The East Carolinian, March 20, 1986






(She
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No
�(,
Thursday, March 20, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
16 Pages
Circulation 12,000

Mendenhall To Receive
Additional Footage
JIMLEITCENS Th, ImMM
4
Future Development Planned
ECU'S Mendenhall Student Center may be the next building on campus to undergo rennovadon.
I hirt-thousand square feet of additions are planned. See the related story on page 1.
By DA VID McGIN N ESS
Staff WAN
In order to deal with the pro-
blem of inadequate dining and
activities facilities for central and
west-campus students, a proposi-
tion is in the works for a 30,000
square foot addition to
Mendenhall Student Center.
The project was recommended
by the offices of University
Unions and Student Life follow-
ing surveys of student usage of
and opinion of campus dining
facilities.
The cost tor the addition is
estimated at S3-4 million. Funds
for the project would come from
several sources.
The major source of revenue
would be student fees. An
estimated increase of Si 5-20 per
student per year (not semester).
Jackson Wins Bell Tower Contest

"Finally, those recommenda-
tions will ultimatelv have to be
approved by the Universit
Board of Trustees added
Shelley.
C G. Moore said the design has
alreadv been sent to an architect
for cost estimates. According
Moore, J. Peease is the architeci
and is not expected to finish his
analysis until next week.
14We need to know how much
money we have to raise Shelley
said, �'before we car decide on a
'ice-C hanceltor fund raising campaign or who to
ffice getting cost focus it on
Laura Graham, a member oi
the Senior Class Council, added
ves the cost it would be quite difficult to con-
's office he duct a fall scale fund raising cam-
By MIKr I I DWICK
News Editor
"he Senioi Class Council an-
lesdav. night that Greg
: ign won first place
B vci design contest.
S125 For his
Ba bara Nicl

d S 2
Kirk Shelley, Senioi I
he wini
paign and provide the necessary
continuity, explained Shelley.
Another obstacle, said Shelley,
is student apathy. "They (the
students) have to get excited
about the project, especially with
a big campus. It's tough to get
12,000 undergraduates behind a
project
"And the succeeding Senior
Class Councils added Graham,
"have to be as devoted to the
project as this year's is
Concerning the proposed Bell
Tower's site, Shelley said he
would like to see it on the Mall
towards Wright Circle. He iden-
tified an open area large enough
to build the tower without distur-
bing the nearby trees. Graham
clarified saying the open area is
not the space where students can
plav volleyball.
"Hopefully it just won't be a
Bell lower she added, "but a
place for socializing; a pleasant
place to be. and an extension of
the Greek Street area
Shelley said that all the models
of designs which are in the Alum-
ni office can be retrieved anv
time.
would comprise a large part of
the project's funding.
Accumulated revenues from
campus dining facilities, as well
as funds from the Mendenhall
Student Center Building Reserve
account would make up the
balance of the proposed con-
struction's costs.
According to the data gathered
by the survey and from informa-
tion from Birchfield Food
Systems, which acted as a private
consultant, the first priority in
the expansion project will be to
add a complete dining facility at
the Mendenhall site. This would
include room for food prepara-
tion, storage, office space and a
cafeteria that could seat at least
400 persons
An increase in dining facilities
was considered especially urgent
by project coordinator Rudolph
Alexander, Director of Universi-
ty Unions, because the present
system whereby students cook in
their residence-hall rooms is due
to be phased out by 1988
According to Flmer Meyer,
ECU Vice Chancellor for Student
Life, student usage of the meal
plan has increased during the pa
several years.
"When I came here (1979-80)
there were about 500 people on
the meal plan said Meyer
"Now over 2.000 people use it '
Myer went on to say that the
phasing out of in-dorm cooking
would probably further increase
the number of meal plan users.
The proposed expansion to the
Student Center would include the
following areas oi the listed ap-
proxiamate size:
1. Basement � WZMB radio
(1.080 square feet); drv food
storage (800 square feet);
refrigerated storage (400 square
feet); food service personel locker
rooms (520 square feet); linen
storage (120 square feet); par-
ty social room for dances,
(3,600 square feet); serving pan-
try (320 square feet); storage
room (320 square feet); and
mechanical rooms, restrooms,
elevator and corridors (2
square feet).
2. Main Floor
(5,000 square feet)
( afeteria
nack bar,
food preparation and I rage
areas, and elevator (5,000 squ
feet).
3. Top Fl Great room,
tor special dining functions,
meetings, and activities (4,212
square feet); large meet - i
(1,440 square feet); nee
room (624 square feel I
Fices at 100 square feet eacl 500
square feet); ai
restrooms and corridors 2,672
square feet).
Construction tii
tion to Mendenhall is esl
to be about IS mont
The proposed project mu
approved bv the UNC Bv
Governors and INC General Ad-
ministration, as we!i as the N (
Legislature.
1
the I Iniver-
mmittee They
t he facult y' s
and make a recom-
icellor.
paign.
"That is the major obstacle
said Shellev. "money The
Alumni Office and Cindy Kitrell,
however, will support the cam-
Financial Aid Regulations To Change
SGA Candidates
Begin Campaigns
B PATTIKLMM1S
Nvednesdav. March 26,
1 l students will have the op-
poi for the 1986-8"
5 idem Government Association
executive officials from a ballot
ol six
"here are two opponents in
both the presidential and vice-
presidential race while the
treasurer and secretary positions
are unopposed.
"1 think the candidates are well
qualified stated SGA President
David Brown. "I believe all the
candidates will work toward
making student government an
organization that serves the
students of Last Carolina
The campaigns officially began
on Monday afternoon. Each can-
didate is allowed to spend up to
5200 on the campaign, additional
funds can be used from private
organizations.
Write�in's will be allowed on
the ballots. For anyone who is
unable to vote on Wednesday,
absentee ballots are available by
contacting the SGA office.
The polls will be open from 9
a.m. to 6 p.m. Students will be
able to vote in numerous places
on campus, including the dorms
and in front of the Student Supp-
ly Store.
See SGA Page 2.
B JILL MORGAN
Maff Writer
The financial Aid Department
here at ECU will be asking
students to comply with new
federally mandated regulations
when applying for aid for the
1986-8"7 academic year.
Both of the new requirements
deal with verifying the
applicant's information given
during the application for finan-
cial aid. The new criteria is seen
as an effort to benefit the
students who really need finan-
cial assistance.
The first of these procedures
required the Financial Aid
department to document returns
the information a student has
provided. Ray Edwards, director
of Financial Aid here at ECU
warns applicants "not to be
alarmed" if they are asked to
prove their financial position. As
many as half of the students who
will be applying for aid will be af-
fected by this new regulation.
Edwards also noted the in-
creased burden in administrative
paperwork is expected to create a
slow down in the process of ap-
plications for assistance: "Delays
are forseen Edwards stated,
"but we will do our best to keep
the process running smoothly and
efficiently
A second change will affect all
students applying for a GSLa
guaranteed student loan).
Every GSL applicant will be re-
quired to submit a needs analysis
document. The purpose of the
NAD also stems from verifica-
tion of financial facts submitted
by applicants.
The Needs Analysis Document
will be screened by a national
system of computer edits devised
by the U.S. Department of
Education. These computer edits
are designed to detect potential
areas of descrepency, such as a
difference between the number of
people in the family and the
number of income tax return ex-
emptions claimed.
Through this series of edits the
computer will designate which
applicants are to be asked for fur-
ther documentation of their
financial status. In fact, some
will be selected on an entirely ran-
dom basis Edwards pointed out.
"By requiring students to sub-
mit a Needs Analysis Document
when applying for a GSL � we
are eliminating the necessity of all
GSL students having to be
verified Edwards stated.
The changes financial aid ap-
plicants will encounter for
1986-87 clearly indicate that
students should be prepare
verify all information thev give to
the financial aid office. Students
should not be intimidated bv the
forcasted delays and new regula-
tions, however, Edwards did
stress that despite cuts made bv
the controversial Gramm-
Rudman-Hollings Act, aid will be
available for those in need.
Course Offers First-Hand Experience
B PA ITI KFMMIS
Each Thursday appn x.mately
48 paying customers meet in the
PIRATES CORNER to eat a
lunch prepared by the students in
EC I Quanitity Food
Laboratory.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds12
Editorials4
Featuresn
Sports14
Early Registration7
Supplement
Work is the sustenance of
noble minds.
�Seneca
Students in the class plan,
prepare, and manage the lun-
cheons. Each week a different
meat is prepared, and one week
features a vegetarian menu.
The menus consist of an ap-
petizer or salad, main entree, two
vegetables, bread, dessert, and a
beverage.
The jobs the students hold
range from pot- washer to pastry
chef to manager. As manager,
the student is given a budget.
With that budget in mind, heshe
plans the menu, makes a market
order, and supervises all ac-
tivities. Each week the students
assume a different job.
Instructor of the course,
Eugenia Zallen feels that the class
gives the students a chance to get
on the job experience and realize
what work goes into each posi-
tion.
"1 didn't realize so much goes
on behind the scenes remarked
Lisa Andrews. "There aie so
many details to work out, I'm
glad I'm getting this kind of ex-
perience now
While in class the students
must call each other by their last
names. Dr. Zallen said that some
students have a hard time with
this but do get used to it.
"Its a little bit different, I
usually know everyone in my
classes by their first names
stated Maurice Rasberry. "Some
people might think it sounds
almost military, but I think it
provides a professional at-
mosphere
The Quanitity Food
Laboratory is required for every
person majoring in Food and
Nutrition Management. The lun-
cheons have been served for the
past 20 years.
Tickets to the luncheons are
sold in two plans. They can either
be bought in packages of six or
12, and sell for $3 a meal. The
tickets go on sale at the beginning
of each semester and are
available to anyone interested-
On a few occasions there are ex-
tra tickets that may be purchased
on Tuesday morning for that
weeks lunch.
Anyone interested in purchas-
ing tickets should get in touch
with Dr. Zallen in room 118 of
the Home Economics Building.
"The luncheons seem to be a
good social hour for those
eating stated Dr. Zallen. "and
great experience for the
students

AM 1 II T�,l Ns - Tta I
I' � -
Lunch Is Served
' Manager of the week, Kerry Marcum gives last minute instruc-
tions to "employee" Maurice Rasberry during a recent Quantity
Food Labratory. See the related story on page 1.
- - .
-
-�
A





111! EAST) MtOI INI N
M-Vkt H2

Announcements
WE WANT YOUR BLOOD
nai ���
�s will oe s
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CIRCLE K
v �
v.
SUMMER SCHOOL
HOUSING


LAW SOCIETY
WALK ON EASTER
- � � v
. � .� � � .
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s -
1 ' A-

CAMPUS CRUSADE
FOR CHRIST

� �
PSI CHI
STRATION FOR
GENERAL COLLEGE
DENTS
� -� .���. ds'iinu- IOC tara to 13 5
lies Sunday afternoon Marcn 30. Eas'er
v. A.iik (A. Peace leave 1pm from tar
Farrnvilie Pactoius
non Greenville common
' 30p . ewpoii 's a Hi oeac goal in
.)f - BtiOf 'S8 4S06
INTENDEDSLAPMAJORS
�� wal ege students interested tn ma
Speech L nguage and Auditory
� kjv will meet on Tuesday. March 25 .n
"rpstet O 101 for purposes of advisement
� � pre registral on Ach s nq will oegm at
Students umhip to at'ena must con
I p' prior to tne time stated
' edi � n iupointment
VIOLINIST VIKTORIA
MULLOVA
i documentary on viotm.s
. V � a ii be snown on Greenville
�� � � � . s � tfay � 3 00pm ana
� ' ' � at University
' '� � � �� � ���� , presen
� �" jr Mor-da�
- �' - IQl � l� ; � � hpse
NURSING
SEAN!
. ii
FALL SEMESTER
HOUSING
� D F D
- -
BIOLOGY CLUe
(CANS mee nq Ma'cf
" �' � � N8 101 � " rte purpose crt a
lite lance �,
ECU HONOR BOARD
a - � � � w . �� . tj Honot
' it 6 3 room ??4 H
� . �. ernpers
- . . � ��� Lion
��
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
� ' . A � � .
on V I March 24 4
- � I Or E CM
Vrf �
CHII
NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH ASSOCIATION
Ma � -
� � � � .
�" - �, � �-
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
WORKSHOP
A three part workshop offeree! '� s'jO� I
at NO COST by the S'uden' ouns�
Center Thursday March X 27 4. Apr i
The workshop (Will 'ck us on help ng members
distinguish between the'r asset' .�
gressive and nonassertive behaviors Par
ticipants can learn how to e�press
themselves diret ti and open I and rei
to interpersonal situations ,i
which neither compromises
Denets nor otfends others P. � -
COUNSEL ING CENTER POP h ' .
TION
AFRICAN STUDIES
COMMITTEE
The Atr.can Sudies Comm �
tion wth the NC Humanities Con n fee a
present a symposium on apar'i � � -
Apartheid and the un.teo States
symposium will be Tuesoa. Va' '
�S , Building It ; free rina 'X�
public
HISTORY LECTURE
As part of the Medieval ana Re- � v -
Studies Committees 1985 86 program Dr
Charles Voung ot the History Departr- .
Duke University wll be givng .
our campus on Tuesday even ng t oopm
March 25 ;986 Hs wiu'f The
Neville Ladies ao Fs- .
Thirteenth Century England ' �� �
ii be held in Brewster B 02 and there a
De a reception mmeoate follow
Brewster B 103
FAMILY BACKGROUND AND
USE OF COUNSELING
CENTER SERVICE
a Iial at .� j n - if the fa a
tiuer . -
by East Ca' � �.��
Pasi are a wth wtH re et ' .
A-�r, o Scenei . . �
�I d n,r 'n� s 'csrj' � -
' lv a' 4pn
� I ���; jrtment I

Home I - s 757 491,
ECU COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
�A .
'�'���� 248 at - i
� � . a . �
a be " � 5peli
� �- .
This Style From
With Single Vision Rx
Lenses for only
$27
95
All Other Fromes
30 to 60 OFF
with purchase of RX Lenses
RAY BAN Sunglasses30 OFF
Offer Good Through 32886
. -A ITW1
'
OptnMon Fii 9am til 5 30 pm
icians
Mmmm.
Positively Good!
$"
SGA Elections Planned
Continued From Pae 1.
� - !
I
. H
� I
I r
k e i a r e I -a
N He
: in the
' Hisi : �� minor Da, id
I am Ming is a
from Kim Hawk,
i
�V on 'he election ballot will
quest fot student input on
. � a problems. The
sCiA a d ke to knou hovk the
bodj feels ahom the need
additional commuter parking
e possibilit of paing the
" �m oi college hill.
NEED CASH?
Southern
Gun & Pawn
752-2464
500 N. Greene
$
$
You'll soon agree once ou take advantage of the delec'able
All You Can Eat & Drink Specials
featured at
77y- 1rlv'l:stditninc
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
SPFXIALS
)l RCHOK r
Alaskanrab Legs
AChabhs$12.95
Sweet ana u t uU nt Alaskanrah I ens
Shrimp and C hablis$12.95
Ten � � � fn i, b ilt . r railed
Beef & BurKund$12.95
The best p
metals include a 1 potato and a trip to
. . i Bar
"Let Us Entertain You"
Friday and Saturday
Weekend Specials
$29.95 2 or 4 per room
Greenville Blvd.
the Ra Greenilie, N.C.
756-2792
Recommendations Debated
Supreri -
-
u ry may si ;
I
W

Burt, who cla
Nebraska Medi Pro! lol
� e reo
him.
k issue is whei Bun can
� mn ll in Colora
recommei �
' I - ;imph pre
em hen from
ferences in the futui
A � en Bur: applied for a
thopedic surgeon at . �
pital, it asked former teacher
: nolh to write a reference let
In response,
Bur performance at Nebraska
was "vvell below average and
advised he should not he hired
orthopedic surger.
197 '
He
g
be
ka
federal district court in Col-
- . J with Roberts' argu-
he 10th Circuit Court
reversed the decision
in Bui favor.
Hi '
A
t

i
U.S Supreme (
Vs i ' .i facult
hailed to Alaska
wi ndei � Nebra
unsel Richard Vv ood.
"We v I hav

1 eaving a state to defend
self : preseni a
tremend n the defen-
add Mai l Mintzol ihe
American Associati : I Hive:
sity Professors (AAUP). "It
Carolina Crisis Pregnancy Center
111 Fast Third Street The Lee Building
Greenville, North Carolina
Free Pregnancy Test Confidential Counseling
All Services and referrals are free of charge
The Center is open Tuesdays and Thursdays
from 10:00 to 2:00 and by appointment
For an appointment or more information, cai
24-Hour Helpline 757-0003
SHOE OUTLET
NAME BRAND SHOES Ai Discount Prices
Quality Casual Shoes $15
Ladies Dress and Casual Shoes
at Discount Prices
Large Selection of Name Brand
Tennis Shoes $12.88 to S29.88
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuii
752-2332
One Block Off Kans Street
l"1111IlilllllllillllllIMIIIlMlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltllllllllllllllllllliiiiiiilliillilillllllllllllllllllillllll
J
St. Paul's Episcopal Church
The Rev 1 . Patrick Housl Ir. Reel
The Rev. Middleton 1 . Wootten, 111, Assoc. Recto?
Martv Gartman, Director, Episcopal C ampus Ministry
HOI V WKKKSCHKDt I K
Sunda
7 30 a.m. � Holy Eucharist
900 a.m. � Holy Eucharist
11:00 am - Holy Euchai
Monday
7:00 a.m. � Holy Eucharist
12:10 p.m. � Holy Eucharist
Tuesday
"00 am � Holy Eucharist
12:10 p.m. � Holy Eucharist
Wednesday
00 a m � Hoi) Euchariat
12:10 pm. � H.iiv Euchariat
5:30 p.m � Holy Eucharist
6:30 p.m � Student Fellowship & Supper
Maundy Thursday
7:30 p m. � Holv Fucharist
Dramatic Reading by Katerma Whitky
Goad t rida
: Good I riday I
haster und�
0 a.m. � Cjren I astei V'igii
9:00 a m. - M l Eucharist
11 00 a m Hoi Eucharist
JOKES ON US mto
NOW OPEN ALL DAY
7 Days a week y$
11 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. f 1
Call 757-1973 jy-fc
for fast delivery
from the areas
finest restaurants
Ask Drivers About the Spring Giveaway
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Recor
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News I diir
197f 7
Graduate
Ann


ECU Scie
Book On
1970
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Gia
Pi
the Org;
Cxp
failed
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Mid
Vent
.
the : :
sUf
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in tl

V
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tices
OPEC
increase
��The
dese
sitive
national
them l s
Ahra
tens
Iran he
specu
stvle r
Persian �
continued �
In "OP
Giar
d ol OP1 C, Al
format ic
rise to don; nanc
market He a
forces rathe-
mine OPEC's actioi
arena.


1





�N This Style Frame
f"P Wtth Single Vision R
Lenses tor only
r $2795
her frames
o 60�c OFF
I RX Lenses
30 OFF
Good Through 32886



on fri 9 u m til 5 30 p.m.
t HI 1 ASfAROl ISIAN
MARC H 20, 1986
111 111 � �
-oil!
l table
specials
KDAY
S12.95
S12.95
S12.95
p to our
Entertain You"
jnd Saturday
end Specials
2 or 4 per room
i Hlvd.
C.
Building
1 on,call
757-0003
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fe
m jsS!
Mreet
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Record Enrollment Expected To Drop
B HUHWHKMK
VssisUnl News Kditor
Enrollment at 1 C L has in-
creased steadilv at ECU since the
19761 school year. With inc-
reasing regulations being placed
on state institutions, however,
the trend is expected to level off
in the next few years
According to Charles Seeley,
director of Admissions, 6,655 ap-
plication' have been accepted for
the Fall '86 term. Seeley added
only 2500-2600 of those accepted
were expected to attended ECU
in the fall.
"We usually get about 2,550
students who actually attend
ECU after being accepted. With
this ratio it is obvious that we are
not every student's first choice
he said.
"Every school is faced with
this situation. Students apply to
schools other than their first
choice as a safety value to ensure
their enrollment in case their first
choice doesn't work out Seeley
added.
Many colleges over-accept ap-
plicants knowing that some will
chose to attend another school.
Moreover, many of these colleges
have a waiting list.
According to Seeley, who has
been director of Admissions for
the past three years, ECU has
never had a waiting list.
At Duke University, where a
waiting list was used last Fall, no
student on the list was admitted,
according to Thurletta Brown,
associate Dean of Admissions.
Seeley expects the increase to
level off due to factors affecting
state supported schools.
"By 1988, out of state enroll-
ment will be lower, and we plan
to cut a small percentage of those
students in the Fall said Seeley.
"The new immunization law
will cut back on students as will
the new requirements for admis
sion, and the Gramm-Rudman
Bill. Some students will not get in
or be able to afford the cost of
Statistics also indicate the high
school graduates are declining
cited Seeley.
Seeley added that many col-
leges enrollments have already
. veled off.
college in the coming years.
llllllllllltlltlllllllllllllllllimillllllllllllllllllllllllMllllllllllllllllhlllllllllllllllllllimillllHHIilllllHIIIIIIIIIItth
VOTE
Graduation Plans
Announced
SCEC Sponsors
Special Children
Chris Tomasic
M
SGA President
Tony Jackson
and for
SGA Vice-President
Your Vote Does Make A Difference!
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir?
B MIKELUDWICK
News t.ditor
I uesdav night kirk Shelley,
Senior Class president, announc-
ed information pertaining to
graduation, commencement ex-
cercises, and tickets have been
mailed to graduating seniors.
"If your a graduating senior
and you didn't g I Spr-
ing Break said Shelley, "then
your parents have the informa-
tion
Shelley emphasised, it is im-
portant to send for your tickets
because if its rained out your
parents won t get to see you
graduate
According to the Commence-
ment Committee, in the event of
inclement weather, commence-
ment will be moved indoors to
Minges.
Due to limited seating,
however, all graduates who will
participate in Commencement
and expect to invite family and
friends must obtain guest invita-
tion.
The deadline for requesting
guest invitations is April 7.
ECU
Book
Scientist Writes
On Oil Industry
By CAROLYN DRISCOLL
Maff Writer
The ECU Student Council for
Execeptional Children is par-
ticipating in several activities dur-
ing this week, which has been
declared county-wide as Excep-
tional Children's Week.
According to Denise Souther,
SCEC vice president, today the
council is sponsoring a party for
emotionally handicapped kids at
the Eastern Area Residential
Treatment Home.
On Saturday, the Council will
send representatives to Kinston
where they will meet with other
Councils for Exceptional
Children within the northeastern
region.
Earlier this week, the Council
honored David H. Giles, a special
education teacher who is retiring
after 20 years at ECU. Giles was
presented with a "plaque of ap-
preciation" at a reception on
Monday, according to Souther,
who added, "Dr. Giles is a great
teacher and he will really be miss-
ed
Yesterday the SCEC sponsored
a skating party at Sportsworld
for a group o! tramable mentally
handicapped students at the F.B.
Aycock School.
Souther commented, "So far
this week has been a success
We've had a good turnout and we
hope the rest of the week is even
better
Anyone interested in this
week's remaining activities can
contact Souther at 752-7774, or
1 vnne McGinnis at 758-9114.
5TH STREET
IMPORT SERVICE
WE REPAIR TOYOTA, HONDA, VW ,
FIAT, PORSCHE, VOLVO, DATSLN,
LOTUS, MERCEDES, BMW, ALDI
AND OTHERS
DIAL
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1M7 C. 5TH
GREENVILLE
!il Ne� B
OPEC, the international oil
cartel that had consumers over
the barrel with high prices in the
1970s is finding itsell being crush-
ed b) : da) accord
in ECU political scienti
Mohammed E. Ahrai
book "()PEC 1 he 1 ailing
Giant published b the Univer-
sit) Press of Kei tuck says tl at
the Organization ol I um
Exporting Countries (OPEC i
failed to recognize market condi-
tions. It now must accepl lower
prices or else absorb production
cutbacks which . have harm-
ful side effects i - the OPEC
nations.
OPE( 5 an ' thud
world oil-producing countries. Its
membership compi 'several
Middle I ast nati n . lnd nesia,
Venezuela and Ecuador have
controlled interi al oil prices
since the early 1970s. At that time
the nations allied with OP1 (
supplied over 60 percent of the
world's oil. Production cutbacks
in these countries forced oil
prices to skyrocket.
Ahrari say OPEC placed itself
in a vulnerable position b conti-
nuing to raise prices and refusing
long-term contracts with buyers.
As a result, consuming nations
have amassed vast oil stockpiles,
conservation policies and prac-
tices have diminished demand,
and competition from non-
OPEC oil producing nations has
increased.
"The failure ot OPEC to
develop pricing formulas sen-
sitive to fluctuations in the inter-
national oil market have made
them highly vulnerable said
Ahrari. In addition, the political
tensions emanating from the
Iran-Iraq war and from the
specter of repetition of Iranian-
style revolution elsewhere in the
Persian Gulf have made OPEC's
continued viability uncertain.
In "OPEC The Failing
Giant an analysis and historical
study of OPEC, Ahrari traces the
formation of the cartel and its
rise to dominance in the world oil
market. He argues that economic
forces rather than politics-deter-
mine OPEC's action in the world
arena.
The organization came into ex-
stence as an economic alliance in
I960 with Iran, Ira. Kuwait,
Saudi Arabia, and Venezuela as
its clout and faced a buyers'
market with international oil cor-
porations dictating production
and prices.
In the 1970s OPEC members
s u c c e e d e d n o t only in
manipulating the price of crude
oil but in reducing the status of
major oil corporations to that
of mere managers of upstream
operations. By exploiting increas-
ingly tight markets in the after-
math of the oil embargo of 1973
and the Iranian revolution of
1979, the OPEC nations ac-
cumulated enormous numbers ol
petrodollars.
The 1980s introduced a soft
market for oil brought on by a
number of economic forces in-
cluding consumer conservation
policies, large oil inventories, and
increased production by non-
OPEC nations. OPEC was no
longer the administrator of prices
but was forced to follow the lead
of spot prices.
Economy Expands
WASHINGTON (I'I'I) - The
economv expanded by just 2.2
percent last year after a slower
fourth quarter than at first
reported, revised figures released
today bv the Commerce Depart-
ment showed.
The real gross national pro-
duct, the nation's output of
goods and services, advanced bv
just 0.7 percent in the fourth
quarter of 1985, the least increase
since the first quarter of 1984
when it was moved ahead 0.6 per-
cent, the department's Bureau of
economic Analysis said.
A preliminary report had a 2.3
percent annual GNP increase on
the basis of 1.2 percent growth in
the fourth quarter. Revised
figures pulled the October
through December quarter gain
Stop hurting
tne trees
you love.
down to 0.7 percent.
1 he yeai to year GNP grow tl
was the least since the recession
vear of 1982. when real GNP
shrank bv 2.5 percent.
Real business inventories
decreased $6.3 billion in the final
quarter following a decrease
$1.8 billion, the bureau said.
ATTIC
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8 th Annual Spring Zing Hing Ding, Fling
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Tequila Bar Specials
Monday: Melon Margarita Night $2.25
Tuesday: Miller Night � bottles 75-
Wednesday: Entertainment Night, Ambers
Thursday: Tequila Shots
Fri. & Sat Upside down night
Sunday: Sunrise Night
� Tequila Sunrise $2.00
March 26th: Tequila Tequila Tan Contest
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Expiration Date May 9 1986
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ATTENTION
Summer School Students
Would you like part time employment while in
school?
Would a rent free room interest you?
5 blocks from ECU campus
Private study area
Private entrance
If you're interested contact:
Robert Wilkerson
Wilkerson Funeral Home
2100 E. 5th
752-2101 between 8:30-5:30





�te iEaat Ear0lintan
Serving the Fastarolma campus community since 1925
rOMLl VENDER, gmkmmv
fAY Stone, ����� ���
Miki 11 m i k. km u greg Winchester. ��
r Cooper, � Anthony Martin. ��,�� �,
John Pi I ERSON, . � wo,
Shannon Short, ,�. �,��,
1)1 RBII Stl VENS, SKTfMr.
DANIEI MAURER cwmw
John Shannon. ��,
DeCHANII I Johnson ,
March 20,
Opinion
Page 4
Youth Income
Wages For Young In Decline
For several generations,
Americans have taken h for granted
that they will earn more than their
parents, and that their future in-
come vkill rise as they grow older.
The Urban Institute, however, has
recently published a stud)
authored by Frank I evy and
Richard Michel, which shows
neither of these assertions is likely
to prove true.
According to the study, which
focused on men's earnings, young
men can no longer expect to earn
more than their fathers It, addi-
tion, the study finds thai it has
become harder and hardet
young families even to mam
level of consumption enjoyed bv
similar families in the pas.
The era in which the babv bo
generation began coming ol tg
1973 through 19S4 was one
which neither wages noi famih in-
come grew. Real wages increased an
average of 2.5 to 3 percent pei year
between 1949 and 1973, and median
familv income doubled, from
$14,000 per year to $28,000 (ii Ws4
dollars). But since 1973, wage
growth has slowed and med
family income has dropped I
peak of $28.16
in 1984.
973
526 415
This slow wage growl
pronounced impact on th(
expectations of young men. Before
1973, the average ma rker
could anticipate that his real ea
ings would rise by 110 p�
ween age 25 and age 35, due n
to the effect of pi
his income. Even though oldei
workers had alreadv
of their promotions, the avei
40-year-old male worker could ex
pect to see his wages continue
rise by about 30 percent o
next 10 years of his !il
Stagnant wages al 73,
however, significantly dan
the earning potential of young and
middle aged men. The average man
turning 25 in 1973 saw
wages increase by a mere I6pei
over the following decade;
who turned 40 in 1973 saw their ear-
nings decline by an average of 14
percent.
All of these factors combined
help to create a scenario in which
sons can no longer expect to do bet-
ter than their fathers. In the I950's
and 1960's, the average 30-year-old
man was already earning more
money than his father had at the
tune the son left home at age 18 or
19. Today, the average 30-year-old
male worker still earns 10 percent
less than his father was earning
when the son was 18 or 19.
1 he only way that most
American families have managed to
escape the effects of the downward
wage spiral is to have two wage
earners both husband and wife
working. This fact helps to par-
tiallv explain why increasing
numbers of women have joined the
labor force, particularly in the last
decade not out of some abstract
commitment to feminism, but out
of economic necessity.
I he implications of these fin-
dings for today's college students
should be fairly obvious. While the
economic picture for young
Americans cannot be characterized
as bleak, it also is not sanguine. The
downward trend in earnings reflects
larger problems in the American
economy and moves to decrease the
earnings of workers to compensate
for those problems.
Yet, bv and large, it is not
necessary to force down the earn-
ings of the young to pay for
mic recovery. There are solu-
tions to the current malaise that see
increased wages and economic
recovery as being complementary.
For example, when workers earn
more wages they buy more goods
thus stimulate production to
�' increased demand. This, in
turn, creates more jobs which
results in more workers being hired
and so on.
course, simply increasing
wages is no panacea. In some cases
high wages do make industry less
competitive. But at some point we
need to begin to question the notion
�ther cutting the wages of the
young a d thus decreasing living
standards adds up to progress.
With more sophisticated
technology and scientific techni-
ques shouldn't the young be look-
ing forward to ever-rising living
mdards?
T he fact is there are ways of run-
ning the American economy that do
not rely upon depressing the wages
of young people. This generation
needs to begin to explore some of
those alternatives.
CONTKft AID
fe 4
Campus Forum
Administration Decisions
This letter is simplv a reque
you and your staff to follow up on
two issues raised at the very beginning
of the spring break. The foremost is
the allegation that someone in the ad
ministration turned down an oppor-
tunity to host President Reagan as the
commencement speaker. All politics
aside, this would have been a
monumental event in the historv ol
ECL, not to mention in the lives ot
the graduates of the class ol 1986.
Secondlv, Dr. Ken Karr granted an
interview. Can you believe he was
available tor a comment. The issue
was the denial ot funds to send out
Lady Pirate basketball team to the
National Invitational Tournament,
he stated that "$5000.00 needed was
not availableand that Duke pi
bably wouldn"t go either What dit
ference Duke's going or not has to the
situation at ECU is beside me. The
issue should be that we reward win-
ners for a job well done especial!
post-season play is in order.
Just think of the year that ECl
could have had. A visit bv oui coun-
try's president and a possible win at
the prestigious NIT bv out Lad
Pirates.
Mark Ouimette
Graduate Student. Geologv
Editor's Note: On the mailer oj hav-
ing the President as our commence-
ment speaker, we were told by ice-
Chancellor for Student Life Elmer
Meyer that the administration had
already invited someone else to
deliver the '86 commencement ad-
dress. It was not learned. Meyer in-
formed us, that the President had an
opening in his itenerary for May 10
until after an invitation had alreadv
been extended to our current speaker.
To disinvite him in favor of inviting
the President, the administration
thought, would have been
discourteous.
On the matter of the lady Pirates,
we agree with you. See Tim
Chandler's piece on page 14 for more
on that subject.
Walker Endorsed
"Why should I, or anyone for that
matter, vote for Gordon Walker for
Vice President of the SGA?" As a
supportei � G 'don, 1 have beer.
asked that que ore tha-
So ECl 's why! i
than "familiar" with the S( T A he's
had i I : � experience
.v understands the
1 egislative process
have exper �
:rrentlv finishing up
1 t. Governor of the Non u hna
lent I eg �� and is �
ancelloi H ���
"l - I ommittee on the Sta
' Mil � tv, exper
YES A
those AY Joil klii'W (
those ot u- � assure �
irdesi worl �
ever con ss "( i
again, "lie has experience ai
dedicated, hut h does he 'eel I
should �
reason tha: (iordon undej
the SGA is an organiaY ; LI
ECl students, that we deserve
opp
He doesr believe . : I
down to special interesi
s "SI UDEN I
INTEREST, not special interes; "
And that's whv you should v
don vv all er, SGA ice Preside
Stephanie P � -
Sop icience i
Orbituary Needed
In the sv,etv outside the university
systen e its a v.irld that touches
of s in manv different w.
B . tins outside, larger world does
,h The Eastarolinian It ap-
peal - the 1 he East �. aroliniar onlv
societv touch it when "the st;
wants it
On feho.aiv lOtii. a triend, who
was a full time student, was killed in
an automobile accident There was
nothing spectacular or sensa-
tionalistic about her death, it was
a freak and tragic occurance
Information regarding the eve:
o her death and about the student
was given to The Fast Carolinian with
the request that a few lines be placed
in the paper. After waiting and wal
ching for the siorv, it did not appear
A telephone call to The Fas;
Carolinian regarding whv the infor-
mation had not been printed resulted
in a staff member saving the paper
M -
w e
lents w 1 lie ea
VI r. R
� Ri
.

y
-
g any
i
I "
� �
-�� . '
Patricia A
in a
Febi
I asl
H .

K .i rei D (
Junior, Nun
'�
The I - - ruan
report few

Vfikt
iwu k n �
a
Krin ft) itt- t
sorry
Conservatives A ttack Corporations
r
JUNIOR PIP
VOUF66PW0R
3W FOOP
T0TH6P06
A6AINI
&imu)tnbjOtotiiw- wrvs
S(J-
By DARRYT BROWN
College Republicans have been hard-
pressed to counter the swelling call by
American students to divest college in-
vestments in companies that operate in
South Africa. Republicans are leary of
losing the friendship of the white
minority government that is, after all,
staunchly anti-communist and
cooperative with American interests.
Young conservatives are uncomfortable
with the fact that they seem, for
American strategic advantage, to sup-
port a racist state and throw human
rights to the wind. They also don't like
being left out of the hottest student ac-
tivist issue of the decade.
So a new conservative students'
human rights group, known by the
acronym STOP for Save The Oppressed
People, is countering with a divestment
campaign of its own. They call for pull-
ing assets out of companies that do
business with the Soviet Union, and they
advocate a boycott of Gulf because it
operates in the Marxist state of Angola.
To prove they also disdain the oppres-
sion of innocent people and to engage
student zeal, STOP has adopted the tac-
tics of the left-petitions, boycotts, sit-
ins, demonstrations-for the causes of
the right. The effort is admirable, but
fraught with difficulties.
Republicans pride themselves on their
pro-business reputation and image as
free-enterprise advocates who are, above
all else, fiscally responsible and good for
American commerce. Under that banner
of private enterprise and corporate
capitalism they win elections.
But business, in general, has a pro-
blem with moral conduct, having as it
docs only one criterion for its actions:
profit. Financial decisions are often un-
constrained by ethical considerations.
The STOP effort is one of the few at-
tempts by business advocates to put
moral considerations into commerce, to
rank ethical decisions above financial
ones. It has previously been the preserve
of liberals (though not always
Democrats) to say that some financial
gains are not worth their costs, such as
pollution, hazardous working condi-
tions, or sharing profits with oppressive
regimes But STOP'S targets are selec-
tive; the abuses bv governments w
I V support-El Salvador. South
Africa, South Korea, Mid manv othe-
are still ignored
liberal efforts have also had a de fac-
to selectivnv Most opposition from the
left has been of abuses bv American
allies, on the premise that we should not
support tortuous governments. But
where we have little connection, i.e
communist nations, liberals have been
largely inactive, being interested
primarily in purifying the American
sphere of influence. If STOP expands
the realm of human rights concerns to
countries now overlooked, it does a
good service, but it must not ignore
atrocities just because thev are commit-
ted by American allies.
All such efforts still have a lot of work
to do to convince business that human
rights sometimes take precedence over
the bottom line.
Foru
l his is a question form for stl
Executive Candidates rorum id
the presidential candidi�-s. fill
South BJdjj , across from Jovb
Fbe Lastarolinian and V
SGA executive offices on Mom
across from Joner IJbran
their platforms
The elections will take placi
Newspap
AUSTIN, IX
dent newspapei
right" al
now
gair.
campus, retracii .
trod b
The Texas Reie
mission to disi
over the sprawling '
privilege now
Daily Texan I
dent paper
"Why mu
student newspaper" a �
Coiyandro. founde- i
publisher, who says the R
brings a long-needej
voice to the I '
"There's
discrepanc betwee-
sentiment of studei
expounded
he says
The univer
of spreading the "se
Coiyandro says, by er
rule that keeps all ad-ca
papers except the Daily Texan
the periphery of the camp
Now Coiyandro, rer
b the Texai
Union (TCLU),
to challenge the rule
In researching the
attorney Susan Dao
has been through a
but one filed ia-
left.
In 1970, The Rag
the New Left Educati
dragged L'T all the �d-
LS. Supreme
distribution rights on
That case was remande.
a lower court, where I
its rule to exclude
containing advr
But the rule now exel
Review, which c
"consistent
i.e a Conservative B �
promotion
The Daily Texan was ex
from the rule hv vp
tion from the univei
"There're no set standard;
OX
Gentlemen:
Are you lookim
textbook0
Are ou looking
.Are you interesi
lasting friendshij
Do you nave lea
great organizatii
If you possess a
tional Fraternitvl
OX is rapidly fo
and want more i
by Room 238 M
or call 752-6635
Thank you for yl
e:





y
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 20, 1986
ons
.
H wever,
ititu-
was
: on
.

rue that
vary
. to
H o run
students
� Mike
11. ed ri-
. j story
� We are
lal
irve
lal
as
corporations
king condi-
� ppressive
gets are selec-
. rnments with
idor, South
many others-
id a de fac-
ts, t ion from the
iscs by American
thai we should not
� ivernments. But
re e have little connection, i.e
muni nations, liberals have been
largelv inactive, being interested
primarily in purifying the American
sphere of influence. If STOP expands
the realm of human rights concerns to
countries now overlooked, it does a
good service, but it must not ignore
atrocities just because they are commit- "
ted by American allies.
All such efforts still have a lot of work
to do to convince business that human
rights sometimes take precedence over �
the bottom line. ,
Forum Question Form
This is a question form for students to submit questions for the upcoming East CarolinianWZMB
Executive Candidates Forum to be held Monday, March 24 on the mall. If you have a question for
the presidential candidates, fill this form out and return it to the East Carolinian offices in the Old
South Bldg across from Joyner Library. All questions should be submitted by 10 a.m. March 24.
Improvements Sought
For Athletes9 Education
The East Carolinian and WZMB will sponsor a forum featuring the candidates for the 1986-87
SGA executive offices on Monday, March 24, from 2 � 4 p.m. The forum will be held on the mall
across from Joyner Library. Students are Invited to come out and listen to the candidates express
their platforms.
The elections will take place Wednesday the 26th. Polling hours are 9 a.m. � 6 p.m.
(CPS) � Big Ten doormat
Northwestern could become a
football powerhouse.
Or the overall quality of inter-
collegiate sports will decline. Or
colleges will take educating their
athletes more seriously. Or col-
leges will not be able to keep
athletes in school.
Or hundreds of colleges will be
sued unless they improve their
"Developmental studies" � or
remedial � programs for
athletes.
Those are just some of the
speculations now tearing
throught college athletic depart-
ments nationwide in the after-
math of a "landmark" court case
in Georgia.
"It sent a shock across the
country reports Charles Mc-
Clendon, head of the American
Football Coaches Association. "I
think it serves notice to all of our
campuses that we need to take a
look at ourselves
"It" was a federal court ruling
in favor of Jan Kemp, an
academic advisor to University of
Georgia athletes who, she says,
was fired because she refused to
give passing grades to some foot-
oall players who were flunking
their courses.
If she had flunked them, the
players would not have been able
to play in the 1982 Sugar Bowl
game.
See DISTRIBUTION Page 5.
Newspaper FightsForDistribution Rights
THE BEST
FOOT
lll lll.l II �, .lllllil I Ililil.lJ
YOU'LL EVER
PUT IN YOUR
MOUTH.
215 E. 4th Street
AUSTIN, TX (CPS) � A stu-
dent newspaper of the "new
right" at the University of Texas
now says it will go to court to
gain the right to distribute itself on
campus, retracing the steps once
trod by leftist campus papers.
The Texas Review wants per-
mission to distribute itself all
over the sprawling UT campus, a
privilege now reserved for the
Daily Texan, UT's official stu-
dent paper.
"Why must there be just one
student newspaper0" asks John
Colyandro, founder and student
publisher, who says the Review
bi .ngs a long-needed conservative
voice to the UT campus.
"There's an overwhelming
discrepancy between the general
sentiment of students and what's
expounded in the student daily
he says.
The university gets in the way
of spreading the "sentiment
Colyandro says, by enforcing a
rule that keeps all ad-carrying
papers except the Daily Texan on
the periphery of the campus.
Now Colyandro, represented
by the Texas Civil Liberties
Union (TCLU), is going to court
to challenge the rule.
In researching the case, TCLU
attorney Susan Dasher found UT
has been through a similar suit,
but one filed last time from the
left.
In 1970, The Rag, published by
the New Left Education Concept,
dragged UT all the way to the
U.S. Supreme Court to gain
distribution rights on campus.
That case was remanded back to
a lower court, where UT revised
its rule to exclude only papers
containing advertising.
But the rule now excludes the
Review, which contains ads
"consistent with its philosophy
i.e a Conservative Book Club
promotion.
The Daily Texan was exempted
from the rule by special dispensa-
tion from the university.
"There're no set standards for
granting exceptions to this rule
says Dasher, who labels the Tex-
an's exemption from the rule
"arbitrary
Last week the Review did win a
temporary restraining order to let
its staff hand out papers on c� -
tain parts of campus.
An American Civil Liberties
Union branch also helped The
Hawkeye Review, a conservative
paper at the University of Iowa,
gain the right to distribute in
1984.
About 40 avowdly conser-
vative papers have sprung up on
U.S. campuses since 1983, when
the Institute for Educational Af-
fairs � a New York think tank
founded by former U.S. Treasury
Secretary William Simon and
neoconservative writer lring
Kristol � began funding them.
The most notorious and suc-
cessful has been The Darmouth
Review, which has frequently �
and happily � provoked its cam-
pus with arch putdowns of
liberals, homosexuals, anti-
segregationists and others.
Two weeks ago the Heritage
Foundation, a Washington,
D.C based think tank, raised
$7,000 for Review staffers accus-
ed of smashing an anti-apartheid
"shantytown" on the campus.
Colyandro says student reac-
tion to his new paper at Texas
"has been outstanding. People
are snapping up papers. They're
disappearing in one day
But at the University of
Massachusetts, many of the first
opies of The Minuteman, which
had its debut last week, ended up
in trash cans, says co-editor Tony-
Rudy.
Rudy says many alumni wrote
to protest they were "embarrass-
ed" by The Minuteman's view-
point.
But Rudy and his colleagues
wouldn't be happier. Rudy says,
inviting readers to "mail bomb
scares and death threats" if they
so desire.
But whether the reception is
cool or hot, some conservatives
still cannot gain control of the
mainstream student press.
At the same time they went to
court to gain access to the cam-
pus for The Review, conser-
vatives lost a chance to take con-
trol of the Texan itself when
Michael Smith, the College
Republicans' candidate to
become the paper's editor, got
only 30 percent of the vote in a
March 5 campus-wide election
for the post.
His opponent, David Nather,
took the other 70 percent, with
6,539 of the school's 48,000
students voting.
But Smith cried foul because
election officials disqualified him
from campaigning during the last
five days of the election. He had
been found guilty of promoting
himself before the campaign of-
ficially began.
204 East Fifth St. 758-1427 Open Mon-Sat 10 am-9 pm
NEW RELEASES MARCH 24
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OX
Gentlemen:
Are you looking for a challenge beyond the covers of your
textbook?
Are you looking to meet new people?
Are you interested in the challenge of forming many long
lasting friendships?
Do you have leadership skills that you want to put toward a
great organization?
If you possess any or all of the above; OX-Theta Chi Na-
tional Fraternity is interested in you.
OX is rapidly forming a new colony at ECU. If interested
and want more information with no obligation please stop
by Room 238 Mendenhall at 8:00 p.m. Thursday, March 20
or call 752-6635 or 757-6824 or 758-3401 Rm 154.
Thank you for your support.
OX
$1.99 pitchers wpurchase of any sub
Choice of over 28 Sandwiches
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-n
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752-2183
PHONE AHEAD FOR FASTER SERVICE
Rebel
Benefit
Concert
Wednesday March 26, 1986
ATTIC
Doors Open at 9:00 p.m.
Admission � $2.00
BANDS
Hightwatch and Centaur
All proceeds will go toward publication
of REBEL '86 the Literary-Art Magazine
of East Carolina University.
f " �'
' ��
,





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 20, 1986
Camp
KempDecisionSetsPrecedence
What did you do during Spring Break?
Dwight Hall
Freshman I ndecided
worked at home
Mim Mitchell
Sophomore Business
"Went to Daytona Beach"
Nancy Sever
Sophomore Education
"I went to Daytona Beach"
��
j?
Jeff Simons
Graduate Student Psychology
"Wen: on a cruise to Mexico and
spent to much money
Danny Bronson
Beverly Williams Sophomore Industrial
Freshman Early Childhood Technology
Education "I just sat around at home.
"1 went on tour with the gospel played basketball and visited
choir to Virginia, Maryland, friends"
Philadelphia and New York
Continued From Page 5.
Kemp eventually left the
university, and then sued it for
firing her.
The court in February ruled
Georgia must pay Kemp $2.6
million in back pay and damages.
While the university is appeal-
ing the decision, the court
testimony about low graduation
rates among athletes, about
Georgia's expectations for its
black football players � UGa's
lawyer told the court the athletes'
college educations at least would
propel them beyond being gar-
bagemen, qualifying them for
postal service careers � and how
it has different academic stan-
dards for "revenue-producing"
athletes has refueled parts of the
college sports reform movement.
The huge award, whether or
not it stands, will cause "ad-
ministrators and developmental
studies people (all over the coun-
try towonder if their programs
are running better" than
Georgia's, says Sheldon Stein-
bach of the American Council on
Education.
Georgia's remedial programs
helped only 16 of the 61 black
athletes on its football team since
1971 to graduate.
"The question Steinbach
adds, "is how many other univer
sities are consucting programs
like that (in which) grades are be-
ing manipulated
Notre Dame Athletic Director
Gene Corrigan estimates there
may be "50 or 60" running shad-
dy programs.
The Georgia system, in any
case, now is "reviewing" all its
developmental studies programs,
Chancellor Dean Propst's office
says.
Other athletic officials
speculate the huge award, when
considered with the National Col-
legiate Athletic Association's new
rule setting higher academic stan-
dards for Division 1 athletes, may
alter competition among schools.
At its January convention, the
NCAA voted to keep freshman
athletes off the field unless they
had a 2.0 grade point average in
11 core high school courses and
scored at least 700 on the
Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT)
or 15 on the American College
Testing (ACT) exam.
Some coaches worry the new
rule, followed so closeU b
Kemp decision, may mak
harder for them to lure qua
athletes.
Northwestern and other more
academically minded schools
compete in Division 1 lea.
may stand a better chance
reasons.
NU basketball coach Rich i .
recalls the university did
both basketball and footba
ing the sixties, when the Big
had academic standards for i
players.
ECU Schedules Apartheid Symposium
Neus Bureau
South Africa's apartheid will
be the focus oi' a symposium
sponsored bv ECU this Tuesdav
March 25.
The symposium, sponsored bv
the ECU African Studies Com-
mittee will be held in the Regional
Development Institute (Willis
Building), from 12:30 p.m to
9:30 p.m.
Kenneth Wilburn. ECU history
professor and project director,
said the symposium was designed
especially for the public. "The
purpose of the symposium is to
promote understanding of apar-
theid and its relationship to the
United States. Many people
criticise apartheid without
understanding all of its implica-
tions he said. "The symposium
was designed to help the public
form views of substance about
apartheid
Wilburn said a resolution to
apartheid in South Africa is im-
portant to Americans for several
reasons. "First, there is the
perspective that if we, as
Americans, believe in eliminating
discrimination in our own coun-
try, why should we support a
regime which institutionalizes
discrimination?" he asks.
He added business relations
with South Africa are important
to both the economics of the
United States and South Africa.
"Since the United States relies on
South Africa's stategic mineral
resources and has more that $2.7
billion in multi-national in-
vestments in South Africa,
Americans have a personal
responsibility to examine the rela-
tionship between their country
and South Africa he said.
"Since that is the case, people
in the West need to help South
Africa be more representative of
the West by firmly encouraging
them to end institutionalized
discrimination he said.
The symposium, entitles
"Apartheid and the United
States will feature a keynote
speaker and three sessions involv-
ing 10 participants who will con-
sider such topics as segregation,
the Bibical justification for apar-
theid, the United States' policy
toward South Africa, and the
Sullivan Principles.
In the first session, two
historians, George Fredrickson
of Stanford University and John
Cell of Duke University, will
discuss the similarities and dif-
ferences between South African
apartheid and American segrega-
tion.
"Fredrickson, Cell, and the
moderator Joel Williamson from
UNC-Chapel Hill, are three of
Ms. Motlalepula Chabaku.
"They will give us their perspec-
tives on the relationship between
the Bible and apartheid and the
effect that this has had on black
ethnic groups in South Africa
Wilburn said. Rev. Dan Ear-
nhardt, Director of the ECU Stu-
dent Methodist Center, will be
the moderator.
the leading scholars in the field of
comparative race relations
Wilburn noted.
The second session will feature
John Chettle, a South African
businessman and director of the
South African Foundation. Chet-
tle will explain the progress of
reform underway in South Africa
today. Also included in this ses-
sion will be William Robertson,
Deputy-Assistant Secretary of
State for African Affairs, who
will provide the Reagan Ad-
ministration's perspective.
Political science professor Sandra
Wurth-Hough of ECU, a
specialist on African political
systems, will moderate this ses-
sion.
The third session will include
two black South African religious
leaders, Rev. Vernon Rose and
I ECU Hillel Sponsors:
The symposium is assisted by
grants from the North Carolina
Humanities Committee, the In-
ternational Programs Division of
the ECU College of Arts and
Sciences, and the Wesley Foun-
dation. For more information
contact the ECU African Studies
Committee at 757-6291.
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGSASCY
$195 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at
additional cost. Pregnancy Test, Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For
Further information, call 832-0535 (toll free
number: 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5
p.m. weekdays. General anesthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917 W�st Morgan St.


A Bagel & Loxs Brunch
Sunday March 23
1:30 p.m.
featuring a talk by:
The Rev. Deborah Steely
Religious Coalition For Abortion Rights
Mendenhall Student Center
Multi-Purpose Room
S TUDENT OPPOR TUSITIES
We are looking for girls in-
terested in being
ounselors � activity instruc-
tors in a private girls camp
located in Hendersonville, NC.
Instructors needed especially in
Swimming (WS1), Horseback
Riding, Tennis, Backpacking,
rchery, Canoeing, Gym-
nastics, Crafts. Also, Basket-
ball, Computers, Drama,
Nature Study, Field Hockey. If
your school offers a Summer
Internship Program, we will be
glad to help. Inquiries: Morgan
Haynes, PO Box 400-C, Trvon,
NC, 28782.
$4 � Community $3 � Students
S2 Hillel Members i
PIT
VILLAGE
DONNA EDWARDS
Owner
Good Selection of Reptiles
and Saltwater and Freshwater Fish
We Carry A Complete Line
of Dog, Cat, and Fish Supplies
Master Card and Visa are accepted and financing is available.
511 Evans St.
Greenville, NC 27834
Phone: 756-9222
Vote
CUNANAN
SGA President
1
Walker
SGA Vice-President
"STUDENT INTEREST, not Special Int �
THE DAY HE
WORE MY CROWN
An Easter Special of Music & Drama
by
Hope Fellowship Church
March 23, 7:30 p.m.
Come Be A Part As Vie Celebrate
The Resurrection of Our Savior and Lord
Nursery Provided Refreshments Following
Hwy 264E to intersection at Hwv 33
Turn left, take first driveway on rigl
Located in Parkers Chapel Gym
y
t
Presents
Our Special
End Of
he Week Party
Free Admission Friday
March 21, 3:30-7:30
Every Sunday is LADIES NITE!
v
; - ' �
i T v D
i CM. �
o 1 - -
PTht r - '
21 11
� 512,
� 7 1 ?i
it i
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Pi Yi T C A





THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 20, 1986
Precedence
e
rule wed so dose)) by the
Kemp decision, ma make it
harder tor them to lure quality
athletes
v rrn and other more
linded schools that
Division 1 leagues
a better chance, he
ach Rich Falk
did well in
I d Mtball dur-
vi hen the Big 10
acaden . standards for its
)te
Walker
e-President
)AY HE
1Y CROWN
ial of Music & Drama
ship Church
3, 7:30 p.m.
elehrate
ivior and Lord
Following
'
o
V
Let Us
Tempt
You
with our
New Menu
S3.2 5
eci with a tasty
d and cheese
tauct and
with rice and
� I
m
V
S2- Cotanche Str�t
Restauxuiii x
757-1666
Presents
ur Special
Party
Friday
�-7:30
rES NITE!
1986 Early Registration
Supplement
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University Calendar
Fall Semester 1986
(Actual class days: 14 Mondays, 14 Taesdays, 15 Wednesdays, 14 Thursdays, 14 Fridays, 14
Saturdays)
July 21, Monday
August 8, Friday
August 20, Wednesday
August 21, Thursday
August 22, Friday
Last day for persons holding a bachelor's degree to apply 'or admission to
Graduate School for the Fall Semester
Last day to pay or secure Fall Semester fees without penalty
If fees are not paid by 4:00 p.m ail schedules both
graduate and undergraduate will be cancelled; Faculty Meetings
Registration and Change Day
Change Day (Drop-Add) and Registration
August 25, Monday Cusses begn; Schedule changes (Drop-Add); Late Registration (Undergraduate
students)
September 1, Monday
September 3, Wednesday
October 27,2S
November 10
November 25, Tuesday
November 20, Wednesday
December 1, Monday
December t, Monday
December 9, Tuesday
10,
17.
Labor Day Holiday
Last t�y to apply for graduation in December
FaU Break (Monday, Tuesday)
Early Registration for Spring Semester Begins
Lust day to remove incomplete given during
Spring andor Summer Sessions, 1906
1140 p.m. - Thanksgiving Holiday begins
8:00 a.m.
resume
End
Day
1040 p.m. � Exams for Fall Semester close
�aujp





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 20, 1986
SCHEDULE CHANGE
(DROP-ADD) POLICIES
AND PROCEDURES
A schedule change period
will continue to be schedul-
ed at the beginning of each
semester.
1. A student may drop-
add with the approval of
the advisor if the need to
drop-add is precipitated by:
failing a course
course or section being
cancelled
not completing a prere-
q u i s i t e
having a partial schedule
If any of the foregoing
applies, the student must
secure the signature of his
or her advisor on the
schedule change form and
take it to the appropriate
terminal operator for key-
ing in.
2. Schedule change re-
quests for reasons other
than those listed above
must be taken for approval
or denial to ihe Dean of
General College, who, dur-
ing the schedule change
period, will be located on
the first floor of Whichard
Building. Prior to presen-
ting the request for the
schedule change, the stu-
dent must receive advise-
ment concerning the selec-
tion of new courses and
secure a schedule change
form signed by his or her
advisor. In addition, a brief
statement which indicates
the rationale for requesting
the exception to the
schedule change policy
must be signed by both the
advisor and the student and
be presented with the
original schedule along with
the schedule change form
for consideration of the re-
quest.
Specific instructions for
terminal access follow:
Students who have partial
schedules may go to any ter-
minal to have approved
modifications keyed in.
Students who are in-
itiating new schedules may
go to any terminal to have
approved courses keyed in.
Students who are seeking
special permission from a
department must go to that
department to have any ap-
proved modification keyed
in, except for accepted
schedules. After securing
special permission, the ap-
proved modification must
be keyed in by the
Registrar's Office.
Students who are seeking
modifications to accepted
schedules must go to the
Registrar's Office to have
approved modifications
keyed in.
The above policies for
terminal access also apply
to graduate students;
however, in general,
schedule change policies for
graduate students will re-
main the same as in the
past. (See graduate
catalog.)
Early Registration
April 1-11, 1986, Sum-
mer Session and Fall
Semester
The Summer Session con-
sists of two terms of 5 12
weeks each. Two-semester-
hour courses meet 60
minutes, three-hour courses
90 minutes, and five-hour
courses 150 minutes dailv.
There are no Satuday
classes. In order to accom-
modate certain students,
various departments will of-
fer some shorter courses.
Final examinations will be
given on the last day of each
term.
Graduate students expec-
ting to begin work in the
summer must complete ap-
plication at least two weeks
before registration.
A student may not enter a
course later than the third
meeting of a Summer Ses-
sion class and receive credit.
Applications for gradua-
tion in a given term must
also be made within the
three-day entrance period.
Refunds
A non-refundable
registration fee is included
in the tuition.
To be eligible for a re-
fund of the Health and
Other University Fees, a
student must turn in the
Student ID Card and the
Student Activity Card when
officially withdrawing.
Students who drop to part-
time or withdraw through
the last day to register will
receive a full refund less the
registration fee and room
rent. There will be NO RE-
FUND for subsequent
changes or withdrawals.
Course Numbers
Course numbers as used
in the Summer School
Bulletin and in the
Undergraduate Catalogue
and Graduate Catalogue in-
dicate the college year in
which the courses should be
taken. Courses numbered
1000 through 1999 are for
freshmen; 2000 through
2999, for sophomores; 3000
through 3999, for juniors;
4000 through 4999, for
seniors; 6000 and above,
for graduate students. The
5000-level courses are
taught at the graduate level
primarily for graduate
students; graduate students
and senior majors will be
admitted, and selected
junior majors and seniors
from other areas may be ad-
mitted with the written per-
mission of the chairperson
of the department or the
dean of the school in which
the course is offered. A unit
may include 5000-level
courses for undergraduate
degree requirements.
Schedule of Courses
The Schedule of Course
lists the terms when each
course is offered. Unl
otherwise noted, course
meet during the regular
terms. There are not Satur-
day classes.
The minimum enrollment
for lecture and laboraior
courses offered during
summer session is
students.
The courses are listed b
school or department.
number, title, days and
hours given, and valu-
Please see page 9
Beat the Summer Rent
Increases
Reserve your apartment for summer or
fall occupancy at today's rates
Now accepting a limited number of
deposits for fall occupancy. Call today for
an appointment
752-5100
Eastbrook Apartments
Village Green Apartments
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
TUirlan and feesfor 1986 Stmy Session
HTRSTTHH fay19-June 24SHU� THW June25-July31
FEES FOR EJ�X H�t-IN1-X�ADUATKS : dtlon & teg. (N.C. ftesLieru) Uitlon Si Reg. (Nan N.C. Riisident)0-5 ttjurs Day D)rm 51.00 51.TO 407.00 407 )0Dav 103.00 814. iHours rrm 103.00 814.009-l Day 154. r 1221. i.imrs Dorm 154. i 122 0 � Day a . i �i � � - . !
�f.i Fee16.5016.50lb.SI16.5016.50. �
It her ni ersity Fees42.5042.5042. �42. 42.50. � . -
Roora Rent Cotten, Furling & Jarvis (see below)125.00125. 1125. '� '
Total N.C. teLient � ii Non N.C. Resident110.00 466.00235.00 591.00162. � 873.00287.00 S. �213. .T) 128 i338. i � . �� r 1687. i. 1
I
y

.�
For Excellence in
Education
Plan to attend
Summer School '86
at
UNC by the Sea
For an '86 catalog, write or call:
Office of Special Programs
UNC Wilmington
601 South College Road
Wilmington, N.C. 28403-3297
(919) 395-3195
Full Tljne burg
fSAUUAiTS �2 Hours 3-5 Hairs b- Hours 9 toirs Thesl
tuition & Registration Fee (NC Resilient) r, �n e mi m �.
TUition S. Registration Fee (Non-Resident) J�� '� S 2 S' '
Health Service Fee ???? S� 1.221.00 1.628.0
ther Required Fees 5� ?�? l6-� l-50
"1 NC Resident (Day) �Sg -J�22 - � L
tal Non Resident (Day) M � � 264.0
" Rent (Cotten, ?ianii� , Jarvis S25, f?' ' ���� ' l'��'� '
local NC Resident Dora ' I25- � '
sfbcial ras-
Private Music Lessons (extra Per credit hour)
u �� ' 2oo
La � Payment Penalty
Returned Checx Fee '
Math & idling Labs equate to 2 extra hours for tuition purposed"
El! � � S - lLT1�or "tod "N-c� �- o-p � �-o
Per Course duiye of 200. '
3$
We've Taken the Guilt Out of Fast Food
GREAT
FOOD
JACK
Summer School 1986
First Term
(Actual days Firs! Term: 5 Mondas 5 Tuesdav sw.�h� a c tu
Registration. 1 day for Final Exams) uesda�- ' Wednesdays. 5 Thursdays. 5 Fridays. 1 day for
LESS
FAT
We've Cut the Calories So You Don't Have To
Jack's Jumbo
j FREE
With Purchase Of
Another Jack's Jumbo !
Fries & Med. Drink
j. SAVE i
With This Coupon
(Limit 1 Per Purchase
Offer Expires 3-26-86)
DRiVK-THRl OMV
Bacon, Lettuce,
Tomato
Soup
Large diet Coke
or soft drink
of your choice
SAVE50C j
With This Coupon �
(Limit 1 Per Purchase
Offer Lxprres 3-26-86)
lRIK-THRl OMV
Hot Ham'N
Lite Cheese
Baked Potato
Large Diet Coke
or soft drink
of your choice
SAVE 50C
With This Coupon
(Limn 1 Per Purchase
Offer Expires 3-26 86)
Chicken Filet
Soup
Large Diet C oke
or soft drink
of vour choice I
SA VECASH& CALORIES WITH THESE
306 Greenville Blvd. Plaza Mall
SAVE 50C
V ith Lhis Coupon
(l irr.n 1 Per Purchase
Offer I xpues 1 26 S6i
COL ROSS!
Phone 757-7769
May 16, Friday
May 19, Monday
May 20, Tuesday
May 21, Wednesday
June 2, Monday
June 23, Monday
June 24, Tuesday
Schedules of both graduates and undergraduates who have registered will be
cancelled at 4:00 p.m. if payment is not received
Registration and Change la
Classes Begin; Change Day Drop-Add and Late Registration
Last day to register or make schedule changes (Drop-Add) for First Term
Last day to drop a course or withdraw without grades
Classes End
Final Examination
Second Term
(Actual days Second Term: 5 Mondays, 5 Tuesdays SWVdnMit.v. kt.
Registration, 1 day for Final Exams) Wednesdays, 5 Thursday 5 Fridays, 1 day for
June 24, Tuesday
June 25, Wednesday
June 26, Thursday
June 27, Friday
July 4, Friday
July 10, Thursday
July 31. Thursday
August 1, Friday
Sch,du.� of bo.h gr.au .�� Mil , , �,� who �.�
c.n�ll�l 4:00p if p.ynlt� ZOZSZ
Registration and Change Day
Cl��s Bwn: Ch�� D (Drop-Add�, Ute Rbdon
L�, d� ,o � �r m.ke KlMMt chmntl mmtAm ,� Smai
Independence Day � Holiday
Last day to drop a course or withdraw without grades
Classes End
Final Examination
?
1
Continued from page 8
semester hours. Dates of
particular courses or
workshops are also
designated whenever they
vary from the regular
schedule. Course descrip-
tions may be found in the
Undergraduate Catalogue
andor Graduate Catalogue
of East Carolina Universi
ty.
Courses listed on the trial
class schedule should in-
clude the appropriate ab-
breviation, course number,
and section number�for
example, ACCT 2401. Sec
tion 001. Courses listed
the registration I
should include departnu
tal abbreviations, course
number, and sect;
number.
Credits andourse Load
The usual regula
concerning a student's pi
gram of studies will apply
during the Summer Sessn
but the regulations are in-
terpreted for the two ten
instead of for an unbroken
semester. Regulations are
outlined in
Undergraduate Catalog
Term!
I MI
Acct
Allied Health
Art
Buv Kd.
Biology
Chemistry
Cont. Educ.
Decision Science
Education
English
Finance
Foreign Lang.
General College
Geography
Geology
History
HIth & Pi
Home Economics
Industrial lech.
Library science
Mathematics
IK
�iii
Jen
Ka
Biol
Han
r rw
Rai
spei
spe.
Coul
Adi
Klei
Deal
ust
Raw
BreM
Brew
Brew
Gral
Brew
Mini
Men
Van
Hani
Joy H
u-�i
u�
ManagementRaw
e:
MarketingRaw
Music ?
NursingNun
PhilosophyBrev
PhysicsPh!
Political ScienceBren
PsychologySpei
Registrar's Office WhiJ
ScienceFlan
Socio, Anth, Econ.Bre
Theater ArtsMev
Pam PenlandAthi
iJon





o part-
ugh
;er will
.
) HI
k�
admitted, and selected
junior majors and seniors
�m other areas may be ad-
mitted with the written per-
mission o the chairperson
the department or the
Jean of the school in which
the course is ottered. A unit
ma include 5000-level
ses for undergraduate
�equirements.
schedule of Courses
iule of Courses
he terms when each
s ottered. Unless
noted, courses
during the regular
I here are not Satur-
nimum enrollment
ire and laboratory
ses offered during the
tssion is ten
ses are listed by
department,
title, days and
e yen, and value in
Please see page 9
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 20, 1986
- burs
lit pd
. ' D5.0
� 28. i
i - i
36. i
� .

� . �
� . '
125.00
215. i
. i
. . �
I 1986
jdntdav 5 Ihuodav 5 l-hdavt, 1 da for
iduutes vho have registered will be
a! 4:00 p m. if pavment is not received
Renislration and Change Day
ine Dav I)rup-ddi and Late Registration
khedule changes (Drop-Add i for First Term
(o drop a course or withdraw without grades
C lasses End
Final Examination
Irm
Inesdays, 5 Thursdays. 5 Fridays, 1 day for
undergraduates who have registered will be
(relied at 4:00 p.m. if payment is not received
Registration and Change Day
inge Day (Drop-Add) and Late Registration
Iule changes (Drop-Add) for Second Term
Independence Day � Holiday
o drop a course or withdraw without grades
Classes End
Final Examination
Continued from page 8
semester hours. Dates of
particular courses or
workshops are also
designated whenever they
vary from the regular
schedule. Course descrip-
tions may be found in the
Undergraduate Catalogue
andor Graduate Catalogue
of East Carolina Universi-
ty.
Courses listed on the trial
class schedule should in-
clude the appropriate ab-
breviation, course number,
and section number�for
example, ACCT 2401, Sec-
tion 001. Courses listed on
the registration forms
should include departmen-
tal abbreviations, course
number, and section
number.
Credits and Course Load
The usual regulations
concerning a student's pro-
gram of studies will apply
during the Summer Session,
but the regulations are in-
terpreted for the two terms
instead of for an unbroken
semester. Regulations are
outlined in the
Undergraduate Catalogue
and the Graduate
Catalogue.
Undergraduate students
may schedule a maximum
of seven semester hours
during each regular term. In
special circumstances,
students may, with the per-
mission of the Dean of the
General College, carry
more than these limits. In
scheduling hours, however,
students should be aware of
the number of contact
hours involved in both
laboratory and lecture
courses per credit earned.
Unless special permission
is received from the Dean of
the Graduate School, a
graduate student may not
register for or receive credit
for a total of more than
twelve semester hours in
Summer School through
enrollment in any combina-
tion of regular session-
length courses. A student
may not enroll concurrently
in two or more workshops
or short courses during each
five or six week summer
term or earn more than six
semester hours in any
regular five or six week
department has discretion
to lower maximum credit
hours.
Students desiring
transcripts checked or col-
lege credits evaluated
before making up their
summer term schedules
should submit transcripts
and request the check at
least one month before the
term opens.
Undergraduate credits
earned elsewhere at
regionally accredited col-
leges or universities will be
accepted when properly cer-
tified, provided such credits
are applicable to the cur-
riculum selected by the stu-
dent at ECU and subject to
program limitations on
transfer credit.
Graduate credits earned
elsewhere at regionally ac-
credited colleges or univer-
sities may be considered for
transfer credit provided
such credits are recom-
mended by the school or
department and meet all
rules governing transfer
credit found in the current
edition of the Graduate
Catalogue. ECU students
Terminal Locations
UNIT
Acct
Allied Health
Art
Bus. Ed.
Biology
Chemistry
Cont. Educ.
Decision Science
Education
English
Finance
Foreign Lang.
General College
Geography
Geology
History
Hlth & PE
Home Economics
Industrial Tech.
Library Science
Mathematics
Management
Marketing
Music
Nursing
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Registrar's Office
Science
Socio, Anth, Econ.
Theater Arts
Pam Penland
TERMINAL LOCATION
Rawl 325
Allied Hlth 302,312
Jenkins Main Office 2000
Rawl 305
Biol Sci Complex N 108-C
Flanagan 205
Erwin Hall 201 & 205
Rawl 238
Speight
Secondary 231
Special Ed. 137
Counselor Ed. 137
Admin. & Supvr. 102A
Elementary 102-B
Dean's Office 154
Austin 124 & 124A
Rawl 343
Brewster A-429
Brewster A-113
Brewster A-230
Graham 101
Brewster A-314
Minges 176
Memorial Gym 203
VanLandingham 106
Flanagan 107
Joyner Lib East-Wing 213
Austin 129
Austin 131
Rawl 137 (Will Alternate
Next Day)
Rawl 223
A.J. Fletcher 102
Nursing Bldg. 157
Brewster A-325
Physics N-209
Brewster A-126
Speight 109 (1,3,8,10)
(2,4,7,9,11)
Whichard 100
101
102
104
105
Flanagan 357
Brewster A-416
Messick 106
Athletics Ground Floor
(Jones)
HOURS OF OPERATION
8:00 - 12:00
8:00 - 2:00
8:30 - 4:30
9:00 - 11:00 & 2:00- 4:00
8:30 - 12:30 & 2:30 - 4:30
9:00 - 11:00 & 2:00 - 4:00
10:00 - 12:00 & 2:00 - 4:00
1:00 - 5:00
1:00 - 4:45
12:00 - 4:00
8:30 - 11:00
9:00 - 2:00
8:00 - 2:00
8:00 - 5:00
8:00 - 5:00
12:00 - 4:00
8:00 - 11:30 & 2:00 - 5:00
8:00 - 5:00
8:30 - 12:30
8:00 - 1:00
9:00 - 11:00 & 2:00 -4:00
8:00 - 5:00
8:00 - 5:00
8:00 - 5:00
11:00-3:00
8:00 - 12:00
8:30 - 12:00 & 1:30 - 4:30
Same
8:00 - 12:00
1:00 - 5:00
8:00 - 12:00
8:00 - 10:00 & 3:00 - 5:00
9:00 - 11:00 & 1:00 - 3:00
8:00 - 12:00
1:00 - 5:00
8:30 - 12:30
9:00 - 12:00 & 1:00 - 3:00
12:00 - 5:00
8:00 - 5:00
8:00 - 5:00
8:00 - 5:00
8:00 - 5:00
8:00 - 5:00
8:30 - 12:00 & 1:00 - 5:00
9:00 - 12:00 & 3:00 - 4:00
8:30 - 4:30
8:00 - 5:00
must obtain prior school or
department and Graduate
School permission to take
courses for transfer credit
at other institutions.
Courses taken elsewhere are
subject to the following
ECU Graduate Council re-
quirements: no more than
one semester hour of
transfer credit can be earn-
ed for each calendar week
of course attendance, and
concurrent enrollment in
two or more workshops or
short courses which results
in more than one semester
hour of transfer credit per
week is not permitted.
The Registrar must be
supplied with an official
transcript of any recent ex-
tension or resident work
done in other colleges for
which the student desires
credit. This transcript
should be on file at least
three weeks in advance of
the date he or she expects to
graduate from ECU.
It is expected that each
student keep for his or her
own information and
guidance an orderly check
on the courses completed
and those yet to be com-
pleted in his or her cur-
riculum.
On-line Registration
Prior to using the on-line
registration system, each
student will develop a
schedule containing no
more than 18 hours of
primary courses and no
more than 15 hours of alter-
nate courses (summer ses-
sion seven hours primary
and seven hours alternate)
that meets with hisher ad-
visor's approval as in-
dicated by the advisor's
signature on the registration
form. All special permis-
sions (e.g extra hours, ma-
jors-only courses, instruc-
tor's permission, etc.) for
course registration must be
secured prior to using the
on-line registration.
Allocation of Registration
Days
April 1,1986-Graduate
Students, Petition Students
and Seniors (96 or more
semester hours credit).
April 2-3�Juniors (64-95
s.h. credit) and those eligi-
ble prior to this period.
April 4 & 7,1986-
Sophomores (32-63 s.h.
credit) and those eligible
prior to this period.
April 8-9,1986-Students
with 16-31 s.h. credit and
those eligible prior to this
period.
April 10-11, 1986� All
students eligible.
Alternate Courses
It is especially important
that faculty advisors ensure
that students list alternate
courses rather than sections
on the course request form.
Terminal operators cannot
allow students to add
courses not listed on the
form since they are not per-
mitted to give academic ad-
vice to students. Terminal
operators will routinely
check the availability of
alternate sections when a
primary course-section re-
quest is unavailable.
It is also important for
students and terminal
operators to follow
schedule "locking" instruc-
tions carefully. In par-
ticular, graduate student
schedules and partial
schedules for
undergraduate students
should not be locked. Inap-
propriate locking of
schedules causes delays
when the student attempts
to complete the registration
process.
Change of Major
To smooth the distribu-
tion across terminals,
students may declare a ma-
jor or change of major at
any time subject to current
university policy and the
policy of the receiving
department.
Please see page 10
FREE
RENT
Going Home For The Summer
But Need A Place For The Fall?
Tar River Estates has a summer special for
ECU students � Rent an apt by May 1 st &
keep your appartment RENT FREE for June &
July! For details call or come by Tar River
Estates Info Center 1400 Willow St. No. 1.
752-4225
Tired of waiting in line for the phone or shower-3 Leave the
dorm doldrums behind � there is an alternative. Your own
place at Tar River Estates Select a one-bedroom garden apart-
ment or a two- or three bedroom townhouse Enjoy fully equip-
ped kitchen, washer dryer connections in some apartments,
spacious clubhouse, swimming pool, and picnic area by the
nver Conveniently located near East Carolina University �
with SGA Transit service Come by today or Call:
TaiKiver
ESTATE
752-4225
UOOVvMlow St
Of ice Hours
M-F 9:00-5 30
Sat & Sun 1 00 5 00
wanogedCy U S S'W Corpora �
Low, Low
Prices
Interest Free
Payment Plan Available !
i
UVL
y Interest Free
Payment Plan
Available ! C
7 Kb
$10.00
Deposit
Special
ECU Student Store
Thursday, March 20
TIME: 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.
9
OflFitto of C�tnt.o 0�p�I
p





10
HE EAS1 CAROLINIAN
MAR H20, WH6
Continued from page 9
Terminal Operating Hours
Each unit with a terminal
tor on-line registration will
schedule a minimum of
four hours per day for
registration during the en-
tire registration period.
The days and hours o
operation should be clearly
posted. The terminals in the
Registrar's Office will be
open 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
during the entire registra-
tion period.
Students have access to
all open terminals, but they
are strongly advised to use
the following locations
depending on their
classification.
� Declared majors �
Undergraduate: Major
Department
� General College Students:
General College
� Petition Students:
Registrar (Required)
� Degree Graduate
Students: Major Depart-
ment
� Non-Degree Graduate
Students: Registrar
� Students Receiving V. A.
Benefits: Registrar (Re-
quired) Whichard Bldg
Room 104
� Evening College Students:
University College
Terminal I tilization
1) The student will pre-
sent the registration form
signed by the advisor (along
with required permissions)
to the computer operator.
No changes to the form will
be allowed.
2) The operator shall use
a maximum of 15 minutes
to complete the regular ses-
sion registration process.
The operator shall use an
additional 15 minutes max-
imum for the summer ses-
sion registration process.
3) The operator will enter
the student's primary
course request. If the re-
quested schedule is possi-
ble, no further changes will
be allowed.
4) If step 3 results in a
partial schedule, the
operator will allow the stu-
dent to choose other sec-
tions o primary course re-
quests andor alternate
course requests. If a
schedule is possible with
primary course and alter-
nates listed on the registra-
tion form and the student
chooses not to accept the
schedule, a partial schedule
may NOT be obtained and
the student will be in-
structed to return at a later
time.
5) If the 15-minute time
constraint is encountered or
the list of primary and alter-
nate courses is exhausted
during step 4. the student
will be given a partial
schedule. The student
should then consult with his
advisor to identify addi-
tional courses and complete
the registration process at a
later time.
6) If a student does not
receive a course because all
sections are closed and the
course is required for the
student (no alternates
allowed), the student may
obtain a partial schedule
and seek special permission
to be added to the course
trom the department in-
volved. Registration will be
completed in the depart-
Short

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ECU STUDENT UNION
4
ment granting such special
permission.
Numbers of Terminals
Available During the Hours
of Operation:
8:00
8:30
9:00
eSI
CHEE&. UfjtjOv TWO
HCRt'S Tug" -TuUTP-s
Fuki , Flap TpLdi&u-
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10:00
54
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47
12:00
12:30
36
32
1:00
1:30
35
2:00
40
40
The Beast Carolinian
2:30
3:00
4:00
4:30
5:00
41
41
33
27
�27
UNDERCOVER
(ATS SOLVE
MYSTERY
By Robert Ma�ii
T � � . � '���; t- ��
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�� a � i. . f� i
ROW i -t �. At � A. � � �
MARTIAN WOMAN
RAISED BY WOLVES
GIVES BIRTH TO
ELVLS-AND LIVES!
Bj -Jff Parker
' - ' vI - ' v - : . z&
� � : �" - �
I'hoto l Danul Maurtr
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Day Of Danc
Two Renown
The ECL I
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levels trail
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modern
Thi- year
will feature :u
dance
Lawrence K
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The Ninth Annual Da Of Dance will
dancer choreographer Lawrence Rhodes
tori on March 23. For more Information
i





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DETAILS IN STORE
THE EASTAROl INIAN
Entertainment
'The Color Purple'
Spielberg Brings Magic To Adult Theme
B KATHY NIBIOCK
si�f ttntrt
Steven Spielberg takes to the
screen once again in Warner
Brothers' motion picture The
( olor Purple. Directing b
Spielberg, music b Quincv
Jones, .md a fantastic supporting
cast made this movie a sure-fire
hit even before release
rhe movie is based on the
zei Prize-winning novel b
Iice Walker which tells the story
a repressed black woman's
growth into contentment and
-elf-actualization.
Celie, supremeh piaved b
W hoopi Goldberg, is a quiet ugiv
:kling whose life in a small
Georgia town in the early I900's
is a continuum of mistreatment
heartbreaks. Through the
iracters that flow in and out of
I er life she learns strength, beau-
� � and self-respect.
top all of the film's greai
ilities shines Goldberg who. in
film debut, has taken a dif-
ficult role and made it beautifully
intense. With her child-like at-
tdes and sheepish grins she
completely wins the audience
over with hei character.
Equally impressive acting by
Margaret Avery and Oprah Win
frey as the women who befriend
Celie adds another plus to the
movie, eiv bungs glitter and
beauty to the scenes with her
character Shug Avery, a lustv
blues smger who helps Celie
realize her own potential.
Winfrey, who took time oft
from hosting her Chicago televi-
sion talk-show, plays Sophia, the
proud, physical woman who is an
inspiration to Celie. Winfrey's
strength, and robustness have
earned her an academy award
nomination foi this role.
The award-winning Spielberg
adds another hit to the list con
taming Jaws, Raiders oj
the loss rk and (lose En-
counters oj the Third Kind.
In ins firs- feature film in two
vears, Spielberg undertook what
he deen e biggest challenge
ot my career" as producer and
director of The Color Purple.
Spielberg does his usual
flawless work with a few unique
touches such as eye-catching
scene and time transitions.
Although not typical of
Spielberg's past movies, The Col-
or Purple contains his un-
mistakeable magic.
Another big name present in
the movie's credits is Quincy
Jones, producer of the music for
The Color Purple Although not
as impressive as other projects
done by Jones, the accompanying
music adequately enhances the
spirit of the story and the mood
of the scenes.
The overall spirit of The Col-
or Purple, due to the plot's chain
of events, could be disheartening,
but humor and beautiful
photography speckle the scenes
to keep the movie from being a
mere tear-jerker. Overall, it is a
well-rounded movie, worth the
three and a half hour sit and the
incredible price.
The COIor Purple is currently
playing at the Buccaneer and is
rated PG-13.
Danny Glover and Whoopl Goldberg star In Steven Spielberg's film adaptation of Alice Walkers Pulitzer
prize-winning novel, 'The Color Purple
Silent Network Opens Doors For Deaf
(UPI) � The Silent Network is
a means for television to com-
inicate with the estimated 22
million deaf or hearing-impaired
mericans who are pretty much
ignored by TV.
Although it only broadcasts
two hours a week � 9:30-11:30
on Saturdays � The Silent Net-
work reaches some 6 million
households, bringing entertain-
ment and information to the hard
rhe dri tree behind the
network is President Sheldon
ltfeld, who says the potential
market for advertisers is larger
than the Hispanic or black
markets
As with all siii us business
enterprises, economics is the kev
factor and one that severely limits
The Silent Networks programm-
ing and ail time.
Altfeld is doing what he can to
provide a well-rounded schedule
foi his audience. Big, expensive
entertainment shows are out of
the question right now. Hour-
long dramas, sitcoms and variety
series are prohibitively expensive.
Instead, the network has pro-
duced nine different modestly
budgeted series. They include: a
series of 13 half-hour shows on
how to train hearingear dogs; a
Day Of Dance Workshop Features
Two Renowned New York Dancers
The ECU Theatre Arts Depart-
ment will sponsor the Ninth An-
nual Day Of Dance in the studios
of the Messick Theatre Arts
Center on Sunday.
The Day Of Dance is a series of
workshops for dancers at all
levels of training and will include
master classes in ballet, jazz,
modern and tap.
This year the Day Of Dance
will feature two renowned
dancers from New York:
Lawrence Rhodes and Robert
Small. Mr. Rhodes will be
teaching master classes in ballet,
and Mr. Small will teach master
classes m modern dance.
Lawrence Rhodes has an inter-
national reputation as ballet
dancer, d i r e c t o i and
choreographer. He is currently
chairperson of the Department of
Dance at the I isch School of the
Arts of New York University.
He first made a name in the
dance world as a performer with
companies such as the Ballet
The Ninth Annual Day Of Dance will feature New York's ballet
dancer choreographer Lawrence Rhodes as one of its guest instruc-
tors on March 23. For more Information call 757-6390.
Russes de Monte Carlo, Joffrey
Ballet, Harkness Ballet, Penn-
sylvania Ballet and the Eliot Feld
Ballet.
His dance roles have ranged
from the classically traditional to
the contemporary. In demand as
a teacher since 1977, Rhodes has
been an outstanding member of
the faculty at The American
Dance Festival in Durham.
Robert Small,
dancer choreographer and Ar-
tistic Director of The Small
Dance Company, is the Reader's
Digest Affiliate Artist in
Residence i.i a two-week residen-
cy sponsored by ECU.
From the creative and in-
novative tradition of Hanya
Holm, Alwin Nikolais, and Mur-
ray Louis, Small has toured the
United States and Europe as a
soloist with Murray Louis Dance,
The Small Dance Company and
as a highly acclaimed solo artist.
He has been awarded four grants
from the National Endowment
for the Arts, a Creative Artist
Public Service Grant, and fun-
ding from the New York State
Council on the Arts.
In addition to the master
classes in ballet and modern to be
taught by Rhodes and SmaH,
classes will also be taught in jazz,
tap, modern and ballet by the
ECU Dance Faculty: Patricia
Pertalion, Mavis Ray, David
Wanstreet and Patricia Weeks.
All classes for the Day Of
Dance will be filled on a first-
come, first-serve basis; therefore,
pre-registration is encouraged.
Registration on Sunday will begin
at 9:45 a.m. in the Messick
Theatre Arts Center.
The Ninth Annual Day Of
Dance is a project jointly spon-
sored by a grant from the North
Carolina Arts Council and the
National Endowment for the
Arts in Washington, DC, a
federal agency, Reader's Digest
Association and ECU.
Additional details and pre-
registration forms for the
workshop are available from the
Department of Theatre Arts. For
further information call
757-6390.
series of 13 half-hour shows for
children akin to "Ding Dong
School" and a musical-variety
series, "Musign featuring a
deaf dame troupe. "Musign" br-
ings to mind a rock video featur-
ing heavy bass rhythm sections
that allow viewers and dancers to
keep time through vibrations.
There is also "Aerobisign an
aerobics program taught in sign
language and a celebntv talk
show, "Offhand in sign
language. Another is "Handle
With Care a lifestyles show for
teenagers.
Altfeld said his network,
beamed to cable systems by
satellite, provides all programs
with audio as well as sign
language and open captions
because, demograp lically, each
deat person lives with between
two and five hearing people.
"We're developing a deaf soap
opera, 'Signs of Our Lives built
around the interrelationships bet-
ween the deaf and hearing peo-
ple said Altfeld, a dapper
producer-businessman who
might easily be mistaken for a
banker.
Altfeld was the prosperous en-
trepreneur of a recording studio.
which he sold seven years ago to
sink every dime into The Silent
Network. He hopes to recoup his
investment � the network has
been running for a year and a
half � by getting the advertising
community to see the deaf as a
significant consumer market.
So far the network sponsors in-
clude Campbell Soup. Mattel
Toys, Hallmark Cards and Kal
Kan pet foods.
Altfeld emphasizes that there is
no charge to viewers for The
Silent Network. It's a free cable
service, open to any cable com-
pany that cares to pick it up.
"We are also developing a
visual game show so the deaf can
participate and win big prizes.
"Most of our casts include
deaf actors and actresses who are
coming into their own.
"More and more people in this
country are using sign language
he points out. "It is the fastest
growing language here, the third
most used in the United States
behind English and Spanish.
"It is important for all of us to
remember that the deaf are com-
pletely cut off from the rest of the
world. Millions of kids were born
in the '60s, after the rubella out-
break, who have nev i
word in their lives.
" They need role model
communication to mak
feel a part of our growing
and to give them h
and employment. It is a
them to see deaf performe
other successful deaf p.
of our series is going to te i
reading to the deaf to mal
lives easier
Altfeld reports that "we t
great deal of mail from deaf:
pie who have discovered out i
work. Some say it is the first time
in iheir lives they have been in
touch with other people
speak their language. I hey go out
and buy satellite dishe-
our show.
"We keep re-running our pro-
grams and the deaf see them
and over again, happy' to
they have something to w
and comprehend. Network T is
incomprehensible to manv
them who cannot lip-read.
"The deaf comprise a siz;
subculture for which we hope to
provide news, entertainment and
informatioin that will bring them
closer to the mainstream
American life
From The Not So Right
Tales Of A Spring Breaker
Bv PAT MOLLOY
Well, here I am, again. Back to the business of
writing these petty little 500-word articles � the
very essence of which keeps me from slipping over
the edge into insanity � or much worse, into mun-
danity.
Spring Break has, once again, cruised by us like
a Jaguar on 1-95 bolting for the
Keys. And once again, 1 was left
behind in my all-too-cool Ber-
muda shorts to sponge up
whatever rays there were lef-
tover between my home in
Virginia Beach, and my friend
John's home in Annapolis.
(Sponge up rays, indeed. You
know damn well he and I spent
that time in bars and taverns
pondering whether or not Ferdi-
nand Marcos would ever get
another job.)
The ride home was quite in-
dicative of how the entire vaca-
tion would turn out. I was picked up by not one,
but two attractive women � Laura and Debra �
or, "The Party Sisters Folks, I haven't met two
more outgoing people in my eight semesters here.
To be safe, Debra (whose one wish is to have a
smaller chest) waited until we were five miles out
of Greenville, and then fired up a bong. Imagine
my surprise. After 1 nearly collapsed my lungs, I
handed the peace-pipe to Laura (whose one wish is
to be thinner � why, I don't know; I guess she
was just being a woman) who did the always
popular steer -with -your -nose-while-you -light-the-
bowl maneuver.
I HTfc :� s
1�t , ���(
After doing her imitation of a Hoover, Laura
turned and asked me what my favorite position
was. Well kids, in case you're wondering, she
wasn't talking about softball.
Naturally, I freaked. I literally didn't know
what to say (if you can believe that). I mumbled
something about "you tell me She did; but this
is no place to go into it.
Suffice it to say that I learned much about
Laura and Debra that day; and
they learned quite a bit about
me. Our relationship developed
nowhere beyond the verbal
stage, however, through no
fault of my own. And 1 wasn't
even home yet.
Now, while most of you were
in the Bahamas or in Lauder-
dale tanning, and making dudes
named Juan bring you
Margaritas, I was in a little
unestablished bar in Maryland
called the Fiddler's Green. It
was my kind of bar. Inside was
a dart board, and all the Jimmy
Buffett you could stand.
I pushed my way between two big-ass bikers,
and ordered a Bud.As I was about to careen awa
from the bar, a woman who bore a frightening
semblance to the Elephant Man called me a
Yankee.
Now, I wasn't about to tell this witch that 1 was
from North Carolina � much less that she was in
Maryland. No, I simply patted my biker friends
on their tentacles and told them of Dumbo's disaf-
fection for Northerners. I don't dare think about
See THE, Page 12
T
I
� -� r -
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I HI FAST K( M I MAN
1 ki tl 20 I986
Classifieds
PERSONALS
? ATTENTION ALL RUNNERS'
JOGGERS AND ATHLETES
� i gma Phi Epsiion is sponsoring ;
I Annual Heart & Sole Classi fl �
Sat v,v;n 22nd A Fun Rorff
jana a 10 K (6.2 mi run will be I � I
' he 2 m s at 9 an a
-s All proo- 3
go to the America 5
i ter Sat � s
' He Town Co"
For more ini
tTar

he enti fee 1 tudents is V. 1
SIG EP GOLDEN HEARTS Or
ext meeting w be tl Sunday at 9
� ibout tl
'ures being taken
N H from 7 10.30 All gii
p with the 10 K
the house ana find out
what time ti . � �
TARA TERROR rY � �
ALPHA PHI BIG BROTHERS
MEETING
and bea
LYNN Tha -

' �
I
Love �
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA
for .�
nac
tac � t of
. � � � �
JDE SPE RATE l Y
? FEMALE
N
SEEKING
PI KAPPA PHI

ALPHA SIGMA PHI
SlG EPS
But whe
END OF THE vVEEK SURPRISE
BASH
Aho V
32 02
���: � � ; 1
VOTE STEVE CUNANAN


not
FACULTY AND STAFF �
�'���� -
inytimi
rY &d � N
FIRE y . -
17 2 except 2C- � 26tl
12 30 8 prr No appointm I
ar e Ask aboo portraits con
� dus organ.za
a a

tion
KA LITTLE SISTERS
nq s '
� - ' : �� :
g for a FANL
lATTENTION SPORTS FANS
! " King Tournament is
I " '
J27tt v . Prepare
'� ������� . bloody : � '
last !
BLONDIE BOY COOKIE
LOBSTER MAN. STUDLEY REN
TAL DRIVER AND BIRTHDAY
BOY: Freeport was an aov
blast! ! Who Mill ever 1
not shot �- �-
Specials punct � . � � �
neighbors, tt � � ��
seat 20 rreopie, vocabulary iessons
boiled lob! '� ter
��apes the s -
se Beck s Beer grop . I ��
cab drivers, 4c kilowatt
dreaded inventor sheet 10 30 p rn
partying, what the t ck, ana " e
giant coconut I - DU .ANE
DE WOBBER1 Love, the girls of
Woodbourne Estates number 2 P S
Du Wane De Wobber look alike con
test coming soon Come prepared
with screwdriver in hand!
S PACEMendenhaM Student
Union March 17 22Works b David
EHallBFAPaintmqV-nor
ScuIpture
LAMBDA CHI'S: Chris, Pat,
Munse, Chip, Dell, Dennis, Bernie
and Bob You guys better be ready
for a partying weekend in Hilton
Head! It is going to be a blast! The
Sigmas are ready for a wild time!
Love, Sally, Kelly W , Kelly C , Mar
ta. Gumby. Verdery, Denise and
LeAnn
ALL SING PARTY: Come party at
the Alpha Xi Delta ALL SING PAR
TY Thursday at the Treehouse from
9 until It's gonna be a blast, so
don't miss itl
DELTA ZETA tl e B . M -
our tavonte
firm ks will flow,
the band will play As ck all
night and �� � . A (ton Beach
will be 1 Hope wi
thout falling on i �� Make
sure your dates gel plenty of rest,
Cai id will be
BEST' WORi- �
AJMAL Congrats on your long
� was a
ii ound the world
Boys of V
RAT. RAMBO. TOON MOOSE
STEVEN AND CRAIG
A - �
� ' a zoo!
be
GIRLS: Show off
a Bar Besl �

KIMBERLY CARPER
eve it's i . � � .
�� . re th
� . that's no lii

it yea I re to g
-
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SALE
WORD PROCESSING
SENIORS SENIORS: SENIORSi

TYPING SERVICES
� �
CHEAPTYPING P
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FOR SALE all
sizes an color; 5 Save
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CenT- - � -
STEREO FOR SALE ��-
speakers, Sanyo 8
techniques 1 . d
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PROFESSIONAL TYPING E
�asonat
5:30
FOR SALE ,aes
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FOR SALE: California King waterb
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base, bevelled mattress Very nice
$750 asking $300
TYPING: All your typing needs
done by a professional secretary
Call Doris at 355 2510 after 6 p m
TAXES: Will do your taxes for
reasonable rates. Ten years ex
penence Call Doris at 355 2510 after
6 p m
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICE: Word processing The
Dataworks specializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertations,
theses resume's and more Ail work
omputer checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary Rates
as lew as $1 75 per page, in
ling paper (call for specific
S) Call Mark at 757 3440 after 7
p m
APT FOR RENT: R.nggold
.M' Unit A Completely turmsh
ed 1 � ep1 "iens Can 637 6885
TUXEDOS All qus attending the
� P Delta Zeta, and P.
Kappa A rmals please contact
Jon Reibe 11 S7 0351 FREE
DELIVERY FREE PICK UP' Best
pric tow
WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED: For 2
� apl 4 blocks from campus
ndil ed $130 montt
� � e 0341
SUMMER JOBS FOR COLLEGE
STUDENTS: Openings available for
mei n the f cod Serv.ee Staff
11 CAMP SEAFARER ON THE
OF NORTH CAROLINA
Goo � �� . plus room and boara
� . ; � � ty for fr en I I
� ' � letl -� 8 throi )l
east it 'een
� � - � � igi expei
ecessary � . n ano gooo
� For more infor
��
eafarei p O B � ?7 v
-�� �� � 76G5
SUMMER LIFEGUARDING JOBS
� Sen - . �� . irding cer
-� . . � PR requin
. as Rt 4, Morehead
"� N 28557 PI � � 247
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE
$135 on c;us � inciai aid
� tear Freshmen,
PI -re, ongoing graduate
� r help � � , n on
funds can Academic Data
free 1 800 544 1 � 4 � �
r write P.O Box 16483 Cha1
SUMMER INTERNS WANTED
N ' �" Carolina s I weekly
� �'�'l a . � 1 circula
� �.��'� g $4 50 per hour
I rna m n ajors
- �� 228 7851 or seno resume and
�' or jean Boney
� ��s Box 431. Graham
. .
BRODY S �
' � ' � nen's store
conscious of mi
��� rking �� the
Expei -nee preferred Good
iry and ability to earn
5 :��'� �pp: i Brody's For
" �� Plaza Monday Friday .
ROOMMATE WANTED: Private
room unturn $75 deposit. $75
' ties, 7 mi from campus
Can Patty at 758 6191 after 6pm
ROOMMATE WANTED. Private
bedroom, no deposit, 15 utilities,
summer Across from pool, 5
blocks from campus Tar River
�s Call Tom at 752 6681
LIVING IN HILTON HEAD FOR
THE SUMMER: Need a place to
stay or roommates to share an
apartmenl w rh Any information
please call Kim after 6 om a-
355 5914
This Spring, Give
YounetfABreak.
With Our SpecinI
S89 Round trip Fare
�A . I
uwmm
��
I � f avail
irSpririj Break Break
GTRRILWRYS
We're Going Places.
The Fiddler's Green Or Bust
Continued From I'ae 11
vvhal happened to thai won
though 1 did hear the vs
"let's skin 'er "
I hei: came morning lohn
likes to think ol himself
somewhat of a fitness freak
that is when he's not pound
down half 0 Milwaukee and
he figured he'd whip us up a
good. healthy breakfast
(breakfast schmeakfast, give me
a Pepsi, some Chitos, and the
Muppet Show, and I can chill
out).
Well, what he told me was
alfalfa sprouts on wheat bre
along with some other
crud, looked suspiciously .
some grass and tree bai 1
growing in m back yard ! u
though, bei .
HELP I lost .
bike lock Frida bel - -
break started I nei
an � afforo a new on � �
has found � ;
752 3513 Tha' .
BRODY S � �
time sale ��� � �
be fashioa
wor� rig with the 1 I Expi
preferred Appi Br the I
M F 2 5 prr
WANTED � lei
- -ping a'
'�- 44 - ��'
TUXEDOS
ADP md I -
contact jor ��
deliver, free 1 � Best 1
'
FEMALE ROOMMATE vVANTED
T o - � � �
� � - .
Nice neic
ROOMMATES NEEDED FOR
MYRTLE BEACH �
nexi few I
erbial
: -
Honda
fohn eemingly ,
. :
Vote
CUNANAN
T
S( A '�
Walker
SGA Vice-Pri
BLOOM COUNT!
� .
ONSOLIOArED
HEATRES
"rh Mix if eek!
IMF COLOR
PI RPI ten
All Seats S2.00 Everyday Til 5:30 PA)
ruwji'
mmm
' .
(.1 G-HO"
p�i. J "HOI SK
HWNH iMMfRs'
Special f XL Student Admission Coupon
Admit 2 Students For The Price Of One
fier 5:30 p.m.
Any Sun lues Wed. r Thurs.
HThn
Color Purple
MiimvM
Mun-O-stKk
ECU Depart went of Tlieatre ArU
ROBERT SMALL
AND THE SMALL DANCE COMPANY
Friday, March 21, 1986
McCiaafc Ttoatic
contti 5th A Eastern
8:15 p.m.
Festival AmocuUm
I Festival
GALA PERFORMANCE
BY fXrrSTANDMC UNIVERSITY
DANCE PROGRAMS
Saturday, March 22, 1986
Ceattali
PwMtttAJ
Cal7S7

THE
Aerobics 52 times a week
and more
$25 a month
NO CONTRACTS
NO INITIATION FEE
Get your summer tan early
Wolff Tanning Bed
$4.00 per visit
10 Visits $30.00
(urkill
tA k
Tooth
- � .
SUYS
SUI
(Members Only)
4
lJ&.
J





n Or Bust
plate
ure
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"HOI SE"
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HMHM1
i PERFORMANCE
TSTANWNC UNIVERSITY
DANCE PROGRAMS
day, March 22, 1986
Ceaeral Admisuo
PuWk &4.00
Students S3.00
For Reservations
Call 757-S390
Mh
"��� II
V
s a week
th
CTS
N FEE
m early
Bed
it
00
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAH( H 20 v
BLOOM COUNTY
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By FRIEDRICH
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ACROSS
� �
Amencn
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11 Con �� �
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u Babylonian
deii
15 Three-base hits
� ' Hel re lettei
18 Ha
d ol rest
21 Posed tor
; . trait
22 Shut up
24 Female sheep
25 Part of church
26 Traps
28 Tell
30 Lad
31 River island
32 Assisted
35 Position ot
att.jirs
38 Tow.iid shelter
39 Snake
4 1 Dispatched
42 Youngster
4 Small particle
45 Spanish for
rivet
46 Lai
conjunction
4 7 Announcement;
49 initials of 26th
President
50 Fond wish
52 Regard
54 Apportioned
55 Remain erect
DOWN
1 Abode of
the Deity
2 Near
3 Wheel track
4 Transgresses
5 Shoots at from
cover
6 Higher
7 Son of Adam
8 Dance step
9 Kind of type
abbr
10 Meal
11 Harvests
13 Mediterranean
vessel
16 Church bench
19 Empowered
21 Splash
23 Figure of
speech
25 Assumed name
27 Organ of sight
29 Dine
32 Detested
33 Raised the
spirit o
34 Spurted forth
35 Condiments
36 Joined
37 Atmospheric
disturbance
40 Capuchin
monkey
43 Blood
44 Bird s home
47 Nothing
48 Music as
written
51 Therefore
53 Printer s
measure
f
Russian Violinist To Visit March 24
In July 1983, the United States
was honored to receive Viktoria
Mullova, one of today's brightest
young violinists, into this coun-
try. Now, less than three years
later, ECU is proud to welcome
her as part of the University
Unions Artists Series. Her per-
formance will be on Monday at 8
p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
Of Mullova's playing the
Chicago Sun-Times said, "There
is not a false or imperfectly
shaped tone in her boe. Her ar-
ticulation is close to perfect. Her
taste is faultless, and her
technical resources are
incredible And according to
The Sew York Times, "The
litany of her violinist virtues
might go on and on
While on tour in Scandinavia
in July 1983, Mullova asked for
and was granted political asylum
to the United States. At once au-
diences and critics greeted her
with open arms in cities such as
New York, Chicago, Baltimore,
and Los Angeles.
She gave her London or-
chestral debut in May 1984 with
the Royal Philharmonic Or-
chestra led by Okko Kamu, and
made her London Symphony
debut in early 1985.
To document her new life in
the West, BBC and ABC televi-
sion co-produced a profile on the
young artist for broadcast in
England, the United States, and
other countries during the fall of
1984.
Prior to her defection, M
was alread) famili � trillions
of television viewers �� the Wesi
She gained renown a, one ol the
most git ted violinists o1 hei
generation aftei tittered
first prize in the 1975 Wieniawski
and the WS2 chaikowsk) c om
petitions
Mullova was born in Moscow
in 1959 and is the onl mus
in her family, which includes a
pair ol twin sisters She v en-
couraged by hot parents U udy
violin before the age ol fiv
By the time she vsas twelve she
gave her first public concerto per-
formance, Vieuxtemps Fifth, and
her path was markeu foi i pro
digious musical career.
�� ���!��-�.

' �) ��� -?�-





I hi t M KO INIAN
Sports
Page 14
An Inside Opinion
Ruling Questioned
Are we reallv going after the
best? That catchy slogan which is
supposed to be the motto for
ECU athletics has to be question
ed.
An editorial view
by
Tim Chandler
The I adv Pirate Basketball
team, which finished 23-7 and
won the CAA regular season title
for the thud straight year, was
awarded a bid to compete in the
Women's National Invitational
"ournament (WN11) Sun. March
9. However, the athletic depart-
ment informed the team that the)
would not be able to go.
E l athletic director Dr. Ken
Kar: stated in a television intei
view (WNC I Greenville) thai he
didn't feel that at this stage ot
development it was vital to the
program to compete in the tour-
nament. I he question 1 have is
�� much more development
doe? Di Karr expect? The
Pirates have won three stra i
regulai season titles and over
;x two years have a 43-16 winn-
ing mai �
"he WNI1 has been a sta
area tor main fine quality
women's teams, reams such as
last year's -
S
and Georgia,
er-up, have all �
the irnan ei and are now
highly recognized for their pro
grams. I hat is what I consider
good development.
Dr. Karr. in not approving the
trip, commented on Duke
University in his television inter-
view. "You have to ask yourself
'will Duke University be there?'
Duke had a fine women's team
this yearand 1 strongly ques-
tion whether they are in the
Ml "
first o! all, what difference
does it make what Duke Universi-
ty does. The mam concern should
be E( I and nothing more.
Secondly, Duke also received a
bid, however they accepted their
bid to the tournament. Smart
move bv Duke University. Look-
ing down the list at teams that
have previously participated will
show how their women's pro-
grams have grown. Teams such
N Cai lina, North
Carolina State, South Carolina.
lexas, currently No. I in nation,
and many others have par
ticipated.
The tournament would have
bee: great experience for the
players that will be returning next
'�ear Recruiting would also
bet s atly Hv participating in
irnament.
As Athletic Director D-
Gene Iemplet. n stated in a
telephone interview Monday that
it (tl ild have been a
experieno Pirate
team Meat, ng that 'here wa
possibilii � idie sing
threi .�.
H w � ai be anymore
negative than the football team
losing nine straight games' Ye
the athletic department still keeps
the schedule just as difficult
years to come.
If the athletic departme-
willing to gamble with a t
that has had back-to-back 2 9
seasons, then why not gamble
the girls team0 Actually, I r
don't feel it is even a gamble
Admittedly, the baskett
program hasn't nearly brought
the money that the football tc
has. But as far as that is conc
ed, money should not play a pa-
in a team's success or even
their failure � should that be
case.
Templeton also mentioned
the athletic department did
teel that appropriate coverage
attention would be brought
university by taking par: i
tournament.
Wrong again. Cable S
Network provides national tel
sion coverage of the tournam
I have u disagree wi
Templeton's statement in
telephone interview when he
pressed that the negative asp
' g ng the tournam
outweighed the positives. I I
' only the women'
had a lot to gain by participatii .
but also the university as a a
It the athletic departi
wants people to believe the i
'hen thev need to r . ' �
Therefore. I tee tl
justifiable in denying I
1 ady Pirates a trip to the WNI1
Men Netters Blank UNC- W
Harrison Looks To Future
B SCOTT( OOPrR
Although the 1985-86 Pirate
basketball season ended last
March 1 on a sour note, head
coach Charlie Harrison and the
ECU squad should no: hold their
heads low.
The Pirates did accomj
some success as they upped their
record to a 12-16 marl fai
their 7-21 record the year be'
last) while going 6-8 in the newlv
formed CAA conference.
Harrison feels good about the
success his squad as well as
that of the conference that has
been seeking more identity on a
national basis.
"I'm pleased (with the team's
overall performance). We've
tde good strides this vear
Harrison explained. �'With the
perfomances of Navy, Richmond
and even George Mason in post-
season play � u mav show peo-
pie. an e state en-
tire area of the c nfe ic strei
g from Wi . i to An-
napolis, V . a very
rhe ; sav
both ups and I n vet begin-
ning the ing four
Vt HOOPSTERS, pane 15
Sports Fact
rhurs. March 20. lSV7
at' deteai the I niversity
P l, in the
lei
game eve the first
lim the tea ive only five
players to a sue instead ol
nine. (They a could
hav he T timeouts).
B n)Mi(,NNKss
' be 1 t I men's tennis team
pulled ofl a devastating 9-0
home-court victory over
rival UNC-Wili ist 1 ues-
cr � m
1 he win, wh , ings the
i's spring-season record to
3-2, was mpressive
Pirates competed
out three ol the players who
helped them to a 5-4 win over the
Seal awks last I
�V the No. 1 smgies spot,
junior Dan I aMont quickly
disposed ot Icrtv Gratz, 6-3, 6-2.
the match, Gratz was
the favorite, but 1 aMont's con-
sistent backcourt game proved
too much for Virginia native
Gratz.
freshman No. 2 singles player
John Melhorn was very pleased
with his team's performance
against a favored UNC-
Wilmington squad.
"Going into the match said
Melhorn, "1 would sav we were
But we all played
underdogs
ly well "
Melhorn put away his oppo-
t, let Robbins, 6-3, 6-4.
Robbins, who occupied the No. l
spot for '� awks las' �
was barely defeated bv then ECl
v : playei )ai- Shell. Melhorn
his play against Robbins was
' this vear.
"I've played left a couple ol
times before (in Virginia tour-
naments) and he beat me b
times said Melhorn. "It was
reallv good to beat him. This was
the best I've played so tar this
season
In the No. 3 singles match,
junior Greg I oyd defeated John
Peacock 4-6, 6-0, 7-6.
The No 4 singles battle was
another three-set contest.
Sophomore Pat C ampanero
ousted Troy Furbav 1 -6, 6-3. 6-1.
Kevin Plumb took care ot his
No. 5 opponent Tommy Allen in
short order, losing no games in
the first set and two in the second
for a 6-0, 6-2 tallv.
The No. 6 singles c ntcst was
pat e closest of the �
mater: "odd Sumner overcame
1 N( W's Ron 1 awrence I
6-7, 7-5.
In doubles actioi . Cat
i John Anthony comb
defeat Gratz did Robbins 2 6
6-1. 6-2. tor a win in the N
Loyd and LaMont to k
their L'NC-W opponents Peas . �
and Lawrence in straight sets
6-2. 6-4.
Bill Wing and Melhorn .
pleted the ECU sweep over Wilm-
ington bv beating Furbav and
Allen 6-3, 6-1, for a clean 9 �
overall finish.
The men will see action ne
Friday, when they take on High
Point College on the ECL' varsitv
courts at 3 p.m. Saturdav
Guilford College will travel to
Greenville for another ECl
home match. This one will also
take place on the varsitv courts
and is scheduled to begin at 1
p.m.
Tracksters Have Success At NCSU
Charlie Harrison will have high expectations for his squad in 1986-87.
Jacobs, Van Deventer
Pace ECU In A Pair
By TONY BROWN
Jake Jacobs and C raig Van
Deventer were the main benefac-
tors in Monday's twinbill blow-
out of NAIA foe Pittsburgh-
Bradford, with each pitching
seven innings of shut-out ball to
enhance their already low earned-
run averages.
ECU blasted Pitt Bradford
12-0 in the opener, then let up a
bit in the second contest for an
8-0 win, moving the Pirates'
season record to 14-0.
Jacobs allowed only three
singles and a double in the first
game, while being amply backed
up by good fielding and hitting.
It didn't take long for ECU to
establish its superiority with
Chris Bradberry blasting a
monstrous two-run homer in the
first inning, which was quickly
folowed by Winfred Johnson's
solo shot for a 3-0 lead.
The Pirates added three more
in the second, as Greg Hardison
singled, stole second and took
third on a wild pitch. Bradberry
singled him in, then Johnson
belted his second-straight round-
tripper, his sixth of the year and
57th career.
Another run came in the fourth
on a bases-loaded single by Mike
Sullivan for a 7-0 Pirate margin.
Five more crossed home in the
sixth. Leftfielder David Ritchie
opened with a double and went to
third on a wild pitch. A double by
Ed Tant made it 8-0, then
Bradberry singled and Johnson
was given an intentional walk to
load them up again. Once more,
See BASEBALTERS, page 16
B sconOOPFR
sv'�i rdii'�
The ECl men's and women's
track teams displayed their
talents iast weekend a! the
N.C.S.I Wolfpack Invitational
in Raleigh.
Craig White grabbed a first in
the 110-yard hurdles for the men.
while the ladies' I inda Gillis
finished first in the 100-meter
dash.
White, who finished first with
a time ot 14.44, was followed by
ECU'S Walter Southerland
Southerland, who finished in
third place, was clocked at 14.76
mark.
The Pirate men also grabbed a
trio of second-place finishes.
Wayne Ferguson's tune of 50.08
was enough to snatch second
place in the first heat of the
400-meter dash Ferguson's
counterpart, Julian Anderson,
grabbed second place in the se-
cond heat with a time of 48.25.
The final second-place finish
came in the 400-meter relay. The
finishing time was a 40.91 clock-
ing.
Elsewhere for the men. in the
100-meter dash, senior Henry-
Williams and freshman Eugene
McNeill finished in fourth and
fifth place respectively Williams'
time was 10.58 while McNeill
finished with a 10.66 timing.
For the women, sophomore
Gillis led the way with a first- and
fourth-place finish. Gillis' 12.0
time was the best in the 100-meter
dash while her 24.8 time in the
200-meter dash was good enough
for a fourth. Oddly enough, her
time in the 200-meter dash breaks
the ECU record of 24.96 held bv
Regina Kent in 1983.
1 he I ady Pirates' freshman
I inda Poteal grabbed a second-
place finish in the 400-meter dash
with a time ol 60.0. Sophomore
Sonja Baldwin finished fourth in
that event.
The ladies had some success in
the field events as freshman
I oleta Lee and sophomore Wen-
dy Trone placed in the discus and
javelin respectively. Lee's mark
was unrecorded as she finished
third in the event. Trone, who
finished fifth, recorded a distance
of 113 feet.
The 4X 100-meter relay team
also proved successful as the
team of Gillis, Poteat. Baldwin
and sophomore Carolyn Martin
took a second-place finish with a
time ot 48.3.
Gillis commented on the meet
and how she felt the ladies
peformed.
"Being that we are a small
(seven members) team, we did a
good job overall she said.
"We're hoping that the injuries
will stop.
"It was not the best 1 could
do Gillis said about her in-
dividual performance. "I've
never ran in lane one. 1 think 1
kind of psyched myself out (in
the 200 meter). Against faster
competition. I could have done
more
Ruggers fr
Down Yale
Bv s Ol I OOPI K
game
holida
four
the N
state ' '�
mergi
team tl
state '��
Zimm
well
In
ruggei
' '
terna"
ftei I
only
free;
Linda Gillis gets baton.
Craig White took first place in the 110-yard hurdle, thU weekend.
Hoopsters
Complete
Season
i ontinued from .
� their 1
The m mil
riei
Mason (75-t"
. ���

cam pa
It sudd
dent that
be
season. 11
� � � i
EC! ��: -
went 16-12). I -
that the I
finally gammy I
been looking �
Although bK
thr
season, ECl
finish gn
on the '
plav
t P
their last
22) follow e :
igry Ja
86-73 24
at ECl
their
game.
Coach Hai
vas disapj
games
we ran
With the
have to take
-he L'NC-W v
dropping tw
ests to I V vv
5-54 to a s11 g S
A team that Ha-
playing
-�onferer.ee a
an unfortunate w i
was a good seas
Harnsc
next year
"en more imp
"Next vear u
more consistent
"Defense
basketball � if get a f
constant effort, we v�
chance to win some
"We need more .
from our inside :
chell Henry gave
Harrison addec1
come from our -
recruiting class f we j
summer work wit . .
and the recruiting class
can make even more strides
Although Curt Vat
(the team's leading -
'he field and leader in -
Scott Hardy (the team -
leader) will be missed due
graduation. E I returns a
of capable plav
Returning starters include
Henry (scoring, rebounder free-
� hrow and minutes-played
leader), Leon Bass deader in
blocked shots) and Keith Sledge
Other returners include Manuel
Jones, William Grad. John
Williams. Jack Turnbill. Herb
Dixon, Derrick Battle, Jeff Kelly
and Gus Hill. Hill was redshirted
this year and is expected to con-
tribute next year.
If the Pirates' improvement in
the 1985-86 campaign is at all in
dicative of their 1986-87 season,
then ECU fans may look forward
to a successful year.
'

B6
a
:
Tl
shi
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vat
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2718
(.reel

!






estioned
baU team
s? Ve:
still keeps
fficult for
cm is
a team
� k :
ble on
i : (
le
basketball
light in
ball team
cern-
be the
he ex-
aspecis
: !cei
I
. the
WN1T.
I; -
UNC-W
test 'au
� the oerall
. cfvame
6-4,
2 h
No 1
N OUt
��
md M(
lean v-n
5 .

ne

sgin
tNCSU

place in the 110-yard hurdles this weekend.
rm 1 AMAKOl IN1AN
MAR H 20, 1VX
15
i small
1 a
did.
e injuries
uld
.it her in-
"I've
� I think 1

. � Kg;linst taster
: hav d
Mto
Sh1
Ruggers Travelled To Bahamas;
Down Yale During Spring Break
B S OI 1OOPKR
I he Rugb dub split a pan o!
during the Spring Break
ys, defeating Yale while
, to I : eeport
iip was set up In Rugb)
International and featured
No ! And 1 teams from the
h Carolina - ECl
UN G rhe two teams
ogether, forming one
al represented the whole
v d as Club President Bill
a n put it, North
indeed represented
added the ext
second game
K Ugb I lub p!a- ;
i iague i i
, (he

No: th Cart
game as the won I
ub s first match, the
e on the shot; end
. with the Freeporl In
R igbv Club.
rl
w ho were p
fieii home field, took a
e, North Carolina's
e can try by Ra
( ampano eluded two
ers and dove at
i: line as lie scored
?-vards out. Mike Brown
factor, !hi
mow the ball N (
in the com
just fi
line, N C. m
their wa� i
Hob 1 obin di '
N.
when Jim I
split the
I he hall ei
v anta.ee favoi ii
I tie c lub's ten i
the firs
l leag .
scoring thi t i
1 hi
ren
ied
able
stanth threatened, but managed
one field goal. It came on a
�l field goal by Jim
i ti who was tilling m
foi a Bi wn.
V in all, I ie players felt that
e was beneficial a
. were abU to play with some
: etition.
"Some of the best teams from
the �� �' Id come to this
i id to play presi-
i iti m ei m an n said .
his a ill be an an-
. al trip foi out growing club
ccording to Zimmermann,
king for those
i I laying or
game ol rugbj A
eduled foi
406 Rotarv St.
gb Club will be in ac
�- ii eensboro
. . irnament
from North
Ho opsters
Complete
Season
( ontinued from page 14
first five, ECl 'hen
ed tour-in-a-rov
. nth oi Januar, when
conference began, was
Harrison's Bucs. Five
including a stunning
irt upset of George
75-6"7 on Jan. 25) were
with tour losses
P ates with an even 9-9
- " one month left in their
idenly became quite evi-
the Pirate program may
- wa) towards a wim
rhis I as not happened
initial year at
82 S1 when the Bucs
It was also apparent
ate program was
. the respect it had
? g for.
eing in the top tour
a major portion of the
I CU let the (top four)
p through their lingers
ll da of regular-season
Pirates came up short
wo attempts. A one-
GMU (70-69 on Feb.
wed by an upset loss to a
. - lame1- Madison team
Feb. 24). This meant
II would be on the road
fii it : �und tourney
ach Harrison reflects. "1
�appointed with our last
les he said. "It was like
ut of gas
�he losses, ECU would
take on the fourth seed�
N -W Seahawks. After
g two regular-season con-
UNC-W, the Bucs lost
c c4 to a strong Seahawk club.
am that Harrison said "was
g as well as anyone in the
ference at that time It was
nfortunate way to end what
a good season for ECU.
irrison has his sights set on
year's team and hopes to see
more improvement.
Next year we have to have
consistency he said.
fense is the only constant in
"u-ketball � if we can get a good
nstant effort, we will have the
e to win some games.
"We need more contribution
our inside people � Mar-
Henry gave us quite a bit
Harrison added. "It's got to
e from our seniors or our
recruiting class. If we get good
summer work with returning kids
and the recruiting class helps, we
nake even more strides
Although Curt Vanderhorst
�the team's leading shooter from
tseld and leader in steals) and
Scotl Hardy (the team's assist
deader) will be missed due to
graduation, ECU returns a host
of capable players.
Returning starters include
Henry (scoring, rebounder, free-
hrow and minutes-played
deader), Leon Bass (leader in
blocked shots) and Keith Sledge.
Other returners include Manuel
Jones, William Grady, John
Williams, Jack Turnbill, Herb
Dixon, Derrick Battle, Jeff Kelly
and Gus Hill. Hill was redshirted
this year and is expected to con-
tribute next year.
If the Pirates' improvement in
the 1985-86 campaign is at all in-
dicative of their 1986-87 season,
then ECU fans may look forward
to a successful year.
� �����
�.��.� i
Veterans Awareness Day
Sponsi
. v Filmsommittee
Wed. March 26
ITINERARY
11 a.m
12 noon
6 p.m
8
9
p.m.
p.m,
Intramural Action Heating
Bv STKPHANIK IKW
As warm weather heads our
way, take advantage of the
Intramural-Recreational Services
many athletic events to tone up
before summer! Here are a few
announcements that might help:
Anyone interested in becoming
an Intramural aerobic instructor
should prepare a five-minute
routine including floorwork and
aerobic exercise and tryout Apr.
12 at 10:30 am in 108 Memorial
Gym. Why not get in shape while
getting paid for it0 For more in-
formation call 757-6443.
The entry deadline for Co-Rec
Raquetball Doubles in Mar. 27.
Register in 204 Memorial Gym.
Co-Rec Volleyball is a hot item
on the spring calendar. Why not
"set" yourself for an exciting
time and register Mar. 25 in 204
Memorial Gym.
Team handball is right around
the corner. The season begins
Mar. 24 in Memorial Gym, but
all particpants are required to at-
tend at least one clinic to explain
rules and regulations for safe
pla For more information call
or drop bv 204 Memorial Gym.
Remember the INTRA-ACTION
hotline is 757-6562.
Today is the last day to register
tor the IRS Tennis-Doubles
Tournament. The tournament
begins Mar. 24.
The backpacking trip will be
Mar. 21-23. Be sure to pick up
next week's ropy of Tidbits for
important tips. The intramural
office (204 Memorial Gym) also
has information packets on the
trip.
Remember the pre-season soft-
ball tournament sponsored by
Easter Seals will begin this Friday
and continue through the
weekend. The entry fee is $20.00
� with all proceeds going to the
Easter Seals foundation 2K
men's and four women's teams
will be allowed to enter.
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
10th & Dickinson Avc.
WE BUY GOLD & SILVER
INSTANT CASH LOANS
Po AU Traruactions Confidential �
BUY�SALE�TRADE ?
; 752-0322 &�&
� Hows: �� ���� pa Mo�S�t. '
A Little More "Beach
at
-JrzE zaL
on
m

Save your breath.
Plant a tree to make
more oxygen.
ike a 30 Minute Vacation
SUNAL
TAWINC SYSTEMS i
Call for appointment
756-9221
b16 E Arlington Blvd
Rugby In Bahamas
Pirate plaer are shov ��� Hopi in a serum during their win over
Yale University a- thelub (bottom) takes time to pose with a few
friends.
Briei tribute to all veterans at the
Veterans Monument �

Distribute free soft drinks in front �
o the Student Store

Wine and Cheese Social. Bring a �
friend. Mendenhall.

� Movie: "The Anderson Platoon"
� Movie: "Birdie" :

HILLCREST LANES &
LEISURE SYSTEMS are
sponsoring rhe 1st annual
BOWLATHOS
DA TES: March 22-23
TIME: 2:00 P.M.
TICKETS: $5.00 for 3 games &
shoes and a
chance to win two kegs or other
various door prizes
Ticket Info: 756-2020
presents
Saturday, March 22nd
XANADU
f
A
HILLCREST LANES
: 2718 Memorial Drive
I Greenville
����������������
r
Doors open at 8:00
Show from 8:30-10:30
Men Free After 10:30
GIRLS! 2:00 Off
for XANADU
with coupon at door
Men Admitted Free After 10:30
Top 40 Music By John Moore
DON'T MISS
THIS WORLD FAMOUS PERFORMANCE
Don't DRIVE Call the �& uU
for a FREE RIDE
758-5570
Privat Club � All ABC P�rmit
���
-4
i





Ladies Take Two From VCU
Bv riM CHANDLER
�.�(��! sp.wl, tMm
rhe 1il softball team im-
proved its record to a sensational
14 1 mark,as the) sweptapairof
games from Virginia Com-
monwealth IPuesday afternoon.
I he Pirates won the firsl game
by a o-l count. Wendy Oment
received a walk, and then stole se-
cond base She scored on an eiror
ot a ground-ball hi! b Jeannie
Murray
1 he Bucs remained
the fourthnmn.
ploded foifive
the fourthfoi
Ozment,Mui ray
I unst'ord.Also Be�
and MonaJack
StacevBoyei
pitcher, inoved hei u
Her earned-run a ei
vear is anincredible0
I n i he finale of the
bleheader, Robin (naves mi
. ed hei record to 7 ! .is she
B i vei VCl 5-1.
1 he Pirates once again opened
lie game by picking up a run
lie tnst inning, lulie Farrow
�n base w ith a w alk, and latei
naged t i score on a fielder 's
� sti uc k again in the
when they collected foui
1 he foui runs came on
lits I he ! uns were scored
� Kee, c aria Alphin,
1 i. and Murray
Virginia Commonwealth pick-
only run ol the game
h inning rwo hits by
V'CI rror by th I
core.
I he next action tor the Bik
softballers will be March 21 21 in
the Honda Stale I ournament
I he Pirates open play in the
round-robin event with two tnst
day games (Statson, and
Massachusetts).
But Slats
Graves and Boyette have only
allowed six earned runs in the
teen games that they have played,
rhey have M strikeouts combin-
ed (Craves 32).
Sophomore leannie Mu
leads the learn in extra base hits
with six (foui doubles.
ti iples), also in RBl's with 10, in
hits w ith I 8, arid in i Lin � scored
with 16.
-JU
TRY OUR NEW
DINNER COMBINATION
Vote
CUNANAN
S( A President
Walker
SGA Vice-President
Choice Ot
�Beef with Broccoli
�Sweet and Sour Pork
�Kang Pao Chicken
�Moo Goo Gai Pan
�Shrimp with Lobster Sauce
�Pork Szechuan Style
IN 1 iKi ST nol Sn
�.�� :
Staoey Boyette picked up her seventh win of the season anaiiMI
Basebaliers
Sweep
Panthers
Continued from page 14
Sullh - me
with a two-run double. A wild
pitch hi ij e one more,
� ockrell's hit n adt
osest the Panther e
was in the first on a wall
an error and a single with one
bui .i double-play ended the
his first decision
l i Pira � triking out five,
I two and allow
mers pac-
ed EC! Bradberry
and two sing
Ritchie and
Sullivan each collecting two
doubles and a single.
V interesti - .� is the fact
that ' I hnson hii three more
e runs and gets three more
pitching victories, he will become
N A history to have
eked 60 homers while winn-
ing 30 games.
LC I eased ofl on the Panthers
in the nightcap, using numerous
substitutions in notching a y-o
win tor (. raig Nan Deventer, who
is now 4-0 on the ear.
The Pirates started the scoring
in the bottom of the first. Greg
Hardison singled, stole second
and came home on a hit bv
Bradberry for a 1 -0 Pirate lead.
Another run scored in the se-
cond, with Steve Sides doubling
and later scoring on a sacrifice fly
by Robert l.angston.
Four more came across in the
second for ECU, with a two-run
homer bv shortstop Greg Har-
dison being the main blow.
The last three Pirate runs came
in the third. Ja McGraw got all
the way to second on an error,
then came home on Sides' single.
A Jim Riley triple, the first three-
bagger for ECU this year, scored
Sides. Ironically he was followed
by the second triple of the season,
this off of Langston's bat,
resulting in the 8-0 game total.
Van Deventer bettered Jacobs'
performance on the mound in the
first game, fanning a whopping
10 batters, giving up only two
singles and two walks. Two other
Panthers got on base via errors,
but one ot those was wiped out
on a double-play.
Richie and Hardison paced
ECU with a homer and single
apiece.
In the words of Panther head
coach Jerry Persichini as told to
Pirate scorekeeper Stuart Gantt,
"East Carolina's got more
bathrooms than we do students
which aptly sums up to the pro-
spects of the 15-man Pitt-
Bradford baseball team against
ECU.
The Pirates will be in action
this weekend at Harrington Field
when host Richmond for a
doubleheader on Sat. and Ver-
mont for a doubleheader on Sun-
day at 1:00 p.m.
Hours Monday thru Thursday
1ft(, . A M to 10 00 P M
10 discount on ntcjulor
dmn�f mnU n.m. Fnday and Saturday
with ECU ID ' M to 11 00 P M
Sunday . Noon to 10:00 P M
1 Peking Palace
Chinese Restaurant
Greenville Square 7 C.C "i " CO
Shopping Center OD" I I D 7
3L-
ONLY
s
t A �
J





Ladies Tah
o From VCU
M H VMM I K
liii
w
f
y
4
50
AI KI 1
eking Palace
T
ehailers
Sweep
Panthers
I





Title
The East Carolinian, March 20, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 20, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.464
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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