The East Carolinian, April 24, 1986






�he lEaat (Earnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No-iPl S Thursday, April 24, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 12,(MM)
Committee Considers
Alternate Parking Areas
Spare Time
JIM If I rOENS FV KailtroHia
Kerry Baldwin and Stee Tucker take advantage of Mendenhall's howling alle, but to most students,
upcoming exams will mean an end to an extra fun time.
Reagan Talks Retaliation
Reaction To Terrorism
W SHINGTON (UPl) -
Reagan said todav
'resi- I" his speech ioda, previewing
the his 13 day journey to Asia the
States "will act again" longest trip of his presidency
Reagan said that just as the allies
nations had united to fight drug
trafficing.they should stand
e
against I ibya if it continues "its
campaign of terror against
American and called on the
res' i V.th world to help
eliminate terrorism.
In a speech to the International
Forum oi the I ,S. Chamber of
Commerce, Reagan warned that
"terrorism undeterred will del lee
the winds oi freedom" blowing
around the world under
American leadership.
"uesday night, he reminded
terrorists that the United States
has a "record of littering history
with the wreckage ol regimes"
thai underestimated American
will.
"Decent people can no K nger
tolerate cowardly terrorisi a
tacks the president said.
"Unilateral response is noi
enough 1: must be dealt with
forcefully and collectively" and
ng m aill be topic of discus-
sion at the May 4-6 Tokyo con-
ference when he meets with the
leaders of Britain. France, Japan,
Italy, West Germany, Canada
and a European Community
representative.
shoulder to shoulder in the bal
agamsi terrorism.
"These vicious, cowardly at-
tacks will, if we let them, ereel a
wall of fear around nations and
neighborhoods 1: wili dampen
the joy ot travel, the flow ol
trade, the exchange o! ideas. In
short, terrorism undeterred will
defiect the winds of freedom
"America will never watch
passively as our innocent citizens
are murdered by those who
would do our country harm
Reagan said. "As we proved last
week, no one can kill Americans
and brag about it. No one.
"We bear the people of I ibva
no ill will, but if their govern-
ment contiues its campaign of
terror against Americans, we will
act again
Reagan used the occasion to
ask lor Arab suppor to isolate
the regime of Moammar kadafv.
"Let no one mistake this for a
conflict between the Western
democracies and the Arab
world he said, (ailing the ter-
ror, sts "but a tiny minority" who
attack .Arabs as well as
Westerners. Reagan said, "We
hope and pray the Arab world
will torn with us to elimiate this
scourge of civ ilization
Reagan noted Libya's
hypocrisy in linking terrorism
itl Moslem tecahings, saving,
"No-where is the siaughte; or
Moslem people greater than in
Afghanistan, vet Colonel
Khadafy allies himsell with those
(the Soviet Union) perpetrating
this crime on Islam and all
mankind
By PATTI KEMMis
Assistant News Editor
A sub-group of the Parking
and Traffic Committee has
developed nine short range park-
ing options to be accomplished
by the fall semester of 1986.
The recommendations could
provide over 450 new parking
places on campus.
According to Elmer Meyer,
vice-chancellor of Student Life,
these recomendations are now be-
ing considered by the Parking
and Traffic Committee:
� Increase number of parking
space by changing the parking
space size from 9 to 8 ft.
throughout campus.
� Pave and line lots on Ninth
Street.
� Pave space on Cotanche near
Ringgold Towers.
� Close James and Eighth Streets
and create parking there.
� Add spaces to existing com-
muter lot across from "Green
Space" on College Hill Drive.
� Added parking on Eifth Street
property next to News Bureau.
� Re-configure space behind
Home-Economics � Nursing
Building to provide more faculty
space, (former SGA President
David Brown agreed this would
be okay if trade-off student
spaces were available at
Mendenhali or College Hill lots.
� Provide more parking for
freshmen near Minges and
Athletic Fields.
� Move state owned vehicles off
central campus.
Meyer also stated the plans to
pave the field at the bottom ot
College Hill have been put on
"indefinate hold
"There were enough questions
raised by the students, falculty,
and staff to put the plans to pave
the field at the bottom of College
Hill on hold said Meyer.
"There were also other short
term solutions
Recommendations were also
made for the future.
They included building a park-
ing deck, developing a new
system of lot designations � the
closer to classroom buildings the
higher the fee. and to provide
shuttle bus service from Allied
Health parking areas.
It was also recommended to
establish special parking fees for
those who wish space between
9-12 a.m. dailv.
"There were enough
questions raised by the
students, faculty, and
staff to put the plans to
pave the field at the bot-
tom of College Hill on
hold
Timer Meyer
The recommendations for the
tu'ure would probably mean an
increase in parking tees
The sub-group has prepared a
survey to get feedback on the
recommendations.
Meyer stated he was interested
in getting the stude n
Anyone interested ii
pleting the survey may pick one
up at either the SGA ffice in
Mendenhali or the office ot Stu-
dent Life in W I
Visual Art Scholarship Formed
By DAWN STEWARD
staff �nln
The ECU Visual Arts Forum,
the School of Art Student
Organization, announced the for-
mation of the ECL Visual Arts
Forum Scholarship Fund, accor-
ding to Rick Higgms, President
of Visual Arts Forum.
Money for the fund is received
through the Annual V.A.F.
Beaux Arts Ball held on Hallo-
ween. The owner of the Attic.
Cunanan Organizes
SGA Cabinet System
Anniversary Noted
By PATH KEMMIS
Assistant Vs Editor
SGA President Steve Cunanan
is now taking applications for
seven cabinet positions that will
be open in the fall.
According to Cunanan, the

By Jll.l. MORGAN
East Carolina's Tau chapter oi
Phi Sigma Pi, the National
Honor Fraternity, will celebrate
its 50th anniversary on Saturday
April 26 at the Annual Founders
Day Banquet.
Awards will be presented and
the installation of new officers
will take place at the banquet be-
ing held at the Holiday Inn.
Richard C.Todd, professor
Emeritus of history, who retired
from East Carolina in 1977, is
also celebrating his 50th year as a
Phi Sigma Pi brother.
Todd was inducted into the
Sigma chapter at Millersville
State University in 1936 in
Millersville, PA. Not only is
Todd an Alumni, but he also
served as advisor to ECU's Tau
Chapter for 27 years.
In 50 years of existence it has
See FRATERNITY page 2.
t
Cunanan
cabinet will work basically the
same way as does the federal
cabinet.
"It will be a lot of leg work
said Cunanan. "But it's a great
chance to find out what is going
on around campus
The seven cabinet positions
available are: Academic Affairs.
Community Affairs, Consumer
Affairs, Minority Affairs, Traf-
fic and Saftey, Student Affairs,
and Publicity.
The duties of the members will
include sitting on several commit-
tees, collecting information and
helping the executive branch.
Cunanan said the only require-
ment he is looking for is "ge-
nuine interest
"The cabinet will be a seperate
branch of the SGA stated
Cunanan, and added previous in-
volvement in the SGA is not re-
quired.
Applications can be picked up
at the SGA office and will be ac-
cepted until the beginning of the
fall semester.
Installing a cabinet system is
the first of Cunanan's campaign
promises he has acted upon.
Tom Haines, where the bah
located, has helped in organizing
the Beaux Arts Ball in the past.
Fifty percent o the profits
from the ball are added to an ac-
count which next week will
become a part of the las;
Carolina University Foundation,
Inc. hfteeen-hundred dollars has
already been collected by the
V.A.F. and is awaiting an endow-
ed status.
"Initially none of the money
will be spent explains Dave
McDonald, director oi Institu-
tional Advancement. He adds.
"Interest earned is sen; directly
to the account. We wan: to even-
tually reach five-thousand
dollars
Once the account reaches this
amount, the first scholarship for
$500 win
criteria for
be awarded. The
the scholarship m-
ides: student must be a n
senior, or graduate student;
ality of artistic wt rk; academic
achievement; dedication tnd
tential in visual art- perfor-
mance; and other qualifications
at the discretion of the V.A I .
committee
" 1 he purpose oi the
ship is to support notorious
suit of careers in visual arts
stated MacDonald.
"We know it may take several
years for the scholarship fund to
reach endowment status, but we
it would be the best possible
use oi the money w .used
-aid Higgins.
I he future oi the fund depends
largely upon the continual suc-
cess of the Beaux Arts Ball. "The
projected date or the I
scholarship award is in about five
years concluded MacDonald
Source Of Discrimination Discussed
By PATRICK O'NEIL
SUfi Writer
Do Muslims suffer from
western discrimination? Is the
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds13
Editorials4
Featuresg
Sports11
Man propounds negotiations,
Man accepts the com-
promise.
Very rarely will he squarely
push the logic of a fact
To its ultimate
Conclusion in unmitigated
act.
�Rudyard Kipling
source of this discrimination bas-
ed in religion or in politics? To
answer these questions one must
understand the nature and struc-
ture of Islam and it's political
and social divisions said Ralph
Braibanti.
Braibanti is the director of the
Islamic and Arabian Develop-
ment Studies Center at Duke
University and a leading research
scholar on Islamic affairs. His
presentation "Religion and Inter-
national Politics: Why the
Resurgence?" was the fifth and
final presentation in the Great
Decision '86 lecture series.
Braibanti began his lecture by
explaining the rise of religion in
politics has not been given proper
attention despite growing
dominance throughout the
world.
Islam, one of the religions
prevalent in politics, is comprised
of one billion people scattered in
a variety of political and
geographical entities and thus,
dividing Muslims three ways, he
said.
First, there is the Arab-
nonArab minority which exists in
the Middle East and is the
smallest minority. Secondly,
there is the division of Muslims
by the political entities in which
they live. Thirdly, there is the sec-
tarian division of Islam, the best
known being between the Shiites
and the Sunni, Braibanti explain-
ed.
The western discrimination
against the Muslims began with
the crusade, or holy wars. Since
that time, Christians have con-
tinually viewed Muslims in a
negative mannner.
Such discrimination occurs to-
da as Braibanti pointed out
television shows including
"Mountbatten: The Last
Viceroy" recently shown on
Masterpiece Theatre, and the
movie "Gandi" which badly and
inaccurately portrayed Muslims.
Iran has been most successful
in cutting through the web by
showing sufficient pride and con-
fidence in its own governing
system, but some economic ties
do remain at this time.
Iran's declaration of in-
dependence from the west has
given Muslims worldwide a sense
Of pride in that a small nation
could stand up to a superpower
stated Braibanti.
Visiting Speaker
JIM LEI TCI s
rtFw(,
Ralph Braibanti concluded the Great Decisions Lecture series
Wednesday by speaking on religion and politics. See related story
on page one for further details. �
X





THFFASr CAROLINIAN
APRIL 24, 1986
Announcements
DAY CAMP RALEIGH
Trie VWCA o Raleigh is in neea o) clay
. vnp vouriseiors from Jvne 9 � August 23 In
'ei �ifs win De fteid on Thursday AprII 24
cot applications and more information con
'�. ' Co op �awi 313
ATTENTION
CO OPS WORKING SUMMER
OR FALL
An Outgoing sem.nar tor all Coop Students
� will tie working th,s summer or fall will
be Meld on Monday May S 4 5pm m Raw!
33� Refreshments will be served Loo for
�'0 tc swmg you I DON t MISS IT
PHI ETA SIGMA
Members'don ' forget the baked goods for
Thursday Apr.i 24 Barefoot on the mall
starting at 12 00 Any questions call
'5? 25'0ask for Pjm
SPECIALOLYMPICS
icogers ana buddies needed tor tne local
Spec.ai Olympics Spring Games to be held at
E B Aycock jr High School on Friday
Apr i 2S from �am 2pm For more .nforma
all Bill Twme at 752 4137 �201 or Con
nie Sappentieid a 355 S417
ECUMARCHING PIRATES
Coiowquarj auditions! � F.aa ana r.fie pos.
� s M- '�86 season Saturday Apr I i�
I 4pm Saturday Apr.i 26 ! 4om Sunday
Vav 4 2 5pm Any questions A
GoolSDy a' 'S1 698J ir Trlf, M�� � ,�
'Si W77
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
II you d like to learn more about the issues
College Republicans is the club lor you Join
us tonight at 6 30 in room 321 Mendenhail
Great proiects are n the works, so come on
out and get involved if you'd like more m�or
mafion call 7M WOO or 75 3155
VETERAN'S CLUB
Our last meeting o� the semester will be
held on Wednesday Apr,) 22. at 7 30pm in
room 221 Mendenhail Four items will be on
the agenda discussion of Memorial Oay ac
tivities. our future .nvolvement m the
POW. MiA Awareness Movement setting up
a Calendar of Events for the next calendar
year let s have a party if you have any
energy left and any suggestions on how we
can best serve you please plan to attend
Refreshments will be provided
SIGMA GAMMA RHO
ATTENTION 20 all bright intellectual
and energetic young men The ladies of
SIGMA GAMMA RHO are now taking ap
plications for little brothers iRhomeos) for
fan semester For further info contact Greg
Walton at 752 9450 or Tmger Simmons at
752 1029
PIG PICKIN&
AWARDS PRESENTATION
ECU Lady Pirate basketball would like
you to iom us for a pig pickm- and awards
presentation on Sunday. April 27 at 4 00pm
Riverside Steak Bar Please RSVP 7574384
Dr Apnl 25 198 U 00 per person
UNIVERSITY CHORALE
university Chorale performing in concert
frOa� April 25 1�6 7 00pm in Fletcher
Ret tai Man Director D' Rhonda Fiemmg
Assisstant Director Eddie Luptcn
SRA
SRA semiformal pictures are now in
Come by SRA office m Mendenhail on Tues
day April 79 and Wednesday. April x
SGA
Reminder to SGA members Monday will
be the last and most important meeting of
the year We will be discussing annual ap
propnations and your attendance .s
necessary Be reminded that if you have
missed two meetings and if you miss this
meeting you will not be allowed to run for a
position m the fall Please be there!
ENGLISH HONOR SOCIETY
Sigma Tau Delta will meet on Wednesday
April 30 1 reading day! at 7 30pm m 104
English Annex We will choose new reps for
the council of honor societies and discuss
plans for next year Also, there will be a
social at Hallbergs on Friday the 2nd
LWMS
Applications for the Ledon.a Wright
Memor.al Scholarship (LWMS) are now
ava.iable tc any black student interested in
appiymg You may obtam an application
from any Diack faculty member Application
deadline �s Apnl 24. 1986 An applications
should be returned t0 tne Ledoma Wright
Memorial Scholarship Committee 210A
Spe.ght Bldg ECU Greeny,uP NC 27834
BE A PEER HEALTH
EDUCATOR
Would you like to gam valuable teaching
experience and learn more about health
issues' Become a part of this exciting new
group of students who are advocates for
health Call Mary Etesha Adams at 757 6841
or come by the Student Health Service room
107 to pick up an application
ATTENTION:
SCUBA ENTHUSIASTS
The Coral Reef Dive Club is holding its last
meeting of the spring semester Tues April
29 at 7 30pm in room 221 Mendenhail You
must attend this meeting if you plan on div
mg with us this summer Get involved with
the club that's going somewhere the Coral
Reef Dive Club
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Campus Crusade For Christ is sponsoring
"Prime Time" this Thursday night at
7 30pm in the Old joyner Library second
floor Please 10m us for fun fellowship and
Bible study We are looking forward to
meeting you
RUGBY CLUB
Awards banquet and coofcout will be th.s
Friday from 3pm until We've decided to
hole il at 119 Hotly St Ripple City, tor the
last official bash of vgA Girls are welcome
ATTENTION
Thee Biology Club will be having an end of
the year bash on Friday April 2$ from
8 30 until The party will be held at me
Rotary Club All members, facultystaff and
guests are urged to attend Tbera will be
music, food and beverages Corne on out and
fav� a great time See you mere
PRIATE WALK
Pirate Walk's last mgm of operation win
be Wednesday at 12 00 midnight We would
nke to thank you tor your patronage We tre
ooking forward to working for you next
iemester Thanks. The Pirate Walk staff
f r?frimtiiinflMf tiHiniittffffniif f 11111 id tit limit
OMEGA PSI PHI
Omega Ps P' tnanxs all G'eee�
organuetioris and students me' helped �.�.
our fundraiser tor The Ronald MD'xa
House a success We were able to dona'c
i 1000 00 Thanks for helping us STFP �
leukemia
ECU COUNCILOF
HONOR SOCIETIES
�ere win be a meeting tor an memce
Ml � evening n BD 204 at 5 15 Old and new
reps piease pian 10 a "end because "�� s �� .
I�8l meeting of the semester Coun
t.ons win be held Don t forget trie o r
Mar 3
iMINtUMIIINHMIIIIIIIIIIIIi
i
Student Special
Economy Mini Storage
May 1 Thru Aug. 31 for $75
300 Farmer St. 757-0373
I Greenville
illlUimtMltimiMMnitltlllMMMHIlM
College Students React
(C'PS) � "We have tvo, and
they're not talking to anyone is
how a woman answered the
phone at the University o Col-
orado's International Student
Center last week.
The "two" thev had were Li-
byan students.
And bv 3 p.m. on the day after
the American bombing of Libya,
phone-weary staffers no longer
bothered to wait to be asked the
question they'd answered too
many times that day: "Do you
have anv Libyan students we can
talk to?"
Meanwhile at Miami-Dade
Community College, television
camera crews prowled the cam-
pus, and Miami Herald reporters
stopped students to ask it" thev
even remotely knew a Libyan.
As the nation's press descend-
ed on college campuses in search
of the Libyan students' perspec-
tive, its quarry stayed out o sight
and administrators threw a pro-
tective blanket of confidentiality
over the handful of Libyans still
studying here.
Fraternity
Celebrates
Continued From Page 1.
only had three advisors. Beecher
Flanagan was the first advisor
serving from 1936-1950. Todd
served as advisor from 1950 until
1977 when Jack Thornton of the
Department of Decision Sciences
took over. Thornton remains as
advisor today.
Todd noted "the fraternity has
changed in many respects in
keeping with the times The ma-
jor change involved the induction
of women into the fraternity.
Phi Sigma Pi went co-ed in
1977. Linda Wilson, president of
ECU's Tau chapter is the frater-
nitie's first female president.
"Despite the fact that there are
men and women in the fraternity
all members said Todd, "are
called Brothers
Phi Sigma Pi is based on a
tripod of scholarship, leadership
and fellowship. "A minimum
GPA of 3.3 is required although
many brother maintain averages
above that said Todd.
Tau has been named outstan-
ding chapter in the nation 21 con-
secutive times. "We are
celebrating 50 golden years with
21 consecutive awards" says
Todd. "I'm mighty proud to be
part of Phi Sigma Pi, it just keeps
getting better and better he ad-
ded.
Members are involved all over
campus, said Todd, Student
Union and sports medicine as
well as participating in in-
tramurals. They also contribute a
lot to our community.
Todd said every year Phi
Sigma Pi sponsors Easter and
Christmas parties for under-
privHedged children, and also
supports Easter Seals with a
volleyball marathon and the
American Heart Assoc. by
holding their annual bikini con-
test.
Some Libyan students fear
they're being watched by fellow
countrymen, their American
friends say.
Though none have complained
of personal harassment, friends
and advisors say some Libyan
students fear for their families
could have been caught in the
bombing.
"They just want to keep a low
profile says James Graham.
director o Foreign Student Ad-
vising at Colorado State Univer-
sity, where a Libyan student was
shot in 1980 � allegedly by a hit
squad out to punish opponents of
Moammar Khadafy.
"They (CSU's eight Libyans)
are Ph.d. students and are con-
cerned about getting their
research and their classwork
done Graham reports.
None of the Libyan students
Graham knows has asked for
help or security, though they
have asked that their names not
be given out to anyone � friend
or oc
More visible, however, were
American students
demonstrating their support or
opposition to the American
military attack.
In Boulder, anti-war activists
held a candlelight vigil on campus
and paraded to the downtown
post office, exhorting people to
withhold their taxes, due that
day. to protest the American
bombing.
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Also including the following:
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THE RACE FOR
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Camp
Do m,u fhink the S(,A lgis
against 1 ,fMa
I inda Rush
r. Industrial Techm
�f
Joe rnent
English lm
ta�
keinPlumb
Sophomore
'�1


NA TO Stages
Mock Battle
ONDON (I PI) - Near , 2 �
N N

� ��-
(
F-ll Is launcl :s

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N A
vo involved
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1 am Dal l
dec ige
ovei the opera
86 because it
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was to hae begun yesterday, I
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PHONF H
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I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 24, 1986
OMEGA PS! PHI
� � I i -j I rrrk
- "�� fipeo mtke
. ���� v. Pooaia
, v a wf I ati�" to Jonve
lijOCO tlp.ng u� STEP on
U COUNCIL OF
- SOCIETIES
�ft� oicnic
HtUIIIHHIIHHIIHIIUlik
nt Special
Mini Storage
Au
f 3
757-0373
ilf ;
It ilMIDMIIHltlllinilillMIDItllMIIIIMIUIIIIIMlMMIIMMIIIIIIIllr
LACE
ndard.
nplete
C4 A W a
� Laundry
and Cable already
ECU Bus Stop
for 4 people
utilities,
isible Students only
July 31, 198"
T
lC
3RD
N. C.
Campus Voice
Do ou think the SGA Legislature should be discussing war
against Libya
Linda Rush Chris C happell
Senior, Industrial Technology Junior, Theater Arts
"1 guess they can do it if they "I think they ought to worry
warn to. 1 don't really see the more about the University and its
point except to express student problems than worldwide pro-
opinion but if they're doing it it's blems they can do nothing
their opinion, not the students' about
opinion
InformalComplaintSORORITIES . . .
r �� rv � "helping you find a path through College"
Benefits Students
Joe Argent
English Instructor
i feel it's a little ludacnst but
understand their concern.
�r �ne should be concerned
the situation but their ac-
ns are too extreme
Todd Abrams
Sophomore, C orrections
i don't feel it's their place to
do it. It doesn't make sense for
them to declare war on Libya
I
Kevin Plumb
Sophomore, Economics
"I don't think the SGA should
) anything because they can do
lining about the situation. But
- good to stir up some con-
oversy
PHILADELPHIA, PA (CPS) �
Giving students a way to air their
complaints without enduring the
rigors of formal hearings may
help colleges keep students
enrolled, a new study by the Na-
tional Institute for Dispute
Resolution says.
The more relaxed and informal
the method of airing complaints,
the better, says Temple Universi-
ty Associate Prof. Joseph Folger,
who did the study with Harvard
researcher Janelle Shubert.
Folger and Shubert figure in-
formal grievance procedures
make students feel better about
their schools, and thus more like-
ly to stay at them.
But the researchers have no
statistics indicating schools that
rely more on mediation than on
hearings have different dropout
rates than schools with other
kinds of grievance procedures.
The two studied the way 20 col-
leges handle student grievances
about everything from parking to
grades.
"Formal procedures often
elicit conflict behaviors Folger
concludes, adding at hearings
"people dig in, they are concern-
ed about how they look
Furthermore, "adjudication of
problems does not restore rela-
tionship between parties Folger
says.
Folger and Shubert found less
formal mediation helps adver-
saries smooth out differences
because no formal conclusion is
forced upon the participants.
For example, Folger recalls a
situation in which a faculty
member on a committee con-
tinually rejected a student'vdisser-
tation.
In a mediation session, the par-
ties discovered the professor re-
jecting the paper had a different
definition o' what a dissertation
should be than the other commit-
.In U.S.
Watched Closely
NA TO Stages
Mock Battle
LONDON (L'PI) � Nearly 200
warplanes from the United States
and eight other NATO nations
streaked into cloudy skies today
in a mock Battle of Britain to
determine how well the alliance
could defend the country.
The jets included 100 U.S.
F-llls launched from British
bases that were staging points for
last week's air raid against Libya.
The U.S. Air Force and Royal
Air Force insisted the NATO ex-
ercise involved no live weapons.
One Labor Party member of
parliament, Tarn Dalyell,
declared his outrage Tuesday
over the operation, code-named
"Elder Forest 86 because it
came so soon after the attacks on
Libya. The four-day excercise
was to have begun yesterday, but
was postponed a day by rain.
"In the present climate said
Dalyell, a leading critic of Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher's
Conservative government, "it
betrays mind-boggling insen-
sitivitv
WASHINGTON (UPI) � Li-
byans living in the United States
are getting a closer look by the
administration and tighter
surveillance by law enforcement
agencies, The h York Times
reported today, citing federal of-
ficials.
The administration considered,
then rejected, a proposal to
deport the estimated 3,500 Li-
byans living here, nearly 1,700 of
them students, officials said
Tuesday.
"We have considered whether
to send them home, and have
decided not to Deputy
Secretary of State John C.
Whitehead said at a hearing of
the House Foreign Affairs Com-
mittee.
Whitehead said it was decided
not to force the Libyans out
because "there will be a Libya
after (Libyan leader Moammar)
Khadafy Libyans who have
been exposed to American ways
might then help the United
States.
Libyans in the United States
have been under careful
surveillance for several years, but
the surveillance grew stricter after
Khadafy threatened last January
to place "suicide" teams in the
United States if U.S. forces at-
tacked Libya.
The FBI has contacted sources
tee members.
Upon resolving the problem of
differing definitions through
mediation, the paper was approv-
ed without the professor being
told he erred.
Folger notes mediation can be
especially important for graduate
students who often have long-
term relationships with faculty
members.
But mediation isn't ap-
propriate for student complaints
about "certain sensitive issues
(like sexual harassment) that can
be swept under the rug" in infor-
mal negotiations, Folger
observes.
Folger and Shubert found col-
leges that use students as the in-
itial liaisons between complai-
nant and school had a high suc-
cess rate in resolving problems.
As Folger and Shubert released
their report last week, however,
administrators at Wesleyan,
Dartmouth, Berkeley and Purdue
announced they would initiate
formal disciplinary hearings for
students accused of violating
campus rules during protests of
campus ties to South Africa.
i! I Ml I 111 ZT. U
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among Libyans living here, to
run down rumors that Libyan
groups may be planning terrorist
operations against Americans,
said officials.
Authorities said they had no
direct information that Libyans
were planning terrorist acts in the
United States, but U.S. bombing
raids on Libya last week had rais-
ed concerns about domestic
security.
Immigration and Naturaliza-
tion Service agents have been
cautioned to watch closely for Li-
byans trying to enter the United
States on non-Libyan passports.
The agency said it had asked the
Canadian government to stay
alert to the activities of Libyans
in Canada.
"It's not red alert time an
F.B.I, official told the Times,
"but there is acute sensitivity to
anything that would suggest ter-
rorism He said the bureau
would be using "all techniques
available" to monitor Libyans in
the United States, and "that cer-
tainly would include electronic
surveillance
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�If iEaat (Earnlinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender, omrra, �,�
Jay Stone, MmmtumB
MiKt Ludwick, ���� Greg Winchester, omorqf i
Scott Cooper, V"� � Anthony Martin, bi� va�
DAN MAI'RFR, BWTMMMM tjil" MEGNEEDHAM, ir, ulali.m Wdnater
John Shannon. ar�w�r Shannon Short. w��i Haw
Di Chanii i Johnson. noKio. Debbie Stevens, skw�
April 24, lv8c
OPINION
Page 4
Religion
Hypocrisy Breeds Agnosticism
Television evangelists have serv-
ed to inspire more than a few
satirists and comedians. Robin
Williams' impersonation of the
Right Reverend Ernest T. Angry
and his Divine Disco Temple of
Comedy springs readily to mind. Or
the Reverend Charles Young out of
Winterville � now there's a
evangelist guaranteed to make
anybody within salvation's reach
sweat holy water.
Young casts out demons and
lambasts hypocrites all in the same
breath: "You know who I'm talkin'
about you T.V. preachers And
it's Young's candid condemnation
of the hypocrisy that infects some
of society's religious institutions
that appeals to alot of people. In-
deed, send us your love offering of
Si5 and we will send you a
prayer dime.
Yes, it's no secret that some
evangelists have strayed off the
straight and narrow path. Jim Bak-
ker of the PTL Club has been
charged with improprieties involv-
ing the misallocation of PTL funds
on more than one occasion by The
Charlotte Observer. Other
evangelists have also been in-
vestigated and some have been con-
victed for questionable business
practices.
But questionable business prac-
tices are not the real essence of the
roi that underlies the hypocrisy in
much o' the faith business today.
It's the venom that has seeped into
many of the fundamentalist
religions that is eating out the heart
of the religious impulse.
One only needs to take note of
the profusion of religious
denominations to realize that
disagreement is endemic to religion.
This country was, in fact, founded
by religious dissenters who fled
persecution in Europe. Thus, it was
the height of irony � bitter though
it was that the Puritans, who fled
religious persecution, ultimately
wound up persecuting the Quakers
because of religious differences.
The spirit of Puritanism lingers
on. When the would-be pious call a
terminal illness, like AIDS, God's
vengeance against sinners, like
homosexuals, there is something
wrong with religion. A religion
founded upon love, forgiveness and
redemption should not rejoice in
peoples suffering. It should not en-
dorse a philosophy of blaming the
victim. And it should not portray
its God as a belligerant and disap-
proving tyrant. Not least because
AIDS is a heterosexual disease in
Africa and it is becoming more
heterosexual in this country all the
time.
Alright, so next the modern
Puritans tell us that promiscuity is
bringing down a hail storm of
Divine wrath upon the sexually
adventurous. The profusion and
spread of sexual diseases in itself,
they tell us, is proof that the Lord
has sent us mortals a righteous and
holy rebuke for their sins.
Of course the idea that perhaps
sexually transmitted diseases have
as much to do with immune systems
weakened by environmental
pollutants, food adulterants, ex-
cessive drinking, smoking, and
drug use (both prescription and
recreational) seems to have elluded
the pious and belligerant. One must
suppose that there are few sins
worse than promiscuity. Why,
come to think of it, are the pious so
preoccupied with people's sexuali-
ty?
Then, o course, there's book
banning and record burning. We
can't afford to let people's weak
and vulnerable minds be influenced
by Satanic ideas. Adam and Eve
proved that. And there are truely
sick and depraved things to be
found on the average rock album
merely by playing it backwards.
Well, of course, none o' this is
new. Prejudice and intolerance
made their debut on this planet long
ago, though they probably had
some o' their proudest moments,(
in this century at least), in Nazi
Germany and Stalinist Russia. But,
when all other religions are wrong
except for one's own and all other
groups are morally deficient except
for one's own, what becomes of the
goodwill, benevolence and
genorosity that has ostensibly been
the hallmark of religion throughout
the ages?
It may be because the scientific
empiricism of our age has torn
asunder many of the foundations of
traditional religions that many peo-
ple cling to the old dogma more
tenaciously than ever. But, ironical-
ly, it may be science that renews our
faith in metaphysical forces. New
discoveries in physics have confirm-
ed much of the worldveiw of
mystical traditions, both eastern
and western. New discoveries in
consciousness research likewise sug-
gest religion's renewed relevance.
Someday, if humanity survives
the nuclear and industrial age, peo-
ple may come to find more grounds
for agreement on the subject of
religion than disagreement. There
will still be differences mind you.
But those differences will be
respected in the way that different
styles of painting are respected in
accomplished artists and different
styles of dancing are respected in
accomplished dancers. People may
study with masters, but ultimately
they will develop their own ap-
proach to the discipline in question.
When that day arrives people will
stop killing one another, practicing
intolerance and inflicting cruelties
in the name of God.
Campus Forum
War Of Words Over Libya
1 have seen alot of questionable let-
ters printed in the Campus Forum
column of the East Carolinian since I
first became a student here in 1982,
but the letter from the apparently
misinformed Ms. Heiber has to be the
most answerable to date.
My resolution as first introduced
(4-14-86) was originally intended to
have the SGA go on record as suppor-
ting Congress in the event of a
declaration of war. It seemed a rather
bizarre resolution at the time (6:00
EST), but at "7;00 when the first
reports of the bombardment of Libya
were broadcast, a declaration of war
by Congress may have well been in
order.
All too often the indecisive, foot-
dragging, responsibility shirking
Congress of the United States refuses
to take action when faced with a
crisis. This is true not only concerning
matters of war, but in matters concer-
ning foreign domestic, and fiscal
policy as well. Congress usually
prefers to let others make decisions.
thus avoiding any blame or criticism,
while preserving the privilege of poin-
ting the finger in condemnation
Congress aside, Ms. Heiber
wonders what rigtit I have to commit
young men and women to armed con-
flict. Does it occur to Ms. Heiber that
the young men and women enlisted in
the various branches of services are
ALREADY committed to armed con-
flict, should the need for such arise
Does it occur to Ms. Heiber that I
myself am registered for the draft?
Perhaps Ms. Heiber believes that
perhaps she may be asked to support
her country in some capacity. God
forbid.
1 quite agree with Ms. Heiber thai
war is no joke. The cold-blooded
murder of innocents by terrorists
under the leadership of Muammar
Quaddafi are no joke either. How
many body bags and grieving widows
ot the victims of terrorism will it take
before Ms. Heiber takes a stand'1
As far as alluding to my political
affiliation, allow me: it is far to the
right of those who condone policies
of pacifism and appeasement toward
terrorists. I! is those people, not I.
who may eventually get us all killed.
Ja Dunn
Junior, Pols.
Racism?
1 am writing this letter in reference
to the April 10 article concerning the
ASSAULTS on campus. I had some
problems-with this article. I feel that
the attacks have been turned into a
racist issue. Lhe fact that several
black men have been knocking on the
doors of girls' rooms asking for cer-
tain people seems pretty valid to me. I
have experienced white men knocking
on my door asking for certain people,
should 1 consider him a rapist'1
Should I use the media to exploit
him? I agree that rape is a serious
problem but, to confuse it with
racism doesn't help the situation at
all, it only diverts it.
Vironetta Lawrence
General College
Guns
. Contrary to the beliel oi NRA
position, the NR- -u;
ll the nr - asli s is -1 at
future legislatii gun contn
elude the Firearms Owners Protection
ct thus allowing law-abiding citizens
: hunters to bu and transport
firearms in thei than tl
home state, however, in
the state .slid
home state 1 his at I prohib
government from imposing centra
ed firearm i m Also
1 rearms Owners Protection ci
:sses n ry jail time I i
criminals wl
crimes. lake a look require-
ment for the ownershij indguns,
you will find them adequately
in get Manipulations of laws
without an informed basis does
represent democracy All the NR f
asks is tor their deserved chance he
listened to and not merely heard.
1 amont M. Brown
.1 unior. Finance
Forum Rules
The t.asi Carolinian welcomes lei
expressing all points of vie
Kissinger Speech Clarified
Press Unfair To Reagan
When Henry Kissinger went down to
Washington last week to address a
meeting of academicians at what he
thought was a closed meeting, he spoke
of Ronald Reagan and his administra-
tion in terms he would not have used ad-
dressing a Republican rally. But if you
listened carefully to everything Kissinger
said, and weighed it comprehensively,
you would find him much more shock-
ing to academicians than to Reaganite
loyalists.
On The Right
w
By WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY JR.
Of Ronald Reagan Kissinger said that,
just to clear the air, he was in no way
"indebted" to Reagan � in the sense,
let us say, that Henry Kissinger would be
bound to acknowledge being indebted to
Richard Nixon. He went on: Moreover,
if you meet Reagan and talk with him
briefly, you wonder how he managed to
be elected governor of California, let
alone president of the United States.
One can hear the academic audience
purring at this point; but it did not an-
ticipate what was to come.
Kissinger went on to say that in fact
Reagan had dominated the politics of
California for eight years, had
dominated the political life of the United
States for six years, and not in-
conceivably could go down as one of the
most significant presidents of the cen-
tury.
How can this be?
Because, Kissinger explained, the ap-
parent limitations of Reagan totally
disguise an intuitive grasp he has. not
only for priorities, but also for techni-
que. Here. Kissinger later explained, is a
man who manged to change his entire
staff without a ripple of change in
policy, so clearly did he himself
dominate policy. A president who clear-
ly outwitted the Soviet Union through
1983 and 1984 on the matter of deploy-
ing theater weapons in Europe. When
Gorbachev arrived in Geneva it was
widely conjectured that he would "eat"
Reagan alive. But Reagan's intuitive wit,
his sense of what to get into, what not to
get into � what academicians might call
his reticulative sense of order � ended
him up dominating the summit. And
just as Gorbachev now believes that by
threatening a summit cancellation
because of Libya he will embarrass
Reagan, quite the contrary is likely:
Gorbachev will lose, and Reagan gain.
Now what got reported from all the
above over ABC was mostly the business
about how Kissinger wondered that
Reagan ever got elected governor of
California, let alone president of the
United States. Nothing was said about
the subtleties of Mr. Kissinger's extem-
porized remarks, let alone his statement
to the academicians that they tend to
suffer as a class because academicians
tend nowadays to be either job-seekers
or revolutionaries. They are, according-
ly, not attempting to carry the load, to
help public figures to conceptualize pro-
blems with clarity. As an example, take
Nicaragua. Mr. Reagan is here genuinely
handicapped by his rendering of the pro-
blem. Either the problem is grave
enough to bring U.S. action, or it is not.
If it is, $100 million is a meaningless an-
titoxin; if it is not, then we have no
business helping the contras at all. The
academic class tends to ignore
refinements in stating the question.
One notes from Ronald Reagan Jrs
amusing and deft piece in Playboy
magazine that alongside the son-
reporter, hiding outside the summit
room in Geneva was presidential
historian Edmund Morris, with the same
nuninous notepad on which he has writ-
ten the first part of the biography ever
done on Theodore Ro sevelt. It is Kiss-
inger's implicit point that Reagan
deserves a biographer of the subtlety oi
Morns. But between now and the con-
solidation of Reagan's reputation in
America's history, commentators need
to be cautious. Last year. Jack Kemp
press aide John Buckley (a nephew)
bunted a question about Kemp (Wasn't
he too stupid to be president?) by citing
Reagan (They said Reagan was too
stupid to be president). What emerged in
many news stones was merely: Kemp
Aide Says Reagan Too Stupid to Be
President.
Ronald Reagan is a very unusual man,
with unusual habits of mind and man-
ner. Three months ago, a retiring and
shy editor was asked by a friend after the
affair whether she had been apprehen-
sive a the prospect of sitting for two and
one-half hours next to the president of
the United States at the testimonial din-
ner. "Well she said, "as a matter of
fact I was. But as soon as he sat down,
he turned to me and .said 'Pnscilla, do
you want to hear what I said to Gor-
bachev?
You wonder how such people as that
can get elected governor of California.
But then you think about it for a while,
and you find yuourself wondering how
come, the last time the voters were con-
sulted on the matter, that man won only
49 states.
Editor's Note: William F. Buckley Jr. is
a prominent syndicated columnist and
author of several books as well as the
host of the PBS series Firing Line
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THE EAST t'AROI 1NIAN
APRIL 24, JW,

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con-
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Reagan
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was merely: Kemp
Reaga i Stupid to Be
is a ery unusual man,
oi mind and man-
igo, a retiring and
� ed by a tnend after the
whether she had been apprehen-
tting tor two and
next to the president of
inited at the testimonial din-
"Well she said, "as a matter of
fact I was. But as soon as he sat down,
turned to me and .said 'Priscilla, do
ou want to hear what I said to Gor-
bachevv"
You wonder how such people as that
an get elected governor of California,
lut then you think about it for a while,
nd you find yuourself wondering how
c me, the last time the voters were con-
Is ilted on the matter, that man won only
Us states.
Editor's Sote: William F. Buckley Jr. is
L prominent syndicated columnist and
mthor of several books as well as the
the PBS series Firing Line.
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1 HI EAS1 �. AROl 1SIAN
APRIl 24, 1986
College Presidents Protest 1987 Budget
WASHINGTON, DC (C PS)
College presidents, scared h
huge budget cuts due next
September, held an "emergency
meeting" here last week, and
believe they won "a strong com-
mitment" from Congress to re
ject the Reagan administration's
198 college budget.
Congress, however, effectivel)
rejected the administration's pro
posal to cut federal college pro
grams by 26 percent in March
Vet the presidents emerged
from the lobbying visit to Con-
gress last week nonethelc- - th ' I
won a major victory.
Natale Sicuro, the Southern
Oregon State College president
who organized the emergency
meeting, announced senators
Mark Andrews (R-N.D.), Ernest
HoIIings (D-S.C), Mark Hatfield
(R-Ore.) and Senate Majority
I eadei Robert Dole (R-kan.)
have given "specific com-
mitments" to freeze, not cut,
funding tor the 1987 fiscal year.
" I hey were very receptive, and
we're confident of their
support Sicuro said. "Andrews
HoIIings will introduce an
amendment on the Senate floor
for returning $1.2 billion to the
education budget
The Senate Budget Committee
defeated the same amendment by
a slim two-vote margin two weeks
ago.
Congress is now wrestling with
the entire budget for the 1987
fiscal year, which extends from
Oct. 1, 1986 through Sept. 30
1987.
But if Congress does not agree
soon on a budget that will reduce
the federal deficit by a certain
amount, the Gramm-Rudman-
Hollings law would force
automatic cuts in most programs
in September.
Some observers estimate col-
lege programs � from student
aid to library help to research
grants � could be cut by a whop-
ping 30 percent if Gramm-
Rudman is invoked.
The prospect convinced some
50 college presidents to join the
emergency meeting of what's
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called the Higher Education
Leadership Committee.
The meeting is an emergency, a
spokesman said, because the
presidents assume the Supreme
Court will uphold Gramm-
Rudman in a decision scheduled
for July. Congress is operating
on the assumption the high court
will overturn the law.
The presidents thought the
stakes were too high to gamble on
the court's decision.
xu&&SC? �jyCr- yy-jy SS"4f-
Nine hundred ol the '
students at Columbia C olleg
Illinois, for example, would
their loans it either the Reaj
budget or the Gramm-Rudi
cuts are allowed to take efl
Columbia president Mirroi
andrott estimated.
William Harris, who I
Payne ollege in
See EMERGENCY page 7.
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ATTENTION
The ECU Student Who Has
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Mark Sawyer contact Clara Van
752-9578
-Cr'4sC&-ss y yy yy yy yy- yy &
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA
AT CHAPEL HILL
1986 SUMMER SESSION CALENDAR
Registration Day
1st Day of Classes
Late Registration
Holidays
Last Day of Classes
Final Examinations
� .
23-24
Mind Games
i-hiw�i rw �,����
From the looks on the above faces, electronics can cause major confusion.
For a catalog and application forms please tekph ne - �" 4364 � �
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reel
Death Allowed
MORKIMOW v N.J (I I'l
A judge today gave pet i
tor a man to ordei
a feeding tube thai ha - ' pi
severely brain-damaged w lea
since 1980
The judge said
removed from Nanc (
Jobes, 31, so thai si
allowed to die.
n H lobes II! 1 B
town, N.J and his
parent. Robei tnd
1 aird, filed suit
mg permission :
feeding lube.
on o
l pa
The nursing I
lOITU
claiming
il fe
� �
Park where she is
opposed the request,
Nancy Jobes is capable
pain and would be
starving to death.
It upheld on appeal, the deci-
ion by Morns Superioi ludge
Arnold Stein would break new
und in right-to-die law, an
issue that first came to national
attention in the Karen
Quintan case a decade a
�lubes is neither comatose,
elderly, terminally ill noi sup
ported by a respirator, all criteria
'hat have been cited as reasons
mg life support in
' to-die cases in New
Stein said in his
tl e lobes case close-
ai �1 Quinlan, the
who died in a
v I nursing home
?ear, nine years after she was
a respirator h
no perceptible dif-
rtween the facts m this
se in Quinlan Stein
tlis decision. "Both cases
i ' ung pet son in an lr-
ersibli � egetative state.
'Quinlan involved an action to
move a respirator. In this case.
tl is souoght is removal of
another artificial means ol life
ppon � feeding tube.
Nai c lobes suffered severe
in damage during a 1980
�pei ition to remove a dead fetus
aftei site was seriously injured in
an auto accident.
Stein said he would not order
I incoln Park Nursing Home
to remove the tube or to allow the
removal to take place in its facili-
ty .
Gear Up for
spring savings
at Kroger!
Welcome Students
& Faculty
SPECIALS
All You
Can Eat
Any one, or any combination of 4
Shrimp � Oysters � Trout
Clam Strips Devil Crab
Ocean Perch � QQ
6
Alaskan Crab Legs Or
Steamed Shrimp
Served with Fried or Baked Potato
Cole Slaw and Hush Puppies
FA MIL Y RESTA URANT
GREENVILLE
105 Airport Road
758-0327
HOURS. SunThurs. 11 a.m. to 9p.m.
Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Ltr
NRB
REG CLASSIC DIET
CHERRY CAFFEINE FRF
REG OR OIET
Coca
Cola
99
8 PC BUCKET
ASSOfi
LIMIT
Wishbone
Fried Chicken
$
8
Pc
SAVE
$10
Moore's
Potato Chips
99�
PICNIC SPECIAL'
Lb
USDA GOV T INSPECTED
3 OR 5 LB CHUB PAK
Ground
Beef
88(
6 Dozen
Peel n' Eat A
y Cooked Shrimp ft
$
Bucket
999
KROGER
English
Muffins . . . O
Cl
Pkgs
�1
IN THE MEAT DEPT
PEPPERONI OR DELUXE
Old Italian
Brand Pizza.
16
Oz
For
items ana Prices
Effective tnru Sat
April 26 1986
$
LIGHT N I .
SANDY MAC
PINK LABEL
Boiled
Ham
Lb
199
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
64
Oz
Ctn
SUNNY DELIGHT
Citrus
Blend
99
M � �
'

2 !
I �

: �
H
Perhapv Mimv of iht era
or at kasi the craines
ATTEN
If you plan to liv
lights, water or h
If so, eliminate �
service in advano


v

Electric Only
Electric & Vol
Electric Worel
Electric & Gos
-
nun '
cul
illows
Electric and cl
Green
fJ
I uMol





IMF I AMAKOl IMAN
�M'KII 24
Budget
Has
V an
Up for
ctvitins
core's
Potato Chips
99

Cottage
Cheese
M Xr
stj�
Citrus
Blend
99
u
) I
ct
10:35 p.m.
Carl 1 eon Merritt ol Raleigh
was banned from campus foi he
ing in possession of a weapon and
using vulgai language in Clemeni
d 'i ni
7 50 p m
Ronald I Hadley ol amp I e
juene was banned from campus
fot assauli on .1 female and being
unescoi ted in a female doi m i
thony I Sullivan and Michael I
I use both olherry Point were
banned from campus foi being
unescorted in a female dorm and.
foi hai i assing females.
9 20 p.m
� Scott dorm resident reported
Ian en ol a i lock radii i from
a indow sill W illiam Hill Mm
ph. Robei I I )a id Bledsoe,
Michael lelsu Harry lames
Howard, ! Pernail Mar
rel, I ai mhowan
am
u
V
Mui r� wj Vpril 20
I H ident
I I eene
tied white
:
M
Breal
vehicle parked in the Fifth and
Reade Streel Freshman paiking
lot was reported
4:30 a.m.
Harry James Howard and
1 imothy Pernail Harrel both
from Chowan College were at
rested foi trespassing alter being
banned in connection with a
larceny
12:19 p.m.
A Scott dorm resident reported
vandalism to his vehicle while
pat ked ea t ol Scoti dorm.
7:17 p.m.
A Greenville resident reported
vandalism to hei vehicle while
paiked North last of Fleming
dorm.
9:00 p m
( larence Jones ol Greenville
was arrested foi trespassing on
( ollege Hill Drive
10:30 p m
Sebastian Williams ol Green
ville was arrested foi trespassing
mi campus and foi the breaking
and entering ol a vehicle which
a as paiked in the Fifth and
Reade Streel :
pnl 21
1 J5 a m
Scott dorm resident was
aught in possession ol and
discharging pyrotechnics from
� he w indow
12:17 p.m.
CHECKOurm
Classifieds
757-6366
A Aycock dorm resident
leported unknown persons had
broken into his vehicle and at
tempted to steal the vehicle while
i! was pai ked onollege Hill
Drive west of Jones
April 22
m JO a.m.
A Jones Hall resident reported
the larceny ol his bicycle from
north of I instead. Greenville
Police Department recovered the
bicycle and warrents are b
obtained hv the Greenville Police
I department
8:00 p m
A Jones Hall resident reported
the larceny ol twenty dollai
from his unlocked room by
unknown persons
HIIHIIIIIIIIItllllllllllllllllllllltlllHIItlllllllllllllllllllillllllllUllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillttMIIIIIMIIIIttllllllllil
I o I iimmi Hanntrv .
My Vew Yean
Pai: � Buddy H here an
( all Me at (806) 742 !
(609) 692 9592 after '
I el's gel tot
4lbt
ATTIC
ifiQQQWQifi
FRI
$1 for
:� QQty V -
-

Emergency MeetingHeld
( onUnued r nun Paje
���
� ' . . �
111 o n

Blame It On The Moon
JIVi I M li,(N I he hul �r.J.f.tr
Perhaps s��m�- t the craziness found in mosl 1I students can be blamed on ur 'unusual' moons,
ur ai hast the crainess of mir photographer!
ATTENTION RETURNING
STUDENTS
If you plan to live off campus in the fall, will you need
lights, water or heat?
If so, eliminate one long line by arranging your utility
service in advance.


V HH
lical
c ii to"nei Sei v ices
Remind then
II .imj
I
i be put in theii name. Just pick up an
impus housing office, Wl hard Building
� 'a i ifth Sueei.
ust be notarized) and mail
P.O Bo 1847. Greenville, N.C. 27835 1847, Ami:
ttei ol credit from theii utility company
it in yout name, a deposit will be re-
Electric Only
Electric & Woter
Electric, Woter & Gas
Electric & Gas
.ii can save mm I .
V
with electric or without electric or
gas space heat gas space heat
5155 $75
$110 $85
$110 $85
$100 $75
the deposit in advance You must include your
name, where service will be required, when service should be cut on and a phone
number where we may reach you
� cut on service charge will be included in your first billing. Service charges are
a, follows:
Electric andor woter $10 Electric, gas andor water � $30
Greenville
��. utii��
For further information, contact
Customer Assistance (919) 752-7166
"I am part � troubled
irdship students who
se wouldn't be able to ci
lege say s Stamfordaziet
� tal State. "It seeems very
short sighted
Caiei described the case id a
Pell Grant student, an Hi spank
a ho had been on welfare foi five
"Federal aid i d, "not
� l enablt I educa
ties
nd will provid try ii
"
Sistei lamce Ryan ' 1 '
i oil . � ' lid as ma �
is T) : studei
: ol financial
Ml agreed
I" whom
ins, ild be
devastate I. c onseque tly, n
!��� gi aduates who plan
school would be
discouraged, add- I tiivet �
Marvlai d Preside! t John 1 -II.
SAT I
Final Night
r
Everyone Open To Public
85c happy night J a gf
1 TIT 4 "f I
y y y .7r. y ?; r
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I I- I
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MONDAY, APRIL 28 � 5 p.m.
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Prince � P.I.L. � KatTina and the Waves Phil
Collins � Tom Petty Stevie Ray Vaughan �
Hooters Jethro Tull � Divinyls � Jimmy Buffett
Black Flag Hoodoo Gurus
and many, many more
Overtoil's
Hours j V !
1 1 1 K.d Hanks Road
Sou til IirU Sh
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We also have a huge selection of
Sunglasses including: Ray Ban,
Vaurnet, Bucci, Seren Getti and Carrera






THE FAST C AROI INIAN
Entertainment
Legend
APRIL 24, 1986
PageS
Tom Cruise To Star In Fantasy Film
Tom C ruise (not pictured) and Mia Sara (above) star in Director Ridle Scott's new fantasy film. Legend.
ImvtftaJ Prnuio Hrest
Ridley Scott, who launched the
horror story into outer space and
drove the detective thriller into
the future, has come down to
earth for his new film. Legend.
The director of Alien and
Blade Runner, Scott has firmly
established himself as one of to-
day's finest visual stylists. For
Legend, he creates a mythical
forest inhabited by faeries,
goblins, unicorns and mortals. A
classic fantasy-adventure, it con-
cerns the eternal struggle between
good and evil.
"The setting for Legend is
timeless says Scott. "It is not a
film of the future, or of the past.
It is not even a story oi now. The
conflict between darkness and
light has been with us since the
creation and will remain with
us through eternity
The Universal Pic;ures release
stars Tom Cruise, Mia Sara, Tim
Curry and David Bennent. Ridley
Scott directed from a script by
William Hjortsberg. The film
was produced by Arnon Milchan
and co-p .duced by Tim Hamp-
ton.
Filmed at Pinewood Studios.
I ondon, Legend the culmination
ot almost four years research
and preparation. Earl) on, Scott
contacted novelist William Hjort-
sberg to discuss the possibility ol
his writing a draft screenplay bas-
ed on Scott's ideas for a story
about a young hermit who
becomes a hero when he battles
the evil lord oi Darkness,
rescues a beautiful princess and
frees the world from its icy winter
curse.
"We had cocktails, and Ridley
said 'Would you be interested in
writing a fairy tale?' Coineiden-
tally, I had begun writing fairy
tales on my own during the past
year, so naturally I told Ridley
'Yes says Hjortsberg, recalling
his initial conversation with
Scott.
Their next meeting took place
several months later in Los
Angeles, where Scott was filming
the futuristic detective thriller,
Blade Runner Hjortsberg
remembers sitting around the kit-
chen table in Scott's rented house
where they "batted ideas back
and forth for about a week or
so
"The characters really came
from left field he says. "We
discussed the hero in many forms
before deciding on Jack O' The
Green.
"Then Ridley decided we
should have a quest. He also
wanted unicorns and thought
there should be magic armor and
a sword. I came up with the idea
oi having the world plunged into
winters darkness. So we had all
these elements which had to be
woven into a story
Even though the final story
took "three years and 15 script
revisions" before it was com-
pleted, Hjortsberg looks back on
the writing as "great fun
It should come as no surprise,
given Scott's reputation, that
Legend is a visual (east. Indeed,
production designer Assheton
Gorton's sets are among the most
elaborate ever constructed for a
motion picture, pulsating with
style and imagination.
Gorton's sets, all of which
started life as original sketches
and models, were constructed on
six of Pinewood's huge sound
stages, including the world's
largest film stage where the vast,
mystical forest came to life
The enormous set � with giant
trees, gnarled and sinister; an un-
dulating mossy floor with hills
and dells, meandering wooded
paths, delightful forest glades
and babbling streams; a sun-
gilded amphitheatre and a cliff-
edged pond with bluebells and
blossoms � is central to the st
and took 50 craftsmen 14 weeks
to build.
I-or the winter scenes. 1,500
icicles were added to the set.
Varying in length from one I
to eight feet, they were made ol
resin and hot wax to achieve the
proper texture. The special ef-
fects team, under supervisor Nick
Allder. also supplied tons of ar-
tificial snow ;n the process ol
"winterizing" the forest set.
See THF CREATOR, Page 9
LaSalle Remembers The Good Old Days
B MICK LASALLE
sjn ml ic. I fcr ysmWa
A' Premium's cine night last
vut- met. 1 was sitting with a
g rgi us blonde to one side. (She
w ho she is. i Two pretty,
ing things were on the dance
floor, jumping around, laughing.
ai k ng me horny. I thought
nyself, "I really like this
' tat night in Premiums 1 was
passi! � through on m wa back
.� -pending the summer in
Raleigh. There is something dif-
fere about Greenville, and 1
mentioned this to m friend on
the other side oi me.
"We-e-e-11, Mick. I guess it's
that the place is small enough to
kind ol hold in your hand
I he hold ol Greenville was
ng tor me. 1 staggered in at
pi inned to sta until 2?. And
let: on my 25th birthday.
l fas easy to stay. I'd be going
It's Mv Move
Sm
out with a 19-year-old girl and I'd
call home. M friends would tell
me how nice it was to slug awav
or, Wall Street for 4() hours a
week. They'd tell me about "the
boss And about "the
girlfriend" who wants to get mar-
ried. I would hear that, sweat
bullets, and sign up for another
semester.
Othei guys my age dreaded
leaving, too. I remember being at
a party on Holly Street in '82 and
. a gu saving, "It I leave this
place and start knocking down a
hundred grand a year, I still
couldn't have more fun than I'm
having now
Of course, he couldn't know
that for sure.
Actually, for all but an elite
few, Greenville is a town tha
gives a guy enough to get by on,
but no more. I'm talking about
money and women. Probably no
'own since the beginning oi time
has ever had a higher concentra-
tion o' men who are lying about
the amount of sex they're getting.
These guys walk around asking
themselves, "If not me, who is
getting it?" Since I'm gone, this
is probably a question all the
more difficult to answer.
"With any kind of savvy
and planning, you can
become a local bigshot.
Then leave town a total
egomaniac � just the edge
needed in a mean world. "
� Mick LaSalle
I had a bunch of fears about
leaving Greenville. One was the
vague notion that once I left. I
would never be young again. But
actually, my situation was mak-
ing me feel older than I really
was. I remember telling a pal that
I was definitely leaving at the end
of the Spring '84 semester.
"Good move, Mickey. This
place is getting as old as shit
And I said, "No. buddy.
We're the ones who are old
When I think of leaving Green-
ville. 1 focus in on one Saturday
in the middle of April, my last
semester. I was walking the
distance from Austin to the gym.
A hundred yards or so away, a
guy with no shirt on was blowing
into a French horn. Pretty girls
were walking by me. It was a spr-
ing day straight out oi the
Garden of Eden. I thought to
myself, "Enjoy it. Remember
it And I guess I did both.
When you're a big fish in
Greenville, there's a tendency to
think you'd be a small fish
anywhere else. But it's the wrong
way to think. ECU has talented
people in it who are good enough
to make it anywhere.
Look at the staff oi the 1984
East Carolinian two years later.
One guy got a job as County
Editor of the Tarboro
Southerner. One woman is
writing for the Durham Herald.
Another guy is writing for the
Washington Post. And I write for
the San Francisco Chronicle.
This week, I wrote about a new
play. I spent two days incognito
on the Berkeley campus, getting
the inside story on the violent
divestment protests. And I inter-
viewed Anthony Quinn in
Sacramento.
Here, I measure time in terms
of events. In Greenville, nothing
really happened. One pleasant
day flowed into the next. Which
is why three years there seem like
a blur now.
I remember two Media Board
Banquets, separated by two
years, like they happened in the
same week. Friends. Sweet
Caroline's, for more than
nostalgic reasons memorable
dates what else? 1 remember all
of my girlfriends, I gue-v
Though most seem like Nixon,
Ford, or Carter to me: Once so
important, but so hard to im-
agine that now.
The real appeal oi Greenville
tot me � then and in my memory
� is the lifestyle. Friends over 'til
five in the morning. Plenty ol
time to go out. to read, to w.ue.
In Greenville, everything's a ma-
jor crisis: Somebody writes a nas-
ty letter to the paper, and
everybody gets pissed oft. I like
that. I also like the weather in
March and April and May, nice
enough to make even some mug
feel like a Romantic poet.
It's an atmosphere that doesn't
challenge you, but lets you
flower. And flower. And flower.
With any kind oi savvy and plan-
ning, you can become a local
bigshot. Then leave town a total
egomaniac � just the edge need-
ed in a mean world.
Trying To Understand Girls
Bv ROBERT MAZZOLI
X�ff Wntff
Women: Can't live with them,
can't live with them.
I've always admired that
phrase, and with good reason.
After sitting around and down-
ing a few brews with many a
friend, talk always comes around
to the sore subject of women. I
hear all ypes of stories concern-
ing how 'she' messed everything
up. Occasionally, during these
long, intense tirades, I can't help
but laugh and say, "Sure, blame
it on the woman
They just drink their beer and
look at me with hot pokers in
their eyes.
A friend of mine, we'll call him
Johnny, goes through his share
of women just about as often as a
Greek gets a new car from mom
and dad.
"She dumped on me, man
he said a few nights ago as he
nursed a can of Black Label.
(Note: Black Label is a sure sign
of one of two things. Either the
drinker has had a major breakup
or the person in question is quite
destitute).
Like the five stages of death, a
breakup, too, has a series of
steps. Johnny seemed like a
classic case for the books.
The first step is shock.
"I can't believe she left me,
Rob he said as he popped
another tab. "I mean, what did
all those other guys offer her that
I didn't. I knew she was lying
around
I knew Johnny's habits, and
with that knowledge I asked:
"You were screwin' around too,
weren't vou?"
"That's different he mumbl-
ed as he moved into the second
step of a breakup; why me?
"Why me?" he asked.
"Let's try to rationalize I of-
fered. Rationalization is the third
stage.
"OK he said. "She's a
whore, and she sleeps around
He paused as he drained the last
of the rot-gut. "I'm a stud, and
women love my body
"Sounds like you two were
made for each other I remark-
ed. "Of course, together you
might learn to have a
monogamous relationship
"Sounds like one of us needed
to change he said. "Why didn't
she change, Rob?"
I scratched my head and said,
"You missed the point, Johnny.
It takes two to tango. Two to
dance. Two to work things out.
Two to
"Two to make babies
Johnny said. "Why me, Rob?"
"We've been through that
stage already
"Oh
Pause.
"What's the next stage?" he
asked.
"Acceptance
"You're right he moaned as
his head fell onto the bar. "I need
to accept the fact that I can't
have my women and eat
"I see your point I inter-
rupted.
Johnny raised a dollar bill and
ordered another Black Label. He
pulled back the tab with a not-so-
smooth gesture and grinned at
me. He was into stage five; self
assurance.
"That bitch he finally said.
JazzFusion Concert
The ECU Student Union Special Concerts Committee will be sponsoring a concert rrf�
ECU contemporary Jazz Ensemble. Directed by Paul Tardif, this group will nreient .of the
JazzFusion music on Friday at 8 p.m. in auditorium 224 of Mendenhal! Student Center tk
members are Maggie Pate, vocals; Don Edwards and Ed Schutte, saxophones; Tony MaJon iCBP
Lewis, drums and percussion; Ric Laasiter, electric baas; and Paul Tardif, keyboards TvlJ-ll
perform musk by George Duke, ChickCorea, Keith Jarrett, Don Grolnlk, Taaia Maria, TWmMo?
and Horace it
4
' c I Wt
h��- �
Peart Shin
B S( OI f i OOPFK
�WU
A well-packed Greet
Coliseum witnessed ar awes-
show luesda.
having released
album Power Hind
formed excellei
accompanu
display.
Being one ��
chance I
concerts, I ha
money
� who played n
tunes alonf
popular 01
The war-
Oysterul
fy shoi
Compared
0-minute perl
hut ei
classi
"Don't fear
Of well, a;
t
But R
evcr
manent Have's
the RaJ
"1 imcligl '
Pictures I P
Rush - �
release itl
"Big M
peare 1
reaI: v
'Silverado' will play in Hendriv theatre
Danny Glover. Kevinostner 6
clean up the town of Silverado
VV'V ThI iPAj- Va
UP W, rW MiC �Al fHuGSDA)
N
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How
Yo
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join Spa. i?
on a 1 1
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outseven week x
weights
IV x 1 PI I





anias Film
Peart Shines As Rush Rocks Coliseum
K SCO! l'COOPt'K
N��l
well-packed Oreensboro
eum witnessed an awesome
I : esda) nighl as Rush.
(leased ih.cn newest
Pom er H indows, pel
� enth I he show was
ed b a fine visual
k lie u ho doesn t get a
to see too man) jamming
ave saj I got mv
at this one. Ruh
, ayed most of theii new
with the older,
sunplv got ofl.
� atm up hand. Blue
p ayed foi a i elative-
� �ut 40 minutes,
a i v o houi.
t pei foi mance b) Rus
rciated greath, Old
li � "God.2
Reaper" came
ighi the majoi i
- ' ' eel.

I . v opened with Per-
it i v single 'S
Moving
'd ott theii new
popular 5
as he ��
backgi ' It was
Other songs from Power Win-
don included: "Mystic
Rhythms "Man hat! an
Project "Territoi ies and
"Grand Designs1 which was the
second song of theii encore.
It was great to heai the classic
sounds of "Tom Sawyer
"Closei to the Heart "In the
Mood "Red Sector A
"VY "Early Distant Warn-
ing "New World Man" and
272's "Temple of Syrynx"
which was the encore's opener.
Personally, 1 felt that " "
surpassed all others. Perhaps it
was due. in pan. to drummei
Neil Peart's excellent display. His
solo must have Listed 10 minutes.
He totall) jammed throughout.
Peart's drum set was on a
ating floor. The set would he
turned around, depending , n
what percussion piece(s) he �� as
usmg at the tune.
V hough anchored by Peart,
the three-m d has talei I at
ei positions. (Oh no, that's
sports). Geddy Lee and le
I ifeson definitely showed their
talents, lee's tine bass playing
i keyboard work c
plemented his usua �
I ifeson also performed
ceileni :cks and displaye :
a good stage presence. He a
ful witl his acou
e H ea r t'
A
Days
It Rush hadn't put on such a
good show, I guess 1 could say
that their light show and
background graphics made up
foi it. But the fellows sounded
great the G'boro Coliseum
does have fine acoustics. 1 can't
take anything away from their
light show, either � it was trip-
pin I heir video behind the stage
fit well with the music and added
thai extra touch for a well-
rounded show � one that the
whole family could enjoy.
"The best thing about it was
that they all were enjoying
themselves on stage while play
ing said ECU student and four-
time Rush concert goer Greg
Melee. "During the drum solo,
he (Peart) was hitting the drums
so hard, he was almost knocking
them off the platform. It was the
best show I'd evei seen
If you haven't seen Rush in
concert, I feel that it is well worth
the effort to attend I'm glad 1
did I feel like a new man.
The Creator Of 'Alien'
Directs Film 'Legend'
( ontinued From Page 8
(n the afternoon oi June 2
i, the magnificent forest set
was completely demolished by a
thai npped through the
lary oo sound stage at
Pinewood Studios. I lames leapt
re than 1(H) feel into the air
d the dense clouds oi smoke
lid be seen foi five miles
: ihe time '�. tl c fire, egend
' �� R idlex s. " I ad jusi I i
'i filming left on the forest
�vas scheduled
.amped ' another fantasy
fh( meni rebuilt
the section oi the foresi set thai
was needed to complete filming
at a separate location, while the
crew continued to shoot on
another set on a differenl I
Pinewood. The production was
back in tull swing in a matter oi
days without a significant setbac k
in the shooting schedule.
I om ruise, one oi t he
brightest stars a m
Hollywood's new breed o
leading men. has his mosl
challenging role to date as lack
()' Green in legend He plays a
mythical character oi the foi
who leads a carefree life, ui
fate compels him to under take a
heroic quesl and rescue the world
from its icy curse.
Cruise has displayed taleni and
versatility since deciding 'o ;
sue an acting careei in 1980.
Alter making his motion picture
debut in laps. Ire appeared in
Franco Zeffirelli's Endless love
and Francisoppola's The Out-
siders
His firsl starring roW
Joel Goodsen, the ei
ajzei in Risk Business
� ATTENTION
Don't lost' your security
deposit on account of dirtv
( arpels
CALL
1 oday
355-2719
I HI 1 AS IAROI INiAN
AHkll 24 lVHft
i?
afiiinrgUF
Appearing April 25
tie VISUALS
Don't DRIVE Call the lttH cRuL
for a FREE RIDE
758-5570 All ABC Perm.
Pnvote Club
ONSOLlDATED
"UEATRES
All Seats $2.00 Everyday Til 5:30 PM
� tlMVH4:WlUmi
1:15-3:15-5:15
I)KA I H
� JMJ G'�anilt� Stwas Shopping C"t
PR4Y FO
V
-S
1-3-5-7-9
"MONEY PIT"
P(,
1-4:30-8:00
COLOR
PI RPl.K
i
PC 13
STARTS FRIDA
Mary I ler Moore
&
Sam YVaterston
2-4:30-7-9:15
in
Btt
PGI3


5th and final Week 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00
SHELLEY
LONG
THE
:
I
pc;
TOM
HANKS
MONEY
PIT
12th and Final H eek
The Color
Purple

Its al
'Silverado'
Siherado' will play in Hendru theatre ihis lhurstta through Saturday ai 7 and M p.m. Pictured above,
Danny Glover, Kevin Costner, Scoll Glenn and Kevin Mine (lefl i right) ride hard and shoot straight to
lean up Ihe town of Silverado.
JTWav; THt &� s-3v �
wrn hjicK �tek T'4ng5PAy
ifioRnoss i p
TO 12th II EEK
OI PREi. I
B
. I -
(ton .ree
� � 5384) m and 5
�'�'��� ' I l � .iHic
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
isorinjj a concert performance of the
us jjroup will present an evening of
pndenhall Student (enter. The group
saxophones: Tony Masson and Brian
ardif, keyboards. The Knsemblt will
rolnik. fania Maria. Thelonius Monk,
HowTo Irrprove
�ur Grades
AtTheBeach.
vill!
I; . n fitttii
han usua ,1 �� ' :
Studentsi m ii 1 heSp
- fin onl. - pei
riKnth. 'I hal - D-days Aitto
ed.
1 hf . " ibi - vvi ! k
outsi en Tcisemachines, free
hirl
poo here an plenl. I I n d
'� tutors i" help you shape up.
S f youi body is flunking the
test call or drop by I he Spa for
niai- infi irmatii tn.
Improving youi grades at the beach
ire � littli hi me work.
-tSp
a
Gret m UU s
t health club raliu
H'TH i'AKK SHi iFFINtil IN i Ik
CiREKNVII It � � �
There is a movie
that you should see
even before you
should see it. ��������
" "wmw �� will not be released until
July 2 but we wanted you to see it
before school lets out That's why were
showing you what is really a "work in
progress which in this case means that
the sound the music and the color are
not quite in a final state.
Obviously we re proud of
About Last Night
or we wouldn't be this anxious
for you to see it
44
about
It's about humor Its about sex 1 St "JoT ' '
It's about emotion it s about friendship "�l� � �
It's about commitment
it s about last night
. .DSTltFEL ANiDBM' KEN PI tLKVARD AVICK KM
N ��
SI EFEL
�'� " B ItfSHOWE
� �� HARRY KERAMIDAS I ner IDA RANI ' . . ���DREW DlMENFASS
Based npii'i Sexual Pervp �. MAM MKAZ R & DEMISE DeCLUE
o, Product IbyJASONI - w.tw
III Rigtm Oes�rv�c!
ROB LOWE
Ifll
(B.

DEMI MOORE JIM BELUSHI ELIZABETH PERKINS
FREE SCREENING
TUESDAY, APRIL 29
8:00 PM
HENDRIX THEATRE
sponsored by
STUDENT UNION FILMS COMMITTEE
E CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Tickets are required Tickets available April 28 at
the Information Desk. Mendenhal!
2 78B
K.





10
THfc EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 24, 1986
BLOOM COUNTY
by Berke Breathed
oh wen JT PlflWfc,
Vtf7,V6 I W�S
6RlN6t4 A �T Of CHEtR.
TVs f, S ' i.r
'�lL'CF'
I

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this poofvs mieisr
CMHK
mtfrf
RWff
Undercover Cats
re fie ' �-
tutu ' �� � �
J (tie' rte a- -
HONWt!
I,� "
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F -r i
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p v .VeV SrTWi , �'
V
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Ml I H � x
&4f
as
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MgU 'Lift JV5T PIG
in imxe cuwe
THINGS BfiCK TObemeR
3H0R6 UP 7WF FRMi
WORK ftNP LAV 50M6
fX4
'�vow U�V
UTSffiAK l
fj GROUHP, � . 3
irk r � vf N
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Sneed
! 1 HEARD ToU WtR9 6f RTE
By BRYAN 1
mfva
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CAN 5TILL
ful
evetv i v
west c(rzf
rue mmtti
The Cfkm iLy Ia,stYmou�
By SoveLoie d CheRr
Man-O-Stick
By JARRELL & JOHNSON
� � C 5f- E - 7T� V
2-
0ut$f:0N 2 WPIA IMAl aW)
KIQ ClOC'5 Ui?J6 it
HoPt PMA, BtiKo f� I c
A�.� S�tUCfc OaV'OSL
Olaralfnfan
Puzzle
ACROSS
Aeriform fluid
Avoid
Soak up
High mounlam
Famed
Exist
i Facial hair
Draws out
Tan
Greek letter
Adored
i Southeastern
Europeans
Chinese dis-
tance measure
Foot pedal
Flesh
individual
Cut
Health resort
i Chickens
Boundaries
Owner's risk
aDbr
I Enthusiasm
Formal
discourse
Cleaning
instrument
Feeble
i More
precipitous
Tentative
outline
Organ of
hearing
58 Omit from
pronunciation
60 Seed
61 Veneration
62 Remained
upright
63 The self
DOWN
1 Idle chatter
2 Beverage
3 Muscular
contraction
4 Suffers patiently
5 Behold1
6 Southwestern
Indian
7 Erase printing
8 Revises
9 Capuchin
monkey
10 Scrap ot food
11 Footlike part
16 Irritate
18 Tranquil
20 Carouse
22 Hawaiian
greeting
23 Roadside
restaurant
24 Mephistopheies
26 Roman bronze
27 Bluster
28 Look fixedly
31 Renovate
34 Finish
36 Retreated
39 Indefinite
amoui:
4 1 Play leading
role
44 Lassos
46 Official decree
48 Animal coat
50 Ocean
51 Game at
marbles
52 Before
53 Spanish for
river
55 Mist
56 Couple
59 Duplicate abbr
Qjnji
dj IV
College Press Service
� 1984 united Feature Synd,c�te
Congratulations
To the Fine Staffs At
WZMB-FM & The REBEL
for winning
Most Improved Medium Most Outstanding Medium
Keep Up the Good Work!
�tE Saut (Earalituan
F ��'
4

�'
EC'l bead baskt-tbal! - a
boost the Pirait projj
fw J
The I.ad Pirate splil
pla in the �outharolina -
Lady Pirate
Bv ill 'i! IH
Th� Lad P
gamt. v
in V
The Hi
3-U
winr
for ; e vi
to St
In
lost
deci-
good ga
iBoyctte, " e
the seventl
game and
we didn't
�cond game
The ! ad ��
�their :
�ty please d a
wish a .
com:
recor d
on t)
Thi week
travel
i S
or Wendy Ozment (top ro�
or memberv of the Pinie soft!
AMMMMMi r" �- � � "
" 4 I I ���& s " 1






s
10!
I HI I AM I AROI 1NIAN
Sports
AHRIl 24, 1986 Page 11
m
i
n
Basketball Recruits Signed
Edwards, Tutt Future Bucs
By SCOTT COOPER
and
TIM CHANDLER
Nptu w l-4Jnuf�
ECU basketball head coach
Charlie Harrison and the Pirate
squad got sonic good news in the
signing of two recruits, Theodore
�Blue" Edwards and Luther
Tutt.
Edwards, a junior-college
transfer from Louisburg College,
is expected to supply immediate
help to the Bucs. according to
coach Harrison.
"He's got some abilities in
areas that can help us tight
away Harrison said. "He's a
leal good offensive placi 'Blue
can be very adept at scoring tic
tmds a way to score
The 6-4 Edwards is strong, has
good speed, an uncanny jumping
ability and innate scoring in-
stincts, according to louisburg
coach Enid Drake.
In 31 games at Louisburg, Ed-
wards averaged 22.3 points per
game, while connecting on 65.S
percent of his shots from the
floor. He also hit 70.0 percent ol
his tree-throw attempts. He pull
ed down 1K7 rebounds while
dishing out 73 assists.
Among his honors, he was the
all-east MVP in the Hurricane
c lassie Eastern Region X
rournament all-region 10 team.
"He will give us some flexibili-
ty. With he and Maichell
(Henry), it will give us two
scorers Harrison explained.
"and it (the combination ol both
players) can put a lot ot pressure
on defenses
Tutt, a 6-6 forward from
Beach Channel High School in
Rockaway, N.Y also hopes to
provide an impact during his
years at ECU.
I utt was named one ot the top
15 players m New York City,
while gaining top-five honors in
Queens. As a membet ot the
highly regarded Gauchoes
Basketball I earn ot New York
City, Tutt has played against ex-
cellent competition and will con-
tinue to play throughout the
country this summer with the
team.
"He's young and has played
against some excellent competi
iion Harrison said. "He needs
a little grooming and he realizes
that there are people in front of
him � but he will push those
players that much further
1 ot the past three years, his
team has reached the quarter-
finals of the New York City
Championships. Individually,
I utt averaged 18.7 points while
grabbing 12 rebounds per game.
He was named to the third team
all-New York City, of which he
was named captain. He was also
a member of the all-Queens first
team.
With these two recruits, future
prospects and the returners from
last vear. the ECU basketball
team hopes tc improve on last
season's 12-17 mark.
m
lions
ffs At
The REBEL
Outstanding Medium
Work!
alinian
Kl head basketball coach Charlie Harrison hopes new recruits will
boost the Pirate program.
More Swimmers To Add To Squad
v
V I
i r

1 he lady Pirates spiil a doubleheader with Virginia luesdav and will
pla in the southarolina sotthall Iourney. See st�r below.
Lady Pirates Split Pair
Bv 111 1 '�! AIR
; i ad Pirate
gn a i
Vir i last 1

B
ainmni r. ECl
I game Pir;
��
"A t :
stili.i st
h n i Softba I ourna-
1 . Hs m11
a " the first
UNC-CH ai
. i orida
. �0 p and Furman .�'
()n Saturday. the
e decided b
" i � day. 's games.
� will be the last
,e yeai tor the lady.
It they can win three
ean es in the tournament this
will he the I
JO-wii season since the Pirates
fasi pitch. Good 1 uck
ies wi
we did
t : igl ' e se
I ga ' n
; - now move
. . 15 "Iwa
a ed with our pla �' I
ive takei I
Boyettes'
an impressive ! 8 5
1 is weekend the Pirates will
to C olumbia, S.C. foi the
Sports Fact
I hur. Apr. 24. 1963
1 he Boston Celtics defeat the
1 os Angeles 1 akers 112-109, to
take their fifth consecutive
NBA championship. Boston
guard Bob Cousy plays in a
Celtics uniform for the last
time as he helps his team win
the otic.
By DAVID McGINNESS
Sports �r1lr
The Pirate swim team has 22
incoming recruits tor the tall
1986 season, with another eight
men and five women expected to
sign letters of intent by May 1.
Pirates swim coach Rick Kobe
feels that this fall's freshman
.lass could weel be the best ever.
"I've tried to bring in even bet-
ter kids every year Kobe said.
"1 worked very hard this vear,
and right now I'm very pleased
with recruiting; this might be our
best freshman class ever
Junior-college transfer student
Anthony Pistorio is among the
outstanding prospects for the
1986 season Pistorio has two
years ol eligibility remaining. He
was a two-time junior-college
All-American while attending In-
dian River Junior College, which
was the 1986 Junior Collegiate
National Champion. Pistorio
also placed second in the 200- and
400-yard individual medley At
the 1986 J.( National Cham-
pionships.
John Crunen is another J.C
transfei recruit He is a two-time
national-meet scorer, placing him
in the top 12m the nation.
Among the freshman in-state
recruits are two teammates from
Mecklenburg Aquatic Club in
Charlotte. N C.
Andy Jetor was the 1986 state
high school champion in the 50-
and 100-yard freestyle events. His
teammate Steven Devon was this
year's Open Championships
500-yard freestyle champion.
.Andy Lewis from Plantation,
111 should round out the Pirates'
freestyle lineup. Lewis was a 1986
Junior Nationals qualifier in both
sprint and middle-distance
freestyle events as well as swimm-
ing very well in the butterfly.
The women's team is gaming
some highly-touted talent as well.
One of the best prospects is Ryan
Philvaw . "Ryan is one ol the best
Georgia native Pam Wilbanks
should add strength to the I adv
Bucs' distance swimming events
She was among the top-eight
7'v� tried to bring in even better kids every year. I
worked very hard this year, and right now Vm
very pleased with recruiting; this might be our best
freshmen class ever. "
�Rick Kobe
female swimmers in North
Carolina Kobe said ol the
states' 100-yard butterfly cham-
pion. Philvaw also reached the
state finals in the 2iM)-vard but-
terfly and the 200- and 400-yard
individual-medlev events.
distance swimmers in Georgia
this year.
Kobe wants to maintain the
Pirates' winning ways, and he
feels that this year's recruiting
class should keep the team on
'rack.
"In swimming, you want to
avoid the need to 'rebuild your
team Kobe said. "We have a
saying here he added, "your
only as good as your freshman
class "
Kobe's recruiting strategy is to
bring tour or five good people
each year, which over a four-year
period maintains a solid
20-pcrson team. This is now
Kobe's fourth season, and his
plan seems to be working. The
Pirates had their best season ever
this year, the men winning the
( A A Conference Champion-
ships, while the women closed
out their 12-2 season with a
second-place showing at the CAA
I ournev.
The ECU swim team will be even stronger with the signing of 22 new prospects.
Softball Plaver Profiled
Ozment; A
Team Leader
Senior Wendy Ozment (top row, middle) is
senior members of the Pirate softball team.
pictured with the other
By JANET SIMPSON
spin Li Writer
"Wendy athletically, is one of
the most talented players that 1
have ever worked with. She is a
little spark plug on defense and
our lead-off hitter on offense. 1
really can't say enough about her
contribution to the team stated
Coach Sue Manahan of her
senior player Wendy Ozment.
Ozment, who plays centerfield
for the Lady Pirates, is the team's
resident 'Cajun Though she has
ived in North Carolina since
1981, she is originally from Loui-
siana, thus resulting in her
nickname.
Returning back to Louisiana
for college was Ozment's inten-
tion until she was recruited by
Coach Manahan. After talking to
her, she decided to attend ECU.
"I was going back to Loui-
siana, but Coach Manahan came
out and recruited me stated Oz-
ment. "I liked Coach Manahan.
She was a good coach and 1
&$$& bought I could get a lot out of
the program.
Of her four years of playing
softball at ECU, Ozment feels the
best about the one she is playing
in now. "This is my best season
so far she said. "I got off to a
good start. I went into a slump
for about two weeks, then 1
started coming back. My batting
has also come around
The team is also playing well
according to Ozment. .After split-
ting a pair of games this past
Tuesday against the University of
Virginia the team is only one
game away from the magic
number of thirty that they were
aimming for at the outset o the
season.
"As a whole we started out
really well staled Ozment
"This is our best season. We have
twenty-nine wins right now and
our goal is thirty . We hav e a good
team and we're playing as a
whole. Everybody supports each
other. It's not a lot of individuals
out there
ECU's switch from slow-pitch
softball to fast-pitch softball at
the beginning of her sophomore
season left Ozment a little shakey
at first, but as time went by she
became more comfortable with
the change.
"1 was a slow-pitch player and
was recruited as a slow-pitch
player said Ozment. "I had no
idea we were going to turn fast-
pitch.
"At first I was very hesitant
and unsure of myself she con-
tinued. "I was really scared to get
in the box. 1 was scared I was
gonna get hit by a pitch. I was hit
twice, then 1 wasn't scared
anymore. This year I'm very con-
fident, very relaxed up there. I'm
not worried about it
Fast-pitch has another asset
as far as Ozment is concerned. It
gives her more of an opportunity
to steal bases than slow-pitch did.
However neither of the two help
her out with one o her greatest
dislikes, which is bunting.
Ozment has two instances
which she considers most
memorable moments. One taking
place in the rain during her se-
cond year and the other taking
place during this, her senior
season.
Navritilova.
"As far as sitting down and
talking to me Coach Manahan
has been important said Oz-
ment. She's helped me through
classes, personal problems and
getting me back up when 1 was
down. I have a lot of respect for
her and if 1 had a choice to stay
here or go somewhere else, 1
would stay here because of her.
She's just a great person.
"As far as someone I admire a
"Wendy athletically, is one of the most talented
players that I have ever worked with. She is a little
spark plug on defense and our leadoff hitter on of-
fense. I really can't say enough about her con-
tribution to the team �Sue Manahan
My sophomore year it was
raining outside and we were play-
ing Carolina here at home
remembered Ozment. "The score
was zero to zero in the bottom of
the ninth and we scored to beat
them.
Ozment also commented on
her experience from this year. "I
can't remember who we were
playing but it was this year
continued Ozment. "I ran in and
made a diving catch, came up and
threw' a girl out at home plate
Two different people in their
own ways have been inspirational
to Ozment's career. They are
Coach Manahan and Martina
lot, 1 admire Martina
Navritilova continues Ozment.
"She strives for the best. She's a
perfectionist and that's the way 1
feel. 1 want to be a perfectionist
in everything 1 do "
Ozment seems to also have her
future figured out to, or at least
tor the next few years. "This
summer I'm going down to
Panama City, Florida to do my
field work for my major in parks
and recreation said Ozment.
"Then I'm going into military
recreation as a civilian. After I
complete my field work,
See �CAJUN page 14
��
r � 40






12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 24, 1986
Hawaiian Tropic
& Budweiser
& Kappa Sigma
Presen t
5th Annual
BAHAMA MAMA
BEACH PARTY
������-


Date: April 29, 1986
Place: Kappa Sigma House
p
���������������a-
Time: 4:00 p.m.
Tickets: $3.00
'Tickets sold in front of Student Store.
furinz the Miss Hawaiian 7
Raffle Grand Prize: An All Expense Paid Trip
For Two To NASSAU
in the BAHAMAS.
40 Kegs of your favorite beverages
Co-Sponsor: WDLX :
Miss Hawaiian Tropic entries accepted until 3:00p.m. April 29, 1986.
To Enter Phone 752-5543
� '� � r �-� - r
Classified
IE&SQKALS
ALPHA DELTA Pi
thank HEAR
The great gir
cream parv T"m
PHI TAU'S b
ing on Fnrjay
Dest ever Also
have their S for I .
DEAR BUNKY K
Sugar Ml
we have fui
IM drafl
consume Ai
past ear he
tara Have f
your two he.
We love 1
KRIS
ter Zeta pa
Love, Wendy
CE
MISS
your birtt la
lunch is quei
refutat �
for a day
AHDA �
DR BOB
AAP V
TIVMOTHY H
spec
be nice toda.
thaf ripicule .
SAM AND BROCKVANS
be
Se;
guys' ' .�. r 29
ambca Cl
Sep-
Sam? a � .
So-
� � � ' j
player for te
Cooi guy "Dav
some 60's clotl
play ou"
a nighl O: I
on her leg,
gallon o Ev
nighTer at B"
"a' s
Downtown was a
looking real gooo E
that search for �� .
that era batch was ta l
Spring Semes'er 36 A
Crow's Nest a ��
Sweetie Pe ana aa-
tun! Easte- A
espec a Satur -
were partying a' Brocd
Company I l
thanks for the birthday
was killer we can shoot M
pool gam �
�'
You guys are 'he besl �
maae fhese past two sen
awesome: we ae j I
" SS a "� 5 5l '
the more reason to party a-
hell a " -� the fa
ya'li! Your A d Things
SPRING VACATION
caneer ,earz
tures BW or i
vacation Br
caneer
Library Your .
returnee to -
CONCERTS D �
of ma or concer t
tourec Norf- Cr na? Show ft
off m ' 1986 Buccaneer �
tures will be returned ' �
by the Buccane
Joyner Library
ALPHA XI DELTA HAPPY HOUR
Cubbies n Pa
with the pledgee �� tti
the best'
College G
Employed or have
employment
College Degree or
(six months prior t
after. Before 4-30-8
No
5
$250 rebat
or usi
Delay 90 da:
Finance plan is
A.P.
.i
&u�81ac
PONTiAC





y
Classifieds
gma
PERSONALS
ALPHA DELTA PI: Would like to
thank HFARTS DELIGHT and all
�� i great qirls who came to our ice
ream party Tues It was fantastic.
PHI TAU'S. Be ready tor Spring Fl
g on Friday its gomg to be the
n- ever Also, all III' sisters must
ive theirfor tickets in TODAY!
DEAR BUNKY: Kingston Place,
iar Mt . Jones Where else could
rave fun? Aristocrat, Sangria,
C draft how much more could we
ne? And those boys! This
� ,ear has been great! I'll miss
1 ove, Wen Wen
I ARA: Have fun this summer with
two new brothers! Be careful!
i ou!
k R iS
:ouldn't have gotten a bet
�'a pal Thanks tor everything
Acdy
i Curos are dangerous, hope
� fhday is glorious But since
s questionable, my appeal is
able So how about the beach
a aiy sometime soon
tDAYA SAY? Harry
DR
BOB
THIS IS FARGIN
LEIGH ANN: You are my brother
and my friend, may our friendship
never end. The time remaining, we
will share. I love you, friend,
because you care Jeff.
AOTT: Get psyched for our stranger
mixercookout on Sunday WHO
will that date be???
SRA SEMI FORMAL: Pictures are
now in Come by SRA office in
Mendenhall on Tuesday, April 29th
and Wednesday, April 30th.
ATTENTION: SCUBA EN-
THUSIASTS: The Coral Reef Dive
Club is holding its last meeting of the
Spring Semester Tues. 29th, at 7 30
p.m. in room 221 Mendenhall. You
MUST attend this meeting if you
plan on diving with us this summer
We will be extremely active this
summer Join the club that's going
somewhere The Coral Reef Dive
Club
CONGRATULATIONS: To Teddy
Locklear of Student Government
Transit System tor placing 3rd in
North Carolina Regional Bus Rodeo
in Wilson last Sunday!
PHI KAPPA TAU AND ALPHA
OMICRON PI: At the Alley. Beer
raffeled off every hour through the
night Raffel tickets available at the
door Monday, April 29th.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
For summer. Rent, $87 50 a month
and "2 utilities. A deposit is re
quired. Call 752 028.
SALE


I












i Contest
iMMOTHY Hope you have a very
I 9tl I 'naav I promise to
uv, The pushy bitch
- � - .ou!
iAM AND BROCKMANN: In the
; What a killer band"
I Nevt DeM, "Who are these
rw - was a blast on Sept 29
� Cl Alpha Grafitti Party
A ou sign mv shirt
A- surprise! Surprise'
Cubbies was never as fun
you are the lead guitar
. � � � � me Usuals? What a trip"
. . David, can we borrow
thes?" Seeing ya'll
3 'own, howcool! Oh what
�� Oct 23 and oh what a bruise
i eg : bottles of baby oil, a half
Everclear and an all
t - il Brockmann's house
� ghl vve'H never forget.
� .as a joke! We were
� ng rea good Big Brother hunt,
� for the oil was fun and
� �� oatch was tasting strong
rig Semester 86 Went to the
Nest with my "Hunnie Bunch
� � � � Pie ana darling" Sam, how
Easter Weekend was fun,
� . Saturday night when we
partying at Brockmann's. 3's
. but 2'S a crowd David,
- � - ne birthday present, it
k er we can shoot the best
n town! Do you want it
n or HARD!
guys are the best' Ya'H have
� ese oast two semesters
Ae are really going to
" s summer but that's all
� 'eason to party and raise
�' a'ii m the fall! We love
� . - A ild Things
SPRING VACATION: The Buc
�'nook is looking for pic
BW or color) of your spring
� 3r nq them by the Buc
H ce across from Joyner
� , vour pictures will be
� ' vOU
CONCERTS Do you have pictures
cprt bards that have
N � Carolina? Show them
86 Buccaneer. Your pic
oe returned to you Come
" e Buccaneer office across from
er Library
ALPHA XI DELTA HAPPY HOUR:
lubbies, Thurs 24th 9 until. Party
. tfi the pledges, and you party with

SIG EP GOLDEN HEARTS: The
cookout planned for this Friday has
been changed to reading day! Sorry
about the mix-up. Don't forget about
our meeting THIS SUNDAY at 9
p.m. Elections for new officers will
be held so everyone PLEASE AT-
TEND
WANTED
WETSUIT WANTED: Interested in
selling a men's small wetsuit? If so,
call 1 800 336 3494 Monday thru Fri
day 9 a.m. 5 p m. and ask for Gary.
Leave a message if not in
CABIN COUNSELORS AND IN
STRUCTORS: Male and female for
western N.C 8 week children's sum
mer camp Over 30 activities in
eluding water ski, tennis, heated
swimming pool, go karts. hiking,
art Room, meals, salary and
travel Experience not necessary
Non smoking students wnte for ap
plication.brochure: Camp
Pinewood, 19006 Bob O Link Dr
Miami. Fla.33015
WSI NEEDED: Trinity Center, new
Episcopal summer camp in Salter
Path N C , needs WSI to head
waterfront Must be aole to sail Sun
fish. Apply: Ed Hodges, Jr Camp
Manager, 101 East 10th St
Washington, N C 27889
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
To share 3 bedroom Townhouse Rent
$145 and li expenses. Call Leslie
752 0938 or Mary at 756 2011
MODELS NEEDED: Attend the Sun
Fun Styling Festival at the Mrytle
Beach Hilton as a model. Free
admission ultra low spring 85 rates
see the newest in fashion and hair
design in addition to having a
"cheap" weekend at the beach. All
hair style models chosen receive
merchandise and hair care valued at
S30 or more. June 7th, 8th, and 9th
For details call Nancy at Honeycutt
Salon Services, 752 6178.
LIVE IN BABYSITTER: For 4
month old. Room by the beach in ex
change for 3 to 5 days a week. Nurs
ing student preferred Contact Pam
or Phil at 473 2979 in Manteo.
LOST: A pair of London Fog glasses
in a dark burgundy Aigner case If
found, please call 758 9223. I need
them!
2 ROOMMATES h CDED,
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY:
$375mo. divided 4 ways ($95mo.)
futilities, '� cable TV. � deposits
4 bedroom house Come by 301
Biltmore St ask for Liz or Bud
TWO MALE OR FEMALE
ROOMATES NEEDED: lm
mediately for summer months. Ful
ly furnished condo at Kingston
Place. $150 rent, $150 deposit, '4
utilities, 2 bed, 2' i bath, pool,
dishwasher. For more info, call
Leigh at 752 1088
MALE OR FEMALE: Very large
private master bedroom includes
waterbed, dresser and air condi
tioner. To share fully furnished
three bedroom house among two
males during summer months.
Across the street from Joyner
Library. $125 per month, �i utilities.
No deposit. 758 7026.
HELP WANTED: Part time
workers Warehouse installation,
delivery, etc. Apply in person
Larry's Carpetland. 3010 E. 10th St.
NEEDED AUG 20: Tiny, 1 bdrm
apt for female grad student Talk to
Robin 752 4973.
TEXAS: Move to Texas to get
ahead! Pkg of over 500 Co's, Apfs
more. Write for info: MAK TX OPP
Richter, 13110 Kuykendahl 402,
Houston, Tx 77090
HELP WANTED: Entry level posi
tion in traffic department Full
time. Knowledge of television and or
computers helpful. Apply in person
at WNCT TV, 3221 Evans St. EOE
LOST: During Mosiers Farm party
April 12. Mixed Shephard Brown
Male No collar If any information,
please call 752 0658
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
To share Apt at Tar River from
May August or longer Furnished,
$150 a month 758 4492
SUMMER JOBS: it's not too late to
find a good iob Thomas Nelson inc ,
has five positions open for the sum
mer. Average pay $250 per week In-
terviews April 24th at 7 p.m More
interviews will be April 28th and 29th
at 330 and 7 in Brewster D 109
ROOMMATE WANTED: Male to
share house Pr. bedroom, washer, 1
mile from campus 2501 E 3rd St
$116 a month and '3 utilities. Call
752 9937 Ask for Tim, Glenn, or Pat
ROOMMATE WANTED FOR SUM
MER: At Tar River Estates For
more info call 757 3760 or 758 9551
Please leave a message
BAR MAIDS WANTED: Part time
Contact Rose between 11 5 al
758 6870.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
To share an apartment in North
Myrtle Beach for the summer.
Reasonable rent. Please call
752 8395
WORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
perience in typing resumes, theses,
technical documents, and term
papers We manage and merge your
names and addresses into mergec
letters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards. Our prices are extremely
reasonable. S 8. F Professional Com
puter Co. (back of Franklin's) 115 E
5th St 757 0472.
T HE EAST CAROLINIAN
CONDO FOR SALE OR RENT: 2
bedroom, 2 bath, loft, fireplace,
washerdryer. $450month Good in
vestment for your parents if you
want to buy! 756 8296
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICE: Word processing The
Dataworks specializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertations,
theses, resume's and more All work
is computer checked agamst 50,000
word electronic dictionary Rates
are as low as $1 75 per page, in
eluding paper (call for specific
rates. Call Mark at 757 3440 after 7
p.m
APRII .24, 1986
13
RENT: 2 room B unit Rmggold Apt
$300 utilities a month. May 10
Aug 20 One or two roommates Call
Michelle at 758 5971 Tues Thurs
after 5 p m
FOR SALE: 12 x 65 mobile home
with 3 bedrooms, Vi
baths $50C
TYPING SERVICES: Resumes,
term papers, theses Low rates
Spelling and grammatical correc
tions included. Cindy 757 0398 after
5:30 p.m
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc Call
Anne at 758 6011 and leave a
message.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
tronic typewriter. Reasonable rates
Call Janice at 355 7233 after 530
SUMMER SUB-LET: May August
$250 plus utilities. 3 bedroom apt ,
1"2 bath, fully furnished, central air,
cable 830 1769.
PIANO FOR SALE: Wanted:
Responsible party to assume small
monthly payments on spinetconsole
piano Can be seen locally Write:
(include phone number) Credit
Manager, P.O Box 520,
Beckemeyer, IL 62219.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: Experience, quality work,
IBM Selectnc typewriter Call Lanie
Shive 758 5301
FOR SALE: Labrador Retriever
puppies, BLACK $150, Yellow $175,
Chocolate $200 AKC registered
Wormed Call Chns Smith at
793 9205.
SUMMER SUB-LET: May July 2
br. Fully furnished and a'c. Cypress
Garden Apts. Call 758 6960
KINGSTON PLACE: Fully furnish
ed townhouse for rent, complete fur
nishings down to silverware. Also in-
clude the following: Air conditioned,
pool, clubhouse, laundry facilities
only steps away, phone and cable
already installed, ample free park
mg, ECU bus stop Rents for $600
monthly (ideal for 4 people $150
each) and owner will pay all
utilities, excluding telephone and
cable. Available August 1st Respon
sible students only 12 month lease
Aug. 1 to July 31. 1986. Call 757 1849
MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE:
Clothes, appliances, furniture, wood
burning stove, air conditioner, and
odds and ends for sale at 1123
Washington St on Saturday, April
26
APT. FOR RENT: Near campus No
lease necessary 2 rooms, bath, kit
chen $125 per month 752 26i;
RINGGOLD TOWERS: 1 bedroom
condo available for rent or sale
Great investment Low money
down, excellent tax write offs Call
George Tibbal at 203 261 6722
down and assume payments Call
758 1559 after 6pm Grimesland
FOR SALE: Diving Equipment of
all kinds Tank, tins, etc Entire out
lit! interested? Call 752 8666
FOR SALE: Bunk bed posts, ladder
and 2 pieces of plywood that fit
under beds to provide extra storage
space package deal $20 Price
negotiable if pieces sold seperately
Call 758 9692
See CLASSIFIED pa�e 14
id Trip
es
College Grad Finance Plan
Eligibility
Employed or have verifiable committment for
employment
College Degree or Proof of Graduating "on time"
(six months prior to graduation & up to one year
after. Before 4-30-87)
No Derogatory Credit
5 down payment
$250 rebate to reduce selling price
or use as down payment
or
Delay 90 days until first payment due
Finance plan is good through April 30, 1987
A.P.R. 8.948 months
atlBzt
PONTlAC
BROWN - WOOD, INC.
329 Greenville Blvd.
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 27836-2157
PHONE (919) 355-6080
l
SUMMER WORK!
SUMMER FUN!
Make yOLr summer PAY off
for you.
Work As A Manpower Temporary
Openings Available For Days, Weeks, And Months.
We Have Immediate Needs For
� Typists � Construction Clean-Up
� Secretaries Material Handlers
� Data Entry Oprs. � Warehouse
Weekly pay and iob assignments to suit you' We service
customers in Raleigh, Cary, RTP, Durham, Zebulon, Greenville,
Fayetteville and other surrounding areas Visit the nearest Man-
power Office to you when your school year ends for summer vaca-
tion
rlmgton
elf
408 West Arlington Blvd
Greenville N C 27834
(919 756-9933
orage
Reserve Your Spa ce Now
For May, June, JJy & Aug.
Absolutely the Lowest Price$
In Greenville
Let Us Prove This To You! MEMBER
CALL NOW
756-9933
SELF-SERVICE!
STORAGE
ASSOCIATION!
FEMALE NON SMOKER ROOM
MATE WANTED: Needed tor both
summer sessions. Rent, $125month
and '3 utilities. Contact Anne ai
758 1158.
LOST: Purple wallet Late Friday
early Saturday morning in Ringgolc
Towers area. Please call 752 9175
REWARD OFFERED.
We are dedicated
to being the best
health club We
are exclusive
with a limited
membership but
quite reasonable.
�The HUB �
618 South Pitt St.
752-1946 or 752-5048
.Yg9$
Bring this fiver for
a tree visit to the
club tor you
and a friend,
by appoint-
ment Call tor
more information.
Feel great all the time with a total program of personal fitness
just for you. Complete co-ed exercise facilities, relaxation tech-
niques and nutritional guidance.
Several energizing Aerobic classes daily
exercise classes for strengthening & toning
' New weight and machine rooms
� Relaxing Yoga sessions daily for toning & centering
Hot tub and Sauna Village SUNTAN BOOTH
Juice 8c LA Bar, high energy snacks
Lockers, showers 8c dressing rooms
Spring Student Special $28.00 a month
1st Summer Session Special $33.00
Both Summer Sessions $60.00 JK�?
Unlimited Club Use, including Suntan BoothJ
POWNTOWN
FWESTATION
D
GOf ENE ST
OPEN PAflWNG AflEA
HOME AUTO
NCCAR TAGS
SOUTH HTT ST
? PHONE
CO
HO,
r JOHNS AH
UNIVERSAL HUB HEALTH CLUB
618 SOUTH PTTT ST.
Exercise is a Natural High!
The Hub is your club.
Have a Healthy Year!
� Aerobic Instructors Wanted
T
I m ��-�






14
I HI 1 M . ROLINlAN
APRIL :4,IS-Ht
Intramural Golf And Tennis Champs
B STEPHANIE DEH IKS sports U rMr'Johnson Finals Roy Pittman-Dave 1 inner 6-4,
lit�; e are the final results of this6-3 over Roy Strauss-Mai k
yeai 's Intramural-RecreationalBerendsen
Services goll and tennis tour-
naments.GOLF
Quarter FinalsMale
Lee Walston-Frank Ritchie1st Place � Mark Wisniewski -
- ovei loe Prys-Greg Floyd75 (Award: Golf Glove and
k � Pittn an-Dave Turner 6-1,T-shirt)
b 2 ovei lefl Heath-Tom kiehl2nd Place � Dell Averette - s
semi-Finals(Award: Mug)
k,�:� -��.niss-Mark Berendsen3rd Place - Fred Hodge, Jr
i ee Walston-Frank Rn-David Kinsey � "9 (Award:
Mug)
R iP man Dave 1 urner H)-()Highest Score � John Hawn
lohn nderson-Eric109 (Award: Mug)
Classified
( ontinued from page 13
ROOMMATE WANTED: To sub
�en' this summer Two bedroom
apartment on campus Ringgoid
Towers Ar cond , cable T.V.
Available May 10. $140mo. and V2
utilities Caii 758 4519
FOR SALE Ass furniture
mps, beo dresser
, � toor grill Price
� � � I by araaua
B � .� '52 9588
ROOMS FOR RENT $11! nth,
ncluded,
; ill 758 "040
FOR SALE eepei .ouch ex
� � $90 Brass bea
5 � ze desk S45 ana
��� � � �: � S25 Pr.ces neg Can
- ' ' 4 I
B E DR OOM APT FOR
SUBLEASE V � �� . fu n fur
- �� rr ampus For
� 3489
�-ZINGLY DIFFERENT ANT I
QUES SHOP �� � nue 1
� - :�
� � � ks anci art
. �now
� .
SUMMER SUBLET � - g
use D6'
- � her
. . �� � -
- � � � � ' � :
FOR SALE Engagemenl r.ng,
� � � s'one with 44
: 0 or S2.000
i recbner only
- � .486
FURNITURE FOR SALE. Brand
: . fop taoies
mptetely brand
saie
excellent litioi Prices
� '58 6876
OSS FROM CAMPUS: Modern
� $245 rr. ntt Can
� nights and
FOR SUMMER SUBLEASE: 1
� - sgold Towers.

FOR SALE Mov t sell all.
� � � airs and more
ill N 757 0647
SUBLEASE 1 bedroom furmshec
� � �� rough Aug Very
�� � �� �� for sum
- '58 7678
ACT NOW" DISKETTES: Bulk
)S DD 49 cents each Lots ot
econds MONEY
� �- N � E No questions
800 634 3478, 9 9
to 6 Sa1 Offer expires
PITT BULLDOG PUPPIES FOR
SALE: iooKing for gooa nomes 7
and one female available For
� call 758 2393 MWF Sat.�
���� � 5 d m and TTH after
SUBLET FOR SUMMER: One
smoker non smoker, need
� r summer Spacious twc
� aDartment at Holly Farms.
no dogs Rent negotiable
2286 after 7pm
TYPING NEEDED?: if you want
� to type papers for you ai
rates can 756 8934
SUNSHINE VIDEO: Will hold a
� on on Saturday, April 26,
to 6 p.m. All proceeds
to the Ronald McDonald
Poster tiles include currenl
� � ses and classic titles Hundreds
fher posters will be available for
purchase which will not be auction
E ach purchase is tax deductable
FOR SALE 1980 Rabbit diesel
or, 5 speed rebuilt engine, ex
ent condition, sunroof Must sell
$2,45 Call Laura at 752 8093.
APT FOR RENT: 3 Dedroom, 1' a
bath, pool Eastbrook Apt $340 per
month plus utilities Call Stephanie
a� 757 0766
FOR SALE : 5'10" Quiet Flight Surf
board Good cond, $140 Men's large
black neoprene wetsuit, $35
Together $160 Call 752 5277
FOR SALE 27" Raleigh Sovereign
10 speed Good Cond $140 neg 6'6"
Cnannin single fin surfboard
w leash, exc. cond $100 neg Call
752 5277
COUCH AND CHAIR FOR SALE:
Price neg Call 752 6512 before 2
p.m!
Female
1st Place � Renee Smith
(Award: Golf Glove)
96
Pick up awards in room 115
Memorial Gymnasium (Equip-
ment Room) from Duane
3-dii "(Basketball May 26-27 and
June 3
Putt-Putt June 2-5
Golf June 9-11 and June 12
Canoe Race June 16-18 and June
19
Co-Rev Progress
Volleyball May 19-21 and May 27
Howling May 26-27 and June 2
Second Summer Session
Activity Registration Begins
I ennis Singles June 25-30 and
July 1
Racquetball Singles June25-30
and Jul 1
Putt-Putt July 7-10
Horseshoes Double July 7-10and
July 14
1-on-l Basketball Jul 7-10and
lul 15
Softball July 14-17 and July 21
Canoe Race JuK 21-23 and JuK
24
Grooms between the hours of 2-4
p.m. I ri Apr. IK. or 9-11 a.m.
Monday, Tuesday or Wednes-
day. ID's will be required to pick
up awards.
As the Spring 1986 calendar
comes to a close, the Intramural-
Recreational Services extend
sports action for those students
who need a break from Summer
School.
Don't sit home and spend long,
hot nights frustrated with the
hooks. Fake out those anxieties
incorporating tun and fitness
Firs! Summer Session
Activity Registration Begins
Racquetball Singles May 19-21
Softball May 26
lennis Singles Ma 19 21
Ma 26
Co-Rec Program
Volleyball June25-30and JuK l
'Caiun' Thought Of Highly
Contiued from page 11
wherever the send me, I'm going
to try to get on an intern program
foi two years -r:er all that 1
want to go back to 1 ouisiana
Teammate Jeannie Murray,
third baseman, thinks very highly
of Ozment. "Batting behind
Wendy 1 feel ver confident
because she usually gets on base
and tier speed and ability to run
the bases makes me confident
we'll get hei around and she'll get
in stated Murray. "When she's
up and her attitude is good,
winch, it usually is. she keeps
everybody up She just makes
people p!a better. She makes
you laugh, and hei thoughts �
the das' get you to think.
Ozment feels really g
ab ui the days she spent at ECU.
"1 can look back and see how
Ive grown, how much I've
matured stated Ozment "I've
learned to accept a ' ' leader-
ship responsibility. I've enjoyed
m years here
HAPPY BIRTHDAY
RAPPI TIM MY C
I he Intramural
during summer
�Recreational Service will be offering 3-OD-3 basketball
school.
'





ntramural Golf And Tennis (hamps
g
sified
kCajun Thought Of Highl)





Title
The East Carolinian, April 24, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 24, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.473
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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