The East Carolinian, March 25, 1986







She
(iarulintan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 o.4fr gfe J Tuesday. March 25. 1986
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
SGA Forum Held,
Candidates Speak Out
Candidates Forum
JIM 1 i:i TONS
I w rawinlMa
Candidates running for SGA offices answered questions Monday from a panel of reporters and the
audience. See related story page 1.
Replacing Old Machines
Library Recieves Copiers
Bv JENNIFER MYER
v.ff Wnlcr
Foi
msi
new Savin copiers will be
d in Joj ner Librar, 'wo in
the Healtl Sciences Library and
one in the Music I ibrar. b
April lfcsaid Ruth kat. djrec-
1 Joyner Library.
Four of these copiers will be
able to make change from $1
bills,and all machines will accept
both coins and magnetic cards.
The magnetic cards will cost the
student $5 allowing 60 copies, an
average of 8.3 cents a copy. Com
copies, however, will remain 10
cents each.
The magnetic cards are new to
ECl 's campus, though used at
other schools. The cards can be
Ned at all seven copiers. They are
ally numbered to be used only
on those copiers supplied by
EC I fhey also inform you of
the remaining value, or how
many copies you have left to
make.
The new copiers are supplied
by Copy Pro. Inc a local com-
pany who will maintain all the
equipment service and supplies,
and they also receive all revenue
from the copiers. The library
does not gain anvthing financial-
ly
According to Kat. "This com-
pany promised us good service,
good equipment with no captal
investment for the librarv. These
machines will benefit the students
and faculty. The library makes
no profit from them. The copiers
are brand new and should be
highly efficient
The copiers in the library now
have been a problem for at least
five and a half years according to
Katz. The ECU Print Shop has
been in charge of the machines'
maintenance and supplies, but
could not adequately maintain
the copiers to meet the demands
of the librarv. students, and
faculty.
Because of the problem, the
Faculty-Senate Committee
brought forth a proposal re-
questing a solution. After ap-
proval. Chancellor Howell ap-
pointed a committee, headed by
Kat o Joyner Library and
JoAnn Bell oi the Health
Sciences library, to research
possibilities. Working with the
Purchasing Department, the
committee decided upon
CopyPro, Inc.
By PATTI KEMMIS
Assistant New Editor
Funding, emergency medical
loans, and the image ECU pro-
motes to outsiders were topics ad-
dressed to the candidates running
for the Student Government
Association executive offices at a
forum held Monday on the mall.
The East Carolinian and
WZMB sponsored the forum that
was intended to give the can-
didates an opportunity to present
their views on various issues.
Running for the office of presi-
dent are Steve Cunanan and
Chris Tomasic.
Cunanan is a junior majoring
in psychology. He has served as
the day representative for the
SGA for the past two years.
Cunanan has also served on the
University Alcohol and Drug
Education Committee and the
University Committee on Park-
ing and Traffic.
Tomasic is a history education
major. His qualifacations in-
clude: present SGA Vice-
President, member of the Media
Board, chairperson of the Pirate
Walk, student member of the
ECl' Athletic Committee and an
SGA delegate to the University of
North Carolinia Association of
Student Governments.
Vice-presidential candidates
are Anthony Jackson and Gor-
don Walker.
Jackson is a junior majoring in
music education He is a member
of the the Minority Student
Organization, the United Greeks
and Social Council, the Minority
Arts Committee and the ECU
Concert Choir. He is currently
the president of the University
Opera Theater.
Walker is a senior majoring in
economics. His qualifacations in-
cludes three and one-half years of
experience with SGA, both at
Campbell University and ECU,
State Chairman of the College
Republicans and Student Lieute-
nant Governor of North
Carolina.
Running unopposed for the of-
fice of treasurer is John Eagan.
He is a junior majoring in
economics. Eagan has served in
the the SGA for the past two
years. He is currently the
chairperson of the Student
Welfare Committee and Student
Loan Advisory Committee and
Junior Class Vice-President.
Eagan is also the chairman of the
Major Concerts Committee and a
student representative on the
Traffic and Parking Committee.
Also unopposed in the Sec-
retarial position is David Tambl-
ing. Tambling, a sophomore, is a
communications majorhistory
minor. Through his experience in
SGA he has become the only stu-
dent member of the Student
Retention and Recruitment Com-
mittee and chairperson of the
SGA Screenings and Appoint-
ments Committee.
One question addressed to the
presidential and vice-presidential
candidates concerned the funding
of the Pirate Walk and Night
Transit.
"I'm in favor of Pirate Walk
getting adaquate funding;
however, I think that in the case
of the Night Transit, students
need to start taking responsibili-
ty, especially when the drinking
age is going up to 21, said
Tomasic.
"We're here to provide service
for the students said Cunanan.
"The students pay fees, if thev
want the Night Transit, we
should provide it. The Pirate
Walk is needed service
Jackson said, "The Pirate
Walk should be a priority of the
SGA
"I support Pirate Walk. If
elected I will work with the pro-
gram said Walker "We have
asked some questions this year,
but no more that we have asked
any other organization
When asked about the
Emergency Medical Loans being
switched to an insurance pro-
gram, Eagan and Tambling seem-
ed to agree.
"I agree with cutting the loans
for implementing an insurance
program that will cover everone,
as long as something is installed
in the place of the loans, such as
insurance said Eagan.
"We need the insurance pro-
gram set up said Tambling.
"The SGA needs to get in the
business of helping students
Cunanan and Tomasic were
asked what could be done to get
rid of ECU's 'party image
Cunanan stated he felt visiting
executive programs would help,
along with raising admission re-
quirements.
He said, "We need to pi
something to ourselves, then
everyone else
Tomasic said he felt offering
students other alternatives would
increase their involvement. He
suggested emphasizing art pro-
grams, lectures and other options
available to students.
During the forum, the can-
didates also gave their views on
other problems, such ai cuts in
financial aid, student apathv. the
possibility of phasing out cook-
ing in dorm rooms and relation-
ship of the Greenville City Coun-
cil and the SGA
The elections will be Wednes-
day .March 26, from 9 a.m. t. 6
p.m. Polling will take plac on
various parts of the campus, in-
cluding dorms and in front of the
student store.
Oil Ministers Halt Talks;
Prices Continue Sliding
Board Reviews Student's Proposals
GENEVA (UPI) - OPEC's
divided oil ministers broke off
nine days of emergency talks to-
day without reaching agreement
on how to stem the worldwide
plunge in oil prices. The cartel's
13 ministers adjourned without
issuing a formal communique,
but said talks will resume April
15 in a effort to reduce daily pro-
duction and reverse a three
month dive in prices from $28 per
barrel to $14. OPEC members
say it is costing them $206 million
daily.
U.S. Soviet Specialist
Opens Lecture Series
By MIKE LLDWICK
News Editor
The Great Decisions Lecture
Series will inaugurate its 1986
season and present Jack Perry, a
noted U.SSoviet scholar,
Wednesday after the SGA cut its
funding of the lecture series.
Chairman of the Political
Science Department, Maurice
Simon, said the series was "put
together with funds from
speakers budgets of the Depart-
ment of Political Science;
Department of Areospace; Latin
American Studies Program; In-
ternational Studies Program, and
from the Political Science Stu-
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds13
Editorials4
Features8
SportsH
Alas! Hegel was right when
he said that we learn from
history is that men never learn
anything from history.
�Bernard Shaw
dent Society
The Great Decisions Series is
designed "to present a university
and community forum for con-
sideration of critical international
issues and developments said
Simon.
Perry, the speaker for Wednes-
day, will discuss the present state
of U.SSoviet relations in his lec-
ture entitled "Star Wars and the
Geneva Talks: What Future for
Arms Control?"
According to Simon, Perry will
also explain how the arms race,
specifically Reagan's SPI pro-
gram, is evolving under Reagan
and Soviet Leader Gorbachev.
Perry's lecture will be from
7:30 pm - 9 pm in Brewster
C-103. Even though the audience
will consist mostly of faculty and
students; he said "The lecture is
open to the public and is cordially
invited
The series, which has brought
speakers to ECU for the past
decade said Simon, will continue
for the next five weeks.
After the SGA Legislature cut
funding to the Great Decisions
Lecture Series, it will inagurate
its 1986 season and present Jack
Perry Wednesday at 7:30 pm.
Bv CAROLYN DRISCOLL
t Writer
Seven out of eight proposals
designed to improve Expressions
(ECU's minority affairs publica-
tion) were approved by the Media
Board at an open session meeting
on Thursday, March 20. Ap-
proval of the remaining proposal
has been delayed until a universi-
ty attorney can be consulted.
The Media Board placed the
magazine in a state of
moratorium (all operations and
funding were frozen) six weeks
ago due to organizational and
budgeting problems. Since then,
the Board formed a subcommit-
tee which met with both the
management of the publication
as well as with interested
students.
A group of minortiy students
at an open hearing on March 4,
submitted a seven-part proposal,
which included a projected
budget, to the subcommittee,
which referred it to the Media
Board. These proposals as well as
one submitted by a Board
member were under considera-
tion at Thursday's meeting.
The outcome of that meeting
was the acceptance of proposals
which allow for three issues of
Expressions magazine during the
academic year as well as a mon-
thly tabloid entitled Idiom, the
issues of Idiom published next
year will be funded through
advertising revenues.
The Board will allow the staff
access to up to $4641, 50 percent
of its remaining 1985-86 budget
in order to fund a spring issue of
Idiom which will be "used as a
training ground for Expressions
staff according to the pro-
posal.
The proposal also provides the
organization with a faculty ad-
visor, Gay Wilentz, an ECU
English faculty member and pro-
fessor of black literature who
volunteered for the position.
In addition, the Media Board
resolved that the management of
Expressions seek input from and
attempt to represent all
minorities on campus.
The Board will seek advice
from a university attorney before
voting to approve a proposal
which calls for a "written com-
munication of apology to the Ex-
pressions staff" from the Media
Board.
This request is based on claims
that Expressions was unduly-
placed in a state of moratorium
by the Media Board without prior
notification" to the staff or the
students, that "this hasty
actionwas not consistent"
with generally accepted pro-
cedures nor "past precedents" of
the Board, and "some minority
students feel that this action has
racial implications
A Media Board member who
submitted an additional proposal
was brought before the Board for
the first time on Thursday. The
approved version calls for the
moiatorium to be lifted at the
end of the fiscal year (July 1986)
at which time the Board will
"select a leader of Expressions
for the fall semester and decide
the final budget
In addition, the proposal en-
courages students who want to
work for a minority publication
to "gain experience and training
in publishing through the East
Carolinian. Responding to this,
Jeffrey Canady, presently �x-
pressions general manager flatly
refused to involve the magazine
with the paper in "any way what-
soever claiming that the "East
Carolinian does not represent
minorities on campus
Commenting on the Board's
action, Michael Smith, chairman
of the Media Board said, "We've
made some significnat strides
toward the objective of making
Expressions all that it should
be
See IDEAS Page 2.
Media Board
MUVTl �n� TteEai
In an open seaslon March 20, the media board approved seven proposals to upgrade Expressions.
T
'


- - . .
� � �
i





THE EAST CAROL IN1AN
MARCH 25. 1986
Announcements
REGISTRATION FOR
GENERAL COLLEGE
STUDENTS
General College �tudent� ihouid contact
'ftei' advi�ers one �ee� prior to m�,r
�cheduieJ registration period to make ar
'in��mwti for atademu advising or both
summer terms and me tan Mmnlir ie�a
SEANC
Trie ECU Chapter of SEANC meeting will
be rteid Tuesday March 25. at 5 30pm in me
Brody Auditorium Eecutive Director erf
SEANC Butch Gunnells. will be gues'
speaker An chapter members art urged 'o
attend Guests art welcome
FILING NEEDED
Persons interested in tiling tor the office of
ECU Marshall may do so beginning March
20, w�6 thry March J� 19U In Room 214
Whichard Building i Dean Carolyn Fulghum
Assoc DeanDirector of Residence Life I
Requirements are a 3 0 GPA and must be a
lunior at me end of me i��6 spr.ng semester
WE WANT YOUR BLOOD
AROTC in coordination mriltl the American
Red Cross will be sponsoring a Blood Drive
a' Mendenhan Student Center on Tuesday
Mar 25 and Wednesday Mar 26 between
noon and aprn Ref reshmen's will be served
��" participation will be greatly ap
predated
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi Eta Sigma members! There will be a
meeting March 27 at a 10 in 221 Mendenhaii
inductees art invited and encouraged to at
tend
LIFE'S A HEALTH AFFAIR
Wed . April 2 from 3 6pm between
Mendenhaii and Greene dorm Free food.
visors, buttons, etc Contributions by FAN
TASY. Aerobic Workshop Suntan Booth
k by Carolina Dairies. GOLD'S GYM
NAUTILUS, Water Sports by Over ton s
Come join us on Wad . April 2 and have some
fun in me sun!
ANNUAL ARABIC
BENEFIT DINNER
The united Holy Land Fund, the General
union of Palestine Students, and the Egyp
tian Student Association cordially invite you
to the Annual Arabic Benefit Dinner Guest
speaker Congressman Paul Findiey Arabic
Folklore Music At the Raleigh Inn,
Ballroom (603 Glenwood Avenue. Highway
?0W) Friday, March 2�, 6 30pm Donation
ten dollars 1 tickets available at door) For
information call 7M �$51 ask or Eddie
INTENDED SLAP MAJORS
General college students interested in ma
lormg in Speech Language and Auditory
Pathology will meet on Tuesday. March 25 m
Brewster O 101 for purposes of advisement
for Prt registration Advising will begin at
5 00pm Students uanble to attend must con
�act the SLAP Dept prior to the time stated
above to schedule an appointment
SRA
SRA Semi Formal proofs are back To
order come by Mendenhaii room 224 So
meone will be there on Tuesday. Wednesday
and Thursday from 11am til 3pm Money is
due at time of ordering Each picture is
12 50
FALL SEMESTER HOUSING
Applications are now being taken for Fall
semester housing at me Methodist Student
Center. 501 E 5th Street (across from the art
building and Garrett dorm) Come by this
week if you art interested in an alternative
to dorm life without apartment worries
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
Huggers and buddies needed for the local
Special Olympics Spring G�mes to be held at
E B Aycock jr High School on Friday,
April 25 from �am�2pm For more informa
tion call Bill Twine at 752 4137x201 or Connie
Sappenfield at 355 5417
CAMPUS CRUSADE
FOR CHRIST
Campus Crusade For Christ is sponsoring
Prime Time' this Thursday night at
t 30pm ,n the Old Joyner Library second
tloor Please join us for tun fellowship and
Bible study We are looking forward to
meeting you
ECU LAW SOCIETY
The Law Scoiety will be meeting tonight at
8pm room 221 ,n Mendenhaii Our speaker
will be Ed Harper, local attorney and former
Law Society member We will be holding
elections for me upcom.ng year and discuss
mgour trip to UNC Law School For more.n
formation contact Richard Pond at 7SJ 3155
Expressions1 Ideas Approved
Continued From Page 1.
Elmer Meyer, vice chancellor
for student life and advisor to the
Media Board agreed, "the action
of the Board was fair and
equitable, given the cir-
cumstancesThe Board has
given the staff of Expressions the
opportunity to continue this
semester, but also the message
that form a management point of
view, more is expected in that
area
Jimmie Hackett, managing
editor of Expressions, however,
expressed a different point of
view. "Overall he said, "I'm
just happy that the proposals
were passed and that we are able
to begin operations again. But
aside from the fact that we now
have a faculty advisor, the only
changes that took place were
negative ones. Basically the
positive changes in the original
proposals were all thrown out the
window by the Board
Regarding the concept of the
Idiom, Smith stated, "The idea is
a good one if advertising revenue
can, in fact, be generated. It will
be a good supplement to Expres-
sions, providing more informa-
tion to minority students
Meyer said, "A publication
(like Expressions) is needed on
campus. It's needed among the
minortiy population by, for, and
of that group. The problem has
been finding people to operate on
that need
The role of racism in this situa-
tion, said Smith, is nonexistant.
"It played no role whatsoever in
any decisions or actions that I
have taken as a representative of
the Media Board, and I sincerely
Student's Candidate's
believe the other Board members
feel the same way
Meyer stressed, "A few people
have perceived racisim is involv-
ed. But the people on both sides
have honestly felt they were try-
ing to do what is best for the
magazine
The racism in this situation
isn't measurable said Hackett,
"But there is a definite effort to
destroy the magazine. This is
evidenced by Shelley's bringing
his proposal to the Board, which
would have effectively destroyed
the magazine for the remainder
of the fiscal year. But fortunately
Meyer was able to convince the
Board to amend this proposal
The Board will vote to approve
Expressions actual budget for the
remainder of the semester at its
next meeting on April 7.
Vote For
A
Chris Tomasic
for
SGA President
AND
Tony Jackson
for
SGA Vice
President

























Veteran's Awareness Day
Sponsored by The Veteran's Club & Films Committee
WED MARCH 26
ITINERARY









Ji-
ll a.m. � Brief tribute to all veterans at the
Veterans Monument
12 Noon �
Distribute free soft drinks in front of
the Student Store
6 p.m. �
Wine and Cheese Social. Bring a friend,
Mendenhaii Student Center
8 p.m. � Movie: "The Anderson Platoon"
9 p.m. � Movie: "Birdie"














CORAL REEF
DIVE CLUB
Attention Scuba Enthusiasts The Coral
Reet Dive Club is holding a meeting Wed
April from 5 6 ir me multipurpose room m
Mendenhaii The Spring break trip to Key
West will be reviewed along with up coming
plans for a Diver Down Spring Bash All
members art ashen to attend An tnoae In
terested art welcome
PMYE
Snow ski during Christmas break Prt
register now for PMYE 1150 (beginning snow
skiing) to reserve your space for fun in the
snow Spend 5 full days at a Ski resort having
the time of your life learning how to sk. or
sign up for PMYE 1151 I intermediate! or
sign up for PMYE 1152 (advanced) There is
a course for all levels Contact Mrs Karan
israef, ski coordinator, for more information
355 6215
ECU RACQUETBALL CLUB
There will be an organuationai meeting on
Tues , March 25 at 5 30pm In Memorial
Gym, room 102 Mandatory meeting for peo
pie wtio are interested In going to inter
collegiate Racquetball Tournament at UNC
during April 11 13 Also, all new people art
welcome to come Practice on Thurs April
3 5 15 7 30pm at Minges Court Be there
COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
ECU College Democrats will meet Thurs
day. March 27. 7pm in room 2ej. Mendenhaii
State Representative Walter Jones, r will
be the guest speaker All members and other
nterested persons art urged to attend For
more info contact Bryan Averette at
'5a 530
I
A
Card Shows
bu Care
Select from our greetings
for all occasions
Central Book & News
Greenville Square
Shopping Center

ECU
Varsity Cheerleeading
TRYOUTS
Organizational Meeting
April 1, 1986 5:00 p.m.
Room 142 Minges Coliseum
Enthusiastic Men &
Women Invited
For more information: 757-6491
ADMISSION
$2.00 25th & 26th
$3.00 27th
ECU Students (with ID)
$1.00 Off Regular Admission
Group Tickets Available
Call 757-3042 or 830-1783
BEGINS 7:30
NIGHTLY
11th Tire
ANNUAL I fVfc
BOXING
TOURNAMENT
FOR ST JUDES CHILDREN S HOSPITAL
MARCH 25,26,27
MINGES COLISEUM
East Carolina Univ.
Great
Taste
Filling
Board
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THF LAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 25, 1986
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Ltion: 757-6491
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OURNAMENT
DREN'S HOSPITAL
RCH25,26,27
INGES COLISEUM
ist Carolina Univ.
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Board Consolidates Services
ECU Ne Bureau
In pediatnc units at Pitt Coun-
ty Memorial Hospital, you can
already tell the change by the way
staff members answer the
telephone. Now it's a cheery,
"Good morning Children's
Hospital of Eastern North
Carolina
The new greeting reflects the
hospital board of trustees' deci-
sion last month to consolidate all
pediatnc services under the
Children's Hospital designation,
in recognition of Pitt Memorial's
increasingly important role as the
pediatnc referral center for 34
counties of eastern North
Carolina.
The change will not involve
any major new construction at
the medical center, according to
Jon B. Tingelstad, chairman ol
pediatrics at the ECU School of
Medicine and medical director o
the Children Hospital. Instead,
under a concept known as "a
hospital within a hospital the
general care pediatnc ward, the
pediatnc intensive care unit, the
neonatal intensive care unit and
the newborn nursery will be
unified under a single organiza-
tional umbrella.
And that unity, said
Tingelstad, will in turn extend
beyond the organizational plan to
encompass the doctors, nurses
and support staff who bring the
plan to life.
"Our primary goal is to focus
on children and to unify the ser-
vices we offer them said
Tingelstad. "But we also want to
build an attitude, to build an
esprit de corps that will concen-
trate efforts to make available the
highest quality and most com-
prehensive services that can
possibly be provided for pediatric
patients in eastern North
Carolina.
I ingelstad believes the level of
pediatnc services offered by the
hospital, the medical staff and
the School o Medicine has reach-
ed the point that the Children's
Hospital is a logical next step.
Twelve pediatric subspecialties
are already represented on the
medical staff, in addition to
pediatric capabilities in surgery
and cardiovascular surgery,
radiology, radiation oncology,
rehabilitation medicine and
psychiatry. A pediatric nursing
service and support staff
Tingelstad describes as "outstan-
ding" rounds our the team.
"I could go down the whole
list he said, "but we feel our
breadth of service and depth of
service have grown to the point
that it's only appropriate that we
elect to go for this designation
PCMH officials adopted the
Children's Hospital model from
one implemented 15 years ago at
Vanderbilt University Medical
Center in Nashville, Tenn. The
model has gained widespread
popularity and has been
employed at many academic
medical centers in the United
States.
Vanderbilt officials have cited
impressive results from the
establishment of their children's
hospital, saying that they have
been able to dramatically im-
prove the quality of patient care
through expanded programs, bet-
ter facilities and more highly-
skilled staff. Under the "hospital
within a hospital" arrangement,
Pitt Memorial will continue to
provide regular operating and
capital funds to its pediatric
units, while funds raised for the
Children's Hospital of Eastern
North Carolina will be devoted
entirely to enhancing the quality
and quantity of care for children.
In Vanderbilt's experience,
another asset of the children's
hospital concept was its ability to
arouse more public awareness
and hopes to strengthen those
links to the region by asking com-
missioners in each county to ap-
point a citizen to the 60-member
Children's Hospital board of
directors, and advisory body.
Later, he hopes to establish
friends groups in each of the 34
counties served.
To Tingelstad, generating that
kind of broad-based public sup-
port is the most exciting thing
about the new Children's
Hospital of Eastern North
Carolina. It's that "intangible
element that is most thrilling.
"We've seen that intensity, that
pride developing. And when
eventually look and see support
bases developing in the com-
munities, we'll realize the ability
to do more, to create, to provide,
to expand. It tends to perpetuate
itself

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IHltMl�tllttlH�IIH�lt�MllinT
Vote
CUNANAN
SGA President
Walker
SGA Vice-President
"STUDENT INTEREST, not Special Interest
iiMitTimiimiiiiiinniiniiHiin
Emergency Talks Halted
Vhat is food poisoning and how
can I keep from Netting it?
Fo
have
id poisoning occurs
bacteria v e
drink as many liquids as possible
to prevent dehydration and eat
only foods that are bland. The
symptoms may indicate other il-
lness as we
' hear mure
ng Juniic tl
a i
food
Continued From Page 1.
Industry analysts in Geneva
said oil prices were bound to take
another beating because of the
meeting's effective collapse.
Delegates said the ministers could
not agree on the wording of a
communique, which they usually
issue after meetings. A statement
was being prepared by the OPEC
secretariat instead, the delegates
said. Delegates said it was im-
possible for the feuding ministers
to even agree on a lower total
production ceiling, let alone in-
dividual quotas.
Before the talks broke down,
nmer when people are picnic-
ing and the weather is warmer.
Contrary to popular belief, store
bought mayonnaise d pro-
d poi rung. In tact,
mayonnaise may actually retard
the growth of bacteria because of
The Health Column H
Marv Klesha Adams
vinegar it contains. Salmonella
organisms cause food poisoning
and gastroenteritis. The best way
to avoid Salmonella infections is
to make sure cold foods, like
beans, are kept hot until it is time
to eat. Meats and eggs should be
thoroughly cooked. Drinking (or
eating) raw eggs like Rock) does
in the movies is thought to be a
prime method of getting a
Salmonella infection, so be sure
to cook your eggs first!
Symptoms of food poisoning
include:
� Diarrhea with 8-48 hours after
ingesting the organism
� Fever
� Nausea
� Vomiting
� Headaches
If you should develop these
symptoms, you should try to

0

The Panhellenic
Council
Is
Sponsoring
An Easter Egg Hunt
Eor your Children On

'
91
�,
vV�gc0 Thursday, March 27, 1986
JO
at 5:00 p.m.
On the Sorth Mall
In Front of Fleming Dorm
the ministers had proclaimed
"agr ement in principle" to cut-
ting production to 14 million bar-
rels of oil a day.
That would have been two
million barrels lower than the old
daily OPEC ceiling of 16 million
barrels, which was abandoned
last December.
OPEC claims a current com-
bined pumping of 17 million bar-
rels a day, but industry experts
say the cartel is actually produc-
ing 17.7 million barrels per dav.
Iraq and the United Arab
Emirates demanded an increase
of more than 60 percent in their
production quotas under the
defunct 16 million barrel ceiling.
Let Us
Tempt
You
with our
New Menu
fl
Professionally
Prepared
RESUME'S
Special Student Rates
355-6810
Daily I un
Special. .
Enchilada Del Mar
$3.25
1 �� cm : art ilia filled with a tasty
IfpfjyP J4uy "q4 sam�
idiyd wftti Ranchero sauce and
, - ream Served with nee and
eans
52-i Cotanche Street
757-1666
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway iN C 33 Ext.) Greenville. North Carolina
Phone 752-3172
(Past Riverbluff Apts.j
Flounder
Popcorn Shrimp
$325
$325
Hours 4:30-9:30 MonSat.
- NEWLY REMODELED -
VOTE
Election Day is
Wednesday, March 26, 1986
Poll Locations:
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
BOTTON AT COLLEGE HILL
CROATAN
ALLIED HEALTH BUILDING
ALL DORMS
Poll Hours
9:00 a.mto 6 p.m.
1
4iv'�
j - � -






�i?e East (Ear0lfnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvboe r, r ��,
J AY STOsTE , Wanaflf ����
M dce Ludwick, v,w, ��, CjREG Winchester, ��,
Scott Cooper, �� � Anthony Martin, ,��,
Daniel Maurer. tinn. &�. jOHN Peterson, i �. ��,��,
John Shannon. , s. Shannon Shor r. w�w ,���,�,
DeChanh e Johnson. �, Debbie Stevens. �
March 25. 1986
Ohn ion
Page 4
SGA Elections
Discussion Of Issues
The 1986 SGA elections for ex-
ecutive officers will take plau?
tomorrow. There will be a total of
twenty polling places. One will be
located in each dorm, at the
Croatan, at the bottom of College
Hill, in front of the Student Supply
Store, in Mendenhall and at the
Allied Health building. Students
must have their I.Ds in ordei to
vote.
This election offers students as
clear a choice as any SCi election
in recent memory. The presidential
and vice-presidential candidates are
even running on tickets in tandem
with one another. Thus we haw
Chris Tomasic Anthony Jackson
the Students' Candidates and Stee
Cunanan Gordon Walker, running
in the Student Interest.
The candidates hae already
spelled out their positions on many
of the issues. But at the candidates'
forum that was held on the campus
mall yesterday 1 had an opportunity
to ask them two questions myself.
Their responses to them may be of
some interest to other students
besides myself.
My first question dealt with the
recent cuts that the Reagan Ad-
ministration has slated to be made
in student financial aid. 1 asked the
candidates for president and vice-
president how they would respond
to those cuts.
While all of the candidates runn
ing said that they supported efforts
to educate students about wha
kinds of financial aid are available
to them. Only two substantive pro-
posals arose from subsequert
discussion.
Tony Jackson, who is running
for vice-president, proposed tha
SGA sponsor a seminar to educate
students on the particulars of the
financial aid cuts and possible
responses to such cuts. Gordon
Walker, who is also running fa
vice-president, suggested that rela-
tions between students and the
financial aid office should be im-
proved and SGA might have a hand
in making that happen.
None of the candidates mentiorv
ed the United States Studen
Association. USSA is the largest
student lobby currently in existence
and has built a reputation fa
fighting against education cuts.
They have organized demonstra-
tions in Washington, D.C. as well
as national lobby days in which
students lobby legislators on bills
related to education.
If the SGA at this university were
to join USSA, particularly in
tandem with other schools in the
UNC system, we might have a
strong impact on both national and
state legislation. Such action might
even lead to the creation of a state
student lobby to safeguard student
interests in Raleigh. Certainly other
states have undertaken such
measures. The formation of SASU
in New York state is one example
My second question dealt with
the recent controversy surrounding
university investments in corpora-
tions operating in South Africa. As
explained in an editorial last
semester, ECU has no investments
through its endowment fund. But,
its institutional funds are forward-
ed to the State Treasurer's office
and combined with those of otho"
schools in the UNC system. And ac-
cording to Doug Chappell, Directcr
of the Investment and Banking
Division of the State Treasury, it b
a portion of these funds that are in-
vested in South African related
holdings. These holdings could
amount to several million dollars.
Many schools have acted to
divest themselves of holdings in
South African based companies,
seeing the ideals espoused within
academia as being incompatible
with investment in a regime tha
sanctions apartheid. Some North
Carolina schools, for example,
UNC-Chapel Hill. NCCU and
UNC-Greensboro, are currently
caught up in divestment struggles
with their administrations.
The candidates' reply to the ques-
tion of what thev would propose
doing about ECU's South African
ties was illuminating. Steve
Cunanan,who is running for presi-
dent, said that he has been led to
believe that ECU has no holdings.
I o determine whether or not it does
have any holdings would require
further study he added. If it k
determined that ECU does haw
holdings he said that something
should be done, which he did not
specify.
Gordon Walker stated that he
felt that, though he is opposed d
apartheid, he feels divestment is un-
called for. He said, instead, that he
believes that more investment in
South Africa will be most likely to
improve conditions in that country
for blacks.
Chris Tomasic and Tony Jackson
both said that, though they per-
sonally favor divestment as a
strategy for ending apartheid, they
would issue a referendum to
students. Students, Tomasic and
Jackson said, should have the op-
portunity to decide for themselves
how they feel about the university's
investments in apartheid.
Though, the two issues analyzed
above were, by no means, the only
ones discussed by the candidates,
they were the two that most in-
terested me. What's more � I knew
that they wouldn't be mentioned
anywhere else.
In any case, as the slogan goo
this time of year: "Regardless of
who you vote for, do go out arri
vote
urn up'nemjuee-jft
mt,R6KS, COOKS
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Campus Forum.
SGA Candidates Endorsed
"STt DEN I IMiRlsi noi
special interest is the tnoto of SGA
presidential candidate Stew
Cunanan. Why did he choose this as
his campaign slogan? Past and pre
sent SGA officers have made political
promises to student special interest
groups forgetting completel) about
the student bodv as a whole. Steve is
against just focusing on special in
terest groups but is concerned with
the views oi all groups as well as in-
dividual student needs
As chairman oi the SGA ap
propriations committee I have work-
ed with Steve over the last couple of
years. Stee has always shown con
cern foi the need of the student
organization to get their fail share oi
SGA money. He has always made
every attempt to express his views in
the best interest for the organization
in question. He has also made ever)
attempt to make sure that each
organization was given a fail and ap
propnate amount
Steve is current! vice-chairman ol
the appropriation committee and he
is also involved in other kev leader
ship positions on campus. Due to
Sieve's leadership ability and his wide
range of communication skills 1 feel
he is the best candidate for the stu
dent bodv as a whole I strongly en-
courage all students who want the
best candidate for the student bod) to
vote tor Steve who will keep the
whole student bodv in mind when
making a decision unlike his opvo
nent who tends to show favortism to
special interest groups. V out vote can
make the difference VOT1 STI VE
CUNANAN SGA PRESIDENT.
Dwayne H. Wiseman
SGA Appropriations Chairman
Vote Tomasic
I feel that a vote for Chris Tomasic
is a vote for the student. He stands
firm in his beliefs, but more impor-
tantly he acts on them; and his ac-
tions are in the best interest of the
students. Chris Iomasic is in favoi in
reinstating the medical loans. He feels
that the students' money should be
available to them, especially when
their welfare is concerned. He is a
strong advocate of Pirate Walk and
having served as assistant director of
Pirate Walk, he knows the needs for
operating it. among which are a set
budget to work with. Mr. Tomasic
believes that funding should be
available to organizations for pro
grams which are available to and
benefit all students, but those that do
not are a misallocation of the
students' money. As a history educa-
tion major Chris teels that promoting
academics is very important, and
ECU being an educational institu-
tion, should promote this and get rid
of its "party school" misnomer.
Likewise, Chris realizes the need of
extracurricular activities as a means
of personal development, and he par-
ticipates in intramural volleyball,
basketball and Softball as well as
numerous on campus and off campus
activities. Chris is a student in every
sense of the word and is interested in
serving the students. He is definitely
qualified for the job, since he is the
current SGA vice president and serves
on many committees. Chris is con-
cerned with promoting students' in-
terests and serving students' pro-
blems. He listens to their concerns
and becomes their voice in the
legislature. Mr. Tomasic's
opponent's slogan is "Student in-
terest not special interest To Chris,
they are one and the same; because to
him, students are special and he has
theii best interest in mind in whatevei
he does. At the forum on Monday at
2:00,hris said, "it's noi what E I
can do foi me, it's what 1 can do for
E I So vote for the person who
will work tor you and with you; vote
tor Chris omasi 'or SGA Presi
dent.
Marilyn Baugl
Jr Ds(
Vote Walker And Cunanan
romorrow the students o E I
have an important choice to make
concerning the future ol student
government I have been involved in
SGA foi tout years, two as Speaker
ol the House and Junioi and Senior
Class President and I know all the
candidates involved verv well. I hope
you all will support Mi Steve
Cunanan foi President and Mr Goi
don Walk foi Vi( President I
are bv far the best people foi the job
ombined thev have over 6 years
legislative experience, making them
the most experienced running mates.
"sieve and Gordon would never g
around to various groups on campus
making promises the) could not
fulfill. I hev instead promise to work
hard foi Al 1 the students and
nisi a few special interests.
"he students ol ECt need a pro-
fessional and responsible person as
SGA President to insure that their
views will be heard bv the Board oi
I rustees and the Administration.
Steve is that man. He w.ll get all the
students working togethei ii stead o
being factionalized.
Gordon has lived here in Greenville
all his life and knows the members ol
the Greenville City Council very well.
He is the voice the students need on
the City Council, a voice that will be
heard. Issues, such as parking around
campus, need to be addressed b) the
cit) and Gordon will make sure the
student interest will be served.
I hope you will join me tomorrow
and vote for Steve Cunanan and Gor-
don Walker: a vote tor Student In
terests and not foi Special Interest.
Kirk Shelley
Speaker of the SGA 1 egislature.
Seniot Class President
youi education - you will
favoi of Mi 1 :a lackson
I nthon) White
President.
E t Ambassadors
Posters
"o the "students" who have beer,
nppmg down the posters urging E I
students to vote for Chris Ton
and Anthony Jackson thank you'
You've done our university �
ntic service. In fact, I would �
propose that the administr
recognize your out star
achievements by establishing a
scholarship fund in your hoi
Perhaps it could be called the
Ignorant and I'm O.K. Awai
Keep up the good work'
Oh, and bv the wav, you've
overlooked one oi the I
Jackson signs over in the East W .
stairwell in Austin Hall. It's on �� iese-
cond floor You can't miss it.
Stephen L. I ogan
Graduate Student
English Department
Lady Pirates
Deal Dr Karr,
s a member of the East C arolma's
Women's Basketball Team I feel it is
mv responsibility and take it upon
myself to express mv dismay concern-
ing your recent decision. I was disap-
pointed when I heard our invitation
to the NWII had been declined.
When 1 saw the television interview in
which you attempted to justify your
decision, however, I became irate. 1
cannot believe that you even pretend
to support last Carolina Athletics yet
this wonderful opportunity to gain
national exposure has been denied. I
find the situation an embarrassment
not only for oui program but for the
entire University. I am graduating
this Spring but I will always feel a
part oi Lady Pirate Basketball. I can
only hope that you are not permitted
to walk awav from this incident
without retribution. Please feel free
to contact me.
rherese M. Durkin
Vote Jackson
Quite frankly 1 do not think there is
anyone more suited for the role of
Student Government Vice President
than Mr. Tony Jackson.
I have known Mr. Jackson for the
past three years and strongly support
him in his campaign for the SGA Vice
Presidency.
Mr. Jackson is a man of high moral
calibre and purpose. He possesses a
strong commitment to academic ex-
cellence. He supports reinstating Stu-
dent Government support of the
GREAT DECISIONS LECTURES,
revitilizing THE STUDENT
EMERGENCY MEDICAL LOAN
program and PIRATE WALK. Mr.
Jackson opposes funding of the IN-
TERFRATFRNITY COUNCIL
RUSH and funding to any other
organization whose purpose is not the
advancement of the University,
academics or leadership.
Mr. Jackson's goal as Vice Presi-
dent of the SGA is to promote and
encourage an atmosphere of
academic opportunity and quality at
Eas: Carolina University.
If you care about the future of East
Carolina University and are serious
about quality education - especially
Editor's Sole: Readers interested in
further details regarding the issues
raised by Us. Durkin's letter are urg-
ed to refer to Tim Chandler's com-
mentary on page 14 in the Sports sec-
tion of the March 20 issue of the East
Carolinian.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the en-
trance of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages
double-spaced or neatlv printed All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted. Students,
J acuity and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that thev are limited
to one every five issues.
SteveCunan an
Mv name is Steveinanai
I am running for the
Stud" Preside
entl) a Junior ma;
n Psycholoj a
grade pom? average

?v
FOI t� � : �
'he capi
resentative for oui
�eminent Association 1 have
Keen a member
Screenings and App
Committee and App-
Committee. Out
WMMHMMW ViC&
Tony Jackson
Hello, my name
Jackson. I am a M
major from Washington, I
and I am a candidate
fice of Student Governme
President. Some oi rr �
tions are: I am the pa
' Alpha Ph; Alpha I
Inc the organizat
organized and spor
Anti-Apartheid March ai ;
and sponsored the Ma
King, Jr comme
celebration that was he I
pus this year. I am a met
the N.A.A.C P , the M
Student Organization, -he In-
states and Social Council, and
the Minority Arts Committee I
am President of the E
Carolina Universit) Opera
Theater, and a member
Concert Choir.
My reasons for runn .
Vice President are:
foremost, I want to serve
students, and to promote
equitable student governme
all students, not just a select tew
I hope to inspire a more resp
ble Student Government, be
one of integrity and honor �
genuine concern for sen .
entire student body. As -
President I promise that ! -
all times consider what is
best interest of "all students
and the Universit)
major goal of mine as Vice Pres:
dent is to promote and encourage
C
David Tamb ling
I am running for this office in
an attempt to implement some
very sound ideas that will
enhance the funcion of the ev
!
pot um
HOME WITH
OUT IT
LA
'e �
� ��i
A





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ave been
ing ECU
I omasic
you!
it) a ter-
d like to
ttion
landing
shing a
nor.
c "I'm
ward "
you've
! omasic-
isl Wing
�se-
parates

:ern-
iap-
tation
ned.
� � your
rate. 1
retend
eti s yet
jain
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issment
for the
'ing
teel a
I I can
'muted
� dent
' d tree
terested in
ting tne issues
letter are urg-
handler 's com-
4 in tht Sports sec-
" �' ihe tost
Forum Rules
weh times letters
a Mail or
he f'ublica-
from the en-
ibrary
� fit at ion, all let-
tame, major and
t, phone number
nature of the author(s). Letters
tiled to (wo typewritten pages,
spaced or neatly printed. All
are subject to editing for brevi-
cenity and libel, and no personal
will be permitted. Students,
and staff writing letters for this
e reminded that they are limited
five issues.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 25,
1986

�' �
t
Candidate's Forum
����������
�������
Steve Cu nan an
President
Chris Tomasic
My name is Steve Cunanan and
1 am running for the office of
Student Govcrnemt President. 1
am currently a Junior majoring
in Psychology with an overall
grade point average of 3.5.
For the past two years I have
served in the capacity as Day
Representative for our Student
Government Association. 1 have
been a member of the SGA
Screenings and Appointments
Committee and Appropriations
Committee. Outside Student
Government I have safeguarded
students interests as a voting
member of the University
Alcohol and Drug Education
Committee and the University
Committee on Parking and Traf-
fic. 1 sincerely believe that with
these qualifications I can best
serve the students of East
Carolina University.
The priviledge of serving as
Student Government Association
President carries with it certain
responsibilities. The foremost of
these is placing the interests of
the student body in the highest at-
tainable position. The students
should always come first! They
should be the President's primary
concern in dealing with Green-
ville City Government. The
Board of Trustees, the
Chancellors' Office, and all
business contacts Under no cir-
cumstance should the top elected
student official bow to the
pressures of these sometimes for-
midable and threatening forces.
This office requires a person to
execute these responsibilities effi-
ciently, effectively, and most of
all tactfully!
The Student Government
President should not be directly
involved in the programming
aspects of the University. In-
stead, he should be more con-
cerned with policy decisions. This
position is much too valuable not
to be concerned with policy deci-
sions which effect the University
population. He should be able to
delegate control of many pro-
gramming aspects to other
elected and non-elected officials.
When one sums up all
criterion; experience, personal
fortitude, and positive growth for
East Carolina University, I trust
that you will see the merits of my
proposals and vote for "student
interests, not special interests
Steve Cunanan
Candidate for SGA President

Vice-President
Tony Jackson
��������
Hello, my name is Tony
Jackson. I am a Music Education
major from Washington, D.C.
and I am a candidate for the of-
fice of Student Government Vice
President. Some of my qualifica-
tions are: I am the past president
of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity,
Inc the organization which
organized and sponsored the
Anti-Apartheid March and Rally,
and sponsored the Martin Luther
King, Jr commemorative
celebration that was held on cam-
pus this year. I am a member of
the N.A.A.C.P the Minority
Student Organization, the United
States and Social Council, and
the Minority .Arts Committee. I
am President of the East
Carolina University Opera
Theater, and a member of the
Concert Choir.
My reasons for running for
Vice President are: first and
foremost, I want to serve the
students, and to promote an
equitable student government for
all students, not just a select few.
I hope to inspire a more responsi-
ble Student Government, being
one of integrity and honor, with a
genuine concern for serving the
entire student body. As Vice
President I promise that I will at
all times consider what is in the
best interest of "all students"
and the University in general. A
major goal of mine as Vice Presi-
dent is to promote and encourage
����-��
an intellectually stimulating
academic atmosphere here at
East Carolina and attempt to
derogate the "party" image that
is associated with our school.
As Vice President 1 will work
toward revitalizing
Student
Emergency Loan program,
basically because, my feelings are
"it's student money, therefore it
should be used bv the students
Also, the program was eliminated
before the University was allowed
to get the proposed, mandatory-
insurance policy instituted, our
opponents ascribe their action to
legislative responsibility but I
assert that it is nothing more than
a game of partisan ping-pong
where the only benefactors are,
noneother than our "responsible
legislators will also fight to
maintain the budget of Pirate
Walk. My decision is based on
the fact that there have been a
Secretary
I feel that the students' satetv
should always come first. My
promise to you is that I will fight
to make, and keep. Pirate Walk a
number of assaults that have
taken place this semester.
top priority of student govern-
ment. 1 oppose funding of i.F.C.
rush, because personally I feel
this, some $900, is only the most
blatant misuse of student funds
Not all students participate in
Fraternity and Sorority rush and
not all fraternities and sororities
benefit from these fudns. Fur-
thermore, I feel that it should be
sole responsibility of these
organizations, as it is with other
organizations to finance their
own membership drives. It
should not be the responsibility
of the Student Government. If it
were then every fraternity, sorori-
ty, club or society's membership
drive should be funded by SGA.
We know this is an impossibility.
However, I feel that this money
should be used in so many other
ways to better serve the students.
Chris Tomasic and I believe in
giving the Student Government
back to students. We believe that
the students do come first. So
know that a vote for CHRIS
TOMASIC and TONY
JACKSON is a vote for equality.
Your vote does, and will make a
difference. Thank you.
Tony Jackson
SGA Vice Presidential Candidate
������
Hello, my name is Chris
Tomasic, and I'm a history
education major and a candidate
for SGA President. My qualifica-
tions for SGA President include:
current SGA Vice President,
member of the ECU Media
Board, Chairperson of the Pirate
Walk Governing Board,
Chairperson of the Parents'
Weekend Committee, student
member of the ECU Athletic
Committee, and an SGA delegate
to the University of North
Carolina Association of Student
Governments (UNCASG). Other
qualifications include, a belief in
the equitable representation of
the entire student body, not just
special interest groups. Second, I
believe in a fair and responsible
government that is responsive to
the needs of the East Carolina
students. Most importantly, I
don't judge people by their race,
color, economic background,
lifestyle, or which organization
they belong to, but I judge people
by the content of their character
and their belief in improving East
Carolina.
If elected SGA President, I will
make sure SGA reinstates the
'Emergency Medical Loan
Emergency Medical Loan is a
loan that students can receive
from SGA whenever they need
medical or dental work right
away. I believe that the SGA,
which is funded by students,
needs to do whatever it takes to
improve campus life for students.
Pirate Walk - I feel this
David Tambling
i �hi aB i rm
I am running for this office in
an attempt to implement some
very sound ideas that will
enhance the function of the ex-
ecutive board. In addition to
preparing accurate and concise
minutes I hope to begin to com-
puterize the operations of the
secretary in order that they may
be stored for easy access.
In announcing my candidacy
for the office of Secretary of the
Student Government Association
of East Carolina University I find
that it is imperative to make it
known that I have served in the
legislature of this university and
understand its function. What I
offer in mv candidacy is EX-
PERIENCE.
From the beginning of my
legislative experience I have taken
an active role in the operations of
this esteemed body. As the only
student member of the Student
Retention and Recruitment com-
mittee I have worked to let stu-
dent views be heard by the ad-
ministration. In addition my ex-
perience has afforded me the op-
portunity to chair the SGA
Screenings and Appointments
committee.
As the election draws near I
would urge the student body to
vote for strong executive leader-
ship and support my candidacy.
With your support we can ac-
complish a great deal in the com-
ing SGA legislature.
David Gray Tambling
organization needs a set budget
every year. I notice this year
Pirate Walk was toyed with by
certain individuals for political
reasons; with the importance of
this organization it should never
be used as a political weapon.
Parking - Everybody is con-
cerned about parking; however, I
feel that a decision on paving the
bottom of college hill needs to be
voted upon by the total student
body. So, if I'm elected SGA
President, I will work for a
referendum for this fall semester.
Funding - every organization
on campus wants and sometimes
needs to be funded. Therefore,
any organization that meets the
requirements of SGA and has a
project with merit should be
funded. However, any organiza-
tion that restricts its membership
(not open to all students) should
not receive annual budget, but
could come forth to the legisture
for an appropriation in the fall.
There are also other duties
which I will make sure are carried
on that current President David
Brown has started. First, Club
Day which was done during every
Freshman orientation. This pro-
gram is very important for the
campus organizations to develop
their membership. Second, atten-
ding City Council meetings is one
of the most important jobs of the
SGA President, because a good
relationship between the city of
Greenville and ECU is so very im-
portant in dealing with parking,
housing, zoning, and business
problems. We, as students of
ECU, are members of the Green-
ville community for 9 months a
year. Third, as a member of the
Board of Trustees being the only
student sitting on the Board. The
SGA President is the direct voice
to the board; therefore, it is im-
portant that the President
develops a good relationship with
board members.
We at the SGA are there for
the total student body not our
organizations. To conclude my
platform, Mr. Jackson and I feel
that the question of the campaign
is not "what ECU can do for us,
but what we can do for ECU
Please vote, it's your right!
Chri. Tomasic
SGA Vice-President
Candidate for SGA President
��
Vice-President
Gordon Walker
When considering one can-
didate or another for an office of
the magnitude of SGA Vice
President, one should consider
three important areas of
qualification: experience, objec-
tivity, and professionalism.
Over the past four years I have
had vast experience in Student
Government, the North Carolina
Student Legislature, and other
campus and state-wide student-
oriented organizations. My
legislative experience ranges from
having served for 3 Vi years in the
SGA Legislature at Campbell and
more recently here at East
Carolina. My administrative ex-
perience ranges from having been
chairman of a campus organiza-
tion to my current tenure as the
State Chairman of the largest stu-
dent organization in North
Carolina with over 10,000
members (Yes, Mr. Stone, the
College Republicans.) At the
present time, I am finishing my

John Eagan
My name is John Eagan and I
am running for the office of SGA
Treasurer. I am a junior major-
ing in Economics.
term as the Student Lieutenant
Governor of North Carolina
(NCSL) and I am readv to return
my emphasis to the foundation of
my extra-curricular
involvementStudent Govern-
ment.
Objectivity is one of the virtues
that must be exhibited in the SGA
Vice President. The job is diverse
by definition and the Vice Presi-
dent must be willing to listen to
all students and consider their
opinions. As Student Lieutenant
Governor over the past year I
have worked with organizations
on 33 college campuses across
North Carolina. From that ex-
perience, I have been exposed to
ALL types of students. What I
learned is that every group must
be treated uniquely. Here at ECU
each and every student pays 'he
same amount of fees, therefore
each student has the right to be
heard and have their opinions
given due consideration. My one
and only campaign promise is
that 1 will approach all issues and
dilemmas from an objective point
of view.
The Vice President is charged
with the duty of working with the
city government and the ECU ad-
ministration on a regular basis.
Over the past few years there
have been a lot of complaints that
SGA has been ineffective in deal-
ing with these establishments.
Why? My feeling is that this
failure stems from a lack of pro-
fessionalism on the part of the
Student Government's elected of-
ficials. City government and the
ECU administration are made up
of and staffed by professionals.
If we are going to be effective in
making students' interest known
and influential SGA and the ECU
student body must be represented
in a professional manner. I feel
that my experience in working
with the General Assembly and
interaction with the Greenville
City Council has given me the
capacity and knowledge to ap-
proach the task of representing
YOU, the ECU Student Body, in
a professional manner.
The choice in this election is
clear cut! Will we elect inex-
perienced candidates or ex-
perienced and proven leaders?
Will we give our vote to the reac-
tionary special interests groups or
to candidates for ALL ECU
students? Will we elect people
who have proven their inability to
conduct themselves in a profes-
sional manner or candidates with
a proven record of professional
conduct? If you want experienced
leaders, objective leaders, and
professional leaders you can have
them. However, as usual there is
a catch. In order to get this type
of leadrship you will have to go
out on Wednesday and vote for
STUDENT INTEREST not
special interests.
Gordon Walker
Candidate, SGA Vice President
Treasurer
��
I have served for the past two
years in the Student Government.
Presently, I am the Chairperson
of the Student Welfare Commit-
tee, and Student Loan Advisory
Committee, as well as Junior
Class Vice-President. I am also a
Student Representative on Traf-
fic and Parking, a member on the
Transit Board, and Chairman of
the Major Concerts Committee
of the Student Union.
I have spent a lot of time in the
office of the present Treasurer,
so I am quite aware of all the
responsibilities the office holds. I
feel that my past experience in
Student Government will help to
improve the office further. One
of the main responsibilities of the
office of Treasurer is to work
closely with the Appropriations
Committee. I feel that my ex-
perience in the legislature will be
very beneficial. I he present Ap-
propriations Committee has set a
precedent by not funding any
academic departments and 1 want
to make sure this continues. Fur-
thermore, the work that has
begun this year on delinquent stu-
dent emergency and medical
loans must be continued. I have
done a great deal of work concer-
ning this problem, and plan to do
much more. The more loans that
are repaid, the more loans that
will be available for the students.
I look forward to working for
the students this year, and I will
always welcome suggestions.
John Eagan
Candidate, SGA Treasurer
SwWIIWJPIIPIfP

� �' J � -
�� - , ��.� . - -
� ' . ��
,� m .






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 25. 1986
Heard
WASHINGTON (UPI) � The
Supreme Court announced today
it will decide how far police can
go in searching an impounded
car, a question that affects any
motorist whose car is towed for
illegal parking or other reasons.
The justices will hear
arguments next term from Col-
orado officials, who are appeal-
ing a lower court's ruling that co-
caine found during the search of
an impounded truck could not be
used as evidence.
The Supreme Court ruled in
1976 in a South Dakota case that
police have a right to search an
unlocked glove compartment
during a vehicle inventory, a pro-
cess customarily done to account
for items found in the vehicle.
But lower courts have been
ivided over whether that ruling
also allows inspections of a
motorist's personal belongings,
such as purses or luggage or other
closed containers.
The justices, returning to the
bench from a two week recess,
also accepted a number of other
disputes for placement on their
1986-87 calendar of arguments
beginning in October, including:
�In a case that could affect
job conditions for thousands of
railroad employees, whether the
Interstate Commerce Commis-
sion can exempt rail carriers from
antitrust laws and contractual
obligations if necessary to en-
courage mergers.
�At the request of the Internal
Revenue Service, whether a full-
time gambler is engaged in a
trade or a business for tax pur-
poses. The case will determine if
Supreme
Defaulters Refused
Future Loans
WASHINGTON, D.C. (CPS) -
Scholars, grad students and ar-
tists who have not repaid their
loans on time no longer will be
able to get grants from the Na-
tional Endowment for the
Humanities (NEH).
In an effort to help collect
money on defaulted student loans
the NEH, which will award
SI32 million to scholars and ar-
tists this year, now will require all
grant applicants to fill out a form
stating the status of any
Guaranteed Student Loan money
they might have borrowed
"Before we offer anyone more
tax money, we wish to be certain
that all applicants are carrying
out their obligations to the
citizens of America says John
Agresto, the NEH's acting chair-
man.
The U.S. Department
Education estimates defaults on
student loans could exceed Si
billion by the end of this year,
and could go as high as S2 billion
by the end of the decade.
The deparment, of course, has
accelerated all its collection ef-
forts.
While Education Secretarv
William Bennett used to head the
NEH, the agency's decision to
grill applicants was its own, not
the Education Department's,
maintain NEH spokesman Dar-
rel deChaby.
No one knows how manv
deadbeats currently are getting
NEH funds. deChabv explains,
but he figures that since a signifi-
cant number of applicants spend
vear in academe, manv probably
took out student loans.
1 though the policy goes into
effect immediately, it won't app-
ly to all NEH grant recipients for
about a year, deChabv says.
a man who took up gambling
after he lost his job can deduct
his losses from his income taxes.
�How far can states go in con-
trolling the price of liquor? The
justices will review a New York
law that prohibits liquor stores
from selling alcoholic beverages
at a price below cost, which the
state defines as the listed
wholesale price plus a 12 percent
markup.
�Whether an Alabama law,
designed to cut down on the
number of appeals filed in
already overloaded courts, is con-
stitutional. The law imposes a
mandatory 10 percent penalty on
defendants who unsuccessfully
appeal money judgments.
The search case involved
Steven Bertine, who was stopped
for drunken driving in Boulder,
Colo on Feb. 10, 1984. After When an inventory was con-
Bertine was placed under arrest, ducted of the truck's contents, a
his truck was impounded under a backpack containing a nylon bag
city ordinance authorizing police of cocaine and drug parapher-
to remove from the roadside any naiia was found,
vehicle that poses a potential traf- The Colorado Supreme Court
fie hazard. ruled the cocaine was the result of
an illegal search prohibited by the
Fourth Amendment.
Comp
H I VNN VW iM
"
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V�. 4 '�
Leave
forests
and parks
clean.
Assorted Easter Baskets � Easter Candies imported from
Germany, Cheddar Cheese, (Ducks, Rabbits, Lambs),
Adult Easter Baskets
Adult Easter Bunnies and Chocolates
X-Rated Rabbits � Male & Female
Largest selection of imported beers in Greenville & the best price'
Wine Available � come by and order
Greenville Square Mall � Next to Cargo Furniture
756-1889
Bl TCCANEER
DORM PORTRAIT COX TEST
RESIDENTS
�Win a feature stor) about your
dorm to be in the 86 Bu aneer
�2 eligible winners
� 1 requirement to enter �
Hde Your Portrait Made
MARCH 1727 Bu( caneer offjce
Questions? 75 7- 6501
Rebel
vjb I -
Benefit
Concert
COMtt
r' �


Wednesday, March 26, 1986
at the
ATTIC
Birdv
The I
At the I n
Hap:
S5
J0jr
NIQHWfllCH
Doors Open at 9:00 p.m.
Admission � $2.00
BANDS
Nightwatch and Centaur
Ail proceeds will go toward publication of REBEL '86
the Literary-Art Magazine of East Carolina University.
H � f





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 25, 1986
ne Couri Computer Testing Useful

search prohibited by thi
mendment.
Stash
Maur trash.
:i
� V?
from
s),
V '
he best prices
Furniture
7V'
B I YNN WEAVER
suff Writer
X1- computers are gaining
popularity in today's society,
re making many impacts in
the areas of testing and measure-
' Most all multiple choice,
nd pencil tests, moreover,
idapted to a computer.
nalized tests are being
ped, which test the ex-
ortlj on information a
ular person knows.
gl � lese might be valuable
es, they are not feasi-
;lassroom use according
� S C hilders o' the ECU
genter.
lers explained. "It would
to write a program
nalized test for a class,
achievement, because
only wants to find out
the examinees know
bjectives
a a! of an adaptive (or
explained by I inda
Introduction to
tnd Modern Test
rather than having
in inee respond to every
ay be better to match
the examinee's abili-
tion is answered incorrectly the
computer will switch to an easier
set of questions, and if the ques-
tion is answered correctly the
computer will switch to more dif-
ficult questions. If the examinee
continues to answers questions
incorrectly the computer will then
stay with easy questions.
However, if they start answering
correctly, the computer will
switch to a more difficult set of
questions.
Programmed learning can be
useful to both teachers and
students.The teachers administer
an adaptive test to the students
before the class begins and with
the results showing students
strengths and weaknesses the
teacher can better program the
class material.
Computerized Adaptive
Testing is only one of the func-
tions computers play in today's
modern world of testing. This
seems to be growing by leaps and
bounds, because of the advan-
tages it has over paper and pencil
testing.
One of the main advantages of
computerized testing is the
amount of time it saves, both the
student and the teacher. "It is
realistic to have 16 students in
one classroom taking com-
puterized tailored tests on the
same material expressed
Childers. Although many com-
panies are offering software tests
on many different subjects
Childers warns to be choosey,
"people just assume that while
someone is offering a software
package, that the package must
be good. That is not a safe
assumption. Some of the tests are
very well developed and can be
useful, while others are elemen-
tary and ineffective
Money seems to be one of the
major drawbacks of this system.
C.E. VanZant of the ECU
Psychology Department
saysone day there will be a
computer on every teachers desk,
and there will be terminals
available for the students to use,
but things are still being
developed to help this growth
There are other problems with
computerized testing that are not
as easily discusses as the pro-
ceeding. The makers and users of
computerized tests need to ex-
plore the questions of; measure-
ment error, validity, item
response theory, human factors
and ethics. These concerns are
being researched by the computer
companies themselves, but unless
their findings are positive they
will not be published A
University Optometric Eye Clinic
DR. DENNIS O'NEAL
Comprehensive Eye Examinations
Contact Lenses
Soft, Hard, Gas Permeable Tinted
Extended Wear, Contacts for Astigmatism
Glasses (One Day Service in Most Cases)
Student & Faculty Discounts on Contacts &
Glasses
Convenient to Campus
Evening & Sat Appointments Available
ink
iir
American Opiomeiru Asso � at ton
612 E. 10th Street
(Across from campus security)
758-6600

I 41
sting requires a
� 'o present each
score each response.
i the next item that
appropriate for the
ns that are too
fficult for the ex-
ti ibute very little in-
tbout that person's
these adaptive tests
very useful to
are being used in
ire regular pro-
militar easily uses
because their ex-
know the informa-
d in their learning.
a j!rade for
. ledge
rrized adaptive test
this manner. Basically,
� irts with a question o'
. I ficult) It that ques-
DRAFT NITE
Tuesday, March 25, 1986
Admission $1.50 Guys
9:00-1:00 A.M
$1.00 Ladies
10C Draft All Nite
& Kappa Sigma
present
DRAFT NITE
Wednesday, March 26
Admission $1.50 Guys
9:00-1:00 A.M.
$1.00 Ladies
10C Draft All Nite
FILM
SALE
ll I ilm n Sal- V nil- (Juantitie l.t-i
M Polo h
sp �hoi,c-
Itodafc 'The Specialists"
ert
arch 26, 1986
IC
d Contour
16
ty-
WELCOME
FOR
EASTER WEEKEND �
On The Circle, Atlantic Beach, N.C.
Telephone: 919-247-2717 for information
� FEATURING - � F RID A Y �
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party � Penny Draft
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1 P.M. till 6 PM.
2-103 Desk Party
CHAIRMAN
OF THE BOARD
8 P.M. till 1 A.M.

Jf J � � M
� m - m -





I'M- EAST C AROI INIAN
StyJe
MARCH 25. 1986
Page 8
Long-Awaited History
ECU Book Released
arolina I niversity. The Formative Years, will sign
autographs in Joyner Library on Alumni Day. April 19. 3-5 p.m.
Mary Jo Jackson Bratton, author of Fast C
Copies of the long-awaited of-
ficial institutional history, East
Carolina I niversity: The Nor-
mative Years 1907-1982, bv Dr
Mary Jo Jackson Bratton have
been placed on sale locall) and
are ready for distribution.
Publication date of the
550-page work is April 18, and a
schedule of publication events
has been announced bv the Office
of Alumni Affairs and the
university.
John Howell, I c I chancellor,
told the university's board ol
trustees Friday that he had read
and enjoyed drafts of the hook
"I found it very thorough, a
scholarly endeavor which has
captured the essence oi East
Carolina University
"I read it with a greal dea
pride Howell said.
James Lanier, Jr vice
chancellor for Institutional Ad-
vancement, said �"The book was
especially written foi alumni and
friends, for people who've shared
the ECl experience Hie Alumni
Association leadership thought
this book would be su
portant asset to the University,
they agreed to help underwrite
the cost and to market the book
"University histories are not
written to make money, but we
hope this one hits the best seller
list among our alumni. We're in-
debted to Dr. Bratton for her ex-
tensive work and to the Alumni
Association for making if
available to the public I.anier
said.
An of!Rial reception announc-
ing the book and honoring Brat-
ton will be held at the
Chancellor's residence Thursday,
April 10 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30
p.m. That same day, from 1 to 3
p rn the Student Store in
Whichard Building will host a
autographing session.
I quite an impressive
volume. We're very proud of the
k and ol Dr. Brat ton's work.
We knew when we read the
manuscript that she had done a
fob, but somehow seeing the
XI m its final form, pictures.
icket and all. is even more
gratifying. We've been waiting
tour years for the finished p
duct, and I believe the wan was
well-worth it Howell said.
Bratton added, "It's hard to
believe it's really, finally here. I
think the printers did a fine job.
My strongest hope is that our
alumni will be happy with the
volume, that they will claim this
history as part of their history. I
want those who read the book to
realize anew, or perhaps for the
first time, how vibrant and strong
this great university has always
been
The Friends of the Library will
sponsor an autographing party in
the lobby of Joyner Library on
Alumni Day, April 19. The
public is invited to attend from 3
to 5 p.m.
Mail order forms are available
from the Office of Alumni Af-
i, Ann. Linda Morton,
raylot Slaughter Alumni
Center, 901 E. Fifth Street,
Greenville, NX (919) 7 5 6686.
Mumni, students and faculty
may purchase the book by
mailorder for a special introduc-
tory price of S 19.95 through Oc-
tober 1. 1986. The suggested
is S22 95
Searching For The Elusive, Conducive American Grape
u. diti'v mv have to lose? i. nn� mn � o . . . , � ,i JL
By BFCk TOY
Miff �nlrr
Now don't gel me wrong � we
live in a great country. Fi
recreation to dining (in my case,
often the same thing), Americans
are always innovative. We like
the one-of-a-kind experience,
even insist on it. except in our
wmes.
I he American wines from the
West Coast are our most notable,
their vineyards the most il-
lustrious, yet the grapes grown
there are ol European origin
(mostly Frencl and German). 1
ask vou, in the midst of our
patriotic fervor, what's wrong
with the native grape0 Richard's
Wild Irish Rose isn't made from
American grapes, so what do we
have to lose
The Fast Coast is more respect-
ful of the American grape, but its
vineyards have a long way to go.
There are several wineries in
North Carolina, most notably the
Duphn Hill company in
Southeastern N.C. Their major
grape is the Scuppernong, which
not only grows prolifically
statewide in the swamps, but also
tastes as weird as it sounds.
Northern vineyards also use
American grapes, but the Con-
cord and Niagra grapes are much
tarter than their Southern cousin.
Most ot the wineries on the fas-
Coast are too small to be na-
tionally distributed, so if you
want to sample a few, a road trip
is in order.
The only American grape
available nationally is produced
by Taylor's of New York, which
is now part of the Coca-Cola em
pire � not the most illustrious of
wme credentials, but you can't
put a good grape down.
The search for the elusive
American grapes cannot be con
ducted in a grocery store or
gourmet shop. They are only to
he found in their respective
neighborhoods Next time you're
travelling up the Fast Coast and
see a sign tor a local vineyard.
stop and check it out � there are
some excellent wines available,
most oi them at minimal prices.
This week's selections are:
Chateau Ste. Michelle.
Washington State
This vineyard produces some
excellent wmes, especially their
Johannisberg Reisling, a German
grape, which is crisp, semi-dry,
Hoarding By Instinct And Habit
(L'PI) � Some people collect
rubber bands in their desks at
work. Others stack old
newspapers so high at home
there's barely enough room to
squeeze through a narrow path to
their bed.
Just about everyone collects
things to some degree. But some
people take hoarding to an ex-
treme, and some researchers are
beginning to believe the tendency
to act like a squirrel could be
genetic.
"We've seen families where
there are four generations o'
hoarders said Dr. Steven
Rasmussen, a psychiatrist at
Butler Hospital in Rhode Island
studying the behavior.
"There may be an inherited or
genetic pattern in this
Rasmussen and an associate are
studying hoarders as part of their
work with obsessive compulsives
� people who exhibit extreme
forms of behavior such as the ir-
resistable urge to wash their
hands
"We noticed that many of our
obsessive compulsive patients are
hoarders said Rasmussen.
"It just seems to be passed
down from one generation to the
next said Rasmussen. He
pointed out, however, that more
studies are necessary, possibly
with identical twins, to prove or
See HOARDING, page 10
Video Installation In Gray
By JOHN SHANNON
���ir MMor
We are living in the "Age of
Electronic Transmission accor-
ding to Peter D'Agostino, an ar-
tist who makes it his business to
be aware of the larger context in
which he works. Our age takes
for granted the "simultaneous
transmission of sound and
image said D'Agostino of
video and its "frightful parent,
(broadcast) television
D'Agostino takes on the
aesthetic problems presented by
video in his piece "Double You
(and X, Y, Z) currently on
display in Gray Gallery.
Video is a characteristically im-
personal medium, but in "Dou-
ble You (and X, Y, Z)"
D'Agostino has undertaken to
bridge some of the prohibitive
space between artist and viewer.
He has brought very personal
subject matter into the piece via
recordings of his daughter's first
attempts at language and images
of his wife's pregnant belly, and
he has introduced an element of
participation to the work via the
"interactive videodisc" on which
the work was intended to be
presented.
Unfortunately, for the Gray
Gallery installation the videodisc
had to leave with D'Agostino
after a reception held for him and
the two other artists exhibiting,
Al Loving and Paul Oberst. The
piece remains on display in video-
tape form, as a linear sequence.
While retaining its intelligibility,
"Double You (and X, Y, Z)"
may lose some of the attraction it
might have held for casual
gallery-goers.
"A person approaching this
piece is getting a learning ex-
perience said D'Agostino,
"perhaps analogous to a child's
learning process In fact, one of
the subjects of the piece is the
process in which a child acquires
language. The acquisition of
language is in turn structurally
analogous to the four primary
forces of physical interaction �
light, gravity, the strong force
and the weak force.
According to D'Agostino, in
approaching his piece one should
"first, be open to learning. Try to
realize you are dealing with a dif-
ferent structure, a different
system. Then, try it � take the
plunge to work in the system
In terms of language, the first
part of the piece is prior to
words. The first force, light, is
birth. With gravity comes the
first grounding in language � the
first words. Then the strong
force, analogous to sentences,

'
appears. Finally, the weak force,
or "the force that allows things
to come apart manifests itself
in songs, which represent a dif-
ferent order of meaning. It
should be remembered that
analogous relationships in the
piece are apparent on many
levels, and that the basic struc-
ture is only a springboard for fur-
ther interpretation.
For instance, the third section
of sentences corresponds to the
strong force, "that which binds
things togethor according to
D'Agostino. In this section, sets
of three words each are allowed
to be grouped different ways to
illustrate the trial and error
method which often leads to the
discovery of meaning. Choices
may include "like soup I "like
I soup "I like soup etc. Of
course, only one choice is "cor-
rect
The particles associated with
the strong force are called gluons.
A child learning the basic rules of
language (syntax) is learning
about the force which binds
words together. But other inter-
pretations are embedded in the
piece and may present
themselves, according to
D'Agostino. The section may be
considered analogous to a stage
in the development of transmis-
sions, for instance, or of con-
sciousness.
.o,d well rounded
good wine for si
during, and atter any meal, "he
price is approximately S
� not a bad in esi
Charles Krug, Calil
This company's Cl
is probably the best b l
variety available from the
California vineyards. Very drv
and slightly delicate in bouquet,
is nonetheless a round, ripe
wme A: approximately Sv
is a wme to be en -
� me.
I avii . New y
I his wme is also made bv a
small, local vineyard in western
New York, .ailed Widmer. Their
version is better, but you won't
� (ireenville unless you're
iking with me. This wine has
� .re and tart sweet
- e Nor-
i tern American grape. A nice
apei td dessert wme. its
swec md full body are I
ng I . mplement most en-
V 4 a bottle, this selectio
wins the C heap Wine Of The
Week award, so give it a shot.
Portraits May Win Eternity
By JOHN MLVNNOS
Have you ever felt that the im-
age ol an organization as pro-
jected bv the yearbook was dif-
ferent from the way members saw
themselves' This year's Buc-
caneer will avoid the possibi
of misrepresenting at least three
groups by holding a special c
test, open to all official campus
organizations and residence halls.
I wo portrait contests are being
held this week by the Buccaneer,
one for residence halls and one
for organizations such as frater-
nities, sororities, and clubs. The
winners of these contests can en-
sure that their groups are ac
curately memorialized with
feature stories in the Buccaneer
for 1986.
One condition is required to
secure entry into the contest �
members must have their por-
traits made this week at the Buc-
caneer office. At the time the pic-
ture is being taken, each student
ty sign a sheet with the name of
er organization on it. Buc-
caneei editor Beth Davis stresses
that "those who have already had
a portrait made mav drop a sheet
by
Davis savs the selection process
will not be based entirely on the
number of portraits made. ��Pro-
bably, if it looks like the
organization put forth an effort,
contacted us, and persuaded a
reasonable percentage of its
members to come out for por-
traits, the group will becom
eligible She added that the final
winners will be drawn at random
from among the eligible groups.
"Some groups are so much larger
than others we wanted to find
a way to choose the featured
group that wouldn't rely on size
alone
nming up the reasons for
having the contest, Davis said,
"Our main goal for the section
on organizations and dorm life
this year is to convey a more per-
sonal view of campus life. We
hope the stories we create will be
from the students' point of view.
And maybe the contest will catch
on in the future
If you are a member of a
recognized campus organization
or a resident in the dorms, and
vou would like to see a feature
story immortalize your group in
the Buccaneer '86, then get over
to the Buccaneer office in the Old
South building and show your
support this week.
This Image Is from the birthlight secton of Peter D'Agostino's Interactive videodisc "Do
You (and X,Y,Z) currently on display m Gray Gallery �UC ��9hk
Undoubtedly, the best way to Angeles, the Boston FilmVideo throughout much oi J,Double"
Foundation and many others,
experience the piece is firsthand.
D'Agostino has exhibited in such
major galleries as the Museums
of Modern Art in New York and
San Francisco, the Institute of
Contemporary Art in Los
and so is worth checking out on
strength of reputation alone.
Of special interest to music en-
thusiasts is the presence of Jon
Gibson's compositions
You Gibson has played with
the ensembles of Phillip Glass,
Steve Reich and Terry Riley, and
his score, especially in parts of
the birth light section, is ex-
quisite.
Proud
CUPI) � The popular
tion of pirates, muc I
ing from gallant and
ing Errol Flynn mo
tie resemblance to tl
of a trade that fli u
high seas in the l�
centuries
In fact mosi pira
poverty by . .
disease or
brutal men who spet
idle hours in di . I
ual orgies
These a
in Raiders and Rebels
399 pages, SiV �
executive and
Prank Shen �
The pirate .
Black beard an
as cruel as a
history
Tor exat
BLOOM COUNTY
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Theatre Of T
America's m
theatre company. The V
Theatre of the Dea'
thirty-fifth tour tv
universally acclaimed
company will be seen at McC
nis Theatre n Thursday I
performance only at 8:15;
The Companv will pr
evening of two plavsa Ja a
thriller and an America
In a Grove by Akutugawa
tale of deception and
directed by Arvin Brown,
Director of Long W
in New Haven, C
Farewell, Vi loel! by E
White is a joyride thr
directed by William R
Artistic D i r ec t o i
Cleveland Playhouse
ding member of The V
Theatre of the Deaf Farewell,
My Lovely! otters a rea
mirror glimpse into tin � -
days of the Mode! T.
David Havs, rtisti D
of The National Theatre
Deaf, began the Companv
years ago. Since then, the
has been dazzling
worldwide with a unique
mance stvle which blends
then
BECOMIN
I
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I
I
L.
on the rigjit m
earning a BSN, wj
Oifem, NJ 0701
ARMY NUR!
"s-�itftfto





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 23, 1986
eleased
said.
iard to
h.ere I
ine job.
at our
� th the
a m this
stor I
book to
the
strong
will
The
m 3
tacult
Grape
Eternity
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and
�. 'ature
. up in
over
�eOld
our

Interactive videodisc "Double
throughout much ot "Double
'ou Gibson has played with
the ensembles of Phillip Glass,
teve Reich and Terry Riley, and
its score, especially in parts of
he birthlight section, is ex-
luisite.
Proud To Be A Pirate? Think Again
(UPl) � The popular concep-
tion of pirates, much of it stemm-
ing from gallant and swashbuckl-
ing Errol Flynn movies, bears lit-
tle resemblance to the actual facts
of a trade that flourished on the
high seas in the 18th and 19th
centuries.
In fact most pirates died in
poverty by hanging, venereal
disease or fighting. Most were
brutal men who spent their many
idle hours in drunkeness and sex-
ual orgies.
These assertions are contained
in Raiders and Rebels (Morrow,
399 pages, $19.95) by advertising
executive and sailing enthusiast
Frank Sherry of Westwood, N J.
The pirate captains, such as
Blackbeard and Black Bart, were
as cruel as any people in recorded
history, according to the author.
For example, Blackbeard once
BLOOM COUNTY
forced a captive to eat his own
ears.
Another pirate leader, Dirk
Chivers, had captured an East In-
dian ship in 1690.
Chivers, captain of the "Char-
ming Mary tired of the shrew-
like complaints of a captured
Capt. Saw bridge, ordered the
captive's lips sewn together with
sailing needle and twine.
Sawbridge died of the atrocity.
Black Bart once had a captive's
lips cut off and fried in a skillet
before his verv eyes. Another
captain forced flammable caulk
into a man's mouth and lit it.
Sherry, a former newspaper
man who describes himself as a
"city boy said he had no in-
terest in the idea of pirates until
about seven years ago when he
went on a chartered sailing cruise
in the Caribbean
"We hit the Virgins, the
Bahamas, and every place and
everywhere I went we kept hear-
ing these colorful local stories
abouty pirates.
"It kind of aroused my jour-
nalistic instincts and I began
looking into it and I became
fascinated by the characters. And
as I looked further and further
into it, 1 saw that these events
were connected. These people
were not so much after treasure
as they were after vengeance
against society and after a free
life which, after all, in those
times was not available to the
sailors. So that's what began it
Sherry said he found that local
historical societies, particularly in
the (arolinas and Virginia, were
very helpful in his research. He
also used official naval and court
records and author Daniel Defoe,
by Berke Breathed
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who wrote "Robinson Crusoe
"Defoe contributed a mine of
information but what he con-
tributed most was the contem-
porary flavor and what people
thought of these guys. He didn't
excuse them but he understood
them. That gave me an insight.
"I had felt before and I think
most people felt that they were
Errol Flynn swashbucklers, bury-
ing treasure, and walking
planks he said.
Sherry chronicles the fate of
Henry Every, a totally selfish
pirate who betrayed everybody
except himself and may have got-
ten away with it to live happily
ever after � one of the few
pirate masters who did.
Every did not drink or par-
ticipate in orgies with his
crewmen because he did not want
to make himself vulnerable.
He also tells the tale of Anne
Dommey, a South Carolina
female pirate who set
astonishingly low moral stan-
dards.
"There is a lot of myth and it's
hard to cut through sometimes.
You have to take it with a grain
of salt. But, for the most part, I
think we've got a pretty good pic-
ture
One of the best known pirates
in history was Captain Kidd, but
in Sherry's research the New
Yorker was probably more sinn-
ed against than sinning.
He was hired as a king's
pirateer and ended up being a
pirate because of the contract he
agreed to.
"What makes Kidd interesting
is that he asked for it. He put
himself in a position where he
had to deliver financially and he
had to engage in piracy to fulfill
that
Sherry says that most pirates,
no matter how they die, had
much more freedom in that pro-
fession than the ordinary person,
or even sailor, during the golden
age of piracy in the 18th and 19th
centuries.
"They had nothing to lose.
They had nothing to lose at all.
The life of the ordinary sailor was
wretched. As a pirate you had
freedom and a voice in the opera-
tion of the ship. You had the
capacity to rise in ranks if you
were capable. The only thing that
mattered was ability and merit
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OE PREGNANCY
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Theatre Of The Deaf Will Dazzle Crowds ! We Do Chicken Right
America's most remarkable
theatre company, The National
Theatre of the Deaf, continues its
thirty-fifth tour this spring. This
universally acclaimed theatre
company will be seen at McGin-
nis Theatre on Thursday for one
performance only at 8:15pm.
The Company will present an
evening of two plays-a Japanese
thriller and an American classic.
In a Grove by Akutugawa is a
tale of deception and intrigue,
directed by Arvin Brown, Artistic
Director of Long Wharf Theatre
in New Haven, Connecticut.
Farewell, My Lovely! by E.B.
White is a joyride through time,
directed by William Rhys, Acting
Artistic Director of The
Cleveland Playhouse and a foun-
ding member of The National
Theatre of the Deaf. Farewell,
My Lovely! offers a rear-view
mirror glimpse into the rollicking
days of the Model T.
David Hays, Artistic Director
of The National Theatre of the
Deaf, began the Company 18
years ago. Since then, the troupe
has been dazzling theatre-goers
worldwide with a unique perfor-
mance style which blends the
magic of sign language with the
splendor of the spoken word. I he
National Theatre of the Deal
recently became the first
American theatre company evei
invited to tour in China.
Leading Broadway designer
Fred Voelpel has designed the
costumes and David Hays the
lighting for both, plays. Charles
Baird, both a designer and Na-
tional Theatre of the Deaf actor,
has designed the Model T and ac-
companying sets tor Farewell.
My lovely! The sets for In a
drove, full of oriental mystique,
were designed by David Hays.
Coupon Redeemable at
Greenville locations only
Expiration Date May 9, 1986
couponAwmm
� � Vote
CUNANAN
SGA President
Walker
SGA Vice-President
"STUDENTINTEREST, not Special Interest
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10
JHJLgAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 25, i986
N.C. Museum Of Art Celebrates 30th Year
The North Carolina Museum
of Art is celebrating its 30th an-
niversary this year with a series of
special events, a major exhibition
of Dutch 17th-century painting
and the publication of a free
brochure on the history of the in-
stitution.
The museum opened on April
6, 1956, in a renovated State
Highway Division office building
on Morgan Street in Raleigh,
which remained its home until the
opening of the new building in
April 1983.
The museum's founding was
the result of historic legislative
action in 1947, when the General
Assembly appropriated $1
million for the purchase or works
of art � thus becoming the first
state legislature to inaugurate an
art collection with public funds.
The North Carolina Art Socie-
ty . which was instrumental in
founding the museum and serves
as its membership organization,
will launch the museum's 30th
anniversary festivities and
celebrate its own 60th anniver-
sary at the Beaux-Arts Ball on
April 19. Tickets are Si25 per
person for members of the Art
Society and $150 for non-
members.
The public will be invited to
celebrate the museum's 30th year
at a free family festival on June
21. Organized around a French
theme, in conjunction with the
summer exhibition "French
Paintings from the Chrysler
Museum the festival will in-
clude music, films, workshops
for children and tours of the col-
lections.
"Holland in the 17th
Century a major exhibition of
approximately 45 works, will be
presented Oct. 25, 1986, through
February 15, 1987, in com-
memoration of the 30th anniver-
sary The exhibition will be
selected from the museum's col-
lection of Dutch 17th-century
painting, considered one of the
finest representations of
Holland's "Golden Age" in the
U.S.
Many of the works in the ex-
hibition were purchased with
funds from the 1947 state ap-
propriation. This also will mark
the first time that a number of the
works in the exhibition have been
seen in the museum's new
building.
"Holland in the 17th Century"
will be accompanied by a selec-
tion of original copper plates of
Rembrandt etchings from the col-
lection of the late Robert Lee
Humber, who played an impor-
tant role in founding the
museum. Also on view will be
prints made from these plates, on
loan from various collections in
the I S.
The free brochure, "North
Carolina Museum of Art: A Brief
History will be available at the
Information Desk beginning
April 1; copies also will be mailed
on request. A copy of the
brochure may be obtained by
contacting the Communications
Hoarding For Security
Continued from page 8
disprove the genetic theory about
hoarding.
Researchers also suspect hoar-
ding may be close!) associated
with maternal instincts, since the
tendency to build nests or feed
the young also disappears when
this part of the brain is cut.
People who exhibit severe
hoarding tendencies also tend to
be overly maternal, Rasshussen
said.
"There's a certain point ot
development when the mother is
gone � you develop an attach-
ment to something like a blanket
to substitute for the mother. " he
said. "Mosl people go through
this stage and begin to develop
relationships with other people
But some people retain their at-
tachment to objects instead.
"People who have high levels of
separation anxiety we think end
up being the collectors. They tend
to be loners; they tend to be
singles, introverts. Thev develop
a relationship that most people
would to other people to
whatever thev collect he said.
So when other people demand
they get rid of whatever they col-
lect, thev are often met with ex-
treme anxiety. Thev "re convinced
something terrible is going to
happen
AMERICAN 'IBf GREETINGS
tor that sx of person
Easter
Cards & Gifts
Pick from our spring garden
of beautiful remembrances
for sharing the joy of the season.
Student
Stores
Wright
Building

Office, North Carolina Museum
of Art, 2110 Blue Ridge
Boulevard. Raleigh, NC 27607,
(919)833-1935, ext. 121.
The brochure traces the history
of the museum from the forma-
tion in the mid-1920s of the
North Carolina Art Society, a
group of citizens dedicated to
"securing for the State a Museum
of Art" as well as promoting ap-
preciation of art and encouraging
artistic talent.
In its early years, the Art Socie-
ty sponsored loan exhibitions in a
series of locations. It also receiv-
ed a bequest of works of art from
the collection of Robert F.
Phifer, a Cabarrus County native
living in New York, along with a
sizeable monetary endowment.
The culmination of the Art
Society's efforts came in the
1940s under the leadership of
Greenville native Robert Lee
Humber, an international lawyer
who returned to North Carolina
after living in Paris for 17 years.
Eager to contribute to the
cultural advancement of his
home state, Humber joined the
Art Society's efforts to establish
an art museum.
His search for financial sup-
port led him to Samuel Kress,
millionaire owner of the S.H.
Kress and Company variety
stores, who agreed to contribute
SI million to help North Carolina
found an art museum.
Because he did not want to be
approached by other states,
however, Kress stipulated that his
promise must remain verbal and
his name anonymous. He also
specified that the Si million must
be matched by a state appropria-
tion.
Armed with Kress's promise,
Humber approached the 1947
legislature with the appropriation
bill. He lobbied intensively for its
passage, explaining that the $1
million was required to match the
promised gift of an anonymous
donor.
The House of Representatives
approved the bill 45-43 in the
final hours of the 1947 session,
after impassioned oratory by
Rep. John Kerr of Warren Coun-
ty: "Mr. Speaker, I know that I
am facing a hostile audience, but
man cannot live by bread alone
Although the matching state
appropriation required by Kress
had been approved, the Kress gift
did not come to the museum until
1960. Difficulties in the negotia-
tions arose when Kress died
without having formalized his ar-
rangements with Humber.
The Kress estate agreed to
honor the promise, but stipulated
that the gift, rather than being
monetary, would consist of
works of art valued at $1 million
or more. This decision ultimately
resulted in North Carolina's
receiving 71 works of art,
primarily of the Italian
Renaissance and baroque periods
� the second largest collection
given by the Samuel H. Kress
Foundation to an American
museum.
A State Art Commission was
appointed by Gov. W. Kerr Scott
in 1950 to spend the Si million
appropriation on European and
American works of art. The com-
mission used the appropriation,
along with $300,000 from the
Phifer bequest to the Art Society,
to purchase a total of 220 Euro-
pean and American paintings, in-
cluding an Old Master collection
which today is considered one of
the most important in the U.S.
A 1953 appropriation by the
General Assembly provided
funds for the renovation of a
state Highway Division office
building on Morgan Street to
serve as a temporary home for
the new museum.
The North Carolina Museum
of Art opened on April 6, 1956,
with Dr. W.R. Vakn'mer, an in-
ternationally known art
historian, as its first director.
For information about ac-
tivities relating to the 30th an-
niversary, contact the museum at
(919) 833-1935.
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CLASS PORTRAITS
The week following Sprinp Break
MARCH 17-27
ALL DATES: 9am-12pm & 1-5pm
EXCEPT 20th & 26th: 12:30pm-8pm
Faculty, Seniors, Grads,
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Appointments are not available
Come early & avoid the lines
2ND FLOOR PUBLICATIONS BLDG.
�M LAI TUCNfe � m ,
tut
Wmfred Johnson ran
Softballer
By Ir r AKI
Spam �
The EC I Lad)
team travelled
Fla this pa
its sight
season bin
The Pr i
competitioi
back
victories
The weekend
ECU as they d
Frida; by a 4-0 s
pitcher Stacey b
only one hit in
to 8-0. She
son bai
The game wa
deadlock until EC I
four
seventh.
Eva Hughes, wl
Pirates in hitting �
nited the wini
single. After Sandy K
Adams singled. Wend)
walked to force in H
nie Murray, rhe Pirate'
hitter this year, then
bases with a double.
The sea d game on Fi
was againsi he Univer
Massachusetts and tha �
strike outs by
the Pirates mo
threats througl
losing 4-0.
Pitcher Robin Gra
fell to 2 as she gave up
runs in the first, fourtl
seventh innings. She relinqu
only seven hits but her tea
mitted five er:
Mona Jackson got the
in the game, a single ii
inning.
The third game on Friday
Spring Practi
Baker Happy
By SCOTT COOPER
Art Baker and the ECL P
football squad have been haro a
work as thev have alreadv beg
spring workouts :n hopes to b
an improve upon last vear'v
dismal 2-9 campaign.
The Bucs are hard a: work a-
they hit the field the field
Tues Wed Fri. and
controlled scrimmage ftei
a few days of practice, coach
Baker is pleased with what he has
seen � especialiv in the offensive
line
"The most pleasant surpris
the play of our offensive lire
Baker commented, "the big
reason is that Rich Autrv return-
ed. He's a little rusty, but he real-
ly looks good. Bourge
Thomas and Struyk are all
veterans and are playing ke
veterans.
"The positives far outw. .
the negatives Baker continued
�bout his early spring-practice
�tsstons. "Their (the players) at-
titudes are better about
themselves. I've tried to instill
fttiat for the past year
Although the Pirates finished
tfce 1985 season with a nine-game
losing streak (the longest among
Division-I schools), they have
Veen quite aggressive in their
Workouts, according to Baker.
'The team really truly has
Ken more aggressive than
icy've been since I've been
sre Baker explained "When
ley're more aggressive, they
to know what they're doing
and they ought to
It's no surprise that in order
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rHE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
MARCH 25, 19Wi
Page II
Winning Streak Snapped
Wlnfrrd Johnson rarrs back in action against the University of Richmond.
Softballers Struggle In Florida
By LANCESEARI
�o�ti �nic
The ECU Lady Pirate softball
am travelled to Tallahassee.
Ha this past weekend � setting
ts sights on a possible pos:
-cason birth.
The Pirates ran into some stiff
;ompetition, however, and came
k to Greenville with only two
. .clones in five games.
The weekend began well for
ECU as they defeated Stetson on
day b a 4-0 score. Winning
.her Stacey Boyette gave up
� I) one hit in raising her record
8-0. She struck out three Stet-
son batters.
The game was a scoreless
deadlock until ECU erupted for
iur runs in the top oi the
jventh.
Eva Hughes, who led the
Pirates in hitting with two, ig-
nited the winning rally with a
single. After Sandy Kee and Kim
-dams singled, Wendy Ozment
walked to force in Hughes. Jean-
nie Murray, the Pirate's leading
hitter this year, then cleared the
bases with a double.
The second game on Friday
was against the University of
Massachusetts and thanks to 13
strike outs by pitcher Lisa Rever,
the Pirates mounted no scoring
threats throughout the contest,
iosing 4-0.
Pitcher Robin Graves' record
fell to 7-2 as she gave up single
runs in the first, fourth, sixth and
seventh innings. She relinquished
only seven hits but her team com-
mitted five errors behind her.
Mona Jackson got the only hit
in the game, a single in the third
inning.
The third game on Friday saw
Stacey Boyette lose her first game
of the season to Westen Illinois
bv a 5-3 count.
The Lady Bucs scored first in
the contest when Murray reached
base and scored on errors.
However, Western Illinois
same back to score two runs in
the second and three in the fourth
to take control of the game.
The Ladv Pirates attempted to
rally in the seventh with the aid oi
four walks, but could only score
two runs.
Murray and Kee had the only
two hits of the game.
Saturday saw ECU gain a 4-2
victory over Bowling Green.
Graves upped her record to 8-2 as
she gave up only two hits and two
runs in the fifth inning. She
struck out three batters.
The game began with a Ozment
single. After two outs, Kee singl-
ed her home for a 1-0 lead.
The Pirates added three more
runs in the second. Mickey Ford
began the inning by getting hit bv
a pitch. Two outs later, Murray
walked. Hughes then doubled
both of them home and scored on
a single by Linda Barrett to make
the score 4-0.
Ozment led the hitting with
two singles.
Nationally ranked Nichols
State then ended the tournament
for ECU by topping the Bucs
with a 7-5 margin.
Boyette's pitching record dip-
ped to 8-2 as she gave up three
runs in the first, one in the second
and three in the fourth. Nichols
State had 10 hits overall.
ECU countered with three runs
on four hits in the third inning,
and two runs on three hits in the
seventh. But it was too little, too
Spring Practice Begins;
Baker Happy Thus Far
Bv SCOTT COOPER
s�octa Ml lor
Art Baker and the ECU Pirate
football squad have been hard at
-vork as they have already began
pring workouts in hopes to build
an improve upon last year's
dismal 2-9 campaign.
The Bucs are hard at work as
:hey hit the field the field on
lues Wed Fri. and Sat. for a
controlled scrimmage. After just
a few days of practice, coach
Baker is pleased with what he has
seen � especially in the offensive
iine.
"The most pleasant surprise is
'he play of our offensive line
Baker commented, "the big
reason is that Rich Autry return-
ed. He's a little rusty, but he real-
I) looks good. Bourgeois,
Thomas and Struyk are all
veterans and are playing like
�eterans.
"The positives far outweigh
the negatives Baker continued
about his early spring-practice
sessions. "Their (the players) at-
t'tudes are better about
'hemselves. I've tried to instill
that for the past year
Although the Pirates Finished
the 1985 season with a nine-game
losing streak (the longest among
Division-I schools), they have
been quite aggressive in their
workouts, according to Baker.
"The team really truly has
been more aggressive than
they've been since I've been
here Baker explained. "When
they're more aggressive, they
seem to know what they're doing
� and they ought to
It's no surprise that in order
for ECU to be successful, they
will need an improved passing
game. Coach Baker said, "We
have to be a better team offen-
sively � throwing the ball. We
need a passing game with the op-
tion. It will really be a key (in
order) for us to succeed with our
schedule
Talk about a schedule. ECU's
gets as tough as ever, including
top-notch teams like West
Virginia, Auburn, Penn State
and Miami. The Pirates will
definitely have their work cut out
for them.
"They've been through that
before and we're determined
Baker said in question to the 1986
schedule. "Most (players) want a
winning season and begin to turn
this program around. We want to
beat the teams we're capable of,
and upset at least one team that
we're not supposed to beat
Coach Baker spoke of some
other apects that have particular-
ly pleased him. The improvement
of the tight ends, quarterbacks
and the immediate help of some
needed newcomers are areas in
which Baker expressed his praise.
"Another area that has been
pleasing is the play of the tight
ends. I attribute a great deal of
that success to our new coach
Mark McHale Baker said,
"he's made a positive impact on
our staff.
"The quarterback play, no one
has really jumped out, but Berke
Holtzclaw picked up where he
left off. Brad Walsh, Travis
Hunter and Ron (Jones) have
See NEWCOMERS, page 13
late as their record fell to 164 on
the season.
Boyette had two hits to help
her own cause.
The Pirates return to action
this Friday when they host Ohio
University in a scheduled
doubleheader at 2 p.m.
CAA Player
Of The Week
ECU's senior pitcher power-
hitter Winfred Johnson has been
named the CAA player-of-the-
week.
The Elizabeth town, native hit
400 in four games last week, in-
cluding three home runs, 10
RBI's and one pitching victory.
His win over Richmond was his
28th which ties him (with Mickey
Brut 80) for the school's
record.
Johnson is currently 4-0 and is
batting over .350 with seven
homers and 33 RBI's, including
five game-winning hits. He is just
two home runs and two pitching
victories shv oi reaching 60
roundtrippers and 30 wins in his
career at ECU.
Sports Fact
Tues. March 25, 11
For the first time, two teams
from the same state meet in the
NCAA final: defending cham-
pion Ohio State, led by Jerry
Lucas and John Havlicek. loses
to Cincinnati, 70-65, in over-
time after winning 32 games in
a row. The following year the
same two teams once again
meet in the final, with Cincin-
nati winning, 71-59.
syfKOH
Spiders Sting Bucs
By TONY BROWN
Sparta Writer
ECU's baseball season-
opening record win streak was
stopped short by a 4-3 Richmond
win Saturday, but not before the
Pirates won the opener of the
twinbill 2-1 to set a new all-time
winning streak of 15 straight.
ECU added a 9-8 win over Ver-
mont on Sunday and topped Slip-
pery Rock on Monday to run its
season mark to 17-1, though.
The Rockets of Slippery Rock
through another spear into the
Pirates yesterday, but ECU came
back for a 5-2 win, raising their
season mark to 17-1.
Slippery Rock jumped in front
in the top of the first on a single
and a home run by Mike Stewart,
which appeared to catcher Jim
Riley to be slightly foul, for a 2-0
lead.
ECU cut the lead in the third
with a run. Mark Cockrell singled
with one out and moved up on an
out. Mont Carter then singled
him in, making it 2-1 Rockets.
The Pirates got a runner to
third in the fifth as Steve Sides
walked to lead oft, then stole se-
cond and later took third on an
out. Pinch hitter Dean Fhehalt
walked and ECU tried a double
steal, but Sides was caught at
home.
The Pirates finally went ahead
in the sith. With one out, Chris
Bradberrv was hit by reliever Bob
Owens, then Winfred Johnson
and Mike Sullivan singled, the
later tying it up. Jay McGraw
doubled in Jo mson and Sullivan
for a 4-2 Pirate lead
The final Pirate run came in
the eighth. Johnson led oii with a
double and Sullivan singled, put-
ting Johnson on third, and then
scored on a ground out. In the
bottom ot the ninth, reliever
Keith Schaffer mowed down
three straight to end the Rockets'
hopes.
McGraw led the Pirate hitters
with two RBI's on a double and a
single Johnson was 2-2 with a
double, while Sullivan had two
singles. The winning pitcher was
freshman Jake Jacobs who pick-
ed up his second victory with no
losses while Schaffer picked up
the first Pirate save oi the year.
Reliever Owens dropped to 0-1
for the Rockets.
"Jacobs pitched superbly
coach Garv Oveton said. "When
he fell behind 2-0, it didn't faze
him. He took control of the
game.
"I went out to the mound
when their were two men on in
�23
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-s
the seventh � he said he was get-
ting tired Overton added. "I
told him the ne t batter would
bunt and then I wanted him to
pitch to the No. 2 hitter before I
brought in Schaffer
As to why the Pirate bats have
been quieter in the past few
gamws, Overton credits the op-
position pitching staff. "We sav
their best he said. "Anytime
you can see a team's best and stil
win, you know you're doing
something right
In the opener Saturday, it ap-
peared that the Pirates would
have no problems winning when
David Ritchie walked to lead off
the bottom of the first and im-
mediately scored on Greg Har-
dison's single, but Richmond
hurler Ted Lowe got out of
numerous jams after that, only
giving up one more run.
Fortunately for ECU, pitcher
Winfred Johnson had a good day
as well. After Brian Jordan had
opened with a single and stole se-
cond in the first inning, Johnson
struck out two straight before
getting a flyball to end the threat.
The Spiders got another lead-
off single in the third, but after a
sacrifice which moved him up,
another strikeout and grounder
left the runner stranded.
Three consecutive singles by
David Ritchie, Hardison and
Chris Bradberrv loaded the bases
for ECU in the third, but
doubleplay got the runners at
home and first. Jay McGraw was
intentionally walked, but a
flyball ended the frame.
Ricmond got another runner to
second in the fifth on an error
and a sacrifice bunt, but two
straight strikeouts killed the
Spider threat once more
Richmond finally tied it in the
sixth on a homer bv Jordon, bul
could score no more.
The Pirates had an excellent
opportunity m the sixth to tie,
getting Steve Sides 10 third on a
single, steal and sacrifice bunt,
but a failed suicide sqeeze caught
him trying to make it home.
The winning run came across
for ECU in the seventh, though.
Ritchie led off with a walk and
moved to second on an error. Jim
Merritt came in as a relief pitcher
with two balls on Chris
Bradberrv. but Bradberrv pushed
a bunt down the third base line
for a hit. Johnson won his own
game then with a single for the
2-1 final score.
The Pirates collected 10 hits,
all singles. Bradberrv had three,
with Ritchie, Haruison and Sides
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The ECU Pirate football team will try to rebound from their 2-9 season. With spring practice just beginn-
ing, Art Baker Is pleased with their performance thus far and hopes it will continue throughout the tough
1986 campaign.
two each. Jordon led Richmond
with a homer and a single.
Johnson went to 4-0 on the
year and 28 career victories,
which ties the ECU school record
for career wins. Ted Lowe was
tagged with the loss for the
Spiders.
In the second game, the
Pirates' habit of leaving men
stranded in scoring position Final-
ly brought the perfect string of
victories to an end in a 4-3 loss.
Jim Peterson threw fairly good
for ECU, giving up only three
singles and a homerun, but allow-
ed seven walks as well, two com-
ing in the fourth inning which
resulted in scores.
Peterson got into trouble im-
mediately when Jordan led off
with a single and moved to se-
cond on an out. However, a
doubleplay temporarily halted
the Spiders.
In the bottom of the frame, the
Pirates threatened. Mont Carter
opened by getting on via an error
and stole second, then Johnson
walked, but a grounder left them
stranded.
In the fourth, Richmond
scored all their runs, with the
help of two walks with no outs. A
sacrifice fly by Andy Malloy
moved the runners up and a
single by John Knvak made it
2-0. Greg Harding hit what prov-
ed to be the game-winning homer
for a 4-0 Spider lead.
ECU rallied in the sixth, but
fell just short of tying it up. Har-
dison, who had already set a
career record in doubles earlier
this season, got another one to
open the frame. Bradberrv was
hit by a pitch, then Johnson got a
double to cut it to 4-2.
David Dip came in to relieve
starter C.P. Richardson, but
Mike Sullivan got a hit to make it
4-3 with no outs. Sullivan got to
third after a sacrifice bunt, but a
grounder and a flyball ended the
rally.
The last chance for the Pirates
came in the last inning when
Mont Carter hit a one-out single
and stole second, but was left
stranded, leaving ECU on the
short end of a 4-3 score.
Peterson dropped to 4-1 with
the loss, while Richardson bet-
tered his record to 1-1.
ECU's all-important CAA con-
ference record now stands at 3-1,
which probably dropped the
Pirates out of first place, pending
the results of recent league play.
The Spiders are 1-1 in CAA play.
In the second game, the
Pirates' habit of leaving men
stranded in scoring position final-
ly brought the perfect string of
victories to an end in a 4-3 loss.
Jim Peterson threw fairly good
for ECU, giving up only three
singles and a homerun, but allow-
ed seven walks as well, two com-
ing in the fourth inning which
resulted in scores.
Peterson got into trouble im-
mediately when Jordan led off
with a single and moved to se-
cond with out on the first of
those walks, but a doubleplay
temporarily halted the Spiders.
In the bottom of the frame, the
Pirates threatened. Mont Carter
opened by getting on via an error
and stole second, then Johnson
walked, but a grounder left them
stranded.
In the fourth, Richmond
scored all their runs, with the
help of two walks with no outs. A
sacrifice fly by Andy Malloy
moved the runners up and a
single by John Knvak made it
2-0. Greg Harding hit what prov-
ed to be the game-winning homer
for a 4-0 Spider lead.
ECU rallied in the sixth, but
fell just short of tying it up. Har-
dison, who had already set a
career record in doubles earlier
this season, got another one to
open the frame. Bradberry was
hit by a pitch, then Johnson got a
double to cut it to 4-2.
David Dip came in to relieve
starter C.P. Richardson, but
Mike Sullivan got a hit to make it
4-3 with no outs. Sullivan got to
third after a sacrifice bunt, but a
grounder and a flyball ended the
rally.
The last chance for the Pirates
came in the last inning when
Mont Carter hit a one-out single
and stole second, but was left
stranded, leaving ECU on the
See PIRATES, page 14
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THE EAST I ARCH INI AN
Sports
MARCH 25, I986
Page ll
Winning Streak Snapped
Winfred Johnson rares back in action against the University of Richmond.
Softballers Struggle In Florida
B LANCE SEARI
The ECU Lady Pirate softball
m travelled to Tallahassee,
1 la this past weekend � setting
ts sights on a possible post-
season birth.
The Pirates ran into some stiff
petition, however, and came
)ack to Greenville with only two
ones in five games.
The weekend began well for
I as they defeated Stetson on
Jay by a 4-0 score. Winning
p.tcher Stacey Boyette gave up
I) one hit in raising her record
-0. She struck out three Stet-
son batters.
The game was a scoreless
eadlock until ECU erupted for
four runs in the top of the
seventh.
Eva Hughes, who led the
Pirates in hitting with two. ig-
nited the winning rally with a
single. After Sandy Kee and Kim
Adams singled, Wendy Oment
talked to force in Hughes. Jean-
nie Murray, the Pirate's leading
hitter this vear, then cleared the
bases with a double.
The second game on Friday
was against the University of
Massachusetts and thanks to 13
strike outs by pitcher Lisa Rever,
he Pirates mounted no scoring
threats throughout the contest,
sing 4-0.
Pitcher Robin Graves' record
fell to 7-2 as she gave up single
runs in the first, fourth, sixth and
seventh innings. She relinquished
. seven hits but her team com-
muted five errors behind her.
Mona Jackson got the only hit
:n the game, a single in the third
nning.
The third game on Friday saw
Stacey Boyette lose her first game
of the season to Westen Illinois
by a 5-3 count.
The Lady Bucs scored first in
the contest when Murray reached
base and scored on errors.
However, Western Illinois
came back to score two runs in
the second and three in the fourth
to take control of the game.
The Lady Pirates attempted to
rally in the seventh with the aid of
four walks, but could only score
two runs.
Murray and Kee had the only
two hits of the game.
Saturday saw ECU gain a 4-2
victory over Bowling Green.
Graves upped her record to 8-2 as
she gave up only two hits and two
runs in the fifth inning. She
struck out three batters.
The game began with a Ozment
single. After two outs, Kee singl-
ed her home for a 1-0 lead.
The Pirates added three more
runs in the second. Mickey Ford
began the inning by getting hit by
a pitch. Two outs later, Murray
walked. Hughes then doubled
both of them home and scored on
a single by Linda Barrett to make
the score 4-0.
Ozment led the hitting with
two singles.
Nationally ranked Nichols
State then ended the tournament
for ECU by topping the Bucs
with a 7-5 margin.
Boyette's pitching record dip-
ped to 8-2 as she gave up three
runs in the first, one in the second
and three in the fourth. Nichols
State had 10 hits overall.
ECU countered with three runs
on four hits in the third inning,
and two runs on three hits in the
seventh. But it was too little, too
Spring Practice Begins;
Baker Happy Thus Far
B SCOTT COOPER
Art Baker and the ECU Pirate
football squad have been hard at
�vork as they have already began
.pnng workouts in hopes to build
an improve upon last year's
dismal 2-9 campaign.
The Bucs are hard at work as
hey hit the field the field on
rues Wed Fri. and Sat. for a
controlled scrimmage. After just
a few days of practice, coach
Baker is pleased with what he has
een � especially in the offensive
nne.
"The most pleasant surprise is
the play of our offensive line
Baker commented, "the big
reason is that Rich Autry return-
's He's a little rusty, but he real-
ly looks good. Bourgeois,
Thomas and Struyk are all
eterans and are playing like
�eterans.
"The positives far outweigh
the negatives Baker continued
about his early spring-practice
sessions. "Their (the players) at-
itudes are better about
hemselves. I've tried to instill
'hat for the past year
Although the Pirates finished
the 1985 season with a nine-game
osing streak (the longest among
Division-I schools), they have
been quite aggressive in their
workouts, according to Baker.
"The team really truly has
been more aggressive than
they've been since I've been
here Baker explained. "When
they're more aggressive, they
seem to know what they're doing
� and they ought to
It's no surprise that in order
for ECU to be successful, they
will need an improved passing
game. Coach Baker said, "We
have to be a better team offen-
sively � throwing the ball. We
need a passing game with the op-
tion. It will really be a key (in
order) for us to succeed with our
schedule
Talk about a schedule. ECU's
gets as tough as ever, including
top-notch teams like West
Virginia, Auburn, Penn State
and Miami. The Pirates will
definitely have their work cut out
for them.
"They've been through that
before and we're determined
Baker said in question to the 1986
schedule. "Most (players) want a
winning season and begin to turn
this program around. We want to
beat the teams we're capable of,
and upset at least one team that
we're not supposed to beat
Coach Baker spoke of some
other apects that have particular-
ly pleased him. The improvement
of the tight ends, quarterbacks
and the immediate help of some
needed newcomers are areas in
which Baker expressed his praise.
"Another area that has been
pleasing is the play of the tight
ends. I attribute a great deal of
that success to our new coach
Mark McHale Baker said,
"he's made a positive impact on
our staff.
"The quarterback play, no one
has really jumped out, but Berke
Holtzclaw picked up where he
left off. Brad Walsh, Travis
Hunter and Ron (Jones) have
See NEWCOMERS, page 13
late as their record fell to 16-4 on
the season.
Boyette had two hits to help
her own cause.
The Pirates return to action
this Friday when they host Ohio
University in a scheduled
doubleheader at 2 p.m.
CAA Player
Of The Week
ECU's senior pitcher power-
hitter Winfred Johnson has been
named the CAA plaver-of-the-
week.
The Elizabethtown, native hit
400 in four games last week, in-
cluding three home runs, 10
RBI's and one pitching victory.
His win over Richmond was his
28th which ties him (with Mickey
Brut T7-80) for the school's
record.
Johnson is currently 4-0 and is
batting over .350 with seven
homers and 33 RBI's, including
five game-winning hits. He is just
two home runs and two pitching
victories shy of reaching 6(
roundtnppers and 30 wins in his
career at ECU
Sports Fact
Tues. March 25, 11
For the first time, two teams
from the same state meet in the
NCAA final: defending cham-
pion Ohio State, led by Jerry-
Lucas and John Havlicek, loses
to Cincinnati, 70-65, in over-
time after winning 32 games in
a row. The following year the
same two teams once again
meet in the final, with Cincin-
nati winning, 71-59.
M
Spiders Sting Bucs
By TONY BROW N
Sport Writer
ECU's baseball season-
opening record win streak was
stopped short by a 4-3 Richmond
win Saturday, but not before the
Pirates won the opener of the
twinbill 2-1 to set a new all-time
winning streak of 15 straight.
ECU added a 9-8 win over Ver-
mont on Sunday and topped Slip-
pery Rock on Monday to run its
season mark to 17-1, though.
The Rockets of Slippery Rock
through another spear into the
Pirates yesterday, but ECU came
back for a 5-2 win, raising their
season mark to 17-1.
Slippery Rock jumped in front
in the top of the first on a single
and a home run by Mike Stewart,
which appeared to catcher Jim
Riley to be slightly foul, for a 2-0
lead.
ECU cut the lead in the third
with a run. Mark Cockrell singled
with one out and moved up on an
out. Mont Carter then singled
him in, making it 2-1 Rockets
The Pirates got a runner to
third in the fifth as Steve Sides
walked to lead off, then stole se-
cond and later took third on an
out. Pinch hitter Dean F.hehalt
walked and ECU tried a double
steal, but Sides was caught at
home.
The Pirates finally went ahead
in the sith. With one out, Chris
Bradberry was hit by reliever Bob
Owens, then Winfred Johnson
and Mike Sullivan singled, the
later tying it up. Jay McGraw
doubled in Johnson and Sullivan
for a 4-2 Pirate lead
The final Pirate run came in
the eighth Johnson led off with a
double and Sullivan singled, put-
ting Johnson on third, and then
scored on a ground out. In the
bottom ol the ninth, reliever
Keith Schaffer mowed down
three straight to end the Rockets'
hopes.
McGraw led the Pirate hitters
with two RBI's on a double and a
single Johnson was 2-2 with a
double, while Sullivan had two
singles. The winning pitcher was
freshman Jake Jacobs who pick-
ed up his second victory with no
losses while Schaffer picked up
the first Pirate save of the year.
Reliever Owens dropped to 0-1
for the Rockets.
"Jacobs pitched superbly
coach Gary Oveton said. "When
he fell behind 24), it didn't faze
him. He took control o' the
game
"I went out to the mound
when their were two men on in
�23
?'
O"
the seventh � he said he was get-
ting tired Overton added. "I
told him the ne t batter would
bunt and then 1 wanted him to
pitch to the No. 2 hitter before I
brought in Schaffer
As to why the Pirate bats have
been quieter in the past few
gamws, Overton credits the op-
position pitching staff. "We sav
their best he said. "Anytime
you can see a team's best and stil
win, you know you're doinj
something right
In the opener Saturday, it ap-
peared that the Pirates would
have no problems winning when
David Ritchie walked to lead off
the bottom of the first and im-
mediately scored on Greg Har-
dison's single, but Richmond
hurler Ted Lowe got out of
numerous jams after that, only
giving up one more run.
Fortunately for ECU, pitcher
Winfred Johnson had a good day
as well. After Brian Jordan had
opened with a single and stole se-
cond in the first inning, Johnson
struck out two straight before
getting a fiyball to end the threat.
The Spiders got another lead-
off single in the third, but after a
sacrifice which moved him up,
another strikeout and grounder
left the runner stranded.
Three consecutive singles by
David Ritchie, Hardison and
Chris Bradberry loaded the bases
for ECU in the third, but
doubleplay got the runners at
home and first. Jay McGraw was
intentionally walked, but a
fivball ended the frame.
Ricmond got another runner to
second in the fifth on an error
and a sacrifice bunt, but two
straight strikeouts killed the
Spider threat once more.
Richmond finally tied it in the
sixth on a homer by Jordon, but
could score no more.
The Pirates had an excellent
opportunity in the sixth to tie,
getting Steve Sides to third on a
single, steal and sacrifice bunt,
but a failed suicide sqeeze caught
him trying to make it home.
The winning run came across
for ECU in the seventh, though.
Ritchie led off with a walk and
moved to second on an error. Jim
Merntt came in as a relief pitcher
with two b a IIs on Chris
Bradberry. but Bradberry pushed
a bunt down the third base line
for a hit. Johnson won his own
game then with a single for the
2-1 final score.
The Pirates collected 10 hits.
all singles. Bradberry had three.
with Ritchie. Harjison and Sides
lie East CVoIiniflti
�� �
5? WWjJttS UlHRT WHL6E
fM'Mfll STATE.0PTHfc
V1RHTE5 AFTER FINISHING '
on U-? MnRK 5HUT0N
RRVQmT �
b
u
The ECU Pirate football team will try to rebound from their 2-9 season. With spring practice Just beginn-
ing, Art Baker is pleased with their performance thus far and hopes it will continue throughout the tough
1986 campaign.
two each. Jordon led Richmond
with a homer and a single.
Johnson went to 4-0 on the
year and 28 career victories,
which ties the ECU school record
for career wins. Ted Lowe was
tagged w th the loss for the
Spiders.
In the second game, the
Pirates' habit of leaving men
stranded in scoring position final-
ly brought the perfect string of
victories to an end in a 4-3 loss.
Jim Peterson threw fairly good
for ECU, giving up only three
singles and a homerun, but allow-
ed seven walks as well, two com-
ing in the fourth inning which
resulted in scores.
Peterson got into trouble im-
mediately when Jordan led off
with a single and moved to se-
cond on an out. However, a
doubleplay temporarily halted
the Spiders.
In the bottom of the frame, the
Pirates threatened. Mont Carter
opened by getting on via an error
and stole second, then Johnson
walked, but a grounder left them
stranded.
In the fourth, Richmond
scored all their runs, with the
help of two walks with no outs. A
sacrifice fly by Andy Malloy
moved the runners up and a
single by John Krivak made it
2-0. Greg Harding hit what prov-
ed to be the game-winning homer
for a 4-0 Spider lead.
ECU rallied in the sixth, but
fell just short of tying it up. Har-
dison, who had already set a
career record in doubles earlier
this season, got another one to
open the frame. Bradberry was
hit by a pitch, then Johnson got a
double to cut it to 4-2.
David Dip came in to relieve
starter C.P. Richardson, but
Mike Sullivan got a hit to make it
4-3 with no outs. Sullivan got to
third after a sacrifice bunt, but a
grounder and a fiyball ended the
rally.
The last chance for the Pirates
came in the last inning when
Mont Carter hit a one-out single
and stole second, but was left
stranded, leaving ECU on the
short end of a 4-3 score.
Peterson dropped to 4-1 with
the loss, while Richardson bet-
tered his record to 1-1.
ECU's all-important CAA con-
ference record now stands at 3-1,
which probably dropped the
Pirates out of first place, pending
the results of recent league play.
The Spiders are 1-1 in CAA play.
In the second game, the
Pirates' habit of leaving men
stranded in scoring position final-
ly brought the perfect string of
victories to an end in a 4-3 loss.
Jim Peterson threw fairly good
for ECU, giving up only three
singles and a homerun, but allow-
ed seven walks as well, two com-
ing in the fourth inning which
resulted in scores.
Peterson got into trouble im-
mediately when Jordan led off
with a single and moved to se-
cond with out on the first of
those walks, but a doubleplay
temporarily halted the Spiders.
In the bottom of the frame, the
Pirates threatened. Mont Carter
opened by getting on via an error
and stole second, then Johnson
walked, but a grounder left them
stranded.
In the fourth, Richmond
scored all their runs, with the
help of two walks with no outs. A
sacrifice fly by Andy Malloy
moved the runners up and a
single by John Krivak made it
2-0. Greg Harding hit what prov-
ed to be the game-winning homer
for a 4-0 Spider lead.
ECU rallied in the sixth, but
fell just short of tying it up. Har-
dison, who had already set a
career record in doubles earlier
this season, got another one to
open the frame. Bradberry was
hit by a pitch, then Johnson got a
double to cut it to 4-2.
David Dip came in to relieve
starter C.P. Richardson, but
Mike Sullivan got a hit to make it
4-3 with no outs. Sullivan got to
third after a sacrifice bunt, but a
grounder and a fiyball ended the
rally.
The last chance for the Pirates
came in the last inning when
Mont Carter hit a one-out single
and stole second, but was left
stranded, leaving ECU on the
See PIRATES,
14
)
fkjjfgg�0riBMN " "
- .�-�����.�.��
-






12
I HI t AM l K(1 INIAN
MAKl H 25, i-M
Sledge: A Basketball Mainstay
By JANET SIMPSON . �.r, .1. . e
By JANET SIMPSON
The tear of having the ball
leave your hand and bounce on
the floor, or knowing it
and go down the lane he will be
waiting foi sou. are two oi the
feelings K I defensive stopp
Keith Sledge, strikes into oppos
ing teams
"I think Keith Sledge e
emphfies someone who plays
because he works hard stated
Coach Charlie Harrison about
his junior small forward "When
Keith first came here, he was not
verv tough and not fundamental
l sound, but he's shown what
hard work and summei dedica
tion can do Harrison added
"He has probably made more im-
provement on the basketball
:ourt and in the classroom as any
kid we've had here in the last foui
01 five years
C oming to ECl to play
basketball was Sledge's choice
for a numbei ol reasons. I he in
teresl shown in him b the
coaching staff here, as well the
campus' location being close to
his home in Roanoke Rapids
were two ol the majoi ones.
Sledge feels the Pirate basket
ball team played well during the
1985-86 season. "1 think we lost a
couple ol games that we
shouldn't have If we had won
'hose games, maybe we would
have gotten an Nl I bid stated
Sledge
fwo ol those losses came to
Cornell and Bucknell during the
Siena College Tournament back
Sledge shows his dunking ability against I (-Wilmington in earlier
action in Minges Coliseum.
OX
OX
Discover a non-hazing fraternity
that is more than just a party.
Theta Chi Fraternin
InformationOrganization meeting
Wed. March 26, 8 p.m. Mendenhall
or call 752-6635
OX, Substance, Not Image
Welcome all undergraduate men
ox ox
NEW & USED
R�tr�ad Tlr��
$7.00 k UP
V � .
SERVlCESPtqVi
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Complete 5 Po.ni �jELoQ
Brake Safetv $L4.00
w Check swF55
-fooK- Cylinder
CAR SHAKES?!
E$14.88 U and Hinder
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For
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Tires
Align me
ient l �
lightly higher , available
v v v v Easter Special v v &
for ECU Students & Faculty
3f MCIAI N0RIH CAROLINA SJAU IMSPICIION STATiCH
Wf StAVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
SFGoodrich
TIRE CENTER
SATURDAY
� 00 AM I NPM
OPENMON FHI
IMA M J0P M
"Consider us your cat
J Home Away From Home ' k
Cog gins Car Care
756-5244
320 West (jfHnvt)ie Btvd
in December. "We should have
won that tournament said
Slegde. "We were picked to win,
but we went up there and didn't
do what we were supposed to
and picked up two crucial
losses
Sledge also fell he had a good
season individually. "Mainly I
tried to concentrate on my
defense because the coach wanted
me to go out and trv to wear
down the other team's best
players recalled Sledge. "Of-
fensively, I think I did okay too. 1
had my games, but I really didn't
look for my shot that often. I was
just looking to pass the ball and
Mich. "
Statistically speaking, Slegde
did have a good season. He ended
his third season here at E I
averaging 7.5 points and 3.2 re
bounds a game. He was hitting
r7.8 from the free-throw line and
51.2 from the Held. Sledge also
grabbed N4 rebounds and handed
out sd assists while averaging 2"
minutes per game.
Siedge was m double figures in
si games. He had 14 against
SMU, 12 against Campbell. Rich-
mond, and George Mason, as
well as 10 in games against James
Madison and Na .
� boul with the flu and a knee
injury slowed Sledge up
somewhat; however, e dealt
both. He played in pain with
the knee, but I id let the flu
run it's course
"The knee injury was more
nor informed Sledge. "1
could play wit I regardless,
but I wasn't ai 100 percent.
The flu knocked me on my
but Sledge continued "I
couldn't gel anyth ng done It
k me aboul a weel I ;et hack
into the flow
� key
M i
S
men
i i tdd
our point guard Tony Robinson
to bring the ball up and try to
penetrate and score stated
Slegde. "He threw the ball in
bounds to me and I didn't 'hrow
it back to him. I just dribbled up
and took a jumper from the top
of the key and made it, winning
the game
Knowing he will be looked
upon for more leadership next
season, Sledge feels up to handl-
ing his role as a senior leader. "I
think I'll be able to fulfill the
task he stated. "I think I show-
ed some leadership this year.
During a couple 'if' days in prac-
tice, some of the guys were down
on themselves and coach told me
that with my hustle I picked
everything up and increased the
pace o practice "
work on his ballhandhng this
summer so we can move him to
the two (big guard) where 1
think he'd be more oi a (actor in
our offensive scheme oi things
"I think Keith Sledge is a very
important part of our team.
stated Turnbill. "We counl
him for his outside shot,
maybe more importantly,
defense. Keith is our defensive
stopper. He comes up with trie
big plays for us, such as the a;
oop dunks, but he also has to be
up to the task of defending
hn Newman (Richn

has ilway: doni a rea
-
he'
"Keith Sledge exemplifies
someone who plays well
because he works hard. "
�Charlie Harrison
Sledge is already looking for-
ward to next season and thinks
it's going to be a good one.
'Next year I think we're going to
have a great season. 1 can't
wait stated Sledge. "I'm just
ready. I'm always ready, I wish
we could start tomorrow. We
would start tomorrow if it were
up to me
Both Marchell Henry and Jack
I urnbill feel Keith Sledge is
definitely important to ECl
basketball Henry and Sledge are
roommates and Sledge and Turn-
bill have been friends since
kindei gai ten.
"1 think Keith was an .ypo
� our team this year
d Henry " I think he was
�ved bv a couple
is though.
"I feel next year we'll see a dif-
'ni Keitl . - me thai will be
ked up score more
Heruv added. "Hopetullv he wi
FREE
RENT
Going Home For The Summer
But Need A Place For The Fall?
Tar River Estates ha
ECU students - Rent a
keep your appartmenr RENT FREE I
July' For details call or c
Estates Info Center 1400 V
752-4225
Tired of a
bel
place at Tar F
me' t or a tv
- �
spac .
TarTvivery
Classifieds
PhRVjSM.S
� H
K A

SIG
V
NT



ROSS
� � ' -




Crit

VO'E
Pepsi
Cola
girl:
T O V - N G F

STACt �
PAN.c
FAC. �
Beat the Summ
Increase
Have a
Blessed Easter
Reserve vour apartmer-
fall occupancy at today's rai
Now accepting a limited
deposits for fall occupancy
an appointment
752-5100
Eastforook Apartme
Village Green Apoi





or ECU
THE HAST AROl.INIAN
MAR( H2?, 1986
13
Classifieds
ile like
id) and
d Keith
good
'Keith
huik
even a
eas
o have
d, but,
PERSONALS
iCkb
ENT
or The Summer
ce For The Fall?
HI KAPPA TAU LIL SISTERS:
� "i rgel the meeting tomorrow
Do sot "hursciavs partv will
A LITTLE SISTERS Remember
� �' meeting is Tuesday
a1 - I �� n Ar are planning
riC Sprang with the
KAPPA ALPHA CALENDER
I - tures will be taken on
5 7 p.m and Wed
I 30 5 p.m at the Attic.
. at our conve
' rested women it you
ike the meeting, come
are welcome Dress
� ik Vou
'NFC. STUDENTS: Get ready
it this Spring's biggest
Budweiser Backyard
immg soon
TAU BROTHERS AND LIL
�TERS Be ready to start oft
a part nite with
fl ers and little sisters
� �' - � ' . to party.
RENT FREE
&
ar
Turkey
Dinner
$
21"
"Il�
er
M

Whole Milk
or Buttermilk
99
na Prices
�' 'hru SJt
Mat :� '6
AU LIL SISTERS ring on
Behear aDou
r i'
HAPPY HOURPRICES AT CUB
, � ' . 6th from 11 and Bottles � j support
�S Junior
NEWGREEKSORORITY ZETA BE '��� NG IN ONDUCTED BY A
EPRESENTATIVE NESTED GIRLS "� ' &824
� . mor
Please
: ople can get � i guys, 3 t'stimi ause the B � � Lefs get � � - de
BOXING TOURNA es Wed .���. Coi ' OUt and H meboys � April � � irly U now, $4
' s for a � floor at nao a good � ao met you , � oe i Fonnie
PSYC. 1050, 1051 STUDENTS: Don't
lorget the research projects you've
signed up for to receive extra credit
on March 27 Additional persons are
needed!
CHUGGING CONTEST: The follow
ing teams need to be at Pantana
Bob's on Wednesday, March 26th:
Alpha Sgma Pi, Pi Kappa Alpha,
Zeta Beta Tau, Beta Theta Pi, Kap
pa Alpha, Delta Sigma Pi, Sigma
Tau Gamma, Sigma Phi EpsHon,
Alpha Omicron Pi, Delta Zeta,
Sigma Sigma Sigma, and Zeta Tau
Alpha Please check your team in
between 10 10 30 at The Gazebo in
back
ATTENTION SCUBA DIVERS
The Coral Reef Dive Club is holding
a meeting Wed. April 9 at 5 in
Mendenhall's Multi purpose room.
Members are asked to attend. All
those interested are welcome.
PAM: Hilton Head was a blast. Fuz
zy Navels were squeezed until the
last Now it's time to relax Hope our
"fun is not just for the past
Dinger. PS We were bumped onto
a hip of new developments.
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA: Get ready
tor one wild sociai this Wednesday
The Pi Kapps are ready to party all
night long! Gee Wally, isn't Greek
life swell
PI KAPPA PHI: The Brothers of Pi
Kappa Phi are advising all people
who are looking for a fun time to be
at our happy hour at Pantana Bob's
tonight! ! It's our first annual "Last
Chance to See Halley's Comet
Party" Come out and party till you
see stars!
SRASEMI FORMAL PROOFS ARE
BACK Come by room 224
Mendenhall to order. Someone will
be in the office from 11 3 p.m. on
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday
Money is due at time of ordering
WANTED
1T � . arty a " the Chi
Mflpp Hour at The Alley
�� there ai l help us slam
HECK OUT THE HOT BODS: This
iM thi Teqt a Bar's
resi Ask al tour n ghtly
E STEVE CUNANAN: Vote
�- . lent and
�� .� P-sident
� iid vote for
� - � � � � I special ii
GIRLS FED EX'R SSS tor
EAS - ND? Enter the
Tequna Bar s B kini Contest. Can or
come Dy to sign up (757 0090 or
. -
TO MY ANGEL JEFF: The past
seven months have been the Dest
possible ever Thanks for making
my freshman �ear extra special. I
L H Your jgar
STACEY: v � illy realized thata
man deserves a real woman i
accepl �� honor SNAKE
PANTANA BOB'S Presents Beer
and Wme night Wed March 26th. $2
Bud pitchers, 52 wme carafes, and
75c 16oz wme coolers "Bringing
A Better Buzz At Better
Pices "
FACULTY AND STAFF: The
Panhellenic CouncM is sponsoring an
Easter Egg Hunt for your children
on Thursday, March 27. 1986 at 5
d m. on the North Mall in front of
ing Dorm Please make plans
n us! HAPPY EASTER1
SUMMER JOBS FOR COLLEGE
STUDENTS: Openings available for
young men on the Food Service Staff
at CAMP SEAFARER ON THE
COAST OF NORTH CAROLINA
Good salary plus room and board.
Excellent opportunity for friends to
work together June 8 through mid
August Must be at least eighteen
years of age No experience
necessary only ambition and good
references reauired For more infor
matmn and an application, write
Camp Seafarer P.O. Box 10976, YM
CA, Rale.gh North Carolina 27605
SUMMER LIFEGUARDING JOBS:
WSl or Senior Lifeguarding cer
t.ficates required CPR required.
Tar Landing Villas, Rt. 4, Morehead
City, NC 28557 Phone 247 5295
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE:
Si35 million plus in financial aid
went unused last year Freshmen,
Sophomore, ongoing graduate
students for help cashing m on
those funds, call Academic Data
Services toll free 1 800 544 1574, ext
639, or write P O Box 16483, Chat
tanooga TN 37416
SUMMER INTERNS WANTED: At
North Carolina's largest weekly
newspaper 3 reporting, 1 circula
tion, 3 advertising). S4.50 per hour
for rising senior journalism majors
Call 919 228 7851, or send resume and
clippings to Tom or Jean Boney,
Alamance News, Box 431, Graham,
N C 27253.
HELP I lost my black kryptonite
bike lock Friday behind Belk when
break started. I need it desperately
I can't afford a new one! It anyone
has found it please call Dave at
752 3513 Thanks
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY:
Female roommate. Large private
bedroom. Rent $132.50 � Va utilities
Call 758 6224 or 757 1364 and leave
message
ROOMMATE WANTED IM
MEDIATELY: Private bedroom, no
deposit, Va utilities. Across from
pool, 5 blocks from campus. Tar
River Apts. Call Tom at 752 6681
WANTED: Students with small car
or motorbike for light deliveries.
Start immediately. Full or part
time Earnings above average. Call
830 1351
TELEPHONE SALES: Day or
night. Full or part time. Start im-
mediately. Dependability is a must!
To work from our office. 830 1351.
HELP WANTED: Care attendant
for ECU male quad living 2 blocks
from campus beginning 4 1 86.
Hours MWF 7:309:00 a.m. Pay is
$3 35 per hour. Call Jean Ellis, Pitt
County Memorial Hospital. 757 4490.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
To share nice two bedroom house.
Fenced in backyard. Dogs welcome
Nice neighborhood. About 15
minutes from campus. S185month
� '2 utilities Available April. Call
744 4695
ARE YOU A FUTURE BUSINESS
LEADER?: Established, student
managed company of over 3,000
students is looking for ECU students
for full-time summer jobs. Profes
sional training provided S4,500
average summer profit. For more
information send name, local phone
and address etc to: Summer Jobs,
Suite 141, 95 South Elliot Rd Chapel
Hill, NC 27514.
WSl NEEDED: Trinity Center, New
Episcopal summer camp in Salter
Path, NC, needs WSl to head
waterfront. Must be able to sail Sun
fish Apply: Ed Hodges, Jr , Camp
Manager, 101 East 10th St ,
Washington, NC 27889
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Beginning in May through both ses
sions summer school. Rent $125 per
month plus ' 3 utilities, no deposit re
quired Will have private bedroom,
must have your own bedroom fur
niture Contact Anne at 758 1158
WORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
perience in typing resumes, theses,
technical documents, and term
papers. We manage and merge your
names and addresses into merged
letters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards Our prices are extremely
reasonable and we always offer a 15
percent discount to ECU students. S
4 F Professional Computer Co.
(back of Franklin's) 115 E. 5th St
757 0472
SENIORS) SENIORS! SENIORS
Enjoy the last phase of your college
career employment. S&.F Com
puters is offering a package price to
help you send out your resumes in
eluding all of the following: Letter
quality typed resumes, Mail merged
cover letters (name and address of
each company as inside mailing ad
dress on letter), Letter quality typed
envelopes with company address
and your return address on
envelope, Everything folded, stuffed
and even stamped, A listing of com
panies sent to (for your follow ups)
Just bring us your handwritten
resume and cover letter and the
businesses you with to apply to and
we'll do the rest. Per resume for
your namesaddr (we stuff) $2.30
(min 10 resumes) (we stuff and
stamp) $1.90 (2 page resume prices
slightly higher). This offer absolute
ly expires March 15, 1986. S&F Com
puter Company, 115 East Fifth St
Greenville, NC 27834 757 0472
TYPING SERVICES: Resumes,
term papers, theses. Low rates
Spelling and grammatical correc
tions included Cindy 757 0398 after
5:30 p.m
FOR SALE: Carpet remnants, ail
sizes, all colors, all prices. Save
50 70 percent. The Carpet Bargain
Center, 1009 Dickinson Ave 758 0057
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
tronic typewriter Reasonable rates
Call Janice at 355 7233 after 530
FOR SALE: California Kmgwaterb
ed Bookcase back with storage
base, bevelled mattress Very mce
$750 asking $300
APARTMENT FOR RENT: 2
bedroom, 2 bath with balcony It will
be for rent May August and fits 3
comfortably $334 70 pius utilities in
eludes a swimming pool, laundry
room, sauna and tennis courts 3
blocks from campus Please call
752 0525 if you are interested
SALE
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICE: Word processing The
Dataworks specializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertations,
theses, resume's and more. All work
is computer checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary. Rates
are as low as $1 75 per page, in
eluding paper (call for specific
rates) Call Mark at 757 3440 after 7
p.m
APT. FOR RENT: Rmggold
Towers Unit A Completely furnish
ed except linens Call 637 6885.
REDUCED Now or especially
summer Full turn, air cc i
Originally $180, now $150! Right on
campus and fantastic price for Ring
gold. Females. Kathy 752 3572.
APARTMENT FOR RENT: May
August or longer Call 752 6682
DAPPER DAN'S BLOWOUT
GARAGE SALE: (Formerly at
Poorman's Flea Market) Vintage
clothing, jewelry, antiques, collec
tibles, and much more all at bargain
prices. Friday and Saturday, 8 6.
Located at 215 Britt Road, 3 miles
east from Hastings Ford down
Highway 33 in Edwards Acres. Look
for signs or call 757 3467 for direc
tions.
V0te
CUNANAN
SGA President
Walker
SGA Vice-President
"STUDENT INTEREST, not Special Interest
Newcomers Make Impact
Continued from page 11 stressing the fundamentals. He
also worked some Baker add-
ed. "The newcomers have made
an immediate impact on our
squad. Several of them have turn-
ed out to be 'superbucks' "
The returning members are
"basically the same team" as
they should supply leadership
and experienced dent. However,
a few changes and replacements
will be made when more of the
newcomers come into workouts
in August.
I After the tirst eight davs or so
of practice, coach Baker is still
believes that performing with
confidence may be a key.
"Our higgest goal is to leach
everybody a job where thev can
perform with confidence Baker
said. "We haven't quite
developed along as tar as we
would have liked � team wise
If the Bucs aggression in spring
practice, can be channelled into
their performance during the
year, ECU may be able to pull oft
some big wins For now, the
Pirate- can he seen hard at work
at the practice fields behind
Ficklen Stadium.
Welcome Students
& Faculty
SPECIALS
All You
Can Eat
Any one, or any combination of 4
Shrimp � Oysters � Trout
Clam Strips � Devil Crab
Ocean Perch � f tyty
6
Alaskan Crab Legs Or
Steamed Shrimp
AVALjOfAMEAL '
Served with Fried or Baked Potato
Cole Slaw and Hush Puppies
FAMILY RESTAURANT
GREENVILLE
105 Airport Road
758-0327
HOI RS: Sun Thurs. II a.m. to V p m.
Fri. and Sal II a.m to 10 p.m.
OtexA
a great pri�
Mon Tues Wed
8 oz.
Sirloin
$2
Includes
Baked Potato
And Texas Toast
?S1

4 yieat fitace t eatf
STEAK HOUSE
Beat the Summer Rent
Increases
Reserve your apartment for summer or
fall occupancy at today's rates
Now accepting a limited number of
deposits for fall occupancy. Call today for
an appointment
752-5100
Eastbrook Apartments
Village Green Apartments
BUCCANEER
DORM PORTRAIT CONTEST
RESIDENTS
�Win a feature story about your
dorm to be in the '86 Buccaneer
� 2 eligible winners
�1 requirement to enter �
Have Your Portrait Made
MARCH 17-27
Buccaneer office
Questions? 757-6501
.1





14
1 HI M . K1 INIAS
M H( H 25,198
Pirates
Slip Past
Vermont
l ontinued from pttgr 11
� i -i J score
1 .V �
i
4 i Mir
!e!
tcl Gar
� start ei
the
Kile
2 1. bui the
ppeai ed to b a
A
i
b Mil

fil
red Brad

v .
-
eg ate ex-
a
d. A er single b
tde ii 3-3,
Stump 1
. pincl
-
tied it
� -
Schaffe � for
EC1

�� �
McGraw.
icril b side- n
� .
i f 1 i t h e
�. �
I i
Vern
�� e yeai
sue STRTIOKI
� - x
Every Tuesday
is
College Nigh!
'( Delivery
' ' Put ' . �
7 p.m. to 11 p.m.
99C SUBS
Your Choice
Han dh
� . d ' �
Han Salami A Cheesi
Pepperoni, Salami dhe(
I urk i . ,heese
Han Turkey theese
Not alid on deliveries
60 o. pili hers SI. 99
tm 'Mir- ��
II im I! pm !� IW 4h
Women's Soccer Club Dominates
B slH'HWII IHW
I he update on intramural fan
c fool woi k I- thai 1 c I 's
Women's Socceilul as made
a second . ictoi ious trip
lav ksonv die, i defeating
I NIDAS6 1
1 . I 's Lisa (Jn
opened the ga a
luring the I ites
ol pla Renee i lessate booted
the third and i
half, VS II
ihe clovk
ECU's Connie O'Brien
dominated in the second hall
with two goals UNIDAS finally
scored in the second half, bin to
no avail. I he Pirates then return
ed the favoi with Kns Slacum
delivering the Mb point.
I he fii o home game was held
I eb 23 againsi SANDIS
1I 's O'bi ien scored the first
il dui ing the ins! four mnutes
pla (irosshandlei followed
� i second point, with less
� e minutes on the clock
Daisev Grosshandler. and
O'brien each scored before
halftime, making the score 5-0
ECU's Stacey Prenn and
Melissa Herberi started chalking
up points for ECl in the second
half, each with a successful kick
Bannon, an E I defender, and
Grosshandler made the final
points foi E I SANDIS scored
during the last foul minutes in
the game, howevei they walki
away defeated 9 1.
Anyone intrested in becoming
an IKS aeibu uhlitiylni -l.ouid
prepare a five minute r �utine in
eluding floorwork and aerobic
eercise foi the tryoul Apr 12 at
10:30 am in lux Memoiial iym
hy rm! get paid while getting
shape Work can be t i
I l;ere is foi
photographer;
department It intereste I
must schedule an appointmi
and submit a pi I nore
i
ffice. I Mai
Memonal dun
I &
. ' �
Fi im-
Swimming Pooh
P
M 1
M I
M & tt
I &
' vf SUN MARCH ?3 THRU SAT MARCH 29 AT SAV-A-CENTER IN GREENV
HI � IMI7 QUAS' ' �
�I
c
nbcr
Oast
er
the supermarket with
wniiij,
s rf
win
A
V
- M -
r
S
WAVAimnmi prices
pos Double Coupons
.
See Store For Details!
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli, Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality.
DIET PEPSI � PEPSI FREE � MTN DEW
Pepsi Cola
2 Itr.
btl.
99
0
Fresh Ham
99c
PURE CANE
Crystals Sliydf
LIMIT ON
.V TH AN ADI I NA.
HASE Al FVERVDAY
A �
5 lb.
bag
88
SELECT
White Potatoes
10 ,b
bag
99
0
Y(Hsco
DUKE S
Mayonnaise
M � Nf A'mAS ADDITK NA.
MASI AM 4, m PRlCt
32 oz
jar
78c
hHH
V" PLAIN OR SELF RISING Red Band Flour UNff ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
M mPURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW WNCE
1. fc 480,
703 GREENVILLE BLVDOPEN 24HOURS gg OPEN SUNDAY7 A.M11BM.





14
Ht EAST L AROL INIAN
Mki H 25.1986
Pirates
Slip Past
Vermont
(Ontinued from page 11
short cud ol a 4- 1 score
Peterson dropped to 4-1 with
the loss, while Richardson bet-
tered his record to 1 1
()n Sunday, 1'ir ate Coach oar
Overton decided to rest starter
Craig Van Deventei aftei the
sixth inning and give freshman
Paul Hill a chance to throw in his
first collegiate appearance, but
an S 2 marg proved noi enough
as ei mom i allied to tie
i . I took 11 ai ge of the game
earh and appea be headed
foi an eas win, bui it took a
th .lining single h Jim Riles
� take the win
In the bottom ol the first,
Bradbern singled, then Johnson
� - 'li careet homer tor a
quick 2-t1 lead.
Vern ont came back in the se
cond on a � alk a .1 two singles to
gin to 2-1, but the
third to
it to w hai appeared to he a
� "able lead.
I R hie singled and stole
second, then with one
Bradberr go- aboard on an er
� double broug
md, i da two-run shot
Mike Sullivan made it fr-1
be I
' solo homer b K(
I rehub came ii the fift , but
�f the inning
Bradben , gled a id si le se
�n and Sulli �
fielder's
�. d Bi adbei i .
field by
� creased I e
lead � 8-2. pi npting
give freshman
Paul Hi! egiate ex-
und in the
. �
H the 1 ttter on a
a single to
M ke n wild-pitched
nother single by
McMullen made il 8
a ed b a two-run homei
ii a the iead
Hill stea , g a
Duke
Stump d out b n trou-
: igain th ninth
ning H ick out pirtch-
leff Melera open the
walked Rob Diestal.
Da Culpepper came in to
� eli( � �- Hill, bui cave up a single
to Kei Trehub fter striking oul
le allowed a three-run
homer b Stamer, which tied it
up a' 8 B
In �' fre I n .a: Keith
Schaffei took tl . und for
iI and ' eld Vermont scoreless,
tl en -he Pirates can e back n the
boti m f the frame 1 r the win.
McGraw singled and moved up
. sacrifice bunt b Sides.at-
cher Jim Rilev then sliced a single
� � the 9-8 win.
Schaffei short stay on the
mound earned him the win, with
record going to 2-0, while
Trehub took the loss. Vermont
dropped I 1-8 on the vear.
Every Tuesday
is
College Night
Free Delivery
for $5.00 A
Over Purchases
7 p.m. to 11 p.m.
99C SUBS
Your Choice
Ham A ('heese
Bologna & Cheese
Ham, Salami A ('heese
Pepperoni, Salami &hccc
Turkey Aheese
Ham, Turkey Aheese
Not valid on deliveries
M) o. pitchers $1.99
tffc liKlf Ht
11 � m t I p m ?32-21t3 :ih 4th m
Women's Soccer Club Dominates
Bv SIKPHAMK DrW
S�ff � .Ur.
I he update on intramural tan
v fool work is thai 1 c U's
Women's Soccei Club has made
i second victorious trip to
Jacksonville, N.C defeating
I NIDAS6-1.
ECU's 1 isa c ii osshandlei
opened the game scoring two
goals during the first 10 minutes
ol play. Renee Flessate booted
le thud and last goal in the firsl
alt, w ith 10 seconds show inj
the clock.
ECU's Connie O'Brien
dominated in the second halt
with two goals UNIDAS finally
scored in the second halt, but to
no avail. I he Pirates then return
ed the tavor with Kris Slacum
delivering the 6th point.
1 he first home game was held
1 eb. 23 against SANDIS
1 t I O'brien scored the first
goal during the first tour mnutes
ol play. Grosshandler followed
with a second point, with less
than live minutes on the clock
Daisev Grosshandler. and
O'brien each scored bet me
halftime, making the score 5-0.
ECU's Stacey Prenn and
Melissa Herbert started chalking
up points tor ECU in the second
halt, each with a successful kick
Bannon, an ECU defender, and
Grosshandler made the final
points tor 1C I SANDIS stored
during the last tour minutes m
the game, however they walked
away defeated 9-1.
Anyone intrested in becoming
an IRS aerobic instructor should
prepare a five minute routine in
eluding floorwork and aerobic
eercise tor the tryoul Apr 12 at
10:30 am in 10H Memorial (i.
Why not get paid while getting in
shape. Woi k can be t un
I here is an opening tor
photographers in the intramural
department. It interested,
must schedule an appointment
and submit a portfolio For more
information, call the intramural
office. Interviews will begin Mar
31.
Memorial Gym
tM & V, 2 5 pm
I & I i 12 5 pm
I 1 1 am 6 pm
11 am '
Sun
1-5 pn
Sw miming Pools
Memorial P
M 1
Ml 12 S
1 & 3:30-7:3
r & 3:30-6:30 pi
I � $:30-
s,i- i i ai 5pn
'I
Vlll
PRICES EFFECTIVE SUN MARCH 2.) THRU c AT MARCH 29 AT SAV A CENTER IN GREENVILLE
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES
iper (baster QJavings
the supermarket with
wai?i:hoijm: prices
� � �� -r i
w CJ�
pus Double Coupons
See Store For Details!
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli, Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality.
DIET PI
'��
les
o
T(nsco
LIMIT ONE V
PURCHASE AT
i �'
ptf�
703 GREENVIliE BLVD. -OPEN 24HOURS SSSNfo" OPEN SUNDAY7 A.M11PM.

t





Title
The East Carolinian, March 25, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 25, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.465
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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