestyles at ECU
and the often overlooked little
things that make up college
life.
Rockefeller "foundation foi ad-
vanced study. She was also a win-
ner in the International Singing
Contest in Geneva, Switzerland.
A successful businessman and
1955 1 Cl graduate, W. Howard
Rooks was also honored with the
��adine Alumni Award in
176.
Rooks is president and owner
Mount Vernon Realty. Inc
an 11-office firm that grosses
more than SI50 million annually.
He is also co-owner oi Gilliam-
Rooks Motors, a Ford dealer-
ship, and of Guardian Mortage
Co a residential loan firm.
As an ECU student. Rooks
: eceived the Thomas Clay
Williams Scholarship Award for
acheiving the highest grade point
average among business majors.
Another graduate, Jeanne
Smith Piland, is a featured per-
former with the New York City
()pera.
While at ECU, Piland won
several local, regional and na-
tional awards in auditions spon-
sored by opera companies and
other professional musical
organizations.
She received her masters of
music in 1969 and taught voice at
the Shenandoah Conservatory.
She has also participated in the
St. Paul Opera, the Omaha
Opera, the Northern Virginia
Opera Theater and the
Chautauga Opera Festival.
Gene Lanier of the ECU
Library Science faculty is another
successful graduate who chose to
remain and serve the university-
after he graduated.
Lanier is a native of Conway,
N.C, and holds degrees from
ECU and the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill.
From 1966 to 1981, Lanier was
chairman of the ECU Depart-
ment of Library Science and has
served as a consultant to more
than 50 libraries across the state.
James H. Maynard, an ECU
graduate, is Chairman and Chief
Executive Officer of the 325-unit
Colden Corral Corporation. The
company is based in Raleigh and
has restaurants in 37 states.
Maynard was born in Jackson-
ville, N.C, and received his
undergraduate degree in
psychology in 1965.
one step al1e nex ti ed was �
"Si 'urhe informal
job is h 'arentheses is mine
1- � . . try (W ho
ise it certa.m is do you
froia. i
:11. . -
ce v on won have one.
use one i
achieve:11. . i .
enouj(N pa d ol car
�i
quahfica � �I!u tiki un while
insen "� - i Because sometimes
14 re s poiis so slow vou'd better
�i amuse
.
IX V1 WAIT!
Okay, i on'i I'l
issified ad. I �
Persoi ���
� �.
workh � iblic. Ex
mpanies g people
� : in Mine. I"hai means you gel
bei � � rk 39.?
week, ai d . fl ��� u k for
Chri
"Fashion conscious" loo;
ited is. "College students
who can afford onh one suit i
� 'A
beauty "El � w
public" reaiiv m
Or i f you d
ei
don ki a
�nd ai:
perience. 1 I
"S
experience

1 per ien ce is
sec l)V Page 2
Welfare: An AIternative For Graduates
B HARKl JOHNSTON
(Editors note: Tht wing
artuie is purei v sai
likeness to persons livt lead
is coincidental The views
presented do not reflect the opi-
nions of East ersi-
ty.)
"Nothing could be finer than
to graduate from has; Carolina
And for a great number ol you,
this slogan will turn into reality
within a few weeks.
Yes, commencement is rapidly
approaching and the consump-
tion of four years (five tor some)
oi so-called hard work and
tremendous amounts oi beer
drinking have finally arrived. The
next task at hand, without a
doubt, will be the most trighten-
ing and horrifying experience you
will encounter � finding a job.
The experience of finding
employment is made easier by the
C areer Planning and Placement
people over at Bloxton House.
You know the building; the one
no one knows about when you
ask directions for getting there.
Well, they are there to help
graduating seniors find jobs, and
here are a few pointers to help
seniors who have neglected to
plan ahead.
let's begin with the two ob-
vious points that you think oi as
soon as the diploma hits your
hands.
The first point is that you can-
not go home, because your
parents have had enough oi your
free-loading for four years. The
years and years oi them footing
the bill for books, clothes, and
beer has now ended. They no
longer look at you as their loving
sons and daughters, but as the
reason for their new-found place-
ment into the "poor-house
The second point is that you
must not stav in Greenville.
With formalities out of the
way, the question of what to do
after graduation can now be
answered. The recommendations
may come in handy when you
step out into the real world.
How to apply for welfare: Do
not get upset or embarrassed
when speaking about welfare.
This service is provided by the
United States government and is
located in all 50 states. Hawaii
and Florida are nice places to
live, but avoid California because
the state is sinking and will soon
meet its final demise in the
Pacific Ocean. This could
become a real pain for the
mailman who is trying to deliver
your welfare check.
After deciding what state to
live in, go to the nearest Social
Service agency. Tell then
situation, and most importantly,
inform them that you're a recent
college graduate. This
eliminate the question and
answer period in a hurry because
the agency probably has a form
already set up for new graduates
And there is a proper dress
code for welfare applicants.
Forget about that new suit
dress deal and go t r that dirty
jeans, t-shirt and oily hair look.
Never go to the agency looking
clean-cut and with the aura of a
person wanting to work for a liv-
ing. No, you want your $169.69
without any fuss.
But don't feel guilty. Your
fellow classmates who attended
class and studied, instead of go-
ing downtown everynight, will
probably have a job, and their
tax dollars are now supporting
vou.
Planning Center Helps Find Jobs
By CINDY DAMM
After spending four or more
years in college, most students
are looking for more than just a
job � they're looking for a
career. Students who need help in
their quest for the perfect job
should contact the ECU Career
Planning and Placement Center.
On their first visit to the Career
Planning and Placement Center
in Bloxton House, located behind
Greene Dorm, students receive an
information packet which in-
cludes registration and reference
forms, which are kept on file.
The students will also meet
Furney James, director, or Jim
Westmoreland, associate direc-
tor, to discuss the student's goals
and ideas abou; a career.
After registering with the ser-
vice, the student will receive a
monthly listing of companies
scheduled to interview on cam-
pus. Those interested in talking
with a company representative
can sign up for interviews, which
are held in Bloxton House.
The monthly listing also in-
cludes job openings that will not
be interviewed on campus, as well
as positions available in educa-
tion and other fields. Summer
and part-time jobs are also listed.
Aside from job interviews and
mailings, the Career Planning
and Placement Center offers
other job hunting aids. Students
can search through two rooms
filled with binders and files of in-
formation on various companies,
military groups, graduate schools
and teaching facilities.
The Center also offers free
magazines and booklets to
students. Careers, a job-related
magazine published Dy
Businessweek, is just one of the
many information resourses
availble at Bloxton House.
The Career Planning and
Placement Center also provides
interview and resume workshops
to enhance students' abilities
once they find a prospective
employer. A video camera is used
to film students in a mock job in-
terview so they can see their
mistakes and improve their job-
hunting skills.
Although the center is used by
graduating seniors who are look-
ing for a job, freshmen,
sophomores and juniors can also
learn from the information-at
Bloxton House. The materials
may be helpful in choosing a ma-
jor or finding possibilities for a
major, James said.
A MONOTONOUS, but necessary ritual for graduating seniors
is searching through the want ads for the perfect job. But beware
� want ads may be deceptive.
T





FREEWHEEL ER APRIL 29. 1986 Page 2
Vol. 3, No. 1
THE FREEH HEELER
April 1985
Susan Askew, Editor
Janice Braswell, Assignment Editor
Monica Konarski, Art & Photo Editor
Greenville, N.C.
Doug Roberson, Page One Coordinator
Editors: Kim Burgess, Terry Slake
and Jeff Jerema
Theresa Rosinski, Page Two Coordinator
Editors.Cindy Damm, Harr Johnston
and Pain Swinburne
Connie Spivey, Page Three Coordinator
Editors; Sissy Funk, Andy White
Elaine Whitman, Page Four Coordinator
Editors: Karen Heim, Patricia Shepard
Dr. Jeanne Scafella, Faculty Advisor
1 HI FREEWHEELER is
� 'I individual write
"0j7 P"blica Journalism �200. c op Editing and Makeup Views presented are
waj reflects vnews ol the Department of English oi East Carolina Universitv
Trashman Keeps Southern
Traditions Alive at ECU
B.lrrr Mi EM A
i ne conjure? ar m
I Cl sorority girls His mere
t entrance doot
causes ai prop:
inge. E( ! essors arc filled
id when
shows
beginning ol eav �� mestei He is
everything that is-goo and
absurd
illustrious w a
freeisi i in the woi Id
rhis Ea
knout.
I
M
He has been labeled a racist, a
drunk, and again in his own
"a loud mouthed idiot
with no sense of values what-
soever. "
(n the contrary. I rashman has
very strong ideals which betray a
similarity, if somewhat distorted,
to the traditions of "the old
He is a right-wing fun-
damentalist�not typical of E( I
who believes in the
uth" as he sees it.
g to Dr. Kirn Smith.
c professoi ol jour-
"1 welcome the diversity
my classroom
also id that I find
b it
1 ew is !
one
ECU
i(. ai .
ions
ig-
� "
x
�eral' .
'in with an
. especi
11 i v e
s a self-proclaimed "good
southerner Trashman had
dreams ol entering Hampden-
Sydne College, but said his
plans fell through due to his "lax
performance at prep school.
I'uu's why I'm here ai fast
( arolina College he adds with
a tinge of bitterness.
When one is fortunate enough
to find himself on the third floor
oi Ringgold rowers, obscure
sounds of beach music and r&b
can he heard emminating from
rrash's duelling. In fact,
! rashman's love and insight into
music has turned a hobby into
quite a profitable business. "The
Whole Nine Yards Inc has
ide its presence known at 1(1
'er the past two years. "I've
spun records for virtually all the
Greek houses on campus ac-
cording to him. "They love me; I
provide the best service and the
best prices in town. Yes sir, my
competition can't touch me
I"he rrashman's plight to
me Greek at ECl lias pro-
ven disasterous. His involvemem
with Beta rheta Pi lasted right up
i on when he was
mousiy ousted
��making Next came i
rheta Chi this
v No longer with them.
rrashman now explains his dif-
ferences with their organization:
�re's too many public
schoolers in I heta Chi; just
outlook rrashman
curi as plans to chartei a
Delta Kappa Epsilon chaptei at
1 as c arolina. It he ts successful
n will his si;igular vi-
sion ol a "good southern fra
come realization.
r. rt
' my. rAfcwc:
OPINION
Bv DO! (, KOBEKSON
When I was in the I
ljs ed to take great pleas
agriculture class witl
ret
I
words ol wisdom. 1 .��
I ear nine di �e
walls oi the c I
school to learn th
I 0 our te.u her, tl
some profo md i
would enric
But, to a c: �up
phrae
arisen to go
I -s pet
� : .
words ol � ai
cornet ol
thousand
as my
close, Mi u
undi
e
For i
as wil
afford us a
over the pasl

Huma
men i

r tier college ycau � mi
monpiact ranees i- as im

n infor-
I ai does I rashman do tot
ation besides torment yoi
women, "pot smoking hippies "
d "liberals Well, back home
m Charlotte, the rrashman en-
joys "a lounging 18 holes oi goll
he country club with a 12 pack
oi beer and a customary cart
He concludes. 'That's the most
relaxing thing m the world, hit-
tin1 choice seven iron shots out at
the country club with a Jamaican
cigar hangiri' out i my mouth
Foi somt
University
��
spen
bar
rx-si in son
the homes
n
Graduates Reap Rewards Of Education
Sexist Barriers Sti Exist
To College Women's Success
Bv II KK SI KE
-
in-
I college
a worth it B
income ol men
was 42 per.
� men w ii
ol dipl ima. Howevei.
nomic advan
al same male with a
e degree had dropped to
ii.
a ae'
ovei lo
was bigger. h 19
college ted women were
55.8 percent mote than
en with only a high
school education. By 1980, the
advantage had dropped to 31.3
in.
� ducted by the Na
ial C enter I �� Education
itistics said, women who have
luated from college caught up
ind surpassed the salaries oi
� female counterparts who
only high school diplomas
more quickly than college-
educated men caught up with
their high school peers.
In 19 "6, women with
Bachelor's degrees were earning
an average of S4.2 an hour,
compared with $4.27 an hour for
the women without a college
education.
Among men. college graduates
were earning $6.88 an hour after
seven sears, having not yet sur-
passed their high school educated
classmates, who were earning
S7.06 an hour.
. PS
know sexisi b
cess aftei
tend ti
tions thai .lo-
ners into a
studies ind
In a survey ol .�
e been in the work I
least 10 years, Kansas State P
Evelyn Hausmann found "n
women initially think I
rewarded mainly on tl
merit, but many ol them real
later on this is not true
Moreovei. Hausmann obsen � .
ed, about two-thuds of
women surveyed fell women were
just as prejudiced as ore
prejudiced than - men.
Via
-
Mai
Ber I

i
Machung thinks
foi full-time n
be more difficul
. i
CROSS CAMPUS�
"I'll know Vm successful when "
Greg Yitek.
Technology
"My personal goal of being
economically comfortable and
happy with what I'm doing. "
Mary Wilson, Fashion Merchan- Bernie Payne. Business-Einance
dising "I complete undergraduate
"I complete working with a P'lot tra' trough the Air .money ,
company and successfully open- ,�'ce ROTC �d become a be obtained "
ing my own shop. " fighter pilot in the U.S. Air
Force
Pam Harrington, Psychology
"I'm out of debt and ha
if this can e
ve
" I he crunch wi
they find it hard to drop ou
force" because
tve two incomes to sup-
port a family, she said.
Dropping out oi careers many
women now start can put the
women at a distinct disadvantage
upon returning to work, she said.
Fifty-seven percent oi the
women Hausmann surveyed cited
family obligations as obstacles to
greater career success.
1 ven the Berkeley women who
expected to avoid such troubles
weren't sure how they would do
"� Machung notes. "Women
confused about how to have kids
and continue jobs "
In a separate stud) in which
men and women were interviewed
for UP to three hours. Machung
found all the men assumed
women will leave jobs to tend
children, and both sexes expect
women to do more oi the
domestic chores and most oi the
childr earing.
"Men and women are confused
about what egalitariarism means
in marriage Machung observes
N I u
HA A T A DS
( ontinued From Page I.
�.
-
I wa �
,J:ev have
eds.
better i
ary.
1 i interested in
a business � be
ful lake this next dd wi
dt.
SSISTAN1 MANAGER -
opening
manager trainet
� �
ng to n
mt
Vssista
means a "gopher " ! he term
"expanding company" explains
why you've never heard oi them
I need vou to work
120 a week Plus, the
md good benefits con-
tradict one another. Benel
come only when vou are no
longei a trainee
you're a trainee for three
years, vou won't get benefits for
th�-ee years. nd be careful
relocating Remember Timbuktu
needs assistant managers too.
Although these ads are but a
t�P of the iceberg of the cold,
cruel world, they do exemplfv the
stretched truths of want ads. So
wnen you're readv to enter the
work world, remember to take
along a good resume, some valid
questions and a very large grain
ol salt.
'60s
Sere
InTh
B If If IAREMA

CO.
Strand
Paradi
"Schoi
"Reach,
Wei
PRI
H
CXJ" tc yiM w �
!
"
mmh � �.





V
'60s Music
Screams
In The '808
'
B JEFF JAREMA
irn oi gaiage music is a
�1 a brief period in history
wore mini skirts and
when guys wore
�ots, peg-legged pants
. u;s I he music they
��'�as a combination ol
'tone" guitai. i ai fisa
scream
a as 1966. I wentx years
e music ol the period,
. lei red to as "garage
ing re evaluated, and
cases, relived.
dozens ol cases in
' om New 01 k Ci-
Nerve to Hollywood's
J �ras. 1 here is such a
�(iteration ol these
I thai a recent
. ease entitled
SALE" compiled 19
i : playing
:ene
i
. Bea its on
Show" in
: mediate
eenagers
bu
the Bands
-
was
hat '
' S
.
heavy dose oi punk attitude and
t hi own professionalism and corn-
met ciality right out the window
(Ol "garage"). Many of these
bands refuse to play anything
other than cover versions of
obscure songs from 20 years ago
with a sell-imposed level of
mediocrity. The casualty list runs
high as they constantly change
hands or disband. Critics say the
garage scene runs a dead end
com sc.
Whether or not the scene runs
its course, there are several new
bands whoso uniqueness has been
overshadowed by their associa-
tion with the '60s. Unlike the
bulk of current garage bands.
these few exceptions take the '60s
inspiration as a basis for their
sound, but they provide the raw
talent and originality themselves.
rhese foui bands are the I yres,
Chesterfield Kings, the I'ell-
rak He.His and the Morlochs.
1 ike the Dutch punks of '66.
San Diego's rell-Tale Hearts
wear their hair at lengths that
would even scare away "heavy
metal" enthusiasts. They pay a
loud, demented style of R"B not
ke thai of theii heroes the
Pretty H ings and Q'65. I heir
: ecoi d. ' The Now "
� the rell-Tale Hearts'
V kx), is a six-song masterpiece
vcases the undeniable
� the whole band; look
' i an east soast tour.
the raw sound of the
mid-60's, one
need to purchase the ex-
B ' ts and peg-
Mi one really needs
n mind and a savage
pi oduced, over
. . the unpolish-
the rell-Tale
Heai I i hesteifield Kings, is
ng in hip disguise S
t a primitive cause!
FREEW HEELER
APRIL 29, 1986
Page 3
Dedicated ECU
Grads Freak Out
TELL-TALE HEARTS (Left to Right): Mike Stax, Eric Baeher,
David Klowden (back row), Ray Brandes, Billalhoun.
Every Student
Needs A Maid
.
By CONNIE SPIVEY
I'm a senior homesick for the
easier homelife. I'm not flunk-
ing a course or in trouble, but 1
need a break from my domestic-
chores.
I can remember my mom say-
ing something about needing a
break from her housework. It
was probably after washing six
loads of clothes, preparing two
different meals to accommodate
the likes and dislikes of hei
family and washing fifteen dirty
glasses.
Like most teenagers, I was
blind to my mom's complaints.
And when she was trying to
make me do something, I was
suddenly deaf.
I can't do that now, though.
If I don't do laundry, I weai
dirty clothes. If I don't cook, 1
go hungry. If 1 don't clean mv
room, it stays messv.
Sometimes I have to yell at
myself, "Connie, clean this
room! Wash your clothes' IV
your homework I tried to do
these chores, but it's so much
easier watching Mom do them.
After the first week of mv
freshman year, my clothes were
various shades of gray. 1 have
clothes hidden away to prove
these shades exist.
Mom came to my rescue, o'
course! But now I've learned a
lesson. It 1 separate my laundry
before I wash it. 1 have the lux-
ury of different colored
clothing.
Of course, after I was decent-
ly dressed. I had to eat ook
ing is not a problem for me. but
washing dishes is. 1 have solved
that problem, too. I've learned
precisely how long it takes
dish to mold, what color�in
shades �the mold is and just
how unpleasant an odoi the
mold emits.
Admittedly, these problems
were of my own making. But
why wasn't 1 warned? Mom's
tears while driv ing me to college
weren't entirely because she
would miss me. She Knew whal
I was m for.
When I'm 30 years old and
looking at my graying hair,
wrinkles and small children, I'll
remember these college years.
I'll probablv wonder if mv
children will c and
think, "Should 1 warn them?"
No. I think I'll just sit back
and wail foi theii long distance
collect calls, and complaints
about molded is and
clothes in shades ol gray
By THERESA ROSINSKJ
College graduates are in better
shape now than ever before,
especially at ECU. Hobbies
formed during college, like jogg-
ing, bike riding or aerobics are
being continued after graduation.
Rick Dillon, owner of the
Aerobic Workshop, said that half
of their members are college
graduates. " I he graduates
realie they're getting older and
want to keep in shape, so they
continue to work out. I hey have
already seen the benefits gained
from keeping in shape and they
don't want to lose them he
said.
The benefits include a stronger
heart, slimmer physique, and bet
ter overall attitude, he said
Dillon said college graduates
are more dedicated to their hobby
and keeping in shape. "The older
people stick with it a lot mor
than college students. The
students come for a month and
then we don't see them again for
two weeks
Although the dedication may
be lacking in students, he said,
the idea is there. And once a
habit is formed it may be hard to
break. So just because classes end
after graduation does not mean a
fitness freak has to stop getting in
shape.
Book Fights Ad Battles
Bv ELAINE WHITMAN
Marketing Warfare. ByAlRies
and Jack Trout. McGraw Hill
Book, Co. $17.95.
"Marketing Warfare" is full
oi surprises. I he authors, AI Hies
and Jack I rout, show that adver
Using campaigns are like battles.
I hev are surprised that more
businesses don't realize the com-
parison.
Kies and I rout lead the reader
'Ugh the beer war, the cola
war. the computei war. and the
burger war. losi ol the mistakes
these companies make are from
not listening to Karl von
( lausewitz, the noted Prussian
military strategist. In per test
military tradition, "Marketing
Warfare" tells how defensive, ol
fensive, flanking and guerilla
techniques make and break the
and small corporations.
Each chapter begins with a
quote fromlausewitz and then
expounds on his theory while ap-
ply ing it to advertising. I he
chaptei on the :omputei war
starts with a Clausewitz quote,
"In sik as war, the errors
which proceed from a spin'
benevolence are the worst
hich is w hy. a- Kies and
rrout explain. IBM is the leader
puters.
1 hev established their
eriority early in the game and
they do not hesitate to crush I
enemy.
Good generaK work tor IBM;
however, even good generals
make mistakes. IBM forgot a
mam defensive principle in the
early 60s. "Strong competitive
moves should always be
blocked
Digital Equipment Corpora-
tion flanked IBM with minicom
puters in 1965. I he same c
puters thai became widely use
scientific research, education, in-
dustrial controls, and health care.
IBM lost a small war because
they forgot that marketing, not
love, is a battlefield.
"Marketing W
well-written book that flows
examples and explanations It's
not for business majors only.
Anyone ini I in advertising
should read and digesi all the in-
formation (: COUI se .
might ins; be interested in
Coca-Cola is numbei one
Pepsi is numbei 'Marketing
War tare" also explains
Coke may not stay on i
COMING ATTRACTIONS
vr a ns
-
� a
I ' -
' ee.
tust he
tan!
erm
a ins
hem
ork
the
.�.in-
B
. . are no
ee foi three
ei benefits for
caieful
Iimbuktu
ads arc but a
f the cold,
do exemplfy the
if want ads. So
re ready to enter the
work world, remember to take
d resume, some valid
tnd a very large grain
On Reading Day . . .
Stranger Than
Paradise
Wed April?!)
8:00 p.m.
At The Underground . . .
"School's Out"
starring the Little Rascals
Also Showing:
"Ready, Willing, But Unable"
Free Admission!
Thurs May 1
1:30p.m.
The Weekend Movie . . .
PRIZZI'S HONOR �,
When killing is no 11he only crime of passion.
Thurs Fri&Sat.
7:00& 9:30 p.m.
ATTENTION: GRADUATES
East Carolina Lincoln-Mercury
HAS YOUR
PRE-APPROVED
CREDIT FROM
FORD CREDIT
PLUS $400 TOWARD
THE PURCHASE OF A NEW
MERCURY
It's Easy To Quality
� You must receive at least a
bachelor's degree or' ,i state R.N
license between October 1,
1985 and September n 1986.
H Yon must have verifiable
employment that begins within
120 days ot your qualifying
vehicle purchase .it .1 salary,
sufficient to cover ordinar liv
ing expenses and your vehicle
payment.
� Your credit record, it you
have one, must indicate pay-
ment made is agreed.
These Vehicles Are
Included In The Plan
Mercury: Lynx, topaz, Capri,
Cougar
otG� c
1,
�isrr0
1 he amount ot your pre-
approved credit i. determined
n the qualify ing vehicle you huv
and you are eligible tor the $400
directlv from Ford even it vou
don't finance your purchase.
Make your best deal and vou can
use the $400 toward your down
payment or jjet a check from
lord after the purchase or lease.
1 Lurry. It a vehicle i not in
dealer stock it must be ordered
hv June 1, 1986, and delivery of
all vehicles must be taken hv
August 1. 1986. See your par-
ticipating dealer for complete
program details.
East Carolina Lincoln-Mercury
Call 756-4267
Ask For
BRAD CONNERTON
Ford Motor
Credit
Company
MERCURY
LINCOLN

" �rffc
i





Page 4 FREEWHEELER
APRIL 29, 1986
Greenville Boogie Woogies
HERMAN FORBES AND TOM FOREMAN dream of nightclub life
in the black musical "Pitch a Boogie Woogie
PhI �,� coartoj I,mi Kumpir H I N,�v Barrau
By SUSAN ASKEW
For lovers of old films, lively
jazz and happy reunions, the Feb.
8 re-premiere of "Pitch a Boogie
Woogie" was a memorable occa-
sion.
"Pitch a Boogie Woogie" is a
26-minute, black musical comedy
filmed in Greenville 39 years ago
featuring an all-black cast of local
performers and muscians.
"It's a real piece of history
says Alex Albright, an ECU
English lecturer. "Black film
scholars have never heard of any
movie being made with stars from
the local community
Albright organized the film's
re-premiere,it's first public show-
ing in 38 years. He located several
cast members and muscians, most
of whom had never seen the film,
and invited them to ECU's Hen-
drix theatre for the festivities.
Reunited were Herman Forbes
of High Point and Beatrice Atkin-
son of Greenville. The late Tom
Foreman, for whom Greenville
named a park in 1981, was
represented by his son and widow.
Charles Woods, Lou
Donaldson and other members of
the Rhythm Vets, who recorded
the film's jazz soundtrack, per-
formed following the screening.
"For three days we sat off
stage and played music over and
over, I would sav six hours a
day says Woods, a retired high
school band director. "It was an
experience for us, something we
had never done before - to have
an opportunity just to be a part
of a movie
"Pitch a Boogie Woogie"was
produced by John Warner and
directed by his brother, William
Lord. Although both were white,
the two were fascinated by black
entertainment.
Warner owned movie theaters
in Greenville's black district,
"The Block and hired minstrel
shows and other forms of enter-
tainment to perform for the
primarily black audiences.
Louis Armstrong and Cab
Calioway played "The Block
Albright says. "Greenville in the
'30s and '40s was one of the hot-
test places for black entertainment
on the East Coast
Warner filmed most of those
performances, using many as
scenes in "Pitch a Boogie
Woogie
The movie was made in the
theater and a tobacco warehouse
that was converted into a sound-
stage. Meant to be shown na-
tionally in black neighborhood
theaters, the film was retired after
six showings due to a quarrel bet-
ween Warner and the booking
agent.
Lord-Warner Pictures Inc the
state's first production company,
dissolved in 1949. The film sat
idle in the Roxy Theater for 26
years until Bill Shephard, a local
musician, found it.
While Shepard was screening
the film, a passerby wandered in
and identified some of the cast as
Greenville residents. Ten years
later, Shephard told Albright
about the film.
After inspecting individual
frames of the film, Albright took
it to the American Film Institute
in Washington, D.C where it
was restored on safety film.
"Pitch a Boogie Woogie" was
made on flammable 35mm silver
nitrate film. "That's why a lot of
theaters burned in the 30s
Albright says.
Albright's first impressions of
the film weren't favorable. "I
couldn't believe I'd done all that
Liberal Arts Majors Can Do
College Contributes Little
To Attitude Changes
By JANICE BRASWELL
W hat can you do with a liberal
degree? It sounds impressive,
yei th concensus is thai it
� doesn'i prepare you for
� � ing.
Ve 'hal son of backgrounds
� copywriters, an direc-
rchers, and technical
V ' ive? Xnd v hat son of
eeded foi indexing,
mderwriting, public
and publishing? And
about travel agencies,
ai d real estate sales?
eless, people continue
�����i,i thai �' �� � � . t
io la led po s - are
He istical � bera a I majors
:e common
themes in literature, and can use
thai training for visionary solu-
ns to business problems, accor-
ding to Roger B. Smith, chief ex-
ecutive of General Motors Cor-
poration.
In a recent article in Business
H eek 's Guide to Careers, Smith
explained that "there is a special
connection between an in-
dividual's liberal education and
his or her success as a manager.
And there's a connection between
managers with liberal arts educa-
tion and a corporation's com-
petitive edge
He went on to explain thai
management is not so much a
science, as n is an an; an art that
begins with a vision. One must
know how to turn an idea into
reality by bringing elements
together in some sort of pattern.
"Just as artists - and writers -
communicate through their
works, managers must be able to
convev their vision in an inspiring
and forceful way to lead - or else
that vision will never be fulh
realized he noted.
While few people realize the im-
portance of cleat communicai
successful students ol drama,
language, literature, speech and
art learn to arrange their thoughts
logically and therefore learn to
speak and write economically.
liberal arts and the r ol
management then are closely
related, and that is just one careei
path of main.
f
B YRK SLAKE
Before you graduating seniors
grab your diplomas and surge into
the utws k! out competitive socie-
ty, ask yourselves this question:
Whai has college done for me
besides preparing me for a job?
According to 111 cod ore
Newcomb, a 45-year veteran of
'caching and expen on the effects
ol college, the answei is "very lit-
tle
In an interview with Education
D i g es . Newcomb said,
"Undergraduates tend to be
more independent ai 22 than they
were at 18, but so are kids who
don't go to college
lour years ol school tend to
make students somewhat more
nberal, less authoritarian and pre-
judices and more interested in
esthetics. But. he maintained that
many who don't go to college
move in those directions also,
though less dependentlv so.
When asked if there were per-
sonality or attitude differences
between college graduates and
non-graduates, Newcomb said
that there were, but not as a result
of college.
'There are differences
presented at the time of initial
selection. In fact, attitudes tend
to stabilize during college rather
than change. Data has consistent-
ly shown that there is little change
after college, even on the part of
those who have changed in col-
lege. It is probably that non-
college people don't change much
either, after the age of 21
On the effects of teachers on
students, Newcomb said that
there isn't mu evidence that
they do have anv effect on
students. "The fact is that
students neither expect much
faculty contact nor get it. In most
colleges, the faculty goes one way,
and the students go another
work for 26 minutes he says
"In the back of my mind I wanted
to find an Academy Award
winner that had been lost "
It didn't take long for him I
realize the value. "The film is
delightful he says. "It has an
excellent sound track of unique
musical pieces and includes some
examples of traveling minstrel
shows which may not exist
anywhere else in the world
"Pitch a Boogie Woogie"
begins with two friends, played bv
cousins Forbes and Foreman, who
meet outside a movie theater and
discuss opening a fancy nightclub.
The two become lost in their
dreams of nightclub life from
their own "private table
Scenes of Forbes and Foreman
puffing cigars and sipping drinks
are interspersed with differen
acts - singing, tap dancing,
shoe and exotic dance routines
performed by Irvin C. Miller's
Brown Skin Models and the
Winstead Mighty Minstrel
Dancers.
After a lot of music and da:
ing, Foreman's dream ends when
he is restored to reality bv his
wife, played by Miss Atkinson.
"Foreman was supposed to be
my husband, and he was looking
at the show and the girls in the lit
tie, short dresses she says. "1
sneaked up on him and hit him
with a rolling pin.
"My part was filmed in
day she says. "Then they n
me do it again the next day
because they said I wasn't hiti
them hard enough. It was just a
cardboard rolling pin, but it h -
ed real
"Pitch a Boogie Woogie" ;
received much publicity, since it is
one of the few films ol its type.
Noting that the film is the only
commercial production by
Carolina's first movie company,
Governor James G. Martin ;
claimed the week of Feb. 2 �
"Pitch a Boogie Woogie" Week
in the state. In addition, the
American Film Institute added a
copy of the film to the Librar.
Congress archives.
The future of the film lies in
Albright's hands. He plans to tour
the state with a copy and presem
lectures on black history. The film
is scheduled to be featured at the
North Carolina Film Festival at
Wilkes College on April 2"
Kappa Sigma &
Budweiser & Hawaiian
Present 5th Annual
Tropic
BAHAMA MAMA
BEACH PARTY L
.AAAAAi
� ������������
i Date: April 29, 1986 j



Date: April 29, 1986
Place: KAPPA SIGMA HOUSE I
Time: 4:00 p.m.
Tickets: $3.00
Tickets sold in front of Student Stores
Featuring
Miss Hawaiian Tronic Rikini (
����



-frr
�������
��

RAFFLE GRAND PRIZE:
An All Expense Paid Trip For Two To NASSAU,
the BAHAMAS
Hawaiian Tropic entries accepted until 3:00 p.m April 29, 1986
To Enter: Phone 752-5543
rni
.
HI
r
David
Coke Cel
(UPI)
S vv ee'
imag
who ca
ingredient
his bad a
11 � as sj
Pern be:
becau-v
medicinal :rea
be a remed
His
higher
ture
backyard
ot his c
tasted
that P
by the .
� a
bv -
The
8. ��
cc
a- a cure i
� revenue I
only $35.
began
bad, n
1888. Pen rx
idea
created a n
Pen �
c oca-
symh
reaches
the mosi
finable � p
s
thdav. Col
aim
in ' nj.
I
First Strike is a local band featuring ale
right) Scott Wynne, drums; Riek BalltJ
Gregor Wrap, bass. First Strike recorded!
on WZMBs Metal Shop (ask for "Kir
June 4th,
MMMNftMtft
I





oogies
�III t XNI . AKOl INJAN
Styje
APKll 2S 1VH6
Page7
Old Cafeteria Gets Facelift
Artist Begins Installation
H .1 H HI MRIHI �' i�
David Ireland
B JOHN SHANNON
SI,tr Kill
Shafts ol afternoon sun slant
through the tall windows o the
Old Cafeteria, striking David
Ireland, visiting artist, and David
Lewis, the graduate student
assisting him, as they survey the
room in which Ireland will work.
Blistered paini curls from walls
and window ti aincs, dust gathers
on an ornate mantlepiece � the
m is suffering from neglect,
and Ireland's presence as a heal-
ing agent of sorts promises to
restore some o its dignity.
"The Orientals have a tiling
ed Feng Shui, or 'dowsing the
povvei spots That's what we're
Joi the moment said
Ireland "It's akin to divining the
f 1 want to let
some ol its
Is
Ireland, who is constructing a
i n'li in the
ia Building, looks the
.night he able to pull it
Ovei si.x-and-one-hall feet
:ateh wisened
. d the eyes and forehead
- oi white wool tor
he, he has the
Coke Celebrates Centennial
.been
�1 a 'ouches
v,( �ke1 .(s' N,i i� C"oca-( ola be-i high school ircus, a pic-the holidays. It ' the bright �� ai iften have
� - hetoric,
still see
i e he name ol
ed States to-
" K lid. "II you look
: all com-
4 ��. � ages, ev en tap
�servi11 g s ak represent the
It msumed� � 1on consumed
1 'deliv. �dd i ke's � 'd and enter-
bumat �ions including
les pei houiMi ut Maid and Columbia Pic-
A IS slOWthree yeai -�. dustries, Inc . and com-
� ��cienues approached $8
'Ol Its !i � eai. a figure greatei
wasBusiness ICellttional products
InHe- ol some countries in which it does
$5 5 million, nban 1. ss.
he i:aJwhich , 'Coca-in foB 1 oca-Cola remains essen-di ink business, and to
waspart ol s kind olcelel the centennial of its
nsidered aambassad i��i 'duct. Coke is pulling
Donald k. stops with a tour-day
preside 1'(May 7-10), featuring
-ersa I "commi - a Iction" as a� cal shows, exhibitions and
e world.child in 1wasreturning atde through the streets ol
I0i bir-Coke bottle :e ' '� centMlanta.
� w '�ere.deposit. ��(I . e birthday party.
nil's! nhit� �See Coca-C ola, page 8
� r
p �� ���
SAU,
1986
First Strike
Pfcoto h, (HIP I.HIHINS
s
First Strike is a local band featuring all original music in a hard rock style. Members include (left to
right) Scoll Wynne, drums; Rick Balliot. vocals; Chuck Myer, guitar; Chip Gideons, guitar; and
Gregor Wray, bass. First Strike recorded a demo with EBDB sound of (Greenville, which can be heard
on WZMB's Metal Shop (ask for "Far Beyond" or "Searching"). The band will play at the Attic
June 4th.
compassionate, gentle ap-
pearance of a country
veterinarian or minister. But the
sparkle in his eyes belies this im
pression, and reveals the soul o a
crafty sage.
"The room's in a distressed
state he said, "and you could
say that's my trademark - - un-
covering and embellishing
distressed surfaces
Unfortunately, Ireland's
embellishment will be temporary,
as ECU plans to restore the
room. "If it were permanent,
we'd treat it differently. For now .
we're trying to come up with a
scheme that will be effective in
the given framework
Appropriately enough, Ireland
plans to call the piece
"Cafeteria I he installation will
play off the former use oi the
space, though how, exactly,
Ireland is not vet prepared to
disclose. For now it must suffice
to say, "Some things we're in-
terested in leaving, some not
Though occasional!) labeled as
an "env it on mental artist,
David Ireland thinks the adjec
tive is somewhat misleading
"Rather than 'environmental
perhaps 'situational' would be a
better term - you do something
specific to a particular situation.
'Environment' pigeonholes you
into interiors and exteriors, nar-
rows your scope
"Galleries are neutral spaces.
I his isn says Ireland. Indeed,
the room already acts on the im-
aginations of those who ex
perience it in peculiar ways, as
this writer can attest.
"It's essentially done Ireland
goes so tar as to say. "It's a
ready-made
Ireland is referring to the
method pioneered by Marcel
Duchamp in which art works are
.tied simply by identification.
lor instance, Duchamp once
labeled a urinal as an art work,
and so it became one. Of course,
: ready-mades is not
quite so simple, as it implies a
conceptual background.
Doubtless. Ireland will not
leave the room as is and declare it
an avante garde landmark. There
ispects ol rhe room he
will consider bringing out or
up. " I he light is verv im-
portant he said "Clouds go
by, the room lightens and
darkens. The light changes
throughout the day, and changes
the character ol the room
The character of places as
revealed through detail and prior
use has been important to David
Ireland since he was young. He
told a story oi the town he grew
up in, in the state ol Washington.
A reporter there did a stoi �
the local prison, with pictures.
"Those pictures made a big im-
pression on me said Ireland.
"The walls had been decorated
by the prisoners, in charcoal, and
in blood. They had burned mat-
ches, and used the burnt ends to
draw with
Needless to sav. the effect was
powerful. Ireland has subse-
quently become a widely known
and successful artist, winning na-
nal awards and installing ma-
jor works in cities such as
Washington. DC. and San Fran-
cisco.
The results of Ireland's work
will go on display Friday at 7:30
p.m. in a reception which will be
open to the public. Students are
urged to experience this unique
re-tormation ol an aspect of
II 's histi ir that most ol us
have never experienced.
Stranger Than Paradise
I he ECU Student Filmsoinmitte will round out its spring semester schedule with Stranger Than
Paradise Wednesday at K p.m and PrizzFs Honor Ihursday. Friday and Saturday at 7 and � p.m.
To Leave The Nest
By 1INDAC HAPIN
Si.ff �nln
Dorinne and Richard Armstrong.
leaving the est: The Complete
Guide to Living on Your Own.
New York: William Morrow and
Co Inc 1986. 306pp illustra
lions, paperback. $9.95.
If you're graduating and mov-
ing into your first apartment, oi
getting an apartment next
semester, buy a copy of I easing
the Nest: 1he C omplete Ciuide to
living on Your Own. It's 10
bucks at Central Book and News.
and worth every penny.
Leaving the est is a guide for
young people entering the world
on their own � away from the
comforts of home and the greater
comfort of a mother to take care
of their everyday needs. It con-
tains down-to-earth advice on
everything from balancing a
checkbook to cleaning a toilet.
Richard Armstrong is a 34 year
old free-lance writer living in
New York who found out after
he graduated from college that
living on his own was not as easy
as he thought it would be. He got
a lot of good, useable advice
about the "real world as he
calls it, from his mother,
Dorinne, and together they decid-
ed to write Leaving the Nest to
help others avoid some of the
mistakes he made when he tirst
started out.
Everything a person entering
"the real world" would need to
know about finding, furnishing,
decorating, cleaning, repairing,
and stocking an apartment is
presented in an easy-to-read,
humorous tone. This dialogue
ul washing dishes is a prime
example: "Dorinne: Before you
turn on the water, check that lit-
tle black gun. Make sure no one
has tied it up with a rubber band
si' it sprays in your face; Richard:
What kind of person would do
something like that?"
There are complete lists of kit-
chen equipment, staple foods,
furniture and bathroom ac-
cessories necessary for an apart-
ment, and useful shopping
strategies for purchasing them.
I here is also a glossary of
classified advertising jargon to
help clear up the confusion of
combing the newspaper on a Sun-
day morning. And the simple in-
structions foi taking care o'
everyday disasters such as a leaks
faucet or a missing button are
sure to come in handy.
"c ooking 101 � An Idiot's
Guide to the Art o' Cooking" is
exactly what its name implies. It
features easy-to-follow recipes
for the person who knows
nothing about cooking. The great
thing about the recipes is that
they are for entire meals (roast
chicken, mashed potatoes, and
Waldorf salad, for example) and
designed so that everything is
ready at the same time.This is
probably the most useful chapter
for many people, with advice on
grocery shopping, using lef-
tovers, and food storage.
There's more � the chapter on
money management explains how
to set up and revise a budget, use
savings for investments, and cope
with other common bank pro-
blems. "Tell Mommy Where It
Hurts" gives a mother's advice
tor treating common illnesses and
choosing a doctor when you're
too sick to treat yourself. "How
10 Become a Decent Human in
Days or Less" is a commonsense
guide to etiquette. It explains
how and when to write thank-you
notes, condolence notes, and to
respond to invitations. It also
gives a list of nine ways to be the
idal overnight guest (one is to
remember that your host has
hope � hope that you will even-
tually leave, so tell them your
plans.)
Leaving the Nest does not otter
any hints on meeting people, suc-
cess at work, or choosing a mate,
but nevertheless makes the
perfect gift for college graduates,
or anyone else moving into their
first apartment. It is skillfully
written and fun to read. It is the
encyclopedia ol living on your
own.
Other books recommended by
the authors;
Almeida. Philip. How to
Decorate a Pump Secaucus,
New Jersev: 1 vie Stuart, Inc
1983.
Ardman, Harvey and Perri
Ardman. The Complete Apart-
ment Ciuide. New York: Mac-
millan Publishing Co 1982.
Martin, Judity Miss Manners'
Ciuide to Fxcruciatinglv Correct
Behavior New York Varner
Books, 1983.
Wood, Jacqueline, and Joelyn
Scott Gilchrist. The Campus Sur-
vival Cookbook o. I and So. 2.
New York: William Morrow and
Co Inc 1981.
,1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 29, 1986
BLOOM COUNTY
w?
Recovery
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W MOTHER'S WVIC6 '
onvour fmneAp �� 0
Q;l'Ui�
Create
cleanness
A litter bit
at a time.
GOOD FOOD
GREAT PRICES
Sunday Buffet
11:30 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
All You Care To Eat
7 Meats � Variety of Salads � 9 Vegetabl
� Homemade Desserts & Breads
es
$4.29
Tax
Children Under 12
Children Under 6
S2.79
FREE!
CAFETERIA
TbePbzQ
IIHMIIIIIIIIIimnillllllllHIIIIHHIIIHHIIIItlHMHIIIIinmilllllllllllMlllMHlHHIIIIIIllHIlllllllllllk
Student Special
j Economy Mini Storage I
f May 1 Thru Aug. 31 for $75
300 Farmer St. 757-0373
Greenville
MMWMMH1HNIMI�IIIIIHMHHI.HMIIIIIIIH ,
NEED CASH?
Southern
Gun & Pawn
752-2464
500 N. Gra�n�
$
ATTENTION RETURNING
STUDENTS
If you plan to live off campus in the fall, will you need
lights, water or heat?
If so, eliminate one long line by arranging your utility
service in advance.
V

At your parents' request, utility serv.ee can be put in then name. Just pick up an
apphcanon ,� Room 211 in the off-campus housing off.ee, Whi ha Biding
or at Greenville Utilities main office, 200 W. Fifth Street. �una.ng
Have your parents complete the applicaton (which must be notarized) and mail
C2Ts0t,e5' P�- ,84- GrCCnViUC� NC" 27835-1847
� Remind them to attach a letter of credit from their utility company.
If you wish to have the utility serv.ee put in your name, a depos.t will be re-
with electric or
a� ipoce heot

V
without electric or
aos spqce heot
Ws
$85
$85
$75
Electric Only If
Electric & Woter $110
Electric, Water 4 Gas $j jo
Electric & Gas j10(j
L�lCaVaVC timC by11ailin� the teix�i' " advance. You must include your
2 WhChrC SCmCC W,U be reuir. when service should be cut on and a phone
number where we may reach you !���
� follows Char8C W "e inC'Uded � bil�"� Service charges are
Electric ondor water - $10
Electric, gas andor water - $30
��-
li
Greenville toj? Utilities
For further information, contact
Customer Assistance (919) 752-7166
Coca-Cola 1 bloom county
Continued from page 7
with costs running into the
millions of dollars, befits the
company's number one position
in the soft drink industry, a slot it
has held since the beginning.
Of all its successes, perhaps the
most telling event in Coke's
history was its decision last year
io change 'he flavor of Coca-
Cola.
It was a calculated business
move that backfired. Consumers
rebelled, called the company and
New Coke awful names and vow-
ed not to let the new beverage
touch their lips again
So what happened in the end?
Old Coke came back, new Coke
remained and the company
discovered just how much its pro-
ducts mean to American con
sumers.
Through it all, the cash
See Coke, page 9





Congratulations
Jeff Chester
WZMB's NEWEST
General Manager
Best Of Luck Always
Take Care, Kate A
We'll M.ss You





w.
suBsinnoiir
�-r-�
Every Tuesday
is
College Night
Free Delivery
for $5 00 d
Over fufk hases
7 p.m. to 11 p.m.
99C SUBS
Your Choice
Ham S ese
Bologna &heese
Hun Said L eSi
Pepperoni, Salami d t
Turkey Aheese
Hum. Turkey dhet
No� valid on deliveries
(0 o. pitchers Sl.W
ii ��.��! �.� 2iij :is i hi ,
408 Wps; Arlington ��
Greenville NC 27834
(919) 756-9933
Reserve Your Spa ce Now
For May, June, July & Aug.
Absolutely the Lowest Price$
In Greenville
Let Us Prove This To You! LMBER
CALL NOW 4T
SELF-SERVICE
75 6-9931 STORAGE
association!
IT'S THE COOLEST HEAT YOU LL EVER FEEL
IT S BELOW MIAMI AND ABO �
PARAMOUNT PICTURES PRESENTS
AHAYWARD HILL PRODUCTION BLUE CITY JUDn nfi qthv
EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS ROBERT KENNERAND ANOnO
SCREENPLAY BY LUKAS HELLER &WALTER HILL BASmoc S
ROSS MACDONALD PRODUCED BY WILLIAM HSrS?? W .
RT- ERECTED BV MICHELLE MANNING SSW&
OPENS FRIDAY, MAY 2ND
AT A THEATER NEAR YOU
QL
v
m
Cok

I E
We Do Ch
1C
j.iiiiiiiiiimmiii!imiiM

HMNIttllllllllHIIIillllllliill
1 ues
DRA






I Hh EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 29, 1986

regulations J
?tf Chester
MWFS1
ral Manager
Of Luck Always
BLOOM COUNTY






1 f, '� a Ml � � - - v V 1 , 1 .�' 1 1 � ' 1 p
:(x:s
v
by Berke Breathed
Mia 5Ah . v
tv vt mm

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v, you vecm
a m
LoeoioMim
wwmu

Hz
, �i UNPiXbmi? NO. THA
Hy 111 jWNbKLi THING 15
im up rwtuy
our Space Now
ne, Jiiy & Aug.
the Lowest Price$
Greenville
is To You!
MOW
V j j
-
aw mm
OPiib, CSMt
�"h
L

-Si.
MtKH'ive&r
AN ITCH 0NP6R'W
MACE'QWC�'go
me.
mm' �
�t,j
W jta, HOW'
RAW � ft 1
Coke To Celebrate Its First Centennial
( ontinued Irom page X
abiliu to expand its sofi promotion.
vative distribu Said Keough, "We claim noin-
s emphasis on fallibility and we listen

��
c
ream
pp
ream
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
SUMMER WORK!
SUMMER FUN!
Make your summer PAY off
for you.
Work As A Manpower Temporary
Openings Available For Days, Weeks, And Months.
We Have Immediate Needs For:
� Typists � Construction Clean-Up
� Secretaries Material Handlers
� Data Entry Oprs. � Warehouse
Veekly pay and . '�� ' suit y u' We service
n Rale )h Can RTP Durham Zebulon. Greenv.lle,
�� - �� � grounding areas Visit the nearest Man
)ffice to you when I . � irei Is for summer vaca-
a
( )l PON
RFEEL
m
or
tato
W4J JL � JrJr plus
FOR ONE COMPLETE
2-PIECE PACK
PlCl
01k
W2ND
AR YOU
We Do Chicken Right JJ
?Q6
:iJMiiitiiiiiittiiif�iiiiitiitit�fiiait�iiitfiiiitiii�i�iiitiiifiii4fitfii(itiiiiiiifitiiitifiiiiiiitiiiiftftt�iiiiJfiiiiiiififiiifiiitiiiiiiiicii:iiiiiiiiiriiiiiifiiitiitittfiiiiitifffiiill&E
RINGGOLD TOWERS
At The Campus mEast Carolina University 1
� SALE AAX tLKfTAL 1A1TS
� LOCATES HiXT 10 CAlVuS
� WALK TO CLASSES AHV DOWkTOfc'S
� EEHC1EHCIES. 1 i t-BEfXIJOU UNIT
� Tullv fiSBMlShf? HV ICCESSOiUEV
� CAmnv asv An cokz:twmed
� KlTCHBk APPLIANCES fuSSlSMEt
� LALMVH FACUinfS 5
� Oh SITE HAKAGlttKl
� oht sfcusirv personnel
� fcfSIPfsT PASX1HG STICrtti
Estate Realty Co.
830-1040 I
"Tiiiiiiiiiiiiiitciiiiiiiitaiitiitiiitiit iitiiiiiiiiit iiiiiiiiiiittiitiiiiiiittiitiiiiiiiiitiiiiitiiiiiiiitittiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiittiiitiiiiiiitiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiititiiiiitiiiiittiiiiiiiiiiiittiiiiiiiti'fP
Presents
Draft
Nite
10
Tuesday & Wednesday, April 29 & 30, 1986
9:00-2:00 A.M.
Admission $1.50 Guys $1.00 Ladies
DRAFT ALL NITE
JIM YOUNG
Dear Fellow Faculty
and Staff Members,
Leadership in local government substantially affects each of us.
Major local issues such as economic development, balanced and
orderly growth, the provision of public services, and the future of
our educational system touch our daily lives.
We are please, in fact we are excited, that a perceptive, intellec-
tual, and community-minded individual like JIM YOUNG has
made the commitment to run for the Greenville seat on the Pitt
County Board of Commissioners.
Jim is an ECU alumnus. As a student he excelled in the classroom
and as a leader in numerous student activities. He was editor of both
The Hast Carolinian and The Buccaneer. He served three terms in
the Student Legislature. He was appointed to the Dean's Advisory
Council and was the first Chairman of the ECU Race Relations
Board.
After his undergraduate years, Jim received his Master's degree
from ECU and a doctorate from N.C. State University. He is a na-
tionally recognized educational leader and is the author of one book
and more than 25 professional articles and published papers in the
field of education.
Locally, Jim serves as Director of Institutional Development at
Pitt Community Collge. He is active in community affiars, serving
as Chairman of the Board of Directors o WTEB-FM public radio,
and is an avid supporter of the arts in Pitt County.
His allegiances to East Carolina are strong and active. Jim is h
supporter of the ECU Alumni Association and a member of the
Board of Directors o' the Pitt County Pirate Club. Please join with
us in supporting him for County Commissioner in the May 6th
Primary. Thank You!
Jim Young Campaign Committee
Dr. Ruth Katz Dr. Karl Trevathan
Campus Coordinator Coordinator, ECl School o' Medicine
Quality Mart
Located at 264 By-Pass and Arlington Blvd.
Attention ECU Students:
Many of you have not stopped by to say hello to
Haywood.
To insure you get a chance to say goodbye to
Haywood, he is offering you a free gift.
As you come in simply say "I came to tell
Haywood Goodbye" and collect your free fountain
drink. Haywood looks forward to seeing you before
the end of the semester.
While shopping at Quick Mart take special notice
of the specials listed below:
6 pk Budweiser $2.59
6 pk Milwaukees Best $1.99
Ball Park Hot Dogs 3$1.00
Best keg prices in town!
Let us cater your parties.

I1 r1
Buy One ; Buy One j
Cheeseburger j j Chicken Salad Sandwich'
! Get One ! ! Get One j
! FREE ! ! FREE
May 1-15 May 15-30





I til- S! CAROi INIAN
Sports
AFKII 29, ivxr,
Pac 10
ECU Pirate Club;
Meeting Challengi
By TIM CHANDLER
and
SCOTT COOPER
NporU Mile.
ROXBORO - We had a fine
time in attending The Annual
Pirate Club Fund-Raising Dinner
in Roxboro last Thursday as we
were joined by some distinguish-
ed guests.
mong those in attendenee
were head football coach Art
Baker, associate athletic director
Dave Hart and assistant Pirate
Club directoi John Chandler.
1 he banquet consisted of a
social houi followed by a
barbecue dinner. Hart made a
tew c in ments and showed an
linute film entitled �'Rally-
ing to the Challenge" � a pro-
motional presentation tor ECU.
Coach Baker concluded the ban-
quet by informing the ECU alum-
nus ol the status of the Pirate
ball squad.
I he president of the Roxboro
chaptei of the Pirate Club. Her-
nia Gentry, seemed pleased with
the turnout. Gentry was the MC
� the dinner and recognized
several euests, including Winkie
Wilknis ol The Courier Times.
Keith Drum of The Durham
Morning Herald and of course,
the two ot us.
Hart spoke of the l
rluence ot
Department
:ontrols
lire 1
the
and
I t I
how
ion)
departi
(for a
'alls on the
arge in-
Athletic
much it
a r e a o f
school's
athletic
av ei
whi
Hart said. "The
athletics has the
visibility for the
v 01
university.
eople form a perception of a
'1 on the image of their
ic program he added.
ave great opportunity
m where we want
V
and we I
go
I he presentation "Rallying to
�the Challenge" mentioned the
wing future of ECU. Included
vas the possible expansion
I icklen Stadium to 50,(XX)
ieats, a .imc center for Pirate
basketball, graduation and con-
erts as well as some comments
letic director Dr. Ken
ar.
Chancellor John
However, the film focus-
K � i
Howe
ed upon the building of the foot-
ball prog t ant.
Hart also spoke or
has been recognized
and that the schoo
respected.
"We worked hard
our program �
positive strides.
how EC I
nationally
is hmhlv
to market
we're making
Hart said.
"More people saw the ECU foot-
ball (las- Year) team than ever
before � people are rallying
behind what we want to do.
"Our goal is to raise one-
million dollars Hart continued.
"To achieve all that is possible,
you must try the impossible. To
be all you can beyou must be
much more
Coach Baker was next to speak
as he gave his review of the spring
practice. Baker commented on
the improvement in this vear's
squad, compared to that of a year
ago.
"I felt there was as much dif-
ference in this year and last � as
day and night Baker said. "We
just ended spring practice Satur-
day. We have one of two things.
We don't have depth or we have
better depth than last year
Baker went on to talk about
the spring game and how the two
freshmen (Walter Wilson and
Travis Hunter) had big days. He
also expressed the way he wants
his players "to be proud to be a
Pirate" and "instill in players a
desire to be proud of who they
are. '
The personable Baker then told
the 70 (or so) people in at-
tendenee a story of how 'the
Pirate' originated. The story was
humorous as it dealt with how he-
obtained the peg leg, the hook on
has arm and especially the patch
on the eye. After a pelican did its
business in Pirates' eve, Baker ex-
plained in the punch-line that the
Pirate used his newly-acquired
hook to remove the residue, and
in turn gouged his eve out. 1 guess
v ou had to be there.
�tter the laughter subsided.
Baker continued by discussing
the players who should have an
impact on this year's campaign.
Baker started with his defen-
sive unit. Vinson Smith, Ron
C.ilhard, David Plum. Medrick
Rainbow and Carl Carney should
have good years for line and
linebacking crews. "We have six
linebackers who can plav and
play well Baker said.
The secondary, consisting of
Roswell Streeter, Flint Mc-
Callum. Ellis Dillahunt and Gary
London have made strides, but
are no; quite ready for where
Baker would wan; them to be.
However, "the secondarv turned
out to be better than we
thought Baker explained
Offensivelv. Baker feels that
the offensive line is a strength
and that they "are a senior
group He spoke highly of
Berke Holtclaw and how he
improved from last year as well
as Hunter being "a pleasant sur-
prise
Reggie McKinney and Jarrod
Moody were mentioned
tailback as Anthony Simpson and
Tim James would supply fullback
duties Baker hopes to go more to
one-back offense m order to
open up the passing game.
He said that the receivers are
also better. Amos Adams, Jackie
Armstrong, Tony Smith and
freshman Wilson would ail con-
tibute at this spot.
Baker concluded by explaining
the three important criteria need-
ed tor a successful program.
"One � you can't succeed
without a top staff, it's im-
perative he said, "two � you
need good player, who can
graduate � people willing to
work to win, and three � sup-
port.
"With your support Baker
added, "there are no
limitations
Men, Women Netters
Conclude '86 Seasons
Art Baker hopes that his squad will be able to "rally to the challenge.
Rugby Club Honors
Successful '86 Season
I he Rugby Club had their lust
annual Rugbv Banquet this
weekend, awarding the players
for what was a banner vear.
Senior Ralph Campano was
named the ream's 19S6 Rugby
Player ot the Yeai while
freshman Steve Kimm took home
the Rookie Rugger ot the Vear
honors. David Schumacher was
the Scrummer o the Vear as
Wales exchange student Doug
1 ckley was the Winger of the
Year.
Club president Bill Zimmer-
man presented the awards at the
pickin' in 'Ripple City' (Hol-
ly Sreet). Zimmerman was
pleased with the team's perfor-
mance over the course of the
yeai
"In the five year's I've been
w
playing, this was one of the best
vears of the club's existence � if
not the best
The club, which was formed
bask in 1975, played 20 different
teams throughout the fall and
spring semesters. In tact, they
battled everv college team (who
has a ugbv club) in the state, ac-
cording to Zimmerman.
The hall- and Spring-Break
Tours saw the club take on
Georgetown, American and
Richmond as well as the Freeport
International Team and Yale.
After the Spring-Break Tour,
the ruggers competed in the
I N( -G and UNC-W Tour-
naments. They represented ECU
See Rl (,(,KRS. page 12
By DAVID McGINNESS
The ECU men's and women's
tennis teams both capped ofl
their 1986 spring seasons on the
weekend of April 18-20.
The women netters played their
conference tourney at Harrison
burg, Va emerging with a fifth-
place finish and a final regular-
season record of 11 -11. Their spr-
ing record of 4-9 was something
of a disappointment after a 7-2
start last fall. Coach Pat Sher-
man felt that injuries played a
significant part in the losing spr-
ing season.
"We had problems with
chronic injuries all season
Sherman said. "We also lost Ann
(Manderfield) for one-and-a-half
months, which forced our other
players into different positions as
well a.s costing us our No. 1
player
Sherman also stated that a ma-
jor factor in the discrepancies in
the fall and spring records wa
the level of competition the l.adv
Pirates faced.
"We had to play much
stronger teams this spring said
Sherman. "That, combined with
the injuries made the spring
season much tougher
Among the standouts m the
women's fall dual-team matel
were: Becky Clements � g
I isa EichhoU - 7-2, Holly Mur-
ray � 8-0 and Susan Montjoy �
6-3.
In doubles, Manderfield and
Eichholz had an impressive 7-1
dual-match record, while M
joy and Clements wen:
fall.
In the women'sY tourney.
Manderfield came awav with a
third-place finish, defeating
Patricia Mckennev (GMU) 6-4,
6-4. ECU finished the comp
tion well behind the top-three
teams William & Mary, James
Madison and Richmond, bu: was
only 1.5 points behind fourth-
place American University.
The men's ream imj
upon its 4-S fall
going 7-7 this sprint '
season record ' IIP
Pirate netters ma
place in the CAA t
the fall, but tout 4
zalea festival and H
tourneys this ; �
I he men's impr i emi
C tall to spring sea
pressive. considei .
lost tw f tl r to
the interim.
"We did I f our i
six, as well as sul I
said Sherman, "but I �
pleased with the perfoi
abilit ol the
non top-six p
well
In fa
see action la
with the best wini
on in I
die's. I odd Sumi .
spring, giving I
i m.
I he best overal
confernce
Vfelhorn, wl
the V
Mthi iugl
N � r: an was

tm's pet ;e.
"Tl
. her le.
"This
thir
team ne
One
ot 1987
beei
�-
' We
playing
nameni
said, fhis .s
By III I HI MR
Compete In Tourney
pas- weekend the lady
traveled to Columl
plav in the I dd
Invitational where
losing
I his
Pirates
S.(
Gamecoc k
they won two games while
three.
In the first game against UNC-
Chapel Hill, the Tarheels
defeated the Bucs -0. Virginia
Augusta was the winning pitcher
foi the Heels. Hits for the Pirates
came from the bats of Jeannie
Murray. Eva Hughes, and Mona
Jackson.
In the second game on Iridav,
the Seminoles of Florida State
defeated ECU 3-0. The first run
was scored on a Pirate error a.s
the 'Noles managed all their runs
off of no tuts. Stacey Boyette,
Mickey Ford, and Jackson all
had hits for the Bucs.
In the third game, the Paladins
ol Furman defeated the Pirates
3-0.
In the second inning, Boyette
reached first on a single then ad-
vanced to second on a passed
ball. She then scored on a
sacrifice fly, but that one run
wasn't enough to shut down Fur-
man. Other hits came from Mur-
ray, Sandy Kee. Ford, and Julie
farrow.
In the first game on Saturday,
ECU clinched its first triumph
over Georgia State 3-0. Robin
Craves was the winning pitcher
for the Pirates, striking out three.
All three of the Buc runs came
in the opening frame. Wendy Oz-
ment singled and advanced to se-
cond after Jeannie Murray reach-
ed on an error. Farrow got to
first on a fielder's choice bringing
in Oment. Kee reached on an er-
ror scoring Murray. Eva Hughes
got on on another Georgia State
error, scoring Julie Garrow
Senior second baseman aria
Alphin led the Pirate charge w
two hits.
Head coach Sue Manahan had
C aria Alphin
this to say about Alphin. "She
made two outstanding plays for
me against UNC-Chapel Hill.
She was two-for-three in that
game aga -
rginia ug
said "S �
dependable
dor need to
making mistakes
alway there
In the final game i S
IC cruised pas- I V
Hill five to one
merit on a positive note S
Boyette was the ���
as she captured her 2
the year.
The Bucs scored
in the third inning w
from Murray, and Fan a
RBI bv Ford, which sc
rav
In thee fourth. L inda B
singled and Kim Ad .
Ozment was hit by a p
the bases, rhis allowed
row to bring in runs
rrTT) 4 0 r ctniru game, thePaladins mt wormg Julie Garrow She was two-for-three in that
LrM.L Sar8e Bradberry Steady Buc Baseballer
By IONY BROWN career as a Pirate baseballer. It could hannen awHino , . T , � " V w w W9
Despite his nickname of pLlZLJT�J?t0 has helped Bradberry gain much feel pressured to play Drc
Spurt, Hrili-r
Over the centuries men have
given up many things for the
women they have loved �
wealth, family and even the royal
throne of England, but bv June
21, 1984. ECU'S star baseball
centerfielder Chris Bradberry
must make a more mundane
sacrifice.
He's got to quit chewing tobac-
co.
According to Bradberry, his
fiancee Cindy Goodwin has laid
down the law on that subject, but
he says he intended to forego the
practice anyway, so that's no
problem.
"Yeah, I've got to quit chew-
ing Bradberry said prior to a
practice session at Harrington
Field on Friday. "My Fiancee
said I've got to quit before we get
married. I had decided to quit
already though because I
recognize it's dangerous to my
health
Aside form this potential cloud
in the future of the 5-11,
190-pound senior, it seems only
good things lie ahead for
Bradberry as he nears the end of
what has become an outstanding
Despite his nickname of
"Sarge he has already earned
the bars of a U.S. Army second
lieutenant through the campus
ROTC program. However, he
faces another possible dilemma
Chris Bradberry
now that his abilities on the
baseball diamond have sparkled
so brightly in his junior and
senior years of roaming center-
field for ECU.
What happens if the pros start
knocking on his door?
Pirate head coach Gary Overton,
who says Bradberry's value could
be greatly affected by good in-
dividual and team performances
the rest of this season.
"He's a definite pro
prospect Overton said. "It
depends on how far we go. If we
do well the rest of the way and he
gets seen by the right people, he
should get his chance at the
pros
Overton has seen Bradberry
evolve from a walk-on who made
the team as a catcher in 1984 to a
well-rounded centerfielder who
can run, throw and hit equally
well. Bradberry has averaged
.385 the prior two seasons and is
now hitting around .333 with
eight homers and 26 RBI's. Base
stealing stats have risen
dramatically from only two in
1984 to 11 last year. He has
already stolen 18 in 20 attempts
this season to pace the team in
that department.
As a centerfielder, he has pro-
ven to be a reliable performer, us-
ing his speed to reach balls seem-
ingly out of reach of the average
player. Changing to that position
from his original job as catcher
lped bradherry gan
confidence in his role as a team
player.
"I was out of baseball for my
freshman year and didn't like it,
so I walked on in 1983 and made
the team as a catcher because of
my size he said. "I had a pro-
blem throwing the ball back to
the pitcher, but I kept hitting, so
they had to put me somewhere
The move worked out well, as
"He's a definite pro
prospect he should get
his chance at the pros. "
�Gary Overton
Bradberry's offensive and defen-
sive statistics prove. It worked
out so well in fact, that now he
may have to make a decision
greatly affecting his future if he is
offered a professional contract.
He will have to determine which
path to take � a secure career in
the Army or the uncertainty of
professional baseball.
"Since I have a future poten-
tial career in the Army, I don't
pressured to play pro
baseball he said. "I would have
to get a waiver from my commit-
ment to the Army, but I would
have to get a larger bonus than
I'm likely to be offered in order
to consider doing that
No matter what Bradberry
decides, Coach Overton believes
the leadership shown by "Sarge"
will stand himsjn g00j stead.
"He'll be an excellent leader by-
example Overton said. "The
fact that he's been commissioned
a second lieutenant speaks for
itself. He'll be an excellent
leader, much the same as he has
been on the field
See PIRATES.
Pg
e 12
Sports Fact
Tues. Apr. 29, 1933
In a baseball rarity,
Washington catcher Luke
Sewell is credited with two
putouts on the same play. Lou
Gehrig attempts to score on a
base hit by Tony Lazizeri and is
cut down at the plate on a
perfect throw from outfielder
Goose Goslin; right on
Gehrig's heels is Dixie Walker,
also tagged out by the alert
Sewell.
WZMB
Victorious
In S-ball
We at The East Cat
would like to cons
WZMB for a fine softba
formance Sunday afternoon a:
the Allied Health Fields
It was a close game but MB
showed they had some
and won 12-6. MB
coach Rick Rhodes obv:
had his troops readv.
There were some prettv good
performances by those folks
Spike Harward had a tew hits
and a nice amount ot RBI's
Mike McVey picked up the
win. going the distance on the
mound.
Although some of the E
employees were on the iniured
reserve list, they should be
ready for next year's rematch.
We all have to thank Pama
Mitchell and Bill Mitchell (no
relation, I don't think) for the
umpire services they rendered.
Classify
r � ��
ilC EP GOLDEN HEARTS Ther
w.n be an emergency r
TONIGHT at me house at 9 p �
Th.s meeting ,5 andat0 �.
EVERYONE MUJ
ATTEND H�.WS are tx.rtg he.
JL5flZ?triiL5ofrdo� cei
S IG E P S
De heic �
house Littl)
courn .�
Eps .
AVednesda
SIGMA PHI EPSiLON
f ons �
Kappa
non. Gar, ,
Re
Rase, : .
Badsr.
V - -
LG . �
S s'ers
HOWARDBtfrGE -
DONALD PA L AND -
HALE
Chape h
JAM IE v
grea' � . .
ac .
RENE
t rtfidav
� �- .
SOUL TRA s


G'Oupee
LAMBDA CHI S
S gas
TRI SIGS
se
-
Sar ; , Home
Car: . - , � �
-
� S" A ISC
Grac Scoc
Kim Daniels
Humbert, Carv-
Books Ae sar �
ave a grea- summ
r "e ai
TARA THE TtRA
P B s ever,
a "a' a sight
one Dy one Masr � . .
snowec us how f as 3
ou we
SPRING VACATION
caneer yea'r �
�ces Bv
vac aon e-
� � '
- ca -
reTurrec I .
CONCERTS
of ma c
fourea N -�

'ores a be -� �
by the Bl - � � �
joyne1- L br
SRA SEMI FORMAL F -es are
now - ;ome by - ffice in
Menoer
ana Weanesca, z
College
Employed or hax
employment
College Degree o
(six months prior
after. Before 4-30-1
VY
$250 rebi
or u:
Delay 90 di
Finance plan i$
A.
PONTiAC
i�iitll lw.nl. '





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 29, 1986
11
nmen Netters
? '86 Seasons
Tourney
er
h PIK-Ml �. pay 12
WZMB
Victorious
In S-ball
ict

pei
MB
. K K
1 od
I
.� -A
RBl's.
MIcedup the
A :i the
ri and is
:e on a
�ider
ight on
Walker,
the alert
Although some of the (
employees were on the injured-
reserve list, they should be
readv for next year's rematch.
We all have to thank Pama
Mitchell and Bill Mitchell (no
relation. I don't think) for the
umpire services they rendered.
Classifieds
PERSONALS
to 6P GOLDEN HEARTS:
Im be
There !
Mil be an emergency meeting'
'TONIGHT at the house at 9 p.m. I
iTh.s meeting is MANDATORY and I
Ieveryone mustI
lATTEND elections are being held I
lor next year's exec-board offices I
t� � � � � � � � � � �. j
SiG EPS: Sweetheart Serenade will
ieia tonight a? 7 p.m. at the
house Little Sisters you are en
aged to come out and watch. Sig
get ready for the cookout on
.Vednesday It begins atll am
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: Congratula
is to the new brothers of N.C.
Kappa Stephen Terpak, Jeff
ter Matt McCulloch, Mike Han
Gary Williams, Scott Diggs,
d Herring, Dave McEwan, Chris
� sey, Dave Holzhauser, Carl
)sher, Paul Kruzelack, Dave
inchard, Ty Saizer, Steve Woodle,
ick Romanick and Eric Crowe
ive the Brothers and .ittle
-ers
HOWARD BERGER, RUSS SMITH,
DONALD FAIL AND ROBERT
HALE: You are going to be missed
ext year Tim Marion, good luck at
- and don't be a stranger!
' he Sig Eps
ATTENTION: SCUBA EN-
THUSIASTS: The Coral Reef Dive
Club is holding its last meeting of the
Spring Semester Tues. 29th, at 7:30
p.m. in room 221 Mendenhall You
MUST attend this meeting if you
plan on diving with us this summer.
We will be extremely active this
summer. Join the club that's going
somewhere The Coral Reef Dive
Club.
THETA CHI: We knew we had a
social with a fraternity, but we
didn't know which one, Our pledges
iad us blindfolded, and being car
'ied on your shoulders was too much
lun We arrived at the campgrounds
snd you uncovered our eyes, then we
Here all set to party with the new
Theta Chi's! The night was filled
with dancing, and with beer we filled
out cups. Some of us didn't stop par
tying there until the sun was coming
up. We all had a blast with you Theta
Chi Men So next semester, we
must definately do it AGAIN! Love,
The AOTT's
ALL GREEKS. Good .uck on finals
and have a terrific summer! See you
in the fall! Love, the AOTT's
BETA ETAS OF AOTT: Cut off with
the Theta Chi's was a blast! Thanks
for the great sister party! You guys
are the best! Love, the Sisters
jAMIE MITCHELL: Tnanks for a SIG EP "A" TEAM: Congratula
a1 ' e last ween Robin Sorry
jl ne goldfish. Johnny Duval,
oarty donkey, let's go drink
� a n naze's and eat seafood soon!
'oca
R ENE: Hope you nave a truly happy
rthday, along with every other day
'�" e year
L TRAIN: We can't wait to see
C a, Tuesday and Wednesday ar
Love, the Buday and the
iVBDACHi S What the hen was
. Buff a lo? We re glaa we
�� ti a high top tennis shoe in it
� me! naa a biast Love, the
TRI SlGS Ae lad a grea spring
C e � gr a s to our
ors Ka'r na Hoboy.
e i Vcc.au' n
V . cna Sara Boi
V Dowell ac Cath
ngratulations to
TAR A
ir, �e"� aa
� .�,ses c Kyte
� �' b n ac DaAn ss all of you and e'ii see
1THEIt RAOF ECU
jl d vou do
�� �� morning
-� �� �� im ack err.
face queen, you
�Aasaone Without
�beDiU�Tara Tara
SPRING VACATION: The Buc
H dook is looking for p.c
� A or color of your spring
gr r-g them by the Buc
ce across from jovner
Your p ctures will be
� T ou
DNCERTS: Do ou ave pictures
� concerl oanas tra' nave
- North Caroi'na? Show them
ft I 36 Buccaneer Your pie-
ce returned to you Come
tl �� Bcaneer office across from
�r Library
SRA SEMI FORMAL: Pictures are
n Come by SRA office in
Mendenhall on Tuesday, April 29th
Wednesday, April 30th.
tions on winning the ALL CAMPUS
softball championship!
TKE'S: Thanks for the social, we
had a great time! Sig Eps.
TERRY SANFORD: Former gover
nor ana Democratic candidate for
US Senate, will hold a press con-
ference Wednesday-April 30, 9 a.m.
Main Lounge Mendenhall. Welcome
him!
STUDENTS: Meet former Governor
Terry Sanford, Democratic Can
dictate for US Senate Governor
Sanfora will hold a press conference
at 9 a.m Wednesday. April 30 Main
iounge. Mendenhall.
ECU MEN: Amateur Strip Contest
a SDortsmen's Tavern tonight.
Apr-i 29 Cash prizes Sign up at
door Caii 758 8912, 758 0059 for
deta s
ECU LADIES. US Male Revue and
amateur s'np contest tonight at
Sportsman's Tavern 9 10 30 Call
758 8912 or 758 0058 tor details
JAMAICA The time will be right
when we board our flight With
graduation near, ECU has seen its
finest years For eight days ano
seven nights we're going to blow the
ufs down and do Negrii right. A
hurricane couldn't oo the things that
we've planned when the three from
Greenville ghangi up on the sand
Don't worry EC, we won't forget
you, this is for us. ust something we
had to do T.P M S , and G.W
MACHO CAMACHO: Get a lOb
SALE
FOR SALE: Whirlpool AC Good
condition. 7,500 BTU'S Great for
small apartment $100 Call 752 8426
WORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
perience in typing resumes, theses,
technical documents, and term
papers We manage and merge your
names and addresses into merged
letters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards. Our prices are extremely
reasonable. S&F Professional Com
puter Co. (back of Franklin's) USE
5th St. 757 0472.
TYPING SERVICES: Resumes,
term papers, theses. Low rates.
Spelling and grammatical correc
tions included Cindy 757-0398 after
530 p.m
CHEAP TYPING. Reports, etc. Call
Anne at 758 6011 and leave a
message
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
tronic typewriter Reasonable rates.
Call Janice at 355 7233 after 5:30.
SUMMER SUB-LET: May August.
$250 plus utilities. 3 bedroom apt
iv3 bath, fully furnished, central air,
cable 830 1769
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER-
VICE: Experience, quality work,
l BM Selectric typewriter. Call Lanie
Shive 758 5301.
FOR SALE: Labrador Retriever
puppies, BLACK $150, Yellow $175,
Chocolate $200 AKC registered.
Wormed. Call Chris Smith at
793 9205
KINGSTON PLACE: Fully furnish
ed townhouse for rent, complete fur
nishings down to silverware. Also in-
clude the following Air conditioned,
pool, clubhouse, laundry facilities
only steps away, phone and cable
already installed, ample free park
ing, ECU bus stop. Rents for $600
monthly (ideal for 4 people $150
each) and owner will pay all
utilities, excluding telephone and
cable. Available August 1st. Respon
sible students only. 12 month lease
Aug. 1 to July 31. 1986. Call 757 1849
CONDO FOR SALE OR RENT: 2
bedroom, 2 bath, loft, fireplace,
washer dryer $450 month. Good in
vestment for your parents if you
want to buy! 756-8296.
CALL NOW New Sony Cassette
Deck for sale Dolby B8.C. auto
reverse, black cabinet, feather
touch Controls 3 year parts and 2
year warrantee still valid. Call
758 9789 and make an offer
FOR SALE: Twin bed Price
negotiable. Can 758 6285
FOR SALE: Rickenbacker 4001 bass
guitar with case, red sunburst $350
Lab Series L2 amplifier, excellent
condition $350 Both $600 758 8283
Steve
FOR SALE: i have a mattress and a
bunk, I need to sell at dirt cheap
prices. Call Bntt at 758 2080
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICE: Word processing The
Dataworks specializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertations
theses, resume's and more. All work
is computer checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary Rates
are as low as SI 75 per page, in
eluding paper (call for specific
rates) Call Mark at 757 3440 after 7
p.m.
RINGGOLD TOWERS: 1 bedroom
condo available for rent or sale.
Great investment. Low money
down, excellent tax write offs Call
George Tibbal at 203 261 6722.
RENT: 2 room B unit Ringgold Apt.
$300 � utilities a month May 10
Aug. 20 One or two roommates Call
Michelle at 758 5971 Tues. Thurs.
after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: 12 x 65 mobile home
with 3 bedrooms, Wa baths. $500
down and assume payments. Call
758 1559 after 6 p.m. Grimesland
FOR SALE: Diving Equipment of
all kinds. Tank, fins, etc. Entire out
fit! Interested? Call 752 8666
FOR SALE: Bunk bed posts, ladder
and 2 pieces of plywood that fit
under beds to provide extra storage
space package deal $20. Price
negotiable if pieces sold seperately.
Call 758 9692.
ROOMS FOR RENT: $115 a month,
utilities, phone, cable- all included,
close to campus. Call 758 7640.
1 BEDROOM APT. FOR
SUBLEASE: May Aug. fully fur
nished, l block from campus For
more info, call 752 3489
AMAZINGLY DIFFERENT ANTI-
QUES SHOP: Discover Uniquely
Yours selection of Vintage clothing,
jewelry, furniture, books and art.
903 Dickinson Ave. (by the yellow
awning). Tues. Sat 11 a.m. 5 p.m.
ACROSS FROM CAMPUS: Modern
1 bedroom apt. $245rnonth Call
Carl for info. 758 1983 nights and
355 6558 weekends
FOR SALE: Moving, must sell all
Sofa bed, tables, chairs and more.
Prices negot. Call NOW: 757 0647
PITT-BULLDOG PUPPIES FOR
SALE: Looking for good homes 7
males and one female available For
more info call 758 2393 MWF Sat �
Sun. after 5 p.m and TTH after
noons
TYPING NEEDED?: if you want
someone to type papers for you at
reasonable rates, call 756-8934.
FOR RENT: Apartment for sum
mer school suitable for 3, $290 �
utilities, pool, cable, ask tor Dave,
752 0579
CHARLESTOWN BOUND: At the
wire Choice in mid 60's beach, rock
n roll, etc Contact the
TRASHMAN at 752 3587 Anytime
Best D.J service in Pitt County
College Grad Finance Plan
Eligibility
Employed or have verifiable committment for
employment
College Degree or Proof of Graduating "on time"
(six months prior to graduation & up to one year
after. Before 4-30-87)
No Derogatory Credit
5 down payment
$250 rebate to reduce selling price
or use as down payment
or
Delay 90 days until first payment due
Finance plan is good through April 30, 1987
A.P.R. 8.948 months
"GaMxi
PONTlAC
Brown-Wood, Inc.
329 Greenville Blvd.
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 27836-2157
PHONE (919) 355-6080
WANTED
NON SMOKING FEMALE ROOM
MATE NEEDED: For fall
semester. Furnished except your
room. Rent $75month and Vi
utilities. Call Mary or Robin at
355 2051
TWO MALE OR FEMALE
ROOMATES NEEDED: Im
mediately for summer months Ful
ly furnished condo at Kingston
Place $150 rent, $150 deposit, '4
utilities, 2 bed, Th bath, pool,
dishwasher For more info call
Leigh at 752 1088
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
To share 3 bedroom townhouse Rent
'$145 and 'a expenses Call Leslie
752 0938 or Ma. y at 756 2011
CABIN COUNSELORS AND IN
STRUCTORS: Male and female for
western N C 8 week children's sum
mer camp Over 30 activities in
eluding water ski, tennis, heated
swimming pool, go karts, hiking,
art Room, meals, salary and
travel Experience not necessary
Non smoking students write for ap
plicationbrochure Camp
Pmewood, 19006 Bob O Link Dr
Miami, Fla 33015
WSI NEEDED: Trinity Center, new
Episcopal summer camp in Salter
Path, N.C , needs WSI to head
waterfront Must be able to sail Sun
fish Apply Ed Hodges, Jr , Camp
Manager, 101 East 10th St
Washington, N.C 27889
Please see page 12
University Optometric Eye Clinic
DR. DENNIS O'NEAL
Comprehensive Eye Examinations
Contact Lenses
Soft, Hard, Gas Permeable Tinted
Extended Wear, Contacts for Astigmatism
Glasses (One Day Service in Most Casesj
Student & Faculty Discounts on Contacts &
Glasses
Convenient to Campus
Evening & Sat Appointments Available
t
612 E. 10th Street
(Across from campus security)
758-6600
iitmmiHiwmmiJiiiiiiitiiHHHiiiiMiiiiiiiHiiHiiiiHiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiniiiiiMiiiiiiiwiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiH
. AO . rV r �
Ou . fV ef. cf rvv r � . -
,o I
O0.�"
I g�38gH
,oe;eO"
� ATTENTION; I
x
Don't lose your security j
deposit on account of dirty:
Carpets
CALL

vW
5&
C00
C"CI
hi
.fe�
Today
355-2719
Short term leases available
in furnished or unfurnished.
967-2234 or 967-2231
: iiiHiiiiiiiimiiiitiiiimiiiiiHimHiissiiiimiiiiiuNHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiifE

H B . 4BflflABORTIONS UP TO 12th WEEK OF PREGSASCY S195 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at addnionaJ cos: Pregnancy Test. Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy Counseling For Further information, call 832-0535 (toll free number: 1-800-532-5384 between 9 am and 5 p.m. e�kdas. General anesthesia available RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS
�The HUB �
618 South Pitt St.
752-1946 or 752-5048
rf2as
Bring this flyer for
a free visit to tr,e
club izr you
ana a friend
t, appoint-
ment Caii for
more information
9HaM ta
We are dedicatea
to Oemg the oest
health club. We
are exclusive
with a limited
membership Out
quite reasonable
fc Gatforrua � IfA' JZy
Feel great all the time with a total program of personal fitness
just for you. Complete co-ed exercise facilities, relaxation tech-
niques and nutritional guidance
Several energizing Aerobic classes daily
Exercise classes for strengthening & toning
' New weight and machine rooms
Relaxing Yoga sessions daily for toning & centering
Hot tub and Sauna Village SUNTAN BOOTH
Juice 8c LA Bar, high energy snacks
Lockers, showers 8c dressing rooms
Spring Student Special $28.00 a month
1st Summer Session Special $33.00
Both Summer Sessions $60.00 j
Unlimited Club Use, including Suntan Booth
DOWNTOWN
FWfSTANON
GflttNI ST
0�N PAfiWNG �SA
HOKC JJTO
NCCAJMA� LJ
south pm st
a
r jors HAflDwAj
UNIVERSAL HUB HEALTH CLL�
611 SOUTH PfTT ST.
Exercise is a Natural High!
The Hub is your club.
Have a Healthy Year!
� Aerobic Instructors Wanted
GOOOVIAS
A





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 29, 1986
Ruggers Conclude
Continued from page 10
well with a 4-3 record in the two
tourney's.
The Rugby Team would like to
thank Dr. Steve Cohen, Pat Cox,
Dr. Elmer Meyer and the entire
ECU Sport-Club Council for
allowing the great tradition of
ECU Rugby to continue.
Continued from page 11
MALE OR FEMALE: Very large
private master bedroom includes
wateroed, dresser and air condi
tioner To share fully furnished
three bedroom house among two
males during summer months.
Across the street from Joyner
Library $125 per month, ' 3 utilities.
No deposit 758 7026
SUBLET FOR SUMMER: One
female, smoker'non smoker, need
ed for summer Spacious two
bedroom apartment at Holly Farms.
Two baths, no dogs. Rent negotiable.
Call 756 2286 after 7 p.m
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female
roommate needed for 2nd summer
session m Wilson Acres Close to
campus, pool, only $97 a month.
Please call 752 5886
HELP WANTED: Bartenders and
waitresses needed at Beau's
Nightclub. Call Jimmy Arnold for an
appointment at 756 6401
TEXAS: Move to Texas to get
ahead! Pkg of over 500 Co's, Apts. �
more. Write for info: MAK TX OPP
Richter, 13110 Kuykendahl 402
Houston, Tx 77090
SUMMER JOBS: It's not too late to
find a good job. Thomas Nelson Inc
has five positions open for the sum
mer Average pay $250 per week. In
terviews April 24th at 7 p.m. More
interviews will be April 28th and 29th
at 330 and 7 in Brewster D 109
ROOMMATE WANTED: Male to
share house Pr. bedroom, washer, 1
mile from campus 2501 E 3rd St.
$116 a month and 'a utilities. Call
752 9937 Ask for Tim, Glenn, or Pat
1
ONE OR TWO PEOPLE WANTED:
To sublet $150 a month each Reduc
ed from $180. Full turn air ?on
cable Rmggold. Kathy 752 3572. Hi
Bren!
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
For May 1. Share 3 bedroom duplex,
'3 utilities, $100 a month and $100
deposit If you called before, please
call agam 758 0047
MODELS NEEDED. Attend the Sun
Fun Styling Festival at the Mrytle
Beach Hilton as a model Free
admission ultra low spring 85 rates
see the newest m fashion and hair
design in addition to having a
"cheap" weekend at the beach. All
hair style models chosen receive
merchandise and hair care valued at
$30 or more. June 7th, 8th, and 9th.
For details call Nancy at Honeycutt
Salon Services, 752 6178.
LIVE IN BABYSITTER: For 4
month old. Room by the beach in ex
change for 3 to 5 days a week Nurs
ing student preferred. Contact Pam
or Phil at 473 2979 in Manteo
ROOMMATE NEEDED: For 2
bdrm. sublet. Village Green 1st ses-
sion. Aug. $130 month, Vi utilities.
Call 752 7561
ATTIC
MAY
2 FRI
Panic
3 SAT
ARS
Atlanta Rhythm
Section
8THUR
Buster
Brown
9 FRI
BRICE
STREET
The Rugby Club was also com-
mended for their efforts in their
participation in the Greenville
April Clean-up Campaign. The
club was one of three ECU
organizations that responded to
the beautification project.
Anybody who is interested in
participating in rugby is welcom-
ed. The team is looking for some
newcomers and will begin next
season in September. Look for
the announcements. Team pic-
tures will be made today at 7:30
p.m. at Rotary Street and
everybody is expected to attend.
IRS Awards Day
Wednesday Afternoon
By STEPHANIE DEW
The annual Intramural-
Recreational Services Awards
Presentation and Picnic will be
held April 30 at 4:30 pm at the
College Hill Field.
Enjoy the festivities and con-
gratulate the 1985-86 IRS winners
in person. Not everyone can be a
winner, but all participants in-
volved in this year's Intramural
program are to be commended.
Most people don't understand
what it takes to come up with a
truly original team name.
For instance, here are a few
IRS favorites for 1986 softball:
Smoke 98.6, Playmates, En-
forcers, Call Us What You Want,
The A-Team, Bern City
Breakers, Catch One Two,
EPT's, The Fish Heads, The Gar-
bage Men, Scott Towels, and
Slay Nickel Baggers.
Show your creative abilities
and athletic abilities this summer
and next year.
Pirates Top Heels
Continued from page 10
four off a UNC error.
In the fifth inning. Ford tripled
and Boyette singled her in. Carla
Alphin sacrificed Boyette to se-
cond then Diane Lunsford reach-
ed on a UNC error, scoring
Alphin. UNC, who had their only
run of the game, got a homerun
by Gerchens in the sixth. Julie
Farrow and Mickey Ford each
got a triple with Farrow having
three hits and Ford having two.
The final record for the Lady
Pirates is 31-18 � their best
record yet. Coach Sue Manahan
was a bit unhappy with Friday's
play, but was pleased with the lat-
ter play of her Bucs.
"I was a litte disappointed in
our play on Friday, but we were
happy with oui play on Saturday,
as we won the consollation round
by beating Georgia State and
arch rival UNC-Chapel Hill
she said. "We achieved our team
goal of 30 wins and we got pit
cher Robin Graves out of a slump
with the Georgia State win. This
was a perfect end for a very en
joyable season
PRICES EFFECTIVE TMFtOUGH SAT MAY 3 AT SAV A CENTER IN GREENVILLE
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES � A - a'tt L. H
. �r-��S�� MUCKS
�� (9te store foi
f
Double Coupons
(See store for details)
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli, Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality
nes
Kiniuui iicci
W5
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
12 oz.
can
DOUBLE Q IN OIL OR WATER
Chunk Light Tuna
LIMIT TWO WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYOAY LOW PRICE
mayuiiiiaise
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
vegetables
3 -100
't'OOlit
JJoors Beer
6.5 oz.
can
12 oz
cans
REGULAR OR LIGHT
10 SAT � x
Nantucket j 703 GREENVILLE BLVD. � OPEN 24 HOURS SSSStitf- OPEN SUNDAY 7 A.M11PM
I �,
" "
�. p. � -� J(�






12
1 Hi I M . KOl IN1
U'RIl 29, W(
Ruggers Conclude
t onfinued from pK�" 10
well itl ,i 4 ' record in the two
� ne S
I he Rugb 1 earn would like to
ik 0 Steve c ohen. Pal Cox,
Di Elm Meyei and the entire
ECl S v lut1 c ouncil foi
tie gi eat ti adition ol
I i. I Rugby to continue
1 ontinued from pug? 11
MAit OR female w. arge
des
��
. . � . seo
" s
the si
SUBLET FOR SUMMER 0
- ,
- "a C
f at H( y Farms
is Rent negol able
ROOMMATE WANTED
1 he Rugb flub was also com
mended foi then efforts in then
participation in the Greenville
pril lean up Campaign. I tie
Jub wd one of three E I
organizations that responded to
the beautification project
�nbod who is interested in
participating in rugby is welcom
ed 1 he team is looking foi some
newcomers and will begin next
season in Septembei I ook foi
the announcements leam pic
uies will be made today at 7:30
p.m at Rotais Street and
everybody s expected to attend
HELP WANTED
K A

a 1 Beau's
sot .
v� � k rx op p
. - - iat - �
.�ME R JOBS - S nol '
iy $25 ' ' �� �'�"
ith al V
rerv.ews w
-
HOOMMATE WANTED Val '

� ' � Call
Ask i r Pal
ONE OR TWO PEOPLE AANTED
FE
- 0OMMATE NEEDED
I
NEEDED -
ig Festival a' " Wry tie
L I
:y at H
r s BABYSITTER
R . � � �
� N
ROOMMATE NEEDED - �

� i ' hs
I ATiTIC
:
I MAY
?
2 FRI
?
Panic
?
? 3 SAT
� ARS
l At Ian i a Rhythm
I Sec lion

8THUR
Buster
Brown
:
9 FRI

BRICE
STREET
10 SAT
Nantucket
IRS Awards Day
Wednesday Afternoon
B SIKPHAMKI)KV
I he annual Intramural-
Recreational Services Awards
Presentation and Picnic will be
held April 30 at 4:30 pm at the
College Hill Field.
Enjoy the festivities and con
gratulate the 1985-86 IRS winners
in peis,ui Not everyone can be a
winner, but all participants in
volved in this seat's Intramural
program are to be commended.
Mils! people don't understand
what it takes to come up with a
truly original team name
I oi instance, here are a tew
IRS favorites foi 1986 softball:
Smoke 9 6, Playmates, 1 n
forcers, Call I s W hai You Want,
I he A leam. Hern City
Breakers, C atch One I wo,
I PI . Ihe Fish Heads. I he da;
bage Men, Svott rowels, and
Slay Nickel Baggers
Show youi creative abilities
and athletic abilities this summei
and next yeat
Pirates Top Heels
( (.ntinucd from pugr in
luiii off a I ss( erroi
In the fifth inning , Ford tripled
and B . ! her in �
Alpliin sacrificed Boyetti
1 'hen Diane I unsfrd
ed on ,i 1 V erroi. sc
Alphin I N( , who had th(
run i it the game,
b Gerchens in the sixth !
I ai row and 1 k k � � i rd eacl
i !iiple with Fai
three hits and 1 i rd ha ing '
I he t inal rec �rd foi I
Pirate
�J set oach Sue Ma
- i ,i bil unhappy
i pleas : �
ler play ol hei Bu
� 1 wa a
.�� : 1 I I
py wi11
.i we won tl
beating ieorgia S at
UNC-i
aid "We
ol (i ���� -
a �ei
iROUGhSAT MA � a' sAV ACENTERINGREENVILLE
the superset t, y�
and �UAl ijj
f
Double Coupons
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli, Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality
BUTCHERS CHOICE WHOLE
SMOKED
Boneless Ham
(half 1.88 lb.)
m
MARKET STYLE
r sliced Bacon
PURE CANE
Dixie
Crystals
PURCHASE AT EVERVDA
LOW PRICE
RED RIPE CALIFORNIA
Strawberries
IMITONI �� iCMLE
WITH AN ADDi" INAI
qt-
basket
129
�m
PQ
r J
Paper Towels
w�
LIMIT TWO WITH AN ADDITIONAL
SE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
.ET PEPSI � MTN. DEW � PEPSI FREE
Pepsi Cob
w
r .
LUNCHEON MEAT
Armour Treet
MIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
12 oz.
can
88
DOUBLE "Q" IN OIL OR WATER
Chunk Light Tuna
2ltr.
DUKE S
Mayonnaise
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
32 oz.
jar
78
LIMIT TWO WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
tooU

6.5 oz.
can
V
REGULAR OR LIGHT
ors Beer
tool �not
12 oz.
cans
-it AM m WHOLE KERN- . -�
RENCh KITCHEN STYLI REGULAR
Green
Giant
Vegetables
3 iOO
16 oz.
cans
1
703 GREENVILLE BLVD. � OPEN 24 HOURS SSKSf OPEN SUNDAY 7 A.M11PM.
�� -fsam





Title
The East Carolinian, April 29, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 29, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.474
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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