The East Carolinian, April 10, 1986






�hc
(Larnlmtan
Serving the Last Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No.4 �rj
Thursday, April 10, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Committee Considers
New Towing Policies
Congested Parking
Jim i n n,tN�
I kr Yah I amJiiaia
Man KC I students spoke out Wednesday to the Greenville Parking Authority concerning the dif-
ficult) of parking, lack of parking, and tickets incurred while using city parking. See related story
page I. for more details.
ECU Co-eds Attacked
Police Investigate Assaults
Bv M
IkT LI, l)
���. I ilitor
in
the pas
Keith Knox o
ty. All the
have been E
"A the in.
vestigation,
not sure, bu
more persoi
these crimes
Knox said
occred wnhu
around :am
crimes were c
; t t i
v ictim
said K
We !
- are
h i
nox.
hink
Mie
tir
committing
a IOUI DICX
pus, and i
�mmitted K
male He added ilia: "pi il .
'he incidents could be related
'Wha: we're asks for s in-
formal ion rninj i .
females who have been approach-
ed by a black male or have seen
an incidents which looked
unusual or females who have
been assaulted staled Knox.
It students have an informa-
tion, Knox asked, that the) call
him at EC I Public Safetj
(757-6150) or contact Dectective
Carla Fuller with the Greenville
Police Department a' 21342
Knox also reported that blacks
males have been going from door
to door, knocking, and asking
for specific people.
More than one black male at a
time have been involved in these
incidents, said Knox. He added
these males were trying to see
who was occupying the residence.
Knox also asked if anyone has
information about these door-
knocking incidents or if anyone
has had this happen to them to
contact the police.
"You don have to identity
yourself explained Knox, "But
I'm asking that people would
identity themselves, because so-
meone may have a piece of infor-
mation that they think is unim-
portant but could be vital in solv-
ing these crimes
In order to protect oneself,
Knox suggested "to always walk
in well-lit and traveled areas.
Don't take short-cuts He add-
ed student should alwavs travel in
pairs ol two or more.
"If thev're approached bv a
subject said Knox, "go im-
mediately to where people are
and report the incident to the
police
When reporting an incident
one should try to give police as
many physical details of the per-
patrator's face as possible as well
as descriptions of any and all
clothing, including shoes, said
Knox.
Other helpful information is
the manner in which the assailant
talked and exactly what was said.
Other safety tips Knox outlined
included avoiding drinking too
much and then wandering oii
alone. "Have friends look after
friends who have been drinking
said Knox. He also suggested
when riding in ears at night to
have the doors locked and the
wmdows rolled-up.
By PATTI KEMMIS
Assistant Nws Kdttor
Student Government Presi-
dent, David Brown, submitted
proposals to be added to the city-
parking ordinance at
Wednesday's Parking Authority
Committee meeting.
Problems facing both universi-
ty students and local residents
concerning parking in controlled
residential parking zones were
considered by the committee.
In January, Brown brought to
the City Council's attention the
problem commuters were having
because their cars were being
towed from the area off Fifth
Street after the two hour tii
limit had been exceeded.
'1 had complaints from
students who had not only had
their cars towed, but also receiv-
ed tickets after they had exceeded
the two hour limitsaid Brown.
The towing charge for students
'o $35 and the parking fine $5.
The Council delegated the sub-
ject to the Parking Authority
C ommittee.
Vice Chancellor oi Student
I ife, Elmer Meyer, and Director
of the Methodist Student Center,
Dan Earnhardt, and Brown were
present to represent ECU at
Tuesday's meeting.
Greenville residents Barbara
Beck and Mike Casper spoke for
the residents oi Tar River.
Brown proposed to the com-
Strategies Explored
By PATRICK O'NEIL
Staff Writer
Are third world nations taking
steps to close the economic gap
with the first world nations?
Does this gap continue to widen
or close with the implementation
of third world strategies9
Charles H. Kennedy, assistant
professor of politics at Wake
Forest University in association
with the Great Decisions '86 lec-
ture series, addressed these ques-
tions in an attempt to explain the
development of third world na-
tions.
According to Kennedy, a
leading expert in third world
development, the economic gap
between these nations continues
to widen despite occasions of sue-
OnTheTnslde
Announcements2
Classifieds9
Editorials4
Features6
Sportsg
The world should makt
peace first, and then make it
last.
�Anonymous
cessful strategies implemented by-
some developing nations.
Several strategies of develop-
ment were explained, cuting
benefits and costs for each. One
strategy used by the successfully
developing nations of Hong
Kong and Singapore, is an export
directed policy in which a nation
will mass produce goods with a
market ability in first world na-
tions. This strategy requires
developing nations to actively
cooperate with the structure of
the world's economic policy-
while stabilizing their domestic
enviroment and increasing their
cultural and educational contact
with first world nations. Each na-
tion however, must provide in-
centives to attract foreign in-
vestors, such as minimized
regulation, tax concessions, or
establishing a free trade zone,
said Kennedy.
Such strategies may cost the
nations in other areas, explained
Kennedy. A repressive political
structure may exist, a cultural
trade may occur weakening the
indigenous culture, and internal
inequality among the people may
develop, only for the benefit of
economic growth.
Kennedy pointed out the op-
posite extreme of the export
Judge Inaugurates
Alumni Lecture
B C AROIVN DKK'SOI.I.
�Miff Wnlrr
Judge Gerald Arnold will be
ECU's first lecturer in the newly
established Distinguished Alumni
Lecture-Seminar Series on Mon-
day, April 14.
This series was created by a
committee organized bv Angelo
Volpe, vice chancellor oi
Academic Affairs, in an "effort
to bring successful graduates
back to campus to celebrate their
success and provide role
models according to David
Sanders, director oi the ECU
Honors Program.
Judge Arnold's public lecture,
"Remarks on University and
Freedom" concerns the erosion
of freedoms that people aren't
aware o and how the university
must protect those freedoms.
In addition, Arnold will be
meeting informally with campus
leaders, ECU Ambassadors,
honor students, and facultv
members.
Arnold will also appear on
WNCT-TV's "Carolina Todav"
with high school juniors par-
ticipating in Scholor's Weekend.
An N.C. Court oi Appeals
judge, Arnold is a 1963 graduate
of ECU. He went on to studv law
at Chapel Hill.
He served as a member of the
N.C. House oi Representatives
from 1971-1973, and was ap-
pointed judge on the Court of
Appeals in 1974.
Arnold was directly involved in
the creation of the ECU Medical
School and reorganization of
higher education in N.C.
He currently serves on the
ECU Alumni Association Board
of Directors and the ECU
Scholor Selection Committee.
Arnold's speech, at 8:00 pm in
Jenkins Auditorium will be
followed bv a reception in the
lobby.
First A ward Given
By BETH WHICKER
Newi Editor
��� � �
The First Annual Communica-
tions Day Award was given
Wednesday night before an au-
dience of TV reporters,
distinguished guests, and the first
graduating class in the Depart-
ment of Communications.
The first graduating class in
communications presented the
award to an individual in the
broadcasting or media field who
best represented the qualities of
leadership, professionalism, and
dedication within an 100 mile
radius of Greenville.
Jim Woods, weatheranchor at
WNCT-channel 9 received the
first award.
"I'm almost speechless said
Woods. "I really appreciate the
award. 1 hope everyone has as
much luck in broadcasting as I
have he added.
According to Woods, with
broadcasting being such a
saturated field it is important to
apply yourself. Woods stressed
the importance of being yourself
f f t r r
mittee that towing should be
limited to those vehicles which
either constitute a traffic hazard
or are blocking the proper entry
and exit from a residence or
business.
He also said in exchange for
not towing, a small increase in
parking fines would be accep-
table.
Brown asked the Council to
consider extending the time limit
for parking from two hours to
three. He stated this change
"Asking us to be your
personal parking lot is
outrageous.
Mike Casper
would allow students and visitors
more time on campus.
Meyei said the ECU ad-
ministration backed Brown's first
two proposals, but not the one to
extend the time limit.
"I didn't think they would be
apt to change the time limit, so
we decided to emphasize on the
first two proposals said
Chancellor John Howell.
He added that "any help we
can get to make university park-
ing better will be appreciated
Casper said Tar River residents
were against Brown's proposals.
"Asking us to be your (the
students) personal parking lot is
outrageous said Casper. "This
plan is only short-term
Greenville Mayor 1 es Garner
suggested a system to lock the
front tires of cars exceeding the
time limit or causing a traffic
hazard.
The tires would not be unlock-
ed until the owner of the car had
paid a fine.
A suggestion was made to give
offenders three tickets before
towing their vehicle.
Committee members pointed
out the city of Greenville would
need a computer system to make
this idea work and that the matter
would be further discussed.
One committee member
brought up the idea of the univer-
sity working with the city to trace
the owners oi the vehicles with
previous violations.
ECU has a system oi matching
students with vehicles due to re-
quired registration.
According to Meyer, this could
be possible if the details were
worked out.
Both Brown and Casper seem-
ed satisfied with the compnrmse
The committee decided to
gather more information before
their next meeting on May 14.
Their recommendation will
then be given to the City Council.
Election Results,
Lassiter Wins Post
By I.AIRA JENKINS
Sl�ff �r1!f
The results oi Wednesday's
SRA elections are in, and senior
Bryan Lassiter, who ran unop-
posed, won the presidency with
239 votes
Three other candidates for the
top five offices also ran unoppos-
ed. Thomas Demon won vice-
president with 241 votes; Kimber-
ly Parrish won secretary with 240
votes, and Lori Jackson received
237 votes to win the office of
treasurer.
The race for publicity chairper-
son was a close one however,
with sophomore Jody Jameson
defeating Janet Batten 126 to
112, a margin oi 14 votes.
Since students must have their
SRA cards to vote, it is difficult
to say how many people were
eligible to cast a ballot, according
to Carolyn Fulghurn, associate
dean for Student Life. Out of the
5,100 students who currently live
in the dorms, Fulghurn estimates
about 70 percent of them were
eligible to vote in the elections.
and developing your own style.
Presure, said Woods comes
with the territory. "The higher
you go the more pressure there
will be Woods advised the first
graduating class to be ready to
accept pressure. "Do the best job
you possibly can. You'll be judg-
ed on what you do. Your reward
will be recognition he added.
Woods has worked in various
phases of the media including be-
ing a radio disk jockey, a
newsman, a sportscaster, and a
weatheranchor. Woods advised
the students to be versatile and
try to learn the different
dynamics of the media field. "At
your age, you've got plenty of
places to go and lots of time to
learn
Eugene Ryan, dean of the Col-
lege of Arts and Sciences said,
"It's hard to find a more qualifed
recepient than Jim Woods.
"It's nice to be first, and we at
WNCT are pleased that the class
has given the first annual award
to Jim Woods. We should all
remember to strive to be number
See WEATHER 2.
� m
Distinguished Broadcaster
Jim Woods, weatheranchor at WNCT received the First Annual
Communications Day Award Wednesday night given by the first
graduating communications class. For more information see
related story page 1.
m
A





1 HI EAS1 v Hoi INIAN
Af'KII 10, 1986
Announcements
ORGANIZATION OF BLACK
FACULTY AND STAFF
ECU MARCHING PIRATES
edonia ar g'
� � "er 210 A
� ��� . � � s . 83
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
NURSING
PR AND PUBLIC IT Y COMM
SPRING SYMPOSIUM
ECU STUDENTS FOR
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' aptei h STUDENT!
B ROYH FOR EN � '
lei psterj working luring "
primary electia tact Mart !
US � � � ��Co ����
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� ��� g �.�� � ted a
COLLZGE DEMOCRATS
A � � mi you art lot then i � '
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ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
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THE BOXERS ARE IN! !
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SCUBA DIVING
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SPECIAL OLYMPICS
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Economic Gaps, Strategies Discussed
(Ontinued trorn Pajft- 1.
directed policy; isolationalisn
rhis policy requires the restru
tion �! trade and cultural transat
tions with u world nations
while enhancing the stabilit ol
parate state Benefits dei
ed from tl strateg)
emei
.
lependence, the enha icen
ol large scale and small a i
develop- eni �tabhsl
qualitv �
withii " e state s Kennedy
tat( I cse benefits
at ion Aould �ut I
�low economic growtl i
� technological increase I
Weather anchor
Receives First
Award
C ontinued From Page I.
a eg is almost onl effec
a .i E
i arket, such as In-
rategy, third v
leal wii firsl world
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE
S135 MILLION plus in financial aid went
Freshmen, Sophomores,
ongoin students, for help
cashii g on your share of those funds,
call Acaaemic Data Services toll free
1800 544 15 39, or write P .0. Box
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B
i ag � 1 WNC1
Vr : a bi i ister's
adcastei He is a model foi
of us ! do nol know ol anyone
market with the zest
and zeal he possesses said Jim
Rees. professor ol ' eat re Arts
"When the graduates
good the scl ol looks good, gi -
ing this award ti ! n Woods has
further enhanced our prograi
said Kim Smith, assistant p
fessor ol English.
According to Rick Rhodes.
professor of Communications, "
Jim Woods is a grea! example to
us as broadcasters and the people
in the Greenville area. We are
very pleased with his winning the
award.
According to Woods, "The
broadcasting field is a lot of fun,
but it is also a lot of headaches.
However, the rewards are well
worth the work
"1
m
liSHlBrTv �� : . . Tlf:eJJiJrrfr(EJllrl
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN

APRIL 10, 1986
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Divorce Also Puts Stress On Students
GAINESVILLE, FL (CPS) -
It's 8 p.m. on a Thursday even-
ing, and Graham, an engineering
student at the University of
Honda, struggles to absorb even
a page of his book on Digital
Communications Systems.
The text is clear enough, but
Graham's mind is 200 miles away
� worrying about his mother
and how she will pay her bills,
wondering if his father will ever
speak to him again.
Graham's parents are getting
divorced, and instead of study-
ing, he just wants to scream.
Graham's not alone. Parental
divorce is a disturbingly frequent
reason students drop out of col-
lege, says Susan Hambleton,
who's earning her doctorate in
counseling education at the
University of Florida.
"They may not direct!) sa
'I'm leaving school because m
parents are divorcing but along
with divorce you find a lot of ex-
tenuating circumstances � the
financial, emotional and reloca-
tion stress that goes along with
divorce she says.
Hambleton, in fact, is finding
that divorce � normally studied
for its effects on young children
� can have a great impact on col-
lege students.
College-aged children of
divorcees, Hambleton says, may
develop an inability to develop
loving relationships of their own.
"The impact (of their parents'
divorce) may be 'whom can I
trust?' "
Hambleton has formed a sup-
port group at the UF Student
Health Services clinic to help
students caught in the emotional
whirlwind surrounding a family
breakup.
"I don't think people reallv
recognize the needs college
students have in a divorce she
says. "They assume that since
thev're older, they can handle
it
Students going through a
parental breakup often feel they
need to go home to "take care of
things Hambleton says.
"Sometimes they get really
distracted, particularly if they're
far away from home
Graham, for instance, feels
pressured to find a high-paying
job to help his mother, who's
retired and can expect little from
her soon-to-be ex-husband.
Though he plans to finish this
school year, his last semester o a
five-year degree, Graham says his
plans for graduate school are
dead.
Students in Hambleton's group
� their names are changed for
privacy � are in many different
stages of family breakup, from
impending divorce to 10 years
after.
On the Friday before spring
break, the support group
gathered in her office for the
sixth time.
While many at the university
had already packed their bags for
home, anticipating a week of
thoughtless relaxation, mom
cooking dinner and perhaps a
holiday family get-together, the
mood in the health clinic office
bordered on anxiety.
"I'm feeling pressure from
both sides says Regina, 18.
"My father asked me to come
visit him. But I'm going home to
see my mom. It feels funny
Regina's parents divorced 10
years ago, yet parental divorce
can be "like a pill that takes a few
years to come out in your body
says Steven, 24, whose family
split up two years ago � for the
third time.
Like many in the group, Steven
and Regina say they're just now
feeling the repercussions � feel-
ings of anger, insecurity and guilt
� of their family breakups.
Steven says he feels a heaw
Wease Named To History Chair
ECt News Bureau
J. Hugh Wease, a veteran pro-
fessor and director of the teacher
education program in history and
social studies for more than 20
vears. will become chairman of
the Deapartment of Histors at
ECU in August.
Wease, a native of Lincolnton,
N.C will succeed Fred Ragan
w ho has served as chair of the
department for the past seven
vears.
"I could not be more
pleasedsaid Ragan who chose
to relinquish administrative
duties to devote more time to
research and writing. "Dr. Wease
has been professionally active
and brought great credit to the
department. He has provided a
generation of in-service
training Ragan said.
The appointment of Wease, ef-
fective Aug. 20, was announced
by Eugene Ryan, dean of the Col-
lege of Arts and Sciences.
"I am very pleased that Hugh
Wease has agreed to accept the
position of chair of the Depart-
ment of History Ryan said.
"He has played an important
leadership role in social studies
teacher education at East
Carolina University. He has
made important contributions to
that program and has worked
eer eruslv with students earn-
ing certification in social
studies
"Each year he has arranged
valuable activities for in-service
teachers, including the highly
successful annual History-Social
Studies Symposium. The fact
that he has been named chair of
the History Department in the
College o' Arts and Sciences il-
lustrates once more to what ex-
tent teacher education forms an
integral part of the college's mis-
sion Ran said.
Ryan acted on the recomm-
mendation of a search committee
which was organized last fall to
select a successor to Ragan.
Wease attended Gardner-
Webb College and received an
undergraduate degree from ECU.
He received a master's and PhD
degrees from the University of
North Carolina-Chapel Hill and
joined the ECU history faculty in
1963.
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sense of responsbility today,
"like I have to be the knight in
shining armor" who over Easter
somehow must solve the conflict
that has scattered a family of five
brothers, three fathers and a
mother.
Yet sharing their stories in the
group, the students agree, helps.
" 'Let me know what I'm feel-
ing is okay is what they want to
hear says Hambleton. "Their
friends say, 'just forget about it
But they can't
"You can't shove (the pro-
blem) in a box and make it go
away Graham testifies.
Graham, a 25-year-old senior,
expects his parents' final court
hearing in two weeks. And
besides affecting his studies, the
divorce may be ruining his rela-
tionship with a long-time
girlfriend.
"I know my parents' divorce
has a lot to do with it he says.
"The minute (my girlfriend)
brought up marriage, I wanted
out
"It's left a real bad taste in my
mouth about that little piece of
paper
Because forming relationships
is so important � and scary �
for young adults, the disillusion-
ment that follows parental
breakup may be the most serious
problem faced by such students,
Hambleton says.
"Whenever we meet, we usual-
ly end up discussing relation-
ships, how they feel about getting
involved with people she says.
"They want to know 'how can
I guarantee this won't happen to
me "
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�J?e East (Earnlinfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
TOM LlVFNDE R, OmiMMr
JAY S T(M- , Wtavvuq Gdta '
Greg Win hi ster, ����,� munm
Anthony Martin, �u,v� ttav
� MEGNEEDHAM, OmUKHmMmmgn
Shannon Short, p. �,���. ����
MlKl 1 i DWH K. w. � .
Scon (1 �oi'i k,
Danii : Mai hi r, �
John Shannon, w.
l)i c h wii i Johnson, .
10, 1986
Dt HBI1 Sll VENS, v ,
UHN ION
Page 4
City Council
Voting Districts Discussed
i a public hearing of the Green-
ville City Council last night plans
tor dividing the city up into oting
wards or districts were discussed
rhree different versions of distric-
ting plans were explained to those
present b Bobb) Bower, a profes-
sional consultant hired by the city.
Presently Greenville elects all of
its representatives on the city coun-
cil through an at-large electoral
system Theoretically, such a
system could have the result of de-
ng black residents any represen-
on on the city council since a
ajoritv elects all six council
and blacks comprise only
ittle more than 30 percent df
Greenville's population. Rielt
I artei is the onl black
representative on the city council.
H e c a u s e m any ' o f t he
hoods outside GreenviBe
ich are being considered for an-
nexation arc white oi predominant-
l white, the city could face litiga
undei federal civil rights laws.
'i laws prohibit the rigging of
the electoral system so that it dilutes
mil! voting strength or other-
wist s minorities a fail shot a
gaining proportional representation
body. Proportional
did
'a;ion simpi) means thai if
s 25 pet cent black, then black
� ave an opportuni-
ercem of the can
governing bods
them.
ree plans presented to
the public hearing
iem would gie .studentsa
f the districts in
I k � ising districts which
lack residents clear ma
icas! two distrcts seem-
e primary focus of the
has no desire to
lim of providing black
in opportunity to elect
? es trom districts in
�mpnse a majority of
ters. In fact, " we
l support this goal. Yet, we
ith student government
! )a id Brow n to the affect
lents comprise a larger
; ireenville residents
blacks according to tit
to that census, in 1980
�ic were 37,603 people living in
vt lie. 1 1,300 of those
sidents were black while 13,000 of
re students.
not all students live in
i tralized location as most
(a: least partiallv out d"
nomic necessity) do. Also, a few
dents commute from out of
tow
Ui i
evertneless, students certainly
:omprise a substantial potential
voting block and one that con
tributes substantial sums to tit
revenue of the city and its ma-
chants. ()n thai basis alone, it
seems to us, that they deserve to
have at least one district in which
they are given the same shot at elec-
ting a representative of their own
choosing as are black residents.
The reasons for this are simple
first, students have identifiable in-
terests which seperate them from
the rest oi' the residents of a city.
The recent vote in Boone in which
students proved to be the decisive
factor in a referendum allowing tit
sale ol alchohol is one illustration
ol this fact. The candidate's forum
sponsored by the 1 C I SGA last
semester is another. At the forum
students identified a variety of
issues trom voter registration to te-
nant's nghts and a proposal to
build a crosswalk on tenth street
that concern them as citizens of
Greenville. Second, students have
laced some of the same kinds of
discrimination and narrassmeri
thai black residents have.
This last point was made obvious
when a previous registrar for the
Pitt County Board oT Meet ions ad-
dressed thecitv council alleging thai
students trom oul of town nave no
right to registei to vote in Green
ville because thev are not perma-
nent residents of the city. Shortly
thereafter she was corrected bv Mr.
Bower and a member of the city
council who informed her that the
law allow v students to establish
legal residence after thev have re-
mained in the town where thev are
attending school for at least thirty
days. I hus, students do not have to
undergo any special tests to
establish their residency in order to
register to vote if thev can prove
that they have resided m Greenville
tor at least 30 days.
The Halloween riots that occured
over a decade ago are vet another
example of the ways in which
students have had an experience in
some ways similar to that suffered
by blacks. During thai incident
police overreacted" to a student
gathering downtown on Halloween
night and inflicting unwarranted
and capricious violence upon
students accordingto virtually afl
reports.
It is true that relations between
students and the city have been
vastly improved since the Hallo-
ween riots. Vet, under similar cir-
cumstances it is not unthinkabc
that the same might happen again
The best safeguard of student in-
terests, therefore, is a student sea
on the city council. Students in
other parts oi the state are active in
city government. Students here
should be too.
CHOOSE THE ONE THE NRA
I5NT SPENPING MILLIONS
TOpSFENPANP
PROTECT
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Lnita Fumttir SynHtemt
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Campus Forum
Hooligan Rebuttal Draws Fire
Allow me to express a few sen-
timents regarding R. Milton HowelPs
(the third, mind you) enlightening bit
ol rhetoric regarding ECU, its stu-
dent body, and the existing rivalry
between N.C. State and ECU.
Let's start with his declaration that
the majority of the students arrested
after State NCAA victory were
from other institutions such as UNC
and ECU. 1 believe his words were,
"It was discovered that the vast ma-
jority of arrests involved non-NCSl
persons first of all, Milton. I have
never heard of any other form of ma-
jority � don't be redundant. Second-
ly, I'm very interested in knowing
who the heck discovered this in the
first place � substantiate your (alleg-
ed) tacts
Now then. On to your question of
whether or noi NCSU cares about its
rivalry with ECU. As you so boldlv
proclaim � as if you could speak for
the enure student body at State �
"Their main priorities are spelled
C-A-R-O-L-I-N-A Well, can
you sav R-E-C-O-R-D CROWD
Don't be silly. Mill. At least State
people can recognize a good football
game when they see it. Incidentally,
when do you think State will trow up
and play real football like ECU?
Lastly is your assertion that all of
ECU is made up of a mixture of
State. Duke, and Carolina fans � get
a grip. It" that were true, why don't
these students simply transfer to
State? Please consider it as a viable
alternative to LC'U.
And if sports is such an almighty
powerful lever in determining your
allegiance to a certain college, please
consider Grambling University �
they have the winningesi coach in the
nation. It would be much ap-
preciated.
1 rnesi P. Roberts
Junior, Writing
ROTC
What is happening here? Am I go-
ing crazy, or are those old reruns of F
Troop, McHales Navy and Gomer
Pyle finally going to my head? You
tell me, but it has become appar- nt
that the ROTC programs of this
country are focussing too intently
upon cummulative G.P.As and
testing performance instead of the
very essence of military dogma, the
ability to lead. Granted, there should
be a correlation between intellect and
leadership, but there is a fine line
which must at times be crossed to br-
ing in both the truely competent and
desiring individual. Who is to say that
a meek, mild, subserviant, nonag-
gressive and nonverbose individual
won't take control of hisher F-16
fighter and dart about the skies
destroying all aggressors like a tiger
let out of its cage. However, the se-
cond Finest Air Force in the world,
the Israli Air Force, would be
somewhat skeptical of this personali-
ty profiles success in air combat. Yet,
why do a few such individuals get this
chance
Or what about the bible toting Ar-
my cadet who hides in his room,
cowering in his own self doubt and in-
securities while using the power of an
institution to protect him from his
own mistakes, along with a few
fellow cadets, Army atheletes who
cannot accept defeat with dignity or
honor. Character is what is lacking in
today's military. Shuttles will crash
because someone has an 11:30 T-off
time. An emensely wealthy United
States Air Force cannot provide safe
air transport home for brave and
honorable men and women soldiers
stationed in the Miadie East. The
U.S. Army cannot provide competent
leadership to free Americans held in a
hostile, foreign land. Where are the
young leaders, the risk takers, the
winners of the future. The young Bil-
ly Mitchells, Chuck Yeagers, Sgt.
Rutchkas, Audie Murphys, Pattons,
McConnels, Jabbaras, Thomas' etc,
w here are these legacies of the future?
I'm not saying that there are no
qualified cadets here at ECU, and to
these people I humbly apologize, this
article doesn't pertain to you. Let's
face it, a monkey can turn a key, as
can the Einsteins of this world, but
it's desire, character, honor, courage,
pride, perseverance, and intellect that
make up the necessary qualities of a
winning officer. A lack of intelligence
may escape the history books, but
poor leadership will always make the
front page and can never be excused.
I think it is time for serious introspec-
tion on the part of this campuses
ROTC and the nation's ROTC units,
who need to look closely at the
screening processes and cadets, and
start giving the due priority to ability
as well as intellect. "It's time to stop,
hey NASA what's that sound,
everybody look what's going down
Jeffrey M. Bntt
Junior, Psychology
PIRGs
Funny how the brief passage of
time can cloud peoples' memories.
The March 27 editorial in The East
Carolinian provides a good example.
In discussing alleged dirty cam-
paign tactics in the recent SGA elec-
tions, the editorialist harkened back
to a controversial campus referendum
in April 1984. The question on the
ballot asked ECU students to approve
a mandatory tax for the left-wing
Public Interest Research Group
(PIRG). Leading the opposition to
the proposal were the College
Republicans, of which I was chair-
man at the time of the vote.
The editorialist, who led the failed
fight for the PIRG tax (students
voted nearly three-to-one against it),
accused College Republicans of tear-
ing down PIRG posters. But here are
the facts: 1) one CR tore down a
PIRG poster and was properly
disciplined, 2) the PIRG peoples'
poster-destruction drive was, at first,
so successful that I had to direct our
campaign workers to place our
posters up with sturdy wallpaper
paste, and 3) two of our CRs, both of
whom are prominent leaders in stu-
dent government, then witnessed
PIRG workers reacting angrily, say-
ing, "They put some kind of crap on
their posters, man! We can't get 'em
down
It's worth mentioning that PIRG,
powerful and nationwide, rakes in
millions of dollars in forced taxes on
students. Recently, it lost a major
case, when the Supreme Court sup-
ported a lower court ruling that
PIRG's mandatory fee was un-
constitutional (Galda vs. Bloustein).
Anyone who wants to learn more
about that memorable referendum
campaign can write me at the College
Republican National Committee, 310
First Street southeast, Washington,
DC 20003. I'll send you a free copy of
my personal account.
Dennis M. Kilcoyne
Class of 1985
Editor's Note:
To trade charges and counter-
charges will mean little to readers un-
familiar with the PIRG issue. Two
years have passed since the referen-
dum was held. Yet, it must be said
that there were, in fact, witnesses who
saw opponents of the PIRG referen-
dum systematically ripping down
PIRG posters.
What is more than ludicrous is
suggest that those who worked for the
establishment of a PIRG here at EC"L
ran a poster destruction drive again s:
the opposition. They did not An
it is true that those who led the fish:
against the PIRGs did put their
posters up with wallpaper paste.
something which was baffling at the
time.
The Managing Editor of
East Carolinian during that period �
Darryl Brown � is aware of thest
facts as is (he Attorney Genera
the Honors Board of that time �
Harry Dest. Moreover, PIRGs
not be fairly characterized as
wing. The majority of PIRGs w
on moderate issues like monitor. ng
rivers and streams for signs of poliu
lion and working to expose consumer
fraud such as price fixing. In 1984
they organized a nationwide studen:
voter registration drive which led to
students at ECU registering over 4(X
students to vote in Greenville
Students were not asked whether the
were Republicans or Democrats the
were simply registered. Currently,
PIRGs are organizing the National
Student Campaign Against Hunger,
which has been formed to combat
hunger both in America and in
Africa.
Yes, it's true that some PIRG-
work on issues like the arms race ana
other controversial issues, but most
PIRGs work on issues of concern
broad cross section of students like
environmental and consumer issues
And, even in the event that a PIRG
works on an issue like the arms race,
it is what the students who run the
PIRG on that campus have chosen to
do. PIRGs are run democratically
Those who fund the PIRG elect their
own board of directors who choose
PIRG projects and allocate PIRG
Jees, not unlike student government.
But all of this is academic. Perhaps
what might shed some light on
what is true and what is not is the
fact that in the April 19, 1984 edition
oj The East Carolinian, Mr. Kilcovne
wrote a column urging students to
d�I against the establishment of a
�?� Qt ECL whlch Maimed: "Bv
NC-PlRG's own rules, 98 percent of
the money collected at a local chapter
must be sent to the state head-
quarters. There, an elite board of
eight people decides how much
money should be sent back to ECU
and for what purposes. Thev are
obliged to send some of the money to
Washington where it is used to push
causes many students at ECU would
never dream of contributing to
In a correction to one of the many
fallacious assertions in Kilcovne S ar-
ticle then Managing Editor Darrvl
Brown wrote in the April 24 1984
edition of the East Carolinian
Several errors of fact appeared on
the Thursday, April 19 Other Opi-
nion page of The East Carolinian.
The No on PIRG' column claimed
nruXnt �l'j!e f�i"g collected by
t 1G aJ ECV would sent to a
state headquarters of NC-PIRG, who
rr de how much to d back to
, ii elected board of ECU
students decides how ECU PIRG fun-
ding � allocated. They do not have to
7ion ��ney l� my national organtza-
It saddens me deeply that the level
of debate on issues of importance has
sunken to such a depth that
Jalsehoods are substituted for truth I
mean no ill will toward Mr. Kilcoyne
yet as a journalist I have a respon-
sibility to report the truth and to ex-
pose disinformation.
Crime Report
April 3
12:5 a.m.
Sla.
being assaulted
parking
1:20
Campu.
Do yoy think marijuana
wh not?
Julit- lurnbaufch
freshman I ndecided
"Yes,
dow n the i

X
Mike Lane
freshman Botc
"It �
people d
-
Scott Long
Biology Sophomore
"It
beca .
trollec
-
by age Inste
men: -pec
ing the flow
U.S they could mal
taxing it
ur bi
tighter til I -
join The S
on a monthly basis foi
month. That - - u-da
' attached.
The Sp.
every week.exercis
weights, steam room, saury
pool. Plus, there are plenty
� ��� � �
111
v
A





MftfiUllfcS

raws Fire
I
PIRl, referen-
� wn
u
s to
the
re at ECU
� :r. .f against
i i ver
;?er
paste,
at the
' The
ftese
. for
we �
can-
- (eft-
work
-in a

� umer
184
� - i
Pu tO
4(H)
lie.

they
trn ntly,
hi Litwnal
Hunger,
� ombat
i in
me PIRGs
race and
ues, hut most
ern to a
tudents like
. mer issues.
that a PIRG
- arms race,
wh run the
Hosen to
itically.
� i PIRG elect their
r who choose
ate PIRG
� � rrnment.
academu Perhaps
me light on
H u not is the
ril 19, 1984 edition
� - 4r Kilcoyne
trging students to
' � stahlishment of a
which claimed: "By
wt rules, 98 percent of
�ted at a local chapter
ent to the slate head-
rr. an elite board of
ides how much
uid he sent hack to ECU
�r what purposes. They are
send some of the money to
here it is used to push
udents at ECU would
��� ' contributing to. "
In a don to one of the many
us assertion) in Kilcoyne's ar-
� then Managing Editor Darryl
wn wrote in the April 24, 1984
edition of the East Carolinian:
' 'Several errors of fact appeared on
the Thursday, April 19 Other Opi-
nion pane of The East Carolinian.
The Wo on PIRG' column claimed
98 percent of the funding collected by
a PIRG at ECU would be sent to a
state headquarters ofNC-PIRG, who
then decide how much to send back to
ECU An elected board of ECU
students decides how ECU PIRG fun-
ding is allocated. They do not have to
send money to any national organiza-
tion. "
It saddens me deeply that the level
of debate on issues of importance has
sunken to such a depth that
falsehoods are substituted for truth. I
mean no ill will toward Mr. Kilcoyne,
yet as a journalist I have a respon-
sibility to report the truth and to ex-
pose disinformation.
4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 10,
1986
crime Report Assault On ECU Co-ed
pnl 3
12:57 a.m.
sla dorm resident reported
being assaulted in the ninth street
parking lot of Joyner library.
I 20 p.m.
A Jones dorm resident
reported the larceny of a bicycle
from the bike shed east of Jones
dorm.
4:20 p.m.
A resident of Greene dorm
Campus Voice
Do you think marijuana should be legalized? Why or
why not?
� .V
'
'1?
ffc
S
Julie Turnhaugh
Freshman L ndecided
'Yes. because it will bring
wn the price
Rodney Chapped
Freshman I ndecided
"Yes, because people want to
smoke it
reported that a vehicle had been
broken into and vandalized while
parked South west of Greene.
April 4
2:15 a.m.
Officers reported that
unknown persons took the louvre
off a vehicle parked north of
Minges.
April 5
2:00 p.m.
An Umstead dorm resident
reported vandalism to and
larceny from a vehicle while
parked North of Public Safety.
April 6
1:00 a.m.
John Anthony Hobbs was
issued a state citation for con-
suming alcoholic beverage on
James Street.
1:48 a.m.
Michael Lee Wells was arrested
for DW1 and possession of con-
cealed weapon in his vehicle in
Tyler dorm's parking lot.
11:56 p.m.
Two Jarvis dorm residents
were issued a state citation for
possession and discharging
pyrotechnics on the west porch of
Jarvis.
Rr
lb
r
Mike lane
Freshman Botany
"It should be legalized because
people do it anyway. It could
become the nation's leading cash
crop. It would also open up new
businesses all over this area
Tim Akur
Freshman Broadcasting
"1 think pot should be legaliz-
ed because I'm a Rastafarian

Ja Shinjjleton
Sophomore Industrial
Technology
"Yes � it would pav off the
national deb: it n were taxed as
heavily as cigarettes
Seott Long
Biology Sophomore
"It should be legalized mainlv
Pecause instead of being a con-
trolled substance as it is now. it
could be controlled by being sold
bv age. Instead of the govern-
ment spending monev on stopp-
ing the flow of marijuana into the
U.S they could make money by
taxing it
The HUB
o'S Soutn Pitt S!
'il '9Ab G 7S2-5CM8
g�i�S�&
Exercise is a Natural
A9Ab
High!

so
1 - -�,
Universal Hub Health
Club
618 South Pitt St.
April Special $28.00
Unlimited Club Use
(onem onth only)
Indud es Suntan
Free visit with ad
HowTo Improve
Y)ur Grades
AtTheBeach.
If you're finding your bathing suit
tighter than usual, now's a fitting time to
join The Spa. Students can join The Spa
on a monthly basis for only $25 per
month. That's $25 for 30-days without
any strings attached.
The Spa offers 52 aerobics work-
outs every week, exercise machines, free
weights, steam room, sauna and whirl-
pool. Plus, there are plenty of trained
instruct! r t i help y u shape up.
S i, if y air b xly is flunking the
beach test, call i r dr p by The Spa for
more information.
Improving your grades at the beach
simply requires a little home work.
-�P
Greenville's
best health club value.
SOUTH PARK SHOPPING CENTER
GREENVILLE 7567991
April 7
12:45 p.m.
The larceny of louvers was
reported from a Belk do.m resi-
dent. The vehicle was parked in
the 14th and Berkley Freshman
lot.
2:20 p.m.
Jones dorm resident reported
that his bicycle had been taken
from the bike shed northwest of
Jones dorm.
April 8
7:45 p.m.
Seott Hall resident reported
vandalism to his vehicle parked
south of Scott Hall.
April 9
2:35 a.m.
A Jarvis dorm resident was ar-
rested for DW1 on Mall Drive
south of Garrett dorm.
7:10 a.m.
A maintenance employee
reported that the Greenhouse had
been broken into and entered.
Vandalism to the window and
missing property was also
reported.
The proceeding information
was taken from Public Safety log
of ECU.
STUDENT STORES
Microcomputer
Product Fair
Introducing
the NEW IBM PC Convertible
&
Two Of The Latest In
Microcomputing Technology
See Both Of These Quality Machines
At Our 3
MICROCOMPUTING PRODUCT FAIR
Date: April 15, 1986
Time: 2:00 p.m. To 6:00 p.m.
Location: Soda Shop, Wright
Building
STUDENT STORES
East Carolina University
Refreshments Wright BUlMing
The
Minority Student Organization
Is Now Accepting Applications
for the following
1986-87 positions.
President, Vice President, Secretary,
Treasurer. Parlimentarian & Historian
Application Deadline: Tuesday, April 15, 1986
Applications May Be Picked Up Daily In
Room 239 Mendenhall between 1 and 5 p.m.
ECU Student Union Forum Committee
Presents:
A Debate on U.S.
Involvement in Central
America
featuring David MacMichael
former CIA Agent
and
Col. Samuel T. Dickens
Representative of the State
Department
Sunday, April 20, 1986 at 8 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall Student Center
Admission: Students � $1.50
Faculty & Staff - $3.00
Public & at Door - $5.00
Tickets available from Central Ticket Office
7574611, art. 266
s ' � i -?-�,�.�
f W- , ' '
"






TIU FAST ARC l INI AN
Entertainment
BLOOM COUNT
PKII 10, � Pdge6
The Graphic
Newell Prefers New Style Of Rock TV Roll
B ROBERT MAZZOL1
and
WARREN BAKKR
The editors and writers would
like to take this moment to thank
111 phones for the all-important
role played in the procurement of
this article. We'd also like to
thank Alexander Hell for making
things possible, like calling Mom
and Dad for money. Also, Mom
and Dad were great at the
barbecue, and thanks for not tell-
ing the police where we were. It
was great chicken, hut Dan blew
his cookies and hours later the
stuff was siill on the ground. You
should have seen Beth's face,
but
We're here to talk about
music North Carolina music.
That's why Brad Newell is ex-
cited about coming to Greenville.
Brad who?
Biad Newell, guitarist for The
Graphic, is a participant in the
North Carolina new music scene.
rhe band has played Greenville
bet.ire in arious incarnations.
Foi .i while. the mas
i,o
quarade
and, but those hac k dav
�V an integi al pai i o the (.
new music scei e released
ai ! 1' called People in class.
opened
;lki
The
Psychedelic Furs and Adrian
Belew and managed a closet col-
lege radio hit (that is now receiv-
ing commercial airplay) entitled
"I Flew Like a Bird Maybe
next year they'll be an overnight
success. Overnight?
Hell, they've been together for
nearly five years. There's nothing
overnight about that.
Newell manages the helm as
chief songwriter for The Graphic,
while the lead vocalist, the sultry
Treva Spontaine, contribuies an
occasional tune or two.
The � wigs are remarkably sim-
ple, wi i a lack of the over-used
synthe' 'ers that most new music
bands pend on. One nice thing
about the Graphic is their basic
tour-piece makeup: guitars, bass,
drums and yes, an occassional
kevboard. No frills R&R, but you
can dance to it.
Newell likes the simplicity.
After opening for bands like
Duran Duran, who seem to have
300 back-up musicians trying to
maintain the sound of the album
a: a live concert, Newell says he
can only shake his head.
"Maybe there should be some
sloppiness he laughs. At least,
he reminds himself, that the feel-
ing i f the concert should be live
and spontaneous.
1 et's review for a moment.
rhey're a simple band with
wonderful tunes. Some of the
Prince Parades
Unique Sounds
On New Album
.atchv lvrics and an
Bj W VI r RlsHH
SUff Wrilrr
I
VI
fa rude.
� Pi nee and
i I
incorp uing a wide
isical i n 11 ue i .
last Around he World
In Day So close . the ind
t very well could tve (or
lid have) been included in
Around the H arid
However, there are several
standouts prescv � ; give
Parade a special personality of its
ow n.
In this, his second soundtrack
album, one can find songs Un-
iracteristic I Prince. Two
� icl songs are "( a I I ie?"and
" enus De Milo
Can I 1 ie?" is a jazzy tune
un-
precedented style that only Prince
could have developed.
"Venus De Milo" is an in-
strumental with a hint of
Lawrence Welk and Glenn
Miller. Only Prince could get
away with something like this and
come out looking good.
"Kiss Prince's first single
release from this album, has been
number one on the soul chart for
almost tour weeks. As he did in
his earlv albums. Prince uses his
voice's flexibility to set his music
apart trom others.
Perhaps the best song on the
album is "Sometimes it Snows In
April This song adds deep
emotional feeling to the album,
as well as being one of the most
sorrowful songs Prince has ever
written and recorded.
Parade seems to follow closely
behind Around The World, yet it
holds many new surprises for the
avid Prince listener.
The bottom line on Parade,
like past Prince albums, is: If you
like Prince, you'll love this
album, but if you don't like
Prince, avoid it.
songs are getting good regional
airplay. They love playing live.
Do they have a record label?
Not yet. Besides the EP that
was released on the now defunct
Dolphin label, The Graphic has
appeared on two various artists
collections. More Mondo, a col-
lege radio staple, contains the
commercially accessible "I Flew
Like a Bird and from the
studios of the U.K The Graphic
appears on another NC compila-
tion entitled Welcome to Com-
boland.
North Carolina in England?
That, in itself, should tell you
something about the music
emanating from one of the most
conservative states in our great
country.
But a group cannot live on
various artists albums alone. No,
indeed � one must have a label.
Newell says within the next six to
nine months, hopefully, the label
situation will be remedied.
We're hoping right along with
them.
Newell assures us that they
have a lot of material. Enough
for a triple album, he says.
We'll be waiting.
But if you're not the waiting
type, catch The Graphic down at
the New Deli this Friday night.
Oh, and Brad says bring your
dancing shoes.
The GnpWc � progress n,� music tand � slaird ,� p� ,� Cre�lvill� .hi. �ekend Brad NU
oe playing at the New Deli FrirJH.v nihl.
GradStudent Shows Photos
Joe Champagne, an ECU
photography graduate student, is
exhibiting his oil pigment
photography process on April
6-13 in the Mendenhall Gallery.
This exhibit is presented as a part
of the ECU Student Union Visual
Arts Series.
The oil pigment process is from
the 19th century and has only
been revived by a few
photographers in the 20th cen-
tury, according to Champagne in
a recent interview. In fact, he
came across it only while looking
through a textbook.
The process is a continuous
tone process. That means it has
an infinite range from black to
white (like a conventional black
and white photo) as opposed to a
half-tone which imitates gray by
enlarging or shrinking black dots.
Champagne says the good
thing about the procedure is that
it can be made from scratch and
different combinations work for
different people. Champagne
worked through trial and error
tor about a year before pei
his own technique I he textbook
procedure didn't work tor him.
Finding the combinati
that work for you, the ma
and the temperatures,
methods o( application,
a long time, bui it becomes very
individual Champagne said
this way, his photos Jitter from
some earlier ones.
While this is Champagne's I
exhibition of oil pigment pho: s,
he has been exhibiting silver
gelatin prints (modern black
white prints, and platinotype
(photos using platinun
silv er)
sin,
platinum are
on and Sout N
v.
�'

� one ab
I here a- plans 1
in
:b!v
even receive :lass
M ke :

e expe
Lanford Wilson's Fifth Of July Is
A Mature Journey Through Sixties
p. more students
ild become aquainted with the
.ess and continue modifying
' eir own needs.
Vpril 19-30. Champagne
� eleven other graduate
lents will be exhibiting their
the 1986 Graduate
Exhibition. His
'tographs are on view through
V 2" in the Mendenhall
pen Monday through
� JO a.m. to 11 a.m
8:30 to midnight; Satur-
on to midnight and Sun-
I to 11 p.m.
It's Mv Move
Qu
Area theatregoers can expect
an interesting look back at the
60s generation a decade after the
anti-wai movement reached its
height, when they see Lanford
Wilson's Fifth of July. This pro-
duction, the last of the season,
will be presented by the East
Carolina Plavhouse on April
16-19 at 8:15pm.
Kenneth Talley. a Vietnam
veteran making do with two
plastic legs as a result of the war,
owns the farm where he has been
living with his male lover. The ac-
tion takes place on the evening of
the holiday, and the following
morning when some old friends
and relatives visit Talley for the
weekend.
All the characters are either
idealogically or physically involv-
ed with each other. There is
Ciwen, a millionairess trying to
become a Nashville pop star;
John, who manages her affairs;
Jed, a dedicated botanist; Jane, a
cynical wisecracking mother and
intermittent homebody; Shirley,
her bright but foolish teenage
daughter; Aunt Sally, a jovial
mild eccentric who carries about
Robert Ruffin, Michael Pitts, and Kelly Anchor share a light moment
in the ECU Playhouse production of Fifth O f July. The production
runs April 16-19, at 8:15pm in McGinnhTh eatre.
her husband's ashes in a candy-
box; and Weston, a country-
music writer, guitar strumming
simpleton who is the butt of
everyone's jokes.
The play has many comic
moments; in fact, it was billed as
a comedy during its popular New
York run. However, Director
Biehn warns that it would be a
mistake for theatregoers to ex-
pect a comedy in the same vein as
those written by Neil Simon or
the traditional situation comedy
on TV.
Said Biehn: "It's true, this is
indeed a very funny play in many
ways, but not far beneath the sur-
face is a hard-hitting and power-
ful drama that deals with the loss
of structure in our lives. It pierces
right to the heart of the matter
often using very blunt language
and for that reason, we think it's
best suited for, and will prove
popular, with mature audiences;
especially those who lived
through and remember the ten-
sions of the 60s
Reserved seat tickets are cur-
rently on sale in the McGinnis
Theatre Box Office. The Box Of-
fice is open Monday through Fri-
day, from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.
For reservations and group sale
information, call 757-6390.
By ROBERT MAZZOL1
N.ff VSrtlrr
Liquor is known the world over as the best stuff
to get you drunker quicker. Isn't it wonderful?
But where can you find a good bottle oi
squeezins?
The Great American ABC Store, oi course.
Sometimes it's hard to pick and choose a par-
ticular brand of liquor. As you walk through the
doors, your eyes are bombarded bv fancy labels
that look like homeless puppy
dogs. The bottles stare back at
you bragging about how old
they are and what proof they
are.
Ye gods. Decisions, deci-
sions.
Green bottles, orange bottles,
purple bottles, brown bottles.
The ABC store is virtual'y a
rainbow of intoxicants.
This article will help your
decision making process and
hopefully educate you in the
various types of spirits.
Bourbon � Here's an old
favorite that most college students are weaned on
How delightful it was to get your roommate to
purchase that first bottle of Jack Daniels, and how
merciless it was to find out that the sun was vour
enemy the next morning.
From the corn vineyards of Tennessee, you can
expect a harsh but intriguing taste with a bouquet
that could revive the dead. But I like Jack Daniels,
mainly for sentimental veasons.
Times have changed, though. You too can
graduate to the ranks of Wild Turkey 101, which
is undoubtedly the best bourbon on the continent.
It's smooth, flavorful and amusing. However, for
a student's budget Turkey is quite expensive. Go
back to Jack Daniels.
Scotch � It's truly hard to find a decent scotch.
First, if you're from the J.D. Green label class,
your taste buds may find little amusement with the
dry and bitter taste of this particular liquor. In-
deed, cne must acquire a taste for scotch.
For the student's pocketbook, scotch is not in-
expensive, and in that case, vour choice should be
on the money A good primer would, indeed
be Cutty Sark Expensive, but just right. Besides'
ks nice.
Rum � First of all, do not use the new Coke for
mixing. I: tastes horrible. My favorite rum is
Bacardi, ligl dark. Don't be deceived by the
expensive stuff. The price tags can become'very
outraj and the appalling thing about that is
Bacardi, a decently priced rum, is like a slant-six
engine u get good mileage from something
reliable. Expensive rum is like a V-8 - too much
Vodka � Is it possible to find
a bad bottle of vodka? Sure
miff. The best test I know of is
simply finding a bottle that has
a strong bouquet but little taste.
Vodka should be judged on its
iack of taste. Smoothness
counts, too. When being
choosy, go for Smirnoff. It
hasn't done me wrong yet
Tequila � Picking the right
tequila is very important. Since
a good v mtage tequila will make
vV vou horny, be willing to put
� down some monevbu not a
whole lot oi money. Of course. I'm talking about
my good tnend, Pepe. Okay, the bottle isn't very
attractive, but the liquor inside will get vou excited
all the same.
Now. if vou want the expensive stuff that packs
an extra kick with an added smoothness Jose
C uervo ,s what you're searching for. Besides vour
tnends will see the bottle on your mantle md envy
your taste.
Gin Now here is my favorite liquor of all
me. Gin like scotch, requires educated taste
buds. At first taste, most people say gi� recalls the
flavor of pine sap (who. ,n their right mind, drinks
sap of pine). Gin should be extremely dry for the
proper effect. For the best tasting gin ifs , ti!
between Beefeater and Tanqueray. Both show
good body, and one of them comes in a greenJk
GUbey'r' f�r G�d'S SakC' Stay �?�
Tip of the Week - At all costs, avoid anv li
quor that has Passport on the label
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Brad Newell.
I !uran I he? will
Photos
u
Than Wine
be
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ika? Sure
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it has
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iged n I �
Smoothness
When be .
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Since
Mil make
to put
but not a
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e isn't very
'�ill kfe' you excited
sive stuff thai packs
smoothness, Jose
B for. Besides, your
ur mantle and envy
�� rite liquor of all
educated taste
'� sa gin recalls the
� m their right mind, drinks
ild be extremely dry for the
bcsl Tasting gin, it's a tie
I Tanqueray. Both show
mesinagreen bot-
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ti ert � At all costs, avoid any li-
?port on the label.
Undercoverats
BLOOM COUNTY
by Berke Breathed
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APRIL 10. 1986 7
By PARKER
ATIAST


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By BRYIX
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by SoveLure A ineKn
Man-O-Stick
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By BROOKS
THtM FUl IN LOVC
WITH im OTMU?.
i i
lLHjf 1 u
OF JULY
The 60 s Generation A Decade Later General Public $4 00 .
ECU Students S3 00 �
For Reservations
' '�'����� �'� ' es On . call 757-6390
:�. ;f: ; A- � �� � -i �" ;f- �"� � -r- -S S : :� �
MEDIA BOARD
is now accepting applications for
General Manager for the 1986-87
academic year for the following: The
East Carolinian, WZMB-FM,
Buccaneer, Rebel, Photo Lab and
Expressions Magazine.
Please apply at the Media Board
office, 2nd floor, Publications Building.
Phone 757-6009. Applications accepted
through April, 16, 1986.
4c" fc iJc X i V -A' "�' lf � �' i: vi' i' w "i' vi "if " "A Ar if tir "A "if " '�A "4r -A sl L sL -i
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Mil l AST I AROI INIAN
Sports
APRIL 10, 1986 Page8
�� "

W
1ti
Defense Takes Scrimmage
JIM IFl Tl.K'sv TbtMttralWa
The Pirate football squad has been working hard in Spring drills in
preparation for what promises to be a difficult schedule.
First Tournament Championship
By TIM CHANDLER
The defense dominated the
play in the Pirates second full-
scale scrimmage of the season.
The scrimmage was held last
Saturday in Ficklen Stadium.
Using a scoring system that
awarded the defense for intercep-
tions, fumble recoveries and
tackles behind the line of scrim-
mage, the defense defeated the
offense 44-25.
Gary Stephens, Ellis Dillahunt
and Roswell Streeter all in-
tercepted passes for the defense.
Bubba Waters and Steve
Englehart each contributed a
fumble recovery for the defensive
squad.
The offensive unit scored four
touchdowns, each on running
plays. Anthony Simpson, Reggie
McKinney, Terry Paige and
Dwight Richardson scored the
touchdowns.
Second-vear head coach Art
Baker said that he was pleased
with the play of the defensive
unit, however he was dissap-
pointed that the offense wasn't
able to overcome the slow start
they had during the scrimmage.
"We got a bad start today and
never did quite catch up Baker
said. "A lot of that had to do
"The defense played excep-
tionally well, they played
very aggressive and our
defensive linemen did a
good job
� Art Baker
with the way the defense played
today. The defense played excep-
tionally well, they played very ag-
gressive and our defensive
linemen did a good job
Baker was especially pleased
with the performance of the
defensive linemen. The linemen
include: David Plum, Medrick
Rainbow, Carl Carney, John
Williamson and Willie Powell.
Baker also praised free safety
Dillahunt and linebaker Vinson
Smith for their great play on
defense.
Baker said that he was disap-
pointed with the passing game on
offense, however he cited the of-
fensive linemen for their good
play.
David Plum commented on the
defense's dominance of Satur-
day's scrimmage.
"The defense always comes
around first stated Plum. "We
basically play on instinct,
whereas the offense has more to
learn
Plum also stated that the team
was playing much better this year
than they were last season.
"We are playing more ag-
gressive, and we are also ex-
ecuting a lot better added
Plum.
Another defensive lineman,
Carl Carney, also emphasized
how the the defense is ahead of
the offense, when asked of last
Saturday's scrimmage.
"We (the defense) picked up
where we left off last year
stated Carney. "The offense is a
lot more technical and takes
longer to get right
The Bucs only have one more
week of Spring practice left. The
Spring drills will come to a close
next Sat. Apr. 19 when the an-
nual Purple-Gold Game will be
played.
Sports Fact
Thur. Apr. 10. 1896
Greek runner Spiridon Louis
wins the first Olympic
marathon in a time of two
hours, 58 minutes, and 50
seconds. Given a hero's
welcome in Athens, Louis is
showered with gifts including
free shoeshines for the rest of
his iife, a special luxury for the
long-distance runner
ECU Irates Take Ultimax IIV
B SCOTT COOPER
Nporu tdllor
The ECU Fnbee Club, belter
known a the Irates. won their
first tournament, the Ultimax
Il. this weekend at the bottom
of the College Hill.
The two-day tournament had a
field oi seven teams which includ-
ed Richmond's L' Hopital Rule.
Duke. Raleigh, Virginia Tech's
Fresh Produce, Wilmington's
Mem Pransters, ECU's Irates
v titrates (a team made up of
Ira'c. ex-Irates and Greenville
players).
1 nc tournament was plaed in
round-robin fashion aftei teams
were pli! into two pools on the
opening Ju. Pool 'A'consisted
of 'lie Mcn Pranksters, the
rates, 1' Hopital Rule and
Boone (a team from Boone that
did not show). Pool 'B' consisted
of the Cutrates, Fresh Produce.
Duke and Raleigh
The initial day determined the
gs as each team was ranked
in accordance of the number o
points the won lost b. These
winning losing margins were
then Jiwded b trie number of
La;r;e plaed that day.
Below is how the placement
and scores looked after the first
day of competition. This -et up
the pairnings for the tournament.
1. L' Hopital Rule-f-5.5).
2. F-resh Produce 4.66).
.V hatesf2.5).
4. Duke� 1.??).
5. Cutrates t-2.
6. Raleigh (-3.5).
1err Pranksters (-8).
lor the Iraies, they finished the
tourney with a 4-1 mark; but
took home their first champion-
ship in their six-year history of
the sport club. (Actually, the
Irates did win a tournament in
the spring of 1983. the Ultimax 1.
however the win was due to a
cancellation because o snow).
After an opening day loss :o 1
Hopital Rule 13-11. the Irates
rolled past the Merry Pranksters
later that afternoon.
In the second day of the
tourney, ECU got passed Raleigh
handily by the score o 13-6.
Then they squeaked by Fresh
Produce '5-13 in the quarter-
finals. Fresh Produce was the
previously No. 1 ranked college
team in the SAL'C (South Atlan-
tic Ultimate Conference � which
includes college teams from
N.C, S.C Va. and Md.).
The Irates avenged their only
tournament loss as they downed
L' Hopital Rule 15-11, in taking
the championship. Duke took
third place as they topped Fresh
Produce in the consolation
bracket. Senior Bob Deman, who
was voted by the players as the
tournament MVP, was pleased
with the final results as well as his
winning of the MVP award.
"It (the tourney victory) was
especially sweet for me and David
(Barnhardt), because we're
graduating � it's our last
Ultimax Tournament we'll play
in Deman said. "It was great
for me to get it (the MVP),
because I'm a senior and it's the
last game for me.
"I'll make note that six people
were nominated for the MVP
Deman added. "It showed how
well our team played
With the Iraies taking first
place and the Cutrates finishing
fifth, it says a lot for Greenville's
frisbee talent, according to
Deman.
"The tournament was even
competition. It wasn't over-
whelming Deman explained.
"I'm amazed that the Cutrates
came in fifth, because the two
(ECU) teams were made from
one. We took a lot of talent from
them
The Irate team members in-
clude Barnhardt, Deman, Rick
Sandman, John Welch (Irate
team captain). Randy Allen.
John Brady, Tim Allen, Greg
Jackson, Eric Shearer, Chris
Norwood, Andre Periera, Rusty
Russ, Steve Rash and Blue Lew.
('Quasar' Brady did not see ac-
tion this weekend due to a sprain-
ed ankle in an unfortunate injury-
while downtown).
With the success of the Irates
this weekend, some players ex-
pressed their feelings after the
win.
"I feel that this Ultimax vic-
tory for the Irates will go down
unparalleled in human history
said the injured Brady.
"What he said said Blue
Few, referring to Brady's com-
ment.
"Wow, we never won (a tour-
nament) before Welch com-
mented, "I don't know what to
say
I thought the rag -1 ag
bunchthe Cutrates showed im-
pressive ultimate ability in their
fifth-place finish another Irate
stated.
"It's great to be a Cutrate
said Norwood. "I thought we
really played well in the tourna-
ment
"All the veterans played as
well as they could have Deman
acknowledged, "and the newer
players complemented them well
with some good ultimate. As a
college team we can't be taken
lightly
In two weeks, the Irates will
travel to Richmond to play z
tough match in shaping up for
the College Sectionals which are
Apr. 26-27 and are also in Rich-
mond.
EAST CAROLINA FRISBEE CLUB
Irate Champs!
Cancellations Tuesday
Due to Tuesday's afternoon
downpour, both the men's
baseball and women's softball
games versus Atlantic Coast Con-
ference opponents were called
The men's game versus the
N.C. State Wolfpack was in the
first inning, with no score, when
the rain interrupted play. The
game will not be made up.
In the women's doubleheader,
play was called in the seventh inn-
ing (of the first game) of the
scoreless contest against the
Tarheels of North Carolina. No
decision has been made as to
whether the games will be made
up.
Ladies Move To .500; Men Top Campbell
B DAVID McGINNESS
The Fady Pirate netters fell 7-2
last Monday to the Lady 49'ers of
UNC-Charlotte, bringing ECU to
a 4-4 spring-season record.
The Pirates captured one
singles and one doubles match.
Becky Clements put away her
No. 1 singles opponent Tracy
Steve in straight sets, 6-3, 6-2.
The Bucs other victory came
courtesy of Ann Manderfield and
Lisa Eichholz. as they edged out
Tina Cascio and Doris Wangerin
in a come-from-behind win.
Manderfield and Eichholz fell 2-6
in the first set, but pulled out two
consecutive 7-6 tiebreaker wins in
the second and third, closing out
the match.
However, the 49'ers had the
match sewn up 5-1 after singles
play, so a win was out of reach
for the Pirates.
Apr. 4, 1986
The Lady netters came away
with a decisive win over Meredith
College last Friday, taking five
singles and all three doubles mat-
ches for an 8-1 victory.
In this match, the tables were
turned, as Clements was the only
player to emerge with a loss. She
fell to Theresa Duffy 6, 6-3 in
the No. 1 singles match.
Ann Manderfield disposed
aft" � � �? u' tfta "?5F
�� f J ��
JON JORDAN � ECU PHOTO LAB
Tarheels Await!
The ECU baseball team will have their hands full today when they host
the L'NC Tarheels at 2:00 p.m. at Harrington Field.
quickly of Meredith's Elizabeth
Hornthal, 6-1, 6-1 in the No. 2
match.
Lisa Eichholz had a little more
trouble in her No. 3 match. She
defeated Emily Houser 6-4, 7-6.
At No. 4, Amy Ziemer took
care of Adriene Gore, beating the
Meredith netter 6-0. 6-3.
Holly Murray n anitained the
ECU streak of straight-set vic-
tories. She topped Amy Messick
6-1, 6-2 in the No. 5 match.
Ty Myers closed out the singles
play at No. 6, winning 6-2, 6-3
against Laura Cochrane, and
clinching the match for the Bucs
5-1.
In doubles action, ECU show-
ed little difficulty in disposing of
the Meredith netters. They gave
up only ten games in their three
straight-set wins.
Manderfield and Eichholz led
the way for ECU, beating Duffy
and Houser 6-2, 6-2 in the No. 1
doubles match.
Maria Swaim and Myers took
out Hornthal and Messick 6-2,
6-1 in the No. 2 contest.
Ziemer ano Murray ended the
match with a 6-1, 6-2 win, for the
final score of ECU eight,
Meredith one.
The ladies will see action next
on Friday, when they travel to
Richmond to face the Lady
Spiders.
In men's tennis play, the Bucs'
match with High Point College
on Tuesday of this week was
cancelled due to rain.
Apr. 4, 1986
However, last Friday's match
against Campbell College pro-
duced a 7-2 victory for ECU. The
match was led by a domination in
the singles play by the Pirates.
At No. 1, Dan FaMont came
back from a 2-6 first-set loss to
Cambell's Ibarguen with 6-0, 6-4
wins in the second and third sets
to clinch the match.
In a close match at No. 3, Jon
Melhorn got bv T. Mavnor 6-3,
6-7, 7-6.
The No. 3 spot saw yet another
three-set contest, but this time the
Pir-tes suffered the loss. After a
strong 6-0 win in the first set,
Greg Loyd dropped two to
Campbell's C. Maynor 6-3, 6-2.
John Taylor topped Hester in
the No. 4 match 6-4, 6-2.
In the No. five match, it was came Pack trom a 3-6 loss in the
ECU's Pat Campanero over
Gaskins. 6-3, 6-2.
Todd Sumner had more trou-
ble with his opponent Carr, but
took his No. 6 match 7-5, 6-4,
giving ECU the necessary five
wins before the doubles play
began.
In doubles, the Pirates took
two of the three matches played.
Ibarguen and Maynor topped
Melhorn and Taylor 8-6. The
match was called at this point due
to darkness.
John Anthony and Campanero
first set to win the second in a
tiebreaker 7-6. They finished the
match off with a 6-3 win in the
third set.
FaMont and Foyd closed the
match out for ECU, disposing of
Carr and Hester 6-3, 6-1.
The win against Campbell br-
ings the Bucs' spring record to
5-7, with an overall record of
9-13.
They play next this weekend in
Wilmington at the UNC-
Wilmington Azalea Tournev.
�� �� ��w
JIM LCLTGENS - Tta I. � m
Senior Sandy Kee puts the tag on this Tarheel runner attempting a steal In Tuesday's action before the
rainont. Their next action will he the George Mason Tournament this weekend In Fairfax, Va.
Classifi
PEMSOSALS
SIG EP BROTHERS PLEDGI
AND GOLDEN HEARTS
to part our faces �
FARM this Sdt'w'
SIG EP GOLDEN HEAR
next me- rtg w e TH
at 9 p.m N'
ticers a
PlEASE at-e n
SIG TAUS ' - -
happ ho
TO BLK MOW
UStmef t'i ,�
chains, rop�
just a little
After all, we'vi
tor the sl"
"cole � ��'
potential of be
i knoA � � ���
me too Bes �;���
"serious" home t
strons N
Love. Sue B
KAPPA SIGVA
da Come p
FUNKY NASSA J
-
and or '�
Gree � � � �
CONGRATU LAT
SIGMA
vctorious P -
support :�
MARTHJ CHEW
2lst Birtttday '
for eve-
Don
CAROLINA SURF
We had ft �
much1
ail to ou
.
chance water
: � head
grea
the ��
shar.�
O Ne " i
es Bury Ba
sis! and Giv
some C
ake " �
time B v C
Yd �� � V �
THE BOXERS ARt
Junior Pan!
Delega
our so r "
KAPPA SIGMA
- ghesi
ana Dway
�he A.1P V �
Award and i "
. � �
average A
Stu
i
arh
eedi
Work You!
NO Wl
Easy tl
Apply 1 lif
I
Ph
11EST
Corner oi 10th
Greenville's
Newest
NOVM
Specializing ii
Meals at Rea
Featuring: Fried Chicken,
Serving Lu
Open 11
7 Dav
The Firehouse
Restaurant Free Delivery tor or
FREE TEA
THE EAST
4
-�






I Page 8
mage
the defense is ahead of
e, hen asked of last
scrimmage.
eked up
re we left off last vear
c offense is a
ca and lakes
� get right
he Bu(
The
ie to a
. 19 when the an
e will be
Sports Fact
Ihur. pr 10. JSsH)
5
rtX
rate Champs
tions Tuesday
e n ade up
rader,
inn-
� s u lina N
las beei made as
in es will be made
mpbell
the
nd in a
1 ed the n in the � j c . disp ing �'
.snobeli br-
kBJs&pr
-�cord of
nexis weekend in
�a'I h e U N C -
�1 Azalcii Tournev.
I
�4 �
JIM Ul n,W - TV tM C
�pting a steal in Tuesday's action before the
iment this weekend in Fairfax, Va.
Classifieds
T
n� 4
PERSONALS
SIG EP BROTHERS. PLEDGES
AND GOLDEN HEARTS: Get ready
arty your faces off at MOSiER S
� ARM this Saturday! ! !
SIG EP GOLDEN HEARTS: Our
text meeting will be THIS SUNDAY
it 9 p.m Nominations for '86 '87 of
5 will be held so EVERYONE
PI EASE ATTEND! ! ! ! !
SIG TAUS: Thanks for a lammin'
. py hour! Love, The Delta Zetas.
TO BLK: How about an attitude ad
tment? Who needs heavy metal
. s ropes, or strings attached
St ,i little friendly companionship1
r ad we've shared a lot Ready
the summer time no more
weather For a guy who has
al of bemg a real sweetheart!
" e Aia life is for you It's tor
Besides, you know I've got
- home ties that are pretty
g No problem Add a smile
Sue BaBe
naPPA SIGMA: Late night
- party Greeks
"hurs
FUNKY NASSAU: Thursday 4D m
K appa Sigma house Come by
� :r nk a case of beer ana p
CONGRATULATIONS KAPPA
S'GMA On another back to back
� � ous p Kapp field day Grea'
. - � brothers
VARTH J CHERRY A very Happy
� - " lay to you toaay You are
al to me ana I 'hank you
. � . �� rtg you do Love Always
CAROLINA SURF LAMBCHOPS:
��� id th aimighty time, thanks so
� ! Big check writer we owe it
.ou sorry about the salad1
- nk ec raiSin "I just want a
watch out for the iacuzzi!
head our hair looks
p nk Ciown watch out for
whales eep that harpoon
.ash that shirt!
faxi Service You saved our
t-jry Barry hold on to your
G-ve us some heia with
You didn't go down there
.r ends but you did! Next
- Y 0 Pasty Pasta1 We love
� e Mama Tunas
THE BOXERS ARE IN Fall 1985
r Panhellenic Executive and
- ���� come to Whichard 209,
�� Apnl 10 between 3 4 to get
r:r es' boxers'
KAPPA SIGMA: Congratulations to
A'ison for winning Greek
' Scholastic Average Award
lyi e A seman for winning
�Dp Most Dedicated Greed
ii d o the fraternity for win
�� e highest grade poing
�� are proud! ! '
CONGRATULATIONS KAPPA
SIGMA i F.C. highest fraternal
GPA on campus, Dwayne
W.seman ADPi Most Dedicated
Greek Award, Lanny
Wilson highest Greek GPA. Con
grats also on a killer victoral jam at
Pi Kapp Field Day TodayFunky
Nassau will be great! Tonight late
night. OH ME! Keep up the good
work!
ALPHA SIGMA PHI: Would like to
thank everyone who made their first
Backyard Blowout such a success.
We knew you could party ECU!
ALPHA SIG LITTLE SISTERS: The
brothers would like to thank all of
you for doing such a great job in
helping us last week. You'all are
fandamntastic!
ALPHA XI DELTA: Presents ALL
SING IN THE SPRING this Tues
day, April 15th at Hendrix Theatre
730 p m. Everyone is welcome!
Don't miss this great show!
TAU KAPPA DADDIES: Thanks for
a raging weekend Red carnation '86
was a weekend I will never forget
I'm looking forward to that deathly
batch i love you all Kathy
FREE PUPPY: Anyone interested
in giving a puppy a nice home call
355 6349
RAFFLE: 1st pnre Peugot pipeline
bike iearth cruzer style) or cash
eauivalenf 2nd prize, $75 Buy your
� ket from a Sigma Phi Epsiion
Brother Drawing to be held at Pan
'ana Bob s Only SI for this great op
pourtunity for fame and fortune
REWARD: My son, Christopher
Wayne Freeman was a first
semester student at ECU He was
k.lled m an automobile accident on
February 8, 1986 His High School
class ring was misplaced while in
school at ECU it was a 1985 Wilkes
Central High School ring and his in
Ti a Is. CWF, were engraved in it The
stone was peridot, which is light
green A generous reward is offered
for information leading to the return
of this ring, there will be no ques
tions asked I am a widow and Chris
was my only child and the return of
his rmg would mean so much.
Shirley A Freeman, P O Box 248,
Wilkesboro. N.C. 28697
WANTED: Responsible females
would like to sublease a two
bedroom furnished or unfurnished
apartment in Tar River Estates for
summer school months. May Aug.
Call 752 4875.
SUMMER JOBS FOR COLLEGE
STUDENTS: Openings available for
young men on the Food Service Staff
at CAMP SEAFARER ON THE
COAST OF NORTH CAROLINA
Good salary plus room and board
Excellent opportunity for friends to
work together. June 8 through mid
August. Must be at least 18 years of
age No experience necessary only
ambition and good references re
quired. For more information and
an application, write: Camp
Seafarer, P.O.Box 10976, YMCA,
Raleigh, N.C. 27605.
TUTOR NEEDED. Elementary
Stats 3228 tutor needed. Call 752 1182
and ask for David.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
2 bedroom townhouse, to share a
room SlOOmonth� '3 utilities. Has
pool, on ECU bus route. Call Kim at
752 7774
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
For both summer sessions room
available May 10th S125 a month
plus '3 utilities Non smoker
752 8629 Mark Pepper
BARTENDERS NEEDED: 21 ears
of age Some experience BegmMa
20 Labor Day! Call Mrs Galberath
at 919 726 5139
3 LIFEGUARDS (MEN PREFER
RED) NEEDED: WSL CPR cer
tifieo df possible) to watch ocean
Must be over 18 Begin May 20 Labor
Day Salary open Call Mrs
Galberath at 919 726 5139
RIDE NEEDED TO RICHMOND,
VA Will help with gas. Can leave
Thursday This is desperate Please
call Pat at 752 9937 or 757 6041
SUMMER LIFEGUARDING JOBS:
WSI or Senior Lifeguarding cer
tificates required CPR required
Tar Landing Villas, Rt. 4, Morehead
City, N.C. 28557 Phone 247 5295
LOST: APRIL 4, 1986: Ladies gold,
Seiko watch Sentimental value
Please return if found $REWARDS
Call Bev at 757 0232
WANTED: Apt for 2 girls at Atlan
tic Beach or Morehead City for the
summer Please call collect (919)
892 3816
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 10, 1986
(JXSXStfSXSXSfcSXSXSXIXiKsK
SALE
DAPPERDAN'SAt Poorman's
Flea Market on Hwy 264 between
Washingtoi and Greenville has Vin
tage Clothng Jewery, and collec
tables Open everySat and Sun.
10 6
SUMMER SUBLET: June August,
$160 with utilities included, private
room in large house behind
Domino's on Charles St Bath, living
room, kitchen privileges, 758 2230
Ask for Taz Cooper
FOR SALE: Diving Equipment of
all kinds Tank, fins, etc Entire out
fit! interested7 Call 752 8666
See CLASSIFEDS, pajje 10

$






i








Hillcrest Lanes
Memorial Drive
756-2020
FREE
GAME
j" Bowl One Game & Receive
l Another Game FREE With This
:
I
1 Coupon.
�)�sX$MSKsK ��'� .��� �� �'�'�,��� �-��?'���� � � � � � � � ���" �) � � � � � � � � � � � � ��
I
J
1 FEMALES NEEDED: Tosublease
2 bedroom apartment at Tar River
Estates. $113 and ' 3 utilities. Apart
ment is furnished For more infor
mation call Lon or Cindy at 758 0238
WANTED
WHITE FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: immediately! Rent $88
' 3 utilities CaH 758 0655
WETSUIT WANTED: interested in
selling a men's wetsuit? If so, call
758 0076 or 752 8355 ano leave a
message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: For sum
mer Private bedroom Apt fully
furnished. $145 month and '2
utilities 1 mile from campus Call
758 6699

Students
s

s

s

X
s
s



Hatteras
Hammocks
Needs You
Work Your Own Hours
NO Weekends
Easy to Learn
Apply 1104 Clark St.
8:00-5:00 Mon-Fri
No Phone Calls, Please

�,

i

s
l!


i
.


i
1
I

.
�i



� �
"1
i
ATTENTION,
SENIORS!
Would you like to be
part of one of the
largest and most
successful child care
programs in the nation?
If you genuinely want to
help troubled kids and
would like to have
camping, backpacking
and river trips as part of
your daily
routine � then we want
you on our team1
If you have majored in
Education or any of the
Human Service related
fields, we can provide
you with an excellent
opportunity for personal
and professional
development.
Write: Eckerd Family
Youth Alternatives, Inc.
P.O. Box 31122,
Charlotte, NC 28231.
1-800-222-1473 (toll
free). EOE MF.
Applications for Refrigerator Rentals
Manager are now being accepted.
Apply In Room 228
Mendenhall Student Center
Deadline:
Thursday, April 10
Be A Leader
Are you organized' Do you like working with other people Are
you interested in minority events on campus If your answer is yes,
then pick up your application for the
Minority Arts
Committee
Chairperson
The Minority Arts Committee is responsible for selecting, planning,
promoting and presenting programs that are geared towards
informing people of many contributions in the arts by minorities.
Pick up your application today at the Student Union Office,
Mendenhall.
����������
SHOE OUTLET
NAME BRAND SHOES
At Discount Prices
Restaurant
Corner of 10th & Cotanche Streets
Greenville's "HOTTEST
Newest Restaurant!
NOW OPEN
Specializing in Home Cooked
Meals at Reasonable Prices!
Featuring: Fried Chicken, Bar-Be-Que, Ribs & Chitlin's
Serving Lunch � Dinner
Open 11 a.m. -2 a.m.
7 Days a Week
The Firehouse Take-Out Orders
Restaurant Free Delivery For Orders Of 120 Or More! Call 758-5623
FREE TEA WITH COUPON
Quality Casual Shoes $15
Ladies Dress and Casual Shoes
at Discount Prices
Large Selection of Name Brand
Tennis Shoes $12.88 to $29.88
752-2332
One Block Off Lans Street
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
41086
GO FROM COLLEGE TO THE ARMY
WITHOUT MISSING A BEAT.
The hardest thing about break-
ing into professional
music is- well, break
ing into protessiona
music. So it you're
looking tor an oppor-
tunity to turn your
musical talent into
a full-time perform-
ing career, take a
good look at the
Army.
Its not
all parades
and John Philip
Sousa. Army
bands rock,
waltz and boogie
as well as march,
and they perform
before concert au
diences as well
as spectators.
With an average
oi 40 performances a month, there
,W) the opportunity for travel
not only across America, but possibly
abroad
Most important, you can
expect a first-rate pro-
fessional environment
from your instructors,
facilities and fellow
musicians 1 he Army
as educational
programs that
can help you
pay for off-
duty instruc-
r tion, and if
. you qual-
tv, even
ielp vou
repay
your
federally-insured
student loans.
Ifvou can sight-
read music, performing in the Army
could be your big break Write
Chief, Army Bands Office Fort
Benjamin Harrison, IN 46216 5005.
Or call toll free 1-800-USA-ARMY.
ARMY BAND.
BE ALLYOU CAN BE.
1
���
��.�





10
1IU I AM I K()i (MAN
APRIL 10, 1986
IRS Team Handball
B STEPHANIE DEW
Mitt �nln
Samantha Jones, an Olympic
star discovered on the various
athletic courts at ECU, mastered
a sport called team handball.
1 he intramural program at
1 CL had lots to do with this
phenomenal athlete's success.
The game ol team handball
continues as an IRS favorite foi
many students. I earn handball
records are posted foi the firs!
two weeks of competition:
Men's W 1
Armv ROTC 2-0
Hansons 2-0
Hoodlums 2-0
Pi Kappa Alpha "A" 2-0
Sigma Phi Epsilon "A" 2-0
Women's 1.
Enforcers 2-0
TriSig 1-1
Delta-Zeta 1-1
Alpha Phi 1-1
Have vou registered to entei
the IRS-Homerun lX-rbv to be
held Apr. 17 at the ECU
Women's Field? Take a swing at
the event The deadline to register
is Apr. 17 and all planning to sign
up should go by Memorial Gym
between 4-7 pm.
In case you'd like to enter the
IRS annual Golf Classic but you
left your clubs at home, take ad-
vantage of the intramural equip-
ment room. The IRS allows you
to borrow items like golf clubs
tennis balls, or even camping
equipment. Don't hesitate to stop
bv, especially before the Golf
Classy to be held Apr. 10 at the
Ayden Country Club.
It only Tom Sawyer and Huck
Finn had staved around long
enough to hear about the IRS-
whitewater rafting trip on the
French Broad River. The event
takes place Apr. 18-20 and the
cosl is $45.00 per person (in-
cludes transportation, river trip
and camping tees). Register in
204 Memorial Gym. There will be
a pre-trip meeting Apr. 15 in
105-B Memorial Gym at 4 pm.
Classifieds
Applications Being Accepted at the
East Carolinian
for Summer and Fall 1986
in the following positions:
Director of Advertising
Managing Editor
News Editor
Advertising Sales Reps
Staff Writers
Apply in person at the The East Carolinian between 12:00
p.m5:00 p Deadline for applications is April 17th. The
Hast C arolinian is an equal opportunity employer.
4BORTIO.S UP
TO 12th I IK
() PREC.A.CY
i.
v
add � . y Test, 1
� ' � I
ai :all 832 53!
- � ;�: 5384) between 9 a
I ieneral anesthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
PET
VILLAGE
DONNA EDWARDS
Owner
Good Selection of Reptiles
and Saltwater and Freshwater Fish
We Carry A Complete Line
of Dog, Cat, and Fish Supplies
Master Card and Visa are accepted and financing is available.
511 Kans St.
Greenville. N( 27834
Phone: 756-9222
FREE
RENT
Going Home For The Summer
But Need A Place For The Fall?
Tar River Estates has a summer special for
ECU students � Rent an apt by May 1 st &
keep your appartment RENT FREE for June &
July! For details call or come by Tar River
Estates Info Center 1400 Willow St. No. 1.
752-4225
Tired of waiting in line for the phone or shower? Leave the
dorm doldrums behind � there is an alternative. Your own
piace at Tar River Estates Select a one bedroom garden apart-
ment or a two or three bedroom Townhouse Enjoy fully equip-
ped kitchen washer'dryer connections in some apartments,
spacious clubhouse, swimming pool, and picnic area by the
nver Conveniently located near East Carolina University �
with SGA Transit service Come by today or Call:
Tarver
752-4225
1400 Willow St
Office Hours
MF 900-5 30
Sat & Sun 1 00 5 00
Myxx)edbv U S Shrtrrr Corporator
Continued from page 9
SENIORS! SENIORS! SENIORS
Enjoy the last phase of your college
career employment S&F Com
puters is ottering a package price to
help you send out your resumes in
eluding all of the following Letter
quality typed resumes. Mail merged
cover letters (name and address of
each company as inside mailing ad
dress on letter), Letter quality typed
envelopes with company address
and your return address on
envelope, Everything folded, stuffed
and even stamped, A listing of com
panies sent to for your follow ups)
Just bring us your handwritten
resume and cover letter and the
businesses you with to apply to and
we'll do the rest. Per resume for
your names addr (we stuff) $2 30
(mm 10 resumes) (we stuff and
stamp) $1 90 (2 page resume prices
slightly higher). This offer absolute
ly expires April 15, 1986 S&F Com
puter Company, 115 East Fifth St ,
Greenville, NC 27834 757 0472
TYPING SERVICES: Resumes,
term papers theses Low rates.
Spelling and grammatical correc
tions included Cindy 757 0398 after
5.30 pm
WORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
perience in typing resumes, theses,
technical documents, and term
papers We manage and merqe your
names ana addresses into merged
letters, labels, envelopes or roiodex
cards Our prices are extremely
reasonable and we always offer a 15
percent discount to ECU students S
& F Professional Computer Co
.back of Franklin's! 115 E 5th St.
757 0472
FOR SALE: Dinette w4 chairs
($40), toaster oven ($15), sofa ($35),
end table ($15), microwave ($40),
also lamp, can opener, other, call
Linda, 758 7276
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICE: Word processing The
Dataworks specializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertations,
theses, resume's and more All work
is computer checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary Rates
are as low as $1 75 per page, in
eluding paper (call for specific
rates) Call Mark at 757 3440 after 7
pm
ATTENTION STUDENTS: After
graduation, don't store your gradua
tion cap in a drawer or on a closet
shelf have it bronzed For more in
formation call 799 3419 or write to
PO Box 7391, Wilmington, NC
28406
SUMMER SUB LET: May August
S250 plus utilities 3 bedroom apt ,
V . bath, fully furnished, central air,
cable 830 1769
SUB LEASE: Spacious, 2 br .2 bath
apt available for sub lease May
July, with option to rent for fall Ful
ly furnished and air conditioned
Call 758 9282, Rmggold Towers
FOR SALE: Carpet remnants, an
sizes, all colors, ail prices Save
50 70 percent The Carpet Bargain
Center. 1009 Dickinson Ave 758 0057
PROFESSIONAL TYPING Elec
tronic typewriter Reasonable rates
Call Janic- at 355 7233 after 5 30
RINGGOLD TOWERS: 1 bedroom
condo available for rent or sale
Great investmet Low money down,
excellent tax write otfs Call George
Tibbal at 203 261 6722
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: Experience, quality work,
I BM Selectnc typewriter Call Lame
Shive at 758 5301
RENT: 2 room B unit Rmggold Apt
$300 utilities a month May 10
Aug 20 One or two roommates Call
Michelle at 758 5971 Tues Thurs
after 5 p m
COTTAGE FOR RENT: Nags Head
Sleeps four Close to beach! Com
pletely furnished Lease May 1 Aug
31. $600 per month Call 441 4483
FOR SALE: 12 x 65 mobile home
with 3 bedrooms, V i baths $500
down and assume c ments Call
75E 1559 after 6 p.m Gnmesland
FOR SALE : 64 Chevy Belair. 4 dr 6
cy , good party car, $395 or BO
355 2185
FOR SALE. H Kardon tuner 910,
pioneer reverb ana expander Good
shape Call 830 1174
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etr
Anne at 758 6011 ana leav-
message
TYPING NEEDED?: If Ou want
someone to tpe papers for ou at
reasonable rates call 756 8934
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom efiaenc
apartment All kitchen appliances,
central location, bus service within
walking distance Perfect for sum
mer students $235 a month 756 476C
antime
FOR SALE: 1974 Mustang ll Haa
lot of work $700 Call M F 10 11 a m
5 7 pm Weekends an i' r-i e
758 6055
16 PERSON YARD SALE: Giver I
student Medical Record Association
Saturda, April 12, 8 a m lpm. at
Allied Health Bidg Come one, come
all!
TO ALL APARTMENT
RESIDENTS: I am selling m Ges
(oni2ears old), a drawer, a neA .
built wooden bunk, and mabe ever
a loveseat at negotiable prices
Brift at 758 2080
FREE YAMAHA MOPED! A
sub lease of Rmggold Towers apar
ment No rent for Ma, $220 a r-
for June and July Can con'
lease tnrough fall ana spring Cal
758 7802
� r jTon
STUDENTS!
BY MAY THE LITTLE SPACES MAY BE IN B-l-G DEMAND! RESERVE YOUR SPACE EARLY
HOOKER ROAD SELF STORAGE 1504 Hooker Road 355-5049 1 block from Telephone Office
& �
408 West Arlington Bivd
Green, lie NC 278
910 75c 7032
-
icie
Reserve Your Space Now
For May, June, July & Aug.
Absolutely the Lowest PriceS
In Greenville
Let Us Prove This To You! MEMBER
CALL NOW
756-9933
SElF-SERViCE
STORAGE
ASSOCiAmON
- r r � -
��� �? �





Title
The East Carolinian, April 10, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 10, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.469
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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