The East Carolinian, April 17, 1986






�tte lEaHt Olaroltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No fifjt 3T3 Thursday, April 17, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Copier Difficulties
Corrected In Time
Copying Problems
JIM I H Ii. tv IV n! I iralMlii
Nt'� copiers installed at Joyner library have been experiencing technical difficult). Do not fear,
the huns Hill be worked out soon, according to Library Officials. See related stor Page 1.
Caution, Awareness Cited
In Preventing Mail Fraud
Bv BKIH WHIChrR
'Assistant f�v Fdiior
Ads claim you .an make
several hundred dollars a week
pcs. lose weight
s � hich re-
wn a ge-
kaxai diamond for
$29.95.
Man) students and Greenville
� e fallen pre) to these
ads and I themselves victims
of mail said Postmaster
Charles Caulk.
�'If an offer sound good
to be ti ue, it said
Caulk
"W e've had serveral cases of
'rand reported this year.
Human beings are gullible, we
mething for
nothing he added.
Anyone who feels they hae
been a victin I mail fraud
should report it to theii I
postmaster, who will inform the
Postal Inspector of the situation
-aidaulk
Caulk explained the postal in-
spector will investigate the claim
if he has enough complaints. If
mail fraud is indeed present, legal
action will be taken against the
firm, and they will eventually go
out of business.
According to Caulk, "you
aid only deal with reputable
firms It you don't ki
anything about the compan) you
should contact the Better
Business Bureau where the
business is located.
Man) times consumers save
� mone) and chances are if
he Bettei Business Bureau has
tieard of them, said Caulk,
re is no business at all. People
have been known to operate
See MAIL Page 3.
By LAURA JENKINS
s�iff Writer
Although there have been some
problems with the new
photocopiers that have recently
been installed in Joyner Library,
the library administration re-
mains confident the copier
system will prove to be faster and
more efficient for students.
The copiers, which are owned
and serviced by CopyPro, Inc
have a special feature � they ac-
cept magnetic cards which allow
the user to make up to 60 copies.
The machines will also operate on
coins, and they can make change.
Since the copiers arrived in
Joyner Library two weeks ago,
there have been periodic
mechanical problems with the
machines.
On Sunday afternoon, for ex-
ample, all four of the machines
were out of order. A library staff
person was able to fix two of the
copiers that afternoon, but
CopyPro, Inc which makes no
service calls on weekends, could
not be reached until Monday
morning. However, when they
were reached, CopyPro, Inc. im-
mediately came and fixed the
other two copiers.
Whenever there are problems
with the photocopiers, the library
stff can call CopyPro to come
and service the equipment.
However, the library staff is now
being traineed to correct minor
problems, such as paper jams.
Ruth Katz, director of Joyner
Library, is confident in both the
quality and efficiency of the new
equipment, and the reliability of
the CopyPro company.
"CopyPro has an excellent
reputation for service she said.
Katz feels it is only a matter of
time until the problems with the
copiers gets worked out.
"CopyPro is trying to see what
problems have arisen and is try-
ing to correct them she said.
According to Ed Murphrey,
president of CopyPro,Inc ad-
justments are always going to be
needed with new equipment.
Murphrey said, however, the
main cause of the problems with
the machines was the coin boxes
inside were not large enough to
handle the volume of money that
was being put into them.
Murphrey said the way to
alleviate the problem is to adjust
the coin boxes to be capable of
handling a high volume of
change. He added a change
machine has been placed on the
wall and that it should also aid in
the situation.
CopyPro, Inc and the library
administration are current!)
working and plan to continue
working closely together to solve
problems concerning the copiers.
Both Geraldine Laudati. direc-
tor of the Music Library, and
JoAnn Bell, director of the
Health Sciences Library, have ex-
pressed their satisfaction with the
new photocopiers that have been
placed in their libraries.
There have no problems with
the performance of the machines
at all, and Laudati and Bell both
feel the card system is a much
faster and simpler way to make
copies.
Marilyn Miller, assistant direc-
tor of Joyner Library, believes it
is important for students to be
aware of the new copiers
available on ca npurs because she
feels students will like the advan-
tages of the card system.
According to Miller, the
greatest advantage of the system
is in order to make a copy, "a
peison doesn't have to have cash
in hand anymore
Miller emphasized not only is il
easier to use a magnetic card than
to use change, it is also cheaper.
The average price to make a copy
using a caid is 8.3 cents, while a
change copy costs 10 cents.
Students can now purchase a
magnetic card worth 60 copies
for S5.00 from a wall dispenser in
any o the libraries. The cards are
good for at least three years, so
one does not have to make all 60
copies at one time.
Information Sought On Rape
In
h
By MIKE I I DWIC K
Nt-�s tditur
the past three weeks there
e bee three assualts and two
rapes on ECt co-eds.
I t. Keith Knox. EC I Public
�pj
Knox added the subject could
possible be wearing some type of
stocking oi headband.
He stressed the subject is arm-
ed.
1 he composite photographs,
provided by Knox, are liknesses
o the indivdidual or individuals.
Safety, said "We are looking for
a black male appn ximately 5'8"
to six feet, dark complexion, slim
build and a close hair cut
suspected in the recent attacks.
Composite photographs are
based upon victim's discriptions
of the assailant, which is a pro-
cess that involves a set of overlays
placed upon a piece of plastic as
the witness or victim decribes the
attacker.
Knox stressed the composites
are not necessarily the same per-
son but that there are similarities.
If one should happen to spot
this individual or individuals,
Knox asked they report where
they saw the suspect, direction of
travel, what type and color of
clothing, and any unusual ac-
tivities.
Knox said most of the assualts
have accured around the Western
half of campus and the adjoining
city blocks. "We're hoping to
prevent him from hitting again,
but we want to catch him he
said.
If students have any informa-
tion, Knox asked, that they call
him at ECU Public Safety
(757-6150) or contact Carla
Fuller with the Greenville Police
Department at 752-3342.
Wright Plans
Re-Opening
Bv JILL MORGAN
Sl.ff WrtUT
Wright Auditorium, located
next to the Student Supply Store,
is less than six months away from
renovation being completed.
The newly renovated Wright
Auditorium will be the home of
the Artists Series and the Theater
Arts Series in 1986-198
Rudolph Alexander, the
associate Dean of Student Ac-
tivities and director of University
Unions, is head of the more than
mmllllMMlMlllllllIM
S3,000,000 project. "The reason
for the renovation according to
Alexander, is basically that we
are a university o' over 14,000
students without a main
auditorium
Upon the renovations being
completed, ECU will have "the
most beautiful concert hall in the
east said Alexander, "and I
don't mean eastern North
Carolina
See GRAND Page 5.
Ii
7'
II
-

Foreign Students Speak On Attack
Bv I ANN WEAVER
Miff Writrr
four foriegn students at
EC ' feel sympathy for the inno-
cent people who were killed in
Tuesday's U.S. attack on Liby
They tee! the United States was
using terrorist tactics just as
Khaddafi did.
The students feel, though, ter-
rorism is a difficult subject to ex-
plain and that this instance will
only provoke more terrorist at-
tacks by Libya and other coun-
tries.
Yosel Abul-Hawa. a Palesti-
nian, explained his view, "If the
evidence the U.S. had on Khad-
dafi could've been published the
attack could've been justified
He added in order for the U.S.
On The inside
to have stable interest in the Mid-
dle East they need to find an op-
timal balance that will satisfy
both the people of Israel and the
resistance of Palestine.
Although this attack will effeel
mostly countries in the Middle
Last countries, the European
countries also have an interest in
the event.
A Norwegian, Olav Osland,
tells how he thinks the
European's feel. "Europeans
don't want anymore conflict or
wars in this century. They feel
that the United States is a protec-
tor o' peace, but that they've
taken things too far this time
The foriegn students feel the
attack could've been eliminated if
the U.S. Government had taken
Khaddafi to an international
organization to discuss the cause
and effects of terrorism all over
the world. Other actions could
have been taken on Khaddafi and
his government rather than bom-
bing them.
The result of this attack they
feel will be a few things. They feel
that Libya will become a
scapegoat for all terrorist attacks
and that Khaddafi will retaliate
all over the world, but will try to
bomb somewhere in the U.S.
Alaklook described what he
felt Khaddifi will doT think
Khaddafi is going to be mad and
Military Goals Discussed
Announcements2
Classifieds11
Comics9
Editorials4
Features7
Sports10
People lose sight of the
hurdles when they jump at
conclusions.
�Anonymous
B) PATRICK O'NEIL
Staff Writer
Editor's Sole: The Patrick
O 'Neil who wrote this storv and
the one in the April 10 issue is not
the more infamous Patrick
O'Neil who worked for the East
Carolinian a few years ago.
"The basic economic and
military goals of NATO and
Western Europe have been
achieved and the success of
Economic and political stability
has led to friction said Robert
H. Durff in his presentation on
'The European Community and
U.S Friction Among Friends
Dorff, a political science pro-
fessor at NCSU and a specialist
on comparative politics, Western
Europe, and national security
policy, also stated that to study
the relationship between the U.S.
and Europe, without considering
NATO, is impossible.
He examined the goals of the
U.S. after World War II in its
restoration of Europe which in-
cluded: creating longstanding
military security in Europe,
economic stability which could
not occur without military securi-
ty, and political stability which
would repress the appearance of
a radical regime threatening
world security.
Dorff stated NATO was
created through the fear caused
by the Soviet threat after World
War II and many of the countries
involved in NATO had to subor-
dinate political sovereignty for
militarv defense provided by the
U.S.
The U.S. enjoyed military
superiority into the late '50's un-
til the Soviets had acquired
atomic capabilities, according to
Dorff.
Until that time, he added,
Europe had to agree with U.S.
policies. This is when Europe
had begun to take steps toward
economic and political recovery.
See NATO Page 2.
JIM I Fl T,�s - rw ti CaniMa
The New Wright Building
Wright Building is being renovated to be the finest auditorium in
the east. Renovations are to be completed by November. A gala re-
opening is planned to celebrate the event.
� . iV
B





IHEEASTCAROL1N1AN
APRIL 17. 1986

Announcements
COUNSELING CENTER
The ECU Counseling Center is offering a
tree PREPARING FOR FINALS
WORKSHOP to assist students who ex
Defence ri.gh levels of stress whicri interfere
with test performance Methods of reiaxa
tion will be taught and practiced and
strategies tor taking various 'ypes of finals
will be covered The workshop will meet on
April 21 23, and 25, 3 4pm In 305 Wright An
nex Smce the workshop will involve skill
building students should plan to attend an
sessions For more information call the ECU
Counseling Center ?57 6M1 or stop by 30?
Wright Annex
CIRCLE K
Don T forget 'onight .s or Induction Ban
quet it starts a' "I Bring your appetite and
let's have some turn it need some more info
can Sue at 75 8428 See ya all there!
GRADUATE MANAGEMENT
ADMISSION TEST (GMAT)
a oe offered at ECU on Saturday June
: '��� Application blanks are to be com
pie'eo ano mn,ied to GMAT Educational
Test.ng Service Box 966 R Princeton NJ
08540 Application must be postmarked no
later than May 19 9S6 Applications may be
obtained from the ECU Testing Center room
105 Spegh Bldg , Greenville. N C 27834
LAW SCHOOL
ADMISSION TEST (LSAT)
Will be offered at ECU on Monday. June
16 at 1 p m New application blanks have
been received by the Testing Center and
they are to be completed and mailed to
Educational Testing Service Box 966 R
Princeton NJ 08540 Registration postmark
deadline �, May 15 lv�6 Reg.strat on
postmarked af'er th.s date must be accom
panieo by a S15 non refundable tee
NATIONAL TEACHER EXAMS
CORE BATTERY EXAMS
WM be offered at ECU on Saturday June
;8 i986 Application blanks are to be com
Pleted ana mailed to the Educational Testing
Service Box 911 R, Princeton NJ 08541 to
arve by May 26 !�86 Applications may be
obtained from the Testing Center room 105,
Spe.gnt eiag ECU
MILLER ANALOGIES TEST
(MAT)
For graduate school entrance will be of
ferec tor �he next two Wednesdays Apm i4
and Apr,i 23 at 2 30 p m n Speigh' 8'dg
room 211 The fee tor the test il J23, payable
m the classroom the day of the test Can
dioates will need picture ID number 2 pen
cils. and the proper tee Afte- the Apr,i 23
test date aamm.stration of th,s test will
resume on May 21 1986
MOTOR AND PHYSICAL
FITNESS
COMPETANCY TEST
Will be held on Wednesday. April 30
(reading day) at Mirtges Coliseum at 7 p m
A passing score on this test is required of all
students prior to declaring physical educa
tionasamaior Passing the te�f consists of
I) Maintaining an average T score ot 45 on
the six item test battery 21 Having a T score
of 45 on the aerobics run.
Any student with a medical condition that
would contraindicate participating in the
testing should contact Dr Israel or Mike Mc
Cammon at 757 6497 To be exempted from
any portion of the test you must have a
Physicians excuse A detailed summary of
the test components is available in the
Human Performance Lab (room 113.
M.nges) Your physician's excuse must
specifically state which items you areexcus
ed from
GAMMA BETA PHI
The last meeting of Gamma Beta Phi will
be held Thurs Apr,I 17 at 7 in Mendenhall
44 we urge everyone to try and attend
EMPLOYMENT
Summer School and fall semester employ
ment opportunities are available to those
who desire t0 become personal care aften
dants to wheelchair students, readers and
'utors For details and an application con
'act CC Rowe Coordinator Handicapped
student Services 212 Whichard Bldg ECU
919 757 6799
ALPHA PHI ALPHA
Presents an an campus social at the
�rehouse Restaurant corner of 10th and
Cotanche V tonight from 7 9 Come have a
good time before the Omega Psi Ph, WOOW
step show competition Beer will be 50� an
nigh'
PHYSICIANS FOR
SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
Mrs Shimon,ra Sakue a 51 year old sur
. vor of the atomic bombing ,n Nagasaki
will visit Greenville this Fr.oey. Apr 18
Mrs Sakue w,ii make2publ,c presentations
at 12 30 pm in the upstairs conference room
of the P.tr county Memorial Hospital
Cafeteria and at 8 p m in the ECU Baptist
Student Center ,511 E 10th SI ; Mrs Sakue
will speak about nr exper.ence and her hope
for world peace and an end to nucluear arms
race Her presentation ,s being sponsored by
'he As,a Resources Center ,n Washington
D C All interested persons are .nvited to at
tend one of these presentations The 7 00
aresentatior a' the BSU win be preceded B�
a pot luck supper For more mfo please can
John Moskop at 752 5023 ihome! or 757 2797
office )
SIGI (SIGGY)
If you are unsure about a career field and
might want to check your interestsexpecta
tions. then you might try SIGI If you can
press a 1.2. or RETURN Key on a computer
keyboard, then you may come and sign up
for a time at the Career Planning and Place
ment Service in the Bloxton House to better
plan your career!
ECU SURFCLUB
Important meeting Thursday night 9pm
my house Contest this weekend against
UNC W ECU'S favorite beverage will be
served
ECU JAZZ AND SHOW CHOIR
The ECU Jan and Show Choir will be per
forming on Sunday. April 20 at 8 15pm in A J
Fletcher Auditorium
RAOUETBALLCLUB
Will hold an organizational meeting on
April 23 1986 Wed 5pm at Memorial Gym
rm 102 All members and new people are
welcome We will be discussing about new
officials tor next school year and plar also
NELSON INTERNSHIP
If you are looking to develop leadership,
planning, time management, communica
tion, and interpersonal skills and also save
some money, there are still ten positions
open tor this coming summer Drop by to
hear abut the program today at 3 30 and 7 00
and Thursday at 7 0OmBB3O3 No particular
major necessary
CAR WASH
Sponsored by inter Varsity Christian
Fellowship Saturday April 19 from 9 til 2 at
the Trade Gas Station on the corner of 14th
and Greenville Blvd Cost donations ac
tepted towards Summer Missions Program
DAY CAMP: RALEIGH
The VWCA of Raie.gh ,5 ,n need of day
camp counselors from June 9 Augus' 22
interviews will be held on Thursday Apr,i
24 For applications and more information
contact Coop Rawl 313
GRADUATE RECORD EXAM
(GRE)
The Graduate Record Exam (General
Portion only no Subiect Exams! will be of
tered at ECU on Saturday June T, 196 Ap
plication blanks are to be completed ana
mailed to Educational Testing Service Box
966 R Pnncefon, Nj 08540 Applications
must be postmarked no later than May 2
'986 Applications may be obtained from the
ECU Testing Center room 105 Spe.ght Bldg
NATO Policies, Goals Examined
Continued From Page 1.
Dorff then explained the
Economic Liberal Theory which
states that an open integrated
economy leads to political stabili-
ty and that economic union
creates a political union.
He said this is essentially the
theory followed until the present
day.
However, with a strong in-
tegrated economy, political
thought amoung European coun-
tries tends to differ. Each country
exercises more political freedom.
Students Speak Out
Continued From Page 1.
upset. He's going to support U.S.
terrorism and bomb somewhere
in the U.S. He's gonna kill inno-
cent people
One point all the foriegn
students felt strongly about was
how terrorism is labeled in the
U.S. Osland of Norway explain-
ed, "American government is not
trying to understand other coun-
tries and other cultures A
Palestinian, Alaklook, adds
"You can not call a population
of foui million people � ter-
rorists. Not all natives of these
coun ries are terrorists
The U.S. objectives towards
European recovery have been
achieved through the fact that
Western Europe has become a
strong economic entitv. said
Dorff.
Some of the positive effects
have included the integration of
the European monetary system
and coordinated European
foreign policy in which the coun-
tries speak with a single voice, ex-
plained Dorff.
Dorff also emphasized that
NATO policies will have to
change to accomodate the
political courses of European
countries and the changes must
come within the structure of
NATO.

KINGSTON PLACE
Affordable, Luxurious Furnished Apartments built
specifically for ECU students.
Swimming pool, Clubhouse, lots of Parking, all
Amenities and Accessories. Units Available for
Summer and Fall.
Call 758-5393
JlE 4th Vreet
Thursday Night Is
TACO NIGHT
Two Great Tacos
for only 99$
60 oz. Pitchers $1.99
Offer Good From 7 p.mll p.m.
Not Valid on Deliveries
If you enjoy Tuesthy Night At Sub Station II,
You HI LOVE Thursday Night!
752-2183
215 E. Fourth St.
GOLDEN GIRL TRYOUTS
Saturday. April l� 10 am Ipm Sunday.
April 20. t p m 5pm Main Lobby. Flatchar
Music Building Any question call Tom
Goldsby 757 4��? or Betsy Mlddleton
7SIMS4
NURSING STUDENTS
You are invited to attend the !�� Issues in
Nursing Convention to be held on April 16
and April 23 in the Nursing Bldg . room 702
See what's happening m Nursing today!
University Optometric Eye Clinic
DR. DENNIS O'NEAL
Op) , �
CAR WASH
The ECU Biology Club is having a car
wjsh on Saturday. April l�, 19M from �am
2pm at Burger King (Greenville Blvd)
beside Taco Bell Come on out and have your
car washed for 2 00 Members please come
out and help
RHOLAMBDA
Rho Lambda meeting Monday. April 21 at
5pm in the Panhellenic meeting room Bot
torn of Fleming oorm
SIGN LANGUAGE CLUB
ECU'S Sign Language Club will present
Spring Fantasy "The Jukebox on April 20
at gpm m Jenkins Auditorium Bring your
friends and watch as Fantasy strives to br
mg the hearing and deaf worlds together
through music and sign language
ATTENTION,
SENIORS!
Would you like to be
part of one of the
largest and most
successful child care
programs in the nation?
If you genuinely want to
help troubled kids and
would like to have
camping, backpacking
and river trips as part of
your daily
routine � then we want
you on our team!
If you have majored in
Education or any of the
Human Service related
fields, we can provide
you with an excellent
opportunity for personal
and professional
development.
Write Eckerd Family
Youth Alternatives, Inc.
P.O. Box 31122,
Charlotte, NC 28231.
1-800-222-1473 (toll
free). EOE MF.
Comprehensive Eye Examinations
Contact Lenses
Soft, Hard, Gas Permeable Timed
Extended Wear, Contacts for Astigmatism
Glasses (One Day Service in Most Cases)
Student & Faculty Discounts on Contacts &
Glasses
Convenient to Campus
Evening & Sat Appointments A vailable
in
,
612 E. 10th Street
(Across from campus security)
758-4600
CONSOUDAIH'
THEATRtS
All Seats $2.00 Everyday Til 5:30 PM
J � � ����! � � i i-ufca
1:15-3:15-5:15-
7:15-9:15
PRAY FOR
DEATH
BUCCANEER MOVIES
� S.u'� Sh)Uiiig C
1-3-5-7-9
"MONEY PIT"
PG
1-4:30-8:00 "
"COLOR
PI RPI.F
A rvj
� ijMin.i, f. num. , f
PGI3
2nd
Action
Packed
Week!
1:15-3:15-5:15-7:15-9:15
SHO
KOSUGI in
V
HELD OVER
SHELLEY
LONG
PG
TOM
HANKS
1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00
MONEY
PIT
11th Smash Week
� STEVEN SPELBERG RLM
1:00-4:30-8:00
It'sdbotjt
life.
It's dbout
love
It's about
-COUPON
Kentucky Nugget Snack
6 Kentucky Nuggets
Kentucky Fries
1 Large Drink
$1.99
Plus
a
We do Chicken Right"
Coupon Redeemable at
Greenville locations only
Expiration Date May 9, 1986
-COUPON-
tfowTd Improve
�ur Grades
AOheBeach.
If you're finding your bathing suit
tighter than usual, now's a fitting time to
join The Spa. Students can join The Spa
on a monthly basis for only $25 per
month. That's $25 for 30-days without
any strings attached.
The Spa offers 52 aerobics work-
outs every week, exercise machines, free
weights, steam room, sauna and whirl-
pool. Plus, there are plenty of trained
instructors to help you shape up.
So. ifyourfodv is flunking the
beach test, call or dnp bv The Spa f� r
more information.
Impmving your grades at the bead)
simply requires a little home work.
TrP
a-
Greenville's
best health club value
SOUTH PARK SHOPPING CENTER
GREENVI1 LE 75S7W1
Apart
mes violei
� ripuscs aci
eek as student j
ed with both a .
rig
In ha' n
studer
injured and a
arrested during �
raids ol
Berkele)
brutal
Berkeley
"A
���
' the firs
Heret;
businessh
resemr e
fracast-
pil-
ing to eact
While
abrupt i.
ampu-
unopposed
asm
Las
example.
JUG.
'na.
prote
vestmeni
business
Afri
Mail Fr
Continued from Pae 1
busines-
compiair
regarding the
diet"
The compa
with mail frau
was made aware
advertising.
Complaints l
recened for an a
duct was a frame
Abraham Lino
Ccu
Do you feel the I nited
I ee Martin
Senior, Industrial
"I think n was
propnate. lt at
meone d mething. I'n
vse had to rev
means. The allies
supported us becaio
right in the middle
Ben Reinhold
Sophomore, Industrial Tech
"It was the right thing to do to
show the Libyans that we won't
take any more terrorism from
them. And for ail of the times
we've helped the European coun
tries, they should have backed uv
up





7HF f AM C AROI INIAN
APRIL 17, 1986
rtometric Eye Clinic
MEAL
III

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38-6600
I 5:30 PM

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10-8:00
I OR
I
1�(,13 I
9:00
MONEY
PIT

. rove
ides

SP
a
best m tiue.
CENTER
l
Apartheid Protests Continue
Overtoil's
enter
(CPS) � Anti-apartheid pro-
tests escalated into an� som-
times violent, confrontations on
campuses across the nation last
week as student protestors clash-
ed with both authorities and
right-wing student groups.
In what may have been the
worst incident, doens of
students and campus police were
injured and a total o 150 people
arrested during two pre-dawn
raids o a shantytown built on the
University oi California campus
in Berkele
"The police were extremely
brutal savs John Hurley, a
Berkele junior.
"A lot of my friends got their
faces cut by police slamming then
down on the pavvement he says
o the first of two violent con-
frontations.
Heretofore a mannered,
businesslike protest movement,
the anti-apartheir demonstrations
of last week more closely
resembled the heated, tense
fracases of the sixties, when cam-
pus opinion was polarized and
opposing groups stopped speak
ing to each other.
While anti-apartheid protests
abruptly erupted on scores ol
campuses last April, they were
unopposed by other students.
asministrators and local ol
Last spring at Berekeley, for
example, several municipal
judges refused to preside at the
trials of students arrested during
protests of the university's in-
vestments in frims that do
business in segregate i - South
Africa.
This year, campus police con-
ducted a one a.m. raid on a
"shantytown" built to symbolize
the plight of South Arica's black
citizens, tearing sown the struc-
tures and uprooting some 200
students camping in the area.
The plywood and cardboard
structures were a fire hazard,
declared Chancellor Ira Heyman,
who said protestors were "in-
viting force
"People barricaded themselves
inside the shanties Hurley re-
counts. "They wrapped their
arms around stuff, and just held
on
Other students, wanting to
avoid arrest, left the shanties, but
then laid down in front of the
buses brought in to cart off their
compatriots. Sixty-one students
were arrested that night for refus-
ing to leave the shanties.
Violence continued Friday,
when police efforts to remove the
rebuilt protest encampment
resulted in an egg, bottle and
rock throwing riot that left 20
students and police injured and
sH) protestors arrested.
Nationwide, such protest seem-
ed to peak during the last week of
March and first week of April,
dubbed the National Weeks of
Action by the American Commit-
tee on Africa.
At Cornell, students occupied
the president's office, unfurling a
b.mner proclaiming the start of
the two weeks o action.
At Penn, about 120 students
marched across campus carrying
coffins draped in black to honor
the South African blacks killed in
Sharpeville while protesting
"pass laws" in 1960.
University of North Carolina -
Chapel Hill apartheid protestors
found themselves in a tense stan-
doff with the College
Republicans and the Students for
America, who built a "Berlin
Wall" behind shanties erected on
the campus green.
The wall, made of wood
draped in sheets and wound with
chicken wire, is a counter protest,
explains student William Peaslee,
a College Republican.
"We built the wall to, (1).
make a statement against the
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Taking Applications
By CAROLYN DRISCOLL
Slaff Writer
The ECU Honor Board will be
accepting student applications
for several fall openings next
week.
The Honor Board is designed
to hear cases of students involved
in lying, stealing and other
diciplinary offenses. According
to John Egar, SGA treasurer,
cases brought before the Board
deal nostly with on-campus viola-
tions.
Students serving on the Board
"listen to the cases, the police
reports, the student's testimony
and the circumstances surroun-
ding the incident, and make a
judgement within SGA
guildelines explains David
Brown, SGA president.
"For students with an interest
in law he continues, "serving
on the Honor Board offers a
good foundation of practical ex-
perience
Egar stresses, "We encourage
all interested students to apply
We're hoping to double the
number of applications we've
received in the past so we will be
able to choose from people ol
various backrounds. We're look-
ing for a diversity o opinions
"Serving on the Board gives
students an opportunity to get in-
volved, serve the campus and
community and have a positive
impact on the qualitv o life ai
ECU says David Brown.
Applications are open to all
ECU students, with sole
qualification o a 2.0 GPA. Ap-
plications will be taken following
a meeting on Thursdays, April 24
at 4:00 in Mendenhall.
Any applications not accepted
tor the Honor Board will be kepi
iin file and considered in the fall
for the Review Board, the Honor
Board's Board ol appeals.
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Mail Fraud Reported In Greenville
Continued From Page 1.
business out of their homes.
Around the Greenville area.
complaints have been received
regarding the "Grapefruit 45
diet
The companv was not charged
with mail fraud but the public
was made aware of the false
advertising.
Complaints have also been
received for an ad claiming a pro-
duct was a framed picture of
Abraham Lincoln for SH). The
picture sent of Abraham Lincoln
was a penny.
"Solar Clothes Dryers" for
49.98 bought by many Greenville
residents turned out to be
clothesline rope and clothespins.
Caulk advised consumers to
watch the wording of an ad
before buying a product.
"Fraduient companies word the
ad io rhey cn cover themselves.
Words like, "these are not typical
results are a blanket for the
company.
Caulk remarked ma?nv of the
fraduient companies are based in
the same areas of the U.S.
Many fraduient products come
from Carlsbad, California;
Culver City, California; Las
Vegas, Nevada, and Miami,
Florida. "This is not to say all
ads from these areas are
fraduient cited Caulk.
Chain letters have also been a
problem in Greenville, said
Caulk. Chain letters asking for
money is illegal as is the letter
making threats upon the receiver.
Manv chain letters claim if the
Campus Voice
Do you feel the I nited States did the right thing by attacking khaddafi's headquarters
Lee Martin
Senior, Industrial Tech
"I think it was most ap-
propriate. It's about time so-
meone did something. I'm sorry
we had to resort to such drastic
means. The allies should have
supported us because they're
right in the middle of it
Dwayne Coleman
Sophomore, Psychology
"I think it's important that we
took action but a lot of innocent
people who weren't involved in
terrorist plots were hurt. The
allies should have stood behind
us the way we've been there when
they needed us

W
Ben Reinhold
Sophomore, Industrial Tech
"It was the right thing to do to
show the Libyans that we won't
take any more terrorism from
them. And for all of the times
we've helped the European coun-
tries, they should have backed us
up
Dawn Shaw
Freshman, Psychology
"It's a good idea that we took
a step to protect the nation. It's
scary but we've got to start
somewhere. It was a step we had
to take.
chain is broken bad luck will fall
upon those who do not continue
the chain. "The best thing to
with a chain letter is to throw it in
the trash can Caulk added.
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Nokomis Gregory
Sophomore, Business Education
"It was a good move. It let
Libya know we're serious. We
can't let them just walk over us.
That's what our military is train-
ed for
Bobbie Gallaway
Sophomore, Early Childhood
Ed.
"I think we did the right thing.
We've been taking terrorism for
too long. Reagan has been warn-
ing and warning them. We've
stood behind our allies and they
should have done the same.
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��





Sty taut Olar0lmlan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender, cw �.�
Jay Stone, Edna,
Mike Ludw.oc, . �, Greg Winchester. t�, � �,
Scott Cooper, Wtt h. Anthony Martin. ���� c
Daniel Mal-rer. � ��, �, Meg needham, c�a�
John Shannon, �,�, Shannon Short. ��
DeChanile Johnson. , w Debbie Stevens, w���
Apnl 17, 986
Opinion
Page 4
Libya
Quaddafi Deserves No Roses
Colonel Muammar el-Quaddafi
� the mere mention of the name in-
spires contempt and revulsion in the
hearts of many. Today nobody
sheds any tears for him. Instead
people rejoice at the news of his
downfall and secretly wish for his
demise.
That is as it should be. Quaddafi
is the kind of evil sack of pus that
folks like to see reap the rancid and
ugly seeds that he has sown. Yes, he
has boasted of supporting interna-
tional terrorism. Yes, he is also the
same guy who offered a million
dollars to anyone who could build a
nuclear weapon for him and we can
only speculate as to what he would
have done with one once he had it.
So those who expend their
political capital in defense of Quad-
dafi should realize that they are
siding with an ignominious
predator and a bully shyster that all
the world has come to know and
despise. Yet, they should also
realize that to stop Colonel Quad-
dafi is not to stop international ter-
rorism.
In fact, insofar as state spon-
sored terrorism goes, Syria and Iran
are more involved than Libya, ac-
cording to informed sources. For
example, when the barracks of the
U.S. Marines stationed in Lebanon
was bombed all the evidence
pointed to Syria as the party
responsible for planning the attack.
Yet, Syria is a difficult nation for
the United States to retaliate
against because it is a close ally of
the Soviet Union. The stakes would
be higher for the United States if it
were to attack Syria as we did
Libya. Even if this country attacked
Iran the political stakes would be
certain to be high, if not the
military stakes.
This is due to a number of factors
related to the politics of the Middle
East. For example, the government
of Hosni Mubarak in Egypt is tot-
tering on the brink of stability. Ac-
cording to a recent article in The
New Republic, the cause is the ex-
treme poverty which exists there,
particularly among members of the
armed forces. The primary
challenge to Egypt's continued
stability is a fundamentalist Islamic
movement similar to the one which
presently holds sway in Iran. Egvpt,
needless to say, is a U.S. ally and an
Arab country.
Now, if the United States were to
attack Syria and Iran while continu-
ing to support Israel almost un-
critically on the Palestinian ques-
tion, we would considerably
strengthen anti-U.S. sentiment in
the Arab world. All of this is not to
say that the United States should
refrain from responding to ter-
rorism on its citizens. Clearly it
should retaliate against terrorists.
But, as thinking people we must
ask ourselves what it is that affords
terrorists the political space to
maneuver in. The answer is that ter-
rorists are responding to a real or
imagined injustice. And it is the
idea that they are representing the
interests of the exploited and op-
pressed that gives terrorists enough
moral legitimacy to exist. Forget
that they are little more than
glorified murderers, terrorists make
the argument that they are simply
continuing politics by another
means.
Thus, what compels those who
support terrorists with food, shelter
or even money to do so is that in
some way they believe that the ter-
rorists they support are champion-
ing their interests as oppressed
peoples. If they did not believe that
it is doubtful that terrorists would
receive the support that they do.
Many of the countries in the Mid-
dle East are unstable. Their situa-
tion is not unlike that in many Latin
American countries except that for
the most part the countries of the
Middle East have more money than
do those in Latin America. The
United States, in some cases, has
even contributed to the instability
there as we did when the CIA
originally put the Shah of Iran in
power back in the early '50s. Of
course the Ayatollah is much worse
than the Shah ever was, but
Mossedegh might have been better
than both had he been allowed to
stay in power.
It is not an entirely unwarranted
assumption to believe that political
systems evolve from autocracy or
even totalitarianism toward
democracy. Over the course of time
many of the authoritarian systems
in the Middle East and the rest of
the Third World are likely to give
way to democratic governments if
they begin to share in some of the
affluence that first world countries
enjoy. But in the meantime, we
must cope with the Quaddafi's and
the Ayatollah's.
The best way we can do that is to
clean our own house and con-
sistently champion human rights
and democratic principles
everywhere. Finally, from such a
position of moral authority, we
must let it be known that should
anyone stoop so low as to attack the
citizens of a country which cham-
pions such values retaliation will be
swift, brutal, merciless, and short.
We will use ships, planes, tanks,
missiles, mace, rusty razor blades,
hot grease and whatever else is
necessary to exact the imperfect
justice that this world offers.
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Campus Forum
Pros A nd Cons Of Libyan A Hack
On Monday at 7:00 pm E.S.T the
United States struck a sound,
retaliatory blow to terrorism and its
home base. In the day and u half
following the air strikes against
Tripoli and Benghali, Libya, I have
watched with pride as the United
States has stood to applaud her
commander-in-chief.
lor main ears now, the United
Slates has attempted to follow a path
ol passive diplomacy to combat the
murderous terrorism of Muammar
Qaddafi. This man has seen fit to
change what he considers an un-
satisfactory world order through the
medium of terrorism. And for several
years now, America has suffered the
loss of innocent lues because o this
terorism. Our diplomatic pleas have
fallen on deaf ears.
The United States has decided to
stop these Bohemians before they
grow out of control. And passive
discussion seems to be the fertilizer
from which they grow. The possibili-
ty firmly exists, that had the US and
the other western allies ended their
isolationist policies in the decade of
the 1930's, the waste of a second
world war may have been diverted.
The US does not believe in repeating
history.
The time has come for Americans
to stand together in a concerted effort
in the war against terrorism. We can
no longer tolerate the maniacal
schemes of Qaddafi to destroy the
US. It is not a question o democrat
versus republican, conservative ver-
sus liberal, or nationalist versus com-
munist. Rather it is a question of be-
ing a free people, of being
Americans. We do not seek to destroy
Libya just for sport. We seek to make
our world free, and safe for all
peoples. And yes we are fighting to
defend the freedoms of our allies,
although their understanding of this
has not been seen.
How Americans can feel sympathy
for a man and nation that has pledged
itself to the destruction of the United
States is beyond the realm of
understanding. But we will continue
to defend the rights of all opinions of
all Americans, whether the defense is
appreciated or not.
1 applaud President Reagan for the
fortitude to carry through with the
action. And my deepest pride and
gratitude goes to those Air Force and
Naval personnel who so ably carried
out the strikes.
It is my earnest desire that all of
America will stand together and that
as a unified people, we will end the
Qaddafi reign of terror, and so make
the world "safe for democracy
Stephen Hines
Junior, History
The Real Terrorism
President Reagan has an uncanny
ability to exercise his office in a man-
ner which brings out American
patriotism. Unfortunately, it is often
by appeal to our most violent in-
stincts in a form which threatens to
compromise our national principles.
We pride ourselves on the rule of
law, on respect for justice, and on the
recognition of the civilizing and
responsible role restraint plays in this
volatile world. We are a great and
powerful nation, and we realize isola-
tion is impossible in these times for
such a nation. The question must be
whether we can lead by moral exam-
ple, using our power to defend princi-
ple in accordance with international
law, or whether our interest will simp-
ly be self-interest.
Specifically, there is no acceptance
of Nicaraguan misbehav ior in Central
America implied by regretting the
U.S. refusal to acknowledge the
World Court's jurisdiction in that
region; there is no weakness in ques-
tioning the consistency of arming
"freedom-fighters" in Angola and
Honduras while we condemn state-
sponsored terrorism; there is no sedi-
tion in considering military
maneuvers in the Gulf of Sidra to be a
willful provocation of a belligerent
and unstable dictator. In short, one
can be devoutly American while not
supporting activities providing the
brief euphoria of action at the ex-
pense of eroding conscience in our
national character.
As a nation, we have the power to
make the world listen by force, but
what would be left worth hearing?
David LeHjs
Grad. School, Art
Ka-Daffy Duck?
In President Reagan's most recent
televised press conference, he referred
to the flamboyant Libyan leader as
"The Mad-Dog of the Mideast On-
ly a couple months ago, he called him
a "quack There have even been
frustrated comics who have donned
him "Ka-Daffy Duck Although
these names may indeed be more ap-
propriate. Colonel Muammar of
Libya does have a legal last name
given to him at birth. What bothers
me, however, is how do you really
spell it? Afraid to attempt it myself. I
have come across at least five dif-
ferent versions of this surname. The
Hall Street Journal is consistent in
printing "Qadhafi" at the head of its
applying articles. USA Today has
somehow claimed this man (man?) to
be "Khadafy An apparent com-
bination of the two, "Kadafi is
what you will find printed in the Los
Angeles Times.
Like most Americans, I'm sorry
that we have to be continuously
reminded of this Libyan "authority
yet as long as we are, I wish we could
at least know how to correctly ad-
dress him. Oh, I'm not planning on
sending any friendly letters or
graduation announcements to the
Colonel, but how does he spell his
own name? Maybe David Letterman
would have more fun with this incon-
sistency that I, but if anyone can
justify a correct spelling, let me
know.
Alida K. Slager
Finance Dept.
Greeks
A few weeks ago, I was reading the
February 25th issue of The East
Carolinian and in the Campus Forum
section ran across the article entitled
"Fraternities Many greeks on this
campus may remember it, it was the
article that stated how there are
"serious flaws" in the greek system
here at ECU. The writer went on to
say how brothers "ostracize" each
other and how the fraternity system is
"diseased" with "dangerous" men.
The writer went on and on, but to me,
and to many others, this guy made
absolutely no sense at all. To begin
with, there is no way a person can
write about the greek system unless he
or she is a member of it and for so-
meone to think they can is absurd to
say the least.
The greek system here at ECU may
indeed have some Haws, but if they
do, it is due to the fact that the greek
sstem does not get the support it
needs from most school ad-
ministrators or from the non-greek
students. Though many school ad-
ministrators and community leaders
do support the greek system, too
many do not. But, on the whole. I
believe that the greek organization is
getting along just fine.
Many people view the fraternity
world as one consisting of young, in-
sensitive, clone-like drunks who care
about nothing but getting drunk, get-
ting wild, and getting laid. This view
is thrown way out ol proportion,
sure, fraternities like to have a good
time at a party, but then, is there
anyone, student or administrator,
who doesn't? The social aspect aside,
a fraternity exists because of the
cooperative effect among its
members, a composite of the con-
tributions o each individual therein,
and for the highest group success
demands each of these individual
qualities of its members. Besides pro-
moting fellowship among its
members, fraternities and sororities
encourage excellence in scholarship
and in building strong morals and
beliefs. The greek system gives young
men and women the opportunity to
participate in leadership positions
and this in turn actually prepares the
greek student more readily for life
after college. Greeks also play a large
role in community functions such as
community chest projects, communi-
ty clean-ups, The Salvation Army,
blood donor projects, and also help
in times needed, such as last year
when many fraternities helped Pitt
County tornado victims, by cleaning
up their properties and distributing
Red Cross parcels. Something else
that may not be known to the non-
greek world is that a big amount of
the money raised by fraternities from
dues and fundraisers goes to national-
ly recognized philanthropy's, such as
the American Red Cross, The Heart
Fund, The Lung Association, Cancer
Association, Muscular-Dystrophy
and others. As an example, the 104
chapters of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity
raised over $700,000 for their Na-
tional Philanthropy PUSH. (Play
Units for the Severly Handicapped)
The Beta Phi Chapter here at ECU
alone contributed over $4,000 this
year, with half its proceeds from their
fall toga party going to this cause.
The greek experience is one of
dignity and pride, and I feel that
more young men and women should
meet the challenge of joining it. I, of
course, am not making fraternities
out to be a group of young men who
study every minute of the dav � hell,
fraternities have some of the wildest
parties a campus can ever experience.
But there is a time for partying and a
time for committment, and most
fraternities know the difference and
their national organizations take a
serious stand on the conduct of its
members and will not hesitate to take
immediate disciplinary action against
the officers andor members of the
chapter which engage in any actic s
that go against their set standards a.id
morals.
It has been said before, it is not the
parties, the house, badge, emblem or
songs that make up a fraternity.
Bob Schultz
Senior, Industrial Tech.
NASA

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 17,
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me tor partying and a
committment, and most
know the difference and
a! organizations take a
Hand on the conduct of its
and will not hesitate to take
iplinary action against
ers and or members of the
apter which engage in any actions
it go against their set standards and
It has been said before, it is not the
arties, the house, badge, emblem or
hat make up a fraternity.
Schultz
nior, Industrial Tech.
NASA Remains Secret On Contents Of Compartment
CAPE CANAVERAL, FLA.
(UPI) � Salvage crews apparent
ly have recovered astronaut re-
mains that sources said were the
subject ot an intense search,
along with more shuttle wreckage
from the crash
site
)1
Challenger's crew compartment.
The salvage vessel G.W. Pierce
glided into port late Tuesday and
tied up at a Navy submarine pier.
Radio traffic from sea earlier in
the day indicated Coast Guard
divers had found human remains
in the area of the cabin crash site.
NASA will not discuss any
aspects of the crew module
salvage operation or the iden-
tification of crew members, but
an ambulance was ordered to the
pier Tuesday night to meet the
Pierce.
Several men unloaded what ap-
peared to be a large, rectangular,
box-shaped container and carried
it on board the ship. About five
minutes later, they carried it off
and loaded it into the ambulance,
which left the area under escort
by Air Force security.
Crew module wreckage was
discovered Five weeks ago in 100
feet of water, 16 miles offshore,
prompting an intensive salvage
operation that resulted in
recovery of most of the
wreckage.
Sources said salvage experts
had all but written off the chance
of Finding any significant addi-
tional debris, but NASA had
refused to call off the search
because some remains of one
astronaut had eluded recovery.
The work may have paid off
Tuesday but the space agency will
not confirm or deny such reports
and there was no sign on when
NASA will release the remains
for burial.
The space agency is in the pro-
cess of polishing up its internal
accident review before reporting
to the Challenger Disaster Com-
mission Friday.
At the Kennedy Space Center
Tuesday, acting NASA Ad-
ministrator William Graham told
reporters it was too early to
discuss the Findings that will be
presented to the presidential
panel, although agency engineers
have said a faulty rocket booster
joint "clearly" triggered the
disaster.
In another development,
NASA sources said the agency
has a 70mm film showing blurry
images of what appears to be the
shuttle's nose section, which in-
cluded the crew cabin, tumbling
toward the sea after the explosion
that destroyed the ship.
A giant piece of charred
wreckage from the rocket joint
that ruptured Jan. 28, dooming
the shuttle and its crew, was
brought to shore Tuesday.
Photographs clearly showed a
jagged, apparently melted hole in
the joint area where a tongue of
flame spewed out with deadly
results.
"I feel frankly very good that
we have found that particular
piece as does the (presidential)
commission and we're going to
put our very best efforts to
analyzing it said Rear Adm.
Richard Truly, chief of the shut-
tle program.
The crucial piece of wreckage
from Challenger's right-hand
booster was recovered Sunday by
the crew of the salvage vessel
Stena Workhorse.
Overtoil's Copy Center
5C per copy
Special Introductory Offer
Good Through May 15th
Located Inside Overton's Supermarket
Corner Third & Jarvis Streets
Walking Distance From ECU
April
11:15 a.m.
A Ciarrett dorm resident
reported a vehicle parked on 9th
and Cotanche St. had been
broken into and entered.
12:57 p.m.
A vehicle parked in the 5th and
Reade St. lot had been broken in-
to and entered. The incident was
reported by a Fletcher Hal! res
dent.
1:05 p.m.
A White Hall resident reported
the larcenj of hubcaps from a car
parked in the 5th and Reade lot.
2:00 p.m.
A visitor to Fletcher Hall
reported the larceny ol a black
billfold containing cash and a
bank card.
3:35 p.m.
Bicycle laxcenj rep
Clement Hall, rhe bike was
located at the bike rack east
Clement dorm.
7:40 p.m.
A Garreit dorm rep
vehicle parked in the s"
Reade St, freshma
broken into and entered and
there wa an attempted larceny.
April 10
2:37 a.m.
A 10th St.
rested tor D i St
11:20 a.m.
Two Jone
found in possessi roll-
ed substance and drug parapher-
nalia.
5:00 p.m.
A June- dorm resid
reported the larceny ol mo
taken from a room.
10:38 p.m.
Two Camp Lejuene marines
were banned from campu- foi be
ing unescorted in Tyler dorm.
April 11
3:26 a.m.
A White dorm resident and a
Scott dorm resident were found
in possession of liquor and being
under age.
10:50 a.m.
Vandalism to a vehicle parked
north of Scott dorm was reported
by a Scott dorm resident.
2:30 p.m.
A Fletcher dorm resident
reported tw o of her tires had been
slashed while the car was parked
east of Fletcher dorm.
3:20 p.m.
The rear wheel of a bicycle was
reported missing. The bike was
located northeast of Belk dorm.
April 12
3:00 a.m.
Recovery of a stolen vehicle.
rhe car was found in the dirt lot
north of ECU Public Safety
Dept.
April 13
2:15 a.m.
A White male from Utah was
issued a state citation for driver
consuming a alcoholic beverage
and a one way street violation.
10:00 p.m
An Aycock dorm resident
reported the larceny of hid bicy-
cle from the bike shed east of
Jlines dorm.
11:50 p.m.
Greenville resident was ar-
rested for peeping-tom west of
Fletcher dorm.
April 14
9:58 p.m.
A Greenville resident reported
en from and damage to two
vehicles parked at the
Chancellor's Residence of 5th St.
April 15
2:00 p.m.
A Department of Medicine stu-
dent reported the larceny of
balance beam scales from the
Brod) Building.
Grand Re-Opening
Planned For Wright
Continued From Page 1.
The newly renovated
auditorium will house 1,500 per-
manent theater seats, carpeted
aisles and entrances, all new
bathroom facilities, and an
elevator tower.
The newly constructed elevator
tower will provide access to the
balcony as well as the University
Counseling Center.
Currently the counseling center
is located in the Wright Annex. It
will be relocated upon comple-
tion of the renovations.
ROTC which is now located on
the second floor of Wright will
also be relocated to the third
floor to allow room for plush
dressing rooms and a green-
room, said Alexander.
At 8:00 p.m. on October 21,
the First performance of "a
magnificent series booked for the
Grand re-opening" will be
presented.
The Gala Re-opening of
STUDENTS!
BY MAY THE LITTLE SPACES MAY BE
IN B-l-G DEMAND!
RESERVE YOUR SPACE EARLY
HOOKER ROAD SELF STORAGE
1504 Hooker Road
355-5049
1 block from Telephone Office
In Concert
CROSS
April 19, 1986
Doors open at 7:30 p.m.
Across from Pitt-Greenville
Airport
All Seats Free
Sponsored by Cross Ministries
ULTRAFLASH
presents
appearing
Friday, April
18th
ULTRAFLASH
Doors open at 7:30
Show 8-10:30
� Women Free
After 10:30
$2.00 off
ULTRAFLASH
with this coupon
ot door
Wright Auditorium will be Sun-
day, November 16, 1986.
The North Carolina and East
Carolina University Symphony
Orchestras will perform a special
concert. Following the concert,
season ticket patrons are invited
to attend a reception hosted by
Chancellor and Mrs. John
Howell.
Two phases of construction
turned Wright Auditorium into a
"great hall The total cost of
the additions and modification
will be more than $3 million, said
Alexander.
The architect firm employed by
the University is J.N. Pease
Associates. The general contrac-
tor is J.H. Hudson Construction
of Greenville.
3eaUd
jcoca. tr7
n COLA j
v�I
prrirm
6$W (iofite&y
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23
11:00
Prizes:
1st place $300
2nd place $200
3rd place $100
For sign up details, call BEAU'S
phone 756-6401
located in Carolina East Centre
J
ECU Student Union Forum Committee
Presents:
A Debate on U.S.
Involvement in Central
America
featuring David MacMichael
former CIA Agent
and
Col Samuel T. Dickens
Representative of the State
Department
Sunday, April 20, 1986 at 8 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall Student Center
Admission: Students - $1.50
Faculty & Staff - $3.00
Public & at Door - $5.00
Tklwtt avaiiobia Item Central Ticket Offic
757-6611, �xt. 266
'�'��-�-�-�� fffh, iiTirmiiTfuniinirinm HOWWWWWI�W�Im






IHl 1 Avi i -Kt.i iman
APRIL 17, 1986
Apartheid Troubles South Africa
Continued From Page 3,
liberal hypocrisy that only con-
centrates on one country while
other countries are far worse,
and, (2), to protest the deface-
ment of the university (by the
anti-apartheid protestors) he
says
The conservative students
originally asked the university
chancellor to order the shanties
removed.
"People here want both the
wall and the shanty down
Peaslee savs. "And we agree We
wani a policy of no protests on
the Quad
The apartheid protestors,
however, figure their shantytown
sit-in is their last available option
for forcing UNC officials to sell
stock in companies with South
African operations.
"We've done everything else
says Margurite Arnold of UNC's
Anti-Apartheid Support Group.
"VVee been before the board.
Our resolution (supporting
divestment) passed a student
referendum by 5-2
Penn State anti-apartheid pro-
testors met not conservative
counter protestors, but a racist
poster campaign.
"Don't tread on me, Blackie
read one poster found tacked on
school buildings and bulletin
boards.
"They (the posters) encourag-
ed students to bring axes and
sledgehammers to tear down our
shanties says Lawrence Patrick
of Penn State's Black Caucus.
The sledgehammering of a
Dartmouth shantytown recently
resulted in the suspension of ten
students. The students � staff
members of the conservative
Dartmouth newspaper � are ap-
pealing their suspensions, backed
by lawyers funded bv the
ChairGiven Money By Alumni
K l News Bureau
A laige private gift by the R.
Dillard Teer family ol Durham
coupled with a state challenge
urant will enable East Carolina
Universiy to establish its first
distinguished professorship in the
& hool of Business
lo be known as the Roberl
Dillard Teer Jr. Distinguished
Professorship of Business, will
lO! Robert (Rob) leer, a 196
graduate of the ECU School of
Business who has successfully
inaged many of the Teer family
'perties and enterprises. The
dowment fund is a gift ol
:� s parents and sev t
hers ol his family.
It will be the first endowed
in 'he academic division of
, and is also one of the first
he University of North
olina system to be funded
der a unique challenge grant
gram for endowed chairs
ated bv the 1985 Genera!
ssembly.
The challenge grant program
ides for state incentive grants
m a trust fund administered
� the UNC Board of Governors
to match, on a one to two basis.
- designated for faculty chair
idowments.
I he endowment to support the
Teer professorship totals
S500.000. Of this, $333,000 from
the Teer family gift will be ap-
plied for a state matching grant
of S167,000, ECU officials said.
am delighted that the
Dillard Teer family has endowed
Robert Dillard Teer Jr.
Distinguished Professorship ol
Business Dr. John M. Howell,
ECU chancellor, said in making
the announcement.
"1: is fitting that the chair be
led tor Rob Teer who is a
ed graduate o the
School of Business
Howell said. "This generous sup-
port of our first endowed pro-
Fes �rship comes as ECU is
beginning to be recognized as one
o! the leading comprehensive
universities in the South.
"Much of ihat recognition
reflects the success of out
graduates who, like Rob Teer.
Have continued to identify with
the mstution and refer to it as
'alma mater " Howell said.
"This support by the Teer
family will enable ECU and the
School of Business to attain even
greater levels of excellence he
said. "We are glad that the Teers
are in the ECU family
Robert Dillard Teer Jr. is at
present the president and manag-
ing director of Teer Associates
Inc a real estate development,
leasing and management firm.
He has been the vice president of
leer Enterprises ltd a real
estate development and manage-
ment firm, and he has been the
assistant vice president for
finance and administration ant
treasure! of Nello 1 Teer Co its
affiliates and subsidiaries located
in Durham. Nello L. Teer Co. is a
large, multi-national construc-
tion company founded in 1909.
"I've always believed that you
gc on; of an experience what you
put into it leer said. "And 1
invested a giea: deal of time,
energy and work in my degree
here
"1 am confident that my
background in business was as
d as i could have received
anywhere lie said. While a stu-
dent a; ECU, Teer received a
Fieldcresl scholarship for
academic achievement.
He said he appreciated "the
willingness of faculty members in
the department ot go beyond the
normal call ot faculty respon-
sibly to make sure that students
understood the concepts, their
setting of very high standards and
evaluation of student perfor-
mance
lames I anier Jr ECU vice
chancellor for Institutional Ad-
vancement, said Rob Teer "is an
excellent role model for
students
"He and an increasing number
ot last Carolina alumni have
taken their education and linked
it with personal skills and at-
tributes to make major contribu-
tions to their professions and to
society I anier said.
"Rob Teer has emphasized
that you get out of an experience
what you put into it Eanier
said. "No one has worked harder
than Rob
Another member of the Teer
family. Lyda Teer, a sister of
Robert Teer, is a 1976 graduate
ol ECU. She is a director of the
ECU Alumni Association and is
serving as secretary of the
association.
Dr. Ernest B. L'hr, dean of the
school of Business, said the
Welcome Students
& Faculty
SPECIALS
All You
Can Eat
Any one, or any combination of 4
Shrimp � Oysters � Trout
Clam Strips � Devil Crab
Ocean Perch �
Alaskan Crab Legs Or
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Served with Fried or Baked Potato
Cole Slaw and Hush Puppies
FA MIL Y RES TA URA NT
GREENVILLE
105 Airport Road
758-0327
HOLRS: SunThun. II a.m. to 9p.m.
Frt. and Sat. II a.m. to 10 p.m.
distinguished professorship will
be conferred "upon a senior
scholarly leader who will join our
faculty and assist them in
achievement of their potential
He said emphasis will be on
developing existing faculty, par-
ticularly the younger members,
"by utilizing the experience of
the chairholder to inspire, in-
struct and assist m activities
which will enrich teaching,
develop research and furnish ser-
vice
The School of Business is the
largest of university's nine pro-
fessional schools with more that;
2,000 students and a faculty,
55. It is an upper division school.
admitting only juniors, seniors
and graduate students. It's entrv
standards are the most stringent
ot any undergraduate program
tor the universtiv.
S3S38S88S38883S3S
Heritage Foundation.
For all the noise, it seems many
students would like campus life
to return to normal.
"Some people want this issue
to be ovet and done with says
Andrea Hayes of Dartmouth.
"We want to go on
Says Republican Peaslee: "1
think most college campuses are
this way � About two percent of
the students are interested in
issues. One percent are conser-
vative and one percent are
liberal
"The rest don't are
The Arizona State group has
joined local churches and labor
unions to demand the city of
Phoenix and the state sell South
frican-related stocks held in
their pension funds.
Instead o folding up then pro-
test banners when then colleges
agrees to divest, anti-apartheid
groups a: about 20 other fully
divested schooU seem determined
to keep protesting.
1
Vowing to remain a force to be
reckoned with, students also are
targeting specific corporations
Dartmouth students, for in-
stance, joined with the United
Steel Workers of America last
week to erect a protest shack in
front of the Phelps Dodge head-
quarters in New York City.
Students demanded that
Phelps Dodge Chairman George
Munroe resign from the Dart-
mouth trustee board because of
the company's inteies'ts in South
Africa and its anti-union policies.
Other groups are urging
students to boycott Coca Cola.
General Electric, Shell Oil and
several computer companies with
operations in the reacially
segregated country.
And some Central America
protest groups are trying to gain
visibility by identifying
themselves with the anti-
apartheid movement.
.

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Send a lovely cut flower a:
rangement from Cox Fi
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April 19 1986
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600 Greenville Blvd - Creenvil
TMf FAST I Aft.
Sidewinder
Cutting Jh
By BFIH WHH KFk
Side w
Southea
br �Uj
roll show
night bei
enthusia
f
Side �
rner
MUSIC
exceller.
"Star 5
was een 1
The bai

state
Jerse
pack-
ing a
pas: �
live pei �
The �
the si .
long
ed ade to BL

Play ho us
Bv JOHN H W

exe.
edv

Pla
the c
dv' dei
rela
ey, Jr. :
fin.
Jenkins, I.
blend
tuali
Lion
ting R.
and
From The Notl
Give Me
Bv PI MOl
Umw immmmm ��� -m
This i s
to an end
without m
like to
year) i
attempting
to riot � withi
to it �
No. to be
of you expressed
for what 1 have vv
for that. I am grate
whv I'm still here
To those '
refuse to stand back a
at yourself, I'll saj -
I hope you get IDS
Enough said L et
sports. Oh. please le
about sports I � I've
torn down everything else under
the sun Now, 1 know no mo-
does the average Sunday, six-p
the sports writers are constantly h
puters. However, that should d
me in my quest to comprehend
As a writer, 1 have an an
understanding for athletes Thev rel
and gonorrhea � 1 know thev eis
don't care. 1 mean who gives a
Larry Holmes is on the come back
hell is he coming back to? He's pra
now � he should give it up w
breathe without a respirator
. f' �
A
1





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TMFEASTCARO- INIAN
Entertainment
APRIL 17, 1986
Page 7
Sidewinder Talks A bout
Cutting Their First LP
B BF.TH W HICKFR
sidewinder, o n e of the
Southeast's top circuit bands,
ught its powerhouse rock "n"
show to the Attic Saturday
t before a packed audience of
husiastic fans.
For the past four years.
Sidewinder has been on top as its
nbers continue their quest I'm
excellence. As semi-finalists on
'Stai Search '84 Sidewinder
was seen by 55 million people
The band's demanding touring
edule takes them through 20
states from Louisiana to New
Jersey where they perform to
acked houses, constantly break-
attendance records. In the
past year alone, over 250,0(X)
people have seen Sidewinder in
live performances.
The band's success led them to
studio, where they cut their
ong awaited debut album entitl-
; bade to Black.
The single "Just Goes to Show
b" was released March 3 and is
being played and requested at
stations across the
southeast.
To continue their fight for suc-
cess, the band has planned to
begin their second album in the
summer.
According to lead female
ocalist Wendy Upchurch, the
contents of the new album has
not been discussed among the
band members yet. "We don't
know any of the details about the
album; it's just too early to tell
she said.
Upchurch, orginally from
Fuquay-Varina, has been with
the band several years and does
all of the bookkeeping for the
group. Upchurch maintains that
neither she nor any of the band
members are in the business for
the money. "Performing is
something we enjoy she said.
Joining Upchurch in lead
vocals is Jan Fields, a native of
Princeton, N.C. Fields, originally
a drummer with a local heavy
metal band, has been singing for
two and a half years, fields is the
newest addition to the group.
"This is the last of the member
changes said an enthusiastic
Fields.
Bassist Robert Keanis, and one
of the two lead guitarists. Chris
Roberts, are longtime friends
who grew up playing music
gether. Both. Keanis and
Roberts have been with
Sidewinder for nearly two years.
Langella Plays Artist
In The Film Liberty'
Wendy Upchurch (left) and Jan Fields of Sidewinder, appeared at the
Attic last Friday night to play for a packed house.
The dynamic guitar section is
rounded out by Tim Lane, who
has also been with the band for
nearly two years.
Bland Sawyer, a UNC music-
major from Elizabeth City, plays
keyboards, acoustic guitar and
sings additional lead vocals.
Sawyer and Jim Sheppard, drum-
mer, like Reams and Robert,
grew up together playing music.
Since 19"8 the band has gone
through 42 member changes,
several of which have been the
lead male vocalist.
Personnel changes were the
main reason Sidewinder waited
almost eight years before starting
an album. "Basically, we were
waiting for the right combination
of people said Fields.
According to Upchurch the
band was not ready to cut an
album. "Last April when we
went to the studios we felt like the
members were qualified and
See BAM), Page M
JULY
Playhouse Presents Adult Theme, Receives Ovation
B JOHN SHANNON
Those who packed into
McGinnis Theatre for las: night's
opening of Fifth of July received
a study in realism, a near-flawless
execution, and a hilarious com-
edy to boot. Lanford Wilson's
play about a houseful of close
friends and family members
ideally suits the ever-expanding
talents of the East Carolina
Playhouse, as plainly attested to
by the standing ovation awarded
the cast.
Tension throughout the two
derives primarily from the
relationship between Kenneth
Talley, Jr, played by Robert Ruf-
fin, and Scott Rymer's Jed
Jenkins, Talley's lover. Ruffin
blends a well-meaning intellec-
tualitv with the physical frustra-
tion of a paraplegic, complemen-
ting Rymer's steadfast loyalty
and down-to-earth ethicalitv.
Though nearly sucombing to
a desire to sell his propertv and
run from what seems like an in-
surmountable situation (the kids
he vsants to teach won't look him
in the eve because of his han-
dicap), Tallev is saved bv the
strong reactions o! Jenkins and
especially bv Aunt Sally, who is
played exceptionally by Hael
Stapleton in one of the plavV
most inspired roles.
The play's inoffensiveness may
result partially from the regulari-
ty of its comic relief. Hal Wells
had the audience rolling with
laughter at his portrayal of
Weston Hurley, a spaced-out
guitar player who intersperces
naive observations culled from
off-beat books with frequent
bong hits.
Hurlev is roundly criticized tor
his naivety upon relating the
moral-less story of an Eskimo
boy who ingeniously (albeit
flatulently) thaws some caribou
meat for his family � unfor-
tunately, he makes the food unfit
to eat in the process.
Another vehicle for comedy is
the flighty and pubescent Shirley
I alley, played exuberantly by
English Toole. Shirley flounces
about like the fourteen year old
she is. but constantly strains to be
older. Her youthful energy is
played off against the drug-
induced mania of Gwen Landis,
an aspiring pop singer played by
Kelly Anchors.
Like Molly Fix's June Tally,
Gwen landis is burned out,
forever divorced from her Uh
idealism. Unlike June Tally,
Gwen still lives in a dream of
glory. June has become cynical
and domineering, like her father.
Micheal T. Puts, as John 1 a-
dis, is perhaps the only "bad
guy" in the play. Ironically, it's
Pitts who complains about the
lack of a moral in Hurley's
Eskimo anecdote. Fifth of July
avoids the problem by ending
with a resolution that ties up the
plot's conflicts neatly � but
those who wish to find out how it
ends can see it for themselves.
(UPI) � Frank Langella, who
likes playing characters in
historical films, became an avid
history buff while preparing for
his role as Frederic Auguste Bar-
tholdi, sculptor of the Statue of
Liberty, in a three-hour TV
movie.
Langella, like most Americans,
had only a dim knowledge of the
great monument in New York
Harbor when he was cast in
"Liberty He quickly did his
homework.
"I knew nothing about the
statue of Bartholdi Langella
said after completing the film. "1
thought the statue was a gift to
this country from the government
of France. It wasn't. The statue
was a gift from the French peo-
ple.
"I've played Cyrano, Dracula,
Sherlock Holmes, Zorro, the
Prince of Hamburg and Salieri in
Amadeus � among other period
pieces and classics on stage and in
films � but few characters were
as fascinating as Bartholdi.
"1 like to play men with epic
dreams, and Bartholdi certainly
was a unique and singular
dreamer. He was obsessed with
designing and completing the
Statue 't Liberty despite a dif-
ficult private life.
"His domineering, strong-
willed mother didn't want him to
marry. This storv is very sexual,
about a man torn between his
mother and his mistress, which
often made his life miserable.
Both women played roles in the
statue's appearance.
"Bartholdi wanted the statue
to be strong and powerful, yet
feminine, accepting and appeal-
ing. He finally settled for giving
Liberty the face of his mother
and the body of his mistress.
"He sculpted many versions of
the head and then destroyed them
until he produced the features
and expression he thought best
represented the spirit of
Liberty
Langella, tall and broad-
shouldered, is even more imlos-
ing off screen than on. His voice
is deep, authoritative and more
familiar to Broadway
theatergoers than to TV or film
viewers. He won a Tony Award
for his performance in Seascape.
Of playing historical roles, the
articulate Langella said, "I never
play the history. 1 play the man.
"Bartholdi understood how
much the world needed Liberty,
this symbol of freedom. He was
motivated by watching the reign
of terror in France under
Napoleon III. Many of his
friends and teachers were ar-
rested.
"He didn't begin work on the
statue until he was 40. It took
him 17 years to complete.
Originally, he thought he would
fill the interior with sand, making
it last forever, but he abandoned
that plan because he needed a
structure that could withstand the
winds.
"He called in Gustave Eiffel
(designer of the Eiffel Tower),
who built an internal super struc-
ture to give the lead and copper
statue interior strength.
"Bartholdi believed the statue
should stand on neutral soil and
represent freedom to all the
world. He came to America and
chose Bedloe's island for its ad-
vantageous location and because
it was empty except for a herd of
goats. He wanted to change the
island's name to Liberty Island,
but it wasn't until recently that
that was done.
"He was discouraged by the
French and American govern-
ments. Bartholdi was brushed off
by President Grant. His own
government was too absorbed in
the Franco-Prussian War to get
involved.
"Bartholdi was forced to raise
funds in France. And he came to
the U.S. on his own to ask for
money to complete the statue and
bring it to this country
Langella said Liberty was Bar-
tholdi's only major work, aside
from the statue of Lion that can
Be found in a small, remote
French village.
"I'm delighted to have par-
ticipated in this film, which will
be broadcast June 30. I think it's
time we made a big fuss over
Liberty again to let our children
know how great our freedom is
he said.
Moore Appears In New Film
From The Not So flight
Give Me A Sporting Chance
By PAT MOLLOY
mntmM tjMrmr fMtm
This is it, folks. The semester has finally come
to an end. And to be honest, it has blazed by
without much incidence or rebuttal (though I'd
like to thank Kathleen Massey; she made my
year). I can safely say that I have done my part in
attempting to incite this campus
to riot � without much success,
to my surprise.
No, to be sure, the majority
of you expressed appreciation
for what I have written � and
for that, I am grateful � you're
why I'm still here.
To those of you who simply
refuse to stand back and laugh
at yourself, I'll say good luck �
I hope you get AIDS.
Enough said. Let's talk about
sports. Oh, please let's talk
about sports. Lord knows I've
YMPfts, WWW �KfiM�.?.
SUNfcS You tkve�S� ui 5pkcs
What of boxing? In this sport there seems to ex-
ist the summation of a concept of the entire na-
tion, that concept being, "If you hurt me, I will
hurt youbadly Who expresses this concept?
Two dudes with the physical builds of Chevys and
the combined intelligence of Chris Washburn.
Boxing is a sad, sad sport.
Sliding into baseball (forgive the pun, I'm not a
well person) This is a sensitive area since I used
to dabble in the sport. But I
have to laugh at myself, and
anyone associated with the
game. I mean where else would
you find eighteen guys stupid
enough to stand in front of a
man who makes his living hurl-
ing objects in excess of 90mph?
Never mind that the man
throwing the objects probably
can't speak any English. Hasn't
anyone noticed that the umpire
and the catcher wear helmets,
chest pads, knee pads, and
masks? Of course, the poor
geek at bat only gets a wooden
X -AN RtC-
torn down everything else under
the sun. Now, I know no more about sports than stick. What's wrong with this picture?
does the average Sunday six-packer � except that To hell with that, better to sit in the publications
the sports writers are constantly hogging the com- building safely behind a compugraphic computer
puters. However, that should do nothing but assist terminal. At least the machine won't spit tobacco
me in my quest to comprehend this phenomenon, on my shoes, or slap me on the ass. And I can pro-
As a writer, I have an amazing lack of nounce the word "computer Can you say Joa-
understanding for athletes. They're like false teeth quin Andujar? Thank you, no.
and gonorrhea � I know they exist, but I simply Basketballnow here's a game. This is the only
don't care. I mean who gives a damn whether sport in the civilized world where a star player
Larry Holmes is on the come back trail. What in (one who makes ten times the amount of money
hell is he coming back to? He's practically a fossil the President does) can carry the name Spud
now � he should give it up while he can still Webb,
breathe without a respirator. See MOLLOY, Page 8
axes Release
"It's the story of a friendship
between two women who live
very different lives says Mary
Tyler Moore of her new motion
picture.
"One is a conservative
housewife whose only creative
outlet has been her home and
family. The other is an am-
bitious, talented TV newscaster
compulsively involved in her
career. When thev meet, they
recognize in each other their op-
posite number, the other side of
the coin. It draws them together
like a magnet she said.
It also, as fate would have it,
subjects them to great stress w hen
they discover they have
something in common after all �
the same man; husband to one,
lover to the other.
As Holly Davis, the shy and
sunny housewife whose security
blanket suddenly unravels,
Moore stars in Just Between
Friends. The Orion Pictures
release also stars Christine Lahti,
Sam Waterston and Ted Danson.
The contemporary com-
edydrama was produced by Ed-
ward Teets and Allan Burns, who
also directed from his own
screenplay. Burns, in fact, wrote
the story with Moore in mind.
Their association dates back to
"The Mary Tyler Moore Show
which he co-created and subse-
quently co-produced.
"At the beginning of the series
I was a 30-year-old ingenue
says Moore, referring to the hit
television show which brought
her three Emmys and served as
the launching pad for her own
production company, MTM.
"During the next seven years my
character matured she was still
good old Mary Richards, but she
� and I � had enough self-
confidence to tackle difficult
issues.
She considers it a tribute to
Burns and the show's other
writers that Mary Richards
became the role model for young
working women all over
America. "They were very much
aware of social growth and the
way it affected women in the
1970s she comments.
Ironically, it is the character
played by Christine Lahti in Just
Between Friends who, like Mary
Richards, revels in TV news.
"My character, on the other
hand, hasn't worked at a real job
since she was a dancer � before
her marriage � and auditioned
for the role of Mrs. Peanut in a
television commercial. When
she's offered a part-time teaching
job in an aerobics studio, she's
almost embarrassed to take the
money. But it becomes the basis
for her closest friendship � and
eventually for a fresh start in
life
Such resilience is a complete
turnabout from the withdrawn,
stunningly severe wife and
mother Moore played in the
Oscar-winning film Ordinary-
People. The character's inability
to accept her son's suicide nearly
sank the entire familybut won
Moore an Oscar nomination as
See DANSON, Page 8
Christine Lahti (right) and Mary Tyler Moore star in Jut Between
Friends an Orion Pictures release. The movie pits two women of dif-
ferent lifestyles against each other as wife and mistress.
r m ��
- � jC'�0-�4P�






8
IHEEAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 17, 1986
,1
Danson, Moore Will
Continued From Page 7
well as a Golden Globe Award.
That was in 1980, just a year
after her Broadway triumph in an
equally taxing role � as a
paraplegic arguing for the right
to die in the black comedy Hhose
life Is It Anyway? Her extraor-
dinary performance (later echoed
by Richard Dreyfuss in the film
version) won Moore a special
Tony Award.
Born in Brooklyn and raised in
Southern California, Moore's
early ambition was to become a
successful dancer and singer � as
well as an actress of depth. By the
time she graduated from high
school she had danced in televi-
sion commercials and variety
shows, and was ready to make
her acting debut � as Sam, the
switchboard operator who show-
ed only her legs in the television
series, "Richard Diamond,
Private Detective
Her next major TV role was
somewhat more visible. During
five years as Rob Petrie's bright
and funny wife Laura in "The
Dick Van Dyke Show she first
showed the range of her comedic
talents and won a pair of Emmys.
After appearing in such hit
series as "Hawaiian Eye "77
Sunset Strip" and "Bachelor
Father she moved into films
with X-15, Then came
Thoroughly Modern Millie, the
musical spoof of 1920s flappers
in which she co-starred with Julie
Andrews.
"It was the embodiment of
what I wanted when I was a
young girl Moore recalls. "I
sang and danced in this wonder-
fully lighthearted movieit was a
fantasy come true
Other film credits include
Don't Just Stand There What's
So Bad About Feeling Good?,
Change of Habit and Six Weeks.
It was in television, however,
that Moore moved beyond acting
to become a creative force. With
her then husband Grant Tinker
she formed MTM Enterprises, an
independent production com-
pany which brought forth such
quality series as "Rhoda
"Phyllis "The Bob Newhart
Show "Lou Grant "WKRP
in Cincinnati "Newhart
"Remington Steele "St.
Elsewhere" and "Hill Street
Blues
On the acting front, mean-
while, Moore matured through
such portrayals as news cor-
respondent Betty Rollin, whose
real-life struggle with cancer was
recounted in the acclaimed TV
drama, "First You Cry
In 1984 Moore and James
Garner broke new ground again
with "Heartsounds a TV film
which explored the effects of sud-
den illness on a healthy marriage.
With the completion of "Fin-
negan Begin Again a romantic
comedy with Robert Preston
made for HBO Films in 1985,
Moore plunged once again into
the chal'enge of a weekly series.
Titled simply "Mary it stars
her as a consumer advocate col-
umnist for a Chicago newspaper,
and premiered to excellent
reviews.
BLOOM COUNTY
fr
'm

3
IfJT Sam "lenton and Mary Tyler Moore star in Jus.
ween Friends, an Orion Pictures release.
Bel-
Molloy Just Jokes The Jocks
Continued From Page 7
Say it slowly so you can
register the full impactSp-ud
We-bb. Can you picture what this
dude looked like as a child? Fer
sher. Imagine him trying to lay a
line on some babe in Grog's.
"Hey baby, my name be Spud.
Spud Webb. You know, I shoot
hoop No doubt ol' Spud would
end up in traction at Pitt
Memorial.
How about sportscasters. God,
what lumps of sub-human flesh
they are. They're always trying to
slip some big words into their
vocabulary � "Well, Giff, uh,
Hansen tried to ribulate the uh,
triseculai quarter of the uh,
lineman. You know, OJ, if that'd
been me, I would have uh, ran-
siated the formidable back by uh,
stomping his ass
Get a grip, dudes. I take
weekends off. I don't want to
hear that junk. Save your
Webster's Thesaurus crud for
some goon with no cerebral cor-
tex, alright.
Lastly come professional
wrestlers. I can alread hear the
faithful of this religion deman-
ding I be hanged by my thumbs
until I say "I admire Hulk
Hogan Get over it.
What an assortment of losers
these guys are. The criteria for
admission to this sport (if that's
what you wish to call it) are sim-
ple: be stupid, be loud, and be ex-
tremely overweight. In other
words, if you can permanently
stretch Spandex, you're a keeper.
���������i
CORRECTION
The Coors & Coors Light Beer
advertised in Tuesday's East
Carolinian was an error. The cor-
rect item and price are:
$1�
Old Milwaukee Beer
6 � 12 oz. cans
TO
OVEBTONS
CORNER OF 3rd ST. & JARVIS
(WALKING DISTANCE FROM ECU)
FRESH
HOT
'doDsQdl Us
&
�onp Bar?
GET READY GREENVILLE
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A SPECTACULAR 14 FT. SOUP AND SALAD
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HOURS: MONDAY - SATURDAY 8.00 AM - 8:00 PM
SUNDAY 1:00 PM - 6:00 PM
��-��.
Now I'm not saying that I want
to get in the ring with these
freaks, but I'd sure like to discuss
the pros and cons of free enter-
prise with them. That would be a
gas.
Okay, that just about does it.
You're through with me for four
whole months. I certainly have
enjoyed meeting several of you �
I hope you can say the same
about me. Incidentally, to those
of you who wonder. I'm really
not as conceited as 1 pretend to
be; nor am I as obnoxious � but
the pay's good.
Editor's Note: "From The Not
So Right" will return next
semester.
0
- - � �. �
s
��� �
40! . .
Don't Leave
J Without O
vV
Interest Free 4,
-my Payment Plan
Available !
i
$10.00
Deposit
Special
Interest Free
Payment Plan Available !
ECU Student Store
Wednesday, April 1i
Thursday, April 17
TIME: 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.
Untrr iOMes
tMM0tE� '
Man-O-Stick
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APRIL 17, 1986
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Fantasy Sings For Deaf
hantasy, a group which per-
forms in sign languag. to music,
will present their program "The
Jukebox" this Sunday.
According to Nancy Barnette,
president of the Sign Language
Club, Fantasy is a group con-
sisting of 20 to 25 hearing im-
paired students, interpreters and
sign language students.
"Our purpose she said, "is
to promote deaf awareness. We
try to relate the deaf world to the
hearing world through music
Using props and costumes to
enhance visual understanding,
Fantasy performers sign to a
selection o mostly popular
music, including "That's What
Friends Are For and Frank
Sinatra's "New York, Ne
York
Fantasy was first organized
about six years ago by the direc-
tor of the program for the hear-
ing impaired, Barnette explains.
Since then, its performances on
campus have enjoyed increasing
popularity.
"The Jukebox" will be held on
Sunday at 8 p.m. in Jenkins
auditorium in the Jenkins Fine
Arts Building. Admission is free.
Band Receives Local Acclaim
Overkill
"7
By FRIEDRICH
Continued From Page 7
ready to head for the top with an
album she said.
The recording session lasted
until the end of September. Fade
to Black can be found at Record
Bar, Camelot Music, and various
other record stores throughout
the southeast.
According to band members,
their style has not been affected
by the frequent changes in the
lead male vocalist. Fields main-
tains, "you just do what you do
best
Sidewinder's style is uniquely
their own; their repertoire of
songs ranges from pop rock to
rock 'n' roll. Their album
features "Just Goes to Show
Ya an upbeat medium rock
song and "Stop in the Name o'
Love a popular rendition of a
50s song.
By varying their music the
band appeals to a diversified au-
dience. "We have no particular
style said Upchurch. "Perfor-
ming, we play renditions of older
songs as well as some originals
like 'Rock 'n' Roll Man a rock
song with a harder beat said
Upchurch. "We consider
ourselves entertainers and for
that reason we play what people
want to hear. That's what we're
here for and that's what we do.
And what they do the do well.
Sidewinder has played to flocking
crowds which have exceeded 8000
on several occassions.
To achieve a high quality of
live performance. Sidewinder
uses the best state of the art
sound and lighting equipment
available, and travels with full
concert production capable of
handling 10.000 seat venues.
Sidewinder's aim is to land a
major record deal. With the ex-
pansion of the band coming from
the debut album and the "Star
Search '84" appearances.
Sidewinder is on the right track.
Barefoot On The Mall Scheduled
Kick off your shoes and stroll
around at Barefoot on the Mall
Thursday from noon to 10 p.m.
This annual spring fling is spon-
sored by the ECU Special Events
Committee and will feature four
different bands.
"This year we have a diverse
group of bands, something that
will appeal to everyone said
Donna San Marcos, chairperson
of the Special Events Committee.
Starting the musical entertain-
ment from noon to 1 p.m. will be
Boone Grass, a blue grass band
that tends to incite audience par-
ticipation. From 1:30 p.m. to
2:30 p.m bop to the rock-a-billy
beat of the Phantoms, and from
3 p.m. to 4 p.m rock to the reg-
gae rhythm of The Amateurs.
From 4 p.m. to 4:30 p.m
door prizes donated by local mer-
chants, will be given away and
from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m the
power pop sound of Xenon will
end this musical montage.
But the entertainment for the
evening is not yet finished. From
8 p.m. to 10 p.m. The Rocky
Horror Picture Show, a cult
classic, will be shown on the mall
in its entirety.
"Music isn't the only attrac-
tion for this event San Marcos
added. "Campus organizations,
such as sororities, are going to
have concession stands and enter-
tainment booths; and we are go-
ing to have a fortune teller and an
antique photographer there.
We're trying to get a carnival at-
mosphere to go along with the
live entertainment
San Marcos added this year's
event will be covered live by
WZMB
7
��� � �





III! I ASIAROl INIAN
Sports
Classifi
APRIL 17. 1986
Page 10
Winfred Johnson: Setting New
B TONY BROWN
Staff Wtttn
Chris Bradberry singles to
centerfield and the ball is
relayed back in to the pitcher,
who kicks at the mound. He
nervously rubs the ball,
studies the figure at the plate,
then hurls an inside fastball,
forcing the batter back as
Bradberry breaks for second
and slides in safe.
Again the pitcher looks
toward home, but suddenly
the umpire points at the bat-
ter and motions him to first
base, indicating yet another
intentional walk for the
powerfully-built clean-up hit-
ter
Another time at bat
Bradberry homers, then the
number four batter steps up
to the plate again. Murmurs
go through the crowd as the
anticipation mounts. So-
meone says "He'll never hit
one now but the pitch
comes in belt-high and is
launched way over the
rightfield fence as someone
yells "I knew he could do it
Such is iife for ECU's Win-
fred Johnson, who as a pit-
cherfirst
basemandesignated hitter
recently became the first
player in NCAA history to
pitch 30 victories while col-
ecting 60 homeruns. a feat he
accomplished last week with
a homer against Richmond.
He has added two wins and a
homer to that mark since
then.
That record-setting perfor-
mance is only the latest in a
long string of highlights for
Johnson, however. He has
already rewritten virtually all
the ECU career and smgle-
season offensive marks and
will lead in several more
before the season is over.
In addition to his offensive
output, several of his pitching
statistics rank him high in
Pirate baseball history, in-
cluding a school record of 32
career wins.
Despite the senior hurler's
success on the mound, it's
being on the receiving end of
pitches that has made him the
Pirate most feared by oppos-
ing teams � and most loved
by the home crowd at ECU's
Harrington Field.
Johnson is the first to point
out. though, that such records
are really a team effort. If
there were not good offensive
players ahead of him in the
line-up or with a less-skilled
team behind him on defense,
he says he couldn't have
achieved the same success.
"A lot of variables are in-
volved as far as setting
records Johnson said. "I've
had the good luck of playing
here with good teams. Greg
Hardison. Steve Sides and
Chris Bradberry deserve a lot
of the credit.
"Without them getting on
base ahead of me it wouldn't
have been possible for me to
do what I have. Coach (Gary)
Overton has helped a lot by
not putting a lot of pressure
on us to produce offensively
and lets me swing. He doesn't
take the bat out of my hands
Johnson says he has got-
ten many good tips from ECU
assistant coach Billy Best.
who picks out problems the
Pirates are having on offense
and uses special drills to get
them back in the groove. He
also credits his high school
coaches. Jimmy Baldwin of
East Bladen and Lmwood
Hedgepeth of Whiteville for
giving him good instruction.
Although Johnson has
been a workhorse of the
Pirate staff, it's nowhere near
the equivalent of his high
school pitching career, as he
was 15-2 his senior year, when
he was on the mound in near-
ly every game.
Winfred Johnson, nho recently became the first plaver in NCAA
histor to hit 60 homeruns and win 30 names in a career, is shown here
firing a pitch in earlier action. I he next action for the Pirates is this
afternoon against North (arolina.
Strong Competition For Tennis Teams
H DAVIDMifJWFW �,� ,rr n-
B DAVID McGINNESS
The ECU tennis teams had a
bus, if unrewarding time last
weekend, as the men came in
fourth out of five teams at the
UNC-Wilmington Tourne while
the women lost their third, fourth
and fifth matches in-a-row.
The Pirates faced strong com-
petition from Guilford College
and The Citadel at the Azalea
Tourney, according to coach Pat
Sherman.
"We played against the Citadel
first, said Sherman, "which
was a pretty strong team to start
against We lost five of six singles
matches against them
The Tourney team results are as
follows:
Guilford College � No. 1 � 35
points.
The Citadel � No. 2 � 20
points.
Campbeil College � No. 3�16
points.
ECU � No. 4 � 13 points.
UNC-W � No. 5 � 6 points.
On a brighter note, the men
showed what they are capable last
Thursday, when they demolished
St. Andrews College 9-0. Among
the remarkable performances in
the match were Dan La.Mont's
No,singles match and Tim
Morris' play both at the No. 6
singles and No. 3 doubles.
In a three-set comeback, La-
Mont defeated Dan Clark 4-6,
6-4, 6-2. Coach Sherman was im-
pressed with the level of
LaMont's play.
"Dan played an excellent
match at the No. 1 singles
Sherman said. "It was one of his
best this season
The rest of both the singles and
doubles competition was
dominated by ECU, as they won
all their matches in straight sets,
losing only five games in the re-
mainder of their singles matches.
John Melhorn led the way with
his 6-0, 6-0 plastering of John
Hall � St. Andrews' No. 2 man.
Greg Loyd was only slightly
outdone by Melhorn. He shelack-
ed Tim Laird 6-1,6-0 in the No. 3
competition.
John Taylor ousted Bobby
Levee 6-1,6-1 in the No. 4 match.
John Anthony rolled over Sven
Capps 6-1,6-0 in the No. 5 con-
test.
Tim Morris completed the
singles sweep with a 6-2, 6-0
trouncing of Greg Brennan. This
was Morris' first appearance in
competition for the Bucs, and he
got off to an excellent start with
wins m both singles and doubles.
In doubles action, it was
Melhorn and Taylor over Clark
and Liard by default in the No. 1
match.
Campanero and Anthony edg-
ed out Benson and Levee 7-6, 7-5
in the No. 2 doubles match, while
teammates Loyd and Morris clin-
ched the match with a 6-1, 6-2
removal of St. Andrews' Prizzi
and Hall.
With the win against St. An-
drews, the Bucs move to 10-13 on
the season. Their next match will
be in this Friday's Richmond Spr-
ing Invitational Tourney
Play by the ECU women net-
ters of late has been somewhat
dissappointing. Last Sunday's
9-0 loss to William & Mary made
five in-a-row, and brought them
to 5-7 this spring and 11-10
overall.
In the No. 1 singles contest,
Namrqatha Appa Rao defeated
Beck Clements 6-3, 6-2.
Ann Mandefield fared no bet-
ter in her No. 2 match against
Julie Kaczmarek. The William &
Mary player topped Manderfield
6-1. 6-4.
Mimi Roche o! W & M
defeated Lisa Eichholz 6-3, 6-4.
Debbie MaCall defeated
ECL's Holly Murray 6-0, 6-2. in
the No. 4 match.
Michelle O'Bryan of W & M
ousted Ty Myers 6-1, 6-0 in the
No. 5 spot and Kathy Chromistey,
beat ECL's Susan Montjo 6-2
6-2.
William & Marv swept the
doubles competition. Mander-
field and Eichholz pushed the se-
cond set of their No. 1 match to
5-7, but fell in straight sets, as did
the No. 2 and 3 ECU doubles
teams.
Last Saturday the Lady pirates
fell to George Mason 5-4. GMU
edged out ECL 2 1 in the doubles
competition after the two teams
split 3-3 in the singles.
Last Friday saw the Lady
Pirates fall 9-0 to Richmond
University. The Lady Bucs only
cleared seven games in the singles
matches and lost in straight sets
in the doubles as well.
On Apr 9, the Lady Pirates
emerged with an 8-1 loss to Old
Dominion University Mander-
field was the lone winner for
LCI , who according to coach
Sherman played the best match
of her life. After winning her first
set 6-1, she dropped the second
6-4, but came back in the third set
with a 6-1 victory.
The women's ream will play in
the CAA Tennis Championships
at James Madison University this
Thursday, Friday, Saturday and
Sunday. The favorites in this
tourney should be William &
Mary and Richmond University.
Pirates Defeat William & Mary
U. I 114 S II 1 V III I I. i '
By TIM CHANDLER
The Pirate baseball team
defeated William & Mary yester-
day afternoon 2-0, running their
record for the year to 30-4.
Jim Peterson picked up the
win, going the distance for the
Bucs. Peterson lifted his season
mark to 8-2.
The Pirates picked up their two
runs of the game in the fifth inn-
ing. Both of the runs were
unearned.
Steve Sides was first to get on
base, as he reached first base on a
error with one out in the inning.
One out later, Jim Riley hit a
ground ball that got past the first
baseman and went into rightfield,
putting runners on first and
third.
The Pirates then pulled a dou-
ble steal. As the unsuccessful
throw to second was late, Sides
managed to steal home. David
Ritchey then came to bat and
connected on a double that
brought Riley in for the Pirates'
final run.
The Bucs are now in first place
in the CAA with a 9-3 conference
mark. They are also ranked in
both major polls this week.
Baseball America has the Pirates
ranked 24th, while they occupy
the 30th spot in the Collegiate
Baseball poll.
The 30 wins for the baseballers
is the the fastest start in the
school's history. It is only the
fourth time since records have The next action for the Pirates
been kept (since in 1951), that the
Bucs have obtained 30 wins. They
are now only four victories shy of
the school record for wins in one
season.
will be this afternoon, as they
travel to Chapel Hill for a
rematch with North Carolina.
Gametime is set for 6:00 p.m. in
Boshamer Statium.
Softballers Split Pair
ByJILLBLAIR
oru Writer
The Lady Pirates and the
Virginia Cavaliers split a
doubleheader played Tuesday
afternoon. ECU won its first
game 1-0 but the Cavaliers
jumped back to a 2-0 victory in
the second game.
Stacey Boyette was the winning
pitcher for ECU in the first game.
Eva Hughes led the way as she
went two-for-three for the
Pirates. Sandy Kee played a very
good game knocking in the winn-
ing run.
ECU softball head coach Sue
Manahan commented on the fine
play of her Bucs. "These were
very well played and were good
Sports Fact
Thurs. Apr. 17, 1976
In Cincinnati a swarm of
10,000 bees near the visitors
dugout delays play for 30
minutes. Eventually the bees
are lured into a makeshift hive
by two fans. Apparently un-
nerved by the experience, the
visiting Giants proceed to lose
to the Reds 11-0.
defensive games Manahan
said. "Both teams had runners
on, threatening to score in several
innings, but they couldn't get
them in. They both were very ex-
citing games
In the second game of the
doubleheader, Virginia won 2-0.
The Pirates got four hits overall
and had bases loaded on several
occasions. Virginia made several
diving catches to get them out of
"They Here very well
played and were good
defensive gamesboth
were very exciting games. "
�Sue Manahan
the tougher innings.
"These were two softball
games that were very interesting
to watch Manahan
acknowledged. "These were also
the last home games for the
seniors. I think they went out
well
The softballers will be in action
in Chapel Hill this afternoon at 3
pm to battle the Lady Tarheels in
a doubleheader.
His prowess as a homerun
hitter did not really emerge
until that season, but
developed rapidly as a star-
ting freshman for ECU in
1983, when he led the Pirates
with 11. He has paced ECU in
that category every year since
and now sets a new career
mark with each one he adds.
When it was noted at the
opening of the '86 season that
the righthanded fastballer
was likely to set the 60
homer-30 victory record, a
great ueal of attention was
focused on Johnson, who ad-
mits he was thinking about
that possiblity a great deal.
"I don't really set personal
goals he said, "but I had the
30-60 mark on my mind. It was
quite a relief to finally get the
suspense over with With
Braduerry (.352, 8 HRs. 10
dbls, 43 hits) batting ahead of
me, it's added another dimen-
sion to our offense
According to Johnson, the
on-base percentage of the
first three batters creates the
situation he enjoys the most
� coming to bat with Pirates
roaming the basepaths.
"Even though you're sup-
posed to be equally ready
every time at the plate. I get
just a little more intense with
runners on base he said as
he grinned at that thought "I
take pride in getting a hit with
men on base "
While he was glad that ECU
has already assured at least a
series split this season with
archnvals UNC and NCSU.
which pleases the fans and
helps recruiting, he says the
mam Pirate efforts this
season are toward the goal of
qualifying for the CAA tourna-
ment again by finishing in the
top four of the league
"I think we lost m the tour-
nament last year because we
relaxed too much Johnson
said "We dominated the con-
ference more last year and I
think we relaxed toward the
end of the season This year
the conference is more even
and we don't have a long lay-
off between the regular
season and the play-offs,
which I think will help us a
lot "
Last year the Pirates blitzed
through their conference
schedule to take the regular
season crown, only to lose
four of five at the end of the
season and get eliminated
from the league tourney
whose winner gets an
automatic bid to the NCAA
play-offs.
Johnson's contribution to
the team has recently
resulted in the 29-4 Pirates be-
ing ranked 24th by Baseball
America and 30th by Col-
legiate Baseball. One look at a
Winfred Johnson hit flying
over the fence toward the up-
per stratosphere will con-
vince you this team can com-
pete equally with any col-
legiate team around today.
If the season continues -
it has so far. the ECU Pirates
may be facing the best teams
in the nation again m the play-
offs as they did in 1984. when
they narrowly missed winning
the NCAA South Regionals at
Tallahassee. Fl
Now the semor-laden Pirate
squad could have anc
crack at the nation's elite,
with Johnson leading the way
on the mound and at the
plate.
As he puts it so sin
"Destiny is in our owi
hands
The Winfred Johnson
ECU Record Book
(through April 15)
Season. HRs. 1 & 2 (22 18)
RBls. 1 & 2 (75, 46): bar
average. 97 AB 432s. slugg-
ing percentage. 1 & 3 (.887.
.710): total bases. 1 & 2 (150,
115): hits (73): doubles, cur-
rently tied for 2,12.
Career: HRs (61 s: RBls (196);
total bases (431). hits. 2 207
A-aiks 2 (93); runs (131);
doubles. 2 (39).
Jicates probable advance-
ment before end of season
Schedule Of Events
For Pigskin Pigout
Thursday, April 17
7:00 pm
Friday. April 18
8:30 am - 2:00 pm
6:00 pm
7:00 pm
9:00 pm
9:30 pm
10:00 pm
Saturday, April 19
7:00 am-9:00 pm
9:00 am
9:30 am
10:00 am
10:00 am
10:00 am - 3:00 pm
10:30 am - 11:30 am
11:00 am - 2:45 pm
11:30 am - 12:00 pm
11:30 am - 2:15 pm
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm
12:30 pm
1:15 pm - 2:15 pm
2:15 pm - 2:45 pm
2:45pm
3:00 pm
3:10 pm
3:30 pm
Pig-Out Golf Classic SociaJ and
Auction
Purple Gold Pig-Out Golf Tour-
nament & Luncheon featuring
Miller Lite All Star
Mini-Carnival opens�band
strikes up near side of Stadium
Pigs Arrive � live radio show
begins � band strikes up on far
side of Stadium
Fires started for pig-cookin'
Fireworks display in Stadium
Pigs placed on fires
Public invited to walk the "mid-
way" around the football
stadium and visit with Miller Lite
All-Stars while pig cookin' con-
tests get underway
Judging of the pigs
Prediction Run Registration
Two-Mile Prediction Run Spon-
sored by Dept. of Intramural-
Recreational Services
Carnival opens
Barbeque Spring Game ticket
booth open
Barbeque plates sold
($3.50plate)
Miller Lite All-Star Autograph
Session
Band plays in tailgate area
Clowns circulate with
PurpleGold Balloons
Dunkin' Booth (Dunkee's TBA)
Miller Lite All-Star Competition
Rasslin' Bear (Bear's Opponents
Kiddie Games
Suntan Bikini Cir. test-Spon-
sored by Pepsi-Cola
Best Dressed (PurpleGold) Con-
test
Pirate Autograph Session
Contest Winners An-
nouncedAwards Presented
Marching Pirates march through
tailgate area into Stadium
Airtime f�r PurpleGold game
broadcast
Annual PurpleGold Game
Kickoff ($1.50 in advance$2 50
Day of the Game
&�!& of Sp'in�
PERSONAL
PHI TAU SPRING FUNG
Apr.i 25th, -j oo unt m
bands, drawing for t,eo
PI KAPPA PHI S�
Phi pledge for a -y
sharp compac' disc pia .
to be held Ap'
PHI KAPPA TAU MAPPr HOU
At Pantana Bods Sunc
Stop by for a tf-A
ALPHA SIG LIL SiSTE&S
pi a yea a a
daf Gel psr hec �
PSA spe a " -
1 fans for suppo I
ALPHA PHI BIG BROTHERS
ductions a' �
Dress formal Br
clothes for t t
sisters i
PHI KAPPA TAU
Yards
apoiog e fc
nouc inc.
dig Our
.party on Apr
'manage ienl
� Yard!
CONGRATULATIONS
wee p
V P Exec Kim
Revere Ba
B
Var � Secrei
SO"
Chap
HEY PI KAPPS Ae
All S .
"Scrotun
jammir
place
��
fha par"
PI KAPPA PM!
Rerrea' Ex
at v
brotherooc meets I
aance s mandat
ses- a
new house � � ac
iv be ma
Or -� -e rra'e'
PI KAPPA PHI
Rosebai a' the f �
day night Le 1
semester ana ge'
min 1 es aeaa
PI KAPPS The
have the potential rc t �
Exec cannot do
get involved In everyth rg c
Get fired up I w
Remember the more you r
.Phi Kappa Phi the rr
H it so brothers ge' �
e? s pu Pi Kapoa P
where we belong o
AYCOCK Wha1
and reac a cve �
488
LOST A LADIES WATCH?
one Can ana � �
7 58 8515
SUBMERGED GIRDERS
Any disc ockey v
tions, bridge pa
� . � �
752 358? a �
LOVE SOUL MUSIC
best or azv. E
Saturday 2 to Jakie ac.
Rob (Starcl
with Dillon A- � �
Willie (Chilly W
reques' 757 613
WANTED
WETSUIT WANTED 'es,ec
selling a men s fs� i
758 0076 or 752 8355 Bnd eave a
� message
SUMMER JOBS FOR COLLEGE
STUDENTS Ope" ngsavs
young men or the Pooc Ser
; at CAMP SEAFARER OS
COAST OF NORT CAS
Good salary plus roorr anc boa
; Excellent opportu ?. � � ?
� work together June B tl
. August Must oe a east Ifl �ea"
I age No experience "ecessa
ambition ana gooc rfte-e-ces re
quired For more c�a' or anc
an appi.cation w c
Seafarer P O Box 1074
Raleigh n C 2?605
HELP WANTED Ba"e-ce-s anc
waitresses neeaec a' Be?
Nightclub Cai
appointment a' S 64
f?
n
rlingtoi
relf
torac
Reserve Youi
For May, June
Absolutely the
In Gi
Let Us Prove This
CALL NO!
75 6-9933

1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 17, 1986
11
ecords
is a
ce
wball

� g
I
t
�-
ia
P ates
� ims
lie
196):
e O Events
teskin Pigout
d
� Tour
:ea:unng
-�band
-adium
lio show
p on far
kin'
lium
-
� e "mid-
football
� Miller Lite
kin' con-
on
Run Spon-
� intramural-
e
pens
Spring Game ticket
Classifieds
ites
sold
Barbeque
piatej
Miller Lite All-Star Autograph
j plays in tailgate area
w n s circulate with
id Balloons
Dun, B jth (Dunkee's TBA)
Miller Lite All-Star Competition
Rasslin1 Bear (Bear's Opponents
TBA)
Kiddie Games
Suntan Bikini Cintest�Spon-
sored by Pepsi-Cola
Best Dressed (PurpleGold) Con-
test
Pirate Autograph Session
Contest Winners An-
nouncedAwards Presented
Marching Pirates march through
tailgate area into Stadium
Airtime for PurpleGold game
broadcast
Annual PurpleGold Game
Kickoff ($1.50 in advance$2.50"
Day of the Game
Half-Time of Spring
Game�TBA
PERSONAl
PHI TAU SPRING FLING: Friday,
25th, 300 until. 30 kegs, 2
IS drawing tor beach weekend!
pi KAPPA PHI: See any Pi Kappa
pledge for a dollar chance on a
p vompactdisc player Drawing
Meld April 28, 1984
PHI KAPPA TAU HAPPY HOUR:
antana Bob's Sunday evening
ny for a tew cold ones!
ALPHA SIG LIL SISTERS: Ya'll
ed a lamming game on Tues
Get psyched for playoffs D.D.
� A special thanks to our number
s tor supporting us.
PHA PHI BIG BROTHERS: In
ons at the house 5 30 Sunday.
ess formal Bring change of
"es tor bowling party with
rsat 7
PHI KAPPA TAU: The Whole Nine
is inc would like to formally
ogize tor not sufficiently an
ng the Phi Tau late night shin
luring the end of Greek Week
ry on April 11, 1984. the staff and
agement of The Whole Nine
.is looks forward to servicing the
"aus agam in the future.
CONGRATULATIONS: To the Fall
ers of Pi Kappa Phi elected last
� President Killen Kaulkurst,
Exec Kirk Odem, V P
erve Barry Oliver, Treasurer:
Simmons, Warden: Jeff
etl Secretary: Chad Richard
Historian John Greenlee,
aplain Tom Lyons.
-tEY PI KAPPS. We looked good at
Sing The "Wick the "O
Scrotum" and the boys were
arnmin congratulations on second
e Congratulations also to the
iners of both divisions and tn all
a participated
PI KAPPA PHI: This Sunday is
Repeat Executive council will meet
V.endenhall from 2-4 and entire
�erhood meets from 4-6. Atten
:ace is mandatory, plans for next
ester will be discussed, rush and
house information and action
be main tipics. Pi Kappa
Te fraternity in 1987
PI KAPPA PHI: This weekend is it,
- seball at the Elks Loage this Fri
;?. i
i g f
.et's plow out this
semester ana get ready for the jam
- I nes ahead
pi KAPPS: The time has come. We
-ave the potential to be number one.
Exec cannot do it by themselves so
� nvoivea in everything possible.
Get tired up l will not let you down.
Remember, the more you put into
apoa Phi, the more you will get
u1 of il so brothers, get fired up and
e1 s put Pi Kappa Phi back on top
where we belong. Dillon
AYCOCK: What is black and white
and read all over? Aycock 107 and
488
.OST A LADIES WATCH?: I found
Call and identify correctly.
tSB 8515
SUBMERGED GIRDERS: Last leg
� disc jockey work, outdoor func
ons, bridge parties, Bar Miztphas,
Contact the TRASHMAN at
. 3587 anytime.
LOVE SOUL MUSIC: Tune into the
in soul on WZMB 91:3 FM.
day 2 10 Jakie (Lady J) 10 12,
Rod (Starchild) and Sunday 6 12
a n Dillon (White Knight) 12 2
e (Chilly Will) We always piay
-equest. 757 6913
CABIN COUNSELORS AND IN"
STRUCTORS: Male and female for
western N.C. 8 week children's sum
mer camp. Over 30 activities in
eluding Water Ski, tennis, heated
swimming pool, go karts, hiking,
artRoom, meals, salary and
travel. Experience not necessary.
Non smoking students write tor ap
plicationbrochure: Camp
Plnewood, 19006 Bob O Link Dr
Miami, Fla.33015.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
2 bedroom townhouse, to share a
room $100mo. and v3 utilities Has
pool on ECU bus route. Call Kim at
752 7774.
SUMMER LIFEGUARDING JOBS:
WSI or Senior Lifeguarding cer
tificates required CPR required.
Tar Landing Villas, Rt. 4, Morehead
City, N.C. 28557. Phone 247 5295.
3rd AND 4th FEMALE ROOM-
MATES NEEDED: For 2 bedroom
duplex one mile from campus in
quiet neighborhood Fireplace and
sundeck. Rent $93.75 please call
752-0319
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share
townhouse for summer. $131 a
month, V3 utilities, 355 7251, ask for
Lisa Munns.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED.
To share 3 bedroom townhouse Rent
$145 and Va expenses. Call Leslie
752 0938 or Mary at 756 2011.
WANTED: People to sublease 2
bedroom, Wilson Acres apartment;
pool, sauna, tennis courts, laundry
room for the summer months. Call
752 0158
WSI NEEDED: Trinity Center, new
Episcopal summer camp in Salter
Path, N.C, needs WSU to head
waterfront Must be able to sail Sun
fish. Apply: Ed Hodges, Jr Camp
Manager, 101 East loth St
Washington, N.C. 27889
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
For summer school and oppor. to
take over fall lease. $112.50mo Va
utilities. Pri room. Call 752 4892.
Convenient location
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
For summer 2 bedroom townhouse
close to campus. V2 bath, central
air, fully furnished and carpeted.
$110 a month and '3 utilities. Call
758 0334
WANTED: 1 female roommate to
share 3 bedroom duplex,
$100month, Va utilities, $100 deposit.
Contact Jan at 758 0047.
NEEDED: 2 roommates Im-
mediately to share 3 bedroom house
Large bedrooms, $130month, a
utilities, good neighborhood. 3
blocks from campus. Call anytime
758 6004.
HELP WANTED: Part time
workers. Warehouse installation,
delivery, etc. Apply in person
Larry's Carpetland 3010 E 10th St.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Please call 355 6251 after 6 p.m.
LOST: One pair glasses. Bifocal in
left lens. Call Henry at 752-1847.
Please! Can't see.
2 FEMALES NEEDED: To sublease
2 bedroom apartment '4 mile from
campus. $113 and '3 utilities. Apart
ment is furnished. For more info,
call Lori or Cindy at 758-0238.
PART-TIME HELP WANTED:
Mowing.etc. Sun. morn. 6 a.m. 11
plus 2 3 weekday mornings6a.m10
a.m. Exp. preferred. $3.50 start.
756 9618.
TWO MALE OR FEMALE ROOM-
MATES NEEDED IMMEDIATE-
LY: For summer months. Fully fur
nished condo at Kingston Place. $150
rent, $50 deposit, 4 utilities, 2 bed,
2Va bath, pool and dishwasher. For
more info, call Leigh at 752-1088.
LOST: Small black labrador
retriever wearing blue collar. Last
seen on campus Wed. Reward of-
fered. If seen call 757 1425.
LOST: Will the person who picked
up 2 rolls of disc film at Burger King,
Statonsburg Rd on Saturday (12th)
please return them or call 752-0406.
Film irreplaceable. Reward.
LOST IN AUSTIN AREA: HP 41C
calculator, high sentlmemtal value,
generous reward offered, call Ralph
at 757 0285 after 9 30 p.m.
LOST: One pair of Ray Ban
sunglasses in the Biology Bldg.
Returnno questions asked.
REWARD OFFERED. Call 758 8056
SALE
WANTED
WETSUIT WANTED: Interested in
selling a men's wetsuit? If so, call
'S8 0076 or 752 8355 and leave a
ssage
SUMMER JOBS FOR COLLEGE
STUDENTS: Openings available tor
oung men on the Food Service Staff
at CAMP SEAFARER ON THE
COAST OF NORTH CAROLINA.
Good salary plus room and board.
Excellent opportunity for friends to
work together June 8 through mid
August Must oe at least 18 years of
age No experience necessary only
ambition and good references re-
quired For more information and
an application, write: Camp
Seafarer, P O.Box 10976, YMCA,
Raleigh, N.C 27605
HELP WANTED: Bartenders and
waitresses needed at Beau's
Nightclub. Call Jimmy Arnold for
appointment at 756 6401
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
For summer to share fully furnished
2 bedroom townhouse $145month
(utilities included). Call 752-3765.
SUMMER POSITIONS: $8 40 per
hour for part or full time work.
Openings in most areas and all ma-
jors are considered. April 21 22 10
am 4 p m room 104 B Brewster
SUMMER WORK: Students with
leadership abilities. AVERAGE
PAY $250 PER WEEK. Students in
terestd should come by an interview
on April 17 (Thursday) at 3:30 or 7 in
Brewster D room 109
ROOMMATE NEEDED: 1 female
roommate needed for May Fall and
Spring Semesters to share a 2
bedroom townhouse, $142.50month,
$142.50 deposit, Va utilities, pool,
laundry, tennis court, basketball
court, need bedroom furniture. Con
tact Liz at 756 3769.
2 ROOMMATES NEEDED: To
share 2 bedroom apt $150 per
month. Available summer andor
fall. Fully furnished, 2Vj baths,ac,
pool. Kingston Place Apt. Very nice-
mile from campus- bus service. Con
tact Andy after 7 p.m. 752 1332.
COCKTAIL WAITRESSES NEED-
ED: Apply in person at Ramada inn
on Monday, April 21 between 3 p.m.
and 5 p.m.
WORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
perience in typing resumes, theses,
technical documents, and term
papers We manage and merge your
names and addresses into merged
letters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards. Our prices are extremely
reasonable and we always offer a 15
percent discount to ECU students. S
a. F Professional Computer Co.
(back of Franklin's) 115 E. 5th St
757 0472
TYPING SERVICES: Resumes,
term papers, theses. Low rates.
Spelling and grammatical correc
tions included. Cindy 757 0398 after
5:30 p.m.
CHEAP TYPING; Reports, etc. Call
Anne at 758 6011 and leave a
message.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
tronic typewriter. Reasonable rates.
Call Janice at 355 7233 after 5:30
SUMMER SUB-LET: May August.
$250 plus utilities 3 bedroom apt
Vi bath, fully furnished, central air,
cable 830 1769
SUB-LEASE: Spacious, 2 br , 2 bath
apt. available for sub lease May
July, with option to rent for fall. Ful
ly furnished and air conditioned
Call 758 9282, Ringgold Towers.
FOR SALE: Couch $25, sofa bed
$50, queen size bed frame and mat
tress $25, surfboard $50, plus more,
call Johnson at 758 2392
FOR SALE: 1980 Rabbit Diesel,
5 speed rebuilt engine, excellent
condition, sunroof Must sell
$2450offer Call Laura at 752-8093.
YARD SALE: 212 B. Stancil Dr
Greenville. Sat April 19, 10 a.m 4
p.m.
APT. FOR LEASE: 1st and 2nd sum
mer school sessions. 2 bedrooms, Vi
bath, balcony, ac, pool, sauna. Fits
3 comfortably $300 plus utilities.
Call 752 0525 if interested.
FOR RENT: 1st and 2nd sessions 2
bedroom townhouse convenient to
campus. Suitable for 3 occupants.
$290 per month plus utilities. Pool
and cable. Call 752 0579.
ROOMMATE WANTED: To sub
rent this summer. Two bedroom
apartment on campus. Ringgold
Towers Air cond cable T.V.
Available May 10. $l40mo. and "2
utilities. Call 758 4519.
PIANO FOR SALE: Wanted:
Responsible party to assume small
montnly payments on spinetconsole
piano. Can be sean locally. Write:
(Include phone number) Credit
Manager, P.O. Box 520,
Beckemeyer, IL 62219.
FOR SALE: Sanyo Cassette car
stereo with Jensen speakers. Price
neg. Call 758 0774.
FOR SALE: Schwlnn 10-speed In
great condition. Also, dreswr, sofa,
and matching chair. Best offer. Call
Ann at 758 0551.
COMPUTERIZED TYPINO SER-
VICE: Word processing. The
Dataworks specializes In student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertations,
theses, resume's and more. All work
Is computer checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary. Rates
are as low as $1 75 per page, In
eluding paper (call for specific
rates). Call Mark at 757 3440 after 7
p.m.
RINGOOLD TOWERS: 1 bedroom
condo available for rent or sale.
Great investmet. Low money down,
excellent tax write ofts. Call George
Tibbal at 203 261 6722.
RENT: 2 room B unit Ringgold Apt.
$300 � utilities a month. May 10
Aug. 20. One or two roommates. Call
Michelle at 758-5971 Tues. Triers,
after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: 12 x 65 mobile home
with 3 bedrooms, IVi baths. $500
down and assume payments. Call
758 1559 after 6 p.m Grimesland.
FOR SALE: HKardon tuner 910,
pioneer reverb and expander. Good
shape Call 830-1174.
TYPING NEEDED?: If you want
someone to type papers tor you at
reasonable rates cail 756 8934.
FOR SALE: Diving Equipment of
all kinds. Tank, fins, etc. Entire out
fit! interested? Call 752 8666.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom efficiency
apartment. All kitchen appliances,
central location, bus service within
walking distance. Perfect for sum
mar students $235 a month. 756-4760
anytime.
TO ALL APARTMENT
RESIDENTS: I am selling my desk
(only 2 years old), a drawer, a newly
built wooden bunk, and maybe even
a loveseat at negotiable prices. Call
Britt at 758 2080
1 BEDROOM FURNISHED APT
For sublease, May Aug $l75mo
Very efficient. Great for summer
school student. Call 758 7131
CONDO FOR SALE OR RENT: 2
bedroom, 2 bath, loft, fireplace,
washerdryer. $450month Good in
vestment for your parents if you
want to buy! 756-8296.
SURFBOARD: 7 Channon single fin
Good condition $85 756 2390 anytime
before 10 p m
COUCH AND CHAIR FOR SALE
Price neg Call 752 6512 before 2 p.m
FOR SALE: 1979 Sunbird 4 speed,
PB, PS, AMFMCasseMe, good
tires, good on gas $1500 negotiable
Call 752 8208
HOUSE FOR RENT: 4 blocks from
ECU campus, carpet, stove and
refrig , 1 yr. lease, 1 mo deposit
Available May 1st $270 monthly
Call 752 5778
FOR SALE: DP Bench wsquat
rack, leg machine, curling bar, 210
lbs. in weights, $125 Mint condition
Call after 6 p m 756 6805
See CLASSIFIEDS Page 12
����maaBaBBZEagaazzzz
Be
"GOLDEN GIRL"
Tryouts
When: Saturday, April 19, 10-5
Sunday, April 20, 1-5
Where: Main Lobby, Fletcher Muse
Bring: Comfortable Clothes &
Lots of enthusiasm'
A
Port
Of The
BEST!
Bldg.
WMTOWJWJMV
i
Attention
Jewish
Students
i
i
(Passover seder will be held j
(at Quail Ridge Social Hall, $
(l4th Street Extension on j
$ Wednesday, April 23rd at $
$6:00
p.m. Make reserva-
tions IMMEDIATELY by
calling Rabbi Koppell at i
$830-1138. $

Cost:
$5 per person
CONGREGATION
� BAYT
SHALOM
i
BUILD A CAREER
IN THE CLOUDS.
Learn how to fly helicopters in the U.S. Arn
Not only could it he one o the greatest experiei
in your life, but it could he the start of an ex I
career.
The Army's Warrant Officer Flight Training
Program makes it all possible. To qualify, you'll need
a high school diploma and, preferably, at least 2 years
of college. Before you learn to fly, you'll need to com-
plete Army basic training and pre-flight training
But once you complete your flight training pro-
gram, you'll be an Army aviator And you thought
only birds got to wear wings.
Call your local Army Recruiter today tor more
information Captain Mallette
118 Reade Street
752-2908
ARMY. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
,$�
NEED CASH?
Southern
Gun & Pawn
752-2464
SOON. Gneaa
r$.
1
$
i
4
oacuaaaacra
c&
ECU
Varsity Cheerleeading
TRYOUTS
Organizational Meeting
April 1, 1986 5:00 p.m.
Room 142 Minges Coliseum o
Enthusiastic Men &
Women Invited
For more information: 757-6491

408 West Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, N.C 27834
(919) 756-9933
Reserve Your Spa ce Now
For May, June, Jirfy Aug.
Absolutely the Lo�it PrieeS
In Greenville
Let Us Prore ThLTo You! jgg
CALL NOW WglCE
� m aqoO STORAGE
756-VY33 association
ATTENTION GRADUATES
Only 23 days remain for you to purchase an Apple or
IBM microcomputer system or peripheral equipment at
savings of 20-35. Under an educational pricing pro-
gram in force at Student Stores, only full-time faculty
and staff and enrolled students are eligible to par-
ticipate.
If you are contemplating the purchase of a system,
come by Student Stores, Wright Building,
and let us show you what is available.
Buying now could save you
a lot later on.
STUDENT STORES
Wright Building
Owned A Operated by East Carolina University
f
.
1





12
rHI I Xs i KUl IMN
M'KIl I'
IW6
"Best Game Of Season"
ECU Lacrosse
Defeat Wolfpack
1I lacrosse
lied N.C.
8-5 in
M . k Seasholtz
iiame we've
r d
� ei 5 due
"Mo
several
squad
n
eams'
es were
. ho
Mark
vA elsh, w ho
� - k!
w fpack
Probably the biggesi surprise
in the game was the pla of the
defense. With Billy-Mac Wilson
the only health) defenseman,
playei coach Duke Whelan was
pressed into action and mid-
fielder Chris Gauland was switch-
ed to starting defense rhis
strong make-shift defense, along
with help from the hustling mid-
fielders and superb goaltending
b Kevin Thompson, held State
to only .i dozen shots.
I he Pirates close out the WS6
regular season with home games
this weekend vs. Citadel on
Saturday and Furman on Sun-
day. Both games are at 1 JO pm
and are played on the lacrosse
field, located behind the Allied
Health, (Belk) building. 1 he team
will then await word on any
possible posl season
touranments.
Classifieds
sal Anello, who played a major role in the
stale. i�� shown above maneuvering in earlier
EC! victory over N.(
lacrosse action.
Intramural Department Plans Banquet
Bv STEPHANIE DEW
�' Write,
I
Awards
be
and v
-� RS winners
be a
ded.
� players
S
McNea
p .
K
undefeated (5-0
These players spell the name
Alpha Sigma Phi. And with
goalie, Jefl Ramey. playing
remarkably at the defensive lime
light, Alpha Sigma Phi recently
� the Kappa Sigs 14-3.
A recent ly scheduled
backpacking trip, coordinated
igh the Outdoor Recreation
iter, was halted abruptly due
transportation problems.
On the wa to the Uwharrie
National Forest, the truck ha
. essential gear broke d
The participants had i
g wail and " k to ireen
� i 11 e
� apolog �.
vience this caused pa
inks tor being involved.
Participants
Michelle iniewicz
Maria Bell
Robert Bell
Kai ie Sey kora
I ray Tvner
frank Floyd
Richard Guidoth
Joey Buck
Dee I ropeano
Lou Ann Proctor
Eric Wheel is
Charles Daughtridge
H()RT1()S UP
K) 12th H I IK
OF PRECIS A CY
5 � � � - � V
Birth i
. . I
i � � �

RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Continued From Page 11
FOR SALE: Window air condi
tioner, practically new, will sell tor
$150 or best offer (resale value
$300 j Call soon 752 1230
FOR SALE: 5'8" Atlantis Prime Cut
triple fin surfboard, S175 Condition
Used one summer, one ding, comes
with leash Please call M �
Ramsdeil at 756 7886 weekdays after
5pm
APT FOR
Villas Call
Johnny
RENT
758 047V
32 WildwOOd
and ask tor
ALTERATIONS: Skirts $1, 3 blouses
$1, beautiful ladies pants for SI.
men's jeans for SI, men's jackets
S5 $10, beautiful men's suits for $10,
beautiful dresses tor $2, new dresses
for $10, Shoes for 25 50 Expertise
Alterations, 429 Evans St
FREE CENTRAL HEATING AND
AIR CONDITIONING, COLD AND
HOT WATER, AND CABLE T V
These spacious 2 bearoo"
carpe'ed apartments are
� a few feet east of the I0tt
� nfersection Abunoa-� ��
on premises laundry fa ' ind a
full time ma
s 24yi � � 0ri ple border - g tl e
'i'pk and . � � - " - ur'
BEFORE YOU REN' K NOV�
AH AT YOU'RE BUYING
Manor - ' B E. 101
t at 75ft 5156
GOING TO SUMMER SCHOOL OR
WORKING IN GREENVILLE?)
Full furnished condo ava a � I
Ma 10th and Aug 1st $4 50 a aa,
for as few or man, days as
want' Ca T " a' 757 16J3v
The HUB
.�� � �
jV
I I
Exercise is a Natural
i
�s
High!

��

Universal Hub Health
Club
April Special
$28oo
Unlimited Club Use
(One Month Only)
Includes Suntan
FREE VISIT WITH AD
618 South PittSr





Title
The East Carolinian, April 17, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 17, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.471
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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