The East Carolinian, April 8, 1986






Mt
Carolinian
Serving, the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No.48m yv
Tuesday, April 8, 1986
Green vUle,N.C.
ft
to
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Students At UNC
Protesting Investments
Safety Comes First
B HI MBUT IW mt (miw
Choosing an over-the-counter medication should be done with much care. Widespread Tampering
has occurred throughout the United States. To learn how to protect yourself from contaminated
drugs, see related stories on page 1.
Drug Tampering A wareness
By JENNIFER MYERS
staff Writer
Drug tampering ha been in the
news for the past four years, and
due to recent incidents of drug
and food tampering, consumers
have become acutely aware of the
problem.
"The he wa i . j against
drug tampering a- a consumer is
tobeawan � packaging and
tamper resistant features said
Bill Battles ol the Food and Drug
Administration in Greensllle.
"Consume; be auare
and alert to everything, tablet- as
well as liquids. However, not
many true reports of tampering
have been found. Those few have
been serious and highly publiciz-
ed. But after the Tylenol incident
in 1982, there was a heightened
awareness to be more alert
Tamper Resistant Regulations
became effective on May 5.
1983. These regulations govern
manufacturers methods of
packaging drugs. The FDA has
recourses if a manufacturer does
not meet certain qualifications.
Title 18 of the U.S. Code governs
the tampering of consumer pro-
ducts and reporting of false
tampering incidents.
These are violations of a
federal statutes and is punishable
by fines up to $25,000 and im-
prisonment of up to five years. If
injury or death is involved in the
tampering, the punishment could
be life or imprisonment.
The type of products required
to have tamper resistant features
by the Tamper Resistant Regula-
tions are all over-the-counter
drugs except cosmetics and
topical creams, insulin, and
lozenges.
Some of these resistant
features required are: boxes with
glued tops or distinctive tape ovei
the flaps that will tear away the
paper if torn or broken: glued
flaps on all boxes; bottles with
shrink wrap or tape around the
neck highlighted with a specific
manufacturer's seal thai is dif-
ficult to duplicate; a lock-band
on the top, a safety foil seal over
the bottle under the top.
All products are required to
print on the label the
manufaturer's tamper reisitani
method, stated, "For your pro-
tection
"However, even with the state
of the art machinery drug
manufacturer's possess, defects
in packaging still occur said
Battles. Some of these may be:
the foil seal missing with no sign
of foil on the bottle; extra foil
seals with cotton protruding;
neck band torn or loose due to
packaging machinery; broken
tablets, and pills found above the
cotton. If any of these or other
defects are found. Battle says to
take the product back to the store
you purchased it from.
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (UPI)
� Students peacefully encircled
the shantytown they built last
month to protest University of
North Carolina's investments in
South Africa while crews used
crowbars Monday to rip down
the ramshackle structures.
Five students were taken into
custody by campus security, but
no charges were filed, said Sgt.
Ned Comar, campus security
spokesman. Comar declined to
identify the students because they
were not charged.
About 300 peolpe gathered
around the shanties in two
circles, holding hands and singing
"We Shall Overcome as a 7
a.m. deadline set by Chancellor
Christopher Fordham to disman-
tle the wood and tin structures
approached.
No trouble was reported, and
students said the five people de-
tained by campus security had
vowed to be taken into custody to
make a stronger ca?e for their
protests. Students chanted "Let
Our People Go" when campus
security took the five students
away.
Students had vowed to avoid
trouble similar to an incident last
week at the University of Califor-
nia at Berkeley when 90 people
were arrested and 29 injured dur-
ing a clash between police and
anti-apartheid protesters at the
campus's shantytown.
"They've always been peaceful
with this. We haven't had any
problems Comar said.
"And what I mean by peaceful
istheycan get prettyioudbut they
haven't given us any problems
The shanties with a banner
proclaiming "Welcome to
Sometown North Carolina" went
Burrough
up almost three wo go in a ef
fort by students to force
university to divest from all cam-
panies doing business in South
Africa. Conservative students
constructed a mock Berl A all.
made of wood, chicken wire and
sheets, to protest the shanties and
to symbolize oppression in the
communist world.
By early Monday, the wall also
had been taken down
The university has ah.
million of a $92 million p i I
See SECURITY Page 3.
Offers Scholarship
SGA Recognized By
Student Legislature
By PATTI KEMMIS
Assistant News Editor
The Fast Carolina Student
Government won two awards,
best bill by a large school and
best speaker of a Senate, at the
March meeting of the North
Carolina Student Legislature.
The winning bill was written by
SGA member James Caldwell.
Kirk Shelley took the honor of
best speaker.
Also at the meeting, ECU
legislator Glenn Perry was elected
the new state treasurer of the
NCSL.
At the SGA meeting Monday
night, the legislature approved a
transfer of funds for the
Marauders.
The group requested a transfer
to pay for two guest speakers at
their banquet. The proposal
passed by a voice vote.
The campus organization Bac-
chus, which promotes the respon-
sible usage of alcohol, requested
and was granted a transfer of
funds to send their president and
vice-president to a national con-
vention.
Karen Palmer, president of
Bacchus, spoke to the legisture
about the importance of their
group. She said the information
received at the convention would
be valuable to the future of their
group.
President David Brown
reminded legislators about a
public hearing being held
Wednesday night to discuss the
warding system of Greenville.
The proposed warding system
will affect the voting districts of
the city.
The hearing will be at 7:30 in
the City Council Chamber of the
Municipal Building.
By JILL MORGAN
Maff Writer
In association with William
McPherson, Associate Professor
of Industrial Technology, and the
Industrial Technology Depart-
ment here at ECU, Burroughs
Wellcome is offering $43,200 in a
scholarship fellowship grant for
graduate students and advanced
seniors.
Burroughs Wellcome, a local
manufacturing pharmaceutical
company, recently approached
ECU. They recognized their need
tor good people and realized the
benefits of a "good working rela-
tionship between education and
industry McPherson said. They
agreed on the scholarship
fellowship grant.
Applications for the Burroughs
Wellcome grant will be accepted
as long as they are picked up
from McPherson by April 14.
The target is set at May 12 to
begin the project.
Applicants should preferably
be working toward their master's
degree in Industrial Technology.
A committee consisting of bet-
ween four and six persons
representing both ECU and Bur-
roughs Wellcome will select six
students to be awarded $2,400
each for two to three semesters.
In return for the grant the
students will work as a graduate
assistant at Burroughs Wellcome.
Students will work
hours a week at Burrouj
Wellcome on �
projects Examp es
students might di
SOPs (standard
cedures) or
literature.
v holarship Fell v. ship i
recipients will also
ECU academic calendar recei
school holidays
H I (s semester systei
McPherson,
for the :
gram. McPl e
objective rigl
.

peep 6
Wellcome
"Burroughs Wellcome
pilot program. We I
more industries involvt
future � possibly eve . na-
tional level aid McPl
So far 12-15 apphean
been distributed. Ot tl .
students and advanced seniors
applying, six will be sele
the scholarship fellowship gi .
Academic background, work
experience and an interview,
which selected applic � will
have with committee members
representing ECU and Burro
Wellcome, will be considered in
determining who will receive the
$2,400. Interested students are
encouraged to get an application
by April 14th.
Pharmacists Report Repeated Drug Product Tampering
Rv RVTI4 UUirklD
By BETH WHICKER
Asriitaat Newi Editor
For the second time this year
local pharmacists have pulled
boxes of capsule medicines off
area pharmacy shelves.
Moreover, students who use
many of the capsule drugs are ex-
pressing concern as to their own
safety.
"I've been hesitant to use any
over the counter drugs since the
recent widespread activity of con-
tamination said Clair Ward, a
senior sociology major.
"I thought that the Tylenol in-
cident 3 years ago was isolated.
I've been really concerned about
my own safety since the recent
rash of incidents involving con-
taminated capsules said
business sophmore, Mike Espejo.
Boxes of Contac, Dietac, and
Teledrin were recently pulled off
pharmacy shelves, after Federal
Authorities found traces of rat
poison in the products in
Philadelphia.
Tylenol capsules were pulled
from local shelves two months
ago, after a New York woman
took a Tylenol capsule laced with
cyanide and was killed.
Test by the Food and Drug Ad-
ministration found that five cap-
sules at the Smith Kline Beckman
Corporation in Phil (manufac-
turers of Contac, Dietac, and
Teledin) contained traces of rat
poison.
According to Health Eduator,
Mary Elesha-Adams the chances
arc minimal that contaminated
drugs could find their way to the
students medicine cabinet.
"Most of the contamination
occurs in larger cities, it's ob-
viously not done by the same per-
son. I'm not saying that it will
not happen in Greenville, In
situations like this you can never
say any one area is safe said
Elesha-Adams.
See TAMPERING Page 3.
Tour Offers Credit, Variety
By DAWN STEWARD
Staff Writer
On June 25 students,
faculty and members of the
Greenville Community will be
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds8
Editorials4
Features7
Sports10
The only reward of virtue is
virtue; the only way to have a
friend is to be one.
�Ralph Waldo Emerson
flying to Manaus, Brazil for a
twenty-one day exercursion on
"The Grand Brazillian Tour
Brazil is a country encompass-
ing almost five million square
miles � the fifth largest nation in
the world � and larger than the
continental United States. It is a
country with a wide variety of
geographical features and vast ar-
ray of cultural traits. Landscapes
range from the still unexplored
jungles of the Amazon River to
the palm-lined beaches of the
Northeast.
The tour will take its members
to nine of Brazil's cities, offshore
oiling sites and possibly to jewel
mines where much of the worlds
semi-precious stones are found.
Students who go this summer
will receive credit within general
college or geography depart-
ments. Teachers who are striving
to complete certification can use
the tour as well, and students do
not have to be geography majors
in order to participate.
Undergraduate students are re-
quired to keep a diary of their
adventures while graduate stu-
dent must compare two Brazilian
cities in a research paper.
The fee for the voyage is
$2,400 which includes roung trip
airfare from Raleigh, all hotel ac-
comadation, Amazon River
cruise, full Brazilian breakfast
every morning, other meals, and
many other items on the itinerary.
"We feel that this is a reasonable
amount of money, actually it is
See BRAZILLIAN Page 3.
Volleyball On The Mall
J � HI WT�T - Tte I
There b no better way to relax In the afternoon than a healthy dose of enthusiastic sports. Here
students unwind while playing a competed ve game of volleyball.
rt � m- r
� r 0
m I





�EEAST CAROLINIAN
APR1L8, 1986
Announcements
SUMMER JOBS
The most successful people in every
career are those who combine �he knowledge
of their field with people knowledge, leader
ship skills and a professional attitude
If you are looking for an in depth hands
on experience In dealing with people
developing self confidence and making
money tor your college education, the
Thomas Nelson internship Program would
like 'o invite you to an interview today at
3 JO and T n BB 303
The summer is the only opportunity you
fave to Ouiid your resume and distinguish
you from the competition because a diploma
s not enough too get ahead "
INTERFAITH SEDER
The sedar is a r.tual meal celebrating the
first two mghts of the Jewish holiday
Passover The ECU Campus Ministries are
lOinfly sponsoring a model sedar ' tomor
row evening Weds April t at the Baptist
Student union a 6 p m introduction about
the meal ana the Passover holiday will be
given by Rabbi Bonnie koppei Israeli folk
dancing will follow the meal There is no
cost The seder is a fascination ritual and a
valuable experience tor people of all taitris
For more information call 758 MX)
ECU SURFING
The contest Easter Sunday went good
ECu 41 UNC 2t) We will nave one more
� on'est th,s semester against UNC W m
W.immgton The date has not yeat been set
so tay posted There will be a meeting the
Thursday n.ght before the weekend of the
tontest
GONE DOWN LATELY
The Coral Reef Dive Club will be holding a
"eet.ng Wed Apnl � from 5 6m
Mendenhaii 5 Multipurpose room April
13th s First Annual Diver Down Sprng Bash
with the Amateurs will be discussed AH
'hose interested m loaning this leading
organization are invited Members are ask
eo �o attena
MASSAGE!
The Physical Therapy Club is having a
massage clinic on Tuesday, April I The
place is the Betk Building on Charles St
troms �� x Coat is tl tor 10 minutes Con
tributlons will be made to charity
METHODISTPRESBYTERIAN
FELLOWSHIP
m place of our regular Wednesday Night
Supper we will be participating m the inter
faith 'sedar" sponsored by the ECU Campus
Ministries Weds evening at A p.m at the
Baptist Student union
SOCIAL WORK AND
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
M S W social work program open house
for anyone interested in finding out about
ECUS new Master of Social Work Program
all invited Thursday. April 10, 1-4p.m room
344 Mendenhall
SPRING SYMPOSIUM
The French, German, Italian, and
Spanish Collection at the North Carolina
Museum of Art " Featuring Joseph P Cov
mgton. Director of Education, North
Carolina Museum of Art April 10. lUpm
Brewster B 703 Auditorium Reception to
follow Ifl Brewster B lu3 Open to the public
RESUME WORKSHOP
When looking tor a iob. will you need a
resume to highlight your education and work
experience? Receive a worksheet and see
samples to develop your own personaliied
resume at the Career Planning and Place
ment Service workshops at 3 p m on either
April 10 or 14 Mark your calenders for either
of these programs
INTERVIEWING WORKSHOP
To get the right tob or career, you might
spend an hour now to hear about some ways
to make an interview situation an enioyabie
ano enlightening experience Mark your
calendar to come to the Career Planning ano
Placement Service at 3p m on either April 9
or 15
CHESS
Interested in playing chess? Call 75 3314
SPRING REVIVAL
ON CAMPUS
Spring Revival will be held on campus m
Jenkins Auditorium April 11 12, 7 30 p m
and April 13. at 10:30 p m You are invited to
help us praise the Lord!
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
Muggers and buddies needed for the local
Special Olympics Spring Games to be held at
E B Aycock Jr High School on Friday
April 25 from 9am�2pm For more inform
tian can Bill Twine at 753 4137x101 or Connie
Sappenfield at 355 5417
ECU MARCHING PIRATES
Col or guard auditions! I Flag and rifle posi
tions for 1B6 season Saturday. 19 April, 1 4
p m Saturday, 2 April, 1 4 p m Sunday
May 4 2 5 p m Any questions call Tom
Gootsby 757 am or Tracey Hedrlc 7JB-9B77
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
M�mbers Remember our Pig Pickin
Sat day, April 1? at 5 � p m Directions
are vailable at the accounting dept office
3rd floor Rawl Be sure to come for fun and
feast
BLACK GRADUATE
SUPPORT GROUP
The Biack Graduate Support Group will
meet Tuesday. April Ith a' 5 p m in
Mendenhall room 23 All interested persons
may attend Any questions call Dwight at
7 52 9367
GOLDEN GIRL TRYOUTS
Saturday, April 19 io a m ipm Sunday.
April X. 1 p m 5pm Main Looby, Fletcher
Music Building Any questions call Tom
Goldsby 757 6902 or Betsy Mlddleton
756954
NURSING STUDENTS
You are invited to attend the 19M Issues in
Nursing Convention to be held on April 16
and April 23 in the Nursing Bldg , room 202
See what's happening In Nursing today'
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Attention! We ttave a meeting Wed , April
19lh in room 349 at 3 It is very important
that you attend, because we will be discuss
ing the election of offices for next year, our
Spring Banquet and award nominations will
be taken for the most outstanding senior,
PBL service award, and the highest
scholastic average The winners of these
awards will be announced at the Banquet It
is therefore important for all members to at
tend this meeting
VETERANS CLUB
The Veterans Club will meet on Wed
April 9th at 7 30 p m in room 221
Menoennall This is an IMPORTANT
meeting We will be nominating officers for
the IS 66 calendar year And we will also be
discussing some very unique ideas This is a
very special meeting Come on out and io�n
us and bring a friend Also, we are going to
attend the ECU vs Carolina Chapel Mill
home game on April 10 it you want to be a
part of a great time Do it!
ZETA PHI BETA
We will be selling study Buddies at the S'u
dent Supply Store on Wednesday from I until
STUDENT STORES
Microcomputer
Product Fair
IBM and Apple Computer
Products Demonstrated
Company Representatives
Available For Assistance
And Information.
Date: Tuesday, April 15,1986
Watch For Additional Information In The
April 10 Issue of The East Carolinian
STUDENT STORES
East Carolina University
Wright Building
Security Stops Students at UNC
Continued From Page l.
invested in those companies. But
the businesses operating in South
Africa, a nation controlled b an
apartheid government abide by
guidelines that prohibit
discrimination in employment,
said Wayne Jones, associate Vice
Chanellor for finance.
The university's endowment
committee met last week to hear
students arguments for and
against the investments, but
decided to delay action on divest-
ment.
Bryan Hassel, student body
president, said he did not believe
the shanties would be resurrected
but said students would not let
the issue of university in-
vestments in South Africa and
racism die. He said students
believe a two pronged attack has
serve their purposes now.
"It seems to be we need to go
in two different directions to con-
tinue this upfront protesting and
making sure this issue stays
alive Hassel said. "The shor-
coming of that is that it doesn't
get people to change their mind.
The second route is to see what
strings we can pull to get the
board to change its mind.
"The public and private attack
they have to be parallel he said.
"They can't be going off in dif-
ferent directions
2 Pieces of Chicken
(Original Recipe- or
Extra CrispvTM
1 small mashed potato
and gravy
1 Biscuit
I Medium Drink
COUPON
FOR ONE COMPLETE
2-PIECE PACK
COMBINATION
We Do Chicken Right
.COUPON-�H
WZMB
Brings to you LIVE
East Carolina Baseball
Mike Small and Joseph White
Call the Action LIVE from Harrington Field
Listen to 91.3 WZMB
for the times and dates of the broadcasts
Our Prices Are
Really Cookin
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r33.
OPEN 24 HOURS
EVERYDAY
'
BANQUET OR
LIGHT
Coors
Beer
,
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE
$135 MILLION plus in financial aid went
unused last year. Freshmen, Sophomores,
ongoing graduate students; fcr help
cashing in on your share of those funds,
call Academic Data Services toll free
1-800-544-1574, ext. 639, or write P.O. Box
16483, Chattanooga, TIM 37416.

tioote
12
Oz
Bits
SAVL�.
wieners
�ij"
GREAT FOR
COOK outs:

V
Serve-n-Save
Wieners
Stye
iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
GENUINE
12
Oi
HELP WANTE D
NEWS LAYOUT PERSON
NEEDED
Please apply at The East
Carolinian, 2nd floor, Publications
Building, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Experience helpful, but not
necessary.
Ground
Chuck
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CHERRv CAFFEINE FREE
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Coca
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potato sala;
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269
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69

SANDY MAC
PINK LABEL
CHEESE DOODLES OR
NATURAL OR RlDGlES
Wise
Chips. j-t
757-6366
The East Carolinian is an equal opportirity employer.
MFHV
Multigrain
Bread
Boiled
Ham
24
Ox.
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items and Prices
Effect thru sat
April 12. 1966
Iroger vmon
Oanoty warm �� mt
mane sow To own
CHEESE MUSHROOM
SAUSAGE OR PEPPERONi
SINGLE TOPPING
Thin Crust
Pizza
$
�-on r�2 5
&H- J 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
g�fpg3S 1600 Greenville Blvd. - Creenvin
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Scholarsh
B l)v slhWAKH
5tfl Writer
Blacl Facu
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them and what can tx
Everyb
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Allerg
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People with se
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Applicatioi
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THh I AS I AKOl IN! AN
APKII 8 1986
5NT STORES
-ocomputer
�duct Filr
plc Computer
ts Demonstrated
ty Representatives
"For Assistance
ormation.
U April 15,1986
)to Information In The
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olina University
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Scholarship Offered To Students
B DAWN STEWARD
staff Writer
On April 26. the organization
ol Black Facult) and Staff of
lei along with various black
student organizations, the E l
Black Alumni, and citizens of the
Pitt Greenville black community
will sponser the third annual fund
sing benefit foi the 1 edonia
Wright Memorial Scholarship al
� p m at Mendenhall
The committee designed the
scholarship for black stude
tending ECU with acadei
merit and careei potential as
criteria foi I annua
O t h e t qua I cat
undergraduate appl include
a minimum ol J2 �urs
and a current overa g ad point
average ol 2 5.
. in
graduates and modi, a
students on the basis
di idual n i
foi applications is April 1H, 1986.
Applications may be picked up
from any black faculty member.
Since the awarding of the first
scholarship in 1984, six recipients
have recieved scholarships for
M) per scholarship.
I Ulis ML Priolt, a graduate ol
ECU'S medical school; Madge I
Barnes, a senior medical student;
and Belinda Atkinson were
among the first to recieve funding
through the scholarship program.
The scholarship is a memorial
to the late I edonia Smith Wright
who died in June 1976, She was a
member of the faculty in the
1 CU School of Allied Health and
Social Professions; and an active
counselor of minority students.
Resource for the scholarship
come from contributions, the
patron donation is SIC "The
re people who contribute, the
re allotments there are to be
ewarded " explained Barbara
Himes ol ECl Psychology Dept.
and Public Relations chairman
for I WMS.
The 1986-87 scholarship will be
awarded out the fundraising
benefit at Mendenhall. Entertain-
ment will feature jav vocalist
Julie Palmer, artist in residence
at Pitt Comm. College. Con-
tributors to the fund will have an
opportunity to win one of three
door pries. First prize will be a
cruise to the Bahamas; second
prize is a $l(X)gift certificate, and
third prize is a dinner for two. A
reception will follow the pro-
gram.
Individuals or organizations
who desire further information,
should contact Jacqueline
Hawkins, President ECU
organization of Black Faculty
and Staff (757-2499)-
ALL ABOAARRD
r
Brazillian Tour Planned
Ticket Good for
HOBO SANDNMCH
Only $2.85
Ribcyt.beeae, Grilled ' n
French f nes
or
HAMBURGER (14 b) �
Lettuce, ! mai Frei hRies ff qq
Clip & Bring to XT( STATION
Continued From Page 1.
very cheap for the quality of
hotels and trips planned" ex-
plained Pamela Leahy , orgainzer
for the tour and member of
ECU'S staff.
"The purpose of the tour is to
make Americans aware of what
exists m the largest countrj of the
Western Hemisphere" Leahy
continued, adding that "Brazil is
a very peaceful country We have
had no hijackings there so no
danger from terroists exists like
in Europe
rhe Deadline to sign up for the
tour is April 15,1986. All
students who wish to go must
first sign up in the geography
department and secondly obtain
a visa.
Stop Your Train At
XTC
STATION
CAROLINA EAST MALL (Across from KL.RR Drugs)
Breakfast SUPER TASTE TRIP T ICKET! Dinner
Tampering Discussed
Continued From Page 1.
According to Flesha-Adams,
fatalies can be reduced by mere
education before taking any drug
that is purchased over the
counter Before taking any drug
for the first time you should
throughly read the direction and
be familiar with the potential side
effects.
Upon purchasing an over the
counter drug the buyer should
most importantly check the seal
to be sure that the medication is
sealed tightly and not cracked or
torn in anv fashion. Look tor
evidence of tampering around the
seal. If any thing looks suspicious
the drug should be taken back to
the place of purchase Elesha-
Adams said.
Elesha-Adams stressed that
vomiting may or may not be
helpful if one thinks they have in-
gested poisinous substances
The substance may or may not be
fatal. Do not wait around to find
out. If you think you've ingested
a harmful substance you should
go either to the Student Health
Center or to the Emergency
Room immediatelv.
Mexican Restaurant
Lunch Special
Everj spring I am bothered b
allergy symptoms. What causes
them and what can be done?
I reatmenl ol milder allergy
itoms includes;
� Use tamines to relieve
al discharge, sneezing and
� Keep your room or apartment
ee bv wiping surfaces with
p cloth (to keep dusl
ig).
� Keep -1- i dows closed and use a
1 editionei
'i� void outside activities during
are i� e, youthe pollination season � you will
iknow when it is here because
.everything outside becomes
ivered in the powdery, yellow
K()RT1()S UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGKANCY
�. - - �
. . ' est, Birtl
and Problem Pregna ding. 1
. . trce
numbei : BOO 5 5384) bei -
� - . Genera e ia available.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Chicken Tostada
$3.25
757-1666
� . " COTAr, HI -REET
VNTOWN GREENVILLE
V
c ntributing to this health col-
were John Goforth M.D
yeai medical student al
C'l . and Pamela Goforth R.
vaccine nurse at the SHS.
norixniiiiainnrnriiiiiniiiimnnnimmiii i i i i i �,
NATIONAL M:�S


3acKLDooi
Thur April 10
� ��
The Health C olumn By
Man Flesha dams
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tain cl - ;he'
-
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car
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substance has a re.
ie body, sue
ng difficulties
the most common allergen-
elude tree and grass pollen, m
tag weed, dust, pets, food,
� person may also be allerj
mly ne allergei several
;rgens. Skin testing and
scratch testing are the mosi ac
curate way to detei m
allergens, although the per-
allergy history may also be
helpful.
Allergy treatment is designed
give relief of the symptoms.
iple with severe allergies.
.sever, may be given allergy
vaccines which contain small
amounts of the allergic
substance. This helps the person
to become desensitized (nonreac-
tive) to the substance.
Watch for details on the
2nd Annual East
Carolinian - WZMB
softball game scheduled
for April 27!
P.S. Hey WZMB, our team
is ready. You bring the
cups (at least 21) and
( we'll bring the rest
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A
(Ufa Saat aiaroltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender. o�,r���,
i w Stone , wa�i ui�
Mike Ludwick, v� �� Greg Winchester, 00,� a,
Scott Cooper, �� mm Anthony Martin, �, cm �-ir
Daniel Mai'rek. &�s Meg Needham, ��.�.�,�
John Shannon, &� Shannon Short, � t4,nattr
DeChanii e Johnson. ����� Debbie Stevens, ���,
April 8, W86
Opinion
Page 4
Dump Site
Nuclear Waste In N. C. ?
Plans for building a high-level
nuclear waste dump in North
Carolina are still under considera-
tion. In fact, according to some in-
dications, those plans are being
taken een more seriously now than
they were previously.
According to Dr. Joe Beck,
Director of Environmental Health
at Western Carolina, two sites are
presently under consideration in
North Carolina. One is located six
miles outside the Asheville city
limits and six miles from Smokey
Mountain National Park. It would,
incidentally, also be only 15 miles
from the Cherokee Indian Reserva-
tion. The other site is located just
outside of Raleigh.
The waste dump will be designed
to house high-level radioactive
waste both from the Department of
Defense and the civilian nuclear in-
dustry. In order to do that the
dump will consist of man-made
tunnels dug 1,000 to 2,000 feet into
granite rock formations.
Presumably such a design will pre-
vent the leakage of radioactive
material into the surrounding en-
vironment.
But, the current plans for basing
dump sites in North Carolina have
gone unchallenged. According
to Jackson County Commissioner
Veronica Nicholas more than 300
people testified in opposition to the
proposed dump site in Asheville last
Friday. Between 60 and 80 spoke
out against the proposed site in
Raleigh. And citizens all over the
state will have an opportunity to
voice their opinions on the dumps
ie coming May 6 primary.
Dr. Joe Beck, Director of En-
nrnental Health at Western
Carolina University, speaks for
many when he talks about the
dangers associated with basing a
nuclear waste dump in the Asheville
area. To begin with, Beck says, the
ignious rock formations that the
Department of Energy (DOE)
wants to bury the waste in are riddl-
ed with cracks and fissures. Beck
cites the existence of hot springs as
evidence of fissures. To even have
hot springs, he says, there have to
be cracks at least 6,000 feet deep in
the rock formation. Thus, there is a
danger of leakage into the surroun-
ding environment.
If a leak occurs, Beck adds, the
groundwater of the Piedmont and
Tennessee could be
contaminated.This is true because
the mountains of North Carolina
house the headwaters for many
rivers and streams that flow east
and west.
An additional risk factor, accor-
ding to Beck, is the danger of in-
creased radiation levels due to the
release of radon gas as a result of
mining for the tunnels to house the
waste. Radon gas is a radioactive
by-product of the decomposition of
granite.
Beck adds that Western North
Carolina has a relatively high earth-
quake potential and has been sub-
ject to floods. Such factors, he sug-
gests, should in themselves render
the Asheville area unsuitable for
consideration as a potential dump
site.
Building the dump site, Beck
says, will result in economic hard-
ship for people who live in the
Asheville area because of its effects
on the tourist industry and on the
area's future growth.
"Congressman (Bill) Hendon's
office came up with data showing
that 47 percent of tourists would
stop coming to our area if the dump
is located here Beck told The East
Carolinian. "The economic im-
pacts are already hitting us. People
are avoiding buying property here,
according to realtors in our area
he added.
Dr. Trenton Davis, Professor of
Environmental Health at ECU, said
that many of the same dangers pos-
ed by the location of a nuclear
waste dump near Asheville would
also hold true if one were to be bas-
ed near Raleigh. The primary factor
suggesting that such a dump should
not be based near Raleigh, accor-
ding to Dr. Davis however, is the
fact that the Raleigh area is a highly
populated and growing area.
Yet both Davis and Beck agree
that nuclear waste must be disposed
of somewhere. Preferably, of
course, North Carolina will not be
one of those places.
Perhaps, government land that
has already been ravaged by radia-
tion such as that in Nevada or Utah
might be used for such a purpose,
as Beck and Davis suggested.
Whatever the ultimate solution to
the waste disposal problem, it is
clear to us that North Carolina is
not suited to house nuclear waste.
ECU students have an opportunity
to voice their opinion on the matter
in a referendum on May 6. We urge
them to vote against the dump.
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MAROJUES
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Campus Forum
Response To' Hooligans At State
This letter is in response to the lei
ter written by Robert Shaw of Green-
ville printed in the East Carolinian on
March 27, 1986.
Mr. Shaw attempts to point out
that N.C State is the true violent
school in question concerning the
"fence incident My personal
knowledge of this situation is limited
so, unlike Mr. Shaw, I will not judge
on insubstantial information. M:
Shaw attempts to distinguish NCSU
as more violent than ECU by the level
of NCAA Basketball chaos at State.
First of all, let the record show that in
the aftermath of the N.C. State Na-
tional Championship victor) on Apni
4. 1983, (yes, I was there, Mr. Shaw,
as an NCSU student) it was
discovered that the vast majontv oi
arrests involved non-NCSU persons.
Two of the largest groups of non-
NCSU perpetrators involved Raleigh
residents (which State cannot be
responsible for) and other college
students (such as ECU and UNO
who made the road trip to Raleigh for
a "free" display of violent behavior-
knowing that N.C. State would be
blamed. Violence by other students
must be dealt with by the UNC
system and is not the sole respon-
sibility of NCSU. As far as the local
residents are concerned, consider
what would happen if the Pirate foot-
ball team won the National Cham-
pionship in a bowl game next year (a
major miracle). Greenville would go
bananas to say the least. Do vou real-
ly think that ECU could restrain the
residents of all of the local counties in
this area who are so hungry for a
local athletic triumph of this
magnitude?
As fas as being "step-children" is
concerned, I agree with Mr. Shaw.
ECU has a lot to offer the UNC
system. But, let's be realistic. Do you
really think NCSU cares about the
ECU game? Their main priorities are
spelled C-A-R-O-L-l-N-A, D-U-K-E,
& W-A-K-E. ECU is an afterthought
at best. You can even see that here in
Greenville. I dare say that you can
find more UNC, NCSU, and Duke
shirts on campus than ECU shirts.
Even the students a: East Carolina do
not consider ECU in the same level as
the Big Four schools. And it makes
me sick. The students here don't ap-
preciate what they've got. ECU will
be a "step-child" as long as the
students think that way.
Uastly, before anyone can judge
any violence at N.C. State, walk a
mile in their shoes. N.C. State basket-
ball has a lot of national exposure.
Several N.C. State basketball games
were broadcast by NBC. Imagine be-
ing a State student and seeing
yourself on national t.v. as the
camera scans the crowd. Do you
think ECU will ever experience such
elation considering the current state
of ECU athletics? Not in our lifetime!
Who is the Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion anyway? Event the coach of the
CAA's best representative, Navy,
said that a final eight appearance was
a "fluke If our best representative
was a national fluke, what's ECU?
Locally mediocre? You want to be
considered equal to State? Our
basketbsll team couldn't even beat
Wake Forest, the lowliest ACC team
with no victories against NCSU �
level competition.
R. Milton Howell, III
Accounting
Nuclear Waste
We would like to encourage all
citiens to join in the effort to prevent
the placement of a high level nuclear
waste repository in North Carolina.
Of the twelve locations selected by
the United Stares Department of
Energy (D.O.E.) as potentially accep-
table sites for the repository, one is 12
miles from the center of Asheville,
and one is 17 miles from the center of
Raleigh.
If either of these sites is finally
selected, the economic and en-
vironmental balance of our state
would be irrevocably altered. A high
level nuclear waste dump in the
mountains would threaten the water
supply tor the entire state, not to
mention the entire Southeast. A
dump near Raleigh would permanent-
ly blight the center of the state, sever-
ly damaging the tourist trade and the
value of real estate. Transportation
of this material through our state will
jeopardize the health of all of us,
especially our children, born and un-
born.
People not only in these two areas,
but throughout North Carolina must
work together to oppose this
repository. This state does not need
the stigma of being known as the per-
manent home of high level nuclear
waste
What can we do?
Register to vote in the May 6
Primary, when the referendum on
nuclear waste will be on the ballot.
April ' is the last day to register.
Unaffiliated voters will be able to
vote in the referendum even though
this is a Primary election.
Vote AGAINST the dump on May
6, and encourage everyone you know
to register and to vote AGAINST the
dump.
North Carolinians must send the
D.O.E. the message loud and clear
that we will not accept a nuclear
waste repository. The May 6 referen-
dum is the most poweful tool
available to us to make this message
known.
If you would like to learn more
about this issue or would like to help
in our state wide efforts, please write
to Citizens for Choice on Nuclear
Waste, P.O. Box 653, Dillsboro,
N.C. 28725.
Veronica Nicholas,
Jackson County Commissioner
704-586-5647
Barry M. Nathan, M.D.
704-586-9041
Gordon Says Thanks
In the spirit of Mr. Chris Tomasic,
I would aiso like to thank some key
people who took part in a gallant ef-
fort a couple of weeks ago. A
campus-wide campaign is something
that no one person can mount alone.
In my campaign to becone SGA
Vice-President, there was invaluable
support given to me by a variety of
groups on campus. To Mr. E. Sandy
Hardy and the College Republicans,
you will always be numero uno in my
book. To the ECU delegation to the
NC Student Legislature, I will always
be grateful for your support both
conservative and liberal, alike. To
David Duprec and the IFC, I am ap-
preciative to you for taking me in as
one of your own, though my greek
letters are not of ECU origin. Lastly
but certainly best looking, to the Tri-
Sigs, ADpis, and Chi-Os thanks a
million.
Because of my responsibility as stu-
dent Lt. Governor of North Carolina
to convene the 49th Annual
of the NC Student Senate on M
26th, I could not be here to reprc
myself on Election Day. Accords: .
a reliable source I had about 100
surgates. From the top, Dw-
Mark, Kirk, Stephanie, Trashman,
Molly, Stymie, Thanks tor all
of your help
Lastly, let me say that being a firm
believer in democracy, I would Sd
my running mate, Steve Cunanan,
and to my opponent, Anthonv
Jackson, the majontv has spoil
Steve and Anthonv, vou have a
responsibility to serve the student
our campus to the best of your ability
and furthermore to work togethc
that effort. Steve, Anthony, Eagan
and Stymie best of luck and may God
be with you as you work together to
make the coming year a great one for
all ECU students.
Sincerelv,
Gordon Walker
State Chairman, College Repubh,
ECUOrEZL?
Whenever I'm awav from ECU a.
the subject of colleges comes up. 1
know I'll either have some defending
or explaining to do. No, 1 tell people
You don't get credit for guzzling beer
or smoking dope. True, we like to
party but we study too. And, no,
passing classes is not as easy as
fighting one's way out of a wet paper
bag. And, yes. I'm positive that ECU
is in North Carolina � not south
Carolina. Plus, it's East Carolina,
not Eastern Carolina
However, these days I'm having a
tough time defending or explaii
ECU. We were promised that I
was going agter the best. And wc
discovered what a hollow promise
that was. It seems that "the Best" is
an exclusively male goal and that our
own athletic department couldn't
scrape up the money to send our Lady
Pirates to the WNIT. What a disap-
pointment. And just when I thought
ECU was finally entering the twen-
tieth century.
ECU aiso seems to be a collage of
other colleges. Our pirate was chang-
ed to resemble State's wolf and
Cahpel Hill's ram. Now we're getting
a bell tower. Why? Because UNC-
Charlotte has one. I don't believe the
bull that a bell tower will provide a
place for students to congregate. We
already have several places for that.
What we don't need is more concrete
around here. And that's exactly what
the bell tower will provide. Why
don't we take the money and buy
much needed books for the library? 1
guess we won't be able to do this until
Carolina does.
Of course, ECU did gain some pro-
minence when Ed Emory was fired.
However, students couldn't tell
anyone who asked why because we
hadn't been told. Either the ad-
ministration didn't trust its student
population or it just didn't give a
damn whether the students knew or
not.
I know that by this point you might
be thinking that I'm one of those peo-
ple who constantly badmouth ECU.
Well, I'm not. I've had my share of
heated arguments that I attend ECU
not ECTC or EZU. I have also im-
mensely enjoyed my four years here.
It is because I am proud of ECU that
I want it to be original and unique �
not a college of conformity.
Elaine Whitman
English major
Boyco
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lei aldn't tell
tsked whv because we
In't been told. Either the ad-
ministration didn't trust its student
population or it just didn't give a
damn whether the students knew or
not
1 know that by this point you might
be thinking that I'm one of those peo-
ple who constantly badmouth ECU.
Well, I'm not. I've had my share of
heated arguments that I attend ECU
not ECTC or EZU. I have also im-
mensely enjoyed my four years here.
It is because I am proud of ECU that
1 want it to be original and unique �
not a college of conformity.
Elaine Whitman
English major
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 8,
1S86
Boycott Resu 11sInViolence
JOHANNESBURG, South
Africa (UPI) � Thousands of
blacks voted to resume a crippl-
ing anti-government boycott of
white stores in Krugersdorf, as
weekend racial violence across
the country left at least eight peo-
ple dead.
"They have the guns, we have
the buying power dissident
leader Aubrey Mokoena said
Sunday as a boisterous, but
peaceful cr wdsof about 5,000
sang and danced in Kagiso ghetto
sports stadium about 20 miles
uest of Johannesburg.
The meeting coincided with
weekend violence that resulted in
two people shot and killed by
police and six others burned to
death.
Police had no explanation for
the six burning deaths near Port
Elizabeth and west of Johan-
nesburg, but they appeared to
mirror earlier attacks by black
radicals on black moderates seen
as "stooges" of the white minori-
ty government.
At the Kagiso stadium, dozens
of speakers repudiated govern-
ment claims that the nation's of-
ficial policy of racial discrimina-
tion, known as apartheid, was be-
ing reformed and Mokoema told
the crowd "apartheid cannot be
reformed, it can only be
dismantled
Police monitored the gathering
from a distance, but made no ef-
fort to intervene as the crowd
voted to boycott stores in the
neighboring white town of
Krugersdorf beginning Tuesday.
An earlier boycott was
suspended in December after
three months to give authorities
time to respond to a number of
political demands.
Residents demanded the
removal of troops from their
ghettos; freedom for jailed
African National Congress leader
Nelson Mandela and the resigna-
tion of blacks serving on govern-
ment created local councils.
Similar boycotts have been
staged in other ghettos. Dozens
of white owned stores have been
pushed into bankruptcy and, in
some areas, businessmen have
responded by urging the govern-
ment to speed up its plans to
dismantle aspects of apartheid.
In some areas, however, white
employers have responded by
dismissing black workers and
dozens of blacks have died at the
hands of radical youths seeking
to enforce boycotts.
Saturday, black activist Winnie
Mandela, wife of the jailed ANC
leader, called President Reagan
and British Prime Minister
Margaret Thatcher "friends of
the racists" for not imposing
economic sanctions against South
Africa.
Johannesburg's Sunday Star
newspaper courted possible pro-
secution by publishing the inter-
view, Mandela's first in 11 years.
The government has
designated Mrs. Mandela for
more than a decade as a "listed
person a restriction banning
her from being quoted in the
local media.
The Sunday Star said,
however, its legal advisers believ-
ed the restriction had become in-
valid following a series of recent
Supreme Court rulings against
the government's wide ranging
political security laws.
American Optometrti �-
University Optometric Eye Clinic
DR. DENNIS O'NEAL
Comprehensive Eye Examinations
Contact Lenses
Soft, Hard, Gas Permeable Tinted
Extended Wear, Contacts for Astigmatism
Glasses (One Day Service in Most Cases)
Student & Faculty Discounts on Contacts &
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Evening & Sat Appointments Available
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(Across from campus security)
758-6600
Organization Confronts Teacher
f RMINGDALE, NY (CPS) �
In its ongoing campaign against
"slanted" teaching. Accuracy in
cademia has taken up the cause
ol a student who claims he was
kicked out of class and beaten up
because he questioned a pro-
fessor's viewpoint.
Gerard A. Arthus, a student at
Stale University of New York at
Farmingdale, charges philosophy
Pro James Friel kicked him out
of class for posing what AIA calls
"a question exposing Fuel's ig-
norance
AIA, in a press release about
;he incident, adds Friel later
refused to readmit Arthus to the
lass � despite having a letter
m administrators � and Ar-
thus was removed forcibly from
ir campus security of-
" icers.
But Arthus subsequently also
a as charged by Farmingdale
ce with second-degree
glarj and assault when the
J3-year-old student tried to in-
terfere with the police's question-
ng o a classmate who witnessed
the incident.
SL'NY-Farmingdale officials,
moreover, say they're still in-
vestigating what happened in
Friers class, and are not yet wil-
!irm or deny Arthus'
� ersion o' the events.
For the moment, Michael Vin-
lguerra. the school's vice presi-
dent of academic affairs, believes
"campus police acted totally
an bounds of their respon-
sibilities
"We're still gathering informa-
tion on what actually happened
adds campus spokeswoman
Patricia Hill Williams.
Friel refers all questions about
the incident to campus
authorities, but Les Csorba III,
MA's executive director, actively
asserts Friel was wrong.
"This is a little extreme to have
a student physically removed
m the classroom Csorba
-ayN, adding it's the first incident
he knows of in which a student
has been forced to leave a class
for questioning a professor's opi-
nions.
AIA was founded last summer
to publicize cases in which pro-
fessors promote liberal biases in
class.
To find them, AIA relies on
students to monitor teachers' per-
formances. If a student com-
plains, AIA tries to confirm the
problem exists and then publishes
the offending professor's name in
its newsletter.
Arthus � who describe his
politics as libertarian and
distributes AIA's newsletter on
the Farmingdale empus � main-
tains his only sin was to questions
Fnel's view of technology.
"He is promoting his anti-
technology bias in the
classroom Arthus charges.
Arthus specifically disagrees
with Friel's view that "man has
reached the zenith of his intellec-
tual development, and whatever
he built in science and technology
destroys the environment
Friel "got upset when I con-
fronted him and said he only has
the right to influence the
students Arthus says.
Friel reportedly then asked Ar-
thus, "Do you have anything else
to say? If you do. I'll have to ask
you to leave Arthus contends.
Arthus claims Friel tried to bait
him, but that the student left
peacefully.
The student says he then went
through administrative channels
to be readmitted to class, but that
when he showed up with a
"memo" giving him safe
passage, Friel called campus
security to throw him out
physically.
Arthus says he suffered neck
and back injuries when officers
pushed him out of the classroom.
Other students have told ad-
ministrators Arthus frequently
disrupted the class throughout
the semester, Vinciguerra notes.
Arthus later tried to force his
way into the campus police head-
quarters to talk to a classmate
police then were questioning
about the incident
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The Recreation Committee pes ents
BingoIce Cream Paly
For A Different Film
Koyannisquatisi(nr)
A t the Underground .
Sports Cartoons
Tues. April 8
7:00p.m.
TONITE
Experience . . .
8:00p.m.
Tues April 8
Thurs. April 10
1:30p.m.
Bring Your Lunch !
The Weekend
FRIDAY NIGHT m
Movie . . .
7&9p.m.
Thurs Fri&Sat.
If this movie doesn 7 make your skin crai, then it's on too tight!
Applications Now Available For
Minority Arts Charp erson
and membership ofaU
Student Union Committees
Pick them up at Student Union Office,
Mendenhall
Shop Monday Thoroath Friday 10 �.m. Midi 9 p.m. - Phone 756- B-E-L-K (156-2355) dlNIQUE
�V
gathering place

0 - -





I HI I as! CAROLINIAN
APRIL 8, 1986
Sexual Pressure Common In Hollywood
RADNOR, Pa. (UP1) - Many
Hollywood actresses are sexually
assed hs theii bosses but do
not expose tie problem for tear
being branded a
"troublemaker TV Guide
magazine reported.
"Everybody is afraid. It makes
pie nervous just to talk about
because suddenlv you get
branded as a troublemaker and
suddenlv people don't want you
ind rimothy Blake, head
Screen ctors Guild
W nen's Committee, said in the
!9 issue
TV Guide said the sexual
harassment problem was so
severe the Screen Actors Guild
established a 24-hour hot line to
handle the complaints.
"This town is full of predators.
People think it doesn't exist any-
more but it does. It happens all
the time to almost every girl I
know. This town eats them up
alive and spits them back out old
and useless talent manager
Joan Green said.
Actor Ed Asner, former guild
president, said sexual pressure in
Hollywood was often blatant.
"I know a girl who went to see
an agent and when she walked in-
to his office he closed the door by
pressing one button. He pushed
another button and a bed shot
out from the wall. That's about
as glaring as it gets Asner told
the magazine.
But some show business ex-
ecutives blamed reports of sexual
harassment on women who failed
because of their acting, not for
rejecting their bosses' passes.
Ana Alicia, now a star on
"Falcon Crest revealed her ex-
perience with a television ex-
ecutive.
"1 went to interview for a
series with a man who was a big
name reputable producer. He
said he liked me. He brought me
back three times to read and said
I was perfect for the part Ana
Alicia told TV Guide.
"The last time he brought me
back he closed the door. We were
alone. He told me his wife didn't
understand him. I told him 1
didn't like him in that way. He
turned on me. He said I would
never work in this town again
she said.
Stuntwoman, Jean Coulter
spent 15 years in show business
earning $40,000 or more annual-
ly, but she said she was
blacklisted in 1980 to; turn .
down the advances of a si
coordinator for Spell, .
Goldman-Speilberg Producti
Culture Shown At International Dinner
B WEAVER
Malt Writer
ei for the Inter-
ments Association
k plat e at the Student
ei Saturday night.
exotic foods, served,
d b the students,
were man) cultural
� well as the curious
t i.S.
ould,
eople
. the retiring
h.oped that
" Reach a large
to show them
1 he agenda includ-
entertain-
show.
S pi epared and
evenings ac-
ad beer.
group o 1
the
p mere
. inized
� idents before,
considered an
mil 1974. During
mal House
n b
( hancellor
insistance of
I sident, Jan -
' tl Ron
i fe and
student
� � lved
ind the in-
V a i: as.
beei putting on
shows for
I he dinners
: I o� I e ' to
al House.
�� estei 'here
ght, 'hen
iIranian night the
i he dinners pro-
largc
. .1 I
i iiernant 'iiat
� g a n ized
. � ig night
. i. i held at
iblk has
� � the
i led Wright.
� �'� a m �st 140
ding 1c I
. olunteer are
the Interna-
V iciation said
Norwaj. "Only
wan do this,
dents and faculty did a
organizing this ear's
- the quests arriv-
I very anxious and
a I at was in store
anticipation could
eyes of the quests.
ttions oi superbly
uliural dishes on the
troma oi the dif-
ghts tilled the air and
aste buds of the
were not left
ause there uas such a
. food to be tasted.
� i- sonething there that
: lease each person.
different cultural dishes
led, Tortillas con frijoles
iltas with beans) from Costa
:ak Ienvaki from China,
Create
cleanness.
A litter bit
at a time.
and Chicken with vegatables and
rice from Palestine. Tasting the
exotic flavors and spices only ad-
ded a dimension to the program.
While eating one could turn
and hear a different language be-
ing spoken in every direction.
The language could have been a
barrier to slow the show, but the
audience adjusted easily to the
unusual accents
The students were worried the
quests uould not be impressed bv
the food or entertainment, but
there vvere no complaints.
The entertainment, which
began at 8:tX) p.m consisted of
several native dances and songs.
� rousing Arabian dance started
things off. The colorful and lively
dance was performed h Donna
Whitlex and friends. Rosni
Mohd-Aup and Shanfah Seyed-
Mustapha, both native Malay-
sians, performed a apin dance,
which slightly resembled an
American Folk dance.
An unusual Indonesian Panija
dance uas performed b In-
drauati rjiptorahardjo. Her
costume was made oi iavered silk
and g d, and the outfit was com-
pleted with an elaborate head
piece consisting of gold and felt.
I he final dance oi the evening
represented Palestine. It was per-
formed b Yosef Abul-Hawa and
his friend Zyad Sakar from
Raliegh This dance consisted of
much stomping, kicking, and
smiling.
Dancing was no; the only
entertainment, there also were
several instrumental numbers
performed on the piano, sax-
ophone, and violin. Jean Kidual,
from Keina. sang a popular
Swahili song and accompanied
herself on the guitar
lo finish this cultural evening,
a fashion show was presented b
the students. Jenevieve a visiting
student from France hosted the
show. Different costumes and
outfits were presented from dif-
ferent countries.
The highlights of the show
were a beautiful purple and pink
San complete with veils. A dress
like this would be worn in India
tor special occasions such as wed-
dings
Malavsia was represented by
two outfits, one modeled bv
Shukry Haji-Noor. It was a black
sarong emboidered with gold
threads covering black pants.
Another shown by Seyed-
Mustapha, was called a Ba-
jukebaya. It consisted of a long
skirt covered by a sarong also
sewn with gold threads. Both of
these outfits are worn in Malavsia
tor special occasions.
The Morroccan outfit was a
simple peasant shirt constructed
with blue and white material.
Then an Ethiopian dress, which
should be accompanied by a scarf
covering either the shoulders or
the head, was also modeled.
The Chen Dynasty o' China
allowed a piece of their collection
to be shown, a chainkan dress
made of vivid red satin and orien-
tal printed cloth.
Wrapping up the fashion
show, all of the students who had
modeled returned to the stage to
allow the audience one last look
a: their costumes. The fifteen
costumes represented ten coun-
tries.
To complete the evenings
festivities the retiring President
of the I.S.A Naresh Tolani,
presented awards and gave
thanks to Wright and Pegg)
Balcombe for their help.
fter the show Tolani said, "It
was a success, it was much better
than last vear one reason the
program's organization went
smoothly was due to the fact that
the students began setting up for
the event a day early, she said.
If there are students who are
interested in meeting some
foriegn students or in becoming
cultured the I.S.A. will have a
table set up for "Barefoot on the
Mall April 24. Their exhibil
will include information on the
different cultures and different
costumes will be modeled.
Tequila Bar Weekly Specials
Sunrise Sunday: $2.00 per serve
Melo-Mondays: $2.00 per serve
Toasty- Tuesday: $2.00 per serve
Wednesday: Always Live "Amateurs'
Thirsty-Thursday: Drink & Drown
Fried-Friday: Get Fried Early at our new Attitude Adjw
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Saturday Night Specials
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The HUB

46 Of 752-5046
Exercise is a Natural
l5a High!
Universal Hub Health
Club
618 South Pitta.
April Special � $28.00
Unlimited Club Use
(onern onth only)
Indud es Suntan
Free visit with ad
FREE
RENT
Going Home For The Summer
But Need A Place For The Fall?
Tar River Estates has a summer special for
ECU students � Rent an apt by May 1st &
keep your appartment RENT FREE for June &
July! For details call or come by Tar River
Estates Info Center 1400 Willow St. No. 1.
752-4225
Tired of waiting in line for the phone or shower? Leave the
dorm doldrums behind - there is an alternate. Your own
place at Tar River Estates. Select a one-bedroom garden apart-
ment or a two- or three-bedroom townhouse. Enjoy fully equip-
ped kitchen, washerdryer connections in some apartments,
spacious clubhouse, swimming pool, and picnic area by the
river Conveniently located near East Carolina University -
with SGA Transit service. Come by today or Call:
TarTJiver
752-4225
1400 Willow St
Office Hours
M-F9 00-5 30
Sot & Sun I 00-5 00
Monogedby U S Shelf. Corporation
MEDIA BOARD
is now accepting applications for
General Manager for the 1986-87
academic year for the following: The
East Carolinian, WZMB-FM,
Buccaneer, Rebel, Photo Lab and
Expressions Magazine.
Please apply at the Media Board
office, 2nd floor, Publications Building.
Phone 757-6009. Applications accepted
through April, 16, 1986.
u����tt�,WWWtt,MWWMWWMWwMtw
ECU
B HROI DJO
a
Forma
.Mar,
( arolit
A sv iatiot
In
pie �
ma
v
� J
sele
firs' 75
bah

I .
The t rmati
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ter ' .
whj
pur
VS
Kef lei:
lead'
.
eas
Bra
supr
the

an
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B BK K lo
1 .
V
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SO a
lusi
M
Simers Uanrei
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and
noth
like
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is v.
grams
Th; - -
the
i
oppoi
without
tion -V .
vMth .i i
Cc
"People toda uk Nvw 41
they sound like th truth M��-
rotlon of Conformity � �fj
A





illywood
s foi turning
ices of a stunt
Spelling-
g Productions.
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THE I AM i aroi INJAN
Styje
APRILS, 1986 Page 7
ECU Book Reviewed
B HAROLDJOYNKR
Staff Witta
jm Carolina L'ntversitv: The
motive Years. 1907-1982 By
Mary Jo Jackson Bratton. East
olina University Alumni
issociation, 1986. $22.95 (list),
535 pages.
In attempting to write a com-
e Insets about anything, one
. tend to overwrite or under-
write.
When ECU History Protessor
Mars Jo Jackson Bratton was
selected to write a record of the
st 75 scars at ECU, she pro-
' ab! did not think her work
.sould eser amount to 535 pages.
But Eastarolina L niversity:
The Formative Years manages to
Jehght the reader in finding m-
sting tidbits of information ot
t is now the state's large
blic university.
With the help of the town
al newspaper, The Daily
Reflector. and other town
eaders. a group of men set out to
bring a state-supported normal
school to a small, but growing,
ern North Carolina town.
Bratton calls former N.C.
. senior Thomas Jordan Jars is,
whose efforts to lobby for a state-
supported school began in 1881,
father ot ECU. By 190
when the school was finally
chartered. Jams was "1.
Although the book does give
an accurate account of ECU's
history, the reader may
sometimes beliese he is reading a
long term paper with a lot of
footnotes. But then again, ECU's
history did not happen overnight.
Bratton did not � whether it
was because the book was
nothing more than a promotional
book financed by the University,
or whether she was competing
against time � offer a complete
siess of mans of ECU's times of
dispair.
In describing former ECU
President Leon Ren true
Meadows. Bratton reported what
the other media had seen and
some couri proceedings. A lot of
people still believe Meadows was
not guilty of embezzeling school
funds, but was rather a man guil-
ts of sloppy book keeping.
Because many of the people in-
volved in ECU's darker side are
no longer living, there was no
was Bratton could hase gotten
other viesvs besides newspapers.
In her section, "Trouble Is Our
Middle Name she carefully
writes that the board of trustees
soted to exonerate Dr.
Meadows for what the)
acknowledged ssas an un-
businesslike manner of handling
college and student funds This
may be her attempt to tell to the
informed reader that Meadows
was not as guilt) e town
wanted to beliese he was.
By 1960. ECU was ready to
grow, and with the determination
oi it's sixth chancellor, Leo War-
ren Jenkins, the school ssa-
destined to make an impact in
North Cat
In "The Sign of Leo Bratton
writes "Jenkins seized the oppor-
tunity to focus his talents upon
an institution whose challenge
was great enough to absorb his
energy, and he generated ever
broader visions of achievement
Jenkins' extensive agenda
when taking over former Presi-
dent John Decatur Messick's of-
fice included putting East
Carolina College on the road to
becoming a university. ECU was
then able to offer a broader S
academic curriculum, as well as
introduce sports and social
activities to the college scene.
Bratton devotes more than 100
pages to Jenkins, who became the
only ECU Chancellor to retire.
His long fights with the
legislature, and with the media,
took their toll, but the people in
the state finally began to take
notice that a unisersity was final-
ly established as an eastern North
Carolina landmark.
After Jenkins left office, the
next pet son to take the job would
inevitably have a difficult time
following Leo's footsteps.
rhomas Bowman Brewer
stayed at ECU for three years
before he resigned. Then
Chancellor John McDade Howell
stepped in, and has since, Bratton
wrote, "been called upon to serse
beyond the boundaries of the
particular office to address the
concerns and challenges of the in-
stitute n
ee HISTORY . page 9
An Alternative To The Commercial Mainstream
Koyaanisqaisi lrom the Hop! Indian word meaning "life out of balance") will screen Wednesday
at 8 p.m. in HendrU Theatre. The film makes spectacular use of time-lapse and slow-motion
photography in a cascade of staggering images keyed to Philip (.lass's soaring, reverberant score.
Good French Wines Lurk Among The Aisles
B BECKY TOY
�M�n nin
French ssMies . � i world-
wide as the mosi pre us
wines ' be seen chugging, but
where, other than France, can
sou find a good bottle oi 1 rench
wine without paying twice as
much as it's worth ?
The Great American cers
Store, of course.
Granted, there are some pre
� sks French wines on the shelves.
But names like "White Rabbit"
I "Papillon" should be fairly
eass to asoid � who would drink
Butterfly wine anywas (Okas.
a bunch ol sou would. Fine.
Just don't tell me about it.)
Most French wines which are
worth uncorking sas on the bottle
which region they are made in. (If
you are unscrewing a bottle
"Rabbi! 1986" at this poil
hanj ip!) I his ex a h
burg ideau and

they're places, not kinds.
The two burgundys 1 have
listed this week are similar only in
the region thes hail from. The
grapes used in each are entii �
different, in color, character, and
flavor.
Next time you'i
going foi a gall
burgundy, remember there
sn'i a Burgundy region in
(. alifoi ma, s� wha r al
is selling? Youi guess is as good
as mine, and I'd go foi a bottle
that's a little more honest, it noi
as dirt cheap.
This week's selection:
Sichel: Beaujolais Villages, 1984
Fhis red burgundy . made from
the Gamay grape, comes from
the northern halt oi the region.
Very fruits, with a full bods.
is a sets smooth, palatable table
ssine, especially at S49 a bottle.
Macon Lugny; Pinot Chardon-
na. 1984
� white burgundy, made with
both Pinoi and Chardonnay
grapes, n has a nice, semi-dry
palate, full bodied without being
overpowering. At $6.19 a bottle.
is a trifle ov. the big bucks
side, but it's an excellent wine
and a good buy.
Baron Phillipe de Kuthchild;
Mouton Cadet. 1983
Probabls the best-known
1 � vineyard, the Rothchilds
base beet! producing excellent
wines foi o iry,
subtle rej leaux is a classis
sin � tenl
winers . and a l bottle, its
snob ap i way.
( halt-an de Tigne; Rose d'Anjoy .
1984
A sets popular rose commer-
cially, it can be inconsistent in
quahts. I his inconsistency is due
to the condition of the cork,
which sometimes is too porous.
allowing air into the wine and
spoiling it. Otherwise, this is a
light, semi-drs rose, with a bit of
a bite to the bouquet. At S3.49 a
bottle, this wins the Cheapie-ot-
the-VVeek Award, so now can you
complain ?
Shad Festival Slated For This Weekend
Singers Wanted
Choral Group Re-Formed
By JOHN SHANNON
stvlr txHtur
.Among beginners, amateurs
and those simply shy of voice,
nothing kills the desire to sing
like fierce competition. And
generally speaking, competition
is what college-level vocal pro-
grams are all about.
This week, students who think
. might enjoy singing and per-
iling with a group will have an
opportunity to get involved
without the element of competi-
Tion. Anyone who has ever sung
with a chorus, or would like to
find out what singing with an
ECU chorus is like, is invited to a
special open house with the
University Chorale.
Newly re-formed this year, the
University Chorale offers an ex-
cellent vehicle for the talents of
ECU's unsung vocalists.
"Students needn't be afraid of it
being too advanced said direc-
tor Rhonda Fleming. "No audi-
tion is required
The group, which currently
consists of about 55 students,
performs often. "We have a tour
each spring in which we sing at
various high schools across the
state said Fleming. "We also
gise several concerts each year at
ECU. We gave one at Christmas
and we're gising one again Friday
April 25th The concert will
begin at 7 p.m. in Fletcher Recital
Hall.
The University Chorale meets
at noon. Monday. Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday in
room 105 in the music building.
This week's meetings are devoted
to an Open House, and all in-
terested students are encouraged
to come and find out what the
group has to offer. Again, no
audition is required.
1 h week 5 id festival
weekend, and also when Halley's
Comet will be closest to Farth.
be s isi -
hie in the i of the
I s - i MI 1 to
Grifton and have some fun at this
small town's annual party
welcoming springtime.
Far-fetched stories and far-out
tales will be fun to tell and listen
to as young people and adults try
to out-lie one anothei at the
"Fishy Talcs" Storytelling (or
Liar's) Contest Wednesday.
Frophies will be given in Fish
Story and in Fall I ales (non-fish
subjects) in both adult and south
divisions, rhere is no entry fee
and tw o ol the 12 winners will ap-
pear on television the following
morning.
The close ol the Hickory Shad
fishing competition Wednesday.
a Shad Queen Pageant and
"Shad-O" (Bingo) on Friday are
the other early Shad Festival
events. Everything else happens
on Saturday and Sunday.
Events running throughout the
weekend are a Craft Show, a Flea
Market, an Art Show, Tradi-
tional Folk Skill demonstrations
at the drift on Historical
Museum and at the senior citizens
center, tournaments in tennis and
I golf, and kiddie rides.
Saturday events include a
parade, a community band con-
cert, clogging, bluegrass music.
break dancing, a street dance, a
horseshoe tournament and
games.
Sunday events are a 2T-mile
bicycle race, three canoe races in-
cluding a new division for racing
canoes, an archers tournament,
and the "Spring Shad Run
footraces in 1-mile. 2-mile, and
10 km. Barbecue will be served
from noon to 3 p.m.
At the Information Sousenir
building on the Town Common
free brochures will be given out
with a detailed schedule of
events, history of the town and
festival, fishing map, words to
the official Shad Festival Song,
and traditional recipes for
regional foods served at the Shad
Festival. On the colorful cover is
a little fisherman with a sers
long, Pinocchio-like nose from
which dangles a fishing line with
a tiny fish. The little man is look-
ing up in surprise as Halley's
Comet flashes by trailing a sign
which says "Eat Mo' Shad
"Mo Shad" is a mythical folk
hero whose bony image has been
preserved on T-shirts and other
official souvenirs. He was born
as graffiti created by a phantom
artist in late 1974 on the cement
counterweight of an old
drawbridge over Grifton's Con-
tentnea Creek. Among Mo's
descendants are "Mozod" who
resembles Izod Alligator in size
and habitat.
Mo Shad's home, Contentnea
Creek, is a popular canoeing and
fishing stream and one of several
prime hickory shad spawning
area.s in eastern North Carolina.
Approximately 20 hickory shad
are caught in Grifton to each of
the larger and more edible
American shad. It was this an-
nual migration home of the small
and very bony hickory shad
which "spawned" the idea of a
springtime festival for all ages
and interests, using the shad as a
coordinating symbol.
Many events have names sug-
gestive of fish or shad, and
several events are included just so
puns around fish could be used
for their names. An example is
the Grifton form of bingo which
is on special cards marked S-H-
A-D-O. "Fishy Tales "Spring
Shad Run" and "27 miles up the
creek with just a pedal" for the
bicycle race are other examples of
the fun.
(Grifton is a small town on NC
11 and NC 118 between Kinston
and Greenville. Schedules of
events may be had by calling
919-524-4075 or writing Grifton
Shad Festival, Box 928, Grifton,
NC 28530.)
Bands Rock For Democracy
Corrosion Of Conformity
"People today ask fewer questions accepting the excuses on TV They repeat the lies until
they sound like the truth Mad world we Ye living in a mad world � from "Mad World" by Cor-
rosion of Conformity, who will appear along with Unseen Force Thursday night at New Dell.
Bv JOHN SHANNON
MiHta
If Democracy as it stands is in
need of a shot in the arm, it will
be interesting to see how it reacts
to a full bods slam. "Rock for
Democracy" will challenge
Greenville to stand up and dance
for its political beliefs, and if the
concertevent fails to catalyze the
community into passionate in-
volvement, well, it won't be the
first time.
Corrosion of Conformity and
Unseen Force, two "hard-core"
rock groups, will provide the
power and the draw behind the
benefit for the Students for
Economic Democracy (S.E.D.), a
campus organization formed les
than a year ago. Corrosion of
Conformity, a band from
Raleigh, is well known nationally
in the underground circuit on the
strength of their live perfor-
mances and two albums � Eye
for an Eye, on No Core records,
and most recently Animosity on
the Enigma label.
"The idea behind S.E.D. is to
raise the political and social con-
sciousness of ECU students
said Steve Sommers, organizer of
the event.
"We've been working hard on
this project for about three
weeks Sommers said. "In addi-
tion to the music, literature con-
cerning different issues such as
Nicaragua, anti-Apartheid, and
the economy will be available
free. Also, Mike Hamer may
speak to the crowd between
bands
The event will function as a
membership drive, too. "We on-
ly have 15 members now said
Sommers. "Organizing new
events for next semester, such as
a possible Nicaragua awareness
rally, with guest speakers, would
be a lot easier if we had more
members
Corrosion of Conformity and
Unseen Force are donating their
talents to the benefit, so proceeds
will go toward improving the
S.E.D. Rock for Democracy
will begin at 9:30 p.m. Thursday
at New Deli, with a $3 cover
charge. The event won't be
dominated entirely by political
invective, by any means. Accor-
ding to Sommers, "We intend to
have a lot of fun
- '
� m nm Mg






8
I HI I AMAK(U INKS
APRILS, 186
Classifieds
i
: PERSONALS
$COTT: Luau and this past weekend
tere too much fun! Glad you got out
�f it alive, now I know that you can
Hang with the best. Looking forward
p AAosier s this Saturday (maybe we
should do something non alcoholic
for a change!) Anne.
AOTT: Luau'86 was loads of fun A
didn't stop partying 'til way past
ne it seemed like thr, weekend we
tever stopped drinking bee but
Jon't stop now Mosier's Farm is
Jirnost here!
fO AOTT LUAU SURVIVORS
few, the proud THE WORkEWS1
ead on.
TODO K Question How many
degrees did the Jacuzzi rise vs
you worked your date7 Answer So
nigh you mildewed!
SCOTT: What can we e v
say Don't worry you're not a
snaker, you're a HOPPER!
ROBERT: Where ARE your shoes?
JAMES: In the popcorn pope- '
tbe refrigerator, on the stove, in �
oaby pool And Mabel was with us
'hrouah it all!
MICHAEL: Don't think you I
make James take his pants of I
clean them cause ou did1
mother!
KAREN: Next Luau instead �
a walker will be a better aw �
SIGMAS: Congrats on win . �
Capp Field Day' AOTT'S
TOM: Thanks for such a 1 I � �
i-uau1 Remember your pr
�ibout "X " Lev
ANNE LEIGH: Dates
te snaked Work r
ROCK N ROLL DELTASIGS
.vasa beach weekend a'
Parfy up! Get bent! At- are 1
inoroll party! it'scasual.
jotbusted for sleer
t' � nd!
TO THE CAROLINA SURF CLUB
CRONES: Oui first day on ��
ome ' i r e Omegas wi
vs the sun wenl down and .�
fd II e oeer, the Came- I
new was nea Our firsl
�vas kind of a boi
eft Margo home to snore "� � �
me dinner f was :
�.e er th e a littu
ias r itm rwliftififiinrJ men
e some h a H .
to ���
.ve -�
� �
Bronze "
-AMBDA CHI ALPHA HILTON
HEAD : Proofs ff the I
� - rdet
'
OO TOU GO DOWN' ��
:iee Dive Clul
Beefing W , ��
.e- je
Apr 3 r rsi .� . nua D Vi .
pr ng Bash v. �� �
e discussed, am those
c ning "the
slwnewhere an
are askeo to atte
EXTENDED DAY! L IS1
-lass portra,ts will be Api
r.m for faculty . �
Jfcderclassn ��� Portra I
are still going it the Bucca
rffice
SPRING BREAK The Buccaneer
? looking for pictures or slides
black and white or color;
,pr ng oreak vacation. Come Dy the
Buccaneer office, 2nd floor, Pubi.ca
'�ons Bida
BACKED BY THE POWER OF
JOBA: The ALPHA SIGS are once
again Tug of War champs. Way to
go BIG GUYS!
CAUSE I'M A SOROOU OOP: Did
we work the beach or what? Truth or
dare, who's boomin' who, festive
outfits and photo sessions on the
pier And scandalous too. Who WAS
"in that bed Exploding radiators, eek
plastic surgery, pyramids and
cheers you'd do what where? Than
indignant man at the gas station who
tagged him and his Cu
Boom, Boom and Boom
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA SIG
AND DELTA ZETA: Winners of
Tug O War from Sigma Tau Gam
ma.
GREEK HAPPY HOUR: With
Sigma Tau Gamma and Delta Zeta
at the Treehouse 8 p.m. Wednesday
night
PI KAPPA PHI: Would like to ex
SS their sincere appreciation to
the young women of each sorority
took the time to answer our
public relations questionnaires last
month Your suggestions and com
its vere found to be very helpful
PANTANA BOB'S CRAZY TUES-
DAY HAPPY HOUR: With the Pi
Kapps will be jammm' tonight
e out and have a blast with the
Pi Kapps and their special guests,
Beaver Cleaver, Lumpy Wiliford,
'av'ior. Barney Fife and
Quest George Jetson. Don't
on the excitement
PI KAPPA PHI CONGRATULATES
KAPPA SIGMA FRATERNITY
AND SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA
SORORITY: On their 1st place
lishes at Pi Kapp Field Day We
ke fo thank everyone
oated om making it a
ver , for all
KAPPA SIGMA. There will be a lit
: tomorrow at 5
RAFFLE lsl prize Peugo pipeline
� '� e) or cash
nd prize $75. Buy your
� r- gma Phi Epsiion
ig to be held at Pan
mis great op
� � e and fortune.
CONGRATULATIONS TO ALPHA
SIGMA PHI AND SIGMA SIGMA
SIGMA g the Sigma Phi
Bol s Chugging
CHE R night. K Bud Pitchers,
c 16 oz. wine
Apr ! 9 from 9 1.
,i puke
concerts e your pictures or
erts in N C
'986 Buccaneer
N �s etc Recogni
0 credit w ll be given.
k" 6501
REWARD My son. Christopher
in, was a first
' it ECU He was
' � )bile accident on
His High School
� ed while in
t Aas a 1985 Wilkes
chool ring and his in
� re engraved in it. The
: ' which is light
us reward is offered
� -eadmg to the return
�� will be no ques
m a widow and Chris
and the return of
would mean so much.
Freeman, P O Box 248,
' � N C 286'v '
WANTED
WHITE FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: immediately! Rent $88
' es Call 758 0655
IOW HIRING: HANK'S
HOMEMADE ICE CREAM: 321 E.
Beside Wendy's Day and
ning shift Apply in person.
Welcome Students
& Faculty
SPECIALS
All You
Can Eat
Any one, or any combination of 4
Shrimp � Oyst�rt � Trout
Clam Strips � Devil Crab
Ocean Perch � QQ
6
Alaskan Crab Legs Or
Steamed Shrimp
Served with Fried or Baked Potato
Cole Slaw and Hush Puppies
FA MIL V RESTA URANT
GREENVILLE
105 Airport Road
758-0327
HOURS. SunThurs. II a.m. to 9p.m.
Frt. and Sat. 11 a.m. to 10p.m.
HELP WANTED: Lifeguards and
rental attendants needed. Memorial
Day thru Labor Day. Send resume
to: Beach Bums Beach Service, P.O.
Box 1409, Atlantic Beach, N.C. 28512.
NEEDED: Two female roommates
to share 3 bedroom apt. for fall
Within walking distance to campus.
S95mo. Please call 752 5886
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
To sublease an apartment at Tar
River for the summer. 593.75 � V
utilities. Please call 752 3708.
WETSUIT WANTED: Interested in
selling a men's wetsuit? if so, call
758 0076 or 752 8355 and leave a
message.
ROOMMATE WANTED: For New
York City. F.I.T. student moving in
August, needs place to live and
roommate(s). Let's apartment hunt
together! 758 7378.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: For sum
mer. Private bedroom Apt fully
furnished. $145month and !?
utilities. 1 mile from campus. Call
758 6699
LOST: On Thursday, April 4. a 14 K
gold link chain bracelet. Extremely
sentimental. Reward offered. If
found please call Debbie at 758 9923
WANTED: Responsible females
would like to sublease a two
bedroom furnished or unfurnished
apartment in Tar River Estates for
summer school months May Aug
Call 752 4875
SUMMER JOBS FOR COLLEGE
STUDENTS: Openings available for
young men on the Food Service Staff
at CAMP SEAFARER ON THE
COAST OF NORTH CAROLINA
Good salary plus room and board
Excellent opportunity for friends to
work together June 8 through mio
August Must be at least 18 years of
age No experience necessary only
ambition and good references re
quired For more information and
an application write Camp
Seafarer, P.O.Box 10976. YMCA
Raieigh, NX 27605
NEED 1 FEMALE: in a 3 bedroom
apt, at Wilson Acres Own bedroom,
pool, cable, AC $115. month
utilities Call 752 1420 Keep trying
3rd AND 4th FEMALE ROOM
MATES NEEDED: To share nice 2
bedroom duplex 1 mile from campus
in quiet neighborhood Fireplace
and sundeck Rent $93 75 i
utilities Please call 752 0319
HELP WANTED: Female student-
assist housewife with house cleaning
and child care in exchange for room
and board Near campus 757 198
EUROPE '86: Looking for a compa
nion to travel to Europe with in the
Fall '86 Please call Barbara at
830 1773.
WANTED: Apt for 2 girls at Atlan
tic Beach or Morehead City tor the
summer Please call collect 919;
892 3816
FOUND APRIL 7th Female b
spaniel in the vicinity of Home
Economics Bldg Please call Tina at
758 2479
u
GOLDEN GIRL
Tryouts
Be
A
Port
Of Th�
SIST!
When: Saturday, April 19, 10 5
Sunday, April 19, 15
Where Main Lobby, Fletcher Muse Bldg
Bring: Comfortable Clothes &
Lots of enthusiasm'
SALE
FOR SALE- H'Kardon tuner 910,
pioneer reverb and expander G
shape Call 830 1174
WHY SHARE? Have
cubic ft dorm size refrigerate
$100. Call 758 6550
FREE: CENTRAL HEATING AND
AIR CONDITIONING, COLD AND
HOT WATER, AND CABLE T
These spacious 2 bedroom �
carpeted apartments are
iust a few feet easf of 1
St intersection Abunav
on premises laundry fa
full time maintenance mec 1
this 24 unit comple �
creek and over -
BEFORE YOU -
WHAT YOU'RE BUS NG
Manor Apartments 1108
Cai j idy a1 ?S6 51S6

� �ViL'l'lJlMUL'JJ!IJlJ'UlVIJJIJTlHM�
. ANNO! N NG HE 1987
J MISS NORTH CAROLINA USA and M ' H CAROLINA TEEN USA '
PAGEANTS






Please see page 9








S USA ?i



PUASE SEND ME INFORMA
NAVt
ADDRESS
ORTH CAROLINA USA.
PHONE
� S DOES N(
� ������A-
FRIEND




r"
����������
� THERE.ARE"TOO SIDES TO "
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
�: '
TUTOR NEEDED: Elementary
Stats 3228 tutor needed Call 752 1182
and ask for David I
CAN
GRADUATES
CALL
100457-4065
FOR $400 AND
PRE-APPROVED
CREDIT ON A
NEW FORD
It's Easy To Qualify
For $400 from Ford
Motor Company
� You must receive at
least a bachelor's degree
or a state RN license
between October 1, 1985
and September 30, 1986.
For Prc-approved
Credit from Ford
Credit
� You must have verifi-
able employment that
begins within 120 days
of your qualifying vehi-
cle purchase at a salary
sufficient to cover ordi-
nary living expenses and
your vehicle payment.
� Your credit record, if
you have one, must indi-
cate payment made as
agreed.
� And don't forgetyou
must receive at least .i
bachelor's degree or a
state RN license between
October 1. 1985 and Sep-
tember JO, 1986.
These Vehicles Are
Included In The Plan
Ford: Escort, Escort HXP,
Tempo, Mustang,
Thunderbird
Mercury: Lynx, Topaz,
Capri, Cougar
Ford Truck: Aerostar,
Bronco II, Ranger,
F-150& 1-2 50
ufod

You are eligible for $400
even if u don't finance
your purchase. Use it
toward your down pay-
ment or get a check from
lord alter the purchase
or lease.
I he amount of your prc-
approved credit is deter-
mined by the qualified
vehicle you buy.
It a vehicle is not in
dealer stock, it must
be ordered In June I
1986. Delivery of all
vehicles must lH- taken
by August II, iolSft.
For complete details on
how to get our $400
plus pre-approved credit,
call the toll-tree number
today.
1-800-457-4065
BLOOM COUNTY
� -
P
C.rrtP JO-
oop CAm.
tern �� oM
AFt.r
7
m
i
f
( ontinutd
FOR SALI
SUV-
COURT
COM PUtE RIZE
VICE
-
i
are a
ATTENTION SI
. .
PROFESSION -
VICE
.
RENT .
S30C
- ;
a'e-
COTTAGE FOR RE
31 $�
FOR SALE
aow
758 �
FOR SALE
355 .
FOR SALE
COP
(goo
E n g
negi I
BIKIN
Tuesday,
$1.00 admission
8.
PRIZES:
1st � $125.00 cash plus one y
2nd � $50.00 cash plus one yi
3rd � $25.00 cash plus one yi
Wednesday, April 9
IOC DRAFT ALL NIGHT
�WfMOMMd
w �- -

. .





BLOOM COUNTY
DiiV
JiJtII.
�n
�,�'
-457-4065
h

1�
:
iiu
by Berke Breathed
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL lttt t
4

PCHTM6S6
me ma&ic m wv heap
OF JeURO'
CirrtR JOHh V
OUR CAPTAlr,
lewRdw from
ZFAP
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m em smite
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V$V
aurrj.
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1-

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softer-ooctAurr

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WHfi . � � � 14 -� �� nt
�. -v westers
.� v. .� � �.��� rflg .���-
- . - i ���. WJSK
bHOUCP ��� '
�3
W&RS -FttPeRlCK 5 of HOuyiAjoop 'ft 300 iH0f?T$ME KNOW

� Mi-
jTyi
History Of
ECU Told
Continued from page 7
The reader must realize in
reading this account of ECU that
it was the people who made the
history. Bratton centers each
division of the book with the
school's four name changes,
along with the leaders who
brought the school where it is to-
day. Page after page, the reader
will find the history of campus
buildings, Greenville, and how
and why school came about.
For the univeristy, Bratton ac-
complished the task of compiling
75 years of history into more than
500 pages, and while doing so,
she offers an informative book.
Perhaps. 75 years from now,
when another book is written, the
author will have Bratton's book
to use as a guide.
�00404040440000040f444444400004444440040900P

li
I
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'
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'



� �

444044444004444444000i
Students
ii
(i
i

I!
ii
ii
'�
ii
ii

h
i


h
ii
Needs You
Work Your Own Hours
NO Weekends
Easy to Learn
Apply 1104 Clark St.
8:00-5:00 Mon-Fri
No Phone Calls, Please

�004044000000t04l!t000000000040000000�000000
�������������������
J
See For Yo
Continued from pae H
FOR SALE 84 Jeei �
43
SUMMER SUB LEt
rra a r
COURT DATE N �.� � �
.
d dooi par� �� .
TRA-D J
-
COMPUTERIZEDT Y PINGSER
vICE
� �-
��


ATTENTION STUDENT'
cjrad ,
� �.
have bronj
formatiop ca
P 0 � ��N C

RINGGOLD TOWERS
-�
Sreat investi
ent ra . r U' �
ba
PROFESSIONALTYPINGSER
VICE: E xpeiA � -
fcti type-�
- -301
RENT 2 rO( �nit R nqgoia
S300 utilities ame " v.i 1 10
Aug. 20 One or two roommates. Call
v helle at 758 5971 TuesThurs
� 5 ��
COTTAGE FOR RENT Nays Head
bieeps four Closeto beach!Com
urnished Lease Aug
31 S600 per month.� 441 4483
FOR SALE: .65 mobilehome
M i :�$500
ana assumeDa t' Call
758 1559 after 6 p rr. Grimesiand.
FOR SALE: 64 Chevy B-
good part car $395 orB O ,
355 2185
SENIORS! SENIORS! SENIORS
Enjoy the last phase of your college
career employment . S&F Com
puters is offering a package price to
help you send out your resumes m
duding an of the following: Letter
quality typed resumes, Mail merged
ier letters (name and address of
� company as inside mailing ad
dress on letter), Letter quality typed
envelopes with company address
and your return address on
envelope, Everything folded, stuffed
and even stamped, A listing of com
panies sent to (for your follow ups)
Just bring us your hand written
resume and cover letter and the
nesses you with to apply to and
ve II ao ?ne rest. Per resume for
ur names addr (we stuff) $2.30
n 10 resumes) (we stuff and
stamp) SI 90 (2 page resume prices
s ghtly higher) This offer absolute
. expires April 15 1986 S&F Com
puter Company, 115 East Fifth St
5ree . � N C 27834 757 0472
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. Elec
�pewriter Reasonable rates
Call Janice at 355 7233 after 5:30.
TYPING SERVICES: Resumes,
term papers, theses. Low rates
Spelling and grammatical correc
tions included Cindy 757 0398 after
530 p.m.
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc Call
Anne at 758 6011 and leave a
message
FOR SALE: Carpet remnants, all
sizes, all colors, all prices. Save
50 70 percent The Carpet Bargain
Center, 1009 Dickinson Ave 758 0057
WORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
perience in typing resumes, theses,
technical documents, and term
papers We manage and merge your
names and addresses into merged
letters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards. Our prices are extremely
reasonable and we always offer a 15
percent discount to ECU students. S
& F Professional Computer Co
(back of Franklin's) 115 E. 5th St
757 0472
No other cards hug
you the way ours do
RPP lnL
0 '�' �
Cards
& Gifts
from
Recycled Paper
Products. Inc.
Available at
Central Book &
News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open until 9 30 p m , seven days a
rack
on All Frames, Sunglasses,
and Contact Lenses
Everyday.
Hem there are two kutn thai ofler UUO JifleiOT frames 10 chocae
trim -M evervtjav :avmg ut 30 -bU off regular retail price The
t- vr Sic J r Haza. and The Eye Care Cener at the Tipui Annex.
In dtklioun. rvc curranuburb are dvadabie at The Eye Care Corner
No appuntncra neconuy CaU far exam fuurs
rhc Hlaj
Phone 756-Wl
OJJ.
�-A
OPIOMC1MC
�t� CAR� GEHFER
Kor Krume StfrttKm and Eye Eiaminaitom:
22S (.rrm.UW lM�d illploa Amcx)
Phone 756-9404
Dr. Peter Hoilis
FOR SALE: Reclmer chair (ery
fortable), snow ski equipment
,d condition, complete set )
jagement ring. All prices
. � able Call Vern at 530 0486
One test where only
you know the score.
(Check One)
Yes NO
DD
DD
DD
Do ymi vvanl tobt; th�:
only one who knows
when you use an early
pregnancy lest?
Would you prefer a tesi
that's totally private to
perform and totally
private to read?
Would you like a test
that's portable, so you
can uirry it with you and
read it in private?
And how about a simple,
one-step test with a dra-
matic color change that's
easy to read and is 98
accurate?
GO
GREEK
If you checked "Yes" to
the above, EPT PLUS is for
you. Use it, and only you
will know your test score.
All Greeks Are Invited To
Shop And Save At
BONDS On all Clothing
With Greek Lettering!
p resents
10th Annual
BOND'S
218 ARLINGTON 7SMQ01
BIKINI CONTEST
Tuesday, April 8 � 9:00 till 1:00
$1.00 admission $2.00 18 yr. olds
85C Cans All Nite
nnrfrc Entries may call 758-4591
rKAijhjb. �r sign up at the ELBO
1st � $125.00 cash plus one year free pass to the ELBO by 10 pm
2nd � $50.00 cash plus one year free pass to the ELBO
3rd � $25.00 cash plus one year free pass to the ELBO
Sigma Tau Gamma $1.50 guys
Wednesday, April 9 presents $1.00 ladies
10� DRAFT ALL NIGHT ERA FT NITE 9-1 p.m
All ECU Students with ID s receive �I OH Dis-
count. Present this coupon for
10 DISCOUNT
ONE COUPON
PER PERSON

Bond's
21 � Arlington Biwl
GrMnvilta 7S6-6001
Bond Where
Super Sajvtofa Pfgtea
SPQKTINQ GOODS



� m m 0
4" � � � -
r � �r m -





I MI I SAROl INIAN
Sports
APRILS, 1986
Page 10
Sweep Three
Defeat George Mason
tUI J ti.i

Junior Mark Cockrell rounds third a third-base coach
waves him on. The Bucs will host N.C. State toda.
Billy Best
By TONY BROWN
S�orU�rlln
Three times the Patriots of
George Mason took a three run
lead on the Pirates over the
weekend and three times the
result was an ECU win. The 9-3,
6-4, 8-6, conference victories
were an important step toward a
berth in the post-season tourna-
ment.
Only the top-four CAA
finishers will qualify for the
tourney, the winner of which is
guaranteed a spot in the NCAA
play-offs. ECU's conference
mark went to 7-3, while GMU fell
to 4-4 in league play.
In the opener on Saturday,
neither team could manage a
score in until the sixth frame.
Two GMU doubleplays erased
the only ECU runners, while the
Patriots had a major scoring
threat cut down at home on a
fielder's choice in the fourth.
Finally, the scoring began in
the sixth inning � all the scoring.
In the top of the inning, GMU
got a lead-off hit from Ryan
Johnston, a double by Luke
Sable and a walk to load the
bass. Although Pirate hurler
��� Jds. nnougn nrate
Pigskin Pig-Out Planned
By SCOTT COOPER .dginR of the ni� wiJl ��,�,
Winfred Johnson fanned the
clean-up batter, an error on a
potential doubleplay ball allowed
one run in. A single by Ray
Mikell made it 2-0, then the
Patriot's last run of the game
came in on a sacrifice.
ECU continued its season pat-
tern of quick retaliation in the
bottom of the frame, pushing in
nine runs with the benefit of only
one hit. Three walks loaded the
bases with no outs, then a
sacrifice fly by David Ritchie
scored one.
A fielder's choice by Chris
Bradberry let another run in,
followed by a Johnson double
which tied the game at three each.
Six more runners scored after
that. A passed ball, two walks
and two errors proved to be the
last runs in a 9-3 Pirate rout.
Keith Schaffer picked up the
ictory in relief of Johnson with a
one-and-two-third inning stint,
going to 3-0 on the year. Steve
Kahn took the loss tor GMU,
also in relief.
Johnson's double and Ritchie's
single were the only Pirate hits.
despite the lopsided score
GMU managed six hits, with
Sable's double the only one tor
extra bases.
In the nightcap, GMU seemed
intent on making up for its per-
formance, jumping ahead in the
top of the first on a three-run
blast by David White. However,
they were held the rest of the
way. This time it was by starter
Jim Peterson, who went the
distance despite striking out just
one batter.
The Pirates cut the margin in
the bottom of the inning on a
solo homer by Ritchie, then tied
it up in the third when Greg Har-
dison singled and came home on
Chris Brdberry's seventh
homerun of the year. Mike
Sullivan continued the rally, get-
ting hit by pitcher J.R. Perdew
and moving up on a fielder
choice, a Steve Sides single and
scoring on a sharp single up the
middle by Mark Cockrell for a
4-3 ECU lead.
Four walks, including an inten-
tional one to Johnson, added a
run for the Pirates in the fourth.
Another runner came across in
the fifth as Johnson doubled and
later tallied on an error.
A sharp defensive play by E( I
By SCOTT COOPER
The third-annual Greal P
Purple Gold Pigskin Pig-Out
Party is approaching as a host of
events are scheduled foi Hirus
Apr. 17-19.
Aside from the infamous pig-
cooking contest and all
barbecue one can desire, there
will be several planned activities
for students as well as the Green-
ville community.
On Thurs. Apr. 1 the Pie-
Out Golf Classic Social and Auc-
tion will be held. This event pro-
mises lots of fun as Miller-1 itc
e pigs will
well
Pre
uruav morning as
tramural two-mile
which is free to
he
Star.
be on
All Star Bob Lanier wi
hand along with ECU I
staff and interested golfe
other Miller-Lite " All
"Hacksaw" Reynolds, wL.
hand late Friday evening to walk
the Ficklen Stadium midwa
Friday and Saturday (Apr.
18-19) are the big das as action
gets underway early (8:30
with Golf Classic and banquet
taking place. The mini-carnival, a
band under the stadium, and live
broadcasts from WRQR-FM wi!i
all take place that afternoon
(WOOW-AM will join in the
tailgate radio shows on
Saturday). The pig-cooking fires
will be started, a fireworks
display and Lanier and Reynolds
will be mingling through the
"midway" later that evening
M'
I here will be plenty of
'� S3 ! price per
� the only thing
'hat isn't free.
A r he Fade Brothers)
tying, clowns will be
ere will be a dunking
some known figures
g (The EC's " .lav
nd a Miller-Lite All
s contesl with
'Hacksaw himself will be going
'he full afternoon of
a
ne
'( unger
Beai -
Do; '�
dec Saw e
s u r l
brave guys and gals will
:hance to win some
ha
and
i
Sal Jav. Wrestle
a Canadian Black
pin her and win $500.00.
she has been
: and her teeth have oeen
noved. Eight men
� �men will be chosen to
attempt to pin the hear � the two
try at one time (good
luck).
A suntan bikini contest will
give some women a chance
� their bathing suits,
her things. A S300.00
first prize, a $125.00 second-
place pr;e and a third-place prize
of $75.00 will be awarded.
If interested in registering for
either the wrestling or the bikini
contest, call the ECU Athletic
Marketing Office at 757-6491.
The best-dressed contest
among the tailgators will be held
later in the day as the ECU foot-
ball team will also be having an
autograph session. The day of ex-
citement is wrapped up with the
annual Purple Gold football
game. Tickets are Si.50 in ad-
vance and S2.50 at the gate.
However, ECU students show
vour ID and get in free.
So don't forget about this ex-
travaganza the weekend of Apr.
I7-19. It's a small cost to pay for
what promises to be a iarge
amount of excitement. Look for
more information on the Great
Pirate PurpleGold Pigskin Pig-
Out Party in later editions of The
East Carolinian.
Sports Fact
Tues. Apr. 8, 1974
No longer able to stand his
team's ineptitude on the field,
new San Diego Padres owner
Ray Kroc comandeers the
public-address system and
reprimends his players for all to
hear. The Padres lose to
Houston, 9-5, in a game
highlighted by the debut of Ted
Giannoulas as the San Diego
Chicken; in time the Chicken
will become one of the most
popular team mascots.
Softball Team Loses Three
caught Mikell trying to score on a
double-steal attempt in the sixth,
then the final run came for E !
in the seventh. Johnson drew his
third walk of the game to lead oft
and Sullivan bunted for a hit. A
fielder's choice by Jay McGraw
left the bases loaded when the pit-
cher delayed too long in deciding
to throw to third. Robert
1 angston's sacrifice fly to center-
field resulted in the Final 6-4
score.
Peterson steadied after the first
inning, scattering six more hits
and walking just two as the Pirate
defense pulled off two
doubleplays in addition to nabb-
ing the GMU runner at home.
Peterson is now 6-3 for the
season.
In addition to the homers -
Bradberrv and Ritchie, Sullh
wenl 2-foi 2 with a double for the
Pirates.
On Sunday, the pattern
established on Saturday con-
tinued, as GMU leaped ahead
the top oi the first with three
runs, onh to lose the game 8-6
Pirate hurler Craig Van Deventer
See PIRATES, page 11
Tracksters
Win Three
By WAJLTRISHE1
�x-U Wrtlrr
Bill Carson, in his twentieth
ear as head coach for the ECL
men's track team, led his tear:
three strong performances
begin this year's outdoo
season.
mpetition
came in Tallahassee, Fla ir.
Domino's Pizza Relays. The
: " meter relav team tied tor se-
Middle Tennessee
tte with a time ol 4o.4s
dividually, James Blue placed
third in the 400-meter run with a
time of 53.11.
The Pirates 1600-meter team
(consisting of Julian Anderson
Ruben P.erce, Phil Estes, a
kdwvn Love), placed fourth with
a time of 3:12.94.
e 1600-meter relay teat:
placed first at their next meet; the
WRAI tlantk (oast Relays
Raleigh, with a time of 3:09.61
Sophomore Julian Ander
placed second in the 400-meter
run with a 464 mark.
Eugene McNeill had a strong
second-place finish in the
100-meter run at the
Carolina Duke Relavs with a
time ot 10.58. The Bucs'
1600-meter relav team took home
a second-place finish with a time
of 3:09.3.
The Pirates' next meet will be
'he Pepsi Seven-Eleven Invita-
tionals in Dallas. Tx on April
lAoovej Senior Diane Lunsford cracks a triple as Sandy Kee (below i
�ttempu a tag in earlier season action. W
By TIM CHANDLER
Hhi�1 S�t�i IMtm
The Lady Pirate softball team
split a doubleheader with Francis
Marion as the Bucs won the first
game 2-1 Sunday afternoon.
The Pirates got the scoring
started early as they picked up a
run in the first inning. Jeannie
Murray singled and was later
driven in on Mickey Ford's triple.
Francis Marion battled back
and knotted the game at 1-1.
However, ECU scored the winn-
ing run in he bottom of the
frame.
Mona Jackson reached base on
an error and was able to score on
a triple by Carla Alphin.
Stacey Boyette was credited
with the win for the Bucs, moving
her season record 12-4.
In the second game, the Bucs
came up short for the third time
in two days, losing 4-2.
Francis Marion got off to a
fast start as they broke on top 2-0
in the first inning.
ECU came back in the bottom
of the third to tie the game at 2-2.
The inning was sparked by a Ford
triple (her second of the day).
However, the Pirates gave up
two more runs in the top of the
fourth, completing the scoring of
the game.
Robin Graves was the losing
pitcher as she dropped to a 10-4
mark on the year. With the loss,
the Bucs fall to 22-8 for the year.
In the first game of a
doubleheader Saturday, the Lady
Pirate softball team was held to
only one hit, in a 3-0 loss to
South Carolina.
The Gamecocks got the winn-
ing run in the first inning, when
thev scored one run. Sikole singl-
ed and moved to second on a
sacrifice. She scored later on a hit
by Dacruz
Wendy Ozment got the only hit
of the day for the Bucs in" the
seventh inning, negating a perfect
game bid by South Carolina pit-
cher Huggins.
South Carolina rounded out
the scoring in the seventh inning
when they collected two runs.
Stacey Boyette pitched in the
losing cause for the Pirates put-
ting her season record at 10-4.
In the nightcap, the Pirates
were once again held to only one-
hit by Gamecock pitcher Huggins
as they dropped a 2-1 decision.
The Pirates only hit was a
rountripper by Mickey Ford in
the fourth inning.
South Carolina, however, got
the scoring started in the game as
they scored once in the first inn-
ing and also the third.
The firs; inning run came when
Dacruz' reached on a error and
was doubled home by Huggins
T1 final run for the
Gamecocks came when Sikole
singled, and moved to second or.
a passed ball. She later scored on
a sacrifice fly by Dacruz
Robin Graves picked up the
loss for the Pirates, putt.ng her
season mark at 10-3.
vVith the loss, the Bucs drop-
ped to 21-7 for the year.
k�i- lurmeyear.
Mixed Results For Netters
By DAVID McGINNFX the M� - � VVIO
-v-v I v � � � ?�
- 1
By DAVID McGINNESS
The men's and women's Pirate
tennis teams both went on the
road last Wednesday, with mixed
results.
The ladies rebounded from a
4-2 deficit in singles play against
UNC-Greensboro, sweeping the
doubles matches for a 5-4 vic-
tory.
ECU stayed in the match with
wins at the top and bottom
singles spots. At No. 1, Becky
Clements defeated UNC-G's
Laura Barnette 6-2, 6-0.
Meanwhile. Ty Myers held up
her end with a 7-5, 6-1 win over
her No. 6 UNC-G opponent,
Toni Albright.
Ann Manderfield fell to Felicia
Poplin, 6-3, 6-4.
Mander field is seeing action at
�� V m V �
the No. 2 spot after suffering an
ankle injury early this spring
At No. 3, UNC-G's Diane Per-
siano topped Lisa Eichholz, 6-2,
6-3.
No. 4 ECU netter Amy Ziemer
came back from a 6-3 first set loss
to Marianne Rizzolo to win the
second set. However, RizZ0lo
made a comeback of her own
taking the third set 6-2 for the
win.
The No. 5 match was another
three set affair. ECU's Holly
Murray fell 6-2, 6-1 after taking
the first set from UNC-G's
Ginger Wallwork 7-6.
ECU's sweep of the doubles
play was led by Eichholz and
Manderfield. They defeated
UNC-G's No. 1 team 6-1, 4-6,
Maria Swaim and Mvers
disposed of their No. 2 op-
ponents Poplin and Rizzolo 6-2,
6-0.
Murray and Ziemer closed out
the doubles sweep, and the
match, over Andrea Ashby and
Susan Frye, 6-3, 6-0.
The ladies now move to a 10-
overall record. Their next match
i beFri. Apr. 11, when thev
wIl travel to Richmond to face
the Lady Spiders.
The men's trip to Elon College
2? Wednesday saw the match
being dominated by Elon, 8-1.
Tne only winner for the Pirate
netters was Todd Sumner at the
no. 6 singles spot.
Sumner defeated his Elon op-
ponent Janalle6-4, 6-3.
In other singles play,
Moerstedt topped No. 1 ECU
Player Dan Lamont 6-1, 6-1.
S-WEDNESDAY ptfen
I
Pirat
Continued from page io
had a somewhat shakv out .
but took the w,n nonetheless'
"1 the help of a relief ap
pearance by Jake Jacobs
The Pirates once m ,ed
immediately
bottom ot the fra
Carter opened w,
Bradberry talked I ��
Sullivan both singled, drh .
run apiece fter McGraw
hit by a pitch to load
Cockrell drew a wall
at 3-3.
A Patriot threat
was cut short -s
gunned down a runne.
tCL then went ahead in the f �
Intramural
Tourneys
Planned
�f STEPHANIE DEW
r ttrvri
For aii !he Babe Ruth,s aj
ECU, here's. ; have been
waiting for- The Intramut
Recreational Services annoui
a Home Run Der- ,
Apr. 17 at the E
Softball Field.
The deadline is Apr 17
interested students should j
between 4 pm at Mem,
Gym.
Putt putt for the fun ol
Sneaker Sam will join vou on
green for the IRSG
be held Apr. 10 at tne
Country Club. There will he a
Golf Classic mandatorv mee-
in the balcony of Men ym
Thur. Apr 10 at 5 pm.
The IRS i spoi g a
Whitewater rafting trip on the
French Broad River Apr. 18
Registration ends Apr. 14 The
cost is $45.00 per person, (in-
cludes transportation, river
and camping fees). Registe-
204 Memorial Gym. There will be
a pre-trip meeting Apr. 15
105-B Memorial Gym at 4 pm.
There are ten aerobic clasa
offered every week and thev are
open to all ECU faculty, stafl
and students. The cost is a mere
� 75 per class and are held in 108
Memorial Gym until May 4.
The "Kappa Sigs (B)"
defeated "Pi Kaps" 26-10 in a
softball raliey March 2 Mark
Harris was the Kappa Sigma
player worth noting, leading in
both defensive and offensive
totals.
v hat an appropriate
nameStrike Force II" is a
team that does exactly what's ex-
pected. Defeating "Smoke 98.6"
18-1, five players had homeruns
for the team. The players includ-
ed Eddie Waylor. Lyn An twine,
Craig Harmon. Tom .Arthur and
Allen Harrell. "Smoke 98.6" had
two hits in the game, one a
homerun by Rick Koebe.
For daily facility hours, major
team sport games, and cancella-
tions due to inclement weather
call INTRA-ACTIQN. -662
Pigskin Pig-Out is schedul-
ed for Apr. 17-19. Don't
miss out!
�1 �� .
Every Tuesday
is
College Night
� Free Delivery
j for $5.00 &
� Over Purchases



7 p.m. to 11 p.m.
99C SUBS
Your Choice
: Ham & Cheese
I Bologna & Cheese
Ham, Salami & Cheese
� Pepperom, Salami d Cheese :
I Turkey & Cheese
: Ham, Turkev d Cheese :

� Not valid on deliveries :

60 oi. pitchers SI.99
i (ai .
: "��ii
i
�VI Ht3 215 I 4 .





r HI AM AROl INIAN
APW11 8, l�M
11
ason
!�
For Setters
Pirates Improve To 26-4
ie Pirate
gles pla n
pped N I EC!
lit 6-1. 6-1
�� WEDNESDAY . p�ge 11
t ontinued from page 10
a somewhai shak outing,
k the vsin nonetheless,
- help oi a relief ap
c b lake lacobs.
once again rallied
ate! to tie it up in the
ol the frame Mont
pened ith a single, then
walked Johnson and
�th singled, driving in a
tser McGravt vsas
to load the bags,
- a walk, tying it up
as Bradberrs walked and latei
seized on Sullivan's single
GMU legamed the lead in the
sixth on a two-run homer by Inn
McGrath, but the Pirates retook
the lead in the seventh with a
tour-run uprising. Hardison and
Bradbenv singled, followed bv
anothei single bv Johnson which
seored Hardison.
Reliever darland Brill came in
to get a fielder's choice (which
advanced the runners), then
walked McGraw Sides brought
one m with a single and walks to
C ockrell and Ritchie made it 8-5
ECU I he latter walk was by the
thud GMU pitcher.
GMU added one more in the
eighth as lake Jacobs came on in
relief with the bags loaded. He
walked in a run, but held the
Patriots scoreless the rest of the
w av, getting a save in the 8-6 win.
The Pirates picked up onlv one
extra base hit a double bv
Brad berry, but had 10 singles and
seven walks plus a hit batsman
Johnson, Sullivan and C ockrell
each had a pair of RBI's with
Sides and Ritchie picking up on
apiece
Van Deventer's season mark
tose to 6 0, while losei ireg Wesi
dropped to 3-2 E( l l's sea
record n"w stands at 2fr-4. while
( iMl dtopped to 1 5 2
"These wins were very impoi
tant tot us said I . I oach
(iaiv verton "What H did
push us toward the top (in
� Ai and move them down
c oming back the wa we
each game is a trademark ol oui
team
Wednesday Scores
Continued from page 10
V No 2, Mitchell defeated
John Melhorn 6-1, 6 4
No JI Ion netter Johnson put
away (.reg 1 oyd 6-2, 6 1
John I a v 1 o r edged oui
Roediger 7 6 in the first se: ol his
No. 4 match, but Roedeger turn-
ed the match around, winning
6-0, 6-1 in the last two sets
V the N 5 spoi Hools ol
Elon disposed ol Patampanaro
6-1, 6-1
In doubles action, the story
was the same tor the Pirates.
Moerstedt and Mitchell topped
Melhorn and Taylor, 6 2, 7-5 in
the No 1 match.
Hooks and Johnson also
prevailed tor Elon in straight
sets They defeated Anthony and
( ampanaro 6-4, 6-0
Roediger and Nassief closed
out the match for Elon Loyd and
LaMont took the first set of their
No 3 doubles match 6-2, but
then lost 6-3 in the second and 7-5
n the third.
The men are now 4 7 this spr-
ing. I hey will lace High Point
College today in High Point
eat in the third
' er Bt adberry,
inner at home
. in the fifth
Intramural
Tourneys
Planned
Bv STEPHANII DfW
� e Babe Ruth's at
re's what yo iv been
I he Inti amui
Services annou
I ' be held
EC!
d
pi I 7 and all
� uld drop in
at Memorial
on
1 Me Gvm
ei trip
Rej in
I erc will be
I )
Gym at 4 pm.
classes
� are
ac . �. sta f 1
� s a mere
May 4
. p a s gs t B i"
��" 26-10
March 27 Mark
Kappa s -
iding in
: fensive
priate
I rce II" is a
a�. a' - ex-
iting 'Smoke 98 6'
I ' � . imeruns
includ-
s ayloi. Lyn Antwine,
v thur and
Sm ke 98 6" had
the game, one a
by Rid Koebe
ours, major
gan es. and cancclla-
inclement weather,
! U riON: 757-6562.
skin Pig-Out is schedul-
ed for Apr. 17-19. Don't
miss out!
SBSIBWH
;?.
:
Every Tuesday
is
College Night
ree Delivery
$5 00 d
()ver Purchases
7 p.m. to 11 p.m.
99C SUBS
I:
Your Choice
H Han. A hee.se
J Bologna & Cheese
((w. Salami & Cheese
kfepperoni, Salami & Cheese
Turkey & Cheese
ffam, Turkey & Cheese


Not valid on deliveries

60 07. pitchers Sl.W
j J 11 a i,
(����
752 21�J
:i i �k 9i
ESeFFECTlVETH �A1 APRIL 12 ATSAV ENTER M GREENVILLE
ai m SERVi THf
the supermarket th 7�
n, ����� " " PLUS DOUBLE COUPONS
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli, Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality.
LUNCHEON MEAT
Armour Treet
NE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
d 88
DUKE S
CREAM OR WmOlE KERNEL CORN
ENCH KITCHE STYLl RCGUtAR CUT .KttsBEANS
Mayonnaise
78c
limit one with an additional
purchase at everyday low pr. i
Vegetables
1703 GREENVILLE BLVD. � OPEN 24 HOURS E OPEN SUNDAY 7 A.M11PM
�IF ��
I





I HF HAS IAROLINIAN AFML��,
11
ge Mason
i ECl

Traeksters
Win Three

�r
te Buc�
s For Netters
Pirates Improve To 26-4
ind Rizzolo 6-2.
� the doubles
y Eichhol and
They defeated
! team 6-1. 4-6,
lasm
and
Si.
Myers
2 op-
md Ziemer closed out
ep, and the
- Andrea Ashby and
� -0
e to a 10-5
eir next match
pi 11, when they
Richmond to face
piders
rip to Elon College
Wednesday ,av� the match
being dominated by Elon, 8-1.
The only winner for the Pirate
ters a.s Todd Sumner at the
N 6 singles spot
Sumner defeated his Elon op-
ponent Janalle 6-4, 6-3.
In other singles play,
Moerstedt topped No. 1 ECU
player Dan Lamont 6-1, 6-1.
See WEDNESDAY, page 11
(. ontinued from page 10
a somewhat shaky outing,
took the win nonetheless,
the help ol a relief ap-
. by lake Jacobs
t Pirates once again rallied
v to tie it up in the
ol the frame. Mont
pened with a single, then
walked Johnson and
: both singled, drning in a
ece tter McGraw was
i pitch to load the bags,
drev a walk, ting it up
itriot threat in the thud
short when Biadberrv
lown a runner at home.
a en: ahead in the fifth
Intramural
Tourneys
Planned
�U STEPHANIE DIW
Miff ni�t
the Babe Ruth's at
what sou have been
The Intramural-
Services announces
Run Derby to be held
at the ECU Women's
held.
idline is Apr 17 and all
students should drop in
. " pm at Memorial
foi the fun of it!
an will join you on the
? IRS Golf Classic to
V at the Ayden
tb There will be a
c mandatory meeting
� Memorial Gym
1 pm.
p s is sponsoring a
. trip on the
ad River Apr. 18-20.
p- 14. The
per person, (in-
flation, river trip
g tees) Register in
C iym. There will be
I! Apr. 15 in
.m at 4 pm.
aerobic classes
. week and they are
ECl faculty, staff
! he cost is a mere
. are held in 108
until Mav 4.
- ppa Sigs B"
Kaps" 26-10 in a
March 2 Mark
kappa Sigma
ting, leading in
,c and offensive
appropriate
. Force II" is a
: es exactly what's ex-
ating "Smoke 98.6"
ayers had homeruns
in 1 he players includ-
Waylor, Lyn Antwine.
irmon, Tom Arthur and
Harrell. "Smoke 98.6" had
a hits in the game, one a
-v Rick Koebe.
la . facility hours, major
sport games, and cancella-
te to inclement weather,
IRA ACTION: 57-6562.
as Bradberry walked and later
scored on Sullivan's single.
GMU regained the lead in the
sixth on a two-run homer by Tim
McGrath, but the Pirates retook
the lead in the seventh with a
four-run uprising. Hardison and
Bradberry singled, followed by
another single by Johnson which
scored Hardison.
Reliever Garland Brill came in
to get a fielder's choice (which
advanced the runners), then
walked McGraw. Sides brought
one in with a single and walks to
Cockrell and Ritchie made it 8-5
ECU. The latter walk was by the
third GMU pitcher.
GMU added one more in the
eighth as Jake Jacobs came on in
relief with the bags loaded. He
walked in a run, but held the
Patriots scoreless the rest of the
way, getting a save in the 8-6 win.
the Pirates picked up only one
extra base hit � a double by
Bradberry, but had 10 singles and
seven walks plus a hit batsman.
Johnson, Sullivan and Cockrell
each had a pair of RBl's with
Sides and Ritchie picking up one
apiece.
Van Deventer's season inai k
rose to 6-0, while loser Grey West
dropped to 3-2. IXC's season
record now stands at 26-4, while
GMU dropped to 15 12
"These wins were er impor-
tant for us said E U coach
Gary Overtoil. "What it did was
push us toward the top (in the
C AA) and move them down.
Coming back the way we did in
each game is a trademark of our
team
Wednesday Scores
Continued from page 10
At No. 2, Mitchell defeated
John Melhorn 6-1, 6-4
No. 3 Elon netter Johnson put
away Greg l.oyd 6-2, 6-1.
John Taylor edged out
Roediger 7-6 in the first set of his
No. 4 match, but Roedeger turn-
ed the match around, winning
6-0, 6 1 in the last two sets
At the No. 5 spot, Hools of
Elon disposed of Pat Campanaro
6-1, 6-1.
In doubles action, the story
was the same for the Pirates.
Moerstedt and Mitchell topped
Melhorn and Taylor, 6-2, 7-5 in
the No. 1 match.
Hooks and Johnson also
prevailed for Elon in straight
sets. They defeated Anthony and
Campanaro 6-4, 6-0.
Roediger and Nassief closed
out the match for Elon Loyd and
LaMont took the first set of their
No. 3 doubles match 6-2, but
then lost 6-3 in the second and 7-5
in the third.
The men are now 4-7 this spr-
ing. They will face High Point
College today in High Point
Pigskin Pig-Out is schedul
ed for Apr. 17-19. Don't
miss out!
5UBSTRTIDIKTJ;
Every Tuesday
is
College Night
ree Delivery
tor $5.00 &
Oxer Purchases
7 p.m. to 11 p.m
99C SUBS
Your Choice
Ham & Cheese
Bologna & Cheese
Hum, Salami & Cheese
Pepperoni, Salami & Cheese
Turkey & Cheese
Ham. Turkey & Cheese
Not valid on deliveries
60 oz. pitchers $199
��rlai ���
H.m II T5II,�3 ���
THROUGH SAT APRIL 12 AT SAV A CENTER M GREENVILLE
Sllltl V" PLUS DOUBLE COUPONS
SEE IN STORE FOR DETAILS'
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
E.cludino Meat Produce, Deli, Bakery S Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current
facS ��h with you. We Will Match like Items or Equal Quality.
SWIFT CANNED
LUCIOUS RIPE CALIFORNIA
Hostess Ham r Strawberries





t '
12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 8, 1986



Si
01 i
fm

A
y
K?KB
tD
K�
r
00 Off With Coupon
SWEATPANTS
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 8, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 08, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.468
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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