The East Carolinian, April 3, 1986






�he lEast (Earnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 So.Vhgm 4ft Thursday, April 3, 1986
Greenville. N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 12.000
JIMIH1(,�NS IVfjiUamu.
Blooming Dogwo ods
Tis the season for North Carolina's famous dogwoods to he in
full bloom. The beginning of the summersea son proves to be uplif-
ting for many ECU students tired of a long, cold winter season.
Wellness Promoted
Health Fair
By BETH WHICKER
sulam "Sf� Kditor
The first annual "Life's a
Health Affair" was held Wednes-
day afternoon on the lawn at
MendenhaU Student Center.
The event was sponsored by
the West Area Residence Council
and ECU Student Health Ser-
vices.
"We combined efforts with the
Student Health Center to offer
ECU an event that is offered na-
tionwide according to Janet
Johnson, area coordinator for
West Campus,
"Students need the advantage
of the health fair to educate
themselves into lives of fitness
and wellness. So often students
are on the go and forget about
their health according to
Health Educator, Mary Elesha-
Adams.
Students do not think about
their blood pressure or their diet
because they are young. Many
students have a very high salt in-
take from all of the junk foods
and processed foods they con-
sume said Johnson.
According to both Johnson
and Elesha-Adams, students need
to realize the importance of a
wellness program and the impact
it can have on their life. Some il-
lness and fatigue can be minimiz-
ed if a wellness prgram is follow-
ed.
The Aerobic Workshop pro-
vided an aerobics demonstration
at the fair to show the students
the importance of exercise in rela-
tion to their lifestyles.
A booth containing informa-
tion on drugs and their effects on
the body was provided by the
ECU Department of Public Safe-
ty.
Bacchus provided a booth con-
taining information on alcohol
consumption, abuse, and provid-
ed pamplets explaining the recent
DW1 law.
Vegetables, frozen yogurt, and
milk were offered at the fair as
alternative foods toward a
healthy lifestyle.
Other booths contained infor-
mation on tanning, hang cancer,
water safety, blood pressure, and
sickle ceil anemia.
Entertainment was provided by
Fantasy, a sign language group
who performed to popular songs.
"The turnout was very good.
A lot of students picked up infor-
mation on tanning and
osteoporosis said Elesha-
Adams.
According to Johnson, the
event was extremely successful
and is scheduled again for next
year.
Marine Chairman Named
By JILL MORGAN
SUff Wriler
A release from the office of the
governor announced the appoint-
ment of Michael K. Orbach as
chairman of the 25 member
Marine Science Council establish-
ed in 1973.
Its purpose is to encourage the
use ana study of the ocean,
estuarine and coastal waters of
the state of North Carolina by
citizens and industries of this
state. Orbach will serve on the
board until June of 1989 at the
pleasure of the governor
The governor appointed Or-
bach after being highly recom-
mended for the position of chair-
man of the NC Marine Science
Council by both the Department
of Administration and the
Department of Natural
Resources and Community
Development.
rhe council, is "basically, an
advisory body to the governor
that meets tour times a year and
reports to a secretary advising the
governor on all marine and ocean
issues said Orbach.
The North Carolina Marine
Science Council is concerned with
all issues involving North
Carolina's waters and coastline.
Currently the NCMSC under
the chairmanship of Orbach is
developing a proposal to house
the artifacts of "The Monitor"
� an iron clad civil war vessel
that sank off the coast of Hat-
teras Island.
The NCMSC is also organizing
a program with the mineral
management councel concerning
off-shore mining.
In addition to these notable ef-
forts the North Carolina Marine
Science Council also administers
three aquariums here in NC that
receive as many as one million
visitors each year.
The aquariums are located on
Roanoke Island, Bogue Bank and
Fort Fisher.
Orbach's appointment to the
NCMSC will last for a term of
three years � ending June 1989.
Orbach also serves as chairman
of the Commercial Management
Subcommittee and vice chair of
the Outer Continental Shell
Committee, as well as being a
government appointed member
of the NC Marine Fisheries Com
mission.
"The nice thing for ECU is
that we have a number oi marine
programs including ICMR. My
appointment gives ECU a central
place in all marine activities
notes Orbach.
Orbach is "a cultural an-
thropologist with a degree in
ecoi
Marme Re
He came E I fhrei
m the I
ai Sam a �
Orbach
other i
rep
mittee i -
m .
� �
Oce
Professor Speaks
On Latin America
Ballots Recounted;
Results Final
By PATT1 KEMMIS
Assistant Nf�s Mi tor
� recount called by Gordon
Walker and Chris Tomasic, can-
didates in the recent elections for
SGA vice-president and presi-
dent, showed a slight change in
the results, however, the winners
remained the same.
President Stever Cunanan
recieved 1085 votes while his op-
ponent, Chris Tomasic, gained
one vote in the recount to bring
his total to 1073.
Anthony Jackson, winner of
the vice-presidential race had
1109 after the recount, an addi-
tion of 3 votes. His opponent,
Gordon Walker, secured 10 addi-
tional votes in the recount to br-
ing his total to 1065.
"It was so close � I felt a re-
count was necessary said
Walker. "My observers also had
some questions about the coun-
ting on Wednesday night
The recount took place Tues-
day. Between the elections
Wednesday afternoon and the re-
count, the ballot boxes were kept
in the office of Joseph Calder,
director of Security.
Approximately 18 percent of
the campus, 2199 students,
voted. This was an increase over
last year's turnout, 1,957 voters.
According to Millie Murphrey,
secretary of the SGA, it has been
many years since a recount has
been asked for in the executive
office elections.
The results from the recount
are final.
BvMIKFLLDWICK
Nmllh
Lars Schoultz, in a lecture last
night, said the current dispute
over foreign policy towards 1 atin
America is due to the debate oi
the causes of instability in Latin
America.
Schoultz is a professor at UNC
Chapel Hill and his address wa
part of the Great Decisions �
Lecture Series.
There are three viewpoints as
to the causes of the instability in
Latin America, said Schoultz.
Historically, there has been
one cause, communism, explain-
ed Schoultz However, during the
Kennedy and Johnson
ministrations a second schoo
thought developed � poverty.
Even though there were two
sides to the debate over cause-
instability foreign policy was soil
unified because, according
Schoultz, both sides believed in-
stability in Latin America, more
specifically in Central America, is
a threat to U.S. security.
A third school of thought has
grown out of the 70, said
Schoultz, that has muddied the
foreign policy waters
According to Schoultz, this
third school Keheves poverty
the cause to instabilitv m Latin
and era: n
deny that instabilit
I S natii na: secu
ting

The
n a ling

view
v ei :a.
.
mai'
stability and
rat
Schoultz

maker;
viev
'A ashing
However, Schoultz
a silver ng in :he whole
deban
not the S sh :
Latin Amci
fluence has
debate. For the
said Schouitz.
see COMMl MVM Pa 3

Student Wins Stock Watching Contest
By LAURA JENKINS
SUff Writer
ECU graduate student Rick
Spencer recently received special
recognition from Barron's
Magazine, a national financial
business publication, after he
placed sixty-first out of 8,696 en-
tries in a stock watching contest
the magazine sponsored.
Spencer's name, along with 99
others who placed in the top 100,
was printed in an issue of the
magazine.
Spencer was very pleased with
how he placed in the contest. He
thought one of the nices things
about it was having friends from
around the country call and con-
gratulate him after seeing his
name Barron's.
Spencer would like to go into
financial analysis when he leaves
ECU. "This contest was not a
guarantee for a job, but it
helps
He plans to enter the contest
again next year.
Participants in the contest were
asked to watch any where from 5
to 10 stocks with values to 5 to 20
percent for a six-month period.
Barron's kept track of the
stocks' opening prices in July,
and the participant who had the
highest percentage return at the
January closing date won the
contest.
Spencer ended with a 319"
percent return.
Participants were allowed to
pick from any stocks appearing
on the New York or American
Stock Exchanges, or over-the-
counter markets. How did
Spencer choose his stocks? "1
had to do a little research, but I
mainly used stocks 1 was already
interested in and had been
following he said.
Spencer said he had been wat-
ching the stock market steadily
for the last three vears.
rhcrc �
volved in
Spencer said he
choice of
'None 'hem w -he
tubes he said.
Spencer rcceh
undergraduate degree
philosophy and psych
he decided to
in Business Administration
pand his job opportunities, and
h" plans to gr a in
December
Summer Field School Offered
By CAROLYN DRISCOLL
SUff Writer
This summer, the ECU history
Department will sponsor a sum-
mer field school in maritime
history and underwater ar-
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds8
Editorials4
Features7
Sports10
The most thoroughly wasted
day is that on which one has
not laughed.
�Cham fort
cheology open to both graduate
and undergraduate students.
"This program is the only one
of its kind in any academic in-
stitution in the US said
William Still, co-director of the
program.
Students in the program, who
come from all over the country,
will spend at least two weeks par-
ticipating in a search for under-
water remains of Sir Walter
Raleigh's 16th century colony on
Roanoke Island.
This particular search was in-
itiated in November by Gordon
P. Watts Jr co-director of the
summer program. Watts is a
former State Archeologist who
discovered the USS Monitor off
of Cape Hatteras in 1973. He
believes remnants of the colony
have long been covered by rising
waters of Roanoke Sound.
Co-directing the summer field
school, Still is a noted civil war
and maritime historian.
The six-week course will con-
sist of two weeks of on-campus
classroom instruction, covering
maritime history, archival
research, boat and underwater
safe'y, and other related subjects.
Participants will then spend
two weeks in the field, learning
boating operations on Tar and
Pamlico Rivers. According to
Kathryn Bequette, a maritime
history graduate student, this will
help students "get a feel for
underwater work
She also describes the demands
of the two weeks on Roanoke
Island. "You're working a good
15 hours each dayyou've got to
be willing to pull your own
weight commented Bequette-
Students who are certified in
SCUBA diving will attempt to
See SUMMER Page 3.
�M 11 Tt,ENft TW Ian Os
First Ann ual Health Fair
MendenhaU lawn was the site for the life '� a Health Affair an event designed to make students
more health conscious. Many students partic ipated by learning more .bout nutrition druas and mm
erclse. See related story page 1. ������

� �





I HI EAS C ROl INIAN
M'Kli J, ig�ft
Announcements
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY

s 'm naeting -
-A
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� KW .�4 rs! CWAI�rr
(Mr ThomnAdi i i

Hit - pig pict
lei boat d - it is
�. (�hi g �, ���" � �
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CAMPUS CRUSADE
FOR CHRIST
� �
�����. We are ioo
GAMMA BETA PHI
Id a general Dusmew meeting
Apm 3 a' 1 in trie MendenhaM
p PM I .orr AH members are urgeo
Remember ticket money i� due
RAFFLE
l�t pnje Peugeot pipehng bike (Of ijih
eqi .flier" Second prue $75 Get your
' ket from any Sigma pin Epsilon Brother
$1 Per iifl:
PSI CHI

COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
a' � .
RESUME WORKSHOP
resun , � ��
� v, - � �l f-
esutrw � -� a' eei- Pia .
�"����'�
I Marl - a er p sfor t
INTERVIEWING WORKSHOP
� � - - a . �
. : .
� � �
ECHO
� '�
l.v
ECU SURFING
� .� vvsi c aster Sunday went good
� JNC ?8 We will have one more
M M"i�ifi against unc A n
A � rig ton T ne date has not yeat Deen set
�av poVeo There win be a meeting the
�v ught tseoce the weekend o the
COLLEGE HILL
�'� toe I rodents There
� � � music and games on
"�� ' I 'day Apr I Sth 4 8pm
n the sun
ECU STUDENTS
' Nags Mead tor beg n
any y.ders Sunda�
� � a e Fr.diey a'
� rrn � at '� S130 Space
t v ;� spaces on the
� � ' nbers ar I surfers Only $5
GONE DOWN LATELY
� - " 1 : - oe holding a
- � � ��-pi . from �- 6
se room Apr
er Down Spring BaV
�'�� � rve discussed
'erested �� pa rig
� � � ec Members a re as
ECU BIOLOGY CLUB
- � �� � � - �� e '� 8'
� s V a, 1 - om bn if
�� � 5 �es a aiso be react,
�� e . �ndidtes �
MASSAGE!
rherapv � � �. j .
- -� � jesda. Apt
� Bet Building on Canes S
� � r nules Con
a � � ' �
SPECIALOLYMPICS
Muggers and buddies needed tor the local
Special Olympics Spring Games to be held at
E B AycocK Jr High School on Friday
April 25 from 9am 2pm For more informa
lion call Bill Twine at 7S2 4137 201 or Connie
Sappentield at 3SS S411
EMPLOYMENT
Employment is available to qualified
students who are interested m becoming
personal care attendents to students in
wheelchairs, readers and tutors For fur
ther details contact OFFICE OF HAN
DICAPPED STUDENT SERVICES 112
Ahichard Btdg ECU, Greenville N C
27834
BIOLOGY CLUB
The ECU B.ology Club is having its spr ,ng
semester plant sale on Wed April 2 and
Thurs April 3 from 7 30 a m to 1 p m in
room BS 111 We nave a large selection and
very low prices so stock up for the summer'
VIDEOGAMES
A Video Games Tournament ,s being spon
sored by the Student union Recreation Com
mittee from Monday April 7 through Fn
day April 18th Trophies will be awarded to
tne n,gnest scorer on each electronic video
game in the Menoennall amusement area
Register your high score in the Billiards
Center All ECU students faculty staff and
their dependents are eligible
BINGOICE CREAM
� b.ngo ice cream part, 4 being spot
sored by the Student Union Recreat.on Com
� "tee or Tuesday Apr , jth at 7 p m ,n the
Mendenhan student Center mult, purpose
'oom Adm.ssion s only 2 Eight b.ngo
games will be played and delicious ice
ream will be served ah ecu students
�� staff and their dependents are
welcome Br.ng a triend1
ECU MARCHING PIRATES
Coiorguaro auditions' ! Flag and rifle pos.
ins for 'at season Saturday ivApr u
p m Saturday 2a Apm l 4 0 m Sunday
Va. 4 23 p m An, Questions call ' n
GOCMSOy T57 6982 or Tr�Cey HedrK 'S8 907'
LEISURE SYSTEMS
STUDIES SOCIETY
pyoan games or the n a � front of
� brar, rtfirmary T me c j
' Wed Apr 1 come ,0g .
Remember -o vote' Recreate ana en .
�I �
PHYE
Snow ski during Christmas break Pre
register now for PMYE 1150 (beginning snow
skung 1 to reserve your space for fun in the
snow Spend 5 full days at a ski resort having
the time of your life learning how to ski or
sign up for PMYE 1151 I intermediate) or
sign up for PMYE 1152 (advanced! There is
a course for all levels Contact Mrs Karar
israel. ki coordinator for more information
355 4215
BLACK ALUMNI
ASSOCIATION
There will be a meeting of the ECU Black
A lumn, Association on Monday. April 7 198
The meeting will be held at MendenhaH Stu
dent Center room 244 at 6 p m
FREE TAX HELP
The Accounting Society is offering free ta�
services tor federal returns at the Studem
Booth m MendenhaH from 46 pm on
Wednesday and Thursday Federal forms
and instructions are available upon reoues'
BILLIARDS TOURNAMENT
"npre will be a student faculty statf all
CAMPUS BILLIARDS TOURNAMENT on
Thursday, Apm 3 at 6 p m Register by
Wednesday Apni 2 in the MSC Billiards
Center Can 757 �6H ext 239 for more into
See you there1
SCUBA DIVING
ADVENTURES
School s out fAai nth l6tr Dve Per
nekamp in tne Florida Keys Ke, c.argo
c or da tne world s most popular 'ee
F ve days and nignts a two tank boat 0,v�,
-a , one n.ght dive includes 'jnm an
backpacks and weights Also snorkel w ft
�ne dolphins Lodging at Howard Johnsons
full breakfas' daily swimming pool or 'r-p
oay snorkehng Cost tags lor further ,nfo
Ray S "a" D'ector of Aquatics II
'511 6441 oper rva'e- p ' a' ons
� .� aO'e
TABLE TENNIS
A Table 1 enr, s C'ub is bemg formed r . fl �
aepartmpn- of university unions A-
organra' ora -ree ng for an "teresteo
oersons w 1 be held on Wea Apr 2na a' '
p m ,n me Mendenhaii Bin arrjs Center An
ECU students faculty staff anc
deoenden's 6 y'S and above are welcon p
GOLDEN GIRL TR YOU TS
AprlQ 0 a I P m Synoay
a 11' 20. 1 p m 5 p - V.a r oocy Fle1 he
y s Building - � Ques.ons CJJII Tom
Isl . til �n: ' Be'sy M 03 '�
'St 69S4
Down East Bed R ace
Sponsored by Senior das s
ECU School of Mediane
Sunday, April 20
to benefit the
ttT
For more Information or lo register. all ISty-H
ARORTIOW I P
I() 12th HI I A
Oh PRFGj'S 4.V(
�195 Abon

and Problem
Further i
number 1-80
p m. �ee
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
wmmmmwmm&w$rm-
No other cards hug you
the way ours do
Cards & Gifts
from
Recycled Paper Produce
Central Book & News
Greenv lie Square '� �
Open 'M 9.30 p it Seve
&btf
83rd Annual
Spring Presentation
of Research Papers
Friday, April 4th
and
Saturday, April 5th
Registraiion begins in the Biology Lobby at
11:30 a.m. Friday
and at
8:00 a.m. Saturday
Scientific Research Papers will be
presented by researchers from across the
State. Learn about new findings in all fields
of Science!
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
10th A Dickinson Ave.
WE BUY GOLD & SILVER
Se INSTANT CASH LOANS
Cqt AU Transactions Confidential y'
� 7SMB22 &.
Ilaan: 9:00 �� i.M pa MoaSai.
a
imiiiifii�.�ffTmT
Our Hats Off To:
Pepsi
SGA
Campus Police
Films Committee
Air Force ROTC
Angel Flight
Army ROTC
For your participation in Veterans
A wareness Day. We couldn 7 have
done it without you!
Next Meeting: Wednesday April 9
7:30p.m.
221 Mendenhaii
iimiimuniiiiM


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Mar 29
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Bed R ace
ipn i
20
M
lS I'P
�Om�N S
;an�iations
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 3, 1986
35�&G
-
i
Red Delicious
Apples
99
79
Orange
Juice
69
ru Sat
Apr 5 '986
on
Communism,
Cause Latin Battle
Continued From Page 1.
raged among academicans.
Schoultz believes this debate is
vital to resolving the conflicts in
foreign policy towards Latin
America.
f you believe Latin America to
be a sphere of influence, explain-
ed Schoultz, then any instability
will be viewed as a threat to U.S.
security.
The Great Debate Series has
been bringing distinguished lec-
turers to ECU for the past decade
and will continue for the next
three weeks.
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE
$135 MILLION plus in financial aid went
unused last year. Freshmen, Sophomores,
ongoing graduate students; far help
cashing in on your share of those funds,
call Academic Data Services toll free
1-800-544-1574, ext. 639, or write P.O. Box
16483, Chattanooga, TN 37416.
Summer Field Classes
March 27
1:25 a.m.
Unknown person's vandalized
the fire alarms on the first and se-
cond floor at the south east cor-
ner of Garrett dorm.
1:46 a.m.
Jay Roger Turner and
Christopher Allen Dennis both of
Goldsboro, NC were arrested and
banned from campus for
trespassing, indecent exposure,
resisting arrest, and com-
municating threats.
8:44 a.m.
Money was said to be missing
from a video game game located
in Mendenhall. The machine had
obviously been broken and
entered.
2:00 p.m.
A vehicle parked east of the
Brody Building was reported van-
dalized.
4:40 p.m.
A resident of Jones dorm
reported that her car was broken
into and there had been an at-
tempt to steal her stereo. The
vehicle was parked in the
freshman lot on 14th St.
11:20 p.m.
A car parked north of Minges
was reported missing a CB
amplifier, after being broken into
and entered.
March 28
4:00 a.m.
Two residents of the 6th floor
of White dorm were found in
possession of liquor while under
the age of 21.
00a.m.
A car registered to a resident of
Garrett dorm was vandalized in
the freshman lot of 3rd and
Reade. The car's convertible top
had been cut by unknown
person's.
25 p.m.
Vandalism was reported to a
car parked in the freshman lot of
3rd and Reade. The car belonged
to a Clement dorm resident.
11:00 p.m.
Dominic Bruce of Camp Le-
juene was issued a state citation
for consuming alcohol in a vehi-
cle on campus and for a weapons
violation. He was then banned
from campus.
March 29
10:45 p.m.
Melvin Eugene Daniels was ar-
rested for trespassing in east
Umstead after being banned
from campus and for driving left
of center.
11:30 p.m.
Willie B. Hentz of Camp Le
juene was charged with driving
without an operator's license,
displaying expired license plate,
and one-way street violation,
west of Greene dorm.
April 1
12:20 a.m.
The larceny of a bike parked in
the bike rack north of Belk dorm
was reported.
12:45 p.m.
A Jarvis resident reported the
larceny of audio cassette tapes
from her vehicle parked north of
Jarvis dorm.
3:00 p.m.
A larceny was reported by
Tyler dorm residents. A class ring
was reported missing.
April 1
8:11 p.m.
A resident of Belk dorm and a
resident of Tyler dorm were seen
with Sandra F. Smith of Green-
ville in possession of marijuana
and drug paraphernalia Smith
was banned from campus
April 2
12:35 a.m.
Scott dorm residents were
found to be intoxicated and
creating a disturbance east of the
Green Barn.
Continued From Page I.
locate artifacts from the Lost
Colony at several sites offshore.
Bequette noteds all SCUBA cer-
tified students will be expected to
provide their own diving equip-
ment.
Those who are not SCUBA
certified will "help with archival
research and on-site, nondiving
operations said Bequette.
"This program has two main
objectives said Watts. "The
tirst is to give an introductory ex-
perience in maritime historv and
underwater archeology.
"The second is to give students
the opportunity to put that ex-
perience to use to aid in searching
for the Raleigh Colony site at
Roanoke Island
Applications can be picked up
at the Maritime History Annex,
located in the white trailer behind
Brewster.
Students interested in becom-
ing SCUBA certified before the
summer field school can contact
Rav Scharf, director of Aquatics
at ECU.
WZMB
Brings to you LIVE
East Carolina Baseball
Mike Small and Joseph White
Call the Action LIVE from Harrington Field
Listen to 91.3 WZMB
for the times and dates of the broadcasts
204 East Fifth Street 758 1427 Open Mon Sat 10 �.l 9
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STUDENTS!
BY MAY THE LITTLE SPACES MAY BE
IN B-l-G DEMAND!
RESERVE YOUR SPACE EARLY
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R
� .





�tiz iEaat (Earnlmfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom LuvHsfDE r, �,� ���,
Jay Stxxe . ���,�� ��
Miki l.1 d� uk. v, ��� Greg Winchester, mm, .Ulll
Scott Cooper, v.�� �� Anthony Martin. ����� �, �.�,�
Daniel Mai rer, iww.� u, meg Needham. tw�� �TO
John Shannon, w, g�. Shannon Short. ��� �.�,
DeChanh e Johnson. �� ��� Debbie Stevens. v.�
April 3. Is86
Ohn ion
Page 4
Spring Fever
Too Late For Redemption
What is this thing that has grp-
ped the people here? Semi-clad,
almost nude and the colors have
changed to bronze and darker
shades of pale short of tan. Wha
indeed � one must ask.
I couldn't say. I'm chronically
disoriented from spending too
many hours in the dark dark
catacombs that exist within the ran-
cid bowels of the building which
houses this newspaper. But it ap-
pears that something important is
afoot. Yes, that 1 can say for sure.
In walking across the campus
after dusk these warm April nighLs
one can hear the testosterone crazed
yodels, smell the heaay necta-
which the denizens of this place
swill. Freshmen find their mean-
ing in a new kind of Sanskrit. And
in the meantime there is the
philosophy of the nave! which ha
gripped the peripheral con-
sciousnesses of Hill inhabitants.
Yes! Let it knaw, slide through
the night like a winged reptile aril
know that in fad you are a wild dog
meant to prowl streets of sin and
redemption. Save a mortal soul ard
do enough to have no regrets in the
epitaph.
Who wrote that drivel? O.K to
press on then. Many on the staff of
this newspaper have, in fact, beat
imbibing prodigious quantities of
psychoactive drugs (Sports?). Of
course it must be added almost asa
rejoinder that 1 strongly disapprove
of drugs. They are the avatars of
Satan and the purveyors of a
Godless Communist ethos that is
corrupting the fine high-spirited
youth of this great American land-
scape. Do tell and the reality
flatulated daily from television
screens is an odd form of sanitv.
Nevertheless, it cannot be
doubted that the punk rock
phenomenon is quite indicative of
the moral decay of the Western
world. It is disturbing to witness the
dayglow hair, spiked chastity bets
and manicured armpits of these lat-
ter day Visigoths bearing mute
testimony to the lugubrious fad
that men who wear polyester id
longer command the respec' thev
once did. Well, God help us.
Homosexuality is rampant and
AIDS is on the increase. Praise
Jerry Falwell, the Lord finally
decided to put the arm on tha
crowd. I thought they might be
allowed to run loose and weird
forever. And every good Christian
knows that God would rather kill
one of these sinful sons of Sodom
than let him live a life of moral tor-
por.
And if only this world could be
cleansed and purified once more
Wait a minute, what is this
anemic swill0 Has my staff become
so blinded by their own bile tha
they've decided to poison me with
contraband substances that I can-
not name in print for security
reasons?
Maybe so. Or perhaps this is
s.imply a rite of the balmy season
The pagan impulse has taken hold.
ther through in order to be able to
lay claim to Wait a minute, wha
is this anemic swill? Has my staff
become so blinded by their own bile
that they've decided to poison nr
with contraband; something that I
cannot even name in print fa
security reasons1
Maybe so. Or perhaps this is
simply a rite of the balmy season
The pagan impulse has taken hold.
The pipes of Pan waft on the
breeze. A Dionysia is in the works.
Indeed, yet at the end of it ail
looms the lecturn and an ashoi
scrawl on a blackboard. An ugly
aesthetic. Of what significance is it,
1 ask when the primal passions
wait to reveal their mysteries to us?
The imbibing of poetry,
philosophy, song and dance yes, a
raucous yes! But, not the dead and
weighty tomes that land upon the
soul with a thud and urgency-
wrought by a semester's pro-
crastination. Not the gastric
agitating crunch of a term paper,
no.
No doctor of knowledge would
know about the salvation that we
seek at these times. Many drink
high voltage Columbian coffee fa
its sedative properties, trying to
stay calm. But the doctors of
knowledge do not grasp the
philosophical significance and
pseudo-psychological ramifications
of such acts. They chalk it up to
Spring Fever instead.
� v � � ft � -
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WAIT THIS TIME W� HIT THE JACKPOT-MS SAVS PR0PER7V
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7ltt
3r&pmrtc!(Hft)eu)a mo
Campus Forum
Editorial Called Biased, Unfair
I think that the editorial on 3-27-86
entitled "SGA Elections: Dirty Tricks
and Foul Play displayed a strong
and undue bias against the
Cunanan Walker ticket. How- could
anyone, let alone an investigative
reporter, walk around campus and
not "find any evidence" to support
the allegations concerning
overzealous Tomasic Jackson
workers?
Perhaps, I need to point out that
the swastika's written in ballpoint pen
on the Cunanan Walker posters were
not put there by the Cunanan Walker
campaign workers. Also the other in-
scription which marred the posters
and the campaign
Cunanan Walker was "fttt An
obvious attempt by those who sided
with Tomasic Jackson, to contuse
voters as to who wanted to det'und
frats and sorities.
Being a Cunanan Walker sup-
porter I must confess that I personal-
ly did not witness students taking
down anyone's p&sters, bm let me
relate a strange phenomenon to you.
Myself and a fellow worker blanketed
Rawl building with Cunanan Walder
posters late Monday night, neatly
placing them in key spots such as the
water fountain, where space allowed.
Oddly enough, the next morning,
many of our posters were missing,
and many had been moved farther
down the wall with a Tomasic -
Jackson poster in the original spot.
I would also like to say that your
editorial is the only source, that I
have come across, to say Mr.
Tomasic "beat up on the Treasurer of
the SGA, Tony Braswell unjustly and
without provocation 1 realize Mr.
Tomasic was put into very difficult
position, where he ultimately had to
defend himself, but in an election of
this magnitude 1 feel even social mat-
ters and conduct should play a role.
Indeed, few people ever saw the
"graphic" until your publication,
due to the fact that they never ap-
peared until Wednesday morning
when a supporter decided to go
against Mr. Cunanan's and Mr.
Walker's wishes to balance or
"smear" the election and East
Carolina University by using
something like this to their advan-
tage.
Indeed, your "inflammatory"
comment about Cunanan Walker us-
ing race as an issue, was an unneeded
and ludicrous one. Both tickets con-
tained minority representatives. One
minority being much more of a
"minority" than the other.
Let me frankly state, that my first
observation concerning the
"CunananWalker posters that
dramatically outnumbered Tomasic-
Jackson posters" was that the latter
candidates must not have purchased
as large a quantity of posters. I guess
it is human nature to always make ex-
cuses for our shortcomings, especially
when they hurt our opponents.
Not only is it "time to speak the
truth" and to "reform ECU politics"
but it is also time to reform the par-
tisan policies of the East
Carolinian,or maybe just it's
reporters' "investigative" tactics.
Richard A. Pond
History, English Major
Editorial Biased
I could not help but to be utterly
shocked over Mr. Stone's column on
March 27 pertaining to the SGA elec-
tions. To say the article was partisan,
biased, and unfair was the
understatement of the century
I'll admit that there was a little
more mudslinging than necessary.
But the only campaign that was ac-
cused of extensive mudslinging was
the side of Cunanan and Walker. Mr.
Stone claimed he couldn't find any
evidence of extensive mudslinging by
I ornasic and Jackson supporters.
Well honey, look harder next time!
There were some satirical posters
made up of Cunanan and Walker. 1
found a few in several dorms
The racial and sexual comments
about Tomasic and Jackson were
wrong. These two should be cleared
any INRl E remarks and ac-
cusations. All of the candidates were
honor albe. Thev all deserve
apologies.
Another issue that MUST be
cleared up is the slander done against
Cunanan and Walker. Steve Cunanan
is a good acquaintance of mine for-
tunately, he had very few, if any ac-
cusations against him. Gordon
Walker, however, was a different
story. He received some accusations
and abnsr that was uncalled for. The
worst accusation was accusing him of
being a racist which is a bold faced
LIE! He is NOT a racist. As a matter
of fact, he is one of my nearest and
dearest friends. There is nothing that
he wouldn't do for me. He is always
there whenever I have a problem or
need advice. If anyone can clear him
of this ridiculous charge, it's me! I'm
a member of the College
Republicans, I'm a freshman, and
I'm black. He is not guilty of that
charge.
1 wish the next SGA administration
the best for next year. We need to put
the slander, accusations, and pro-
blems behind us.
Jill Aver it
Freshman, Poll. Sci.
Editor's Note: Observations on the
election were based upon what I, per-
sonally, had an opportunity to
witness and hear . Special considera-
tion was given to reports from those
who were relatively uninvolved in the
election itself.
Allegations against Mr. Tomasic
regarding an incident with Mr.
Braswell were contained in a letter to
the editor submitted to us, which we
declined to run because of its libelous
content as I stated in last week's
editorial. Allegations were also made
against Tomasic in the office of this
newspaper by persons who were in-
volved in the Cunanan Walker cam-
paign, but who shall remain unnam-
ed.
The flyer that was put out regar-
ding the incident between Mr.
Tomasic and Mr. Braswell seemed to
imply to many on the writing staff of
this paper that Mr. Tomasic assaulted
Mr. Braswell with a baseball bat.
That was a fallacious, and certainly a
malicious, allegation.
This paper did not call Mr.
Cunanan or Mr. Walker racists nor
did we mean to imply that they en-
dorse racism. Yet, we received reports
from what we believe to be reliable
sources that racist jlyers were being
circulated by some working in the
Cunanan Walker campaign and
racist remarks were made by those
associated with the campaign.
As for graffiti; swasticas, hammers
and sickles and the like were em-
broidered on the posters of both sides
as nearly as we can tell. Yet only the
TomasicJackson posters were
systematically torn down nearly as
soon as they were put up according to
several witnesses.
We concede that Mr. Cunanan and
Mr. Walker may have been the vic-
tims of cruel remarks also. But we do
not believe (hat such remarks
the result of a concerted efj
elements of the Tomasic Juk -
campaign to smear them Thus wt
stand by our editorial of last W
Tomasic Says Thanks
I. Chris Tomasic. would like
thank Alpha Phi Alpha. S.E.D .
United Greek Organization,
Dorm, The Music School. Gospel
Choir, MSO, The Staff of Fjcpres
sions. V.A.F E.A.I and
o t h e r sy o u know who you
are).However, I would like to give a
special thanks to my business
manager and girlfriend MAR 11 Y
BAUGHAM THANKS'
This election made me grow as a
human being. I saw the good and bad
in people; and I'm proud for what I
stood for and who I stood with. A
man is only as good as his charactei
and the people who worked on the
Tomasic and Jackson campaign are
tine Americans in every sense of the
word. It we had more people like
these individuals, we would be able to
work through anything in life.
As for you Tony, I'm happy you
won and proud to call you friend. I
know you will do the best job yo
can; you have my prayers and sup-
port for next year.
David, it's been a pleasure to work
for you this year, and 1 hope we'll be
friends forever.
This letter could go on and on. b
thi is not an editorial. All I wanted
do is show my thanks. To all of �
who voted for me, thank you'
Chris Tomasic
Junior, Education History
War In Libya?
W'ith each report of recent action in
the Gulf of Sedra, I look around me
and I see expressions of delight. We
Americans, particularly we young
Americans, seem to be entertained bv
the violence. Has it been so long since
Viet Nam? I guess it has. However,
difficult, it is important for us to
recognize the consequences of the
past week. People are getting hurt'
It is easy and altogether too conve-
nient to say that Khadafi brought this
on his people. The Libyians who are
getting hurt do not make decisions.
they follow orders; these orders being
to protect their coastline How
Reagan defines Libyan waters is not
important to Libyan soldiers.
Reagan and Khadafi are playing a
silly game. There is nothing to be
gained by violence in the Gulf of
Sidra. There is only loss. The Libyans
who have died or been injured thus
far arc human beings with the same
desire to live that the victims of past
terrorism had. When will we all grow
up? As it is absurd and insane to
destroy lives and property of those
who are indirectly involved in a con-
flict, the Libyan people should not be
held responsible for the antics of that
madman. It is time for Americans to
prove that we are indeed a great Na-
tion!
John Byrd
Junior, Anthropology
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the en-
trance ofJoyner Library
G
Vo
How do ou h
week's S(, ele-
ments about the
( andv R-n
Buiir
PamhriNtit
Freshma
I'm
:hev net
area
man s;
Tara Pr
ursini? Fn
'I'm '
Mf�c (,ran(
Freshman Theatei
"I'm g!ad
won, but l'n
Cunanan w
tism at the
and the v
think that t
relevant to the a
and shouldn't nave bee
un "


A





y
'd, Unfair
ere
: by
si fl
ts we
Iomasic as I hanks
ke to
; I) .
Sla)
i pel
res-
and
give a
MAR 11 YN
.
hat 1
A
a;ater
� on the
campaign are
se of the
people like
- able to
life.
ippy you
friend. 1
- you
ind -up-
-vork
; be
. but
mted to
War In Libva?
in in
� around me
:dight. We
ing
- ' : t.d b
� g o.nce
. -�-� er,
. to
nsequ I rhe
: e are getting hurt!
too conve-
adafi brought this
� Libyiai ��� � are
' make decisions,
rdcrs being
How
� ers is not
ildiers.
rid Khadafi are playing a
-ere is nothing to be
:e in the Gulf of
I he Libyans
neen injured thus
neings with the same
e that the victims of past
m had. When will we all grow
it is absurd and insane to
lives and property of those
are indirectly involved in a con-
. the Libyan people should not be
held responsible for the antics of that
madman. It is time for Americans to
prove that we are indeed a great Na-
tion!
John Byrd
Junior. Anthropology
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 3,
1986
I
I
I
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the en-
o trance of Joyner Library.
ju. IgflMf I
Campus
Voice
How do you feel about the results of last
week's SGA elections? Do ou have any com?
ments about the way the canpaigns were rurir
'�S8
California Legislature
Gives Teachers Raises
"as
Candy Renfrow
Business Freshman
�'I'm happy with the two who
won. 1 think they'll do well.
Brian Freeze
Sophomore Industrial
Technology
"I voted for Cunanan because
Tomasic said all Greeks were
drunks and he wanted to change
the Greek svstem
(CPS) � The AFT's Robinson
believes the school reform move-
ment - often expressed as a
nebulous concern for course
excellence" - may have helped
inspire the raises in California, if
not everywhere.
Teachers on the 19 campuses
of California State University
received a 10 percent raise last
year, followed by nine percent
hike this year.
"The California Legislature
has been generous the last few
years observes Paul Worthman
of the California Faculty
Association.
But Worthman warns the in-
creases are being used as bait by
trustees, who : -� trying to wrest
more control from faculty
members over how campuses are
run.
As part of their proposal to
raise salaries by 6.8 percent next
year, for example, Cal State's
trustees suggested procedural
changes in the way they could
award bonuses and make promo-
tions without consulting faculty
members as rigorously as they do
now.
"This is really demoralizing to
the faculty. It's really a nasty
thing asserts Prof. Ann Birge
of Cal State at Hayward.
In Colorado, legislators are of-
fering higher salaries in return for
closer control over the kinds of
courses and graduate programs
certain state campuses can offer.
Nevertheless, "I don't see
'quid pro quo' (the pratice, in
this case, of trading campus in-
fluence for higher salaries) as a
national trend Robinson says.
Moreover, professors in some
states particularly those depen-
dent on the depressed encergy
economy - won't be getting
raises at all.
In general, though, Molotsky
and Eymonerie think faculty
salaries will keep rising for a year
or two more.
Beyond that, they forecast
lower federal support for col-
leges, which may make continued
increases in real income more dif-
ficult.

Attorney General
Pam Christie
Freshman utrition
"I voted for Chris Tomasic �
I'm sorry he didn't win. I think
they needed to have fewer voting
areas in main places instead ol so
many spread out all oxer campus.

Keith Abluton
Feshman Business
"1 vsas happy Cunanan won,
but 1 wish Gordon Walker would
have won the vice president
Applications available in SGA office at
Mendenhall and 209 Whichad
Application DeodlineApril 11
"GOLDEN GIRL"
Tryowts
U When: Saturday, April 19, 10-5
Sunday, April 19, 1-5
Where: Main Lobby, Fletcher Music Bldg.
Bring: Comfortable Clothes &
Lots of enthusiasm!
vv '�'��vyy- vVAVxxyvyy'vvyy
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Br
Washington Highway (N.C. 33 ExtGreenville, North Carolina
Phone 752-3172
(Past RiverbluffApts.)
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Popcorn Shrimp
Hours 4:30-9:30 MonSat.
- NEWLY REMODELED -
J. � �� -�- -i- �i- �i- -i- -r �i� -A' -A- "A" & "A" "A" '
Autographing
Session
ECU Student Stores invites you
to attend an autographing session
for Dr. Mary Jo Brat ton, author
ECU: The Formative Yean
Thursday, April 10, 1986
1:00 p.m - 3:00 p.m.
The book is available at Student
Stores, Wright Building, at a cost
of $19.95 plus sales tax.
Refreshments Will Be Served X
Tare Prosser
Sursing Freshman
"I'm happy with the results
Mem�
American Optometnc Association
University Optometric Eye Clinic
DR. DENNIS O'NEAL ,11m
Comprehensive Eye Examinations l
Contact Lenses
Soft, Hard, Gas Permeable Tinted
Extended Wear, Contacts for Astigmatism
Glasses (One Day Service in Most Cases)
Student & Faculty Discounts on Contacts &
Glasses
Convenient to Campus
Evening & Sat Appointments Available
7

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I
612 E. 10th Street
(Across from campus security)
758-6600
Steve Grant
Freshman Theater Arts
"I'm glad Anthony Jackson
won, but I'm not glad Steve
Cunanan won. There was favor -
tism at the voting booths at Slay
and the Student Store. I also
think that Tomasic's fight was ir-
relevant to the whole campaign
and shouldn't have been brought
UD
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I






6 fHE EAST CAROLINIAN APRI1 V iv�6
African Studies Committee Present Apartheid Symposium
1 i. e Bureau
n official oi the Reagan Ad-
ministration lold a smposium at
ECU this week that the United
States intends to use all its in-
fluence to end apartheid in South
v" ica
William Robertson, Deputy-
Kssistanl Secretar oi Siate for
frican ffairs, said the people
ited states are aware of
�� need foi change in South
ca
" v � desire freedom foi
and abroad The
messag s nil Vfi ica todaj is
end apartheid We (the I Sare
the influence we
� end apai
� �� d
. Robertson.
v erican businesses
south Atnca are the
he United States has
. positive change in
ever we have to pull
- entit) and we are
i ng to use it as effectively as we
assist change in South
Our aim must be to bring
o her senses, Apar-
e dismantled he
d
He American business
� need to remain in South
'rder to bring about a
that coun-
- problems. "Rather than talk
we are going to pull
lesses out of south
VI ige to businesses
'Do m more
said American
�crating in South
helping to end apar-
The businesses there are
iny ar
I .� does take place.
I nitcd
-

iulti-nati lal c
$2.7 �
� .a. Robert-
wit h d
-es wou
. .ernmei
�morrow
but I
� heid would
ressure
ur 350
�s ild sa 's'
� Ided.
eaker at the sym-
1 hettle, .
ion,
will have K : .
g efl - and
"Apa saster
� .11 be with
come, It is a mat-
ter . caring
e said.
Hems
Africa,
aid change is occurring,
"Change is taking place in South
Africa. Throughout society,
segregation is being dismantled
Far more signifincani are the
changes which indicated the
government has abandoned
grand apartheid
Chettle cited an increasing
number of blacks moving into
businesses and a denouncement
of apartheid b South African
President Botha as some ol the
change that have occurred in the
country.
ithough reform is taking
place in South Africa, Chettle
said serious problems fot Macks
such as the right to vote, pooi
education and high unemplnv
ment are vet to be solved.
i. hettle also said he believes
American corporations should
continue to operate in South
frica, "I here is a general reicv
tion b the American people ol
apartheid, but also a general
jection of economic sanctions
and disinvestment against South
Africa Black people react very
much the same way the Mask
rank and file believe I S. cor
porations should stay in South
Africa 1 believe this is a pro
foundl) sensible and correct
view "
He added the South African
people believe American corpora
tion operating in their countrj
should do theii best to push,
quality and should remain in
South Atri
1 he keynote speaker at the
sympoium wa Da
assistant I R
autl
Fhe Sullivan P
CO!
Othei spx �
posium includ
)r lohnell if D ��
and .
nive
the similar
between Soul
K
-
Brazil
The
B
�ryJ-
Save your breath.
Plant a tree to make
more oxygen.
PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH SAT APRIL 5 AT SAV
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(bassi. i�vjd Biounl
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Deli alonfc with Dim I ittk
9:30 pm followed b Dtrt I
new progressive r�nk r��n





rHE fASTCAROl INI AN
AFRIl J, N86
African Studies Committee Present Apartheid Symposium
I i ! Ncwv Bureau
An official oi the Reagan Ad-
ministration told a symposium at
ECU this week that the United
Slates intends to use all its in-
fluence to end apartheid in South
frica.
William Robertson, Deputy-
ssistant Secretary of State for
African Affairs, said the people
of the United States are aware of
the need foi change in South
Africa
" Americans desire freedom for
ose here and abroad. The
message to South Africa toda is
end apartheid We (the U.S.) are
going to use the influence we
�o in South Africa to end apar-
theid he said.
a g to Robertson,
pressure on American businesses
erating in South Africa are the
best method !he United States has
litating positive change in
region
"The onl lever we have to pull
the business entitv and we are
. ing to use it as effectively as we
can to assisl change in South
frica. Our aim must be to bring
ith Africa to her senses Apar-
. d must be dismantled he
said.
He added American business
interests need to remain in South
V bring about a
peaceful resolution to that coun-
try's problems. "Rather than talk
ul how we are going to pull
businesses out of South
Africa, our message to businesses
ld be, 'Do more; do more
Robertson sad American
esses operating in South
Africa are helping to end apar-
"The businesses there are
g more; many are staying to
a ge does take piace.
s is a mjor way the United
States can plav a role in positive
change
X ' ug e United States has
about 350 multi-national cor-
ns and $2.7 billion in-
vested in South Africa, Robert
said a withdrawal of
Ymerican businesses would not
� the South African
y .ernmen;
"It the - �- pulls out,
frican government
topple tomorrow
We cat mpose sanctions, but I
assure �u apartheid would
fie I mted States is
e, we can put pressure on
frica To our J50 com-
panies i would say Stay the
he added
Another speaker at the sym-
John Chettle, director of
African Foundation,
theid will have long-
� " intry and
ts people.
"Apatheid has been a disaster
se repei ns will be with
for vears to come. It is a mat-
ter ol anguish for any caring
ith African he said.
Despite the serious problems
:h exist in South Africa,
Chettle said change is occurring,
"Change is taking place in South
Africa. Throughout society,
segregation is being dismantled.
Far more significant are the
changes which indicated the
government has abandoned
grand apartheid
Chettle cited an increasing
number of blacks moving into
businesses and a denouncement
of apartheid by South African
President Botha as some of the
change that have occurred in the
countrv.
Although reform is taking
place in South Africa, Chettle
said serious problems tor blacks
such as the right to vote, poor
education and high unemplov
merit are yet to be solved.
Chettle also said he believes
American corporations should
continue to operate in South
Africa, "I here is a general rejec-
tion by the American people of
apartheid, but also a general re-
jection ol economic sanctions
and disinvestment against South
Africa. Black people react very
much the same way the black
rank and file believe U S. cor-
porations should stay in South
Africa. I believe this is a pro
foundly sensible and correct
view
He added the South African
people believe American corpora
tion operating in their countrv
should do their best to push for
quality and should remain in
South Africa.
The keynote speaker at the
sympoium was Dan Purnell,
assistant to Rev
author ol the Sullivan Prim ipies.
I he Sullivan Principles pron
equal opportunity in mei
companies operating in s
Africa
Other speake-
posium included two
Dr John Cell ol Duke
and Ge �rge Fred; icks
ford University -ed
the similarities and differen
between South Afri ai
Ame
eluded wen
Ros '�'
pers;
and �
'Brazil'
There
Bv H
I
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9:30 p.m followed n Dirt l
new progressive rock band f





Symposium
relations. Also in-
he Res Vernon
ila Chabaku,
can leligious
vided their
relationship
'� apartheid.
entitled
e United
ed h the
esoinmittee
romote a
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
APRIL 3, 1986
Page 7
Brazil' Flies Hioh
There's A Life After Python
By ROBERT MAZZOLI
SUffWrMw
Let's get something straight
ight from the start. There is too
nuch to see in the movie Brazil.
lowever, there is a remedy for
to see Brazil again, and again,
againad infinitum.
Remember the song by XTC
ailed "Senses Working Over-
ne?M Easily, one could sit com-
abl in the theatre for a little
er two hours, pay close atten-
an to the action, even take
res, and one could miss a great
a es and ears are simply in-
dequate for the visual and aural
mpact of Brazil.
Brazil concerns the ultimate
nare � a bureaucracy of
lure that strangles itself
is own paperwork, lots of
aperwork. For instance, the
ie opens with a paper pusher
a fly. The dead fly lands in
printing machine, and thusly,
.me Tuttle becomes Buttle.
tie is forcibly (even this small
lescriptive word is inadequate)
aken from his family and home
juestioned by the govern-
1 he government of Brazil?
I don't think so.
rhe U.S. government?
Maybe, but whomever's
�:nent is irrelevant.
t Sam Lowry, a nice civil
fellow who lives part of
n a dream. The society he
� is filled with indifferent
cubicles, decorator plumbing,
plastic surgeons and posh
restaurants with not-so-posh
meals (a little green slime here
with a touch of purple there). Of
course, he lives in a world of
paperwork of which he is slowly
growing weary of shuffling.
Brazil is a strange world, no
doubt. The strangeness of it all
forces Sam more and more into
his dream world of flying � fly-
FILM
ing without the aid of an aircraft.
In these dreams, Sam is
transformed into an Icarus-type
character who tries to free a fair
beauty from her cage. Literally,
the woman of his dreams is real,
and when he finally sees her,
flesh, blood and all of that other
good stuff, she becomes his
obsession.
Sounds like a simple plot,
doesn't it.
Fooled you, but don't feel bad.
The plot fooled me, too.
There is very little simplicity to
Terry Gilliam's epic of future
times. On the surface, you could
swear you're watching some
demented version of 1984. You
are. Then when you get into
detail, you'll notice intricacies
from other visual movies like
Pink Floyd: The Wfl, Gandhi,
Blade Runner, Monty Python
and the Holy Grail, Time Bandits
and Gone With the Wind.
In a way, you could roll up the
visual impact of each of the
aforementioned movies and still
have room left over for more
scenery in Brazil.
Amazing, huh? So amazing, in
fact, that Universal almost did
not release the film. Thank God,
Gilliam fought for this movie.
But the movie is still strange,
performances abound
throughout � excellent perfor-
mances from Jonathan Pryce
(Sam), Robert De N'iro (a
renegade plumber), Katherine
Helmond (Sam's mom) and
Michael Palin (the evil inter-
viewer). Costumes, sets,
cinematography, pace,
intensitywell, damn, it's a
strange but great film.
Some of the scenes are
understated but tend to be the
most memorable. In one in-
stance, Sam's mother throws a
gala, and when Sam comes
through the door, a man dressed
in an early 17th century suit pulls
out a pistol and demands an in-
vitation from the hostess's son.
Incredible.
So if you have a penchant for
strange but classic movies, Brazil
is for you. In my opinion Brazil is
the best movie of its kind I've
seen in the past five years. It's
like f'raserhead; strange,
melodramitic and engrossing.
However, Brazil has a plot. And
much, much more.
It's all about flights of fantasy. And tf� nightmare of i
Terrorist bombings. And late night i
True love. And creative plumbing.
Terry Gilliam's Bizzare film, 'Brazilfea turing Jonathan Pryce,
Robert De Niro, Ian Holm and Michael Pal in is presently playing at
the Plitt IV Theatres in the Carolina East Convenience Center.
Gilliam, known for his work with Monfc Py thon, proves that he can
take his off-beat humor and carve a niche f o r himself in the film in-
dustry outside the Python group. This Lhfve rsal Pictures film is rated
R.
'Mr. Sunshine 'Brightens ABC Line-up
� The idea of laughing
d man is, of course, sick.
. ng with a blind man; now
. es down a bit easier.
.t is the key difference in
s new sitcom "Mr. Sun-
which debuted March 28.
-st glance, one is tempted to
md it a sick show that cracks
ies at the expense of the
. tless But it does more good
narm.
show is about an acerbic,
ned, about to be divorced,
: college professor who is
blind. In the first episode, by
fficial count, there is one joke
nute that touches on the sub-
� of blindness.
a delicate subject, for net-
ks do not wish to dance on
the toes of the sightless.
But "Mr. Sunshine" works,
and often is hilarious, because
the writers seek not to laugh at
the blind man, but to laugh with
him; to treat him as an ordinary
human being, not some one-
armed superman, hero javelin
thrower who just won the Olym-
pics for America.
Too many times television
treats disabilities the same way: a
blind man who sees more than
those with good eyes or a man in
a wheelchair who achieves more
than those with legs. To be on
television, the disabled must be
truly extraordinary.
Tales that harp on the hero
handicap theme only help to
make the handicapped out to be
freaks. They must not only deal
with their disability, but do so in
such a super-achiever way as to
inspire and motivate those
without disabilities.
But the handicapped are
neither heroes nor freaks. They
are people, plain and simple.
Jeffrey Tambor plays Paul
Stark, alias "Mr. Sunshine and
is also an accomplished stage and
screen actor (you may remember
him as Michael Keaton's boss in
Mr. Mom or as Judge Alan
Wachtell on "Hill Street Blues").
Barbara Babcock plays his
landlord, John Navin Jr. is his
16-year old son, and Grace
D'Angelo is perfect as his caustic
secretary.
With a show about a blind
New Originals Band Offers Variety
Scheduled To Rock The New Deli
man, Tambor is aware that he is
treading on rice paper.
"I have been terribly vigilant
about this. For instance when 1
bump into the wall, the laugh is
not at the bump. The laugh
comes at the place where he says
'And I knew that was there We
are laughing at his pride, at his
nature, at his character.
"The humor that comes from
him is that he will not accept
help. He can do it all himself
'There's no problem he says
Tambor then details a scene in
the premiere in which Stark who
has just severed ties with his wife,
reluctantly heads to a club for
newly separated or divorced peo-
ple. He promises he will use his
red and white cane, but as soon
as he steps inside the door, the
cane is folded up and tucked into
. his pocket. Naturally, a frighten-
ed blind man at a dance can cause
quite a stir.
A woman asks, "Are you real-
ly blind?" and Stark responds.
"Bats use me as a role model
Tambor explains. "There's
one line: 'bats use me as a role
mode You put that in print and
sou go, wow. But that's the first
time he's been out in a social mix-
ture. He's scared. The line comes
out of that. That false bravado.
"1 feel the humor is very in-
structive. It is not at the expense
of anything. Everyone can
understand what pride is,
whether they are disabled or
not Tambor says.
"It's quite universal. This
show is not about blindness. It's
about a man who is a great
teacher, who has an acerbic
nature and whose heart is shiver-
ing with fear because he's afraid
to get back out there in real life.
He's afraid to ask for help. He
mistakes everything for pity.
"Where 1 think he's blind
See ABC, Page 8
B DAVID BRADSHAW
MIWHtai
Off-beat but not off rhythm,
of-line but not off the target,
the progressive rock band Off
Center plays a brand of music
that can't be pigeoned into the
usual holes. David Blount,
guitarist, keyboardist, and lead
vocalist for the group, describes
the band's eclectic sound as a col-
lage of "jazz, rock, pop and fu-
sion but not just that
The band's repertoire consists
entirely of original tunes, ranging
from fusion-influenced in-
strumentals to pop vocal songs.
Creating original music has been
an important principle for the
band since it was formed in the
summer of 1985, the songs being
written by Blount and guitarist
John Shannon.
When time permits, Off Center
records their music at a studio in
w M3 f
Off Center, which consists of (left to ftjit) Morad Rowshan-Aragi
(bass), David Blount (vocals, guitar, keyboards), Scott Patterson
(drums) and John Shannon (guitar), srescheduled to rock the New
Deli along with Dirty Little Secrets on fuday . Off Center will start at
9:30 p.m. followed by Dirty Little Secrta at 11 p.m. Off Center is a
new progressive rock hand formed leas man a year ago.
Blount's home, and one of their
songs, "The Lamb is receiving
some airplay on WZMB. In the
near future, Blount hopes to get
some of the music on WRDU and
other North Carolina stations.
Although the band was formed
last July, they didn't surface until
the recent WZMB Battle of the
Bands competition. Their perfor-
mance earned them first place in
the contest, a $300 cash prize and
some local recognition.
Aside from Blount and Shan-
non, Off Center consists of Scott
Patterson on drums and Morad
Rowshan-Araghi on bass. Patter-
son's drumming provides a
solidity and stability to the group
sound which may reflect his ex-
perience in the heavy metal bands
Driver and Threshold.
Rowshan-Araghi, a self-
described Pink Floyd fanatic,
feels the diversity of influences
within the group make for
something to interest "just about
anybody
Off Center will perform for the
first time since the Battle of the
Bands this Friday night at New
Deli, along with Dirty Little
Secrets, another predominately
original local band.
Off Center will open the first
set at 9:30 p.m and Dirty Little
Secrets will begin at 11 p.m. A $2
cover will be charged at the door.
A far cry from the usual bar-
rage of worn out classics or
unknown new wave covers, the
evening promises fresh entertain-
ment for a town that should be
ripe for it.
Insiders Claim
Casting Couch
Still An Issue
(UPI) � Many Hollywood ac-
tresses are sexually harassed by
their bosses but don't expose the
problem for fear of being brand-
ed a "troublemaker TV Guide
magazine reported.
"Everybody is afraid. It makes
people nervous just to talk about
it, because suddenly you're
branded as a troublemaker, and
suddenly, people don't want you
around Timothy Blake, head
of the Screen Actors Guild
Women's committee, said in the
March 29 issue.
"This town is full of people
who think it doesn't exist
anymore but it does. It happens
all the time to almost every girl I
know. This town eats them up
alive and spits them back old and
useless talent manager Joan
Greene said.
Actor Ed Asner, former guild
president, said sexual pressure in
Hollywood often was blatant.
"I know a girl who went to see
an agent, and when she walked
into his office he closed the door
by pressing one button. He push-
ed another, and a bed shot out of
the wall. That's about as glaring
as it gets Asner told the
magazine.
But some show business ex-
ecutives blamed reports of sexual
harassment on women who failed
because of their acting, not for
rejecting their bosses passes.
Tracy Groggins of "The Col-
bys" said she was fired from
"Magnum P.I for refusing the
advances of a boss. But producer
Donald Bellisario said Groggins
was fired because executives were
disappointed in her
performance
Ana Alicia, now a star on
"Falcon Crest revealed her ex-
perience with a television ex-
ecutive.
"I went to interview for a
series with a man who was a big
name reputable producer. He
said he liked me. He brought me
back three times to read and said
I was perfect for the part Alicia
told TV Guide.
"The last time he brought me
back he closed the door. We were
alone. He told me his wife didn't
understand him. I told him I
didn't like him in that way. He
turned on me. He said I would
never work in this town again
she said.
Stuntwoman Jean Coulter
spent 15 years in showbusiness
earning $40,000 or more, annual-
ly, but she said she was
blacklisted in 1980 for turning
down the advances of a stunt
coordinator for Spelling-
Goldberg productions.
From The Not So flight
Pat Is Just Majorly Chafed
Bv PAT MOLLOY
I EMU!
It's time again. Time to talk of the little t hings
that accumulate over time and really piss me off. I
consider myself a pleasent enough iudt. 1 like
most pets (except poodles and Schnaxzer-like
dogs), I watch Star Trek, and I bathe; therefore, I
expect things and people to fall into place and
assume a smooth groove. Unfortunately, life, in
its ultra-splendid glory doesn't always work out
that way.
I went to Fast Fare at around two in the m orn-
ing to pick up a cup of badly-needed caffeine . Just
as I put my hand on the locked door, I notice d the
Fast Fare sign that clearly announced "open 24
hours Try to figure it. Just another pan in the
butt.
Debutantes. Who believes that in the 80's peo-
ple are still having their "coming out" parties.
Good lord, do us all a favor and just stay in. To be
fair, I have a few friends who are "debs and I
can take them in small doses � like cyanide .
They have phrases that only debs are sup posed
to know, which are highly reminiscert of the
secret "Elk handshake Phrases such s "I feel
close and "don't ya knowand "big kisser, big
kissesThey also have names such s Dawn,
Ashley, and Katherine. You know what they talk
about? They talk about jaunting around the south
of France as if it were a trip to the bathroo m �
which , incidentally, isn't a bathroom � it's a
lavatory, dahhhling.
Certain rock bands have ill effects on me. B ands
such as Asia � which isn't really a band �th ey're
just a few dudes who figured out how to slam a
chord on a guitar and scream like croaking
gazelles. Think about their lyrics. "One look from
you and I would fall from grace. And that w ould
wipe the smile right from my face Certainly a lot
of thought went into that song. The guy probably
wrote it in the lavatory. Give it a rest.
The lingerie industry really chafes rrc. They
simply can't leave a good thing alone. At the very
instant 1 mastered the art of unbuckling a bra
while hugging a girl, Maidcnform developed a bra
that buckles in front.
God, am I mad. Folks, I spent hours.no, days
of my life practicing to snap that hook just right.
And I was good at it, too. I could snap a bra a t fif-
ty yards. I'd just look at it and the damn thing
would fall off. But noooo, not anymore. N ow I
have to angle my hand in a fashion that w ould
make Silly Putty cringe.
Morons trouble me to no end. You can spot
them without much difficulty. 1 spoke toam oron
night before last as a matter of fact. Normally, I
would have simply ignored him, but he caught me
while I was slightly intoxicated.
I was drinking a beer at Chico's, talking to a
guy standing net to me, and suddenly re s t arted
calling the bar tender "honey and "sweet
thing He was a moron. Give it a res; dudes.
We're no longer in the days of the "old w est
Women nowadays are quite capable of rapo n ding
to their given names. Give it a try, I bet you ' 11 get
where you want to go much faster, partner.
Okav, I'm finished. Tve vented my frustrations,
for now. 1 can breathe easily with the know ledge
that I'll no longer have to deal with these
troublesome subjects. I can traverse downtown
ready to deal with the stupid signs I'll ercou nter.
Ready to deal with the debs (luv ya). Andqu ite on
my guard and ready to deal with any morons who
might come my way. My only hope is that I don't
run into any geeks during my visit. Geeks, now
they really chum my stomach
� f,r
f - �" m ��' m � �
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.
- V4 immri V�





8
IHh EAS1 . ARoi IMAN
APRll J, 1986
Dunaway As Beverly Hills Madame
I h. i arr some �fr� eood ruwiio
ii be afraid of Ihr dark.
A
ILOOM COUNTY
il PI) There are two roles
most actresses love to play �
nuns and hookers
These are the meat parts that
Mien drau Academ) Award at-
tention and seem to fascinate au-
diences 1 he are, perhaps, the
extremes ol the female moral ex-
perience and when written foi
nims they are frequentl) packed
with drama.
Indeed, two Oscar nominees
this Anne Bancroft and
Meg rill) - were nominated for
theii oles as nuns
ae Dunaway, who won an
Oscar in 1976 playing a hard-
bitten executive in e(irk,
plays the title role in Beverly
Hills Madam a two-hour NB(
TV movie to be broadcast March
31.
"For some reason Dunawav
said the other day, "everyone is
interested in hookers. Thev are a
challenge to play for ' many
reasons. Most men and women
really don't know what makes
them tick or why they become
hookers.
"I was developing a project
about prostitutes on my own
when this story came along two
months ago. it was just about
what I had in mind � the story o
a woman who runs a string of
$l.(XX)-a-night call girls.
"She trains, educates and
refines the young hookers in the
profession. I'd researched the
subject, including news stones
about the Radcliffe girl, the
socialite, who became a madam
and wa.s arrested in New
Dunaway, slender and nu
a cold on one of her infrequ
trips to Hollywood
London home, said she had n
met a high-class call g
madam, which adds
fascination with such women.
"My character is nat
and on the level at whi
operates there is a fortum
made from prostitution
said. "But it can't be ea
woman emotional!)
"Money probabi) is
reason why whores g
business. But it also g
kind ol power, ol be-
ntrol of a situation �
�'� man and never being
�hie
"M research ver clearly m-
men don't get into pro-
vr the enjoyment ol
�t'x- I in ex-hooker whi
led ever to be emo-
ii' b a man agam.
1 ne reason why ac-
play whores is that
� ers also have to be
;ses who act out their
he men they ate
lighted a cigarette
and exhaled a cloud of blue
smoke She went on to say there
is a fine line between so-called
respectability and prostitution.
"Whores go to bed with men
they don't love for profit she
said. "Many women marry men
they don't love for security or
material reasons. Women tradi-
tionally have felt they must pro-
tect themselves in a man's world.
There has almost always been a
stigma of being a woman alone.
So women make bargains in life
FRK5HT NIGHT
If Mm Unr hrwig w 4f d
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e bails you want 30c
756 3261 after 7pm
ATTENTION STUDENT'
graduation �
.ap in a draw i
� have t bi i .�
format on call 799 34
P O Bo r391
28406
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term papers
Spelling and grar-
� ns included .
5 30 .
FOR SALE
sizes, all coi
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ONSOLIOATiD
HEATRES
All Seats $2.00 Everyday Til 5:30 PfvQ

frwi ii'k m'
BUCCANEER MOVIES
7th Big Week!
"THE COLOR
PURPLE" pg-u
' S�KJHIM Nt"lt .
05- 3 10
7 159:20
"GUNG-HO"
P(x-13


PROFESSIONAL TYPING
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VICE
DatavA �
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reports U
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lent
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FOR SALE
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The Money Pil
PG

Special ECU Student Admission Coupon
Admit 2 Students For The Price Of One
After 5:30 p.m.
Any Sun Tues Wed. or Thurs.
SPIELBE.TG FILM
Cdor
ckets
t a playing'
nl '
Please set pae 12
- it 757-344
APARTMENT FOR RENT V
August of ier.
RECORDS
DAPPER
GARAGE
. .
� i d les
prices c �
Located a'
east fi
.�� �.
for ' I
DAN'S BLOWO
SALE I rmerly
Flea Markel . I
���� � f. antiques, coi
� �
� � � anc Saturday
215 Britt Road I
Hastings Foro dc
U T
Blank Tapes
TDKUD90 $2.98
Maxell XLII90 $2.98
112 E. 5th St. 758-4298,
NATIONAL
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120Ficklen Street
830-0345 i
CHANGE OIL, LUBE i
AND FILTER I
W i
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res �
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per customer
- 36
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$19.88 Change Fluid I
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($49.95 value)
One Coupon per customer
Must be presented at time of
sale I
Expires 4-30-86
FREE TO
FREE ESTIMATES
REPLACE FRONT
DISC PADS
Most Cars
$39.88
Turn Rotors Extra,
if needed
One coupon per customer
Expires 4-30-86
A
niiii�iintntiiiTinfTnlltlfMlllt
s
t
I
Students
jfatteras
Hammocks
Needs You
Work Your Own Hours
NO Weekends
Easy to Learn
Apply 1104 Clark St.
8:00-5:00 Mon-Fri
'o Phone (alls. Please
See For Yourself
GRADUATES
CALL
499:457-4065
FOR $400 AND
PRE-APPROVED
CREDIT ON A
NEW FORD
on All Frames, Sunglasses,
and Contact Lenses
Everyday.
Sw. then- are two kiuim, ttv ttei BOO Ojttwm train u, d�ff
trun j evtrvdi awp)� M) fiO .ti regular retail pnus rtx:
Eyt Sue jt The Wua. anl The hye ("are Cams at ihe Tmn Ar��
In additmii. eye cununaDms are availabkr at The fye Care Cola
Nu appntrtnt-nf i�xevsar. (all tor exam hiiur.
eve �i
rhr PUa
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onoMcmic
CAB�C3E
o.o.
For r ramr Selection and Kye t umiiulmm
:i (.rrrmillr Bivd iTiploa Annei)
Phone 756-9404
Dr Peter Hollis
It's l:as To Qualify
For $400 from Ford
Motor Company
� (Hi Tiuist receive ,u
least a bachelor's degree
or a state RN license
between)ctober i, 1 985
uul September n ! 986.
For Pre-approved
Credit from Ford
Credit
� You must have vei ih-
�ille employmeni that
begins within 20 days
of your qualitx inr vehi-
cle purchase .11 .i salary
sufficient to cover ordi-
nary living expenses and
your vehicle payment
� Your credit record, if
you have one, must indi-
cate payment made as
agreed.
� And don't forgetyou
must receive at least a
bachelor's degree or a
Mate R. license between
October 1, 985 and Sep-
tember n 1986.
1 hese Vehicles Are
Included In The Plan
Ford: Escort, Escort EXP
lempo, Mustang,
1 hunderbird
Mercury: Lynx, Topaz,
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lord Truck: Aerostar,
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o
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You are eligible for $400
even if you don't finance
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toward your down pay-
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lord after the purchase
or lease.
The amount of your pre-
approved credit is deter-
mined by the qualified
vehicle you buy.
It a vehicle is not in
dealer stock, it must
be ordeied by June 1,
l�86. Delivery of all
vehicles must be taken
by August M, 1986.
For complete details on
how to get your $400
plus pre-approved credit,
call the toll-free number
today.
1-800-457-4065
M
OPINION! '�

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FREE TOWING
FREE ESTIMATES
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ADS
Cars
$3988
Rotors Extra,
needed
ei customer
s
5
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Wire I e if
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rom
ttcT ti-
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: you buy.
flicle is not in
Mock, it must
red h June 1,
)elivery of all
is must be taken
;um U, 1986.
mplete details on
get your $400
je-approved credit,
toll-free number
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 3, 198ft
BLOOM COUNTY
t
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5 Outfit
52 Sum up
53 Note of scale
55 Empower
59 Diocese
9 Flying mammal 60 Fish sauce
12 Landed
13 Girls name
14 Macaw
15 Cubic meters
17 Sign on door
18 Short sleep
19 Demons
21 Pope's scarf
23 Return to the
scene
27 Article
28 Heavenly being
29 Solemn promise
31 Shoemaker s
tool
34 Kind of type
abbr
35 Musical
compositions
38 Cooled lava
39 Condensed
moisture
41 Deep yearning
42 Swift
44 Part of to be"
46 Infinite duration
48 Parts of
skeleton
51 Winter vehicle
30 Rabbit
enclosure
32 Linger
33 Lord s wife
36 Born
37 Footwear
40 Roam
43 Greek letter
45 Maine abbr
4 7 Choose
48 Foundation
49 River in
Germany
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2 In music, high
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4 Bands of color
5 Canadian park 54 Beverage
and peninsula 56 Neckpiece
6 Printer s 57 Piece of cut
measure timber
7 Southern 58 Abstract being
blackbird 61 Babylonian
8 City in Nevada deity
9 Fruit
10 Sea m Russia
11 Strip of cloth
16 Use
20 Men of learning
22 Sun god
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Focus On
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Help Prevent
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Support the
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FOR HEALTHY
BABIES
build a strong
foundation with
good prenatal care.





I Ml EAS1 l AKOl INIAN
Sports
APRIL 3, 1986 Pige 10
Bo wling To ward O lympics
Bowlers Advance
By TIM CHANDLER
Three ECU students may find
themselves bowling for the gold
in the 1988 Olympic games. The
three students are Loleta Lee,
Lewis Kendrick and Wade Pen-
dagill.
All three students are trying
out for the Team U.S.A. bowling
squad. Team U.S.A. not only
compete in 'he Olympics, but
also the World Games, and Pan
American Games.
The three competed in Raleigh
on March 22 for the right to earn
a berth in the regionals to be held
in Jacksonville, Florida, beginn-
ing on July 24.
They will be representing the
North Carolina Young American
Bowling Alliance.
If the three advance past the
regionals, they will only have two
more rounds to go to become a
part of the team.
The date for the tryouts for the
nationals has not yet been an-
nounced.
Annual TKE Boxing Tourney Results
The trip to the regional tourna-
ment will be an all-expense-paid
trip for the three.
Lee, a freshman from
Petersburg, Va said it is a big
honor for her to go to the
regionals. "I was real excited
when I found out that I made it
stated Lee, "but I still have to
climb the ladder some more
"I was real excited when I found
out that I made it, but I till have
to climb the ladder some more. "
�-Loleta Lee
Lee also said that she needs to
get her arm in shape since she will
have to bowl around 24 games in
the regionals.
Lee is also a member of the
ECU Lady Track team She com-
petes in the discus event
In the state bowling tourna-
ment, Lee had an average score
of 188.
Kendrick, a sophomore from
Fayetteville, will receive a bye
from the first day of regional
competition. Kendrick finished in
the top seven in the state competi-
tion earning him the bye
Kendrick said that he wa.
pleased with his finish. "I didn't
think I would finish in the top
seven said Kendrick, "it wa
pretty exciting for me
Kendrick also stated tha
felt that the regionals would be a
good experience "I believe it
could teach me a lot added
Kendrick. The third student,
Wade Pendagill, was unable to be
reached for his comment on the
tournament
If all goes well for the three
Pirate bowlers, II :ould be
well represented in the 1988
Olympic Games.
Sports Fact
Thurs. Apr. 3, 1936
Boxer Al Carr takes only 10
seconds to flatten his opponent
in a lightweight bout held in
New Haven, Connecticut A:
the opening bell, Carr rushes
across the ring and knocks Lew
Massey cold with one punch.
By SCOl I 'COOPER
The 11th Annual T'KL Boxing
Tournament took place March
25-27 with eight overall winners
in different weight categories.
There were two repeat champs
from last year as James Thomp-
son and Raleigh Berry won their
respective classes. However,
Cherry Point native Steven
McAllister was. named the m
valuable boxer of the tourna-
ment.
The boxing tournament's
registration chairman Mark
Schechter was pleased with the
student turnout � at least with
the championships.
"In the championship round
there were a lot of people � three
times as many as the first
nights Schechter said. "We
gave out some tree passes and did
tie advertisement.
"We had a little more support
from the campus, but less (than
lasl year) from the community
Schechter added. "There were
more students than we expected
� and we were happy about
that
ltl igl somewhat pleased
witl crowd, Schechter had
fering opinions on the
fighters' talents.
"The mam problem was the
quali ty of the fighters
Schechter said. "The guys uere
in as good as shape and they
weren'l as skillful (as last year)
Schechter also said that it was
difficult to get long-range com-
mitments from the fighters. They
had originally planned on getting
36 participants, but ended up
with 29. However, the tourna
ment was a success and the
money earned will be going to a
good cause.
St. Judes Hospital in Ten-
nessee will get a considerable
donation from the Miller-Lite
sponsored tourney.
Here are the final results in the
1986 TKE Boxing Tournament.
Note: the classes are not specific
weights, but the boxers were mat-
ched by their weights as closely as
possible.
In the 130-pound class,
Havelock native Keith Ly won by
decision over Vanceboro's
Charles Adams.
In the 140-150 pound class, in
what was "the most exciting
fight Stephen McAllister won
by decision over Bethel's Eddie
Peele.
In the 150-160 pound class,
Greenville's Raleigh Berry won
by decision over Mike Clayton
from Goldsboro.
In the 160-pound class,
Plymouth's Tommy Johnson
defeated Greenville's Ray Sharpe
by decision.
In the upper 160-pound class,
ECU student Bobby Harbin
retired to George Willoughby
from Cherry Point.
Goldsboro's James Thompson
knocked out ECU student Don
Hicks in the second round of
their upper 170-pound class.
In The heavyweight division
(200 pounds and over), Anthony
Torres of Jacksonville won by
decision over Charlottesville,
Va native Mike Harrison.
In an unscheduled extra bout
matching a pair of heavyweights,
Jacksonville's John Jackson
knocked out Chris Simpson of
Winterville in the second round.
- �� �� �j "iiiitivmc in me scvonu rounu.
Baseballers Drop Three Over Weekend
By SCOTT COOPER
&
TIM CHANDLER
After rolling through their first
21 games (by winning 20
them), the Pirate baseball -cam
fell on hard luck by dropping
three out of four games this
weekend.
Mon. March 31. 1986
Virginia Commonwealth
squeaked past ECU 5-4 in 10 inn-
ings as Chris Garrett picked up
the win for the Ranis
The Bucs scored first with two
runs in the top of the second inn-
ing. Jay McGraw walked and
Steve Sides singled. Jim Rilev's
sacrifice bunt set up McGraw
score when Robert Langston
grounded out. Sides managed to
score on a wild pitch.
VCU retaliated with a run in
the third inning. Adam Knicely
singled, stole second, and later
scored on a Kim Chambers
single. This cut the Pirate lead to
2-1 after three frames.
"v' some scoreless innings,
F (1 came up with a run in the
ris Bradberry led off
; ible and advanced on a
wild pitch. Winfred Johnson's
sacrifice fly to center then gave
IU a 3-1 advantage.
The Rams took the lead in the
bottom of the sixth with a four-
run inning. Tony DeliaVecchia
and James Alston each singled,
and aftei a sacrifice bunt, scored
on a Nick) Hertz two-run dou-
ble. Kniceiv then followed with a
single, allowing Hertz to score.
ECU fought back to tie the
game in the ninth. A single by
Sullivan and a fielder's choice by
McGraw moved Sullivan to se-
cond. Side1- then walked and
Mark Cockrell singled in
McGraw, tying the game at 4-4.
VCU took the victory with two
outs m the bottom of the 10th.
Dave Anselmo doubled and
scored on the following single by
Hertz.
Kniceiv and Hertz contributed
two hits apiece for the Rams. The
Bucs were paced by Bradberry's
three hits.
Garrett, who only pitched two
outs in the tenth, got the win. For
ECU, Jake Jacobs started but
Johnson picked up the loss, put-
ting his record at 6-2.
Sun. March 30, 1986
The Pirates needed 11 innings
Sunday before downing James
Madison 9-6 in CAA action.
With the win, Johnson picked up
his 30th career pitching victory.
After two scoreless innings, the
Bucs took a 2-0 lead as Bradberry
homered after a David Ritchie
single.
In the bottom of the sixth, the
Dukes exploded for three runs.
Ivanicki singled and Robert
Trumbo blasted a two-rum
homer. Rod Buddie's sacrifice fly
then gave JMU a 3-2 advantage.
JMU tacked on another run as
Schwartz reached on an error and
later scored on a Scott Mackie
double.
The Pirates came back to tie
the game in the top of the eighth.
Sullivan led with a double. Two
outs later, Cockrell was hit by a
pitch, and both runners later ad-
vanced on a passed ball. Catcher
Jim Rilev's clutch single enabled
both runners to score.
The Rams picked up a pair in
the eighth as Jeff Garber walked
See PIRATES, page 11
-�
TOM O MAI A - TK Photo Lab
These opponents are shown competing ti the finals of the 11th annual
TKE Boxing Tournament on Thursday mn.nu
Men, Women
"He Missed The Tag"
action at Harrington Fidd. The Bucs wai tb e game back on March 11. ECU will be in action this after-
noon at 3 pm in Raleigh when they take on N.C. State.
By DAVID McGINNESS
orU Writer
The 1986 spring season pro-
gresses for the ECU varsity tennis
teams, and both the men's and
women's teams are just under the
.500 mark in their spring records.
In their last three matches, the
women went 1-2, defeating UNC-
Wi'mington 6-3 on March 23,
while falling to Ohio University
8-1 on March 25, and to David-
son College 9-0 on March 16.
The women's spring record
now stands at 2-3, while their
overall tally for 1985-86 is 9-5.
No. 1 singles player Ann
Manderfield is still out with an
ankle injury, but did play in a re-
cent exhibition doubles match.
The lone winner against Ohio
was Lisa Eichholz, who played at
the No. 2 singles spot. Eichholz
defeated Traci Kenan 6-3, 1-6,
6-3.
In men's competition, the
Pirates' record now stands at 4-6.
The Bucs were beaten by the
Harvard "B" team 9-0 on March
28.
On March 27, the Pirates lost
6-3 against Virginia Tech.
Although the Bucs came back to
win two of three doubles mat-
ches, the overall match was
already out of reach due a 5-1
deficit after the singles play.
Among the winning matches
for ECU against Va. Tech were
Greg Loyd's 3-6, 7-6, 6-2 three-
set win over Charlie Petusky.
John Taylor Aiid John Melhorn
defeated Calhoun and
Wooldridge 6-4, 7-6 and Pat
Campanero and John Anthony
took care of Petusky and Hagge
6-1,6-3.
On March 26, the men topped
Pfieffer College 6-3. behind
strong singles play from
Melhorn, Loyd, Campanero and
Todd Sumner. Doubles play
from the Bucs was even more im-
pressively consistent. Thev swept
all three of those matches, two in
straight sets.
On March 24, the Bucs fell 6-3
to High Point College. Cam-
panero and Sumner provided the
only singles wins for ECU. In
doubles, Melhorn and Bill Wing
defeated their High Point op-
ponents in three sets, 3-6, 6-2,
6-3.
On March 23, Guilford came
away from their match with ECU
with an 8-1 victory. The lone win-
ners from ECU in that match
were Melhorn and Wing, who
won their No. 3 doubles match.
In what may have been the
upset surprise of the season, ECU
blanked a favored UNC-
Wilmington team 9-0.
Even though the Pirates were
without two of their players, thev
pulled off a win that was twice as
decisive as their 5-4 victory over
the Seahawks last fall. The
Pirates had lost three players
since last fall, while the Seahaw k
had actually gained one.
The men were in action vester -
day at Elon College, while the
women travelled to UNC-
Greensboro. The results form
those matches will appear in next
Tuesday's edition of The Easi
Carolinian.
The men will see action next on
A 8, when they will face High
Point College away at 2:30 p.m.
The women play next on Apr
7, when they take on UNC
Charlotte at home. Match time is
set for 3 p.m. and all interested
parties are welcome to come on
out and support the Lady Pirate
Coach Sherman .� Better. in earlkr�,lo�.
�.
Surf
Hv l)AM)( oi By
lent
Bea
Surl 1 ea
tera
Pirates T
In Extra
( ontinued fn

Bra
Bra II
V
the bases M
.
rig tw
game's fina
passed ball
at. March 2V. 1 ,
The Pi
garner to James Ma
5-3 on Satur .
In the operu
cond inning �a
enough
Dukes adJ-
fourth and on
as the sixth.
JMl 's Ma �
damage as he .
player
Robert Trumb - -
two RBI a V � .
were 2-3.
M �
distance
Intramural
Golf
Tournament
Bv STEPIUMr- 1)1 U
Arnold
Lopezare j
The lntramu
Services announce a .
to be held Ap - !
Ayden Golt and t
Tee-off times are ft
and 2-4 pm. Awards w, .
first-and second ers
the men's and women
There will be a manda: �
ticipants meeting held pi
m the balcon)
nasium.
All levels ol players art
-ouraged to p
additional inl 204
Memorial Gym,
The men's rac,ue'
tournament has endec
prising results
Andv Altman and M S
took the open-division
pionship while Ra .
Tom Irrera. the underdogs of the
intermediate division, beat
undefeated Carl Bradsher and
Glen Hamilton u ft ��
matches (15-12, 15-10, 15 I
15-13).
Crews and Irrera had steadily
made their wav through the
loser's bracket after tailing in the
opening match to Ed Jimenez
and Scott Herald After facing
the Jimenez and Herald combo a
second time, this time victorious,
the underdogs' took the losers
bracket by surprise Despitt the
odds, Crews and Irrera took the
men's raquctball doubles title
Anyone interested in becoming
an aerobic instructor should call
the intramural office in Memorial
Gym for additional information.
There are openings for
photographers and artists as well
Anyone interested should prepare
a portfolio and schedule an inter-
view in advance.
Outdoor Recreation
M & F � 1:30-6 pm
T & Th � 3-5 pm
Training Room
M-Th � 10-12 am
M-Th � 2-6 pm
i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRU 3, 1VH6
11
Advance
ie was
"1 didn't
he top
it was
iat he
aid be a
( vc it
ad
dent,
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� on the
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Sports Fact
Lhurv pr 3, WMt
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pponent
eld in
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rich.
I
1
'O Om�� Tt Photo Lab
cumpHing vi th v finals of the 11th annual
n I hursdav even s ng
feat 'Hawks

igh the 1 es were
rs, they
�vice as
r over
The
ee players
etheSeahawks
ne
�ster-
- while the
UNC-
results form
appear in next
I The East
ee action next on
� will face High
. 2:30p.m.
la next on Apr.
when they take on UNC-
les matclfiarlotte at home Match time is
; bee� 3 p.m and all interested
parties are welcome to come on
il and support the Lady Pirates.
trm�n advises netters in earlierac
Surfing
Defeat Tar Heels
rU DAVID COLBY
(�UIMk�Tta
lOakl
le most East Carolina
idents migrated to Myrtle
last weekend, the ECU
� 1 earn travelled to Cape Hat-
foi their traditional Easter
surfing trip.
Sunny eighty-degree weather
and light offshore breezes com-
bined with a good north swell to
create ideal conditions all
weekend. The water temperature
was in the mid 40's, requiring full
wetsuits � with boots and gloves
Pirates Top JMU
In Extra Innings
( ontinued from page 10
Mark Brockell smacked a
two-run homer over the
d fence.
ever-saj die Pirates came
(6-6) in the ninth.
d off with his third
tl e season. Bradberry
a double and was
third on a single by
Pinch hitter Dean
sacrifice flv scored
ind sent the game into
eventh, Ritchie led ou
- and was moved to se
a sacrifice by Hardison.
; gled, but Ritchie
at at the plate.
intentional walk to
alt singled to load
McGraw countered
i ground-rule double �
1 hehall added the
as he scored on a
at. March 29. 1986
dropped a pair ol
umes Madison, 9-0 and
;a afternoon.
ei. a five-run se-
was more than
lue the Bucs. The
a pair o'i runs in the
e in the fifth as well
� e did most of the
earned CAA co-
the week honors.
.vent 4-4 with
Mackie and Boddie
went the
1 Ml . picked up the
: go) the Kiss for
ntramural
Golf
Tournament
B STEPHAN1EDEW
nold Palmer, Nancy
are you listening?
Intramural-Recreational
:es announce a golf classic
be held April 14-15 at the
n Golf and Coutry Club.
ee-off times are from 8-10 am
. 2-1 pm. Awards will go to the
and second-place winners of
and women's divisions.
e will be a mandatory par-
pants meeting held April 10th
alcony of Memorial Gym-
.m.
All levels of players are en-
aged to participate. Pick up
�nal information in 204
orial Gym.
e men's raquetball doubles
mament has ended with sur-
ng results.
Altman and Mike Shytle
- 'he open-division cham-
p while Randy Crews and
rera, the underdogs of the
rmediate division, beat
lefeated Carl Bradsher and
� Hamilton in two straight
� hes (15-12, 15-10, 15-8,
. )
( rews and lrrera had steadily
tde their way through the
loser's bracket after falling in the
pemng match to Ed Jimenez
ind Scott Herald. After facing
'he Jimenez and Herald combo a
nd time, this time victorious,
'he underdogs' took the losers
bracket by surprise. Despite the
�dds, Crews and lrrera took the
men's raquetball doubles title.
Anyone interested in becoming
an aerobic instructor should call
'he intramural office in Memorial
Gym for additional information.
There are openings for
photographers and artists as well.
Anyone interested should prepare
a portfolio and schedule an inter-
view in advance.
Outdoor Recreation
M & F � 1:30-6 pm
T & Th � 3-5 pm
Training Room
M-Th � 10-12 am
M-Th � 2-6 pm
After taking an early lead,
ECU dropped a 5-3 decision in
the nightcap.
After JMU took a 2-0 lead,
ECU picked up three in the fifth.
Cockrell and Ritchie singled and
an error on the pitcher resulted in
one run Hardison's smash was
too lough for the Dukes' short-
stop as another run crossed.
Johnson's ground out resulted in
the third Buc run.
In the bottom o the sixth,
Mackie, who had all five RBI's
for JMl . struck again. His two-
out, two-run homer put JMU
back in front 5-3.
Dana llison allowed five hits
while striking at six and walking a
pair.
Jim Peterson went the distance
for ECU, allowing seven hits
while striking out five and walk-
ing t h r ee.
being a necessity. No one seemed
to mind the water temperature,
however, since the waves were
head high and over-head all
weekend.
The highlight of the trip was
the contest with UNC-Chapel
Hill on Sunday. The contest was
held in perfect conditions at Bux-
ton, just north of the Hatteras
lighthouse.
ECU's Johnny Ghee, who took
top honors in the event, express-
ed his opinions on the ideal con-
ditions. "Those were the best
waves we've ever held a contest in
during the three years I've been
on the team
Todd Parker, who placed se-
cond in the competition, added
that "The waves were breaking
so far out from the beach that it
was hard for the judges to see the
surfers Todd caught the
longest waves of the contest and
nearly won, but Johnny Ghee
seemed to put more maneuvers
into each ride.
Most of the ECU squad had
not been in the water this year,
except for the spring-break trip to
Florida. Freshman Blair Riddick,
who placed third overall, com-
mented, "We didn't know what
to expect from Chapel Hill,
because they had a brand new
team since last fall
The Tarheels proved to be no
match for the Pirates as each
preliminary heat was won by an
ECU surfer. Johnny Ghee, Todd
Parker, Blair Riddick, and Gor-
don Van Sant all won their first
heats � scoring ten points each
for ECU and advancing into the
finals. The Pirates also took six
of the top-eight individual plac-
ings to seal up their victory over
Chapel Hill.
Team scoring in intercollegiate
surfing is determined by the
places each surfer finishes in his
heat. Each heat is made up ot
four to six surfers and top
finishers advance into semi-final
and final heats. Each heat lasts 20
minutes and five judges on the
beach score each wave ridden.
Only the top three waves are
counted, so the best strategy is to
wait for the biggest set waves in
each heat.
The ECU team will be com-
peting once more this spring
against arch-rival UNC-
Wilmington. The Pirates are very
optimistic about this matchup
and hope to put in another quali-
ty performance like last weekend
The Seahawks are at an advan-
tage in that their squad gets to
surf daily, but the Pirates feel
they have the talent and deter-
mination to lead II to victory.
TEAM RESl I IS
1st � ECU (Team A) 48 pts.
(Tie) 2nd - UN( 28 p
die) 2nd - ECU I ream B) 28
pts.
ECU INDIVIDUAL PLACINGS
1. Johnny Ghee
2. Todd Parkei
3. Blair Riddick
5. Gordon Van Sant
6. David Coll
7. Johnson Hagood
Equal at i3. Cree Mitchell
Mike Temple
Don Hinton
Marts Griffin
Thit Sryle Frame
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All Other Frames
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Offer Good Through 4 786
v
H MUM '� "






sF i
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� i INKS
M'KU IVKf,
iued from vw H
w
.Kl I
s� ex
�� �
� �
li
i
SENIOKV
ROOMMATE WANTED In two
Bedroom duplex two blocks from
v,i� through Aug may
i � in Aug $115 utilities
6624 Great Place!
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
sublease an apartment al Tar
for the summer $93 75 '4
Please call 752 3708
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share
apt at Tar River Estates beginning
ite y For more into call
HELP WANTED: Lifeguards and
rental attendants needed Memorial
Day thru Labor Day Send resume
to Beach Bums Beach Service, P O
Box U09, Atlantic Beach, N C 28512
NEEDED: Two female roommates
to share 3 bedroom apt for tall
Within walking distance to campus
$95-mo Please call 752 5886
ROOMMATE WANTED: To sub
rent this summer Two bedroom
apartment on campus Ringgold
Towers Air cond cable T V
Available May 10 $190mo. and 'j
utilities Call 758 4519
COLLEGE STUDENTS: Earn extra
income in your own neighborhood, it
you wish For more information call
758 4335
NOW HIRING : HANK'S
HOMEMADE ICE CREAM 321 E
10th St Beside Wendy's Day and
evening shift Apply in person
APT TO SHARE: 2 bedroom, cor
ner of Mead St Male or Female
Smokernon smoker , Available for
summer $120mo ' j utilities
758 6407
WANTED Experienced, certified
lifeguards for summer employment
Call Barbara Wilkerson for an inter
view. 355 5602
HELPWANTED: Female student tc
assist housewife with house c leaning
and child care in exchange for n
and board Near campus 757 1798
ARE YOU A FUTURE BUSINESS
LEADER? Established, student
managed company of over 3,000
students is looking for ECU students
tor full time summer Obs Profes
sional training provided S4.50C
average summer profit For more
information send name, local phone
and address etc to Summer jobs,
Suite 141, 95 South Elliot Rd , Chapel
Hill, N C 27514
SUMMER LIFEGUARDING JOBS
or Senior Lifeguai
tificates required
Tar Landing Villas, &? v
City, NC 28557 Phone 247 52?
SUMMER INTERNS WANTED
North Carolina's larges' weet ,
newspaper (3 reporting
tion, 3 advertising; $4 SC u '
for rising senior journal !
Call 919 228 7851, or sena res
oings to Tom or ,� �
Alamance News. Box 431 G
N C . 27253
WHITE FEMALE RDOMMAfF
NEEDED immediate! Renl $�-
1 utilit.es Call 758 0655
USDA Choice Beef Chuck - Bone-In PtunUnytAprMd6T9d86hru

CHUCK
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CABBAGE
UNION
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APPY HOUR
" Come
-
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S i 11 th
.�OWN oral
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,f room.
Diver Down
� '�
at's gomg
,ers
I � ' ; � , r
9th 9 5
seniors, and
frail contests
e Buccaneer
OPEN
Monday night 9
ible at the
n participating
My son, Christopher
was a first
�� ECU He was
automobile accident on
� His High School
1 �� sptaced while in
II was a 1985 WUkes
� ' ng and his in
graved in it The
Io 1 Aich is light
.ard is offered
l nd'ng to the return
I mere will be no ques
isked l am a widow and Chris
; and the return of
would mean so much.
freeman, P O Box 248,
N C 28697
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Pkg. of 12 12 07 Cans Reg. & Lt
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6 Oz. - TunaSalmon
LOW
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i





Title
The East Carolinian, April 3, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 03, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.467
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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