The East Carolinian, April 15, 1986








She iEaat (Earnlintan
Serving (he East Carolina campus community since 1925
ol.60No.
luesda, April 15. 1986
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 12,(MX)
Inaguaration Friday;
Work, Changes Begin
NewSGA Officers
i M HI M�� B I rte MM �ro(l-�
vtunanan, newh elected SGA president will be sworn in J-ridav as will the other newly elected
rs For more information, see related story page 1.
Citizens Voice Oppostion
To Support Of Nicaragua
H HAROI l)JO NIK

' Represen-
Nica

mce.
groups
passes
�.a pledge of
disobe-
dience and suffer nse
quences, Hamer sai d
Hamei, a foi � ;
Eng erad
1 � C pen I six n
Nit
I know
now who In
have had members of heii
keHammei I �
ugh I think ui lei nsta-
(Monda
views ol a large n .
Greenville citizens whi I i
strongly aboul the
vote
Since June. 85 Mica
citizens have been killed b
( ontras, Hamer said "1 asi year
a hen I was there, a boai
onl method ol p � ta
was considered a n tan
get. Killing innoceni :i
is definite viola ules I
war. We are honorable nati
government has to take a
stance
H a ' ii said any ne attending
S indaj 's debate at Mendenhall
Si idem Center between former
CIA Agent David MacMichael
and Col. Samuel T Dickens, a
representative of the State
Department, should asi
both. "How does an arm ex-
rate killing by the Contras
1 )ur primary reason for opposing
g is because the Con-
ra . with the backing o U.S. tax
are killing, raping and
rig innocent Nicaraguan
ai tl 5 implicating U.S.
this immoral terrorist
" he said.
nj iI student interested in
nding out more about the
Nk issue should contact
er at 830-0349 or the Green-
Peace Committee at
758-4906,
By PATTI KEMMIS
Assistant rws fcdltor
On April 18, Steve Cunanan,
Anthony Jackson, John Eagan,
and David Tambling will be
sworn in as the new exectutive of-
ficers of the SGA.
Cunanan and Jackson won the
presidential and vice-presidential
seats on a split ticket.
"Whether or not we can work
together is a question I've been
asked many times said
Cunanan. "I think we will work
very well together. Tony has one
point of view and 1 have another
� it will be a trade off � and I
think it will be better because of
the different views
Jackson added he felt their
work would involve a lot of com-
primise, but the decisions they
make will be the right ones, and
they will stand behind them
together.
Included in Cunanan's top
priorities as president are
reinstating the cabinet system,
enlarging the office space, and
improving ECU'S image.
"I think a cabinet system will
keep people better informed and
allow more people to be
involved said Cunanan.
He added he felt it is important
to have more office space for
some of the SGA committees and
cabinet members.
Cunanan mentioned several
ideas he has in hopes of removing
ECU's party image.
"I would like to promote such
groups as Bacchus and maybe
even start a designated driver
program said Cunanan. "I
would also like to start up a pro-
gram in which visiting executives
speak to groups here on
campus
"This could serve a two fold
purpose � it would educate
students and the visitors he ad-
ded
Jackson said he hoped to get
the SGA more involved in spon-
soring culturally diverse pro-
grams or at least supporting
them.
"I would like to set up and ex-
pand on the Club Dav David
Brown started stated Jackson.
"It's important to promote cam-
pus organizations and show they
are getting support from the
SGA
He added he would like to
"improve and continue" the
book exchange p:
(unanan stated h(
.�. �
represent EG
ble.
"There has bo
about the campaign be i
one � 1 reel my vi
.red. G i : and I had
knowle .
takinj if ii lid 1
to rest
"It's time gei i - �
put everything aside and I
Tony and 1 arc :a
stated Cunanan
Jack
paign caused
"The ca
not bin
;ither. ! 1 like t
towards uni
populatii
sense a dec :
Jack
mv power
David, and Jo
Leg
back
ler he i
MBA's Help Some Graduates
COLUMBIA, MO (CPS) �
Middle-and lower-income
students can improve their earn-
ing power dramatically by filing
away their business bachelor's
degrees and going on for master's
degrees in business administra-
tion (MBA), a new study has
found.
Buccaneer Awarded
For Photography
B CAROLYN DRISCOLL
staff Writer
The 1985 Buccaneer recently
won several awards with distinc-
tions in photography, according
to Beth Davis, this year's year-
book editor.
The publication won first place
overall with mark distinction in
photography by the Associated
Collegiate Press.
In addition, Garv Patterson
SGA Discusses Declaring War
B PA I If KEMMIS
Assistant News hditor
rV I -SGA
i Jay Dunn in-
resolu declare
� at aga
Dun need for the
ire in a prac-
tical
rhe read by Bryan
1 asil . used I ibya of being a
terrorists and
mistreating ,S.
� I S invasion oi
I bya
Legislatoi Mark Simon spoke
� ainst the resolution stating
the SGA wa exactly sure of
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds13
Editorials4
Featuresg
Sportsn
A fanatic is one who can V
change his mind and won't
change the subject.
� Winston Churchill
1
what was going on and that it was
not the legislature's place to pass
such a resolution.
The resolution was rejected by
a voice vote.
"It (the resolution) was ir-
responsible behavior that the ma-
jority of ECU students would not
be in support of said SGA
President David Brown.
"There are more important
issues to be discussed in the stu-
dent legislature than declaring
war on Libya he added.
In other business, legislator
Gordon Walker explained a
resolution opposing the change
electing state official in odd
numbered years.
He mentioned the problems
concerning costs, overlapping
elections, and municipal elec-
tions.
Municipal elections are held on
the odd numbered years Walker
stated because "it allows voters
to consider the local issues more
closely.
The campus sign language
organization, Fantasy, had
representatives at the meeting to
ask the SGA for money to help
with a show being held Sunday.
Robin Leonard, member of
Fantasy, said their groups func-
won two Columbia Scholastic
Press Association wards for his
news related photos oi Hurricane
Diana in 1985 and the tornado in-
cident in 1984.
Mark Barber and Mike Smith
each won a CSPA award for their
sports photographs, Barber's in
color and Smith's in black and
white.
"I thought the 1985 yearbook
deserved the award said Davis.
"We always strive to be number
one and I think the added touch
of the photographers' awards
emphasized how well the book
turned out
tion is to bridge the gap between
the hearing world and the hearing
impaired world.
The group performs sign
language to music.
The SGA voted to grant the
group funds to assist their perfor-
mance which will take place Sun-
day at 8 p.m. in Jenkins
Autorium.
Brown announced Chancellor
John Howell has dropped the
plans to pave the recreational
field at the bottom of college hill
for the moment.
Alternate recommendations to
increase the parking places
available on campus have been
made and are being considered.
Brown also informed the
legislature about a campus
beautifieation project proposed
by Kinji Akugawa. a Japaneese
enviromental artist.
The project calls for a brick
sidewalk to be added between the
Rawl Building and Student Supp-
ly Store.
A bench would be installed to
give students somewhere beside
the sidewalk to sit with a canopy
available on rainy days.
The project would take place
this summer.
But the highly touted MBA
doesn't help upper-middle and
upper-income students earn
much more than they could
without an MBA, the study also
concludes.
The study of 346 graduates of
the universities of Missouri, Kan-
sas and Oklahoma also
discovered that women from the
middle, lower-middle and lower
classes earned as much as their
male counterparts four to five
years out of school � half the
samples had BAs and half had
MB As.
"We think it's very gratifying
finding equality (between the
sexes for the lower group says
Tom Dougherty, the University
of Missouri at Columbia manage-
ment associate professor who
directed the study.
Within four to five years of
earning their MBAs, graduates
from the lower classes were mak-
ing about SI 1,000 more a year
than economically similar
students who earned just business
bachelor's degrees.
MBAs, however, did not help
improve the earning power of
students from the upper
economic classes.
"Students from the upper
group already have the skills and
c ;itacts ne
Doughery sas, "wl
MBA ma)
socialization that 1
lower group need'
money.
And while "lower cla
and women out
four years were makii -
amount oi money, fei .
the upper class were ea
than males from the uppc - ata
Dougherty thinks it's be
wealthy females may no: have
same access to family businesse
as do upper-strata males, a fac
he found to contribute greatly
earning power.
He also speculates affluent
women probably do not have the
same financial motives as ten
from the lower classes
"Rich women can afl
take interesting jobs such as
working in a museum observes
William Hokanson, director of
communications foi H.
business school.
There also may be a limited
number of well-paying jobs,
which often are grabbed b males
from affluent backgrounds,
maintains Charles Hickn .
the American Assemble of C
legiate Schools oi Business
��
Art Exhibition
j a k
Mann iwem(
Twelve students completing graduate thesis requirements will exhibit their work in Gray Gallery
April 19 through April 30. Ahove, art Instructor Paul Hartley gives helpful advice to graduate art stu-
dent Nancy Natdson.
r � mr m � .�� � m �-
: " -
f





Hi EASTCAROL1NJAN
APRIL 15, 1986
Announcements
GOLLEN GIRLTRYOUTS
sa'urna� Aprn 19 to a m Ipm Sunday
pr"J0 Ipm 5pm Mam iotby Fletcher
Wus Buiiomg Any questions call Tom
Goldso, HI 698? or Betsy rWOdleton
S8 6��u
NURSING STUDENTS
I ' v tad to at'eno tie 198a Issues in
.�on to be lelo on April la
i n �� Nursng Bidg room X2
��"�� wtiat s nappenny ir. Nursing today'
CAR WASH
ogv Club is laving a car
:s r vtL.rr)av Apr.i !� 198 from �am
!� -�� �. ng .Greenv.lle Blvcl
M � ' Bell Come on ju'ana nave your
� wa! i. JO Members please come
ut and "eip
WHO LAMBDA
� bda meeting Monoay. Apm 21 at
inhetie meeting room Bot
SIGN LANGUAGE CLUB
� juagc Cub Aih present
'��� " " � .okeocx on Apr,i 20
Pi ns Auditorum Bring you
ao a as Fantasy str.ves to br
near ng ana deat worlds together
I die s.gp anguage
SIGI (SIGGY)
� � � .ffix1' a tareer deio and
jht want 1 � ,� you' n'pres's pxpec'a
' 'ry SIGI It you can
RE1 H N x ey on a computer
� pybcw � -h . x, may come and vgn up
���.� Camper Planning and Place
�ip B'oxton House to be'tpr
��ppr'
ECU SURF CLUB
important meeting Thursday night 9pm.
my house Contest this weekend against
UNC W ECU'S favorite beverage will be
served
ECU JAZZ AND SHOW CHOIR
The ECU Jan and Show Choir will be per
forming on Sunday. April 20 at 8 tSpm in AJ
Fletcher Auditorium
RUGBY CLUB
All ruggers are ordered to participate in
Greenville Clean up Week in cooperation
with the Community Appearance Commis
sion Our section ot the city is the park and
t'eid at the corner of Srh St and Memorial
Dr.ve Everyone should be there. Tuesday at
Team pictures will also be taken Ram
date will be Wednesday
CAMPUS CRUSADE
FOR CHRIST
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST is
sponsoring "prime Time' this Thursday
night at 7 30pm in the Old Joyner Library se
cond floor Please iom us tor fun fellowship
and Bible study We are looking forward to
meeting you
PIRATE WALK
Persons wishing to apply for positions of
d.rec'or. Assistant Director and
Secretary Treasurer for Pirate Walk may
ao so in room 228 of Mendenhall Student
Center iSGA Office! Deadline for filing is
4 22 86
TECHNICAL WORKERS
The ECU Government Association is look
ng for a responsible technical writer to edit
the ECU Auto Repair Guide Some research
and typing required A J100 00 stipend is
available Contact SGA at 757 6411 Ext 218
for further details
NELSON INTERNSHIP
If you are looking to develop leadership,
planning, time management communica
tlon, and interpersonal skills and alto save
some money, there are still ten positions
open for this coming summer Drop by to
hear abut the program today at 3 30 and 7 00
and Thursday at 700 in BB303 Noparticular
major necessary
DEPTOF POLS
PI SIGMA ALPHA
Great Decisions NH - a Global issues
Forum - will present its fourth topic �
The European Community and the US
Friction Among Friends " The speaker is
Professor Robert Dorff & Norfh Carolina
State University, 7 30pm to 9pm in BC 103
(lecture room) Open to all students, faculty
and public Free of charge Come listen,
question and discuss'
PHI SIGMA PI
Phi Sigma Pi will hold its next business
meeting at 5pm, Wednesday. April )� in
Biology N102 New officers will preside
Also, don't forget money for the rattle ana
'or beach week
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
Jom the best party at ECU! The College
Republicans are holding their weekly bash
this Tuesday (and every Tuesday) at 6 30 In
'oom 221 Mendenhall We're looking tor
studentswho are excited about being on the
fdge of a better tomorrow 1
CAR WASH
Sponsored by inter Varsity Christian
Fellowship Saturday April 19 from 9 til 2 a�
the Trade Gas Station on the corner of 14th
and Greenville Blvd Cost donations ac
cepted towards Summer Missions Program
DAY CAMP: RALEIGH
The YWCA of Raleigh is in need of day
camp counselors from June 9 � August 22
interviews will be held on Thursday. April
24 For applications and more information
contact Coop Rawl 313
AKA
Women's Forum on money management
Saturday. April 19, 10am 2 30pm, Brewster
Building Workshop on small business flnan
cing. mortgages, taxes. IRA's and Keogh
stocks and bonds, real estate investments
F ree of charge, but you must br Ing you r own
lunch women only
COUNSELING CENTER
The ECU Counseling Center is offering a
free PREPARING FOR FINALS
WORKSHOP to assist students who ex
perience high levels of stress which interfere
with test performance Methods of relaxa
tion will be taught and practiced and
strategies for taking various types of finals
will be covered The workshop will meet cm
April 21. 23, and 25, 3 4pm in 305 Wright An
nex Since the workshop will involve skill
building, students should plan to attend all
sessions For more information call the ECU
Counseling Center (757 441) or stop by 307
Wright Annex
GREENVILL AND PITT
COUNTY VOTERS!
Come meet and talk with the state, county,
and local candidates The League of Women
Voters is holding a candidates reception
Tuesday. April 15 at 7 30pm at The First
Presbyterian Church of Greenville on Elm
and 14th Streets, Greenville Everyone is
welcome For more information call
754 4914 or 752 2459
INTERVIEWING WORKSHOP
To get the right job or career, you migh'
spena an hour now to hear about some ways
to make an interview situation an enjoyable
ana enlightening experience Mark your
calendar to come to the Career Planning and
Placement Service at 3 p m on either April 9
or 15
Tobacco Linked To A ddiction
2nd Annual
SLAY HOT SHOTS
Wednesday April 16, 1986
. ,1-5 p.m.
Proceeds benefit the
HOMELESS OF GREENVILLE
TO BE A HOT SHOT � � .m.Jf4frrr�J,M
Score as many points as possible in a 1 minute
time period on the basketball court between
Slay and Umstead dorms.
Entry Fee $1.00
Prizes totaling over $100
(Trophies for top male and female winners)
i.
z

prizes donated by . . .
Annabelle's Restaurant & Pub
Quincy's Steak House
Plaza Cinema
Buccaneer Theaters
Farm Fresh
Kroger Sav-on
Bill McDonald Karate C
A Cleaner World
Bond's Sporting G
Peeler's Sporting G
Western Steer
L 1V! Even a the surgeon
he American Cancer
Soc ietj and the New England In-
tercollegiate Baseball Association
is' week joined in coincidental
to call for bans on all
idvertising tor chewing tobacco,
an f asi Carolina University pro-
fessoi rdeased a study showing
more than one out of every
� male collegians dip or chew
v lei preliminary data
released a; the same time indicate
thai qu a smokeless tobacco
abil maj he far more difficult
. ving up smoking.
In perhaps the most surprising
news in a week of surprising
smokeless tobacco news, ECU
Prof. Elbert Glover announced
that 22 percent of the nation's
male college students either dip
or chew tobacco.
Glover and three associates
asked 5,500 students nationwide
about their tobacco habits, also
finding that two percent of the
females surveyed said they used
smokeless tobacco.
In recent years, of course,
many schools � Stanford,
Maryland, Miami and Pacific
Lutheran, among others � have
restricted or simply banned
smoking in the classrooms and
other campus haunts.
Few, however, have bothered
to ban smokeless tobacco use.
Last week, the New England
Intercollegiate Baseball Associa-
tion came close, asking its
member schools to ban all tobac-
co substances during games and
practices.
At the same time, the
American Cancer Society,
meeting in Daytona Beach, en-
dorsed a resolution to ban all
cigarette and smokeless tobacco
ads, especially those directed at
young people.
See SMOKELESS Page 7.
2 Pieces of Chicken
(Original Recipe or
Extra CrispyTM
1 small mashed potato
and gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
I!
�t
i!
COUPON
MX mjjjjplus tax
FOR ONE COMPLETE
2-PIECE PACK
We Do Chicken Right
OVEBTON&
presents
Inc
THE GREAT PIRATE
PURPLEGOLD PIGSKIN
PIGOUT PARTY
BAR-B-QUE SALE
ir-rr
.PSKO PEPS' PEPSI :
6 � 12 oz. cans
2 Liter Bottle
2 Liter Bottle
PEPSI
PEPSI
SPRITE
Canada Dry
GINGER ALE 2ur &
�CE 8 lb. bag
s-
m
House of Raeford
WHOLE FRYER
Frosty Morn
HOT DOGS ,2Mpk,
Overtoil's Buns
HOT DOG 8 a. ,g.)
HAMBURGER 8 c
2$1.09
2S1.09
COORS &
COORS LIGHT
12 pack � 12 oz cans
,4"
BUDWEISER
6 pack � 12 oz cans
269
OLD
MILWAUKEE
Case of 24 cans
699
� �
Lays All regular varieties
POTATO CHIPS
Mount Olive
KOSHER DILLS
Del Monte
CATSUP
French's
MUSTARD
Steaks
SIRLOIN
T-BONE
I
b $1.99
ib $2.19
HAMBURGER PATTIES s ,b Pkg �
$1.38
Imperial
CHARCOAL ,01bbO9 $1.59
20 Ib. bog $2.99
21 1 Jarvis Street
(Corner of Third Street)
Walking Distance From ECU
OVERTON&
SALE
Wed. April 16 thru
Sot. April 19
HOURS
Mon -Sat 8 a m -8 p.m.
Sunday 1 pj-n -6 p.m.
Plans
WASH
R
Re
"A '�
mm
l pon uraduation I'm
noinn to travel ih
huropt tor the
and I want to know tv;
and medical si
before leaving?
rhel
N- Jen- Hea
cina
The Health I
Mar I- It-hd dam�.
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c h e c �
necessary
car, �

Depar:
Human 5
If you
regular
am adj
VI
the
from a -
where
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care pi
special med
moi
To .
customs
mec ; a
in a
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out a che �
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name, ad
prescribed
and generic
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tion, allerj;
and special
There a
health I
when travel s
try.
OUi clot fies
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Wednesday, Apr
Admission $1.50
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Annual
OT SHOT
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IS

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5 lb pkg lb
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bog $2.99

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 15, 1986
Plans To Revamp Higher Education Act
N ASHINGTON, D.CPS)
Some call ii akin to "putting
socks on an octopus some call
it fear, but b any description the
government is having a terrible
time fashioning a Highei Educa
tion Reauthorization ci ol
1986.
Which once was supposed to
be called the Highei Education
Reauthorization Aci oi 1985.
"The climate is different this
time says Dallas Martin of the
political struggle over the all-
important bill that will, sooner
bui probably later, set American
ligher education policy through
the rest of the decade.
Martin, head of the National
Association of Student Financial
id Administrators, ought to
know. The widely respected
I pun graduation in May, I'm
going to travel throughout
Europe for the summer months
and I want to know tpis �t shot,
and medical services I will need
before leaving?
1 he '
ir fa
ance becau .ac-
occu

The Health c olumn B
Marv 1 lesha dams
tifica
.
I
a
Book" Is
and garments which do not
circulation are the
St, and a good pair of
rlking shoes is a necessity.
(Make sure they are well broken
before the trip.) The type of
you take will depend
on the location you're
v isil .
Be cautious of what you eat
a id drink. Do not trust the
atei Drink bottled beverages
without ice and never assume the
alcohol in a beverage can kill
bacteria. Moreover, in some
lair products are not
eurized so you should avoid
m it possible, and also try to
foods that are not m-
us.
Give special attention to swim-
2 areas. It you are on a
beach, be careful and remember
�� ivs wear sunscreen and
educator virtually wrote the
Higher Education Reauthoriza-
tion Act of 1980, timed to expire
last Oct. I, himself.
Congress is supposed to pass
such acts every five years, to "
reauthorize" the giant federal
student and college aid programs
established in the original Higher
Education Act of 1965. And
when it reauthorizes the pro-
grams, it sets maximum funding
levels for them for the next five
years.
Educators do not hesitate to
stress its importance.
"It provides a road map" for
Congress and colleges, says Bob
Aaron of the National Associa-
tion of State Universities and
Land-Grant Colleges.
"It establishes what each party
� federal government, state, col-
lege and family � (in the college
business) is responsible for he
adds.
And the Reagan administra-
tion thinks it's a chance to bring
conservative reform to campuses,
to pull the federal government
out of higher education and leave
it where the reformers believe it
belongs: the states.
But, as the Count von Bismar-
ck suggested, the process of
creating a Higher Education
Reauthorization Act of 1985
hasn't been pretty.
On March 3, for example, a
Senate committee finally passed a
version of a bill it first began
pondering in 1984.
And what the Reagan ad-
ministration promised would be
meaningful, long-overdue
philosophical debate about
higher education has turned into
just another budget argument
that, some say, the administra-
tion hasn't even bothered to at-
tend.
Martin says the process has
been more fiscal than
philosophical. "There's a strong
deficit consciousness from Con-
gress and the public
The Senate proposal, recently
out of committee, would trim
about $2 billion from the present
authorization of $11.7 billion for
fiscal 1987. The House's final
version, approved in December,
would cut funding a bit less
drastically, to about $10.6
billion.
If the full Senate approves its
version, a conference committee
will draft a compromise, Both
houses will vote on it and send it
to the president, probablv later in
1986.
To keep federal college pro-
grams going in the meantime,
Congress has exteded the 1980
act's provisions through
September.
Despite the long struggle, some
aren't sure the figures in either
version should be taken seriously.
"No authorization legislation
has ever been completely
funded" over the five-year life of
the act, notes Charles Saunders
of the American Council on
Education.
Yet most college lobbyists want
some kind of bill approved as
soon as possible, apparently to
get something on the books
before the administration gets its
own act � literally and
figuratively � together.
Given all the administration
talk about killing most kinds of
federally funded college pro-
grams � from student aid to
dorm construction to help for
libraries � they apparently think
the cutbacks now under con-
sideration could be a lot worse.
The Education Department
says they should be.
"We get alarmed when
authorizations get too high
says Bruce Carnes, Education
Department undersecretary for
budget and planning.
Carnes believes the current
congressional plans � which
some observers say would dictate
five years of dropping more
students from student aid and let-
ting college buildings fall into
disrepair � are "Utopian
"We (the department) take
authorization figures very
seriously he says. "It means a
very great deal because much of
the bill is in the form of entitle-
ment (programs guaranteeing aid
to all students who qualify)
Yet both congressional and
college sources are puzzled why
the Education Department � if it
does, indeed, take the act serious-
ly � has failed to present a com-
plete proposal of its own.
The department did deliver
parts of a proposal the day before
the Senate Labor and Human
Resources Committee finished its
version March 3, but committe
Chairman Orrin Hatch (R-Utah)
caJled them "too late" and "too
draconian
As part of his broader reform
effort, Education Secretary-
William Bennett had his own ver-
sion of a reauthorization act.
He promised to deliver his own
version of the act by the end of
January.
Physicists Oppose Star Wars
Depai tmeni Heamd
Hum S
If )
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Tingei
imons, Health Education In-
teri c ntributed to this column.
WASHINGTON. DC (CPS) �
A majority of the nation's
physicists opposes the controver-
sial Strategic Defense Initiative,
usually called the "Star Wars"
project, a new national survey of
549 physicists indicates.
During the last year, almost
3,000 professors � many of them
physicists � have signed pledges
not to take SDI research funds.
But SDl's research chief says
that, despite surveys and peti-
tions, his office has had no pro-
blems distributing the research
moriev.
The Union of Concerned
Scientists, an anti-Star Wars
group that often takes stands on
social and political issues, corn-
fflis-s-ioned the nationwide study
conducted by Peter D. Hart
Research Associates Inc an in-
dependent polling service in
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Washington.
"We selected physicists (to ask
about SDI) because they are
closest to the necessary
technology UCS spokeswoman
Ellen Dudley says.
By a margin of 54 percent to 29
percent, the physicists said SDI is
a mistake.
But James Ionson, SDI's direc-
tor of Science of Technology,
dismisses the survey as a poll of
people who wouldn't know much
about the necessary technology
anyway.
"It's aimed at people out of
their arena he says.
Ionson thinks engineers and
computer scientists � people
more familiar with applied
technologly that physicists �
would have been better able to
judge whether SDI weapons
eventually can be workable.
Sixty-three percent of the
physicists who said they know
about the new kinds of
technology SDI would require
described the program "as a step
in the wrong direction for
America's national security
policy
L'CS's legislative analyst
Charles Monfort hopes to use the
survey to help convince Congress
that the scientific community
generally opposes space weapons.
"Most people on Capitol Hill
are lawyers and businessmen, not
scientists he notes, adding the
politicians who have not made up
their minds on the SDI "will give
it (the survey) some weight
With federal funding for
research getting increasingly
scarce, the temptation to accept
SDI money rises.
During the 1986 fiscal year,
Ionson will award about $100
million in research grants, with
more than $60 million going to
universities.
And while iarge numbers of
professors at the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology, Cornell,
Princeton, Michigan State and Il-
linois led the way in refusing to
accept SDI funds, Ionson's not
too worried about finding scien-
tists to take the research grants.
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�te iEaat (HutBlinmn
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender. -i , ,ra mi
Jay Stone, ua-w Edm
Mike Ludwick, mm td� Greg Winchester, a
Scott Cooper, .��s s� Anthony Martin, �� cmh Ma
Daniei MArRER,fiw��mww Meg Needham, 1,��
John Shannon, w,&� Shannon Short, ��, -mr u
DeChanii e Johnson, , ��� Debbie Stevens, vrrrrorv
April 15, 1986
Opinion
Page 4
Dorm Cooking
To Fry Or Not To Fry
A proposal is in the works which
will limit the amount and types of
cooking which students will be
allowed to do in their dorm rooms.
The proposal, which is tentatively
scheduled to take effect in 1988,
will prohibit the use of deep fat
fryers and some other cooking ap-
pliances. Use of toaster ovens,
microwaves and refrigerators,
however, will still be permitted.
The new proposal will take effect
at the same time that additions to
Mendenhall Student Center are be-
ing completed, according to Vice
Chancellor for Student Life, Elmer
Meyer. It is hoped that the addi-
tions, which will expand
Mendenhall's serving capacity, will
help to give students an alternative
to dorm room cooking.
The problem with the new pro-
posal for many students, however,
is the expense which is involved in
eating out or eating at Mendenhall.
The problem for the Administra-
tion is the fire hazard posed by
dorm room cooking and the plumb-
ing problems created by the dump-
ing of grease down dorm room
sinks. What this means in practical
terms is that most dorm room cook-
ing will, in fact, be phased out by
1988.
Most UNC-system schools have
already prohibited dorm room
cooking of any sort, according to
Meyer, and many have mandatory
campus meal plans. Under such
plans students are required to buy a
set amount of food from campus
cafeterias each semester. At UNC-
Chapel Hill, for example, a
minimum of $200 is required, ac-
cording to current SGA President
David Brown. Thus, ECU is one of
a small minority of UNC system
schools without a meal plan and
with the option of dorm room
cooking.
The compromise solution which
immediately springs to mind is to
expand kitchen facilities in the
dorms. Perhaps, as David Brown
suggested, the administration
caould install one kitchen on every
floor in the dorms. At least if that
were done dorm students would re-
tain some of the same privileges en-
joyed by students living off cam-
pus.
THfc'CRNT ERT IM OURROoK'RvJlt N Foil �FF�CT.
DO YOU REALIZE
WUAT A PULL-
SCALE U.S. ATTACK
OK KUADAFY-
i?
)
WOULP DO
TOTUE ZgJ 'y,y
ARAB WORLD?! JTy Jfc4
i&
Campus Forum
Criticisms Of ROTC Unfounded
L
1 am writing in response lo the opi-
nion on ROTC expressed by Mr. Jef-
frey Britt that appeared in Thursday's
(10 April) issue.
After reading Mr. Britt opinion
and wading through his attempts at
witty descriptions of ROTC cadets
and past military and civilian failures,
I saw the two points he was trying to
make. First, that United States'
military leaders are not displaying
leadership, and therefore recent
military and civilian tragedies have
occured. And secondly, that the
military has no leadership because
military officer recruitment and train-
ing programs are picking the wrong
people. These are interesting points,
but unfortunately Mr. Brill is wrong.
A lack of military leadership was
not the cause ol any of the failures
Mi. Britt mentioned. The United
States Space Shuttle program is run
by a civilian agency, NASA, not the
military. The military is involved, but
not in making decisions about NASA
procurement, which is apparently the
reason for the shuttle disaster. It was
not an Air Force plane that crashed,
decimating the 101st Airborne Divi-
sion, but a civilian charter plane.
Now however, there are thorough
checks made on civilian planes used
to transport troops. Finally, the
American failure to rescue the Ira-
nian hostages did not occur because
of military leadership breakdown. It
basically failed because the Carter ad-
ministration delayed taking any ac-
tion for months after the original Em-
bassy takeover occured. I am not
claiming the military and its leader-
ship makes no mistakes, but then
again what other large, comp' x
organization does.
It seems strange to me that Mr.
Britt, a psychology major, would
seem to know so little about human
potential and leadership abilities. It is
true that the military tries to recruit
the highest scholastic achievers and
those that score the highest on perfor-
mance tests. As a psychology major
Mr. Britt should know that these peo-
ple are usually the most motivated,
most dedicated, most leadership
oriented people around. Instead, Mr.
Britt seems to want heroes; people
with nerve, courage, guts. These are
fine qualities, but apparently he
wants everybody in a leadership posi-
tion to be John Wayne. He should
know that not everyone (thank God!)
is like this.
In the military, just as in every other
human occupation, if every leader is a
hero, with no one following anyone,
nothing will get done. In the military,
heroes get killed, and what is more,
they get their subordinates killed.
No man is born a leader. Leader-
ship is learned. That is what ROTC is
all about. ROTC stands for Reserve
Officer Training Corps. Training.
Training brings out leaders. When
training does not bring out the leader
in a person, the military knows it. It
does not accept or promote in-
competence. Mr. Britt has looked at
failure and laid the blame in the
wrong place. America's military
leaders are the best in the world, and
officer procurement programs, in-
cluding ROTC, do now and will con-
tinue to provide more of the best.
Jeffrey D. Lippert
Senior, Poli Sci
Words Of Choice
Surely everyone is in favor of
"goodness "freedom and
"peace Just as surely, everyone
should ask of the writer or speaker,
"What specifically do you mean by
those words?"
In Science and Sanity Alfred Kor-
zybski advised us to use index
numbers along with words to remind
us that there are always differences
His formula is the seed of a good
liberal education. We only neec:
learn to apply it in our thinking,
speaking, and writing. Here is the
formula: "Cow 1 is not cow 2 " Nc
two cows are exactly the same; no tw
Jews are identical, no two WASPS,
no two women drivers, no
homosexuals, no two liberals If we
look closely enough, we can always
find differences, and these dif-
ferences can be very important. Our
similarities make us human; our dif-
ferences make us individuals.
When we hear words like
"freedom "communism and
especially "God let us remember to
ask, "What does the other person
mean when using that term?" Both
Jesse Helms and I use the word
"freedom but the meaning he has
in mind(?) is very different from
mine.
Jim Bridges
Elizabeth Citv
Protester Recounts Prison Experiences
By PATRICK O'NEILL
I have now been in jail or prison for
all or parts of the last 22 months. To
make a long story short, I jvas arrested
Easter morning 1984 for depredating
S2.908 worth of government property.
(Using a small hammer I put a few dents
in some metal components of an
unassembled Pershing II nuclear missile
launcher. Seven other people including a
Roman Catholic nun were arrested with
me). On July 26, 1984, the eight of us
received three year federal prison
sentences. I have been incarcerated ever
since.
At this time, I choose not to discuss
the specifics of my "crime nor do I
plan to discuss the philosophical or
moral reasons for my actions. I'll save
that for another day. Instead I'd like to
tell you a little bit about what my life in
prison has been like.
The last salaried job I held before
coming to prison was News Editor of
this publication. At the time of my arrest
I was a full-time student at North
Carolina Central University in Durham.
So my transition to prison came from
basically the same type of day-to-day liv-
ing most ECU students experience.
My First two months of incarceration
were pent in the Orange County Jail in
Orlando, Florida. The jail was a
miserable, filty, roach-infested
dungeon. (On several occasions I found
full nests of roaches in my bed). The jail
was often Fifty percent overcrowded so
there were usually people sleeping all
over the floors. I slept on the floor near
the urinal for four days before I got a
bed. There was no segregation of in-
mates in the Orange County Jail, so I
often found myself sleeping only a few
feet away from a person who had been
charged with murder, rape or some
other violent offense. I was scared.
After my conviction, I spent two mon-
ths "in transit" to the minimum security
prison I am in now. During those two
months I served time in nine different
citycounty jails, prisons and "correc-
tional centers" in four different states
and the District of Columbia.
Most of those nine facilities were as
bad or worse than the Orange County-
Jail. In the Virginia Beach Correctional
Center I was again forced to sleep on the
floor. The worst was the Portsmouth
(Va.) City Jail where I never saw the
light of day or breathed fresh air; the
portions of food were so small that
prisoners were always hungry.
'7 have now been arrested for
civil disobedience five times and
have received jail or prison
sentences four out of the five. "
The hunger produced high tension and
anxiety. 1 had food "taken" from me on
several occasions and witnessed a brutal
fight over a cigarette (cigarettes were in
short supply also). My complaints to jail
officials were basically ignored.
On September 20, 1984, I was
transported to a minimum security
federal prison in Atlanta, Ga. Every
time I was moved from one facility to
another I was forced to wear leg irons,
shackles around my waist with my hand-
cuffed hands attached to the shackles. I
would have to stay chained up like this
for as long as fourteen hours at a time. I
would refrain from eating or drinking
very much on those "in transit" days
because the chains were often not
removed if I had to use the bathroom.
I started my work in the peace move-
ment when I moved to Greenville on
August 19, 1977. I was arrested for civil
disobedience for the first time on my bir-
thday, March 27, 1982, at Fort Bragg,
N.C. 1 have now been arrested for civil
disobedienc? five times and have receiv-
ed jail or prison sentences four out of
the five. I have spent close to 700 days of
my life behind bars in more than 20 dif-
ferent jails and prisons. I'm not putting
out these facts for the purposes of self-
adoration. It didn't take me long to
realize that there is no glory in this type
of work. And neither is it my intention
to brag. I am merely giving readers the
opportunity to know something about
my life.
The days and nights, weeks and mon-
ths, and now years 1 have spent in-
carcerated have been the most horrible
times of my life. I am always lonely,
always despairing, and always wishing I
were home with my friends and family.
The last two Christmases were the worst.
It is hard to describe how miserable it is
to be in prison on Christmas. Just about
everyone is sad.
The question often asked of me is
"why go through so much agony for
such an unreachable goal as world
peace?" I'm not exactly sure what
"drives me but my faith in God plays
a primary role. I also believe there to be
no greater challenge confronting
humankind today than to eliminate war
before war eliminates us. 1 believe it can
be achieved, but only through extraor-
dinary nonviolent means by people who
are willing to commit themselves to non-
violence and peace with the same fervor
which people have committed to
violence and war throughout the cen-
t u r i e s .
Well, I'm beginning to get off the topic;
I did say the story was going to be about
prison life.
One thing I have concluded about jail
and prison is that all of them are terri-
ble, inhumane places, their primary pur-
pose being to crush a person's spirit and
strip herhim of her his dignity.
The Orange County Jail was typical.
Besides the filth, overcrowding and ver-
min, the jail was always too hot, always
too loud, always crowded with cigarette
smoke and never peaceful. The toilet
and sink were a combined stainless steel
unit offering no hot water. The toilet
had no seat and was right smack in the
middle of the cell block. When you used
the toilet you did so in full view of 15 or
2C people. Privacy was non-existent. A
phone was available for collect calls, but
using it was tricky. Many fights broke
out over the phone. I rarely used it
because it was always so noisy anyway.
I was allowed "visits" twice a week. A
visit consisted of talking to someone
through a thick, scratched-up piece of
glass. The only problem was you
couldn't look through the glass and talk
to the person at the same time. When
one person spoke the other would have
to have their ear next to the screen in
order to hear. Since there were no
dividers between the ten or so visiting
slots everyone was shouting back and
forth. When you looked at each other
through the glass, it was just silence; the
facial expressions said enough.
The prison I'm in now is considered
one of "the best" in the federal system.
Well known people such as former Con-
gressman John Jenrette and Tennessee
banker Jake Butcher are here with me.
But "the best" the feds have to offer is
about 100 times worse than Cotton
'dorm at ECU.
The prison is divided into four dor-
mitories. Each dorm is subdivided into
25 maze-like cubicles; each cubicle about
one-third the size of an average ECU
dorm room. Believe it or not three men
sleep in each cubicle! There's one set of
bunk beds and one single bed. Two peo-
ple cannot be out of their beds at the
same time for the purposes of getting
dressed or anything else which requires
movement. We each have one metal
locker, about the size of a compact
refrigerator, for all of our possessions.
Three hooks are provided to hang our
clothes on.
To survive prison 1 have stuck to a
strict daily routine. I would even go so
far as to say I have prospered from this
experience; made the best of a bad situa-
tion. When 1 got here I looked at three
critical areas of personal health:
spiritual, mental and physical. I allotted
certain amounts of time to nurturing
each area, allowing for larger portions
of time to be devoted to the area of
greatest need on a particular day.
My primary care for my physical
health has been running. I have been a
long distance runner since I was 11 years
old. I have run at least 4 miles, but have
averaged more than 6 miles, every single
day I have been here - rain or shine, hot
or cold.
With refe ds to my mental health 1
have not been as successful a steward as
I'd like to have been. I feel like I have
the least control in this area because
there are so many outside variables in-
volved. Emotions such as stress,
loneliness and anger are constantly ac-
tivated.
I haven't been spoiled. I'd
be happy to give all of this up to be able
to come back home. Hope to see you
soon.
"s

Fihl new I no
weft- presented
Monume
BURi !
A granr
Alama
the field- a
of -
state hist
on the marl
"It rea

Road Co
Creates C
(UPli -
tenths n
hold, i
.
oceanfi i
condominiun I
The nar
from N 211
Island. B
fee: away
developer M
to n li
boom.
The road lead
HP Ol Topsa.
developers
gressive
of land in
Topsail Shoi
"This art
the most di
of any place oi S
Carolina coa
Owens, dire
sion of Coastal Mai
Bostic has pei
State Depa:
tion to mo
must have
Management -V
y y Y � i ' "
MED
j is now accep
General Manl
academic ye;
East Carolinil
Buccaneer,
Expressions
I Please app
office, 2nd
Phone 757-61
through Apri





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 15,
1986
.1 EFFECT.
ifounded
and will con-
' the best.
ds Of Choice
favor of
i and
everyone
speaker,
mean by
v lfred Kor-
use index
i remind
ferenccs.
ed of a good
need to
thinking,
Here is the
2 No
ame; no two
two WASPS,
no two
Is. If we
in always
hese dif-
tant. Our
our dif-
words like
sm and
�member to
'her person
ii term?" Both
ase the word
meaning he has
different from
nences
subdivided into
each cubicle about
1an average ECU
r noi three men
There's one set of
ingle bed. Two peo-
their beds at the
1purposes of getting
ing else which requires
' have one metal
size o! a compact
' our possessions.
Jed to hang our
1 have stuck to a
e I would even go so
have prospered from this
made the best of a bad situa-
here I looked at three
personal health:
tal and physical. 1 allotted
Ms of time to nurturing
allowing for larger portions
be devoted to the area of
fca need on a particular day.
primary care for my physical
h has been running. I have been a
distance runner since 1 was ! i years
ave run at least 4 miles, but have
1 more than 6 miles, every single
have been here - rain or shine, hot
ilH
'lUi
ith regards to my mental health I
ve not been as successful a steward as
like to have been. I feel like I have
least control in this area because
tn are so many outside variables in-
Ked Emotions such as stress,
?liness and anger are constantly ac-
ted.
I haven't been spoiled. I'd
happy to gjve all of this up to be able
jome back home. Hope to see you
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1
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rPz

University Scholars
Eight new University Scholars were recognized during the ECU Scholars Weekend banquet Sunday. The high school seniors
were presented I niversitv Scholars plaques by Chancellor John Howell.
Monument Built For N.C. Battlefield
elf
torage
408 West Arlington Blvd
Greenville N.C. 27834
(919) 756-9933
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BURLINGTON. NC (I PI) -
A granite monument shadows th
Alamanee Battleground claimin
the fields as the firsi combat zon
of the American Revolution, bi
state historians place an asteris
on the marker.
"It reallv was a civil w .
North Carolina Jerry Cashion,
a historian with the state Division
rchiev and History, said of
e battle that took place on the
county's rolling hills more than
200 years ago.
The monument's assertation
"stretcher the point because
Road Construction
Creates Con tro versy
(UPI) � A three a
tenths mile stretch o! asphalt is
holding back a tide ol
tion along a pristine
oceanfront, but a
million project could opei l
condominium floodgate
The narrow road runs n
from NC 210 to the tip o! Iopsail
Island. By moving it 300 to 500
feet awa from the cean,
developer Marlow Bosti (pes
to make room for a construct
boom.
The road leads to the northern
up of Topsail Island, where
developers have already built ag-
gressively along a 2-mile stretch
of land in an area called North
Topsail Shores.
"This area has probably had
the most dramatic rate of change
of any place on the entire North
Carolina coast said David
Owens, director of the state Divi-
sion of Coastal Management.
Bostic has permission from the
State Department of Transporta-
tion to move the road, but
must have a Coastal
Management Act permit.
t t Ti "T x i t 'T i i T i 'T
Bostic has proposed to build a
id with three public beach ac-
cess sites providing enough park-
jz for a toatal of 634 cars. That
�( uld allow the development at
le tip of Topsail Island to spill
into what is now mostly
virgin land.
North Carolinians were fighting
North Carolinians and it's hard
to bring the (British) Crown into
that he said. "The folks just
said they were not going to put up
with corruption
State officials plan to pay
homage to the 2,000
backwoodsmen and 1,000
militiamen commanded by
Governor William Tryon in the
skirmish May 16, 1771, four
years before the Concord and
Lexington battle.
The Guilford Militia will
march on the 42-aere bat-
tleground in the park's first
muster May 3-4, said site
manager Bryan Dal ton.
The volunteer group will
reenact the day-to-day chores of
the Revolutionary soldiers, and
the overnight muster will include
firing a cannon identical to those
used in the late 1700s, he said.
The Battle of Almance broke
out when farmers angered bv ex-
cessive taxation revolted in force.
Tryon, the only British soldier in
the militia marched through
Hillsborough and confronted the
2,000 "Regulators" near
Alamanee Creek. Nine regulators
and nine militiamen died in the
two-hour battle. "Tryon was on-
ly carrying out his mandated duty
to keep the peace Cashion said.
"It would be unfair to wrap the
Hag around one or the other
The battle proved to be good
exercise for the Regulators when
they were later confronted with
professional redcoats, he said.
"It was one or two times that
militia ever got together en
masse, so it served as good train-
ing Cashion said.
Area
Tequila Bar Weekly Specials
Sunrise Sunday: $2.00 per serve
Melo-Mondays: $2.00 per serve
Toast Tuesday: $2.00 per serve
Wednesday: Always Live "First Strike Band"
Thirsty- Thursday: Drink & Drown
tried-Friday: Get Fried Early at our new Attitude Adjust-
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Saturday Night Specials
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752-8926
BAR
-4
MEDIA BOARD
is now accepting applications for
General Manager for the 1986-87
academic year for the following: The
East Carolinian, WZMB-FM,
Buccaneer, Rebel, Photo Lab and
Expressions Magazine.
Please apply at the Media Board
office, 2nd floor, Publications Building.
Phone 757-6009. Applications accepted
through April, 16, 1986.
1
-� - -
Comedy Zone
Wednesday Nights
$1.00 o�
With Coupon
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16
C .til S8S5"0 ioi .1 FRH RIDf nn ihr
&yvy nu&
I
COMING ATTRACTIONS
I I !
A Special Film . . .
Beyond the Walls (R)
Wed April 16
8:00p.m.
From the Films Committee . . .
The Mean Season,r, 7 & 9 p.m.
A t the Underground . . .
Charlie Chaplin, W.C. Fields,
and Laurel & Hardy Cartoons
Bring Your Lunch!
The Late Show . . .
BLOOD SIMPLER)
Thurs Fri &Sat.
Thurs. April 17
1:30p.m.
11:00p.m.
Fri & Sat.
Siili Available At
The Student Union Office
Applications for Minority Arts Committee
Chairperson
and membership of all Student Union Committees
Pick them up at Student Union Office, Mendenhall
mjomtc out ioiom you
t
gathering place
-





6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN APR 11 IV
1986
Impose
(CPS)-Presidents of I S
Catholic colleges say they're con-
cerned that a first draft of new
Vatican rules now circulating
among them would, if im-
plemented, dramatically change
church higher education.
If enacted, the new policy
could eliminate Catholic college
students from federal aid, cut the
schools themselves off from
government funds and grams
and, by one account, turn the
campuses into "centers of indoc
trinastion, not centers for learn-
ing
It could also force many non-
Catholic teachers to leave
Catholic campuses.
"We can't ask faculty to sweai
allegiance to the Roman Catholic
Church says Dr. Nicholas
DeProspo of Seton Hall Univer-
sity in New Jersey.
The Vatican document on
higher education attempts to
define the relationship between
"science and faith" at Catholic
universities, and proposes u
give bishops power to appoint
faculty.
The directive implies churches
would have direct control of
faculty hiring.
But at federally funded col-
leges, such control would violate
the First Amendment, which re-
quires the separation of church
and state.
In all, the changes could
jeopardize about a half billion
dollars in government grants and
loans to Catholic schools and
their students, some sources
setimate.
The directive, when final, will
affeel Catholic universities
worldwide, including 235 U.S.
schools known more for
academic excellence than for
religious indoctrination.
Seton Hall's DeProspo also
worries the directive could
jeopardize the school's accredita-
tion.
"Government and accreditors
could say this makes us centers
tor indoctrination, not centers of
learning" he cautions.
Specifically, the Vatican at-
tempts to define what theology
professors can teach, but some
tear chinch ideology could in-
vade academic classrooms as
well, says Father Thomas
Gallagher of the U.S. ICatholic
Conference.
"A concern of some pro-
fessors he says, "is that
Catholic theology could surface
in other courses" such as
biology. socioloigy and
psycholog).
Much of the difficulty seems to
stem from translating and apply-
ing a Latin document aimed at
universities in communist and
Third World countries, as well as
those in the United States.
"It atttempts ot cover the
universe Gallagher says. "It
has a lot of misunderstandings
and terminology not suitable for
American CAtholic schools
In particular, the Vatican pro-
poses to place faculty under the
supervision of bishops a pro-
gressive idea for universities in
some East European and African
countries, but a questionable one
here.
"in a communist country, the
challenge may be to wrest a bit of
control from the state
Gallagher says. "Here our main
challenge is getting enough
money to survive
Translating an archaic
language into modern-day
English leads to more confusion.
When the Vatican talks about
the relationship between
"science" and faith, many fear
an attack on scientific principles
like evolution, says Sister Alice
Gallin, executive director of the
Association of CatholicColleges
and Universities.
"But in Latin, 'seientia' really
means the 'search for knowledge'
or 'quest for truthGallin says.
The ambiguity has left college ad-
ministrators wondering just what
the Vatican is asking of them.
The Catholic Conference
recently appointed a committee
of college and church authorities
to explain to the Vatican that the
U.S. Catholic university system,
the largest in the world, differs in
history and structure from other
Catholic institutions.
"OUr independent universities
report ot boards of trustees, a
concept unfamiliar to them
(Vatican doctrinaires) says
Gallin.
"We were not founded by
bishops or popes she says of
the American system. "We have
a historical and legal context of
independence
American Catholic universities
also are unique int heir tradition
of science and liberal arts pro-
grams. European schools mainly
teach theology.
'They (the Vatican Congrega-
tion) are writing about a type of
institution unknown to us
Gallin savs.
Before pushing any panic but-
tons, Gallin cautions, people
should realize the document is
only a draft
And the Vatican seems to be
listening to U.S. concerns, she
adds.
Eventually university
presidents will meet in Rome for
an International conferencer
discuss the document.
to
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Sunday, April 19, 1-5
Where: Main Lobby, Fletcher Muse
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ommmmin
ECU STUDENT UNION FORUM COMMITTEE PRESENTS
A Debate on U.S.
Involvement in Central
America
featuring
Col. Samuel T. Dickens
David Mac Michael
former CIA Agent
and
Representative of
the State Department







Students Restore Relations
SANTA BARBARA. CA (CPS)
- About 2.000 U-Cal at Santa
Barbara students have signed a
petition to try to fire the school's
chancellor.
As a result, The Associated
Students Legislative Council will
vote in early April whether to put
Chancellor Robert Huttenback's
credibility to a test before
students.
The motion, which students
say probably will pass, will have
no binding authority. It's merelj
a statement of student feelings.
"We got student signatures to
show it's a student movement,
not a student government verses
administration conflict. Those
are all too common stud
ficer Todd Smith contends.
"The reason behind this move-
ment is not one particular thii
It's his style complains Rich
Laine another council member.
The petition is just the latest in
a series of insults traded between
the administration and the cam
pus student government.
"He runs the school like a
business, but does not deal with
the consumer � students l aine
says.
The adminstration, in turn.
says the student politicians are at-
tacking Huttenback onl to tr to
recoup credibility lost to allega
tions of scandal and failures
read student attitudes accurately.
Smith maintains students' ire
began last spring when someone
overheard Huttenback sav he
would flush down the toilet a stu-
dent petition for divesting school
funds in South Africa.
"The context of the situation
has been forgotten asserts Bet-
sy Watson, the campus's director
of public relations.
Students had forced their way
into Huttenback's office, and
demanded he sign the petiton.
Huttenback replied he would not
be bullied, Watson says.
The student officers reply the
chancellor tried to get his way
even when students disagree with
him hv creating a student govern-
ment of his own choosing and
simply holding his own campus
elections when legitimate votes
displease him.
Students maintain Huttenback
bverted student government by
o gel his way on a cam-
pus busing issue.
Huttenback effectively over-
turned the results of an April,
1985, student vote against paying
a fee tor unlimited bus service in
and around campus by staging a
highly unusual polling on the
iss . al registration last fall.
1 he chancellor used the results
'all vote � done by check-
nig off a box on the registration
to justify imposing the
tee on students.
Watson says the administra-
tion made a procedural mistake
hv allowing the student govern-
ment to take up the issue in the
t'itst place.
"I think (student officers) are
verv embarrassed (by subsequent
tudent support of the bus fee)
Watson speculates. "They feel
they have to posture themselves
to restore faith on part of their
constituency
Moreover, Watson says the
government is still smarting from
allegations made last fall that
some officers mishandled student
funds.
W&;&&&y U Yv '�' - -
Sunday, April 20, 1986 at 8 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall Student Center :
Admission: Students � $1.50
Faculty & Staff � $3.00 I
Public & at Door � $5.00 j
Tickets available from Central Ticket Office �
j 757-6611. ext. 266 :
uiiiiiiinmn1��,�,�i
Swing into savings
at Kroger!
REGULAR OR
LIGHT
Coors(Cans)
or Budweiser
$l-00 c
timlthoU
California
Strawberries
Welcome Students
& Faculty
SPECIALS
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Any one, or any combination of 4
Shrimp � Oysters � Trout
Clam Strips Devil Crab
Ocean Perch � QQ
REG CLASSIC DIET
CHERRY CAFFEINE FREE
REG OR DIET
6
Alaskan Crab Legs Or
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Served with Fried or Baked Potato
Cole Slaw and Hush Puppies
FA MIL Y REST A VRANT
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HOURS: SunThun. 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
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i
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the wa)
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i
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ng Jew
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Smokeles,
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( ontinued From Pge 2

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East Cal
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Director of
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News
Advertising!
Staff
Apply in person at the The Eas
p.m5:00p.m. Deadline for an
East Carolinian is an equal opp






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 15, 1986
Schools
university
eel in Rome for
conference! to
ment.
�WVWMmV�.mM�,�M�Utftrfm
)EN GIRL

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Milk
Minorities To Begin Restoring Relations
CO! LEGE PARK,MD(CPS)-
fter the latest in a series of
"small explosions" in relations
between black and Jewish
students nationwide during the
las! year, University of Maryland
students are trying to restore
peace in the wake of a Kwame
1 ourc speech.
The speech by Toure � better
known to older students and
tacuity members as Student Non-
violent Coordinating Committee
leader Stokely Carmichael, who
popularized the fist-shaking
"black power" chant of the six-
es led to a spate of death
threats and racist intimidations
on the College Park campus.
"The only good Zionist is a
dead Zionist Toure said during
a speech sponsored by the univer-
sity's Black Student Union, lea-
Jewish students otfended and
t Tightened by some students'
cheering response.
"We want some kind of
assurances of our security says
lacob Blumenthal o' Maryland's
Jewish Student Union.
Jewish students asked the
Black Student Union (BSU) to
apologize or state it did not sup-
r 1 I o u r e' s stand on the
destruction of Zionists. The
BSU, however, refused.
"That part of the speech
frightened a lot of people says
Blumenthal, who also cited
Toure's brochures, which "ac-
cuse Jewish butchers of selling
bad meat to blacks and Jewish
bankers of manipulating national
economies as scaring Jewish
students.
"That's old and scary anti-
Semitic tactics says Blumental,
"the kind the Nazis used
In other incidents surroun-
ding Toure's visit, someone carv-
ed a swastika in the front door of
the Jewish student paper, the
BSU president received death
threats on his answering
machine, and both black and
Jewish students reported being
taunted while on campus.
"We're seeing a spreading of
hatred on campuses says Jef-
frey Ross of the Anti-Defamation
League's (ADL's) national of-
fice. "Individual campus situa-
tions are being inflamed by out-
side speakers
Ross says frequent campus
speakers like Toure and Muslim
Minister Louis Farrakhan often
encourage the inflammation.
But the tension comes not only
from Toure's and Farrakhan's
provocative opinions of Zionism
and Jewish theology, but also
from threats of reprisal from the
militant Jewish Defense
Organization (JDO).
When Farrakhan spoke at the
State University of New York at
Albany last year, JDO followers
reportedly carried weapons and
intimidated students in the au-
dience. The clash between Far-
rakhan and JDO supporters
almost grew "into a riot, and it
scared a lot of people the cam-
pus paper reported.
Riot fears were never realized
during a Farrakhan visit to Pitt in
November, but recently at Penn
Farrakhan aide Jamil Muham-
mad told students Jews were
"chosen for that damn hellfire
for telling those lies they've been
spreading
"The greatest problem isn't the
violence at campuses during
(such) speeches, but after says
the ADL's Ross, "in dorm situa-
tion and in classes, when people
who otherwise would be friends
see each other as opposing
sides
"The small explosions are the
most serious thing
One such "small explosion"
came at the end of a fist recently,
as BSU President Tim Shaw
decked a Jewish student for
"running off at the mouth
The two students have since
mended their hard feelings, Shaw
says, and general tensions seem
to be abating.
Since then. Shaw, Blumenthal
and other student leaders have
been meeting "quietly says
Esther Abramowit of the cam-
pus Hillel House.
"We learned an unfortunate
lesson says Blumenthal, who
agrees tensions are easing. "We
(blacks and Jews) weren't as close
as we thought we were
"We have to put up with the
same racial slurs as they do
says Shaw.
There even may be more
dialogue in the wake of Toure's
speech than before it.
"People say we're trying to
sever the ties of blacks and Jews.
But on our campus, there were
none Shaw says.
"If we want to have any kind
of coalition, we have to respect
each other, agree to disagree and
look at our differences as well as
our similarities
Similar understanding and
dialogue grew out of Toure's
visits to other campuses.
At Columbia, for example,
black and Jewish students
prepared for Toure's visit by
holding workshops in which
stereotypes and group sen-
sitivities were discussed, and par-
ticipants staged role-playing
skits.
When Toure arrived at Colum-
bia March 4, few students attend-
ed his speech, though it drew
crowds from the Harlem
neighborhood surrounding the
school.
Rifts also seem to be healing in
Colorado, where last fall Jewish
students protested using student
fees to bring Toure to campus
The confrontation seemed tc end
in fruitless animosity.
But when Angela Davis came
to campus this month, advisors
to black and Jewish groups met
"in open communication, not
confrontation says I oren
Finkelstein of Colorado's Anti-
Defamation League.
"There's a real effort to turn
to chapter two he says
"When people can respect the
differences between us says
Shaw, "then we can have coali-
tions
And as Blumenthal concludes
"If he (Toure) wants to destro)
the alliance between Jews and
blacks, but then we make it
stronger by him coming here.
then we've fouled his purpose
Smokeless Tobacco Linked
To Addiction, Gum Cancer
Continued From Page 2.
rhe group wants to extend a
new ban on smokeless tobacco
advertising on electronic media to
print media, too.
In a speech to the same group,
geon General C. Lerett Koop
ased a report finding that
g-time smokeless tobacco
rs are 50 times more likely to
gel cheek or gum cancer than
� musers
"1 am ver alarmed aT the high
rate" ol student use of the
:es, exclaims Molly
lin ol Bowling Green State
University.
1 aflin, who assisted Glover in
the nationwide survey, adds dipp-
ing tobacco is far more popular
than chewing it.
Smokeless tobacco has become
popular on campus, she believes,
because commercials suggest it is
safe, an impression further pro-
moted by the number of seeming-
ly healthy athletes who use it.
"You look at the World Series,
and you see the players doing it
Laflin says.
One reason may be that they
can't stop.
In a separate study. Glover at-
tempted to get 41 students at an
unnamed Christian college to
quit smokeless tobacco. "Thev
certainly had incentive to quit
he adds, because the school
threatened to expel them if they
failed.
Glover found their withdrawal
symptoms were similar to
smokers "but more intense
In his nationwide studs oi
students' smokeless consump-
tion, Glover found that 23 per-
cent of the smokers who started
puffing before they were 10 were
still smoking in college.
But 61 percent of those who
began using smokeless tobacco
before they were 10 years old
were still addicted by the time
they got to college
Be A Leader
Are you organized? Do you like working with other people? Are
you interested in minority events on campus? If your answer is yes,
then pick up your application for the
Minority Arts
Committee
Chairperson
The Minority Arts Committee is responsible for selecting, planning,
promoting and presenting programs that are geared towards
informing people of many contributions in the arts by minorities.
Pick up your application today at the Student Union Office,
Mendenhall.
� lie?
The HUB
618 South Pitt St
752-1946 or 752-5048
��
'TH tv
Exercise is a Natural
A,Ab
High!
f
1" 9� "
Universal Hub Health
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618 South Pitt St.
April Special $28.00
Unlimited Club Use
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Indud es Suntan
Free visit with ad
l
I
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Microcomputer
Product Fair
IBM and Apple Computer products demonstrated.
Hands-on experience encouraged
See the full line of IBM Personal Computers,
including the New IBM PC Convertible. Also, the
Apple Macintosh Line will be featured, including
their new MacPlus.
Company representative available for assistance
and information
Refreshments provided!
Applications Being Accepted at the
East Carolinian
for Summer and Fall 1986
in the following positions:
Director of Advertising
Managing Editor
News Editor
Advertising Sales Reps
Staff Writers
Apply in person at the The East Carolinian between 12:00
p.m. -5:00 p.m Deadline for applications is April 17th. The
East Carolinian is an equal opportunity employer.
IU
Date: Tuesday, April 15, 1986
Time: 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Location: Student Stores, Wright Building
Register For Door Prizes
STUDENT STORES
East Carolina Univeristy
Wright Building
�HMmi Ak
.�� ���
- �
- - r r





I HI I ASTAROl INJAN
Style
NC
APRIL 15, 1986
Page 8
ECU Show And Jazz Choir
� TON1 II MM t
rh�V�f m�H 8nd Jf" C,h�Jr liU be Performin� in Hher Recital Hall Sundav at 8:15 p.m. Other
ofncl RSThVenH mC,U,de'he Ja" Band in co"r Wednesday at 8:15 p.m. and a concert b the
(. oncerl Band Thursday at 7:00 p.m.
'Timothy Liberty'
Plays Tomorrow
Salvation Army Helps Out
B KAREN HFJM
Two years ago, when a tornado
swept through Pitt county and
other parts of southeastern North
Carolina, hundreds of people
were left homeless and without
food or any other resources.
Volunteer rescue workers took
them to emergency relief centers
where they could receive im-
mediate care and help. But what
happened to these people the next
day or the next week? Luckily,
the Salvation Army stepped in.
The salvation army set up one
center where all the local social
work agencies could congregate
to help people. This way people
didn't have to drive all over the
county seeking help. The Salva-
tion Army was the only agency
there with the ability to give
direct cash assistance.
Many people know of the
Salvation Army's thrift store, but
don't know much else about the
large organization. It's a religious
charity group operated in a
military fashion. The Salvation
Army "is motivated by a love of
God and a concern for all the
needs of humanity
The Salvation Army isn't
limited to Greenville; far from it.
The international organization
serves people in over 85 countries
around the world. It not only
provides physical aid such as
food, clothing and shelter, but
also helps people with their per-
sonal and family problems. The
Salvation Army has set up
rehabilitation centers to help with
problems such as alcoholism and
drug abuse. And they are ready
when a disaster strikes.
While doing all these things,
the Salvation Army brings its
faith into its work. Its workers
preach the Gospel and the love of
God. The organization has its
own set of religious doctrines or
beliefs that its members follow.
The motto of the Salvation Ar-
my used to be "saved to serve
You can see this motto on the
shoulders of officers wearing the
uniform. There is an "S" on each
shoulder pad. The more recent
motto is "heart to God, hand to
man
You may be wondering how
the Salvation Army gets money
to sponsor its programs and help
so many people. It doesn't all
come from those black kettles at
Christmas time.
They get their funds from the
United Way, the Christmas Ap-
peal, fund raisers and donations;
some comes from a federal fun-
ding program called FEMA, or
Federal Emergency Management
Assistance.
The biggest funding drive is
during the Christmas season,
when the Salvation Army
workers become public fixtures
ringing bells beside black kettles.
The money they raise is mostly-
used during Christmas, and
anything that is left over goes
straight into other winter pro-
grams.
Another program the Salvation
Army sponsors at Christmas is
the adoption of a family in need.
Ronaid Davis, chief ad-
ministrator and pastor of Green-
ville's Salvation Army, explains
that they are very selective regar-
ding which groups adopt families
since thev want the best for them.
Helping people is a continuous
process for Greenville's Salvation
Army, not a seasonal one. "The
Salvation Army is always chang-
ing. It's never stagnant said
Davis.
When people in need come to
the Salvation Army, they can bet
they will be gien immediate and
continuous help. Davis explained
that after three months, if a par-
ticular family is not off the
"gimme list the group starts all
over from square one with them,
so a family is never lost in paper
work or red tape. Greenville-
Salvation Army has a high rate of
success getting people off the
"gimme list
The Army helps Greenville
residents get their feet off the
ground by helping them pay their
rent, utilities or food bill. The
first month a family is receiving
assistance, it is being paid by
federal funds � but that is a one-
time-only deal. Any help received
after that comes out of the local
Salvation Army account.
Davis is currently working on a
program that might be able to be
fit into ECU's social work
department. It would allow ECU
social work majors to work at the
Salvation Army and receive
credit for it. One of the things
students would be helping with is
the interviewing of needy families
before and after Thanksgiving,
getting ready for Christmas.
Nothing final has been decided
about the program yet.
Whether in the social work
department or not, Ronald Davis
would like to see more ECU
students who have a real love for
helping people come out and see
where they might fit in. He ad-
vises students to "expand your
energies and give a helping
hand
This year's winner of The
Playwrights Fund of North
Carolina Best Play competition
for North Carolina playwrights,
will be performed in two
readers' theater productions on
Wednesday at the Greenville
Museum of Art and the
Humber House.
The winning play, Timothy
Liberty, by David Brendan
Hopes, is informed by the Book
of Ruth. Its two characters,
Naomi and Ruth, are mother
and daughter, two women who
move between real and illusory
worlds, expressing themselves
with dance movement and
poetic dialogue throughout the
play.
Hopes, a native of Akron,
Ohio, holds an MA in creative
writing and a Ph.D. in literature
from Syracuse University, and
now teaches at UNC-Asheville.
Hopes is a widely published
poet, as well as a fiction and
non-fiction writer, and h first
book of poetry, The Glacier's
Daughters, won the 1981
Juniper Prize and the 1982
Sazti age Prize.
Timothy liberty exhibits
Hopes' background as a poet in
the language Naomi and Ruth
use as they talk about their loves
and fantasies, and express their
courage, their mutual respect,
and the combination of despair
and desire which provokes their
rather surprising engagement
with the dangerous world out-
side.
The Best Lunch Theater Ever
presentation of Timothy l.iber-
ty is at noon at the Greenville
Museum of Art. 6th and Evans
St. Audience members are in-
vited to bring lunch, enjoy
beverages provided by the
GMS, and talk with the
playwright after the show.
The Downtown, Downstairs
encore performance is at 8 p.m.
in the basement of the Humber
House, 5th and Washington
Streets. Karen Baldwin,
Associate Professor of English
at ECU, will lead a post-
performance discussion of the
play with the audience and the
playwright. There will be a
reception for t: e playwright
after the performance to which
audience members are invited.
Both performances are free and
open to the public.
Gregory Stewart Smith makes
his del ul as a PFNC director
for tl is production. Loretta
Riggs as Naomi and Ann Secord
as Ruth are veterans of PFNC
readers' theater performances.
Each was most recently seen in
the PFNC fall production,
Whose fsic) Jfruid of fid ward
�Mbee
This Greenville premiere pro-
duction ! Timothv Libertyis
nude possible by Creative
Projects Grant trom the
Theater rts Of! if the
North Carolina Arts Council, a
state agency, and the National
Endowment for the Art a
federal agencv The moderated
eventing post-performance
discussion, one of a series on
"Human Values in New
for the Stage is supported by
a grant from The North
Carolina Hum at ties Commit-
tee.
Environmental Artist
Ireland Visits ECU Campus
M I Sf� Bi-rrau
David Ireland of San Fran-
cisco, an environmental artist,
will construct an environmental
installation in a room of the Old
Cafeteria Building on the campus
of Last Carolina University.
The construction begins on
Monday, April 28, and concludes
on Friday, May 2. Ireland will be
assisted by undergraduate and
graduate students.
Ireland will present a lecture on
April 28 in Room 1220 of the Leo
W. Jenkins Fine Arts Center. He
will be honored with a reception
on May 2 in the Old Cafeteria
Building when the viewing of his
installation will first be allowed.
Ireland's visit is funded by the
National Endowment for the
Arts, through Gray Gallery.
"David Ireland is considered
to be an environmental artist
because he changes the environ-
ment said Perry Nesbitt, Gray
Gallery director. "ECU is allow-
ing him to add to and subtract
from the structural elements of
the room, which has some very
interesting architectural
features
The room contains a fireplace,
granite floors and arched win-
dows. "The room is decaying,
but it contains some good raw
material Nesbitt said. "I have
seen other pieces he has done,
and I thought the elements in this
room might jog him in some
way
Ireland's structure will be tem-
porary, Nesbitt said, since the
university plans to restore the
room.
Ireland earned a BA in 1953
from the California College of
Arts and Crafts, where he studied
industrial and stage design. In
1974 he received his MFA from
the San Francisco Art Institute in
printmaking.
Public and institutional works
of the artist include "Jade
Garden" in Washington, D.C
"Candlestick Park" in San Fran-
cisco, "Gallery" in Boston,
"Reformatory" in Monroe,
Washington, and "Barracks" in
Fort Barry, California.
His works have been exhibited
at the New Museum of Contem-
porary Art, White Columns
Students Show Work
Gallery and the Mo David
Gallery in New York City; Emily
Carr College of Arts in Van-
couver, Cananda; Leah Levy
Gallery, 80 Langston Street
Gallerv. 65 Capp Street, Mr.
Gordon's Birthday Party and the
Museum of Conceptual Arts in
San Francisco.
He received the National En-
dowment for the Arts Artists
Fellowship Grant in 19"8 and
1983. In 1982 he received the Ar-
tist of the Year award from the
Contemporary Arts Council of
Oakland Museum.
He has served as a visiting ar-
tist at the San Francisco Art In-
stitute, the Emily Carr College of
Art, the University of California
at Berkeley the Massachusetts
College of Art in Boston, Har-
vard School of Landscape Ar-
chitecture in Cambridge. MIT,
and the San Francisco Museum
of Modern Art.
Ireland's lecture and reception
are free and open to the public.
Parking is available in lots ad-
joining Jenkins.
?w
By DAVID BRADSHAW
This year's Graduate Thesis
Exhibition promises to cover a
great deal of the art spectrum,
with works ranging from acrylic
paintings to ceramics to art
metals. The subject matter of
these works will encompass
thematic elements as diverse as
the artists and their respective
mediums; relations of time and
space, the quest for truth, and in-
teractions of color.
The 1986 Thesis Exhibition
features twelve graduate students
who are all finishing this
semester. The show is being
organized wholly by these
students, with practically no help
from the Gray Art Gallery.
Gallery Director Perry Nesbitt
explained, "The students
themselves are organizing the
space of the installments. They
are also planning the reception.
The whole show has been
democratically planned and
organized. It really is all theirs
Of the twelve graduate student
artists participating, five are
painters. Ann Thompson
presents acrylic paintings and
black and white woodcuts. Fred
Galloway's exhibit contains a
series of self portraits which
depict his understanding of
Christianity. Margaret Shearin
and Nancy Natelson incorporate
line, color and form in at-
mospheric paintings, while Leslie
Karpinski exhibits a series of
painted fabric panels and
garments.
Helen Colevins is one of three
ceramicists showing in the exhibi-
tion. Much of her work is drawn
from memories of her stay in Ita-
ly, where she had many inspiring
experiences. She works with
planes of space in clay and glass.
Gail Spence's box constructions
and Mark Brown's historically
referential vessels round out the
ceramics entries.
Agyeman Dua works with scaf-
folded clay. His tree-like, totemic
sculptures deal with the religious
beliefs of the people of the Akan
Society of Ghana, which is Dua's
native country.
Pornkumpoo Phakswan, a
native of Thailand, uses painted
silk to create environments, while
Joe Champagne works with
platinotypes, which are
photographs in platinum. Betty
Melton McKim will display draw-
ings and works in metal.
The show will open with a
reception in Gray Gallery on
Saturday from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
The public is invited.
The exhibition will continue
through April 30. For those in-
terested, some of the works will
be available for sale.
i&4 ,
M A
M "
� v - ��,v
This unfilled platfuotype by graduate student Joe Champagne Is one of mam �nn.
ex-
gen Sntur-
Samuel Stone of V
Salem will become di
development at the
Carolina Museum
tive July 1, He
director of de
North Carohna S
Arts, a px
since Januarv
In making
ment, museur:
Richard S
stated, "We i
a man of San
tials to the
of developmer.
New A:
(UPI) - H .
won an I
portrayal i! a I
in the film The h
says as a new .
he plans to re
my people
Ngor, a
and doctor a
and near
homela
allegiance I
last Friday
He sat
1,000 othe:
small U.S. flat
Chandler Pav
administer v
District J.
Another 2. �
the oath a I
life N '
newlv sw
stand !
also have
freedom
Boom
(UPI) � w
30s, those bo-
World War II bal
have the highe
history if currei
a Census Bureo
"I think the �
group of women
very different tha
and younger in how they pi -
though their life cy
-ENGINEE
MA
OFFICI
I
The Army
ing and Science
ficers. For thos
important step
the Army.
You've work'
of Science degr
way to use y
valuable superv
available now !
An Arm pla
portunities anc
receive degrees
direct to arran
Call:
� � -

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Liberty'
omorrow
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ward
A
Campus
-v
Ar-
il
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liege of
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Landscape Ar-
i dge MIT.
Museum
Mion
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ad-

-
one of many works to go on ex
ils Exhibition will be given Safer
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 15, 1986
NC Museum Of Art Gets Shot
Samuel Stone of Winston-
Salem will become director of
development at the North
Carolina Museum of Art effec-
tive July 1. He currently is
director of development at the
North Carolina School of the
Arts, a position he has held
since January 1972.
In making the announce-
ment, museum director-elect
Richard S. Schneiderman
sjted, "We are pleased to bring
a man of Sam Stone's creden-
tials to the museum as director
of development. Stone has serv-
ed in a similar capacity at the
North Carolina School of the
Arts and has conducted several
successful major capital cam-
paigns. I have every confidence
that he will serve our needs ad-
mirably and raise the museum's
fund-raising campaign to a
higher plateau, thereby helping
us serve our audiences better
Stone commented, "I am
grateful for the confidence in
me shown by the museum
Board of Trustees Search Com-
mittee and by Dr. Schneider-
man. It will be a pleasure to
continue my involvement with
the arts community statewide
within a new setting, as well as
refreshing to face new
challlenges with colleagues
whose approach to management
and public service is so compati-
ble with my own.
"The museum is at a critical
juncture in its history, and I am
fortunate to be a part of the
team that will chart and carry
forward the next phase of
development Stone said.
Stone, 44, is a native of
Charleston, W.Va. He holds a
Doctor of Ministry degree from
the Union Theological
Seminary in Richmond, Va. and
a Master of Divinity degree
from Duke University. He also
hold a B.A. degree in sociology
and anthropology from Duke
University and did graduate
work in sociology at Wake
Forest University.
Stone was assistant chaplain
and an instructor in philosophy
and religion at Colgate Univer-
sity, Hamilton, N.Y. from 1967
to 1969. He then joined the staff
of the North Carolina School of
the Arts in 1969, serving in a
variety of teaching and ad-
ministrative postions before be-
ing named to his current posi-
tion in 1972
At the School fo the Arts,
Stone has assisted in building
the school's endowment from
zero to $2.7 million. He has
provided administrative leader-
ship to secure and manage an
annual operating budget from
the private sector in the range of
$1.5 to $2 million. Stone was
project director for the $11
Arm
million campaign to develop the
Stevens Center, a major public
performance space for the
School fo the Arts and keystone
for the revitalization of
Winston-Salem's urban core.
Stone is a frequent consultant
and speaker on arts, education
and urban revitalization issues.
He is married to Bonnie Vick
Stone and they have two
daughters, Clare, 16, and
Sarah, 15.
New American To Help His People
� �
(I PI) � Haing S. Ngor, who
won an Oscar last year for his
portrayal of a fellow Cambodian
in the film The Killing Fields,
says as a newly sworn U.S. citizen
he plans to return home "To help
my people
Ngor, a Cambodian refugee
and doctor who survived torture
and near starvation in his
homeland, took an oath of
ailegiance to the United States
is) Friday.
He sat in the front row among
00 other immigrants clutching
small U.S. flags at the Dorothy
Chandler Pavilion as they were
administered the oath by U.S.
strict Judge Robert Kellehera.
nother 2,000 immigrants took
?ath a few hours later.
"Today is a very big day in my
fe Ngor said on stage to the
ewly sworn citizens. "Today we
d for freedom, but todav we
o have to protect our
;dom
Drawing applause with two
raised, clenched fists. Ngor aid,
"I thank God very much. God
bless U.S.A. Bravo Freedom!
Bravo U.S.A
Ngor told reporters he planned
to return to Cambodia "to help
my people so they can have
freedom like 1 have today
In his 1985 Academy Award
winning performance, Ngor por-
trayed Dith Pran, a journalist's
interpreter forced to flee Cam-
bodia when the Khmer Rouge
guerrillas look control of the
country in April 1975.
He was operating on a patient
when Khmer Rouge guerrillas
burst into the room, threatening
to kill him. He escaped into the
country with his fiancee, who
later died of starvation in his
arms.
From 1975 to 1979, he lived off
the land, constantly moving and
hiding from the Khmer Rouge.
He was captured three times and
tortured each time.
The first time he was arrested
flfcr referring to his fiancee as
"sweetheart" instead of "com-
rade
"We were starving and I had
pulled up a vegetable to eat
Ngor said in an interview before
"The Killing Fields" was releas-
ed. "For this, they cut off part of
my finger on my right hand, as a
lesson not to find food on my
own, that the Khmer Rouge
would provide
During his two other captures,
Ngor was hanged from a tree,
crucifixion style, for three days
and two nights. Another time he
was nearly suffocated by a plastic
bag tied over his head that forced
him into into agonizing convul-
sions.
"Out of the fifteen captives
onl) five survived and 1 was
one of the five he said.
Boomers Likely Split
iUPI) Women now in their
JOs, those born during the post
World War II baby boom, may
nave the highest divorce rate in
history if current trends continue,
a Census Bureau official says.
"1 think the key is that the
up of women in their 30s is
verv different than women older
and vounger in how they progress
though heir life cycle said
Jeanne Moorman, demographic
statistician in the bureau's Mar-
riage and Family Statistics
Branch. "It's just that the baby
boom generation is a unique con-
sort of people
Moorman cited a study that
shows the rate of marriage
failures among women between
ages 30 and 39 could reach 60
percent for first marriages.
According to the Census
Bureau's definition, the divorce
rate is the number of breakups
per year per 1,000 married
women. The current rate is about
22 per 1,000, or 2 percent.
Among the entire adult popula-
tion, less than 20 percent has ever
divorced, she added.
See DIVORCE, page 10
ENGINEERINGSCIENCES
YOUR DEGREE
MAY BE WORTH AN
OFFICER'S COMMISSION
IN THE ARMY.
The Army is looking for 1986 graduates in Engineer-
ing and Science disciplines to serve as commissioned of-
ficers. For those who qualify, this program could be an
important step toward a rewarding career � in or out of
the Army.
You've worked long and hard to earn your Bachelor
of Science degree. A commission in the Army is a good
way to use your technical expertise while gaining
valuable supervisory experience. And the opportunity is
available now!
An Army placement officer is available to discuss op-
portunities and qualifications with those about to
receive degrees in Engineering or Science. Contact him
direct to arrange an appointment convenient for you.
Call:
Captain Mallette
118 Reade Street
752-2908
ARMYOFFICER.
BEALLYOUCANBE.
In 1979, Vietnamese troops in-
vaded and Ngor crawled between
the lines across the border into
Thailand. He found his way to
the United States, where he has
worked helping other Southeast
Asian refugees.
Ngor said he was traveling to
Cannes, France, this weekend to
preview a documentary he had
just finished about Cambodian
refugees. He also is writing a
book and screenplay about his
life.
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington H,ghway (N.C 33 Ext Greenv.lle. North Carolina
Phone 752-3172
(Past RiverbluffApts.)
Flounder
Popcorn Shrimp
$3
25
$3�
Hours 4:30-9:30 MonSat.
- NEWLY REMODELED -
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And the re both repre-
sented h the insignia you wear
as a member 1 the Army Nurse
v . rps i he i aduceuson the left
means y u re part ot a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule.
not the exception The gold bar
on the right means vou command respect as an Army officer f you're
earning .1 BSN, write Armv Nurse Opportunities, TO Box 7713
Clifton, NJ 07015 Or call toll free 1-800-US A-ARMY
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE,
1986-87
Honor
Board
There will be a meeting
Thursday, April 24 at
4:00 p.m. in Mendenhall
Student Center Room 244
for all students interested
in being on the Honor
Board for the 86-87 school
year.
-4T'
�?�





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 15. 1986
BLOOM COUNTY
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Come on out the putting's fine!
Putt-Putt Golf Course Is Now Open For 1986!
PUTT-PUTT
BRING IN THIS COUPON & PAY
ONE COURSE FREE!
Limit one per person, per day
Eseuei�20J4.
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Divorce Ahead
Continued from page 9
Other reports show nearly 1.2
million divorces in the United
States each year.
"It's a mistake to say that
divorce is so rampant, because
it's really not Moorman said.
"By far, marriage is the predomi-
nant trend. Only about 30 per-
cent of the women aged 30 to 39
have divorced at this point, so
we're saving six of ten only if
trends continue
Moorman and Arthur Norton
prepared the 20 page paper on
divorce, re-marriage and child
bearing among women in their
30s. Norton, assistant division
chief at the bureau's Population
Division, discussed the paper Fri-
day at the annual meeting of the
Population Association of
America in San Francisco.
Moorman said statistics also
showed that "the later you wait
to get married, the less likely you
will divorce
She speculated that when peo-
ple marry at a later age, "they are
more stable and more sure of
themselves and more likely to
pick people who are
compatible
For example, she said of the
women who married under age
20, 30 percent had divorced,
compared to 15 percent of the
women who married in their 20s
and only 12 percent of those who
married after age 30.
Other findings showed women
in their 30s are more likely to
divorce if they had a child before
marriage or gave birth to a baby
within seven months of the mar-
riage. Thirty-five percent of the
women in that category had
divorced, conpared to 29 percent
who married under other cir-
cumstances.
Among all women aged 15 and
older, 2! percent of those with
pre-mantal births or premarital
conception had divorced, com-
pared with 22 percent who mar-
ried under other circumstances.
Childbearing also is affected
by the marriage divorce cycle,
Moorman said.
Divorced women who do not
remarry have an average of two
children. Those still in their first
marriage have an average of 2.2
children, but those who divorce
and remarry average 2.4 children.
"For The Man Who
355-5222 Wants To Dress To Impress'
Mon-Sat
10-9
New Summer Fashions
Arriving Daily
Shorts by SATURDAYS
only $21.00
HEETT-Shirts
only $14.00
Tuxedo's, Cummerbunds, &
Bow Ties Available
just right for that
Special Formal
Plus more all available at
The Style Shop
at The Plaza Mall
10 Discount ECU I.D.
Layaways, Mastercard, Visa and
American Express Welcome
(
� - , �. .
?6
OF JULY
Apr 16-19
8:15pm (Wed Sor)
McGinnis Theatre
(corner of St 5 Easter
The 60 s Generation A Decade Later
era Pub : $4
EC'
P:r Reserv 11
Don't Leave
ECU Without One!
Interest Free ,
Payment Plan
Available !
$10.00
Deposit
Special
Interest Free
Payment Plan Available !
ECU Student Store
Wednesday, April 16
Thursday, April 17
TIME: 9:00 A.M. fo 4:00 P.M. MUSf&iSHS


He Ir
Chris Bradbem show
(top) going into second
sus George Mason
ECU F
B riM( IUMii
sconoopi h
With the
Pigskin Pij!
around the
community is
ing on a trul
In its third yeai
itiated b P
Athletic Direci
Pig-out Par
largest crowd ever B
nual even: was
couple of hundred pe-
ed the Sprint
cording to Marke
Lee Workman.
"Last sear we ha
for the wl
W'orkman "Th
are expecting 15,001
Workman a
tional recogm:
received. "t
from school
State, Mississip
nessee U rl
"I hae also bee i �
event b pe
Player Of
Senior Winfred
named the
Association's
the Week for his efl
from Apr. " thr
The 5-10,
Elizabethu �
the week in
Pirates posted
record. Johns,
the plate with tw
RBls and one p
The home ru
Richmond and M
his solo shot a: R
an NCAA . Wi
home run, Joh
only player in NCAA
Nicklaus
By SCOTT COOPtR
ft
TIM CHAN 1)1 IR
apMiMMn
� ��r� npmnt
It was a great mon i
Sunday as Ja -
from behind to �
Master's Tour
Augusta. Ga.
What made it
fact that the 'Gold
age 46, proved he was
jor contender on the pi
despite what mans other pe-
tended to beliese
Nicklaus, like in the olden
days, had no equal in the sp
and was again at his tines- at the
Augusta National Golf Club He
stormed to a under-par 65 in
the final round, finishing a si
ahead of Tom Kite and
Australia's Greg Norman in
claiming his record sixth career
triumph in the heralded tourna-
ment.
Birdies at the 16th and 17th
holes finally pushed Nicklaus in
front. And as he walked up the
majestic 18th, he was fighting
back the tears as the thousands of
gathered fans around the green
I
I
H
manl
hotel
I
ing
mg
Nl
9-un
masj
agai
.
-





! PUTT PUTT
For 1986! . m��v
ON & PAY
D C Cf
Kkliit
JULY
ne!
M
Interest Free
an Available !
16
7
HE FF SOMES
Dm fort oi Cw�tion Compmn
ihi i asik() inian
Sports
AHKIl 13. !V��. Page
Comebacks Pace Bucs
Pirates Defeat Mt. Olive
I
� .
V

He's In There!
Chris Bradberry shows his sliding techniques as he portrays Pete Rose
(top) going into second and then is home safeU (bottom) in a game ver-
sus George Mason
Bv TONY BROWN
I he rrojans of Mount Olive
College held the Pirates scoreless
through two innings on Saturday ,
then took a 1-0 lead. But as
usual, ECU roared back to tie it
up and went on to cruise to a 10-1
win, bettering its season mark to
29-4.
With one out in the third, a
Pirate erroi allowed a Mt. (Hive
runner on, who then went to
thud on a hit-and-run single bv
Kusu Howard and later scored
on a fielder's choice tor a 1-0
Trojan lead.
In the bottom ol the name,
Steve Suit's and Mark Cockrell
singled for the Pirates and each.
moved up on a sacrifice bunt by
Jim Rilev. Mont Cartel walked to
load the bases and c ireg Hardison
drew another walk fron Ml
Olive pitcher Joe Renn, forcing
in a run and ty ing the score.
1 c I' look the lead in the
fourth and nevei was seriously.
threatened again. Mike Sullivan
opened the frame with a single
and .lav McGraw walked. B
moved up on a passed ball, I
each scored on consecutive
sacrifice flies by Sides and
Cockrell, making it 3-1 Pirates.
In the fifth, ECU started pull
ing away as .reg Hardison
homered aftei a walk Chris
Bradberry followed with a single
and came home on Winded
Johnson's double to centerfield
for a 6-1 margin.
Johnson picked up his 61st
careei homer with a solo shot in
the seventh and another Pirate
run scored aftei three consecutive
singles by McGraw, Sides and
Robert Langston. Two more
Pirates came across in the eighth
i,i the final I'M score.
EC! picked up 1. tuts in the
game, as 10 ol 11 battt i
least one Johnson led the way,
going 4 foi 5 with a double and a
homer foi three RBK while Hai
dison collected three RBls as
well.
( raig Van Devi gave up no
earned runs as he look his mark
6 0. loe Renn's record fell to
-2 for theTiojans, whose record
dropped to 15-17.
Kl vs. I NC
(in 1 hursda the stands were
full, the E I tans were riding the
1 ai Heels and the Pirates were
winning a game against another
ACT rival, sticking the Heels
with a 9-6 loss.
ECU really dug its way into a
hole, letting UNC move out to a
5 0 lead, but in typical fashion
the Pirates rallied in one inning to
tie it up and went on to win the
game.
1 he Carolina lead ame on
solo homers by Devy Bell and
Steve Mrowka, along with a two-
run double by Matt Merullo and
ueee bunt, but in the bottom
the fifth, ECU struck suddenly
to even tilings up.
Greg Hardison opened the
trame with a walk and Chris
Bradberry's eighth homer of the
yeai quickly made it 5 2. A dou-
ble by Johnson was followed by a
walk. With one out, reliever Tim
Kirk came on to strike one out,
but walked Cockrell to load the
bases. Jim Rilev promptly laced a
double to center to knot it at 5-5.
Kirk loaded the bases again in
the fifth and was relieved bv
Dave Benovy, who immediately
.e up a drag bui to Side scot
ing what proved to be the winn-
ing run. Cockrell got an infield
hit to add one more.
Sullivan singled another Pirate
run in the sixth, then the Tar
Heels closed the gap in the
seventh as Scotl Johnson doubled
and scored on Merullo's single.
The final run of the game came
in the bottom of the frame as
Cockrell walked and later scored
on an error.
Jim Peterson went to 7-2 on
the year with the win, while Tim
Kirk took the loss, tailing to 0-2.
UN 's mark dipped to 19-13
overall.
ECU was paced by Bradberry's
homer and two RBls, along with
three RBls by Rilev. The Tar
Heels were led by Bell's homer
and double and out-hit ECU 9-7.
IU will be oil the road for a
six-game stretch, but will return
Harrington field in Greenville
Apr 24 a' 7 p.m. in an important
non-conference match against
N C. State. I he previous game
between the paw was rained out
er an innii I play, while
1 C I took their first meeting -6
in Raleigh on Apr. 3.
ECU Pigskin Pigout; A Unique Attraction
B 11M( HANDI IK
&
s( on COOPER
Np.t� I dti
mnual Purp
km:
� �
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-
ed 1 �
Dave H
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w as sia � .i

Mar 1
Lee Worl
"Last

W
are expe - 5.00
Work man a
S
�: "W e have re.e:ed ca
uch as ()kl a
Mississippi Stai ei
ee Workman commented
. isked aboui
by people from Michigan
1 la: I : as bee write
al publications
ik ai seminars concern-
he event's in-
e planning is a
. accoi ding
v.
"i I'm already
c next yeai's " he said,
foui
. ' IS
eenville ty as
lys a
.
� i immei for in-
.
barl uple ol E I
lp set up chairs,
1 he entire
taff . way oi
iso, the
Depart-
mile
es, there
will I guests app
Millei I . N Stars Jack
"Hacksaw" Reynolds and Boh
1 aniei will be on
kevnolds, who played fo
at rennessee, picked up his
nickname aftei a J8-0 loss to
Mississippi. In frustration aftei
the game, he cut a 1953 Chevy in
� using 1? blades and a
80. He remained a majoi force in
the Rams' defense foi 1 I seasons.
In 1981, he was acquired by the
San Francisco 49ers In 1983,
during the playoffs, Rev nolds
was fouiih he team with 12
I
f
Jack "Hacksaw" Reynolds
'hacksaw
In 1970, Reynolds was dratted
in the firsi round hv the 1
Rams. He was named to the Pr
Bowl twice and lead the Ranis in
total tackles in 1975, "6. 78 and
Boh I anier
tackles. He played foi the 49ers
until 1985, participating in tw
Supei Bowls. Recently retired.
Rev nolds is considering a careei
in broadcast
Rev nolds was recently selected
I t;is to Hie all-time
Rims team, commorating the
Rain- 40th season in I
Bob 1 anier, at just a shade
lei sevei feel allesi
M er-Lii Stai Bui ol all his
big lea urt, his
: ead
B- Players' Association loom
�� impr
I aniei was I e Playei presi-
deni early '80s when the
associat at
time, was revolutionary
. cei ning both drug
abuse and revenue sharing.
Foi a great player who always
� out ol a championship
i ing, I aniei's legacy is thus
assured.
ier's closest miss to a
impionship came in college in
1970. He was then the dominant
� ver in the natioi . foi v'
Boi i re. However, he suf-
ed a knee injury late in the
I ; em Regionals
a game the Bi ad virtually
w rapped up. v ith I anier at
center, UCI A's siring of cham-
mships was definitely in
y Bi ' � ith 1 anier out of
action, the Bruins went on to
another championship.
1 anier was forced to have
surgery, but he was still the first
k in the NBA draft that year.
Seven times an NBA all-star.
1 anier is No 12 on the NBA
er scoring list with over
19,000 points
I aniei has worked as both a
o and television sports corn-
Milwaukee, where he
concluded his pro career. Cur-
rently, he is the president ol Bob
I anier Enterprises � a firm that
tributes promotional merchan-
dise tor large companies
I he Miller-Lite All-Stars,
along with the Greenville com-
munity, hope to boos; -he Pirate
Football program.
"It is the official kickoff to
next year Workman explained.
"It lets the team know that there
is fan support, and it helps the
fans get excited about next
season.
"It is a fun weekend for people
to come out and participate in
Workman added, "and that's
what it is all about
Player Of The Week
Senior Winfred Johnson was
.ed the Colonial '
Association's baseball Player ol
Week for his efforts in games
Apr. 7 through Apr 12
The 5-10, 210-pound
abethtown native hit .615 for
week in three games as the
Pirates posted a perfect
rd. Johnson was 8-of-l 3 ti
plate with two home runs, six
RBls and one pitching vicl
i he home runs came agai
Richmond and Mt. Olive, w
solo shot at Richmond set
an NCAA record. With I
home run, Johnson became the
only player in NCAA history to
h
ireei home tuns and pit
; i career ictories.
current! - i wns . 61
careei home runs and a 32-11
career pitching record.
11 rough the P rates' J4 carries.
Johnson is g .355 with 10
home tuns and 47 RBls along
with a team leading 12 doubles.
Johnson also leads the 1 C I staff
with his 8-2 record. ECU'S record
stands at 29-4. 8-3 in CAA play.
1 his is the second rime this
season Johnson has earned CAA
Player o the Week honors.
Johnson captured the first award
Pirates Stumble In Tourney
ie season o
n March 24.
Winfred Johnson
Nicklaus Wins Sixth Masters
By SCOTT COOPER
&
TIM CHANDLER
It was a great moment in sports
Sunday as Jack Nicklaus came
from behind to win his sixth
Master's Tournament in
Augusta, Ga.
What made it so exciting is the
fact that the "Golden Bear, ai
age 46, proved he was still a ma-
jor contender on the pro tour �
despite what many other people
tended to believe.
Nicklaus, like in the olden
days, had no equal in the sport
and was again at his finest at the
Augusta National Golf Club. He
stormed to a 7-under-par 65 in
the final round, finishing a shot
ahead of Tom Kite and
Australia's Greg Norman in
claiming his record sixth career
triumph in the heralded tourna-
ment.
Birdies at the 16th and 17th
holes finally pushed Nicklaus in
front. And as he walked up the
majestic 18th. he was fighting
back the tears as the thousands of
gathered fans around the green
showed then appreciation.
Nicklaus paired the final hole,
leaving a 50-foot birdie putt a few
inches short. He then fell to his
knees. But it wasn't over.
Nicklaus. then watched Kite
miss a 10-foot birdie try at the
18th thai would have forced a tie.
And then there was Norman,
who was relentless in his pursuit
of the green jacket.
Norman seemed finished
earliei in the day after a double-
bogey six at the 10th hole. The
big blond known as the "Great
White Shark knocked in bir-
dies at the 14th, 15th, 16th and
then the 17th hole to even with
Nicklaus. Sudden death seemed
obtainable for Norman.
However, the day was meant
for Nicklaus. An aggressive Nor-
man would bogey the finishing
hole, pushing his4-iron approach
right of the green and then miss-
ing a 15-foot putt for par in clos-
ing with a 70.
Nicklaus, who finished with a
9-under par 279 total, was the
master of Augusta National once
again. Kite, with a 68, tied Nor-
man for second at 280, a stroke
ahead of Seve Ballesteros.
For Nicklaus, it was his first
Masters crown since 1975 and his
first major championship since
1980, when he captured both the
By JII I.BI.AIR
The I.adv Pirates captured
three out o seven games over the
weekend .it the (.eorge Mason
I ournameni in Fairfax, a
In the first game Friday against
Furman, the Pirates seized the
game with a 5-1 victory. Stacev
Boyette, who picked up the win
foi ECU, drove in the winning
RBI in the fourth inning. Wendy
Ozmeni and Mickey Ford both
were 2-for-4 with two singles
each.
In the second game on Friday,
ECU swept by I NC Wilmington
54). Boyette was again the winn-
ing pitcher. Sandy Kee and Ford
both went 2 for-4 with Kee hav-
ing one RBI. Robin Graves drove
in the winning RBI in the first in-
ning. The Pirates had eight hits
while they slowed UNC-W to on-
ly five.
In the third game on Friday,
George Mason defeated the
Pirates 2-0. Dyson was the winn-
singles. linn picked up the vic-
tors tor the Heels.
I he second game proved to be
maway foi the Pirates as they
crushed I asalle 10-0. Murray
went 2-for-4 with a single and a
double Boyette was again the
winning pitcher. Due to ECU'S
10-run lead, the game was vailed
aftei five innings.
Sunday's opening game proved
to be unsuccessful foi the Pirates
as furman defeated them 4-1.
ECl dK five hits and Furman
had eight. Boyette knocked in the
only run for the Pirates � com-
ing in the seventh inning. She
went 2-for-4 for that game.
In the Bucs final tournament
appearance. 1 asalle beat the
Pirates 3-1. I ynda Barrett
brought m the winning run for
1 asalle off a sacrifice fly. Boyette
led the Buc bats with a double in
three at bats.
The lady Pirates' record is
now 25-12. Stacev Boyette's
record in the tournament was 3-4
and her overall record is 15-5.
Robin Graves record in the tour-
nament was 0-3 and she is now
10 on the year. The Pirates host
Virginia today in a doubleheader
at 2:00 pm.
U.S. Open at Baltusrol and the ing pitcher for the Patriots. FC'l
PGA at Oak Hill. His six year
wait was now over.
"There was an article in the
Atlanta paper last Sunday that
said I was done, washed up,
through a ecstatic Nicklaus
said. "Someone pasted it on the
refrigerator door at oui house
here early this week and 1 kinda
sizzled on it for a while.
"1 read where it said that peo-
ple 46 don't win the Masters.
And you know, I kinda agreed
with it. But I also thought about
that all week � done, washed up.
"Sometimes, you gel
something in your mind like that
and it spurs you on
And spurred him on is certain-
ly what it did. It was his 20th vic-
tory in a major championship.
For the record, his unprecedented
Plecse See "GOLDEN, Page 12
had four hits but that wasn't
enough to stop George Mason
who got both o the winning hits
in the fifth inning.
In the first game on Saturday,
UNC-CH rolled past ECU 3-1 to
put the Pirates o to a rough
start. Jeannie Murray was 2-for-4
for the Bucs with a pair of
Sports Fact
Tues. Apr. 15. 1947
Modern baseball's first black
major league player, Jackie
Robinson, goes 0-for-3 in his
debut versus Boston. At first
Robinson is received coolly,
but his warmth and skill soon
make him a favorite. He retires
in 196 with a .311 career bat-
ting average and laifr is in-
ducted into the Baseball Hall of
Fame.
Boyette Does It Alt
Senior Stacev Boyette, who went 3-4 on the mound, also swung a hot
bat in the George Mason Tournament, over the weekend.






IL JEHEEASIXAROLINIAN APRIL 15. 1986
'Golden Bear ' Wins Masters
Continued from page 11
collection of trophies now reads:
six Masters, five PGAs, four
U.S. Opens, three British Opens
and two U.S. Amateurs.
Nicklaus isn't the oldest player
to chalk up a major tournament
win. Julius Boros was the PGA
winner in the 18 at 48. But the
aging "Golden Bear" probably
was the most satisfied.
"They're all great Nicklaus
said. "But the last one is always
the best one
Only a handfull of Masters, or
any other major for that matter,
will ever be able to top this one,
or its incredible finish.
Legend has it that the Masters
is never decided until the last nine
holes on Sunday. And that's
where the legend named Nicklaus
made it happen.
Nicklaus, who had the huge
galleries standing and cheering at
every hole, was to play the final
nine holes in 30 strokes, a
6-under effort that equalled a
tournament record. And that was
enough to push him to his sixth
green jacket.
"This is a young man's golf
course said Nicklaus, who has
participated in 28 Masters. "The
greens are glass-fast, the pins on
all the knobs. It's a hard course
to walk with all the emotion � a
very hard tournament to win.
"It's also a course where ex-
perience helps you. I knew today
that as long as I kept my com-
posure, kept under control, as
long as I kept making birdies, I'd
have a chance to win. I knew the
other guys might have trouble
coming in
And the competition was never
better as the showdown conclud-
ed on the 18th. There was two-
time Masters winner Tom Wat-
son to contend with, and defen-
ding champion Bernhard Langer.
There was a confident, front-
running Seve Ballesteros, who
had two eagles Sunday and at
times seemed destined to win a
45 Year-Old Rose
Still Young At Heart
CINCINNATI (UPI) Pete
Rose, still young at heart, isn't
ruffled about turning 45 yester-
day.
Rose, the Cincinnati Reds'
player-manager, prefers pouring
over baseball statistics to discuss-
ing Social Security.
"I always approach it with this
philosophy Rose said. "I know
there's a lot more behind me than
there is in front of me as far as
playing. But I don't go home and
think about when I'm going to
retire and how old I am.
"If you're constantly talking
about how old your are, you're
going to start feeling old. But if
you continue to act young, you're
going to feel young and play
young
In his 24th major-league
season, Rose is the second oldest
player in baseball this year,
behind 47-year-old pitcher Phil
Niekro of the Cleveland Indians.
Rose spent his birthday travell-
ing with the Reds from San Diego
to Atlanta for a two-game series
that starts Today.
"The only thing Monday does,
as far as I'm concerned, is if I
wanted to collect my pension, I
could Rose said, "i know I'm a
year older than I was last year,
but I don't feel any older at 45
than 44.
"If I slugged around like a guy
45, then I would. But I know my
mind isn't the mind of a 45-year-
old, as far as the way I approach
the game
Rose doesn't smoke or drink,
and he works out reguarly to help
prolong his playing career. The
attention to health has paid off.
At age 25, rose hit .313. At age
30, he hit .304. At 35, he batted
.323. And at 40, his average was
.325.
Rose collected career hit No.
4,192 last September, passing Ty
Cobb as Baseball's all-time hit
leader. But his overall average
slipped to 264, the worst of his
career.
He started this season on the
15-day disabled list recovering
from the flu. He also has been
troubled by a hiatal hernia that
requires medication.
Rose plans to return to action
when he regains strength. His
energy and attitude amaze his
teammates.
Every Tuesday
is
College Night
Free Delivery
for $5.00 &
Over Purchases
7 p.m. to 11 p.m.
99C SUBS
Your Choice
Ham & Cheese
Bologna & Cheese
Ham, Salami & Cheese
Pepperoni, Salami & Cheese
Turkey A Cheese
Ham, Turkey & Cheese
Not valid on deliveries
60 oz. pitchers $1.99
larladn lax
II � a-ll� ?S2-2IIJ �L�
'�������
"He sure doesn't act 45
rookie shortstop Kurt Stillwell
said. "He gets along with me,
and I'm 20
"I just can't imagine the
fathers of other players on my
team playing big-league ball
Pete Rose Jr 16, said. "I can't
picture them in a baseball
uniform playing ball
Rose can't imagine himself
unable to fit into a uniform.
"I see a lot of guys I went to
school with Rose said. "Thev
look like they're 10 or 15 years
older than me. I don't unders-
tand it.
"But I'm the type of guy who's
never going to be a little, fat guy.
I'm just not like that
third Masters title, and finally the
formidable twosome of Kite and
Norman.
"Any time you've got Watson
and Ballesteros and Langer and
Norman, it gives you more incen-
tive he said.
"My son Steve called this mor-
ning and said, 'What do you
think it'll take, pop? I said a 66
would tie and a 65 would win it.
"He said, 'Go shoot it
For an hour, all was quiet as
the leaders went off and the an-
ticipation grew. But that ended
with an explosion of sound as
Ballesteros and Kite, playing in
the same twosome, both holed
shots from off the green to eagle
the par-5 eighth hole � Kite from
81 yards and Seve from 50.
"That got everybody going �
the players, the galleries, even the
caddies said Kite, who has now
finished in the top-10 at Augusta
National nine times but never has
won. "That got the tournament
going
Another eagle by Ballesteros at
the 13th hole appeared decisive.
It pushed the former Master
champion to 9-under for the
tournament, two shots ahead of
the field.
However, his lead diminished
two holes later at the par-5 15th.
Ballesteros, attempting to reach
the green in two at the 500-yard
hole, badly pulled a 3-iron and
saw the ball splash into a green-
side pond.
The bogey, which was followed
by another at the 17th, ended
Seve's bid. It was down to Kite,
Norman and Nicklaus.
GRADUATES
Only 25 days remain for you to purchase an Apple or
IBM microcomputer system or peripheral equipment at
savings of 20-35. Under an educational pricing pro-
gram in force at Student Stores, only full-time faculty
and staff and enrolled students are eligible to par-
ticipate.
If you are contemplating the purchase of a system,
come by Student Stores, Wright Building,
and let us show you what is available.
Buying now could save you
a lot later on.
STUDENT STORES
Wright Building
Owned & Operated by East Carolina University
Student Stores
6th Annual SidewalkSpring Cleaning Sale
S
' I
TV '

7-
- On The Street �
I In Front of The I
Student Stores
Lobby
Date: Thursday, April 17, 1986
Time: 8:30 a.m. til 4:00 p.m.
TREMENDOUS SAVINGS ON
SELECTED MERCHANDISE
Wearing Apparel, Art Supplies, Miscellaneous-
Supplies, Gift Books, Grab Bags, etc.
Marked Down For Unheard of Bargains
c

; i
' �i
� Cotton Candy �Popcorn
� 15 Pepsis � Candied Apples
1 Save up to 70 off on
IML Many Items
m
Miit
JL
4
Student Stores
Owned and Operated by East
University
Classifie
PERSONALS
FOO
was �
thru yet Co
Taus
LIGHTWEIGHT �
well
I
soon Had e
HEY A D P.s
prec
sere
HECK
house
iCdr I
GO
CONGRATULATIONS
GREEKS
ara s
Let's
Kar-
L R
-
PHI SIGMA Pi
Om .
Dav
nmg -
Sau
v
.
CONGRATULATIONS
j. Best o

GREEK HAPPY HOui-
ELBO
;
sor-
CONGRATULATIONS TO Pi
PA PHI FRATERN
ng tn
as .
-
SIGMA PHI EPSlLON
? A S T A F A R I A N I S M



ECU AMBASSADORS -
' s ng sen ors
RAFFLE
faia E
DOUrV �
SIG EP GOLDEN HEARTS
proofs fr
ae 1 �n
WEDNESDA � NIGHT
p.m
own :
sorru
SALE
TO SUBLET F
on can-puS cable reduced
Or
150! Now,
"owers Fen
FACULTY: Do
I? F�pp- encefl
qua �, a ,1
Free es mates
?57 3
CONTACTl
$105.00 c
� 145.00 e
inciuaes exams tenses core k I l
Student D No other t
OScSrVE
The Tipton Annex
228 Geenvi�e Blvd
oawwasHsaBco
L Peter w
�-r
�wAmfti mmim






Jacket
Classifieds
Mas

� cad
i
� !
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500-y a

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PERSONALS
ii pel burned the beer
� elax cause we're no
iti lal ons The Phi
.hTWEIGHT You hunq pretty
I e ready for our con
ave to settle this real
,it time
D Pi S:
i
? ?-????�?
TES
le or
3.1
-
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?
?

s
ing Sale

$'
hope ya ii are
ies for a
� v. irnmin,
wn the
' � end of the
are! HERE WE
il pa Sijs
vATULATIONS TO ALL
� - Week a as a ter
' anks fo IF C. in
with ail the fraternities
� �r making it happen.
� �' week! The
for being so special.
I es1 - st Aaned you to
. . k � ep smiling! K J
SMA PI: Congratulations
ge Class! Welcome new
. Brown, Kimberiy
� Drake, Craig Hor
. s I �. : 0 Iks Tara
S'oner Greg
v � . Bel A � tfield,
,inc Penny
NGRATULATIONS: To Tempie
recent wea
k to the happy cou
ia g From Garner
�H HAPPY HOUR AT THE
e lnesday night is
� � E !Do Room, spon
H appa Phi. Come out
� the Pi Kapps
.A-rjONS TO PI KAP
ETERNITY : For recerv
A a a r ci
F C. Banquet Also
� n Owain
- ippa Siqs on
EPSILON: The draw
- ��� .
i Bob's at II
S2 wine
- i � e coolers
A t? i a n ism : Webster s
k jamacen
bers wor
� ��� - Rastafar
a me of
.SSADORS App
Scholar
� assaaor En
ire available at

arship is
� ��� rs �-r:y and is
; � �� a� The
Is is open to
i ce to
� r applying is
W ai i p m.

Deuaot pipeline
. � or cash
17S Buy r'Our
Pfi Epsilon
g � : � he � at Pan
� � oc
? ortune.
GOLDEN HEARTS: The
�posite p'Ctures
. � �ne house on
N T AT 8 30
want 1 pick out your
'� ei an e Dy the house
veen 8 30 and 10 30!
SALE
986
N
E
1
�M
neous:
ins
-ET Full turn air con
aDie, reduced 180 to
" r summer. Ringgold
es Kathy 752 3572
LLTY: Dc ou need your lawn
need student does
� reasonable rates.
� ' Call Brett Patton at
WORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
perience in typing resumes, theses,
technical documents, and term
papers We manage and merge your
names and addresses into merged
tetters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards Our prices are extremely
reasonable and we always offer a 15
percent discount to ECU students. S
& F Professional Computer Co
(back of Franklin's) 115 E 5th St.
757 0472
SENIORS! SENIORS) SENIORS
Enjoy the last phase of your college
career employment S&F Com
puters is offering a package price to
help you send out your resumes in
eluding all of the following: Letter
quality typed resumes, Mail merged
cover letters (name and address of
each company as inside mailing ad
dress on letter). Letter quality typed
envelopes with company address
and your return address on
envelope, Everything folded, stuffed
ana even stamped, A listing of com
panies sent to (for your follow ups)
Just bring us your hand written
resume and cover letter and the
businesses you with to apply to and
we'll do the rest. Per resume for
your namesaddr. (we stuff) $2.30
(min 10 resumes) (we stuff and
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slightly higher). This offer absolute
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Greenville, N C 27834 757 0472
TYPING SERVICES: Resumes,
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Spelling and grammatical correc
tions included. Cindy 757 039B after
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CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc Call
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FOR SALE: Carpet remnants, ail
sizes, all colors, ail prices Save
50 70 percent The Carpe' Bargain
Center, 1009 Dickinson Ave 758 0057
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
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Call Janice at 355 7233 after 5 30
SUMMER SUB-LET: May August
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V i bath, fully furnished, central air,
cable 830 1769.
SUB LEASE: Spacious, 2 br , 2 bath
apt available tor sub lease May
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ly furnished and air conditioned
Call 758 9282 R Inggold Towers
FOR SALE: Couch $25, sofa bed
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tress $25, surfboard $50. plus more,
call Johnson at 758 2392
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER-
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is computer checked against 50,000
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are as low as $1 75 per page, in
cluaing paper (call for specific
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RINGGOLD TOWERS: 1 bedroom
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PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
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RENT: 2 room B unit Ringgold Apt
$300 utilities a month. May 10
Aug. 20 One or two roommates Call
Michelle at 758 5971 Tues Thurs.
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FOR SALE: 12 x 65 mobile home
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TYPING NEEDED?: If you want
someone to type papers for you at
reasonable rates call 756 8934.
Candied Apples
FOR SALE: Diving Equipment of
all kinds. Tank, fins, etc Entire out
fit! Interested? Call 752 8666
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom efficiency
apartment. All kitchen appliances,
central location, bus service within
walking distance. Perfect for sum
mer students $235 a month 756 4760
anytime
TO ALL APARTMENT
RESIDENTS: l am selling my desk
(only 2 years old), a drawer, a newly
built wooden bunk, and maybe even
a loveseat at negotiable prices. Call
Brin at 758 2080
APT. FOR LEASE: 1st and 2nd sum
mer school session 2 bedrooms, 1' 2
bath, balcony, ac, pool, sauna. Fits
3 comfortably $300 plus utilities.
Call 752 0525 if interested
1 BEDROOM FURNISHED APT
For sublease. May Aug $175mo.
Very efficient. Great for summer
school student.
CONDO FOR SALE OR RENT: 2
bedroom, 2 bath, loft, fireplace,
washerdryer $450month Good in
vestment for your parents if you
want to buy! 756 8296.
COUCH AND CHAIR FOR SALE:
Price neg. Call 752 6512 before 2 p m.
FOR SALE: One ticket to see Rurh
m concert, Saturday, April 19. at
7-30 p.m. at Hampton Collesium. Va.
$13.60, no profit 752 9153
FREE YAMAHA MOPED With
sub lease of Ringgold Towers apart
ment. No rent for May, $220 a month
for June and July. Can continue
lease through fall and spring Call
758 7802
SUMMER SUB-LET: June August,
$160 with utilities included, private
room in large house behind
Domino's on Charles St. Bath, living
room, kitchen privileges, 758 2230
Ask for Taz Cooper
GOING TO SUMMER SCHOOL (OR
WORKING IN GREENVILLE?):
Fully furnished condo available b w
May 10th and Aug. 1st $4 50 a day
for as few or many days as you
want Call Tom at 757 1689
RINGGOLD TOWERS: 1 bedroom
apt available m August Complete
ly furnished, and equipted with ap
pliances ana kitchen utensils. Rent.
$220 per month Call 752 008-1
FOR SALE; Sansui Integrated
Stereo Amplifier 80 watts per chan
net. Perfect cond 758 8191, Bob
FOR SALE: 83 Honda B 45 Magna
Motorcycle Great St. or touring
bike New tires 1 owner $1595. Days
80 2647 Nights 756 7554
WETSUIT WANTED: Interested m
selling a men s wetsuif If so, call
758 0076 or 752 8355 and leave
message
WANTED: Responsible fem
would like to sublease a two
bedroom furnished or unturnisl
apartment in Tar River Estati s I ��
summer school months May Aug
Can 752 4875
SUMMER JOBS FOR COLLEGE
STUDENTS: Openings available lor
oung men on the Food Service Staff
at CAMP SEAFARER ON THE
COAST OF NORTH CAROLINA
Good salary plus room ana boara
Excellent opportunity for friend
work together June 8 through mid
August Must be at least 18 ea
age. No experience necessary only
ambition and good references
quired For more information and
an application, write Camp
Seafarer, P.O.Box 10976 YMCA,
Raleiqh, N C 27605
BARTENDERS NEEDED: 21 eari
of age. Some experience Begin Ma
20 Labor Day' Call Mrs Galberatn
at 919 726 5139
3 LIFEGUARDS (MEN PREFER
RED) NEEDED: WSi CPR cer
tified (if possible) to watch ocean
Must be over 18 Begin May 20 Labor
Day. Salary open Call Mrs
Galberath at 919 726 5139
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
For both summer sessons Room
available Ma 10th $125 month plus
' -1 utilities. Non smoker Mark Pep
per 752 8629
SUMMER INTERNS WANTED A1
North Carolina's iarqest we� 1
newspaper (3 repoH rcula
tion 3 advertising $4 SO 1 er hour
for rising senior journalism
Call �19 228 7851 or senc resume ar.a
clippings to Tom or Jean Bone,
Alamance News Bo� 431, Graham,
N C 27253
I HF EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 15, 1986
13
WANTED TO BUY OR RECORD
"2001, Space Odessy" soundtrack
Call Bob at 752 3389
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
2 bedroom townhouse, to share a
room $100mo '3 utilities. Has
.001 en F CU bus route Call Kim ai
,774
HELP WANTED: Bartenders and
waitresses needed a Beau's
Nightclub Call Jimmy Arnold tor
lintment at 756 6401
CABIN COUNSELORS AND IN-
STRUCTORS: Mai and female for
western N C 8 week children's sum
mer camp Over 30 activities in
eluding Water Ski, tennis, heated
nming dooI, go karts, hiking,
Room meals, salary and
el Fxperince not necessary
Non smoking students write for ap
plicationbrochure Camp
Pinewood, 19006 Bob O Link Dr
Miami, Fia.33015
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
mer 2 bedroom townhouse
to campus 1 3 bath, central
fully furmshea and carpeted
� month and � utilities. Call
7 58 0384
WANTED: 1 female roommate to
share 3 bedroom duplex,
$100month, v3 utilities, $100 deposit
Contact Jan at 758 0047
NEEDED: 2 roommates im
mediately to share 3 bedroom house
Large bedrooms, $130month, '3
utilities, good neighborhood 3
blocks from campus Call anytime
758 6004
SUMMER WORK: It's not too late to
find a good job We will be glad to
give you an interview. AVERAGE
PAY $250 PER WEEK Interviews
on Tuesday, April 15 at 330 or 7.00
m Brewster D room 109
HELP WANTED: Part t me
workers Warehouse installation,
delivery, etc. Apply in person
Larry's Carpetland 3010 E 10th St
HELPWANTED: Female student to
assist housewife with house cleaning
and child care in exchange for room
and board Near Campus. 757 1798
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Please call 355 6251 after 6 p.m.
See CLASSIFIED, page 14
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
10th Sl Dickinson Ave.
WE BUY GOLD & SILVER
. INSTANT CASH LOANS
All Transactions Confidential W
�?L BUY�SALE�TRADE Tjf
Horn: 9:00 �m-6.00 pa MoaSat.
WANTED
ttC�aC9-5-Ct9-Ql9-Cc9-(P'P?k
ECU
Varsity Cheerleeadikg
TRYOUTS
tr9-
Organizational Meeting
April 1, 1986 5:00 p.m.
Room 142 Minges Coliseum
Enthusiastic Men &
Women Invited
For more information: 757-6491
-&D -�D -�0 -�0 �f;�) C D -�D 3 & 3

8
9

I
GRADUATES
CALL
1-800-457-4065
FOR $400 AND
PRE-APPROVED
CREDIT ON A
NEW FORD

CONTACT LENSES
t-
iiversity
$105.00 DAILY WEAR
$ 145.00 EXTENDED WEAR
Includes exams lenses care Kit and foHow up for one month
Student ID No other discounts apply
onoMemic
�Y�CAR�C�KTCK
OD
PA
Dr Peter W HolNs
The Tipton Annex Greenville. NC 27834
228 Greenville Bivd jiSiSISl
It's Easy To Quality
For $400 from Ford
Motor Company
� You must receive at
least a bachelor's degree
or a state RN license
between October 1, 1985
and September 30, 1986.
For Pre-approved
Credit from Ford
Credit
� You must have verifi-
able employment that
begins within 1 20 days
of your qualifying vehi-
cle purchase at a salary
sufficient to cover ordi-
nary living expenses and
your vehicle payment.
� Your credit record, if
you have one, must indi-
cate payment made as
agreed.
� And don't forgetyou
must receive at least a
bachelor's degree or a
state RN license between
October 1. 1985 and Sep-
tember 30. 1986.
These Vehicles Are
Included In The Plan
lord: Escort, Escort EXP,
Tempo. Mustang.
Thunderbird
Mercury: Lynx, Ibpaz,
Capri, Cougar
Ford Truck: Aerostar,
Bronco II, Ranger,
F-150& F-250
L
vV.iG�
I
l
C
SLVVV
You are eligible for $400
even if you don't finance
your purchase. Use it
toward your down pay-
ment or get a check from
Ford after the purchase
or lease.
The amount of your pre-
approved credit is deter-
mined bv the qualified
vehicle you buy.
If a vehicle is not in
dealer stock, it must
be ordered bv June 1,
1986. Delivery of all
vehicles must be taken
bv August 31, 1986.
For complete details on
how to get your $400
plus pre-approved credit,
call the toll-free number
today.
1-800-457-4065
�� m
I I





14
I HI EAST vkoI IMU
�Pku
IRS Olympic Handball Tryouts Planned
B MrPHAMr DKN
IKS sj�ff Mrllrr
s the Spring 1986 calendai
comes to a Jose, she Intramural
Recreational Services extend
�se students
Ntn' need a break from Summei
School
Don me and spend
nights frustrated with the
1 ake out those anxieties
fitness
1 irsi Summei Session
Activiiv Registration Begins
gles Mas
Ma 26
S � Ma 19-21 Ma 26
� M i 19-21 Ma 26
Basketbal V1a 26 27 June
I une 2-5 June 5
June 9-11 June 12
( a v Race June lfi I 8 lun 19
F
Ma 19-21 Mas 27
Bow Mas 26 27 ne 2
ctiit Registration Begins
reni i gles June 2 Juh 1
Racq June
li ; il i
Juh 7 10 10
Horseshoes . iuh
14
1-on-l Basketba
"Siai Search" right hert
campus o! EC l Mon pi 28
- men's and women' � V
game will be held th i I in
Memorial Gym a) 7 JO pm 1 he
Assistant Vi pu
v oaches, Reita union. Melinda
Hale and Mike Riei
tend the eve
1 hese
visiting ovei
seareh o! prospe. ti
well as promoting the spi
II AM HANDBA1 1
I hese coa ht sd vull bt
! ' and putting oi
skills and strategies' clinics, Api
29
not all! At 6:30 pm
trai am i ight, mere will be a
"Sta Si . � amp held in
Memorial (�ym
;s ope � ginners and
I player alike
excellent o iic tor people
game, a: well
a I scrim

skills are en
I earn Handball w a
n I enmai k around 11
the ceni
players to I
cold Scandina
1i �da. it is pL I
and ranks
in : rid
'
Buehninj
Han Iball i
like a has!
PRICE iEFF! riVE! �� APRIL I3TMR JA1 APR
Wfc RESERVI ' m . �� '
Sol
4
R
San
Classified
( ontinued from paje 13
FEMALE ROOMVATE NEEDED
113s r�
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
FOR SUMMER ire 2
T MOSIER S FARM
. �� ' I
LOST - pair
- � :
- � � ��
B 9223 N 6i led I 10! i
LOST
�'�" � ill Henry ai
;1IMI �?"M'V"sb'WCOUPON
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce. Deli, Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With You. We Will Match like Items or Equal Quality.
�vyf?
Ml '
JMTn
r'
s
QTi
�.Vrf
i
Save your breath.
Plant a tree to make
more oxygen.
Coca Cola
0
liter
bottle
99
Give vour
rmhi hand
a bin
Thank
You
Secretaries Week
Starts April 21
What better way to say
'Thank You" than with
a vase of lovely mixed
flowers from
Cox Floral Service, Inc.
638 E. Arlington Blvd.
Suite C
756-7226
Call or visit
us toda
Crystals SUCJctf
WITH AN A
-A E ATI
. ���
LOW IN SODIUM
Yellow Onions!
DUKE S
Mayonnaise
M INE Wll M AN AODI I SA
PuROtASl A- � . � . - i. MPR
Armour Treet
UMTTONE
WITH AN
I AOOmONAL
1 po,isrf 12 oz.
i LOWMMCE C"
REAM RWH LE RERNI IRN
BENCH KITCHEN STYLt Rl . AR R
S Vegetables
3 100
16 oz
cans
1
Red Band Flour
LIV �. . Si
���. A
P&Q
Paper Towels
LIMIT TWO WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
Ikxvj
703 GREENVILLE BLVD. � OPEN 24 HOURS SSSHtf
0PENSUNDAY7A.M11RM





Title
The East Carolinian, April 15, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 15, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.470
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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