The East Carolinian, March 27, 1986






mt
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No.4fr.qg
Thursday, March 27, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Cunanan, Jackson Win Post
In Tight Race, Large Turnout
By PATTI KEMMIS
Assistant News Editor
By a difference of 13 votes,
Steve Cunanan won the office of
Student Government Association
President over Chris Tomasic in
Wednesday's elections.
Anthony Jackson won the of-
fice of vice-president over Gor-
don Walker by a margin of 49
votes.
"This is the closest election
I've seen in my five years here
said current President David
Brown.
Student Supply Store. He receiv-
ed a total of 1085 votes.
"It was really close said
Cunanan. "I'm just really happy.
I had a lot of hard workers and
that did it
Tomasic, with a total of 1072
votes, carried Mendenhall, the
Croatan, Allied Health, and Col-
lege Hill.
Jackson took the Croatan,
Mendenhall, Allied Health, Col-
lege Hill and Slay with a total of
1106 votes.
Walker carried the remaining
dorms and the Student Supply
JIM t II !�.� �� Tt ?�aratkai
SGA Elections
ing will take over as Treasurer
and Secretary. The both ran
unopposed.
Eagan said, "I'm pleased with
the outcome. I think the best can-
didates won and I feel like we can
and will work well together
SGA legislator Dwayne
Wiseman stated that he felt
Cunanan and Jackson will work
well together even though they
did not run on the same ticket.
"Now I'd like to take the time
to mend the broken fences that
were made during the elections
and get everyone back into a
working spirit said Jackson.
"I want to mend fences and
bridge the gaps now to unify
everyone and better the school
said Cunanan. "I think Tonv wil
in and start to work
According to SGA Election
Rules, if the election's result is
within three percent of the total
votes cast, a recount will be
automatic for that office if the
candidate desiring a recount con-
tacts the Elections Chairperson,
Sven Van Baars, within 24 hours
after the final tally is posted.
The results were close enough
in both the presidental and vice-
presidental race that Tomasic
andor Walker can ask for a re-
count.
In a phone interview after the
results were announced. Walker
confirmed he would be asking for
a recount.
Tomasic had made no com-
ment as of 2 a.m. Thursdav con-
dofine job. I can't wait to get cerning a recount.
Sleeping, Partying
Favorite Past- Times
SGA elections were held Wednesday. Here, an ECU student
casts his ballot for the candidate of his choice. For election results
see related storj page 1.
Cunanan
2199 students voted, which is
approximately 18 percent of the
campus.
Cunanan carried the dorms,
which includes Clement, Flem-
ing, Siay, and Umstead; and the
Jackson
Store with 1055 votes.
"I think this is a victory for the
students with a conscience said
Jackson. "Right prevails when
your heart is in the right place
John Eagan and David Tambl-
Jobs, Wealth Concern Today 9s Students
RIVER FALLS, WI (CPS) �
Today' students may be more in-
terested in jobs and wealth than
their predecessors, but it's not
because they are greedier, two
University of Wisconsin pro-
fessors say.
Their study o student attitudes
also suggests calling collegians
apathetic is a bum rap.
"I think attributing apathy to
this generation of college
students is misleading main-
tains Bud McClure of the
University of Wisconsin at River
Falls.
In a sample of almost 300
students from the River Falls
campus, McClure and associate
Thomas Russo found students to
be most concerned with issues
that have immediate impact on
their lives.
Students listed abortion, the
nuclear arms race, drug use,
pollution, conservation, politics,
world hunger, unemployment,
poverty and equal rights as their
most important concerns.
"International issues of today
are perceived to be out of con-
trol McClure says.
In contrast, the "quiet genera-
tion" of the fifties was more
orderly because "there was a
sense of (national) invulnerabili-
ty
But today's students, McClure
says, are not much different from
their predecessors of the late six-
ties and early seventies.
He thinks it's because
observers often exaggerate the
number of students who were
politically active in the sixties,
and underestimate the number
who are active today.
See STL DENTS Page 3.
B JILL MORGAN
suff Writer
In a recent survey conducted at
ECU, 25 students (13 males and
12 females) picked partying as
their favorite past-time activity.
Seventeen of the 25 par-
ticipants in the survey picked par-
tying as their first choice while
Jating garnered 20 percent of the
number one votes Females cast
all the number one votes in
dating.
"The term 'dating' is an am-
biguous term" said Richie
Jackson and Dean McCrickland
� both seniors here at ECU. "But
it (dating) would be number one
if the benefits were right they
added.
The survey asked students to
rank the following 5 things �
dating, partying, attending par-
ties, listening to records, and
sleeping � from 1-5 in order oi
what they like to do best
Number 1 being the favorite and
5 least favorite.
The survey was inspired by a
study conducted by the Levi
Strauss compare. Levi called
their study "501" in reference
their popular buttonfiy 501 jeans.
Julie Boyle, a spokeswoman
for Levi Straus Company ex-
plains "Levi Strauss calls the
study its "501 survev" because
the company is researching why
traditional jeans are gaining
favor again on campuses.
!n fact, "Jeans are more
popular than ever with college
students Boyle says, adding
students who have jeans wear
them 75 percent of the time
Company executives theorize
singer Bruce Springsteen may be
see PAST Page 3.
First Annual Veterans Awareness Day Success At ECU
Bv BLI H W Hit KF R noon with an onnnrnmifv tw n� ;n . k� .u ui: . .i . - .
B BETH W HICKLR
Vssislanl Sews l-xlitor
A tribute to all veterans at
Memorial Gym set the pace
Wednesday for the first annual
Veterans Awareness Day spon-
sored by the ECU Veterans Club.
"Veterans Awareness Day was
designed to show the ECU stu-
dent body what the veterans club
is about and the ideals we repre-
sent said Jim Reid, president of
the ECU Veterans Club.
The activities continued at
noon with an opportunity for
veterans and the general public to
meet each other at the student
store where the veterans served
soft drinks.
The vets provided a wine and
cheese social at Mendenhall to
further mingle with the ECU stu-
dent body.
"The veterans want to get bet-
ter aquainted with the student
body. We want to promote inner
growth within our club and not
become a club within ourselves.
We hope Veterans Awareness
Day will show the public that we
are not sterotypical 'military
men but men who have made a
decision and learned to make the
best of it said Reid.
A candlelight vigil was held at
the American Legion Hall in
honor of those soldiers still miss-
ing in action. After the vigil,
veterans club members, members
of the ECU student body, former
POW's, and other interested
groups marched three miles
around Greenville.
Two movies concerning the
ECU's SHS Insurance Rises
plight of the veteran in soceity
were shown at Hendn.x Theatre at
the finish of the evening.
Friday at 3p.m. the POW flag
will be raised at Joyner Library.
ECU is the first educational in-
stitution to ever fly the POW
flag. The flag will be flown for
the remainder of the semester.
"The plight of the veteran in
soceity has come a long way since
the Vietnam era. Things have
definitely changed. People have
more appreciation of what a
veteran is. Still, some of the
public is unaware of the veterans
point of view.
According to Reid, veterans
B CAROLYN DRISCOLL
Staff W riter
Student health centers at col-
leges across the country are ex-
periencing drastic hikes in liabili-
ty insurance rates, and ECU is no
exception.
In fact, ECU's health center
has seen its total insurance costs
increase by "at least 100 percent"
in the past year and expects an
ever greater increase during the
next year, said James McCallum,
director of Student Health Ser-
On The Inside
Announcem Classifieds Editorials. .ents2

Features
Sports
It is not the lie that passeth through the mind, but the lie that sinketh in it, that doth the hurt. �Francis Bacon
vices here at ECU.
But while this increase seems to
be affecting student fees and
causing the elimination of ser-
vices on many campuses, Mc-
Callum does not foresee such
changes occuring here in the near
future.
The primary reason health
centers (as well as private prac-
tices) are seeing higher rates, ac-
cording to McCallum, is the
courts are awarding increasingly
large settlements in malpractice
suits. "Once a settlement is
made, it sets a precedent said
McCallum. The higher the set-
tlements become, "the higher the
insurance companies must raise
their fees to offset the set-
tlements
Between 1982 and 1985, ECU's
liability insurance (which protects
against malpractice suits) increas-
ed from $3,548 to $12,751. Dur-
ing that time, the Health Center
did increase its coverage from $1
million to $3 million, a change
which McCallum says accounts
for a small portion of the rate in-
crease.
When asked what changes will
be made in terms of student fees
or services, McCallum stated "I
cannot say at this point in time
He did note, however, because
"everything done here has to be
paid for by student health fees
those fees will eventually be af-
fected. He added that fees, which
were $49.50 for 1985-86, will not
be greatly affected in the upcom-
ing year.
"We don't intend to eliminate
services. I would rather seek
financing through other ways
than through the elimination of
services said McCallum.
While some colleges are deal-
ing with this situation by reduc-
ing staff, the size of the ECU
Health Center is at its highest
point in seen years.
Many colleges are trying to
cope with less students as well as
higher insurance rates, a trend
TCU appears to be bucking. Last
year, the Health Center had
53,000 patient visits, and if this
year follows the pattern (as it has
in the past five years) it will sur-
pass this mark.
, � 0 m � �y ����������
nave pride in their country and
take American rituals very
seriously. "It digs deep when a
veteran sees someone not paying
attention during the national an-
them, or not stopping as the flag
is raised or lowered
Reid explained veterans were
taught these customs while in the
military and that the raising and
lowering of the flag, taps being
played, and the national anthem
being sung are held close to the
veterans heart. The veteran
observes these customs with ut-
most respect.
"We know we are in a unique
situation and we hope Veterans
Awareness Day helps the public
better understand our ideas as we
learn to better understand the
public's view said Reid.
The ECU Veterans Club is
open to all students, faculty, and
staff members. The purpose of
the club is to promote the
American way of life, encourage
mature leadership, and promote
inter-branch fellowships among
the veterans of the United States
Armed Services, their
dependents, active duty person-
nel, reservist, and all other in-
terested groups.

.��
l
.V. -i;lri
hi 11�4 t �

i
��
Tmg0
?"Tmmmmm
Veterans A wareness Day
ix Tt,rM� - m i
. � �
ROTC members observed Veterans Awareness Day Wednesday by honoring the POW's and
MIA'i with a tribute beside Memorial Gym which was named In honor of veterans. For more details
see related story page 1.
71
i







IlliJASTCAROLINlAN
MARCH 27. 1986
Announcements
CORAL REEF
DIVE CLUB
Attention Scuba Enthu�ia�rj Th� Coral
Keet Dive Club i� notomg a meeting Wad
April � from 5 � in me multipurpose room in
Mendenhaii The Spring break trip to Key
West will be reviewed along with up coming
elans for � Diver Down Spring Bain All
�nemberj are atktc to attend All those in
'ereited are welcome
PMYE
Snow i during Christma� break Pre
re�i�ter now for PMYE 1150 (beginning �now
Jkimgi to reserve your space for tun M the
�now Spend 5 tun days at a ski resort hav.ng
'he time of your lite learning how to sk or
Mgn up tor PHvp 1151 I intermediate or
�ign up for PMVE 1153 (advanced' There .�
a course for all levels Contact Mrs karan
sraei sk'coordinator tor more information
1SS4215 -
COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
ECU College Democrats will mee' Thurs
la March?' 7pm m room 24� Mendenhaii
State Representative waiter jones Jr will
tie me guest speaker AH members and other
�nteres'ed persons are urged to attend For
more .nfo contact Bryan Averette a'
Se 4S30
FALLSEMESTER HOUSING
Applications are now being taker tot fa
semester housing a 'he Mefhodu' S'uden'
.enter �i E 5th Street across from ne art
tu iding and Garrett dorm Come By 'h s
�veek f you are interested In an alternative
to dorm life without apartment worr es
H1LPM
The Accounting Society la offer wo free tax
sarvicaa tor federal return at the Student
Booth in Mendenhaii from 4-e p.m on
Wednesday end Thursday Federal forms
ana instructions are available upon request
BILLIARDS TOURNAMENT
There will be a studentfaculty staff ALL
CAMPUS 1ILLIAHDS TOURNAMENT on
Thoradey. April 3 at a p m Register by
Wednesday. April j in the MSC Billiards
Center Call 757 Mil ext M� tor more Info
See you there1
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
Muggers and buddies needed for the local
Spec ial Olympics Spring Games to be held at
E B Aycock jr High School on Friday.
April is from �anr�2pm For more informe
tlon call Bill Twineat 753 4137 x 201 or Conme
Sapoenfield at 355 5417
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi Eta Sigma members! There will be a
meeting March 27 at 6 30 in 221 Mendenhaii
inductees art invited and encouraged to at
tend
LIFE'S A HEALTH AFFAIR
Wed April 2 from 3 6pm between
Mendenhaii and Greene dorm Free food
visors buttons etc Contributions by FAN
TASY Aerobic Workshop. Sunfan Booth
Milk by Carolina Dairies GOLD'S GYM
nautilus Water Sports by Over ton �
Come io.n us on Wed April J and have some
fun In the su n'
ANNUAL ARABIC
BENEFIT DINNER
The united Holy Land Fund, the General
Union of Palestine Students, and the Koyp
tian Student Association cordially Invite you
to the Annual Arabic Benefit Dinner Guesi
tpaaker Congressman Paui FIndley Arabic
Folklore Music At the Raleigh inn.
Ballroom (sXr? Gieowood Avenue, Highway
70W) Friday. March a 30pm Donation
ten dollars (tickets available at door). For
information call 7S�M51. ask for Eddie
ECU COUNCIL OF
HONOR SOCIETIES
There will be a moating for all members
tonight at 5 15 In BO 104 Please plan to at
tend
REGISTRATION FOR
GENERAL COLLEGE
STUDENo
General College students should contact
NtOl, advisers one week prior to their
scheduled registration period to make ar
rangements for academic advising or both
summer terms and the fall semester, its
FILING NEEDED
Persons interested in filing for the office of
ECU Marshall may do so beginning March
20 la thry March n, 1M. in Room 214
Wh.chard Building (Dean Carolyn Fulghum
Assoc DeanDirector of Residence Life I
Requirements are a 3 0 GPA and must be a
lun.or at the end of the 1M spring semester
BLACK ALUMNI
ASSOCIATION
There will be a meeting of the ECU Biec.
Alumni Association on Monday. April 7, )���
The meeting will be held at Mendenhaii Stu
dant Center, room 24 at a p m
EMPLOYMENT
Employment is available to qualified
itudents who are interested In becoming per
"nal care attendants to studants m
n��lchalr�. readers and tutors For further
��tails contact Office of Handicapped Stu
'�nt Services, 212 WTilchard Bldg ECU
Jraonvllle. N C 27B14
ECU SURFING
There win be a contest with UNC CH and
UNC Won Sunday March 30. at t. the contest
w�M be Mg at me Itgrrfhowae if you have any
TOrfcataj. contact ma at 757 MM
BIOLOGY CLUB
The ECU Biology Club fs having its apring
samester plant sale on Wed . April 2, and
Thurs . April 3 from 7.30 am to 1 p m in
room BS 111 we hmvt a large selection and
very low prices so stock up for the summer I
L.S.S. MAJORS
Mandatory meeting Thurs , April 27 at a
P m. in Biology 103 For all L S.S malors if
unable to attend please inform Or Hancock
w me l.S.S offica
�ka�3W BLESSINGS
From The East
Carolinian
The East Carolinian will not publish Timda y due to the
Easter holiday.
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
10th & Dickinson Ave.
WE BUY GOLD & SILVER
INSTANT CASH LOANS
2 All Transactions Confidential V�!�
,Q BUY�SALE�TRADE JtCT
752-0322 "V
1 Hours 9:00 am-6:00 prn MoaSal.
Ca
How do you feel al
Monday night?
FeministResumesEvoke Response
(CPS) � Women may hae a
hard time getting a job if their
resumes evince strong feminist
feelings or refer to school pro-
jects that a prospective employer
may see as meaning they could
cause "trouble" on the job. a
new study b two professors sug-
gests
Em plovers surveyed by
Michael Hitt of Texas ,V1 and
William Zikmund of Oklahoma
State seemed especially reluctant
OBDM
to hire female students who had
done studies of job discrimina-
tion.
But corporate preferences for
male applicants in general seem
to be fading, Hitt adds.
Other job placement officials,
however, question Hitt and Zik-
mund's study, and note
"political" references on a
usume are always a risk.
"I am not sure if (discrimina-
tion) is specific to women's
groups says Joe Santos, a
placement officer at Miami of
Ohio.
Employers in general seem to
respond less positively "to social
stands of any kind" on resumes,
he observes.
Hitt and Zikmund's study sug-
gests companies appear anxious
to respond to feminist applicants
with appropriate care, if not with
jobs.
"The study shows companies
Students Establish Identity
tend to respond to feminist ap-
plications to make sure they are
responding to feminists Hitt
says.
Hitt and Zikmund sent the
resumes of two women to some
200 companies.
Hitt and Zikmund were most
intrigued by firms' replies to the
resumes that mentioned the job
discrimination thesis, but were
identified only by the applicant's
initials.
Continued From Page 1.
The key to provoking student
activism, he says, is to find issues
:hat affect students directly, and
ones about which they feel they
can influence the outcome.
McClure attributes student in-
terest in South African apartheid
to students realizing they can in-
fluence college holdings in com-
panies doing business with the
Pretoria government.
"I don't disagree with" the no-
tion that students are not as
politically passive a.s some critics
suggest, says Kenneth Green of
UCLA, which co-sponsors with
the American Council on Educa-
tion an annual survey of some
200,000 freshmen nationwide.
Most observers who call col-
legians apathetic, in fact, cite the
UCLA study, which, among
other discoveries, has found
freshmen becoming ever more
materialistic in their life goals.
The findings recently convinc-
ed a group of college presidents
to resolve to make "community
service" a graduation require-
ment. The group hoped to end
students' "preoccupation" with
career and material goals.
But a number of other studies,
most recently from Mount Hood
College in Maryland, documents
that student attitudes generally
change and become less egocen-
tric during the course of college.
And many of the other impres-
sions of students as overly
materialistic are derived from
studies done at "private elitist
schools in the East McClure
contends.
McClure's study, done at a
midwestern state school, may be
more representative of student at-
titudes nationwide, he says.
His students' career aspira-
tions, moreover, have more to do
with "trying to establish an iden-
tity in a chaotic world McClure
concludes. He believes becoming
a professional is a way of exerting
control over oneself in a world
frequently perceived as out of
control.
"Some say it's greed, while
others say it's uncertainty about
the future Green says of stu-
dent career aspirations.
"When I have asked a college
audience 'how many of you know
people who have lost their job9' I
see a sea of hands Green adds.
This may be why "we see a lot
of portfolio-building behavior"
among college students, he
speculates.
BUYING?
CHECK OUT THE.
Classifieds
757-6366
$
NEED CASH?
Southern
Gun & Pawn
752-2464
500 N Gram
Tan m 'A
EMRICrftfXlft COLLEGE EYPERtENCE
scholarship
leadership sisterhood
phiiartthrophv � socudxctivitus
Uoyd Lewfe
Junior, Industrial
service
lOl? EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
INTERVIEWS CONDUCTED BY A NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE
APRIL 2nd ana 3rd
CALL LAURA SWEET
ror more cktAils- pnm-�-enic advisor
iv ivii. mil PHONE NUMBER 757-624

!

J
215 E. 4th Street
f
Plant Sale
ECU Biology Club
Wed Apr.l 2
Thurs , April 3
7:30 a.m1:00 p.m
at the
Biology Greenhouse
Room S-l 1
l-M-lll J" f
Beat the Summer Rent
Increases
Reserve your apartment for summer or
fall occupancy at today's rates
Now accepting a limited number of
deposits for fall occupancy. Call today for
an appointment
752-5100
Eattbrook Apartments
Village Green Apartments
-COUPON-
Kentucky Nugget Snack
6 Kentucky Nuggets
Kentucky Fries
1 Large Drink
$1.99
Plus Tax
.�
We do Chicken Right"
-COUPON
Thursday Night
Is
Taco Night
Two Great Tacos
for only 99C
60 oz. Pitchers $1.99
If you enjoy Tuesday Night
At Sub Station II,
You'll LOVE Thursday Night'
David Lewis
Sophomore, Political Sc
"It's a traged v
military. I . .
coo:
Students Te
B DAWN Mr vv rd
Maff Wnfrr
Beginning
Physical Ej
conduct : swimrn .
the facul
aged four and ab
These classes will be taug
lay, Wednc
Ja '� 4; 4
� I . enr a
reached I
i and mus- he a
need of further
"The siuO:
ALL
include:
F
stai
I
752-213
215 E. Your St.

i
� -





BLESSINGS
The East
olinian
: j&da due to the
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 27, 1986
Campus Voice
How do you feel about what happened between the U.S. and Libya
Monday night?
ina Coins & Pawn
Dickinson Ave.
GOLD & SILVER
r CASH LOANS
SALE-TRADE C
75X4122 V
L
V?
k oi�i n
�-6�J4
ight
ht
acos
9C
$1.99
Night
t
Night!
215 E. Fourth St.
Lloyd Lewis
Junior, Industrial Technology
"I think it will grow into
something major mainlv because
they'll retaliate
Margie Tyson
Junior, Clothing Texiles
"I'm not sure how I feel about
it because I'm not sure I've heard
the whole story � no one seems
to have all the facts
I
Andrea Murphy
MBA, Graduate Business
A dministration
"I think the U.S. shouldn't
have done what they did. I think
the U.S. was provoking them to
see what would happen
!

David Lewis
Sophomore, Political Science
"It's a tragedy of American
justice. I think they're trying to
infringe on the rights of
American citizens and the
military. I think Kadafy should
cool out
Brad Robertson
Senior, Busines
"It's strange that ail those
missiles they launched didn't hit
anything � its almost as if the
didn't intend to
Chock Owens
Sophomore, Biology
"The way I see it is we were in
rnational waters and they at-
tacked us on a peaceful mission
� I think it is good the U.S.
fought back
Students Teach Swim Technique
B DAWN STEWARD
Maff Writrr
Beginning April 7, thiry-two
Physical Education majors will
conduct six swimming course for
the faculty's and staff's children
aged four and above.
These classes will be taught on
Monday, Wednesday, and Thurs-
day from 3:45-4:15 and 4:30-5:00
pm on April 7, 9, 10, 14, 16, and
17. To enroll, a child must have
reached his or her fourth birth-
day and must be a "beginner" in
need of further instruction.
"The student teachers have to
have field work for theii ma
� this is then way of complel
it explains Melrose Moore l
ECU Health Personnel Dep
merit. She added, "becauseoi
large number of teachers, the
children will more than likely
have private lessons
Each student instructor must
keep a class log for the student(s)
he or she will be teaching, and at
the end of the course must pre-
sent a written report concerning
the teaching of this child. Par: o!
this report is an interview with
one or both parents.
Parents wishing to enrol their
children in this program need to
go b) Minges Coliseum and pick
in application.
ATTIC
Thurs.
Sugar
Creek
Fri.
Blushing
Brides
Rolling Stones
Tribute

ALL YOU CAN EAT
PIZZA
BUFFET
includes Pizza & Salad
$3.45
i
ttHttflMMMHlfli
From 11-3
starts March 31
5!
' ' �
��
'
;��,
$&&
it
M
P
Vc
S
Past-times Chosen
Continued From Page 1.
partially responsible for keeping
jeans so popular on campuses.
The study, Boyle says "gives
the company an overview of the
habits of consumers. Students are
the prime target (market) for our
jeans
In the Levi Strauss survey at-
tending parties topped student's
preferences, while "partying" ac-
cumulated 70 percent of the votes
of more than 6,000 students as
one of their five favorite ac-
tivities.
"Partying is definetly a verb
on campus Boyle noted � and
it is not the same thing as atten-
ding a party.
Listening to records caught 63
percent of the votes as students
favorite thing to do, followed by
sleeping with 56 percent. Dating
brought in the least amount of
votes as the favorite thing to do
with only 42 percent choosing it
number one
The ECU survey found none of
the students surveyed chose at-
tending parties as their favorite
thing to do while eight percent
chose listening to records as their
favorite past-time with sleeping
earning only four percent of
"favorite things to do" votes.
Kevin Hidalgo said, "This is
tough because my vote changes
week to week. Some weeks I like
to sleep, others I like to party
Participants in the survey at
ECU were asked to specify
whether they are originally from
North or South of the Mason
Dixon line and whether they are
male or female.
The only significant difference
noted is that of the 12 females
surveyed 5 chose dating as their
favorite thing to do. Not one
male chose dating as number one.
The North and South voted
consistently the same in all
categories revealing students con-
sider partying their most favorite
thing to do.
mm
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We are looking for girls in-
terested in being
counselors � activity instruc-
tors in a private girls camp
located in Hendersonville, NC.
Instructors needed especially in
Swimming (WSI), Horseback
Riding, Tennis, Backpacking,
Archery, Canoeing, Gym-
nastics, Crafts. Also, Basket
ball. Computers, Drama,
Nature Study, Field Hockey If
your school offers a Summer
Internship Program, we will be
glad to help. Inquiries: Morgan
Haynes, PO Box 400-C, Tryon,
NC, 28782.
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2H?e iEaut Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvhtoer, g���,��,
J AY STCNE , Umimt�m Editor
MlKF LUDWICK, v�,mw
SCOTT CtX)PER, � ,�,
DANIE1 MAL'RER. (��.�.� Edito,
John Shannon. ���
DeChanile Johnson, mmm
Greg Winchester, d,� Q mU�,
Anthony Martin, ��,� a
John Peterson, ���,
Shannon Short, ��-�� ��,
Debbie Stevens. sr�rv
Mar.h 2 N86
Opin ion
Page 4
SGA Elections
Dirty Tricks And Foul Play
Tentative congratulations are die
Steve Cunanan and Tony Jackson
on their victories for SGA Presidert
and Vice-President respectively.
Their races were hotly contestad
and each of the victors deserves ai
opportunity to savor his victory,
hough recounts have been re-
quested
But there were things which took
place during the campaign tha
Nhould not be forgotten right away.
No, these things must be hashed oil
and discussed.
The campaign that has just
recently been concluded was net
completely unlike past campaign
that have taken place on this cam-
pus. It was a dirty, malicious,
mudsiinging and, in some respects,
even racist campaign from start to
finish.
Certainly I do not mean to cast
aspersio- or place blame on the
shouidc of the candidates involv-
ed in this election. I believe all the
candidates to be honorable men
Yet when those working in their
campaigns spread malicious
falsehoods and rip down the posters
of their opponents they go too far.
It would be infinitely easier fa
me if I could say that wrong-doing
was to be found in equal measures
on both sides of this election. Butl
cannot.
The graphic above which I
observed two Cunanan Walker
campaign workers displaying en
their campaign poster is illustrative
of just some of the abuses that I am
speaking about.
In addition, it must be frankly
stated that the fact that
Cunanan Walker posters
dramatically outnumbered
Tomasic Jackson posters was not a
tesult o' any slothfulness on the
part of the latter two candidates. It
was a result of the fact, as many
witnesses have reported, that tre
I omasic Jackson signs were simply
ripped down by overzealoiB
Cunanan Walker campaign
v. .M kerv
Allegations have been made to
the effect that TomasicJackscn
kers were guilty of the same,
but this newspaper can find no
evidence of it.
A letter was written to this editor
alleging that Anthony Jackson had
threatened to burn down The East
Carolinian at a Media Board hear-
ing. Upon investigation, that
allegation proved to be patently un-
true. Anthony Jackson was net
even at the hearing at which it was
alleged that he made the comments
cited above, according to several
witnesses. Because this newspapo-
can be held liable for printing such
ungrounded allegations, we refusal
to run that letter.
Allegations were also made ii
this office that Chris Tomasic had
fired a Pirate Walk employee
because he was homosexual. Upon
investigation that too proved to be
false.
Mr. Tomasic, in his capacity as
SGA Vice-President did not have
the power to fire anyone frorr
Pirate Walk. The person in ques-
tion was not, in fact, fired
Moreover, Mr. Tomasic, according
to Kurt Bubenhofer, Director cf
Pirate Walk, never mentioned cr
suggested that the person in ques-
tion be fired.
Lastly, of course, there is the, by
now infamous charge that Tomasic
is Neanderthal. It is said that re
beat up on the Treasurer of the
SGA, Tony Braswell unjustly and
without due provocation. That is
what the graphic featured above
refers to.
There is no way to know precisely
what happened the night that the
altercation between Tomasic and
Braswell occured. Suffice it to say-
that Tomasic was not the man who
weilded the baseball bat accordir
to Greenville Police Departmert
reports.
That there were even commens
made to the effect that Tomasic's
campaign was made up of
"niggers" and "faggots" is only
hearsay. 1 hat is not the main issue
It is inflammatory to even mention
such matters I suppose,
It is not enough to simply decry
dirty campaign tactics as though
they occured equally on both sides.
For they did not.
This editorial will be called par-
tisan, biased and unfair I imagine
In fact, folks who participated in
the Cunanan Walker campaign wil
probably think of it as just plain
mean.
But what was done to Chre
Tomasic and Anthony Jackson was
mean. And if justice is to be done
those who are responsible for that
meanness must be held accoun-
table.
This newspaper has no desire to
change the election results. We
believe that Steve Cunanan and
Tony Jackson are honorable men
They will represent our school well.
But Chris Tomasic and Tony
Jackson deserve better than they
got. They deserve apologies and
they deserve to have their names
cleared.
Most of all another election
should never be run like the ore
that was just finished. The students
at this university deserve better. It is
not enough for a person to simply
say that they cannot contrd
overzealous campaign workers. At
some point a candidate must tale
responsibility for what those work-
ing for him do in his name.
Three years ago a referendum
was held on establishing a Pubic
Interest Research Group on this
campus and the same tactics woe
employed by those who opposed
the establishment of the PIRG
Last year similar tactics were
employed in the race for SGA presi-
dent. And in years past the same
sort of thing has happened from
time to time.
Yes it is time to speak the truth
and it is time to reform ECU
oolitics.

�wo nSwwrMtfMtMILCNV SlintUMMWlNC�
TCHAsic for n?Esir;rNr?
ME'S - KbAU MGMrtR
J
9
Campus Forum
The Hooligans At State
I could not help but chuckle to
myself during the last three v.eekv
over press reports of the spirited and
recently destructive and nastv
behavior of N.C. State students and
followers. This all coming after each
of their NCAA basketball tourna
ment victories.
You see what I find so amusing is
that it was only a few months ago that
after the East Carolina University vs
N.C. State University football game
in Raleigh, certain pompous members
of the N.C. State University ad-
ministration including Chancellor
Poulton, publicly and through the
media, chastised and lambasted E( I
and the small number of spirited
students involved, for their victory
celebration behavior. Their big crime.
pushing over a small section of a 3
foot high end zone retaining fence.
Boy, you would have thought it was
an unpardonable sin from the NC M
administration's reaction.
But wait! What do we hear t;
the same administration after four
Wild Hillsborough Street victory par-
ties culminating with last Friday's
four injured Raleigh police officers.
34 arrests and property damage1
a word, not one solitary word
In the future 1 suggest that
Chancellor Poulton and his other of-
ficials clean up their own act before
passing judgement on other state in-
stitutions' student behavior.
Now last but not least. If they warn
to threaten to cancel the very
lucrative ECU vs NCSU football
series because of the fence issue as
they allegedlv did, maybe they ought
to also consider the following; decline
ail future NCAA basketball playoff
invitations until they learn more
about how to control their own stu-
dent victor) celebrations. We're no
longer your step children down East,
Sirs.
Robert Shaw
Greenville
W alk For Peace
1 here was an announcement in last
week's East Carolinian. It said:
"WALK ON EASTER. Choose your
tance, lx yards to 13.5 miles
!i v iewpoints with peach goal
anged "peace goal"
"peacl goal" is not bad at that
peace ts a peach and a pear and a
I great price.
rhc fruit, peace, is born after long
. ion in which work, studv,
prayer and witnessing all play impor-
witnessing, on
1 astei Star Walk for Peace.
: ix a joyful part, as fits this
of celebrating the triumph of
walk 13.5 miles, you should
' walking at 1 p.m. at Farmvilleor
Pactolus or Bethel (for details call:
830-0349, or 758-4906, or 825-4981).
walk 100 yards, walk from your
parked car to Sycamore Hill (on
Greenville Common between NCNB
and Green St. Bridge), at 5:30. There
and then, I think you will enjo
half-hour ceremony at whicl
live oak to be planted on the (
mon will be decorated with the ci
of life. Brief comments will fo
trom Rev. James Daily (south),
Willie Mae Carney (north), a 1
ville walker's spokesperson (w
Prof. William Bvrd (east), David
Rubenstein, and Mayor
William Hadden (Greenville)
I wo ol the star routes will cro
E.C.I campus about 5 p.m. coming
from 10th and College Hill Drive
One will traverse the Mall I
Flanagan to Jenkin's (Art), then
ceed west to Readeirele, C otai
to the Common. The other will t
at the Nursing Building, and proceed
north of Speight and Mcginnis,
ween Whichard and Gotten, then
north of Fleming, Jarvis, n. Garret
each 5th St. at the Methods-
dent Center and on Holly t( 4l
Reade to the Common.
"All viewpoints" means ju
Peace is not a goal of the "peace
movement" only. For more informa-
call 758-4906.
Carrol Webber
Greenville Resident
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view Mail or
drop them by our office in the Pul
ttons Building, across from the en-
trance of Jovner Lihrarv
Jerry Falwell's Majority
TtM Mm KaevMic
Now Jerry's got a new sales pitch. To
counteract the public's impressive
distaste for him ("The highest negatives
of anybody except Khomeini says one
Republican pollster), Falwell announced
in January that the Moral Majority was
changing its name to the Liberty Federa-
tion. The Liberty Federation will have a
political and education arm � the Liber-
ty Alliance � and will publish i's own
newspaper, the Liberty Report.
Last year, Falwell changed the name
of his Liberty Baptist College to Libertv
University. The school is located on
Liberty Mountain outside Lynchburg,
Va which Falwell now refers to as the
town of Liberty. It is not known what
the residents of Lynchburg think of
Falwell's decision to change the name of
their town. But if they remember
anything about the history of the
political groups using the name "Liber-
ty they will ask the reverend to please
shut up.
In 1934, some of the nation's
millionaires created the American Liber-
ty League. The idea for the league
originated with R.M. Carpenter, a
retired vice president of DuPont. Sub-
sidized with millions of dollars from its
members, the Liberty League engaged in
a massive public-relations campaign,
churning out pamphlets, canned news
stories, press releases and radio speeches
reporting that Franklin Roosevelt's New
Deal was part of a worldwide Marxist
conspiracy. By 1936, Republican
presidential nominee Alf Landon
described the league's endorsement as a
"kiss of death New York Times col-
umnist Arthur Krock wrote that the
chairman of the Republican Party
"would have walked a mile out of his
way rather than be seen in the company
of a Liberty Leaguer
The Liberty or Death Committee,
formed in Freeport, N.Y on July 4,
1962, carried on this tradition. The com-
mittee's main objective was to require
prayer in the public schools, claiming
that "the day the Supreme Court took
God out of the schools, they ruled in
favor of obscenity
The Liberty Legion was established in
the mid-1960s to get nd of all intellec-
tuals, since "the word intellectual is a
synonym for the word athiest and the
words communism and Marxism
aresynonyms for intellectualism and
atheism In 1968, it changed its name-
to the Liberty Party.
That same year, retired right-wing
general Edwin Walker created the Liber-
tv Network to compete with the nation's
leftist newspapers and TV networks.
Not much else is known about the Liber-
tv Network: When Walker discussed it,
few people could make much sense of
what he was saying. "Our efforts he
explained, "will extend for all
Americans, to 1968 and 1976 � very-
significant years � and on up to 1000
A.D Walker said the network would
investigate the Kennedy assassination.
Walker became obsessed with the case
after the Warren Commission alleged
that Lee Harvey Oswald unsuccessfully
tried to assassinate Walker just before
the Kennedy assassination. The new in-
vestigation, said Walker, should focus
on "the fact that Oswald knew Rubens-
tein and Rubenstein knew Oswald
"Do you mean Jack Ruby?" a
reporter asked.
"1 mean Rubenstein Walker
replied. "You can call him anything you
want
Last year was dififcult for Jerry
Falwell. On May 3 he wrote to me, say-
ing he had "absolutely failed to raise the
money necessary to keep the Moral Ma-
jority moving ahead Repeatedly-I am
asking myself and others-where we are
failing? Have we won so many moral
battles that our friends think the major
conflict is over?
"Yes we are winning the battle against
the efforts of militant
homosexualsThe porn kings are now
losing money heavilyBut now � we
face the possibility of losing the most
important battle of allIf this country
compromises with our defense against
the communist nuclear weapons, then
sex and violence on television will
become a moot issueI have no inten-
tions of allowing Tip O'Neill and Jim
Wright to place my children and grand-
children in communist slaverv or
worse
I didn't reply, and Jerry contacted me
again in August, this time via a United
Express Gram, whatever that is.
"Moments ago I was told my family and
home would be blown up today
Jerry informed me. "Militant homosex-
uals, pornography peddlers and abor-
tionists have often threatened our
livesBut since my return from South
Africa, communist terrorists are openly
threatening to kill me and my tmily
because of my campaign to stop the
Soviet Union from taking over the vital
minerals, strategic sea lanes and naval
based of South Africa.
"I am willing to confront the death
threats, the twisted and biased media
coverage � but only if I have the help,
prayers and support of my friends I
must ask you to immediately send an
emergency gift of $100, $50, $25
Again, I didn't respond. Jerry sent me
a more desperate letter less than a week
later: "If I cannot find the support of
friends like you � I'm afraid we are in
serious trouble. And pornographers,
militant gays, abortionists and liberals
will continue to lead this country
straight down the path of moral decay
Then there's the Liberty Lobby, based
on Capitol Hill and doing well in the age
of Reagan. Its orientation was sum-
marized by its founder, Willis Carto,
when he wrote to an association:
"Hitler's defeat was the defeat of
Europe. And AmericaThe blame, it
seems, must be laid at the door of the in-
ternational JewsIf Satan
himselfhad tried to create a perma-
nent disintegration and force for the
destruction of the nations, he could have
done no better than to invent the Jews
And now the Liberty Federation?
Suddenly, Moral Majority doesn't
sound so bad.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 27, 19M
t
State
There
y the
he first

cranes
�-
1south),
Farm-
��� est .



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'



1
Garret
Forum Rules

h or
he ci-
ne en-
ority
ind Jim
i i grand-
er or
tacted me
via a United
that is.
irmly and
lay
n sex-
and abor-
av,e itened our
South
ire openly
and my family
stop the
� . �er the vital
a lanes and naval
outh Africa.
" int the death
twisted and biased media
- but only if 1 have the help,
and support of my friendsI
mus' ak you to immediately send an
emergency gift of $100, $50, $25
Again, 1 didn't respond. Jerry sent me
a more desperate letter less than a week
"It I cannot find the support of
friends like you � I'm afraid we are in
serious trouble. And pornographcrs,
militant gays, abortionists and liberals
will continue to lead this country
straight down the path of moral decay
Then there's the Liberty Lobby, based
on Capitol Hill and doing well in the age
of Reagan. Its orientation was sum-
marized by its founder, Willis Carto,
when he wrote to an association:
"Hitler's defeat was the defeat of
Europe. And AmericaThe blame, it
seems, must be laid at the door of the in-
ternational JewsIf Satan
himselfhad tried to create a perma-
nent disintegration and force for the
destruction of the nations, he could have
done no better than to invent the Jews
And now the Liberty Federation?
Suddenly, Moral Majority doesn't
sound so bad.
Videos Lessen Perception In Students
Music
college
NYON, TX (CPS) -
v ideos can desensitize
students to violence, a survey 700
midwest em collegians has found.
Ihe study, released last week
b Sharal Rehman. assistant
professor at West Texas State,
found that after viewing music
videos for a while, students
became less capable of perceiving
increasing levels of violence in the
videos.
1 he following information was
from the ECU offense Log
Report, the dates covered in this
�rl are March 16 through
March 26.
March 16. 1986
12:20a.m
k now n person 's were
i cutting the chain, north
� ns ri Building.
I 53a
- o! items missing
rom door and other doors
rom the third floor of
rm.
v ' aulkner, age 23.
04 c are) Rd Kinston, NC
tnned from campus after
�ted tor simple posses-
� marijuana and possession
. paraphernalia.
i sm of a vehicle parked
Jones dorm was
Belk dorm resident was ar-
: liege Hill Dr. for
-esv and reckless
-
a U'R was
ted h was taken from the
of the Home
Building.
3:10p.m.
A bicycle larceny was reported
from the 1st floor of Jones dorm.
The bicycle was missing from the
bike shed east of Jones dorm.
March 18
1:16p.m.
A gas cap and plastic converti-
ble top rod tips were reported
taken from a car parked in the lot
west of Mendenhall. This inci-
dent was stated by a resident o
the third floor of Garrett dorm.
3:19p.m.
A breaking and entering and
larceny to a vehicle was reported.
The vehicle was parked west of
the Brodv building.
March 20
1:15p.m.
An off campus rape was
reported. A black man entered
the girl's car at Trade Gas Sta-
tion, W. 10th St. The male forced
the girl to drive to an unknown
destination. He raped her then
left the scene. No suspects have
been found.
11:30p.m.
Courtney D. Jones, of Camp
Lejuene, was arrested for
trespassing in Greene dorm.
Jones had previously been bann-
ed from campus.
March 21
4:05p.m.
Larcenv of a bicvele was
Rehman also found students
tend to excuse violence in videos
done by performers they like, and
that women students in his study
tended to view themselves as vic-
tims of violence.
They are not the only ones
disturbed. A growing body of
scholarly research seems to be
supporting contentions that
music videos often are unduly-
violent or sexual.
"I think the coupling of
violence and sexual imagery is
troubling University of
Georgia media researcher Joseph
Dominick maintains.
Dominick and colleague Barry
Sherman recently studied 165
"concept" music videos shown
on MTV and two other stations
that feature music videos, WNBC
and WTBS, and found about 55
percent of the videos featured at
least one violent episode.
The musical carnage ranks se-
cond only to prime-time network
television, during which 60 per-
cent of the shows feature at least
reported from the 4th floor of
Belk dorm. The bicycle had been
taken from the bike shed north
west of Belk dorm.
10:40p.m.
Jimmie Irving Taylor, age 35,
of Route 4, Lot 14 of Homestead
Trailer Park, Greenville, was
banned from campus after being
arrested for DWI and littering.
March 22
1:45a.m.
David M. Corson, age 20, of
11-B Carleton Ln Mt. Laurel,
NJ, was arrested west of Greene
dorm for giving false information
to a law enforcement officer.
2:15a.m.
A Scott dorm resident was ar-
rested for DWI.
3:00a.m.
John Martin Reilly. age 23, of
Camp Lejuene. was arrested for
DWI
7:20a.m.
Jimmie Irving Taylor, age 35,
of Route 4, Lot 14 of Homestead
Trailer Park was arrested for
driving with a revoked license.
March 23
3:30a.m.
James Vincent Peele, age 23,
of 403 1 2 Harding St Green-
ville, was arrested for trespass-
ing. Peele was previously forbid-
one incident of violence.
While Dominick has no scien-
tific measure of how popular
music videos are among college
students, he believes they are
' big on campus from my casual
analysis
"You may be teaching a
young, impressionable audience
that the two things (sex and
violence) go together he says.
The Georgia and West Texas
studies confirmed other
observers' discomfort. "My
tolerance level lasts 10 to 15
minutes because of the way they
portray violence and women as
sex objects, " says Judy Byrd of
the Sisters of Justice in Canton,
Ohio, about videos.
Dominick and Sherman con-
tend "in many cases, women
were presented as upper-class sex
objects for lower-class males with
visions of upward mobility
They determined social status
from clothes, jewelry and cars in
the shows.
den to come on campus.
5:20a.m.
Robert Stephen Ruzevich, Jr
age 22 of Box 404, Livingston,
IL, was arrested for DWI, over
crowded vehicle and possession
of marijuana. The arrest took
place on College Hill Dr.
March 24
11:45a.m.
Bicycle laiceny reported from
second floor Scott dorm. Bicycle
was parked east of Umstead
dorm.
March 26
2:00a.m.
Officer reported unknown per-
sons vandalized and took the
receiver from the blue light
emergency phone located north
of Fletcher dorm.
Persons having any informa-
tion concerning vandalisms or
larcenies mentioned in this
report, please contact the ECU
Public Safety Department. The
information provided will be kept
confidential and a reward will be
offered.
eVlLUGE
DONNA EDWARDS
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THFPASTC AROI INIAN
Entertainment
MARCH 27. 1986 Page ft
Page, Rogers
Rock On With
2nd Firm LP
By WALTRISHU
SJiff Ytrllri
The Firm, rock n roll oldest
new group, once again proves to
music listeners that they're no; a
band that stands tall one sear and
disappears the next.
With their second album.
Mean Business, Jimmy Page and
The Firm have established that
they really do mean business, and
that they are one of the top per-
forming bands oi the '80s
Page, a former Yard Bird and
Zeppelin, converged with Bad
Company's Paul Rogers, along
with former Manfred Mann
drummer Chris Slade, and bassist
1 ony Franklin in 1981. 1 atei
year they produced their firs;
album. The Firm With then hit
song, "Radioactive theii
album went on to become one
the year's best sellers. This years
album appears to be no dil I
Written K Rogers and Page,
parts oi the album intertwine i
two distinct sounds that made
I ed Zeppelin and Bad Company
famous. However, most of "it-
sounds you'll hear are the
group's own. Such is the case
with "All the king's Horses an
excellent song with a delicate
mixture oi the foursome's ex-
traordinary talents.
rhose two songs contain
.nds that are as oi igina
are appealing. Pag
in these song; gj sm a
texture. Roger's bluesy
l-boj vocals distinguish this
group's sound jusl as the) did tor
Bad Company years ago.
'1 mine Hunter the hardest
sounding song on the album, is
reminiscent of the ed Zeppelin 1
album, but with a slower, more
laid back tempo.
Influences from Page's years
with Eric Clapton can be found
in "Cadillac another oi the
group's slightly hard sounding
rock songs. "I ive in Peace" is an
excellent song with a sti
meaning asking the questions,
"Why can't we live in peace
Wh can't we have relief?"
Acting Tops Action In
Film For The Heart
Oscar winner Ceraldine Page (right) and Rebecca DeMornav (rtt �tor in k- Ti j �
to Bountiful Page plays an elderly woman ZZarch oJ her rooi. Snd Tht Trip
'Africa' Shuts Out Spielberg
Overall, their album gives off a
variety of different sounds to
chose from. like their first
album, however, they are far
from reaching their full potential
as a complete rock band. Then
again there are songs on this
album, such as "Live in Peace"
and "All the King's Horses
which do exceed the expectations
oi most listeners. If Leonard
Maulton were a record critic he
would probably give this album a
seven.
11 PI Out of Africa, a
period love story told against the
sweeping panorama oi Kenya,
dominated the Oscars � winning
for the best picture and director,
d dealing Steven Spielberg's
The Color Purple a stunning
defeat
Out of Africa and The Color
Purple were both nominated 11
times Africa won seven Oscars,
but Purple failed to win a single
award Monday nigh and tied
The Turning Point from 197 for
tne ' ats in Oscar history.
s! ; berg, whose movies have
made more money at the box of-
t ice than those of any other direc-
tor, had been snubbed bv the
Academy oi Motion Pictures
Arts � Sciences bv not even being
I as best director of the
produced.
. nostalgic and sen-
show that ran 15
lutes pas! us scheduled three
hours to a worldwide audience
estimated at more than one
billion, Geraldine Page finally-
won an Oscar on her eighth try,
picking up the best actress award
her touching role as a widow
returning to her roots in The Trip
to Bountiful.
William Hurt was named best
actor for his tour de force perfor-
mance in the role of a homosex-
ual prisoner in love with his
cellmate in The Kiss of the Spider
Woman.
"It's incredible a surprised
Hurt said. "I didn't expect to be
here, so 1 don't know what to
say I am very proud to be an
actor
Oscars for supporting roles
went to two sentimental
favorites; Anjelica Huston, as a
brazen Mafia princess in Prizzi's
Honor, which was directed by her
father, John, and which starred
her longtime boyfriend. Jack
Nicholson; and Don Ameche, as
a man rejuvenated from a creak-
ing oldster into a break dancing
dervish by the fountain of youth
in Cocoon.
In addition to best picture and
the best director Oscar for
Sydney Pollack, Out of Africa
won five other awards � for
adapted screenplay, original
score, cinematography, sound
and art direction. Witness � the
only best picture nominee in the
top 10 at the box office � was a
double winner, for original
screenplay and film editing. Co-
coon also won a second Oscar,
for visual effects.
At a post ceremony party at the
Beverly Hilton Hotel where two
weeks ago he was named best
director by the Directors Guild of
America, Spielberg was asked
why Purple was shut out.
"I'll have to think of a quote
later, but for now you can say we
were pitched a no-hitter but the
crowd still loves us
Lionel Richie, a Grammy win-
ner earlier this year for his work
on "We Are The World won
the best song Oscar for "Say
You, Say Me" from the movie
White ights.
Other winners included the
epic Japanese film Ran for
costume design. Mask for
makeup and Back to the Future
for sound effects editing.
The ABC telecast from the
Dorothy Chandler Pavilion was
hosted by Jane Fonda, Alan Alda
and comic Robin Williams,
whose running line of biting
jokes and impersonations of
Nicholson and others kept the
elegantly dressed audience in stit-
ches.
Page, who played an aging
woman tracing her roots and
memories in The Trip to Boun-
tiful, was nominated seven times
previously without winning. That
record is now shared by Peter
O'Toole and the late Richard
Burton.
Among those defeated in
voting for best director was the
79 year old Huston, who won his
first Oscar in 1948 for Treasure
of the Sierra Madre as his father,
Walter, won for best supporting
actor. He had hoped to win again
with his daughter.
By DAVID BRADSHAW
�MfTWfMM
The Trip To Bountiful is a
movie about life, death, and just
about everything in between. It is
about the importance of place
and family � about home, and
the need to stay in touch with
home.
The movie is set in 1947 in the
inland coastal region of Texas,
yet the themes presented are
timeless ones. It could just as
easily be set in modern-day
Greenville or in eighteenth cen-
tury France.
The main character in the film
is Carrie Watts, played by
Geraldine Page. Like Dorothy in
The Wizard of Oz, she "just
wants to go home Home to
Carrie is Bountiful, Texas.
Carrie is an elderly woman
who is fast approaching the end
of her life, yet she hasn't been to
"home" in twenty years. She
lives with her son, Ludie, and his
wife, Jessie Mae. Because
generational differences and Car
rie's longing to return to Boun-
tiful, she decides to pack her
bags, pension check and all, and
move back to Bountiful.
The majority of the film deals
with Carrie's "trip
Bountiful On the wav. she
meets and befriends Thelma,
played by Rebecca DeMornav of
Bisky Business fame.
Bountiful is not a filn
edge-of-your-seat act:
it relies on the develop
characters, especiall)
draw audiences int
Superb acting per!
made the character
very memorable, and establi
a feeling of sympathy
them. The urgency in m
desire to return home
palpable, and the rang
lions she feels when
arrives is experienced
revelation.
Overall, The Inp to Bount
is a mixtu
edv. a roller
and laughter
ends on a i
renewal. In the film i
"I've had my trip,
enough to keep me
of my life And tl
keep audiences smil i
ing when 'hey lea
It sou enjoy a qual
with quality
don't mind a mo
you think, then Tht
Bountiful i 1 at �

N.C. Publishing House
To Re-issue Old Books
Spielberg Produces As Hanks
(UPI) � Algonquin Books of
Chapel Hill, a house that has
gained national attention in four
years, is embarking on a unique
experiment this spring � one that
will undoubtedly be watched in
New Yc k.
Algonquin and its president,
Louis Rubin, will re-issue at leas:
five novels that are out oi print.
but with a unique twist.
"What's unusual is that the
writer writes an introduction and,
if the author wishes, the author
can revise the novel.
"It's not unheard oi, but we're
making a special emphasis with
the author telling about the book
and how he came to write it
Rubin said in an interview.
The first of the series Cale, by
Sylvia Wilkinson, will be publish-
ed in April. Others planned in-
clude: The Man Who Was Sot
With It, by Herb Gold; Debbie,
by Max Steele; Jordan County,
by Shelby Foo.e; and Which
Ones Are The Enemy, bv George
Garrett.
"I thought they w
tant books that were ou
and I thought the
back in print
Algonquin was
winter oi !���
came out in the fa
will publish its �
i ng
In 1987
publish 20 to 25 books, vv I
.i set up a
one oi the hat k
good books N
that is any .
books that are sul
You can get fictioi
you have to come up wi
for books and gel -
them, or else find good wr
and find out what they - i
write about and encou .
to do it Rubin said
Rubin, a professoi
writing at the University of V
Carolina, is an expert
'hern literature. His n
cent study oi the subject was
published bv Louisiana S
University Press
I rttrrui New, Rrimr
Walter is a lawyer for rock 'n'
roll groups.
Anna is a classical musician
who plays the viola.
They've been making beautiful
music together, living in the
apartment of her ex-husband, the
magnetically egocentric Maestro,
Max.
Deeply in love, Walter and An-
na will soon be deeply in debt,
falling into and having to survive.
The Money Pit.
Tom Hanks and Shelley Long,
two of today's most appealing
young performers, star in the
contemporary comedy directed
by Richard Benjamin.
Presented by Steven Spielberg,
the film from Amblin Entertain-
ment and Universal Pictures also
stars Alexander Godunov and
Maureen Stapleton.
Max has been away on tour for
a year and has allowed Anna to
stay in his vacant apartment until
he returns. Living in romantic
bliss, Walter and Anna have seen
their love for each other grow. In
fact, the conservative Walter
wants to take the next step, but
Anna is not ready to marry again.
She's perfectly happy to stay with
Walter without any more strings
attached.
Suddenly, Max returns. He's
back and they're out - out of the
apartment, almost out of money
and into a frantic search for a
roof over their heads.
Walter hopes this rush to find a
home could give he and Anna the
opportunity to make a further
commitment to each other,
cementing their relationship and
lessening the chance that Max
could sweep her off her feet
again.
Great foundations are not built
on triangles.
Walter's real estate friend tips
them off to a house that is almost
too good to be true. It is.
"There's something about a
bargain says Tom Hanks,
"that will make people do almost
anything. It gets them crazy.
They can't resist it
Except for a few minor repairs,
the house seems to be in order.
Only after Walter gallantly car-
ries Anna over the threshold does
the front door fall off.
Their dream house starts to fall
apart and so does their relation-
ship. They have to rebuild both.
Will they someday live happily
ever after?
As director Richard Benjamin
says, "If you can live through
this, keeping your sanity and
your sense of humor, you can live
through marriage
The Money Pit is the fourth film
directed by Benjamin, whose
talent as an actor have made him
a star in films, television and the
theatre. The first film he
directed, My Favorite Year,
clearly established his directing
talent. He followed that with the
sensitive, romantic drama Racing
with the Moon, and the period
action-comedy City Heat with
Clint Eastwood and Burt
Reynolds.
"For me says Benjamin,
"directing The Money Pit was
the most complex and challeng-
ing production yet. Physically, it
had aspects of the Olympics
The comedy is filled with
elaborately staged physical ef-
fects, most of them actually hap-
pening right in front of the
cameras with split-second timing.
Some sequences were shot with as
many as six cameras to capture
action that could only be staged
once.
Steven Spielberg was first at-
tracted to David Giler's
screenplay and approached Ben-
jamin to direct it. They were both
intrigued with the interplay of
characters and comedy, the
counterpoint of romantic rela-
tionships and imaginative visual
humor in a most contemporary
situation.
Bringing his own creative
See LOVE, Page 7
Tom Hank stars as Walter, a do-tt-yowetf handy-man la the bu c�. c
Money Pit This film, directed by Richard Benjamin, also stars Shelley LoTT Wbw� iro��ction The

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BLOOM COUNTY
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MAKCH27, 1986
BLOOM COUNTY

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5 Ballot
9 That woman
12 Sandarac tree
13 Metal
14 Beverage
15 Intolerant
persons
17 Hypothetical
force
18 Rodent
19 Blood vessel
21 Narrow, flat
boards
23 Short-distance
track man
27 Article
28 Barter
29 Small lump
31 Parent colloq
34 Maiden loved by
Zeus
35 Greek letter
37 Pinch
39 Hebrew letter
40 Beam
42 Drink slowly
44 Din
46 Printer s
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48 Transport to
another
50 Europeans
53 Is m debt
54 Everyone
55 Negative
57 Places tor
combat
61 Spanish for
river
62 Declare
64 Rescue
65 Brawl colloq
66 Contest
67 Barracuda
DOWN
1 Public vehicle
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2 Swiss canton
3 Sink in middle
4 Furnish
5 Call on
6 Conjunction
7 In addition
8 Goals
9 Run aground
10 Warmth
11 Dines
16 Doctrines
20 Recent
22 Note of scale
23 Mix
24 Malay canoe
25 Sun god
26 Hurried
30 Repast
32 Part of church
33 Antlered animal
36 River island
38 Own
41 Color
43 In favor of
45 Supposing that
47 Coroner abbr
49 Cognizant of
50 Young salmon
51 Mixture
52 Projecting tooth
56 Eggs
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Love Blooms In Romantic Comedy
Continued From Page 6
stamp to the film, Benjamin has
enjoyed his association with the
Amblin team, headed by
By BROOKS Spielberg, Kathleen Kennedy and pounding the pressure
1 Frank Marshall.
are getting tenser and testier.
"It's making us crazy explains
Shelley Long. "It's sucking up
every cent we have, and with Max
lurking in the wings, it's com-
"Steven is there when you need
him, and the same applies to
Frank and Kathy notes Ben-
jamin. "They let you make your
own movie in a atmosphere that
stimulates creativity
Benjamin points out that own-
ing a house has always been the
cornerstone of the American
dream.
Against this background of
destruction, construction and
reconstruction, Walter and Anna
For an actress with a flair for
comedy, she relished the chance
to segue from cozy, romantic se-
quences to outrageous physical
comedy within the same film.
The Emmy Award-winning
star of "Cheers" began her role
in The Money Pit only a few
weeks after giving birth to her
first daughter, Juliana. Upon
completion of filming, she
resumed her top-rated television
series.
Hanks has had an extremely
busy career since shooting to film
stardom in Splash, following his
role in the TV series "Bosom
Buddies Immediately after he
finished The Money Pit, he
started filming Sothing in Com-
mon with Jackie Gleason.
Alexander Godunov made his
impressive motion picture debut
in Witnert and is now looking
forward to more film roles to
complement his career as one of
the world's most noted and elec-
trifying dancers.
Maureen Stapleton is equally
at home in films, television or on
the stage. The versatile actress
was an Academy Award winner
for her performance in Reds.
I





1 HI I AST I AROI INIAN
Sports
MARCH 27. 1986
Page �
I

t
Y

BucsWinTwentk th

t
-VMH W"
'
Pirates Sweep Three
r TIM CHANDLER 5,mnH ,�k ��,
By TIM CHANDLER
JIM I El Tl.r.NI T�t
Mark Cockrell doubles in action against Oh .o I niversity. ECU visits James Madison Saturday.
Ruggers Third In Tourney
b sco rr cooper
GREENSBORO - The Rugby
Club participated in the Third
Annual Greensboro Invitational
Rugbv Tournament last weekend
and finished with a 2-1 record
while winning the consolation
bracket,
Easl C arolina opened against
Duke on Sat. March, 22. Through
costl) penalties, the Blue Devils
took an early 7-0 lead which they
maintained throughout the firs!
half.
-ftei scoring a try (when the
ball is downed the try -zone,
worth lour points), Duke missed
the extra point. However, they
came back to score a field goal (a
kick through the uprights, worth
three points! from 20 meters out.
ending the halt with a 7-0 advan-
tage
The second half was all EC
Wales native. Doug Ecklev,
scored the Club's first try on a
briliant 40-meter scramble.
Eckley used his quickness and
agility to elude about 10 Duke
players who could do nothing but
watch as he streaked to the try
one. Steve Calcott, another
Englishmen, added the extra
point (kicked on a vertical line
from the spot on the goal line
where the try was scored, worth
two points), cutting the Blue
Devil lead to 7-6.
With just minutes to play,
Eckley responded again tor the
purple and gold. Ecklev scrambl-
ed for the trv one, then had a
brilliant assist to Bob
Human Keg" Eason - wl
made the winning trv. Calc
then iced the game with his se-
cond extra-point conversion. 1 (
would go on to win 12-7.
"I'm proud o! the way
team plays hard until the I
whistle blows saidUD presj
dent Bill Zimmermann afi
EC victory, "you can afford to
just give up when you're down,
you've got to keep the pressure
on
EC then took on the South
Carolina Gamecocks just one
hour after the Duke game. I SC
was fresh as they did not have a
first-round game. It was a hard-
hitting defensive struggle
throughout the contest.
I Sc , an obv iously largei
team, could only music- two field
ils as they deteated the Pirates
6-0. EC did have some scoring
opportunities in the game, but
were unable to capitalize
However. EC did manage to keep
the Gamecocks, who are the No
1 'earn in 5 arolina, oui
try zone.
" "c: the game, several spec-
rs came up u me and �
vs tressed by the way we
plaved and
well Zimmermann l
See CONSOLATION, pa 10
The Pirate Baseball team made
it three-for-three against Ohio
Universitv as they took a 5-0 deci-
sion yesterday.
Craig Van Deventer went the
distance for the Pirates, moving
his season record to 5-0. Van
Deventer gave up only six hits,
while walking three batters and
striking out four.
The Pirates got their scoring
underway in the second inning,
when Steve Sides got on base with
a single. Sides then stole second
base, and scored on Mark
( ockrell's single. All of this took
place with two outs.
The Bucs remained silent until
the fifth inning. With one out,
Mont Carter got on base with a
walk Greg Hardison moved
(. arter to third base with a dou-
ble. Chris Bradberry then
brought Cartel home with a
single.
The Pirates struck once again
in the sixth inning. Mike Sullivan
led off the inning with a double.
Jay McGraw then received a
walk, putting runners on first and
md with no outs in the inning.
"sides then bunted, moving
Sullivan to third and McGraw to
second with one out. Cockrelf
sent a sacrifice fly to center field
enabling Sullivan to score,
pushing the Bucs lead to 3-0.
In the eighth inning, McGraw
was walked with one out, follow
ed by Cockrell who was walked
with two outs in the inning, put-
ting runners on first and second
Jim Rilcy doubled home both
McGraw and Cockrell giving the
Pirates their final tally of five
runs.
Leading hitter for the Pirates
was Sullivan, as he turned in a
two-for-four performance.
With the win, the Pirates pick-
ed up their 20th win of the season
against only one loss. That start
is the best ever in ECU history
In the first game of the double-
header with Ohio University on
Tues. March 25, Winfred
Johnson picked up his fifth win
of the year, against no losses.
Johnson went the distance for the
Pirates, who won 8-6.
With the win, Johnson set a
school record for wins in a career
with 29. The old record was 28
wins held by Mickev h
(1977-80).
Sophomore McGraw led the
way for the Pirates in hitting as
he drove in three runs.
Sullivan and Bradlev also
tributed two hits each to pa �
Bucs.
in the nightcap, the Pirates
came tmm behind to take a I
decision from Ohio.
Heading into the both i
third, the Pirates seemed t 11
a lot of trouble, trailing '
Then the explosion came
Pirates sent fourteen batter-
the plate, as they scored ten �
in the third inning.
Johnson led the way w
towering three-run homer .
him 59 for his .areer
school record), v.
homerun. Johnson moved
within just one homerun and
pitching � being tl
player in NCAA historv
60 homers arid 30 pil
tone, in a career.
illivan, the Pi rau
baseman, also bai
roundtnpper in the third inn.
Jim Peterson pi I
I I U as he went the dista
pushing his re-
seas.
The nexi a
baseballers will be Satur :
they will travel to James Ma I
la
Duk
Sports Fact
Ihurs. March 27. 1879
In Chippewa Falls, Canada,
lightweight Arthur Chambers
defeats Johnny Clark in a
136-round championsri
the longest title fight ii
historv The longest boxing
match on record took place in
1825. when Jack Jones
stopped Patsy Tunney in the
276th round.
(.�'
ECU Cheerleaders Optimistic
By SCOTT COOPER course - it's easier to ,et �rk -w. c�k i
the RuKby Cub competed In the L NOG T ourney and walked awa with . third-place finish
By SCOTT COOPER
No matter what the score, no
matter who the opponent is, ECU
will always be fully supported as
long as the Pirate cheerleaders
are on hand.
The ECU cheerleading squad,
coached by Pam Davis, is con-
stantly backing ECU athletics.
The team took 13th place in na-
tional competition and is eagerly
looking for interested students.
Coach Pam Davis stressed the
need for more male cheerleaders.
"The one thing I would like to
get across is male cheerleading
Davis said. "We really want to
emphasize how important men
are (to the program). It's a
masculine thing to do. If you've
got good guys, you can build a
better team
"We have an ex-football
player on the team and another
one is trying out Davis added.
"Girls are important too, of
course � it's easier to get girls,
they've had high school ex-
perience
Whether it is a guy or a girl, the
cheerleaders are having tryouts
for interested men or women.
Beginning next Tues. Apr. 1 at 5
pm in room 142 Minges Col-
iseum, there will be an organiza-
tional meeting. At the meeting,
Davis will discuss what is re-
quired along with some
background information on the
team. Clinics will be held that
week with tryouts being held on
Tues. Apr. 8 (the time will be an-
nounced).
Now would be a super time to
get involved with the
cheerleaders, according to Davis.
"We finished 13th in the na-
tion. It was a super season
Davis acknowledged. "We got
recognition in Memphis and pats
on the back all year
The Pirate squad did have
some tough competition in Mem-
phis. Such schools as N.( . State
(national champs this year).
Auburn, Ole Miss, Nebraska.
LSU and Penn State were some
top names that were competing
However, the Bucs withstood
competition and fared rather well
in all three events � cheer, fight
song and the side-line competi-
tion.
"We finished in the finals of
all three and took home the most-
improved award Davis said
happily. "We were in the top-ten
of everything � we felt good
about that
All the success is due to hard
work. The squad practices every-
day with stringent workouts. The
guys are in the weight room three
times a week while the ladies
spend two days a week on the
weights. Also, the men must run
a seven-minute mile while the
women must clock in under the
eight-minute mark.
Davis had some basic priorities
the team. They are: 1) to sup-
port the teams, no matter what
and 2) to go (and compete) to the
ional championship. She also
said that the team is open to all
ggestions and that they did not
discourage anyone.
"We feel it will be a heckuva
ear tor us added Davis.
ECU cheerleader Tim
Rochester had nothing but
positive thoughts about his
cheerleading experience.
"It's fun. It's always a com-
petition � we compete every
game Rochester said. "It's a
sport. 1 work, even more at this
than other sports. I do it in spare
time and am always practicing
For anyone interested in
becoming part of the ECU
cheerleading squad, your chance
is now. Be at Minges at 5 pm on
Apr. 8 to obtain more informa-
tion.
1986 Pirate
Football Schedule
Sept. 6
Sept. 13
Sept. 20
Sept. 27
Oct. 4
Oct. 11
Oct. 18
Oct. 25
Nov. 1
Nov. 15
Nov. 27
N. C.State
WEST VIRGINIA
Auburn
Penn State
SW LOUISIANA
Temple
GEORGIA SOL THERN
South Carolina
SOUTHERN MISS
CINCINNATI
Miami, Fla.
Away
HOME
Awa
Away
HOME
Away
HOME
Away
HOME
HOME
Awav
Lady Tracks ters
Fare Well In Meet
BvVVAITDUun w � w w �
Tb. ECU cbd .�� ta .�,� �. ECAC-S.ua, T.un, .� WUU.��bur .� ,�,�, for tatmui �aitaU.
By WALT R1SHKI
The ECU Lady track team,
under supervision of second-year
head coach Wayne Miller, are
looking forward to a season of
progress and success.
The lady Pirates began their
1986 campaign with strong ef-
forts in the North Carolina State
University Invitationals and the
Georgia Relays. In both events,
the Lady Pirates have placed in
the top-five in each category they
had entered.
Sophomore Linda Gillis led the
way at the NCSU Invitational
with a first place effort in the
100-meter run. Her time in the
event was 12.0 seconds. Lisa
Poteat also contributed with a
strong second-place finish in the
400-meter run with a time of 60.0
seconds.
With a combined effort, the
women's team placed second in
the 400 x 100 relav with a clock
ing of 48.3 seconds. Javelin
thrower Wendy Trone finished
second in the Georgia Relavs with
a throw of 138 feet.
Gillis feels that the team has
done great, despite the fact that
the seven-member team is still
young (4 sophomores.
freshmen)
� Werc Just now getting into
�t, ' Gillis commented "Being a
very small team, we're progress
in8 a great deal
Gillis' goals for the team are to
keep progressing, and for the
mile-relay times to improve. On a
more personal scale, her goals are
to run the 200-meter race in .23
seconds, and to make the Na-
tional competition. (She came
within two-tenths of a second
from being invited last season).
The lady Pirates next meet will
be the Carolina Relays on Apr.
4-5.
Classified
NEW GREEK SOB
PHA
KENT SMITH
-
KENT SMITH
' r V .
ALPHA XI DE L rA
ATTENTION
I
1
KA BROTMf -
LITLE SISTERS

ABAGAYLE H
-
TO CLINT as
THE CORAL REEF
-
TO THE BETAS
V A C H O C A

PIKA LITTLE SISTER:
DELTA ZETA
as a Drea i
a tf rtie
were givi
ed

BETH RICHARDSON -
TROXEL

-
oes
ALPHA XI DE.U
I
ATTENTION SC,
nbers at
ATTN ECU STUDEN-
The e
TONIGHT
rau Be'a
apt
e party a ��
,HOP TO THE ALLE
1 ZETA Pledge
00 Eas'e- v
I Miss isn't
ope so �
-

� � -
misses
no showea
funjre ! hope ��-
s
T0 THE ECU SKHERS �
- Son
for ore ��
Q as a as cr
April J
Room
GD -6D 0 tsr
�.�.
,t





THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 27, 1936 9
a Three
con-
pace the
Pirates
10-5
be m
-
a


(a.


V�
;e finish.
I j
I
Pirate
Sch edule
N.C. MateAway
VIRGINIAHOME
AuburnAway
Penn StateAway
LOUISIANAHOME
TempleAway
31ASOI THtRNHOME
DutharolinaAway
THKRN MISSHOME
INCINNAT1HOME
Miami, Fla.Awav
are
I
Tracks ters
ell In Meet
101 � . � relay with a cl ick-
� W : Javelin
m i Wendy lione finished
the Georgia Relays with
138 feet
Ilis feels that the team has
e great, despite the fact that
the seven-member team is still
ang (4 s o phomores, 3
la State freshmen)
tnd the We're just nov. getting into
events, it Gillis commented. "Being a
laced in very small team, we're progress-
es ing a great deal
Gillis' goals for the team are to
led the keep progressing, and for th-
hational mile-relay times to improve. On a
in the more personal scale, her goals are
in the to run the 200-meter race in .23
is. Lisa seconds, and to make the Na-
with a tional competition. (She came
l in the within two-tenths of a second
of 60.0 from being invited last season).
The lady Pirates next meet will
rt, the be the Carolina Relays on Apr.
:ond in 4-5.
?
Classifieds
personar
NEW GREEK SORORITY: ZETA
APHA WILL BE TAKING IN
VIEWS CONDUCTED BY A
NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE.
INTERESTED GIRLS
�SE CALL 757 6824
KENT SMITH: On campus, I ought
� see your face, In due time I'll put
n your place Others will figure
.our game, never a change,
re always the same What's
ifl ?o you, is long time due, So
k Dack and laugh now, cause you
' Ahen I'm through K C.
KENT SMITH: From the roommate
K My name you can guess, I
- ew from the start you had no
� No tears shall she shed, no
:s are said, with the exception
re not worth I
ALPHA XI DELTA: Hope you had
� a the social We're glad you
e along Lets get together again
The Alpha Phis
ATTENTION KA'S: Have a FAN
TIC EASTER BREAK and par
the sun comes up1 Myrtle
ound! Love ya ail The Little
�� S
kA BROTHERS, PLEDGES AND
"LE SISTERS: The April Fool's
. Brother Burn Party is quickly
-oachmg Be sure to have your
� Jug up! Get ready to party!
ABAGAYLE . Hapoy 21! I hope your
�'�i- s extra special, because
deserve it This weekend will be
ll vou can count on it. Myrtle
Beach here we come. Remember
ays LOVE YOU! Ranger.
TO CLINT AND THE REST OF
THE CORAL REEF DIVE CLUB
tk you. Debbie (The East
Carolinian
TO THE BETAS: Have a jammm
ster Weekend. Be ready to party
en you get back We'll miss you!
Love, l.i Beta Babes
MACHO CAMACHO: WHO'S
AORKING WHO??? Tara
PIKA LITTLE SISTERS: Thanks
� i "he help during our initiation arid
"Stailation. We iove you! Pika
Brothers
DELTA 7ETA: Spring Formal was
a blast. A Dream Girl party those
oeople crashed Did ya see that girl
a th the poiceman's hat? An open
oar to fiii our ar:nks, they cut Boner
oft. that realiv stinks. The awards
were given, some people were burn
ed. But they'll get over it! Another
DreamGirl has come and gone. If
you missed it. you really missed it!
BETH RICHARDSON AND GINA
TROXEL: Congratulations on your
Dream Girl ana Most Outstanding
Junior awards You two are the
best! I love you both. Your Big Sis'
Michelle
ALPHA XI DELTA: Had a great
' me playing golf last night Thanks
?c a fun filled evening Lefs do it
again. Alpha Sigs
ATTENTION SCUBA DIVERS
The Coral Reef Dive Club is holding
a meeting Wed April 9 at 5 in
denhall's Multi purpose room
Members are asked to a'tend All
'hose interested are welcome.
ATTN ECU STUDENTS: One more
�veeK until ECU'S biggest spring par
fy The Budweiser Backyard
Biowout is coming soon Get your
kets early Call 757-3516
TONIGHT: Come party with the Phi
Tau, Beta Omega Pledge Class
Mappy Hour at Cubbies, 9-until
Come party with the Phi Taus.
HOP TO THE ALLEY: DELTA
ZETA PLEDGE HAPPY HOUR
9 00 Easter Monday. March 31.
MISS: Isn't seven a lucky number? I
hope so, 5.L.H. thinks it's heavenly,
but sorry i haven't been an angel
more like a ratt, huh?) Blue cater
pillars are great, panthers are too,
but Harry is the best and he really
misses you, lefs work together, the
rhino showed how I feel to the
future, I hope we can make a
deal (I'm no such a bad guy.) By the
way, Shaun is dead. Harry Sr.
TO THE ECU SKIIERS: Party at
J m's on Thursday at 8 Call 752 2692
'or more information.
HEY KAPPA SIG LITTLE
SISTERS: Are you ready to party
tonight? Look out ECU, the winds of
Bahama Mama are starting on her
way It's party time Kappa Sigma
style
REWARD: My son, Christopher
Wayne Freeman, was a first
semeste. student at ECU. He was
killed in an automobile accident on
February 8, 1986. His high school
class ring was misplaced while in
school at ECU. It was a 1985 Wilkes
Central High School ring, his in
itials, CWF, were engraved and the
stone was a peridot which is light
green A generous reward is offered
for information leading tc 'he return
of this ring, there will be no ques
tions asked. I am a widow and Chris
was my only child, the return of his
ring would mean so much. Shirley
A Freeman, P.O Box 248,
Wilkesboro, N C 28697.
PSYC. 1050, 1051 STUDENTS: Don't
forget the research projects you've
signed up for to receive extra credit
on March 27 Additional persons are
needed!
i�j i �r
SENIORS! SENIORS! SENIORS
Enjoy the last phase of your college
career employment S&F Com
puters is offering a package price to
help you send out your resumes in
eluding all of the following Letter
quality typed resumes, Mail merged
cover letters (name and address of
each company as inside mailing ad
dress on letter), Letter quality typed
envelopes witti company address
and your return address on
envelope, Everything folded, stuffed
and even stamped, A listing of com
panies sent to (for vour follow ups).
Just bring us your hand written
resume and cover letter and the
businesses you with to apply to and
we'll do the rest Per resume for
your names addr (we stuff) S2 30
(min 10 resumes) (we stuff and
stamp) $1 90 (2 page resume prices
slightly higher). This offer absolute
ly expires April 15, 1986 S&F Com
puter Company, 115 East Fifth St
Greenville, N.C. 27834 757 0472
TYPING SERVICES: Resumes,
term papers, theses. Low rates.
Spelling and grammatical correc
tiois included Cindy 757 0398 after
5 30 p m
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc Call
Anne at 758 6011 and leave a
message.
FOR SALE: Carpet remnants, all
sizes, all colors, all prices Save
50 70 percent. The Carpef Bargain
Center, 1009 Dickinson Ave 758 0057
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
tronic typewriter Reasonable rates.
Call Janice at 355 7233 after 530
FOR SALE: California Kingwaterb
ed Bookcase back with storage
base, bevelled mattress Very nice.
$750 asking $300.
TYPING- All your typing needs
done by a professional secretary.
Call Doris at 355 2510 after 6 p.m.
TAXES: Will do your taxes for
reasonable rates Ten years ex
perience. Call Dons at 355 2510 after
6 p.m.
FOR SALE: '84 Jeep CJ7 Renegade
Pkg 6 cyl 5 speed, sport wheels
and tires, 20K miles Here on
weekends for viewing Call 752 2143
for more information
FOR SALE: Pioneer SX V 300
Audio Video Digital receiver, 50
watts, 6 months old, still under war
ranty. Only $175. Call 757 3720 or
752 1116.
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICE: Word processing. The
Dataworks specializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertations,
theses, resume's and more All work
is computer checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary Rates
are as low as $1.75 per page, in
eluding paper (call for specific
rates) Call Mark at 757 3440 after 7
p.m.
APT. FOR RENT: Ringgoid
Towers Unit A Completely furnish
ed except linens Call 637 6885.
REDUCED): Now or especially
summer. Full turn, air con.
Originally $180, now $150! Right on
campus and fantastic price for Ring
gold. Females Kathy 752 3572.
APARTMENT FOR RENT: May
August or longer Call 752 6682
DAPPER DAN'S BLOWOUT
GARAGE SALE: (Formerly at
Poorman's Flea Market) Vintage
clothing, jewelry, antiques, collec
tibles, and much more all at bargain
prices Friday and Saturday, 86
Located at 215 Britt Road, 3 miles
east from Hastings Ford down
Highway 33 in Edwards Acres. Look
for signs or call 757 3467 for direc
tions
ATTENTION STUDENTS: After
graduation, don't store your gradua
tion cap in a drawer or on a closet
shelf have it bronzed. For more in
formation call 799 3419 or write to
P.O. Box 7391, Wilmington, N.C.
28406
RINGGOLD TOWERS: 1 bedroom
condo available for rent or sale
Great investmet. Low money down,
excellent tax write offs Call George
Tibbal at 203 261 6722
FOR SALE:
Drum. SW X
p.m. 756 3717
New Pearl Snare
14 $100 Call after 4
LOUNGE AND FUN: Now available
for private parties, socials, shin
digs, and formal balls The
TRASHMAN'S Music and light
show Funk, rock, mid 60's, punk,
beach and R&B 752 3587 anytime!
Best rates m town.
WANTED
SUMMER JOBS FOR COLLEGE
STUDENTS: Openings available for
young men on the Food Service Staff
at CAMP SEAFARER ON THE
COAST OF NORTH CAROLINA
Good salary plus room and board
Excellent opportunity for friends to
work together June 8 through mid
August Must be at least eighteen
years cf age. No experience
necessary only ambition and good
references required. For more infor
mation and an application, write:
Camp Seafarer, P.O. Box 10976, YM
CA, Raleigh, North Carolina 27605.
SUMMER LIFEGUARDING JOBS:
WSI or Senior Lifeguarding cer
tificates required. CPR required
Tar Landing Villas, Rt. 4, Morehead
City, NC 28557. Phone 247 5295.
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE:
$135 million plus in financial aid
went unused last year. Freshmen,
Sophomore, ongoing graduate
students: for help cashing in on
those funds, call Academic Data
Services toll free 1 800 544 1574, ext
639, or write P.O. Box 16483, Chat
tanooga, TN 37416.
HELP WANTED: Female student to
assist housewife with house cleaning
and child care in exchange for room
and board. Near campus. 757 1798.
SUMMER INTERNS WANTED: At
North Carolina's largest weekly
newspaper (3 reporting, 1 clrcula
tion, 3 advertising). $4.50 per hour
for rising senior journalism majors
Call 919 228 7851, or send resume and
clippings to Tom or Jean Boney,
Alamance News, Tox 431, Graham,
N.C, 27253
WANTED: Students with small car
or motorbike for light deliveries.
Start immediately. Full or part
time. Earnings above average. Call
830 1351
TELEPHONE SALES: Day or
night. Full or part time. Start im
mediately. Dependability is a must!
To work from our office. 830 1351.
SUMMER CAMP COUNSELORS.
Men and women, generalists and
specialists. Two overnight 8 week
camps in New York's Adirondack
Mountains have openings for tennis,
waterfront (WSI, ALS, sailing, ski
ing, small crafts), all team sports,
gymnastics, artscrafts, pioneering,
music, photography, drama, dance
and nurses (must enjoy children).
Write: Professor Robert S. Gersten,
Brant Lake Camp, 84 Leamington
St Lido Beach, NY 11561.
TWO MALE ROOMMATES NEED-
ED: For both summer sessions and
the '86'87 year Rooms available
May 1st. $125 a month � V utilities.
3 bedroom house. Excellent location
less than 1 block from campus. NO
SMOKERS, NO PARTIERS,
SERIOUS STUDENTS ONLY
752 8629, Mark Pepper.
ARE YOU A FUTURE BUSINESS
LEADER?: Established, student
managed compan t of over 3,000
students is looking for ECU students
for full-time summer jobs. Profes
sional training provided $4,500
average summer profit For more
information send name, local phone
and address etc. to Summer Jobs,
Suite 141, 95 South Elliot Rd Chapel
Hill, N.C. 27514.
WSI NEEDED: Trinity Center, New
Episcopal summer camp in Salter
Path, N.C, needs WSI to head
waterfront. Must be able to sail Sun
fish. Apply: Ed Hodges, Jr Camp
Manager, 101 East 10th St
Washington, N.C. 27889
DAY AND EVENING SHIFTS:
Quality phone salespeople needed
immediately. Hourly � bonus. Also
light delivery We train those who
qualify 123 W. 3rd. St. 752 0038
WANTED: Experienced, certified
lifeguards for summer employment
Call Barbara Wilkerson for an inter
view. 355 5602
4th FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED
ED: Starting April or May for nice 2
bedroom duplex 1 mile from campus
in quiet neighborhood. Fireplace
and sundeck. $93 75 � V� utilities.
Please cal: 752 0319
Honors Program
3.gpa
3.4 gpa
3.4 gpa
3.4 gpa
3.4 gpa
3.4 gpa
3.4 gpa
3.4 gpa
3.4 gpa
3.4 gpa
3.4 gpa
3.4 gpa
3.4 gpa
HONORS
PROGRAM
HONORS
PROGRAM
HONORS
PROGRAM
HONORS
PROGRAM
HONORS
PROGRAM
HONORS
PROGRAM
HONORS
SEMINAR:
TWlTBDPHI-
CAL ft LITER-
ARY VISIONS.
SEMINAR:
FTCTirjriNTo
FILM.
SEMINAR:
TTHoTaev.
SEMINAR:
RicrrTvTTY &
SCIENTIFIC
REALISM.
ANTH 1000
MEDREN ST
EC0N 2113
ENGL 1100
EN6L 150
GEOG 5001
HLTH 1000
HIST 1550
HIST 1555
LIBS 1000
MATH 5171
PHIL 1110
SEED 3355
SPECIAL
LECTURE:
"Why Should
We Believe
What Our
Computers
Tell Us"
Dr. Harold
Levin, NCSU
Thursday 357
e pa
Austin
See Dr. Sanders 212Ragsdale Ml Welcome
Oaoas-ooaoaaa'
ECU
Varsity Cheerleeading
TRYOUTS
Organizational Moating
April 1, 1986 5:00 p.m.
Room 142 Minges Coliseum
Enthusiastic Men &
Woman Invited
For more information: 757-6491
-tSO-D-0-600'60DDDO �C&

The Usuals
Thursday NMe
at
IKH KID!
iOfty
ytae
TRY OUR NEW
DINNER COMBINATION
Comes with egg drop soup or onton
soup, egg rcli. fned rice, fortune
cookie and hot tea
Choice Of
� Beef with Broccoli
�Sweet and Sour Pork
�Kang Pao Chicken
�Moo Goo Gai Pan
�Shrimp with Lobster Sauce
�Pork Szechuan Style
ONLY
Xours: Monday thru Thursday
.� 11 30 A M to 1000 P.M.
10 discount on rogwtor
�inn men .torn. Fr,da and Saturday
wfth ECU ID 11 30 A M to 11:00 P.M.
Sunday: 12 Noon to 10:00 P.M
1 Peking Palace
Chinese Restaurant
756-1169
Greenville Square
Shopping Center
Sunday Buffet
Only $4.50
2 Kinds of Appetizers
7 Enfrees with Soup and Salad
X
�-X
COME AND SEE THE
OLD WORLD AT BUSCH GARDENS
Jfpas
APRIL 5, 1986
for only $25.00!
Ii mwvgm (ktton end r
admleeton. Bua laevoe �t 7:00 ajn
AOMAtlON TtCKETT ONLY: S 12.46 (No bua traneportattorO
Call Now! Only 100 Reserved Tickets.
Cat 787-6911. iMI for more Information or com by the Contral Ticket Offteo, MonOonnaM
SPONSORED BY THE ECU STUDENT UNION TRAVEL COMMfTTEE
.





U)
HI I s i Kt 1 INKS
M Kk H 2 NXr.
H
s I U�
IRS Softball Tourney Results
uir nru . � � � � .
HAMF m
e recent change ot
seems almost impossi
rid vacant softball field
least not an intramural
ts ot the pre-season sot!
hold Maul:
test began at
I ended at 9
ier. it
pm Saturday. All proceeds will
go to the Eastei Seals Founda
tion Here are the winners:
1 Hustling Stickmen
: iki
V 1 he "V I earn
1 Kl won the quarter and semi
final games m the final innings.
heating Spitfire (8 7) and The
" " 1 earn (8-7).
I he 11 na 1 gam e was a
onsolation Champion
ontinued from page 8
South
va:
- �
I N
a
re game,
e so
� tgain the
� I for E
"I'm reall) glad I came to East
arolina Eckley said "1 like
the people in this area, and have
made some really good friend-
ships through my rugb ex-
pel ience here at ECl
"It was an excellent team per
formance this weekend b
everybody said Calcott.
I (. G were great hosts to an
exciting and interesting tourna-
ment
"A fantastic weekend to add to
m last semester m association
with the Rugb Club said
V humacher.
The Ruggers will next be in ac-
tion a week from this weekend
when they travel to Wilmington
to compete in the I Ni W Tour
nament. Some teams competing
in the tournament include
Davisdon, Bellmont Abbe.
Guilford College as well as some
ei s
Club will then end the
season at home when they host
- ampbell University.
showdown between Hustling
Stickmen and IKE Hustling
Stickmen won 14-1 There were
12 teams in the single-elimination
tournament.
Regis nation for the IRS
Whitewater Rafting trip ends
Apr 14 The trip is scheduled
Apr 18 20. The cos! is $45.00 per
person, (includes transportation.
rivei trip, and camping fees)
Register in 2l4 Memorial Gym
I here will be a pre-trip meeting
Apr 15 in 105 H Memorial Gym
at 4:(X pm
Here is the itenerarv tor the
rafting trip:
1 ii Apt IS, 1986
12:tM) Noon I oad van. meet
at rear entrance i Memorial
Gym.
12:30 pm Depart Greenville.
7:30-8:00 pm Arrive in
Paint Creek camp overnight.
Sat Apr. 19. I9.H6
7:30 am v ake up call.
8 JO am Breakfast
9:30 Depart campsite
10:30 am rrive at French
Bi id ((utpost (704 fi22 5535)
11:00 am Preparation for
rivei trip orientation instruc-
tion.
ipprox i late lunch
� ided b Nantahala Outl
ters.
5 )0 pm End mcr 'rip at
i utpost
rvoo pm Sh wers at ui
post.
6 JO pm
campsite.
7:00 pm
leave Outpost tor
Supper amp out.
Sun. Apr. 20, 1986
8:00 am Wake-up call.
8:30 am Breakfast.
9 M) am lease foi Green
Give a hoot.
Don't pollute.
K C
'r2
viiie.
6:00 pm
ville, end ot trip.
Arrive in Green-
There are ten aerobic classes
offered every week and they are
open to all ECU (acuity, stafl
and students. The classes cost
$0.75 pei class and are held in 108
Memorial Gym. Classes will con-
tinue through May 4.
Be a part of this precedental
IRS event and 'Slave to the
Rhythm
Aerobic Classes
1 ues. and Thurs. 4 05 5:05
In. 5:15-6-15
Sat. I MM) 12:00
Sal 1:00-2:00
Sun. 4:00 5:00
I oning Classes:
Mon. and Wed. - 6:30-7:30
lues. and Thurs.
6 50-7 JGMMG 112)
Important notice "here are
opening tor IRS artist
tographers. It interest
prepare a portfolio and schedule
ai inteniew tor next week.
r�PK
AH()HII()S UP
TO 12th H IK
Of PREGNA
Viv (Vborti m from 13 i � eel
� si Prcgna
and Problem Preri e mg t
Further information .� - ' ' -�
�r i H'jO 532 4; betweei �
pm weekday! General an � ailat
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
?
vWi

The Panhellenic

y
Council
Is
Sponsoring
An Easter Egg Hunt
for your Children On
V
'
-�,
��,
pe�s' to Thursday, March 27, 1986
)0
A1
at 5:00 p.m.
On the orth Mall
In Front of Fleming Dorm
('onsolation Bracket
1 i
1 I l6l
Final-Four Picks
dame
Duke-Kansas
I si -Louisville
Matt V1ers
I si
Bill Davtson
Duke
ii sv ille
.lav Stone
Duke
I SI
I om I.uvender
Kansa
i SI
Rappin I imm (
Duke
Louisville
Patti kemmis
Duke
I ouisvilie
Mr. Coop
Duke
I ouisvilie
Mike I udwkk
Duke
LSI
Beth Y nicker
Duke
Louisville
ampionship pick appears in boldface print
FREE
RENT
Going Home For The Summer
But Need A Place For The Fall?
far River Estates has a summer special for
ECU students Rent an apt by May 1st &
keep your appartment RENT FREE for June &
July! For details call or come by Tar River
Estates Info Center 1400 Willow St. No. 1.
752-4225
Tired f waiting m hne tor the phone or shower3 Leave the
Irums behind there is an alternative Your own
place at Tar River Estates Select a one bedroom garden apart
a two or three bedroom townhouse Enjoy fully equip
� - ' hen, washer dryer connections m some apartments,
is clubhouse, swimming pool, and picnic area by the
river Conveniently located near East Carolina University
with 5GA Transit service Come by today or Call
Tarl�ivery
ESTATE'
p
752-4225
1400 W. I low St
Office Houri
MF90O5 30
Sot & Sun 1 00 5 00
l S SItiv � r
SHOE OUTLET
NAME BRAND SHOES
At Discount Prices
Quality Casual Shoes $15
Ladies Dress and Casual Shoes
at Discount Prices
Large Selection of Name Brand
Tennis Shoes $12.88 to $29.88
752-2332
One Block Off b vans street
Have a
Blessed Easter





Title
The East Carolinian, March 27, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 27, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.466
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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