The East Carolinian, March 18, 1986






�hc
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No.tg �f Tuesday, March 18, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Parking Plan Delayed;
Committee Formed
By PATTI KKMMls
I Nrwt rk.
- "
Flits W( KfHt
Put To Use
A Lacrosse team takes advantage of the field at the bottom of College Hill. The field was the initial
site for additional parking. See related story on page 1.
Support Group Offers Help
By JENNIFER MYERS
MTWtMm
Alcoholics Anonymous is a na-
tional self-help organization with
a chapter in Greenville that helps
alcoholics stay sober.
Members attend weekly
meetings at various churches
around town According to a
spokeswoman from the Flynn
Christian Home, a half-way
house for recovering alcoholics,
"Those who do not recover, do
not give themselves totally. If AA
(Alcoholics Anonymous) doesn't
help, they haven't been honest
with themselves. No one can ex-
pect a quick magic cure
AA has two different types of
meetings; opened and closed.
Anyone can go to the open
meetings, such as friends of
members, or people seeking in-
formation. Closed meetings are
only for members. Confessions
and group discussions take place
at closed meetings, where the
alcoholics receive support and
understanding from fellow
members.
"Not many students have pro-
blems and come to AA the
spokeswoman said. "Students
have become aware there is a pro-
blem. Sometimes they attend the
open meetings, but very few are
members
A campus organization called
BACCHUS (Boosting Alcohol
Consciousness Concerning the
Health of University Students)
was formed for concerned
students at ECU. Their purpose
Media Board
is to promote responsible drink-
ing. They could, therefore, be
classified as helping those who
drink of who have a drinking
problem.
BACCHUS is student run with
members originating from Social
Work and Criminal Justice
departments, people interested in
pursuing this field as a carrer.
those with friends who have
alcohol problems, or just those
interested in the organization's
cause.
According to Karen Plamer,
the president of BACCHUS,
"Some people have the opinion
that we're a strange group, that
we don't drink. But we go out
and have a good time, we go
downtown. We just believe in be-
ing responsible drinkers. We
want people to be aware that
there is a problem with drugs and
alcohol. We believe in drinking
responsibly
BACCHUS works with first-
time offenders in alcohol and
drug-related charges. These of-
fenders attend workshops where
they see movies and fill out ques-
tionnaires. A follow-up interview
is held within a week of the
workshop. "This puts the
students in touch with each other,
and lets them know that there is
concern. It's a place they can go
to talk, and to know we're here.
There is no pressure, no
discipline, no mediators
Palmer stated.
The workshop can act as a
referral service also. If the stu-
dent feels he needs professional
help, he or she can be referred to
the counseling center, the Mental
Health Center, Alcoholics
Anonymous, or Narcotics
Anonymous, depending on the
need. Palmer stated that, "First
offenders usually don't have pro-
blems. However, a problem
could begin, "so referal could be
neccessary
BACCHUS works with RA's
in dorms and are trying to get
fraternities and sororities involv-
ed. They are trying to get ac-
tivities organized such a schedul-
ing bands or having field days to
help the campus understand their
purpose and to help raise money.
"By getting people involved it
could help them as well as BAC-
See GROUP Page 5.
The plans to pave the field at
the bottom of College Hill to pro-
vide additional parking for com-
muters and staff was postponed
after the Finance and Facilities
Committee decided March 7th to
form a committee to look into
other alternatives.
According to Elmer Meyer,
vice-chancellor of Student Life,
action to find more available
parking began after a petitition
signed by approximately 25
falculty members was submitted
which expressed the need for ad-
ditional staff parking and con-
cern was voiced by others about
the lack of parking.
Tom Goolsby, director of the
Marching Pirates was one of the
faculty members who signed the
petition. He stated that there is a
parking problem but thinks pav-
ing the field is a "terrible idea
"It would be be very uncom-
fortable to practice on a paved
field. It is already hot on the
grass, pavement would lake it
awful stated Goolsby.
The Student Government
Association held a public forum
on the 5th to get student input on
the proposal. Approx, rr.atly 30
students were present.
Student response indicated that
the field is both needed and
wanted for recreational purposes.
Remarks were made referring to
the future ECU as being East
'Concrete' University.
Several students stated that the
university needs to develop a long
range plan for growth that pro-
vides space for both parking and
recreational areas. Other students
suggested an increase in parking
fees to finance a parking deck.
The Falculty Facilities Com-
mittee met on the 6th to form a
proposal to send to the Board of
Trustees. Due to a split vote, an
agreement was not reached. They
did decide to suggest forming a
committee to look into the exact
need and alternatives.
On Friday the 7th the Finance
and Facilities Committee decided
to send the proposal back to
Chancellor Howeil to appoint a
committee to report back to the
Board at a later date.
David Brown, president of the
SGA, statedWe need to get the
word back to the Chancellor that
we are against paving this or any
other recreational field
Brown said he is presently
seeking letters from leaders of
campus organizations who sup-
port saving the field. He also has
plans for another public forum
sometime in the future to get
more student input.
"I had mixed feelings at first
about paving the field, but its
pretty clear that students want
the area to stay green remarked
Meyer. "Sometimes we (the
falculty) may forget that
although we get to go home at the
end of the day the students live
here
SGA Gives Money To Vet Club
By PATTI KEMMIS
At their meeting Monday
night, the Student Government
Association gave the Veteran's
Club 200 dollars to help fund
the Veteran's Awareness Day be-
ing held on March 26 and also
agreed to recommend to
Chancellor Howeil that the
POWMIA Hag be flown in
front of Joyner Library.
"Our belief is that this kind of
effort will generate enough
energy to bring POW MIA to
some sort of resolution stated
Jim Reid, president of the
Veteran's Club.
Speaker of the SGA, Kirk
Shelley announced earlier rumors
that President Reagan was going
to speak at this year's graduation
ceremony are false. He stated the
idea had been proposed but later
dismissed due to various reasons.
The legislators were reminded
of the elections being held on
March 26. Running for the SGA
offices are: president � Steve
Cunanan and Chris Tomasic;
vice-president � Anthony 'Tony'
Jackson and Gorden Walker;
treasurer � John Eagan; and
secretary � David Tambling.
In other SGA business, Presi-
dent David Brown has been
working with the Greenville City
Council to reach a new agreement
about the parking on 5th Street.
The proposals Brown submit-
ted were: to increase the time
limit on parking from two hours
to three hours; not to tow unless
the vehicle is causing a traffic
hazard or blocking a residencial
entrance or exit; and a small in-
crease in the fines in exchange I
not towing.
Brown has asked all students
who have had their cars towed
from the surrounding area of
campus this school year please
contact the SGA office.
The next city council meeting
that this issue w.a be discussed at
will be April 9
St. Patrick's Day Honors A Legend
Bv JILL MORGAN
TUfTTTiIlM
Yesterday, St Patrick's Day, is
a day when the Irish in everyone
comes out. People celebrated
Ireland's patron Saint Patrick,
reinforcing a legend built around
the humble man who reportedly
drove the snakes from Ireland.
Few facts are available on St.
Patrick. Most of us just consider
St Patrick's Day as an excuse for
an awesome party. Actually,
however, the legend of St.
Patrick stems back to the days of
the Roman Empire.
Expressions Decision Delayed
When the Roman Empire was
weak and near collapse Britain
was vunerable to looters who
crossed the Irish Sea, sacked
farms and stole slaves and any
valuables they could get their
hands on.
At age 16 Patrick was taken
slave in Britain and ultimately
sold to a cmeftan in northern
Ireland. During lonely hours on
Ireland's hillsides tending flocks
of sheep Patrick prayed often
and accepted his dilemma as
punishment for not heeding
God's commandments.
Deciphering a sign Patrick
believed to be from God, he
escaped the enslavement of the
hills and sheep and devoted the
rest of his life to prayer.
Patrick travelled through
Ireland as a missionary conver-
ting pagans to Christians � he
was a tireless and fea.Iess mis-
sionary- nicknamed "Old Shaved
Head
As the centuries passed a day
wa set aside to honor St.
Patrick's life and achievements
� March 17th � the day of his
death.
Primarily March 17th was set
aside as a religious holiday. As
years passed celebrations started
occurring after church � and to-
day there are celebrations,
parades, and parties around the
world in commeration of St.
Patrick.
The biggest and most famous
parade is the St. Patrick's Day
Parade in NYC � thousands
upon thousands of Irish, and
non-Irish alike, indulge
themselves in what may be the
biggest street party on record.
Green beer flows freely in the big
city � and everybody's happy!
Familiar symbols associated
with St. Paddy's Day include the
"Wearin' O the Green
shamrocks and Leprechauns.
The wearin' of the green is a
symbol of unity for Irishmen and
See LEGEND Page 5 .
By CARLOYN DRISCOLL
afT Writer
Further discussion of a pro-
posal to improve Expressions
(ECU's minority magazine) was
postponed during yesterday's
Media Board meeting until later
this week.
Over a month ago, the publica-
tion was placed in a state of
moratorium (all funds and opera-
tions were frozen) by the Media
Board because of budget and
organization problems. Expres-
sions will remain in moratorium,
according to the Media Board,
until these problems can be
resolved.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds10
Editorials4
Features6
Sports8
The strongest principle of
growth lies In human choice.
�George Eliot
A proposal was submitted at
an open hearing on March 4 by
several students who had discussed
the plan at Minority Student
Organization meeting the night
before. The main purpose of the
proposal is to present Expres-
sions in a "format that minority
students want said William
Roberson, who read the proposal
to the subcommittee at that time.
This format, he said, would
enable "minority students to
voice their opinions on issues that
directly and indirectly affect
students at ECU
A Media Board subcommittee
met with the general manager and
managing editor of Expressions
before spring break to discuss the
proposal, which was accepted by
the subcommittee and brought
before the Media Board for ap-
proval.
The proposal allows for the
publication of three issues of the
magazine next year, as well as the
establishment of a monthy
tabloid, entitled "Idiom The
proposed tabloid is to be used as
a "training ground" for the Ex-
pressions staff and will be paid
for through advertising revenues.
The first issue, however, will be
financed with the remainder of
the 1985-86 budget.
The proposal also provides the
publication with a faculty ad-
visor, Gay Wilentz. Wilentz, who
volunteered for the position , is a
member of the English Depart-
ment Faculty.
In addition, the current pro-
posal request a "written com-
munication of apology" from the
Board to the staff of Expressions,
stating that the magazine "was
unduly placed in a state of
moratorium" without prior
notification, that the Board's ac-
tion was inconsistent, and that
"some minority students feel that
this action has racial implications
relevant to ECU's degree of
racial equality
The last part of the proposal
states "Be it resolved that the
management persue all
reasonable meansto represent
all minorities whether racial,
ethical, or idealogical in the
minority publication.
The Media Board will meet
Thursday, March 20 at 7:00 p.m.
in Mendenhall to further discuss
this proposal.
SGA Meeting
At Its meeting Monday Bight the SGA voted to help fund a Veteran s Awareness Day. See related
story on page 1.
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A






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 18, 1986
Announcements
MAKING A MAJOR
DECISION
' n program is designed to aid students in
I nooairtg an academic maior in a small
group format Each participant will also
I eceive individual aid trom trie group leader
? desired Group participants will increase
self knowledge of their interests values
aDiiities learn now these relate to majors
and career areas at ECU and narrow their
options through a systematic career decision
making process The Maior Decision Group
will meet Monday March 17 )� 21, and 24
ATTEND ALL FOUR MEETINGS 31 XM
Wright Annen Please contact the Counsel
ng . enter in 30' Wright Annex (661I for fur
'her information or to let us know you plan to
attend
PHI SIGMA PI
ASSERTIVENESSTRAINI
WORKSHOP
NG
A three par' workshop offered to students
al NO COST by the Student Counseling
center Thursday March 10 11 t April 3
' I �� workshop will focus on helping members
I s'iriguish between their assertive, ag
jress.ve ana nonassertive behaviors Par
Danti i �n learn how to express
'� f reives directly ano openiv and respond
r'Dfvorai Situations in a mannf
e 'er compromises ndividuai
� ft n� offends others PLEASE CALL
-OuNSEliNG CENTER FOR REGiSTRA
ION
PIRATE WALK
The IDs tor both operators ana escorts
should have already been made but if you
are one of 'hose who has not cease get in
'a � w tr a staff member tor details as
I .�S OOSS'ble THANKS'
TABLE TENNIS
TOURNAMENT
An An Campus Table Tennis Tournament
1 sponsored by the Studen' union Re� 'ea
Ml Committee II win be "ieid or Thursday
Marcn �ft- a' 6 30p �oc- 44 of
Mendenhan S'uden' Cfnf A
students facui'v & staff are e g.be 'o par
pa'etree Register .n the Bnnards Center
� MendenhaM br Wednesoa, vva- I ivth
Phi Sigma Pi will hold Its next business
meeting on Wednesday. March 19 5 30pm in
Biology 102 Please plan to be there we're
nominating next years officers Don t forget
the pledge meeting at Spm
INTENDED SLAP MAJORS
General college students interested in ma
loring m Speech Language and Auditory
Pathology will meet on Tuesday. March 25 in
Brewster D 101 for purposes of advisement
for Pre registration Advising will begin at
S 00pm Students uanble to attend must con
tact the SLAP Depf prior to the time stated
above to schedule an appointment
VIOLINIST VIKTORIA
MULLOVA
A special documentary on violinist
Viktoria Mullova will be shown on Greenville
Cable television today at 3 00pm and
8 00pm The Department of University
Unions Artists Series Committee is presen
tmg Miss Mullova in concert on Monday
March 24 at 8 00pm in Hendrix Theatre
SUMMER JOBS
It over the break you didn t have luck tin
dmg a 10b and are looking to save good
money and gam some experience to build
� our esume you are mvited to an inter view
with The Varsity Internship Program on
Tuesday and Thursday at 7 00 m BB 303 No
particular maior is necessary Average
salary is around 13500 See if we can help
you
RACQUETBALLCLUB
There will be an organ.jat'Onai meeting on
Tuesday March 18, Spm at Memorial Gym
room 102 All members are required to be at
�he meeting in order to go to intercollegiate
Tournament at UNC All new people are
we'come
PRE MED
The next meeting of Alpha Eps'lon Delta
w n be held on Tuesday March 18 at fpn
'OomM'Flanijsn Or Dennis O'Neii O D
a Greenville Optometrist will be the
featured speaker Plans tor the convention
a' Chapel Mill on March 20 through 22 will
aiso be discussed, so it s very important tha'
an members attend this mee'ng
FREE
RENT
Going Home For The Summer
But Need A Place For The Fall?
Tar River Estates has a summer special for
ECU students - Rent an apt by May 1st &
keep your appartment RENT FREE for June &
July! For details call or come by Tar River
Estates Info Center 1400 Willow St. No. 1.
752-4225
Tired ot waiting in line tor the phone or showed Leuve �� i
dorm doldrums behind there is on alternative Your own
place at Tar River Estates Select a one bedroom garden apart
ment or a two or three-bedroom townhouse En(oy fully equip
ped kitchen, washer dryer connections in some apartments,
spacious clubhouse swimming pool, and picnic area by the
river Conveniently located near East Carolina Univers r
rvitn SGA Trnrv � enice Come by today or Call
TarTJivery
ESXVTE!
752-4225
MOO Willow St
Office Hours
M F900 5 30
Sat & Sun 1 00 5 00
- � �
For The Man Who
Wants To Dress To Impress"
Come by and see the new line of
Rigolletto
Great new styles and colors.
Better than before
Hawaiian Print Shirts
Bermuda Shorts
Jackets, Jeans, also casual pants all
by Rigolletto - new line in fashion
Come by today!
We also have:
UNION BAY
HEET
LEE
AJ'S
Layaway now for summer
10 off for all ECU students
with ECU ID
355-5222
M-Sat. 10-9
Pl.ua Mall
Muter Card
Visa
Choice
American Express
Welcomed!
VETERANS CLUB
There will be a meeting Wednesday night
March 19 trom 7 � 9 30 pm In room 247
Mendonhaii There are many important
topics tor discussion including Veterans
Awareness Day next Wednesday We really
need group participation with this event so
P'ease try and make tomorrow night's
meeting There has also been some drastic
changes m veterans benefits as a result ot
the Granim Rudmann budget cuts You may
be surprised when you get your next check
So come on out and become aware of what is
happening All students faculty and staff
are invited to attend Refreshments will be
provided
ERISBEE CLUB
The Irates invaded Florida over Spr ng
break and returned experienced In the
Prostbreaker Tourny m Gainesville and
hosted by me fatwomec of u ot F the irates
ere 1 3 losing some (lose ones in Oaytona
the Irates were 2 0. beating u o K and a
military academy in Miami at the Spring
break Ultimate Tourny hosted by the Miami
Refugees the irates played well against 3
stronger opponents ou' iimt up short 3
times The Ultimate season continues as the
irates play in 4 more tournys a' Duke. UVA
APPST and ECU suit.max vii The irates
also play today Tuesday March It 01 the
college hill parking lot fields aganst
Weslevan of Conn Come out and suppor I " e
irates
METHODIST STUDENT
CENTER
if you are cverned abu' Apartheid
Winds of Change a � m met worth see
ng Two of South Af-a , res' known nia �
church leaoers Desmond Tu'u newly
electee B sioc jt Johannesburg ana
Of trie i9�4 Nobe "Mif or re and
Boesak Campus M.raster at the Un.vers t.
' 'he Wester- Cape and P'tsapn' of �� .
World Aii.ance of Refor ied f I rches sme
1982 descr.be 'he Aparthec- lystcn n the
Light uf scripture and tackle many f e
questions that Nor ft net 1 am hnd mos'
difficult Dinner s a s JO the Mm win be
shown a' 6 00 The cost for dinner- �, s
$! 50 if you 1 ail ahead For -nore
or to reser.e yourself spot
�S� XX
SUMMER SCHOOL
HOUSING
Residence halls to be used tor Summer
School Ivea are Jarvis Koedi Cotten and
Clement i women I. and Fleming and Garrett
"neni The demand for housing may not be
flreet enough to lustity the use of all floors In
Clement and Garrett Hans Fleming Han
wii house men during me summer but it
ill revert back to a women s residence halt
Fall Semester 196
Room deposits for the First Session of
Summer School will be accepted in the
Cashier s Office, room 105. Spilman
Buildmg beginning April 7 Room
assignments will be made In the respective
residence hall offices on April 9 and April 10
Thereafter they will be made n the Office ot
Housing Operations Room 201 Whicharo
Building
Students who wish to reserve rooms they
presently occupy provided such rooms are
to be m use this summer, are to make reser
vations on Wednesday April 9 All other
students may reserve rooms on a firs' come
first serve basis on Thursday April 10
FALL SEMESTER
HOUSING
Students enrolled Spr .ng Semester vfj
who plan to return to East Carolina Univers'
fy Fall Semester I9�a and who wish to be
guaranteed residence hall housing will be re
quired to reserve rooms during the week x
March 24 2a Prior to reserving a room a
student must make an advance room pay
ment of sao These payments which must be
accompanied by housing appi.rations
' ontracts will be accepted In the Cesfie- !
Office. Room 105 Spnman Building begmn
ng March lg .announced earner as Va- '
?0i Students residing off campus should ob
ta.n the applications from the Office of Hous
ng Operations Room 201 Wh.chard
Bu.idmg These will be available begmn,ng
�-� � h 18
Room reservations are to be n ,)��
respec' ve resid- ��(in according
to the following schedule E.iept.ons
Assignments tor Fleming Ma r � adi
n jarvis Han and those tor Urns tea d Ha
wni be made m Slay Hal
What good is a Fraternity?
Well, for starters it:
1. promotes Scholarship
2. enhances Social Life
3. provides Service to ECU
4. builds Personal Character
5. establishes Lifelong Friendships
You now have the opportunity to help
yourself and others while setting the rebirth
of a fraternity at ECU.
THETA CHI FRATERNITY
For more information on how you can get involved,
the Associate Dean of Students office at 757-6824 or E
at 752-6635.
Pieces of Chicken
(Original Recipe" or
Extra Crispy
small mashed potato
and grow
Biscuit
Medium Drink
(Ol PON
sJ JL � jJjJplus
FOR ONE COMPLETE
2-PIECE PACK
COMBINATION
We Do Chicken Right
Coupon Redeemable a!
Greenville locations on I'
Expiration Date May 9
'986
.(Ol PON
Spring into Savings!
REFRES"
- BEVERAGE
i
yj Frted
a1
California - 1 - A
IR 5 LB PAK
HUB PAH,
Ground
Beef
Loaf
OLD FASH
White
Bread
19
� �
Fried
Chicken
$
Pc
499
THREE
u
I
f
KROGER FROJt N
100 PURE
Orange
Juice
SUN PACIFk-
JUMB
Navel
Oranges
12
Ol
Can
69� 3 99
IM PIZZA
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd - Creenvill
SAUSAGE OR
PEPPERONI
Tony's
Pizza
$
coke dm � cone
CHERRv COKi OR
Coke
Classic
$
Ltr
NRB
115
DOUBLE
MANUFACTURERS
r 4 99 coupons!
la � CopywjM 1986 Ol lun fn tn . ' COUDOm
ie I �rogr Si� On " 'P tO 50' f3CI valUf"
I ouamitv mams hwvm r9 B for everv10 DurrnatP
?or everv $10 purchase
DETAILS IN STORE
Strict
always possesed
sphere stud
during
ere has been
I
1

State Park
es

-
- appi s:
a
repair
av-
a:e park system Da
the News and Obserxer
"The peopie have c
anc orr.e U nd We
a: .to preserve, protect,
and manage
"They (the
we'ii rake il ' B
even be able to preserve a
Davis said a
be
parks, natural areas.
other recre i
da-
"What
.
ave some strateg
i
The litanv � a v
buildings a: Foil Ma
and Hanging Rocl
lapsing buiJeaj al Han icks
Beach, water and sewr
at Kerr Lake and a
basin and broaden
Carolina Beach Marina.
Dav said Nortl
ranked eighth from the t
a nationwide studv or
spend . he Na
ssociation of State Park Du
"Basicallv, we're
bottom on everything D
said. "Thev have- g w
across the stre the
CJ�

Agree
abirtl
W.
Centrs
A





is a Fraternity??
hips
help
ebirth
UNITY
1II JL
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 18, 1986
flea
Chfcc
ried
Chicken
499

Navel
Oranges
399
Coke
Classic
11s
DOUBLE
MANUFACTURERS
COUPONS!
"� � vngs coupons
'o SO" ace vaiuei
�ry S10 ourrrasp
DETAILS IN STQBE
Strict Regulations Maintained Early ECU
B UEnLSTOIL
ECU has not always possesed
the relaxed atmosphere students
see today, because during the
past sixty years there has been
much change in rules and
policies.
ECU sociology students
Sabrina Garrett, freshman, nurs-
ing; Penny Peele, freshman, nur-
sing, and Tracie White,
freshman, special education
researched the rules governing
curfews and dating during the
past sixty years and found a vast
difference between the ECU of
today and the ECU of yesteryear.
In 1926 the SGA passed several
rules to students. Section I read
the judicial powers shall be vested
by the student council and the
council may reprimand any
member of the association or
withdraw privileges.
Section II stated the standard
of the college may be raised and
upheld by the students, and ex-
plusion of a student will occur for
any of the following acts; or any
other as serious; stealing,
cheating in any form; lying to the
council; night riding, smoking
and drinking intoxicating liquors.
Section III of the student's
rights indicated that any girl
would be sent home if she was
restricted for more than 12 weeks
consecutively due to non-
adherance to the regulations.
In 1926 rules were strictly en-
forced upon students. Dorms
were locked by 10 p.m. and
students were to be on campus by
5:45 p.m.
University fathers permit
dating in the early years but with
only strict adherence to or-
diances. When a female student
wished to go calling, she was re-
quired to sign her name, the
name and address of the person
she wished to call upon and file it
in the office of the lady principal
no later than 1:45 p.m. on the
day she wished to make the call.
Calling hours were 3:30
p.m5:45 p.m. on weekdays,
4:00 p.m5:45 p.m. on Sundays,
and 8:00 p.m10:15 p.m. even-
ings.
In 1927 a new regualtion was
added: women students may
speak to young men on the street
but may not carry on an extended
conversation with them, nor walk
with them. In 1932, however, this
regulation was dropped.
Nevertheless, many students in
the early 20s and 30s were
reprimanded for breaking the
strict dating regulations.
In 1921, Virginia Rhea and
Pauline Sanders were sent a note
of warning for failure to return to
school at 5:45 p.m. after going
shopping.
In 1935, Elizabeth Gibson was
late signing in at the close of
Christmas holidays. Consequent-
ly, her riding privileges were
removed for two weeks.
By 1935 calling and dating had
been officially separated.
State Parks Need Repair N. C.
RALEIGH. N.C. (UPI) �
From sagging buildings at Hang-
ing Rock to a collapsing
bulkhead at the coast officials say
the state's parks are in desperate
need of repair and warn the pro-
blem could require closing some
facilities.
William Davis, director of the
State Parks and Recreation Divi-
sion, said the state has historially
paid too little attention to park
maintenance. He said the repair
bill is now approaching $20
million and some parks could be
closed unless the General
Assembly comes up with repair
money.
"As I see things, the state was
never bought into the idea of hav-
ing a state park system Davis
told the News and Observer.
"The people have come
and said "Here's some land. We
want you to preserve, protect,
d manage it
"They (the state) said 'Fine
we'll take it But they've never
come acros with the bucks to
even be able to preserve and pro-
tect it
Davis said a new fee or tax may
be needed to bring facilities at 52
parks, natural areas, lakes, and
other recreation areas up to stan-
dard.
"What if the legislature says,
No, it's not a priority for North
Carolina? Then you know, we're
going to have some strategies for
closing parks Davis said.
The litany of woes includes
sagging buildings at Fort Macon
and Hanging Rock parks, a col-
lapsing buldhead at Hammocks
Beach, water and sewer problems
at Kerr Lake and a silt-filled
basin and broaden docks at a
Carolina Beach Marina.
Davis said North Carolina
ranked eighth from the bottom in
a nationwide study on state park
spending by the National
Association of State Park Direc-
tors.
"Basically, we're toward the
bottom on everything Davis
said. "They haven't signed up
across the street to operating the
state parks system he said in
reference to the General
Assembly.
Rep. Narvel Crawford, (D)
Buncombe, co-chairman of the
legislature's state parks study
commission, said Davis' estimate
of $20 million in repair needs was
"fairly realistic, The appropria-
tions through the years have been
sproadic
Crawford said the state had
been concentrating on acquiring
new park land and last year
budgeted S25 million for the pur-
pose.
Besides the S20 million in
repairs, the study commission
also identifies $65 million in
needed capital improvements.
Davis said the parks alsoneedsad-
ditional personnel including ex-
perts such as forestors,
biologists, and botanists to help
manage the properties
ABORTIOS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
Sls Mxmioi 13 to 18 uee a;
additional cost Pregnanc) rest. Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancy c ounseling f . 1
Further information, call 832-0535 (toll free
number I 800 532 5384) between 9 a.m and 5
p.m. weekdays General anesthesia available.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917 West Morgan St.
East Carolina Tanning Center
3 Beds � No waiting
Any member refering another receives 3 free visits
UBE Coupon Book has free visits
Open 10 a.m. till Late Night!
Suntana & Wolfe Beds
2 Free Visits with purchase of package with this ad.
(Bring a friend and that makes 5 free visits!
Headphones and fan in each room
When nobody else can tan you �
We Can!
757-3385
for appointments
Freshman and Juniors were
allowed four dates a month;
sophmores were allowed six dates
a month, and seniors were allow-
ed an unlimited amount of dates.
All dates took palce Cotten
Hall's parlor. Walking dates were
permitted on campus from 3:00
p.m5:00 p.m. on Sundays but
.
Create
cleanness.
A litter bit
at a time.
Professionally
Prepared
RESUME'S
Special Student Rates
355-6810
only if the Dean of Women
granted permission.
During 1935 Juniors, Seniors,
and Sophmores who had com-
pleted five quarters of work were
allowed show and church dates.
In 1944 the SGA added a new
set of regulations. Students were
only allowed to date when the
parlor hostess was on duty.
Students dating in the parlor were
allowed to go to the college soda
shop or uptown for not more
than one hour. Walking dates
and church dates, however, were
exempt from the filing process.
The rules for men and women
still remained separate in 1944,
and both sex's rules were govern-
ed by their respective judiciaries.
In 1963 the SGA added the
following rights that were
granted to every student:
presumption of innocence until
Sec RULES P�ge 5.
Tequila Bar Specials
Monday: Melon Margarita Night $2.25
Tuesday: Miller Night � bottles 75-
Wednesday: Entertainment Night, Ambers
Thursday: Tequila Shots
Fri. & Sat Upside down night
Sunday: Sunrise Night
� Tequila Sunrise $2.00
March 26th: Tequila Tequila Tan Contest
TEQUILA
BAR
DO H V TO H V GREEN VIL L E
(Formerly Premiums)
Sirloin,
Salad and Beverage
Super Saver Prices
6 oz. sirloin complete meal4.5 9
8 oz. sirloin complete meal$ 5.5 9
SIRLOIN SUPER SAVER combination prices
include USDA Choice sirloin steak, choice
of potato, bread, the famous Western Steer
salad bar and your favorite beverage.
Western Steer
Family
STEAKH0USS
lM�.t�H L.lMtU-
T 1986 Western Steer-Mom n' Pop's. Inc
3005 East 10th St.
Greenville
;

i





�i?e East (Earnlmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender, -r ir-niujj
Jay Stone, w.�t t
Mike Ludw k k. m. � Greg Winchester. ,�,�m�,
Scott Cooper. ��� Mln, Anthony Martin, �,�� .�,�
Daniei Mai ri r. hMtMM. John Peterson, .m
John Shannon w ��, Shannon Short, ,w.��, ��.
DeChanile Johnson. �� ���, Debbie Stevens, ��
March 18, IV86
Opinion
Page 4
Contra Aid
The Politics Of Deception
In a special televised address to
the nation Sunday night President
Reagan sought to link the San-
dinista government of Nicaragua
with everything from drug smuggl-
ing to sponsoring terrorism in El
Salvador, Costa Rica, Guatemala
Honduras and even the Dominican
Republic. He also alleged that the
Sandinistas were responsible for the
murder of four U.S. Marines in El
Salvador last year and that
Nicaragua has become a satellite of
the Soviet Union.
It is an odious task to have to
write anything which even remotely
seems to question the veracity of
the president of one's own country.
But with the U.S. House scheduled
to vote on military aid for the
Nicaraguan contras this Thursday it
is a task that no one of conscience
can shirk.
First, according to every
legitimate human rights organiza-
tion that has studied conditions in
Nicaragua, the Sandinistas, though
they are guilty of some abuses, look
good when compared to the contras
or even 1 ! Salvador, which the
United States supports. According
to the Americas Watch Report
Human Rights In Mcaragua, 7-85,
In Nicaragua there is no
systematic practice of forced disap-
pearances, extrajudicial killings or
torture While prior censorship
has been imposed b emergencv
legislation, debate on major social
and political questions is robust,
outspoken, and often strident
(The) description of a totalitarian
state bears no resemblance to
Nicaragua in 1985 The 1985
Amnesty International Report
which is now available at mam
bookstores agrees substantially
with the America's Watch report
with minor differences.
On the other hand, the human
rights record of the contras is not so
sanguine. According to Violations,
another America's Watch report
released 3-85, "They (the contras)
have attacked civilians in-
discriminately; they have tortured
and mutilated prisoners; thev have
murdered those placed in hors cie
: combat by their wounds; and thev
; have committed outrages against
personal dignity Amnesty Inter-
national also agrees with the
America's Watch findings noted
above. According to former contra
leader Edgar Chamorro, "Many
civilians were killed in cold blood.
Many others were tortured,
mutilated, raped, robbed or other-
wise abused The atrocities I had
heard about were not isolated in-
cidents, but reflected a consistent
pattern of behavior by our troops
(Affidavit of Edgar Chomorro
before International Court of
Justice, 9-5-85)
Furthermore, though President
Reagan denies that the contras are
former members of the national
guard of the late dictator Somoza,
who used the guard to terrorize the
citizenry of Nicaragua there is no
evidence for his view. According to
a research report for the bipartisan
Arms Control and Foreign Policy
Caucus entitled Who Are The Con-
tras, 4-18-85, 46 of the 48 posi-
tions in the FDN military leadership
are held by ex-(Somoza) National
Guardsmen Testimony from
former contra leader Edgar
Chamorro enlargers on this portrait
of the contras, "Former National
Guardsmen who had sought exile in
El Salvador, Guatemala and the
United States after the fall of the
Somoza Government were recruited
to enlarge the military component
of the operation. They were offered
regular salaries, the funds for which
were supplied by the C.I.A.
� �Arms, ammunition, equipment
and food were supplied by the
CIA
In responding to the allegations
made by the President to the effect
that the Sandinistas are engaged in
exporting arms to neighboring
countries, former C.I.A. officer
David MacMichaels said: "There
has not been a successful interdic-
tion, or a verified report, of arms
moving from Nicaragua to El
Salvador since April 1981 The
Administration and the C.I.A. have
systematically misrepresented
Nicaraguan involvement in the sup-
ply of arms to Salvadoran guerrillas
to justify efforts to overthrow the
Nicaraguan government (h
York Times, 6-1 1-84)
On the subject of the Nicaraguan
military buildup which the Presi-
dent claim- threatens the security of
neighboring countries and ultimate-
ly the United States, a U.S. In-
telligence Report prepared in late
1984 and cited in the Hall Street
Journal said, "The overall buildup
is primarily defense oriented, and
much ot the recent effort has been
devoted to improving counter-
insurgency capabilities In
testimony before the House Sub-
committee on Inter-American Af-
fairs 4-27-83 Lt. Col. John
Buchanan, retired USMC added,
"The might of the Nicaraguan air
force is infinitisimal the much
vaunted threat of the Soviet-built
T-55 tanks in Nicaragua is really a
hollow threat and the
military garrison near Somoto
was comprised of two small
buildings and a one-vehicle lean-to
maintenance shed
President Reagan claimed that
the Sandinistas were responsible for
the death of four U.S. marines in El
Salvador. Yet, according to an
Associated Press report filed by
Dale Nelson, when asked to present
evidence to back the President's
allegation an anonymous official in
the White House admitted that
none existed.
The Reagan Administration's
policy of deceit and support for ter-
ror in Central America is clear. It is
up to the American people to op-
pose it. The alternative posed by the
Contadora nations still waits to be
tested in good faith.
INTOTHE STEAMING JUNGLE HE
LED HIS GANG OT FREELANCE
ff��'ES T0 BLAST AN ILLEGAL
COMMIE GOVERNMENT TO ffFi( - -
SAACMO AAOVXESS PRESENTS
SOLDIER of FORTUNE m
STARRING RONALDLEROY REAGAN
A.ND ACASTOFOVER6.AAAYBF 7 RUBtS
Editorial Criticized As Inaccurate
The editor of the East Carolinian
should be applauded for his interest
in the SGA Legislature. However.
Mr. Stone's editorial on March 4th
was totally unrepresentative of what
the Legislature is trying to do. My ob-
jective is to take this opportunity to
set the record straight.
This year the SGA Legislature has
stepped into a new era: "An Era of
Responsibility
The Legislature, and especially the
Appropriations Committee, has
taken the time and made the effort to
analyze the merit and reasons tor
each and every issue presented to us
for consideration. This type of
analysis is contrar) to the traditions
of the past when bill after bill floated
through the Legislature by consent.
I will not venture as far as to say
that we have made the right decision
in every case, but we have taken the
responsibility vested in the legislative
branch of our Student Government
Association very seriously. Being a
legislature, we have the parliamentary
tools to correct our mistakes. Put in
such a situation, I feei that we have in
the past and will continue to take ap
propriate action.
As for the events of this past Mon-
day, it does not amaze me that the
editor claimed we acted on a partisan
basis; that claim is the easiest u
discredit an action that one does not
agree with. The 'Great Decisions'
vote was based on a motion presented
by several conservative members or
the Legislature to overturn the deci-
sion we made last week not to fund
the event. Ironic or Partisan0
Neither! However, the majority up-
held our precedent of not funding
academically-related projects, which
this lecture series obviously was. Fur-
thermore, even if the decision by the
Legislature had been to fund the
series it would have likely been vetoed
by SGA President David Brown,
whom I agree with in this instance.
Our president is not a conservative.
Ironic or Partisan? Neither! As for
the Michael Harrington decision, I
personally made a motion to hold up
passage because of some inconsisten-
cies in information presented to the
Appropriations Committee. Once all
of the facts are laid on the table, this
bill will be re-evaluated. Again, that
action was not of a partisan nature. It
was a unanimous decision by the Ap-
propriations Committee, which is
chaired by a democrat and made up
of a representative cross-section of
our student body. Ironic or Partisan?
Neither!1
I ReSRET I HAV�
BUT 100 MILLION
19 sive for m
CONTRAS
J
J
Claims by Mr. Stone of partisan-
ship being exemplified by the SGA
Legislature are unfounded. As for his
claim that College Republicans are
doing some type of strong arming,
there are only EIGHT CRs in a
Legislature made up of FIFTY-TWO
students. I have had a couple of math
courses and would venture to say that
eight is a small minority and not in
the nieghborhood of a controlling in-
terest. However, I am proud to say
that there is a biased in the
Legislature. The biased is toward
STUDENT INTEREST, not special
interest
Sincerely,
Gordon Walker
Representative
ECU SGA Legislature
Editorial Criticized
Jay Stone is a friend of mine and
one of the better editors we have had
at The East Carolinian. His bias in
the article about the S.G.A. not gran-
ting funds for the Great Decisions
Lecture Series appropriately belonged
on the editorial page. However, I
would like to make some points the
student population should know
about this incident.
First, there is no comparison bet-
ween the funding of honorariums for
Captain McDaniel, former pilot and
P.O.W. in Vietnam, and Socialist
Michael Harrington. Captain
McDaniel only received $200 which
didn't even cover his airfare. Also,
students raised the remaining funds
to finance his trip. McDaniel is the
president of the American Defense
Institute and Foundation, the leading
civilian non-partisan research and
lobbying groups, in Washington,
D.C , tor national defense issues.
They otter numerous debates on
many defense related issues with both
sides represented by respected ex-
perts Every person who attended the
speech vas offered free of charge
Captain McDaniel's book. Scars and
Stripes, and offered a chance to
receive his organization's newsletters
free despite their political persuasion.
The avowed Socialist Michael Harr-
ington is making a profit reaching in-
to four figures for his speech at
E.C.U
Second, the S.G.A. passed a
resolution which, in essence, stated
that student funds should benefit
mainl) students and not faculty.
Great Decisions is Maurice Simons'
baby. He said after the meeting,
"Nov. I've go: to get a tin cup and
I've got to go around and collect
money if I want this program The
Political Science Society and Honor
Society students should raise the
funds if they want the program. Also,
the speakers, who would profit from
students' funds, are professors at
Duke. U.N.C . Wake Forest and one
is an ambassador working for a think
tank. Professors from other schools
who come to speak here shouldn't
profit from students' funds for a
class-oriented lecture series. The
financing of education is the ad-
ministration's responsibility. The
series is written into the syllabus of
one of Maurice Simons' classes.
Also, Maurice Simon chose the
speakers because he said the students
in the society and honor society
didn't know of any speakers on the
subjects. 1 refuse to believe "honor"
students don't know of or can't come
up with speakers on subjects they are
supposed to be "honors" students.
Maurice Simon and two students
were all who came to lobby the
S.G.A. for the series. One student
was vice-president of one of the clubs
and the other student was a member
of the other club. Obviously not
many students are very supportive of
the series.
The S.G.A. has on several occa-
sions set a precedent that the ad-
ministration fund education which is
the school's purpose. I think visiting
professors should only profit from
student's funds when they are
distinguished experts speaking in a
lecture not meant for a class
specifically.
E. Sandy Hardy
E.C.U. College Republicans Chair-
man
Senior, History
University Unions Rudot
ander reportedly agreed that
bias was the decisive fach
three votes on funding �
speakers discussed ab
No Review
In the Theatre Arts Departn
are concerned with Pi
theatre training. We take
ourselves to present high qu
fessional productions to
mmunity. Like the
New York theatres, we depe:
audiences, and we try �
evening of theatre in Gree-
joyable as one in New Y .
It is discouraging to The i
majors when we pick up
newspaper, which is read
students, but by the comn
are a large n of oui
and find that our show ha
reviewed Is it not the a
of the press to inform
Perhaps after reading a rev
or bad, intrest mav spark i
dividual might wish to see
A good review has been know!
an actor a future part, and we
1 can all use constructive cr
It is als discouraging to
three. 3-inch columns of ne �
space was used to print ai
about a hog that enjoys chai
and wine. This and other loca
are invited to see our shows
even given free tickets. '
because our opening night ��
Friday night, those in charge
East Carolinian decided it wav r
important to review what was
downtown, than what was p
McGinnis Theatre. (Hun
wonder what goes on in that . .
building anyway1)
Lindsay P Beasley
Junior
Theatre Arts
Editor's Note: S.G.A. President
David Brown, in fact, told Maurice
Simon that he would have supported
funding for "The Great Decisions"
series had the legislature not vetoed
it. Moreover, he stated that he saw a
vast difference between Simon's pro-
posal and the S.G.A. 's ruling on fun-
ding academic programs. There isn 't
space here to go into the particulars
regretably. Suffice it to say that I
have been told by Vice Chancellor for
Student Life Elmer Meyer and
Associate Dean and Director of
Cartoon Poison
Shelton Bryant's "Spray a�
depicted in Tuesday's politica
toon, could not possibly kill the
that Expressions was a victim
management, bad editing, and
tant disregard to other mm.
groups on campus.
Mr. Bryant's characters mav be ai
tistic but not realistic. What he r
ed to portray in his political car
as the fact that Expressions a
not take the slap in the face it dese-
ed. His discernment in the car
was admirable, using a "Bes
how" label on a can of sprav wl
hid the actual poison being spread bv
the offended parties in question
claims of racism and the use
threats served as their true defense
yet such a groundless accusatior
would not be acceptable in our paper
perhaps this can of self-righieou
expressionism" has a peel off labeP
I praise Kirk Shelley and the media
board for saving this campus from
any future embarrasement. It is rm
wish to see Expressions again �
publication deserving of a pat on the
back and that can represednt
minorities in a grammatically correct
way.
�I inclusion I leave a note to
Shelton Bryant, cartoonist for Ex-
�"�'��� and The East
ESSEi ,ast n� �
spelled Shelley not Shelly.
Laura Graham
Environmental Design
Senior
Forum Rules
.Jte Ea" C'rol'n" welcomes Itmn
�IIS pos of v� M�� "�
The Leg
( ontinufd J r pt 1
worrier, I) . .
rei,
dominated
Hei
regiments
Mar
become .
not onJ
counti �
of lu

familial
as a
him �
teach the
3
!
ro
-�4
we
v �
We
J he Health
Marv Llesha dams
y
UT present
harmful and vs
B
v youi
�w healthy you a
� Ai

yea
� '�
weig
� Do
� D
� Do you tal
strid
� Do you eer.
15-30 minutes a: .
w et
� Do
drinking
� Do -
medications no: intedei
use'
� Do you wear
while riding
If you answered all the q
nons with a "yes" you i .
road to good health' It .
answered no" to anv
Tuesday. March 18
Admission $1.0
V
l&
Entries can sign u
presei
DR
Wednesday, Marl
Admission SI
10P





s
Wk
tfjgti
ORTUNE m
JAN
PTC
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 18, 1986
accurate
�r in the
lev
mem we
rial
e it upon
- quality :
liege
Sessional
pend on our
ike an
le as en-
� I :ity.
eatre
�ur campus
� on
unity (v.
i jdience)
been
en:
-
: view, g
k and
� e show

certain-
thai
� spapei
an ar'
ampagne
� papers
s and are
ose that
� -ell on a
irgc a the
a as more
as playing
aying in
i u m m 1
� big grey
n Poison
ilitical car-
Mi! the fact
tim oi poor
. and bla-
minonty
may be ar-
e refus-
al cartoon
Expressions could
fa eil deserv-
e .artoon
I "Best in
pray which
n being spread by
. .estion. Idle
arid ihe use of
eii true defense,
: e accusation
rptable in our paper.
' seif-nghteous
has a peel off label?
die and the media
ampus from
embarrasement. It is my
Expression again, a
erving of a pat on the
that can represednt
grammatically correct
' I leave a note to
:artoonist for Ex-
"ns and The East
Kirk's last name is
led Shelley not Shelly.
ira Graham
� ironmental Design
Sen
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them b our office in the Publica-
twns Building
The Legend Behind St. Patrick's Day
Continued From Page 1.
women. During Queen Victoria's
reign � when England
dominated Irish life and politics
Her Majesty forbade her Irish
regiments to wear green on
March 17th � the day that had
become significant for Irish unity
inn only praise of St. Patrick.
Green symbolizes Ireland, a
country of hopes and a country
lush, green, rolling hills.
Ihe Shamrock we are all so
familiar with is a religious as well
as a festive symbol. St. Patrick
himself used the three leaves to
each the holv trinitv oi the
Father,Son and Holy Ghost.
Legend has it that St. Patrick
himself planted shamrocks in
Ireland where they now grow in
abundance; some also say that
the saint stood in a patch of
Shamrocks where he drove the
snakes from Irelands beautiful
countryside.
The most appealing of St.
Patrick's Day symbols has to be
that wizened, bearded dwarf we
call a Leprechaun. Many of us
never will actually see a real live
Leprechaun, because you see they
do not like to live close to the
homes of humans.
Legend says, however, if you
spot a Leprechaun he cannot
vanish, and (if he's not a stub-
born ol coot) he may even tell you
where he hid his pot of gold.
Rules, Policies Change
1 have been hearing a lot about
wellness and wellness programs.
v hat's it all about and how can I
ui may level of wellness1
Most people think that
wellness means not being sick.
a ever, it means much more.
Wellness is a positive state oi
'feeling good" including the
health oi your mind, body, and
spirit. The goal of wellness is to
�educe vour risk of illness or
The Healtholumn by
Mar Klesha Adams
injurey. In order to reduce your
chances oi becoming hurt or ill
. should understand with of
� present lifestyle habits are
harmful and which are beneficial.
B answering the questions
w your can begin to find our
how healthy you are. Answer
each question with a "yes" or
"no
� Are vou a non-smoker?
� Do you have your blood
-sure checked at least 1-2 per
vear'1
� Are you presently at your ideal
weight?
� Do you eat food low in fats and
cholesterol and high in fiHer?
� Do vou take time to relax each
day? "
� Do you take minor problems in
stride?
� Do you exercise vigorously for
15-30 minutes at least 3 times a
week?
� Do you know vour alcohol
drinking'Mimit"
� Do you avoid illegal drugs or
medications not inteded for your
use?
� Do you wear your seat-belt
while riding in a car?
11 you answered all the ques-
tions with a "yes" you are on the
td to good health! If you
answered "no" to any of the
questions you should consider
making lifestyle change to incor-
porate wellness in your life.
Other tips to help you become a
healthier person include:
� Don't drink and drive
� Women: monthly breast self-
exam and annual pap
� Men: monthly testicle self-exam
� Have regular dental exams
� Annual colo-rectal exams after
age 50
Continued From Page 3.
guilt is proven, the right to face
the accuser, privilege of presen-
ting witnesses, the right to active
or passive counsel in defense, the
right to be judged by a council of
students according to the SGA
constitution, and the right to ap-
peal.
In 1964 it was added that no
student was required to testify
against himself.
Two years later in 1966 it was
added that students must sign out
on special permission cards when
Support For
Alcoholics
Continued From Page 1,
CHUS Palmer stated.
With the drinking age changing
to 21 this year the organization
may lose monentum. However,
with this age increase the use of
drugs is also expected to increase.
So BACCHUS'S help may
change from being centered on
drinking to drug use.
The campus drinking age will
change to 21 on August 1 instead
of September, so that dorm
students will not start drinking on
campus and then be expected to
stop.
BASSHUS would like to get
across to students that they are
not an anti-drinking group. They
are involved in seeing that
everyone has a good time safely.
If' interested in BACCHUS
wither call or come to meetings in
Mendenhall 242, every other
Thursday at 5:15. The next
meeting will be March 6.
Welcome Back Students
& Faculty
SPECIALS
All You
Can Eat
Any one, or any combination of 4
Shrimp � Oystm Trout
Clam Strips Devil Crab
Ocean Perch &
6
Alaskan Crab Legs Or
Steamed Shrimp
Served with Fried or Baked Potato
Cole Slaw and Hush Puppies
FA MIL Y RES TA URA NT
GREENVILLE
105 Airport Road
758-0327
HOURS: SunThurs. 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Fri and Sat. 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.
& PI KAPPA PHI
present
LADIES BEST TAN
CONTEST
Tuesday, March 18
Admission $1.00
9:00 to 11:00 p.m.
$2.00 18-year-olds
vflfcS

1st $100 cash x 1 yr. free pass to ELBO
2nd $50 cash & 1 yr. free pass to ELBO
3rd $25 cash & 1 yr. free pass to ELBO
Entries can sign up at the ELBO or at the Student Supply Store
COME EARLY!
presents
DRAFT NIGHT
Wednesday, March 19
Admission $1.50 Guys
9:00-11:00 p.m.
$1.00 Ladies
10P Draft All Nite
dating, riding, or leaving campus
after 7:00 p.m. or returning after
7:00 p.m.
The 70s, however, brought
about new found freedom to the
students at ECU when all dating
regulations were lifted in 1970.
From 1973 to the present, the
open door policy has been in ef-
fect. This policy allows both
sexes in the opposite sexe's dorm
rooms during certain hours. No
curfews are enforced.
University Optometric Eye Clinic
DR. DENNIS O'NEAL �
Comprehensive Eye Examinations
Contact Lenses
Soft, Hard, Gas Permeable Tinted
Extended Wear, Contacts for Astigmatism
Glasses (One Day Service in Most Cases)
Student & Faculty Discounts on Contacts &
Glasses
Convenient to Campus
Evening & Sat Appointments Available
iiik
Mtmt�i
American Optometric tatociatiori
612 E. 10th Street
(Across from campus security)
758-6600
Every Tuesday
is
College Night
Free Delivery
for $5.00 &
Over Purchases
7 p.m. to 11 p.m.
99C SUBS
Your Choice
Ham & Cheese
Bologna & Cheese
Ham, Salami & Cheese
Pepperom, Salami & Cheese
Turkey & Cheese
Ham, Turkey & Cheese
Not valid on deliveries
60 oi. pitchers $1.99
nrlnlri lit
11am lip n TO : 1�1 :il 44h sj
����.���
7" " � I
A





I Mi I AM Kc I JNJAN
BLOOM COUNTY
Page f�
Chamber Festival Finale
Ensemble Performs
The acclaimed chamber uroup An Die Musik will play in Hendrix Theatre Wednesday at 8 p.m.
Tickets are available fr m the Central Ticket Office today and tomorrow.
The internationally celebrated
chamber music ensemble. An Die
Musik, is scheduled to perform
the last concert of the 1985-86
ECU Chamber Festival. Co-
sponsored by the Department of
University Unions and the School
of Music, the performance will be
at 8 p.m. on Wednesday in Hen-
drix Theatre.
Comprised of five superlative
artists (Eliot Chaps, violin;
Maureen Gallagher, viola; Daniel
Rothmuller, cello; Gerard Ruiter,
oboe; and Coinstance Emmerich,
piano), the ensemble has been
dedicated to chamber music and
performing an annual concert
series in New York since 1976.
Each musician works in har-
monious understanding with the
others; the rapport among them
is such that the audience never
gets the impression of an ensem-
ble being directed from the "first
chair The ensemble makes
music together as a group which
allows individual voices to sing
out clearly within the entire
sound structure, enhancing the
character of each, rather than
producing a common sound.
An Die Musik. (the name
drawn from Schober's poem
which is dedicated to music com-
posed by Schubert) has an im-
pressive touring and recording
background. They are pan
many distinguished chamber
series across the United States
and are included in major centers
and festivals as weil. Their recor-
dings have been extremely well
received; an all Mozart recording
released in 1983 received a
"special merit" acclaim from
Stereo Review This celebrated
ensemble has performed and
recorded in six countries and is
featured in concert each sea
on national radio in the United
States and in Europe W
reviews like "ardent impetuosity,
musical integrity, and fiery in
strumental bnllliance" from The
Sen York Times, it is no surprise
they have attained a place in
foremost rani
chamber music en semi lay.
for this not-to-be-
Ned performance are available
�n the Centra Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student Center, 11
a.m. � 6 p.m. Ticket prices are
$2 '�r (high school and
under), and $4 for EC I.
faculty staff and the public. All
tickets are $4 at the
more information, please
757-6 266
Gala Performance Features ECU Dancers
The American College D
Festival Gala Performance,
featuring performance
outstanding umversitv dance p
grams across the Mid-Atlai
region, will be presented s
day, March 22, at 8:12
McGinnis Theatre.
The Gala is being pres�
part of a fhree day Dance Fesl
hosted by the ECl Depa
of Theatre Arts, and is
many American College Dai
Festivals being held a
country, The Mid-Atlar
Festival will have 15 participati .
schools from across the M
Atlantic region including (from
North Carolina). 1 as; Carolina
University, Meredith College,
North Caronna C entral, V
rest University, and the
University of North C an
Charlotte.
rhe focus of these festivals is
be on dance as a performing
the aim is to encourage and
- ze excellence in perfor-
id choreography on the
el. The purpose of the
wofold: to provide an
mity for college dancers
leir works adjudicated
tiqued bv established pro-
and to provide profes-
tsses, workshops and
ning experiences as well as
ther unities for mterae-
g all participants. Ad-
' s from these
festivals ould include the
building of a network of com-
munications within the college
dance community and between
the college and professional
e world, and also audience
development for college dance.
As pan of the three day dance
which is being held at
ECU for the Mid-Atlantic
Region, each college may present
for adjudication two pieces, one
of which must be choreograped
by a student. The most outstan-
ding of these pieces will be chosen
for the Gala Performance by the
adjudicators of the Mid-Atlantic
Region Festival, dance critic
Camille Hardy and modern
dancer choreographer Robert
Small.
Camille Hardy is dance critic
foxfDancemagazine, presently on
the faculty of New York Univer-
sity Tisch School of the Arts,
director of Dance Critics
Association, and has been on
numerous dance panels, in-
cluding the National Endowment
for the Arts. Robert Small,
modern dancer, choreographer
teacher, and Artistic Director of
The Small Dance Company
Have You Been 'Purcilioiis'?
i PI) � A �� ��
.i new book on
u n
the did I
Anyway, sniglei
useful terms as '
and "purcili .
The formei
lexicon as the experience of wai
ing up New Year's Da
"wondering how much
made of
previous night.
All of us who have regaled par-
modeling lamp
ding they were
have experienced
� auldlanxiety.
"Pui . �" appears to have
� wed from the word
tnimous which, accor-
my dictionary, can mean
� urage.
rhe sniglet is defined as "the
nner in which a man holds his
� etbook in public, as if
ntained some odious
matter
1 can't recall ever holding my
wife's pocketbook in public, but
I have experienced extreme cases
of "purse fright" when looking
for an extra set of car keys. So I
can empathize with all of my
"purcilious" brethren.
I nexplained Sniglets of the
I niverse covers most foreseeable
contingencies not dealt with by
the dictionary. The need for some
sniglet-like term to apply to
legitimate two dollar words was
See SNIGLETS, page 7
Three Artists' Work Shown
M 1 W.hr
The works of three artists will
be on view in Gray Gallery Friday
through April 12.
Exhibiting their works are
Peter D'Agostino, associate pro-
fessor of communications
Temple University; Paul Obersl
of Boston, and Al Loving, artist
in residence at Virginia C
monwealth University.
The artists will be honored at a
reception in Gray Gallery at 7:30
p.m. on Friday. D'Agostino will
lecture on Tuesday at 7:30 p.m
Loving will lecture on Friday at
4:30 p.m and Oberst will lecture
on Monday at 7:30 p.m.
All lectures will be presented
free to the public in the
auditorium of the Jenkins fine
Arts Center.
D'Agostino will be installing
"Double You (and X,Y,Z) a
videodisc project based on the
four forces believed to cause all
physical interactions in the
universe � light, gravity, strong
and weak forces.
"Double You (and X.Y.Z)" is
on national tour and is supported
by the National Endowment for
the Arts, the American Film In-
stitute, Penn Council on the Arts,
Center for Advanced Visual
Studies at MIT, and Temple
University.
D'Agostino received his BFA
from the School of Visual Arts in
New York City and his MA from
San Francisco State University in
California. He attended the Art
Students League in New York Ci-
and the Academia di Belle Arte
in Naples, Italy.
D'Agosnno received a Na-
nal Endowment for the Arts
fellowship in 1974, 1977, 1979,
and 1984, an Ohio Arts Council
fellowship in 1980, a New York
State Council on the Arts grant in
1981 and a Pennsylvania Arts
Council fellowship in 1982.
He was a visiting professor of
art at the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1982,
and was assistant professor of art
from 1977 to 1980 at Wright
State University in Dayton, Ohio.
D'Agostino's works have been
selected for collections at the
Museum of Modern Art, the
Electronic Arts Intermix, The
Kitchen, and Printed Matter, all
in New Yrk; the San Francisco
Museum of Modern Art, the
I ong Beach Museum of Art, and
the Santa Barbara Museum of
Art in California; the Palais des
Beaux-Arts in Belgium, and the
National Gallery of Canada.
Oberst combines sculpture,
painting and drawing in his work.
He has had numerous solo and
group exhibitions as well as com-
missions at The Stux Gallery in
Boston, the New Gallery of Con-
temporary Art in Cleveland, and
the Chicago International Art
Exposition in Chicago. He has
done a dance set for "Taking
Measures a sculpture installa-
tion at the University of Akron
Art Gallery in Ohio, a set and
costume design for "New
Dance Cleveland Center for
Contemporary Art in Ohio, and a
set design for Footpath Dance
Company, Cleveland, Ohio.
In 1982, Oberst was awarded a
fellowship from the Fine Arts
Work Center in Provincetown,
Mass.
Loving is known for his woven
fabric paintings, but is currently
working with handmade paper
and monoprints.
He received his MFA from the
University of Michigan and his
BFA from the University of Il-
linois. He has had numerous solo
exhibitions and was awarded the
National Endowment for the
Arts Fellowship in 1982-83,
'76-77, '75-76, and '70-71. In
1975 he received the Creative Ar-
tist Public Service Grant from the
New York State Council on the
Arts.
Loving has received various
public commissions and has been
featured in Studio International,
Art forum. Art Gallery, Art
News, The New York Times, Art
in America and Artspeak.
He is currently having a
retrospective at the Studio
Museum in Harlem, N.Y.
Gallery hours are from 10 a.m.
until 5 p.m. Monday through
Saturday, and until 8 p.m. on
Wednesdays. For more informa-
tion call (919) 757-6336.
comes from the tradition ot
Holm, Nickolias, and Louis, in-
cluding eight years as soloist with
the Murray Louis Dance Com-
pany, and presents solo and com
pany concerts and residencies
throughout the I :
Europe.
This proji utially 1 -ided
by ECU; a joint grant from
North Carolina Arts Council and
the National Endowment I
. DC, a
a grant from
and the
lege Dance Fes:
all 6390
Poet To Read A t Jenkins
By JOHN SHANNON
Poet Michael Waters will read
selections from his work Thurs-
day in Jenkins Auditorium. I he
reading will start at 8 p.m and
admission is free.
Water's poems have appeared
in such prestigious journals as
Poetry, 1he American Poetry
Review, The Georgia Review,
and The Missouri Review among
others. In addition, he has three
book-length collections to his
credit: Fish Tight (1975), ot
Just Any Death (1979), and I
recently. Anniversary of the Air
For Anniversary of the Mr
Waters won the 1985-86 Tow son
State University Prize for
Literature. This award is highly
coveted by writers, as it is an im-
portant symbol of recognition in
the field of arts and letters and
carries with it a monetary prize.
Waters was born in New York
City in 1949, and attended the
State University of New York at
Brockport. He subsequently
studied at the Universitv of Not-
Miehael Water
tingham, the University oi Iowa
and Ohio University.
Since then. Waters has taught
in the Creative Writing Program
at Ohio Iniversitv and at
Salisbury State College in
Maryland. He also spent a year as
eaching
srature and

� Waters received a
ment for the
� enabl-
ime
� hout
material support. Waters
� ng
Greece ther
. trope � gathering
dl sur-
iters will corn-
ex-
i he
Brewster B103 at
be an ex-
terested
receive first-class
n their work, and to
wise bcnt ex
this distinguished
who would like feed-
ie of their poems are
asked to submit ten to fifteen
aters after the
ding, if possible. The
workshop is sponsored by the
I CL Poetry Forum.
"BuildingCorner"
Paul Oberst s "BuildingCorner" is one of the works currently on display at Gr�v r.n.
exhibiting wID be Peter D'Agostino and Al Loving. All three artist, will present lecture m fceit.
week. Please see the accompanying story for details coming
?��, ft
I 1
T �
I
Classifi
SALE
WORD PROCESSiNG
per er e
techn ca
papers, a
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etters
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FOR SALE Carpe-
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Chris
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Ininrmntiop
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t 264 Bypass NE
A rrh-Mt ctab
$1.00 off
Wednesday





rms
w
'� -ming
BLOOM COUNTY
Km oh
V
I 4
I
V ft �. m vv� � h 1
(
$
-r i
by Berke Breathed
s

7
� � i
r
. i
i
v f
-
r
o j�

i
;
JdL
Classifieds
Sniglets
( onUnued from page 6
impressed upon me the other day
as I was reading about ancient
roman roads.
These thoroughfares, "iters"
they are called by crossword puz-
zle freaks, apparently were every
bit as dangerous as modern
highways. Yet, travelers of that
day never had to cope with words
like "infrastructure
One dictionary defines "in-
frastructure" as a system's
"underlying foundation or basic
framework It you have ever
driven over a viaduct, you know
what the underlying foundation
o' the interstate highway system
is. But what is wrong with calling
a bridge a bridge?
Would the movie Bridge Over
the River Kwai have been as suc-
cessful if it had been titled In-
frastructure Over the River
A wai?
I Hi i SIAKil IMAN
MAKf h m, . m
FREE EYEGLASS
FRAMES
WTIH IHKPl RCHASEOI PRES KIP I ION LENSES
( hoftsr from our lurur fteta tx.n f faattsa frames
TO 60 OFF
ALL FRAMES IN STOCK
WITH PRESCRIPTION LENSES
Must present coupon with order f��r discount
Not Good With Other Advertised s pevials
COUPON EXPIRES MARCH 31, im
I
SOFT
r
j
! CONTACTS
00 PA1K
I
� We Can Arrange n Eye Exam For YouOn the amr Da
� Ask About Our Senior
Citizens 20' !)tount
SALE
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SKYDIVING A
V � i
GRATEFUL DEAD FA
STEREO FOR SALE
MPUTERIZED
R SALE D - 210 1977 5
��� r Ca
205 Beech St

N BOOGIfc up now for
� D J ser
giobe Piinn
752 3587
fS best!
MER INTERNS WANTED
rcula
S4 50 .
jjors
and
B
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ens
d Good
-
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NEEDED Now or by Ma 1st for
nice 2 bedroom duplex 1 mile from
� -pus Quiet neighborhood,
Fireplace & Sundeck $93 75 �
util Please call 752 0319
TUXEDOS AM guys attending the
A DP I. DZ, ana PIKA for ma is please
contact Jon Reibel at 757 0351 F-ee
delivery free pick up Best price in
town
Please see paje 10
"?0.U,re�Tivillr Bl�d
Ai rnvs r rum
1 he PUm
The
Trs.
OPTICAL
(.ar M Harris
I icensed Optician
PALACE
jlPKN.VlWtl PMMQNPW IHKI rkil) � PHOr 56-4204
ECU Department of Theatre Arts
The American College Dance Festival Auodatimi
Mid-Atlantic Regional Festival
ROBERT SMALL
AND THE SMALL DANCE COMPANY
Friday, March 21, 1986
Grt �
-
TYPING SERVICES

Spe

CHEAPTYPING -

message
FOR SALE Can
s zes a
- . -
.ORS SEN
STUDEN
REN
NEED A D J'

TUXEDOS

-
DEl
E NEEDED

GALA PERFORMANCE
BY OUTSTANDING UNIVERSITY
DANCE PROGRAMS
Saturday, March 22, 1986
lEEDED B�
McCinni Theatre
corner 5th � Eastern
8:15 p
A
jar'
ana er
��nee
Ceatral
P�Mic S4.00
Per
Caf757-�3M

�. .
VOTE
Chris Tomasic
for
SGA President
Picture Yourself
between the Covers. . .
of the Buccaneer
Introducing the Portrait
Contest for Organizations
Fraternities, Sororities, and other Campus Organizations are eligible
to win a feature story to be published in the 1986 Buccaneer. One re-
quirement to enter:
Have Your Class Portrait Made
March 17-27
Buccaneer Offtee
Any Questions757-6501
$1 ,00 Off With Coupon
Wednesday, March 19
:i
GO FROM COLLEGE TO THE ARMY
WITHOUT MISSIHG A BEAT.
ii. lesi thin
� �� tessiona
a' j break-
Sessional
S ' i re
; � r
' irn your
nt
pert( rm
take.
! ki i m �k .ii th

trades
'hilip
'� i
is mai
' they torn
het irecoiKen
diem es .is well
�rs
iv� raue
oi 40 performances a month, th
also the opportunity tor travel
not only across America, but pos
n at
Most import,tnr you can
expeci a first-rate pro-
fessional environment
from your instructors,
facilities and fellow-
musicians The Arms
has educational
programs that
can help you
pay for off-
duty instru
tion, and it
you qual
ify, even
help you
repay
your
federally-insured
student loans
It voiK.ir, Mht
ik.
' ' m B.mds v-
Be i � � nson, L 4
ARMY BAND.
BEAU YOU CAN





BLOOM COUNTY
by Berke Breathed
xge f
erforms
reason
: i n -
tfice.
I
VI
ncers
VI
kins
.
display at Gray Gallery. Abo
' present lectures In the coming
Sniglets
Continued from page 6
impressed upon me the other day
as I was reading about ancient
roman roads.
These thoroughfares, "iters"
they are called by crossword puz-
zle freaks, apparently were every
bit as dangerous as modern
highways. Yet, travelers of that
day never had to cope with words
like "infrastructure
One dictionary defines "in-
frastructure" as a system's
"underlying foundation or basic
framework If you have ever
driven over a viaduct, you know
what the underlying foundation
of the interstate highway system
is. But what is wrong with calling
a bridge a bridge?
Would the movie Bridge Over
the River Kwai have been as suc-
cessful if it had been titled In-
frastructure Over the River
Kwai?
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 18, 1986
FREE EYEGLASS
FRAMES
WITH THE PURCHASK OP PRESCRIPTION LENSES
Choose from our large selection of fasMon frames
ALL FRAMES IN STOCK
WITH PRESCRIPTION LENSES
Must present coupon with order for discount
Not Good With Other Advertised S pedals
COUPON EXPIRES MARCH 31, 1986
SOFT
CONTACTS
r
Classifieds
.SALE.
�bMmMMMNR
WANTED
WORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
perience in typing resumes, theses.
technical documents, and term
papers We manage and merge your
names ana addresses into mergea
letters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards Our prices are extremely
reasonable and we always offer a 15
percent discount to ECU students S
& F Professional Computer Co
(back of Franklm's) 115 E 5th St
7570472
SENIORS! SENIORS! SENIORS!
Enjoy the last phase of your college
career employment s&F Com
puters is offering a package price to
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eluding all of the following Letter
quality typed resumes, Man merged
cover letters (name ana address of
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we'll do the rest. Per resume for
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Slightly higher). This offer absolute
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puter Company. 115 East Fifth st
Greenville, N C 27834 757 0472
typing services Resumes,
term papers theses Low rates
Spelling and grammatical correc
tions mciuaea Cindy 757 0398 after
5 30 p.m.
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc Call
Anne at 7586011 and leave a
message
FOR SALE: Carpet remnants, all
sizes, all colors, an prces Save
50 70 percent. The Carpet Bargain
Center. 1QQ9 Dickinson Ave 7 58 0057
SKYDIVING: Would you like to g
skydiving? Call Mike for de
752 9662
GRATEFUL DEAD FANS A
tickets to their Hamnpton shovi
Friday still remam at Appie
Records One price pays tor
ticket and round trip bus transp
tion BE THERE! Get there
comfortable way
STEREO FOR SALE: AR 100 wa"
speakers Sanyo 80 watt receiver
techniques turntable, S200 Call D
Batten 752 8028
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
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reports, term papers, dsserfa?ons
theses, resume's and more �
is computer checked against 5(
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are as low as $1 75 per p
eluding paper (can for spe
rates). Call Mark at 757 U4
p m
JUNIORS, SENIORS, AND GRAD
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APT FOR RENT R i n g g o I
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ed except linens Call 637 6885
NEED A D.J?: Are you havin
party and need a D J? For the best
m top 40, beach ana dance,
Morgan at 758 7967 oetween 5 ana
7 30 p.m. Reasonable ra'es
References on request
TUXEDOS: All guys attending
Alpna Delta Pi, Delta Zeta, ana p
Kappa Alpha formals please con'
Jon Reibel at 757 0351 FREE
DELIVERY, FREE PICK UP! Best
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VOTE
Chris Tomasic
for
SGA President
$1 .00 Off With Coupon
Wednesdoy, March 19 j
FOR SALE: Datsun B 210 1977 5
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752 7640 after 10 p m. 205 Beech St
Greenville, N C
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SUMMER INTERNS WANTED: At
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BRODY'S: Person wanted tor full or
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ision Apply Brody's For
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ROOMMAJE NEEDED: Anytime
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ROOMMATE NEEDED: Beginning
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BRODY S: Person wanted for part
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WANTED: Stuaent with car Light
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�s Can 756 4409 after 7 pm
4TH FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: Now or by May 1st for
nice 2 bedroom duplex. 1 mile from
campus. Quiet neighborhood,
Fireplace & Sundeck. $93.75 � 'i
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TUXEDOS: All guys attending the
ADPI. DZ, and PIKA formals please
contact Jon Reibel at 757 0351. Free
delivery, free pick up. Best price in
town
Please see page 10
00 PAIR
I
� We Can Arrange An Eye Kxam For You On The Same I)a
� Ask About Our Senior
Citizens 20 Dbcount Gar M Harr�s
Licensed Optician
703 Greenville Blvd
Across From
The Plaza
VSA-
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OPEN 9:30 AM to 6 PM MONDAY iHRl FRIDAY � PHONE 756-1204
PALACE
Picture You
Introducing the Portrait
Contest for Organizations
between the Covers. . .
of the Buccaneer
Fraternities, Sororities, and other Campus Organizations are eligible
to win a feature story to be published in the 1986 Buccaneer. One re-
quirement to enter:
Have Your Class Portrait Made
March 17-27
Buccaneer Of f ke
Any Questions757-6501
GO FROM COLLEGE TO THE ARMY
WITHOUT MISSING A BEAT.
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ith .in average
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BE AH YOU CAN BE

A





IMF FAST C AROl INIAN
Sports
MARC H 18, 1986
Page 8
Bucs Are A Perfect 12-0
Pirates Defeat Cavs

I
J
i
JIMIH K.tSs IWIwUMMh
Stnior Mont Carter gets back to the bag before this Bulldog second baseman can make the tag. C arter and
the Pirates will be in action today in a doubleheader against Pittsburgh-Bradford at 1 pm.
ECU All-America Status Achieved
By SCOTI COOPER
ECl trackster lee McNeill
earned indoor All-America status
last Fri. March 14 at the Nt A
Indoor Championships in
Oklahoma City.
The sophomore sensation from
St. Pauls, N.C. finished sixth in
the 55-meter dash with a 6.21
time.
Although McNeill finished
sixth, the class of sprinters was
one of the best ever, according to
ECL' coach Bill Carson.
"It was the fastest group ever
assembled in a meet Carson
said. "There were more sprinters
under 6.20 than ever
Lee McNeill
Lady Bucs Denied
Trip To Tourney
B TIM CHANDLER
The ECU Lady Pirates, who
successfully defended their CAA
regular-season title for the third
straight year, were awarded a bid
to compete in the National
Women's Invitational "Tourna-
ment (NWIT).
However, the Pirates, who
finished 23 this vear, turned the
bid down.
ECU athletic director Ken Karr
stated finances as one reason why
the Pirates won't attend the tour-
nament. Dr. Karr, who was inter-
viewed on television last week
(WNCT Greenville), fell the trip
was unnecessary to the program.
"At this particular stage of our
development, I was not convinc-
ed that traveling to Amanlio to
play before a handful of people
in the NIT was extremenly vital
to our program Karr said.
Head coach Emily Manwaring,
who was noticeably disappointed
at the university's decison not to
attend, said that Dr. Karr had in-
formed her on Fri. March 7. that
the university would not accept
the bid.
"Anybody that really loves
basketball and has spent a good
deal of their life playing it, would
love to continue playing Man-
waring said.
"At this particular stage of
our development, 1 was not
convinced that travelling to
A marillo was extremely
vital to our program. "
�Ken Karr
Manwaring further stated that
the tournament field would have
been a competitive one. Among
the teams competing in this year's
tourney include Notre Dame,
Fresno State, Tenn. Tech and
Duke. Also Idaho, U.S. Interna-
tional, West Texas State and
Southwest Louisiana.
The NWIT, which is held an-
nually in Amarillo, Tx is in its
18th year of existence and will
begin Thurs. March 20.
Teams that have won the
championship have used the tour-
nament as stepping stones to na-
tional prominence, according to
Manwaring. Among those are
Old Dominion, Southern Califor-
nia (last year's national cham-
pions) and Georgia (last year's
runner-up).
Some other teams that have
competed in the tournament, but
have not been as fortunate in�
elude Texas, undefeated this year
and ranked No. 1 in the land.
Also North Carolina, N.( . State,
South Carolina and Kentucky.
Manwaring also said that the
teams have used the tournament
tor experience, promotion of
their university and also for
recruiting.
Dr. Karr, in not appoving the
I CU trip, referred to Duke in an
earlier interview. He stated, "you
have to ask yourself, 'will Duke
University be there?' Duke had a
fine women's team this year
and 1 strongly question whether
they are in the NIT
This statement, however, was
proven false as Duke did accept
their invitation.
Dr. Karr was unavailable for
comment on the matter yesterday
afternoon, but ECU associate
athletic director Dr. Gene
Templeton stated that no single
criteria was used in making the
decison.
"We looked at many areas in
the short time period we had
said Templeton. "There just
wasn't enough positive aspects to
offset the negatives.
"We have to make the call,
and suffer the disappointment
with the coaches and student
athletes stated Templeton.
Templeton further said that the
atletic department did not have
an adequate amount of time to
look properly at where the money
would have to come from. Thus,
the athletic department decided it
would be a bad decsion to ap-
prove the trip.
Among other negative aspects
that Dr. Templeton mentioned
were that the money had not been
budgeted. Also, that the players
had already missed a great deal of
class time and finally, that the
athletic department did not feel
that the university would gain
much national attention from the
tournament.
Sports Fact
Tues. March 18,1953
The National League ap-
proves the move of the Boston
Braves to Milwaukee, the first
major franchise shift in fifty
years. The Braves' attendance
increases over 600 percent in
their first year in Milwaukee.
McNeill is the first individual
dual All-American (indoor-
outdoor) at ECU and the first
short-sprinter to have reached
such success a: the Nationals for
ECU
"He gave an excellent perfor-
mance and did a great job Car-
son explained after stating that
McNeill was trobled at the start
of the race. "He's got such a big
heart
McNeill achieved outdoor Ail-
American status earlier in the
vear with a time of 10.11 in the
100-yard das in Indianapolis,
Ind.
By TONY BROWN
The ECU Pirate baseball team
kept their amazing opening-
season win streak going Sunday
against Virginia with an 9-5 vic-
tory to go 12-0 on the year. It's
the best opening start for the
baseballers since accurate records
have been kept.
UVA opened the scoring with a
run in the second, then ECU
rallied quickly in the bottom of
the frame to take a 4-1 lead. Mike
Sullivan and Jay McGraw singled
and a walk loaded the bags. A hit
by Jim Riley scored one, then
Mont Carter's single made it 4-1
ECU.
The Cavaliers tied it up in the
third on a three-run shot by Kent
Savedge, but ECU matched that
in the bottom of the inning. Win-
fred Johnson doubled one in,
then was doubled in himself by
Sullivan, who later scored on
Mark Cockrell's hit for a 7-4
Pirate advantage.
ECU added one on a David
Ritchie single, then UVA picked
up one more as did ECU for the
9-5 final score.
Mike Basara led UVA with two
doubles and a single, while
Sullivan had the same for ECU.
C ockrell and Carter added a pair
of singles, as every batter for
both teams had at least one hit.
Winfred Johnson went to 3-0
with the win, while the loss drop-
ped UVA's season mark to 8-6.
"We beat the best club we've
played this vear ECU Coach
Garv Overton said. "Winfred
had some problems pitching, but
I thought he spotted the ball well.
Virginia's good offense was the
reason for their number of hits '
Sat. March 15. 19X6
In Saturday's 6-3 win over the
University of Connecticut, the
Pirates pounded out three
homers to back up hurler Jim
Peterson, who bettered his season
mark to 4-0.
Johnson homered in the third
for with one on for ECU, follow-
ed quickly by another longball by
Sullivan for an early 3-0 lead.
U-Conn picked up two in the
fifth, then added another in the
sixth. However, the Pirates came
back in the bottom of the frame
on a two-run homer bv Mark
Cockrell, then added one in the
seventh for the final run.
Riley had a double and two
singles in a 3-for-4 effort, in addi-
tion to the homers by Johnson,
Cockrell and Sullivan.
Fri. March 14, 1986
On Friday, the roving Stags
returned once again to the gi
of Harrington Field, but found
the grazing no greener, despite
scoring their customary three
runs.
Unfortunately tor Fairfield,
the Pirates got 10, three con
from Chris Bradberry,
homered twice and added a dou-
ble.
Greg Hardison had a two-run
homer and a double in a 3-for-5
day, while freshman hurler Keith
Schaffer took a win in his
start after a shaky beginning. Ik-
held the Stags to six hits, but twi
went over the fence, though the)
came too late to help.
Thurs March 13, 1986
Thursday's twinbill ��
U-Conn was washed out.
Wed March 12. 1286
On Wednesday, the Stags
returned to Harrington Field, but
again fell to ECU, this time by a
4 3 count I he Stags picked up a
run in the first, but ECU tied it
up in the second when Sides' bunt
scored Sullivan.
Fairfield took the lead again on
a Joe Mancini solo shot in the
fourth, then increased the lead to
two on a homer by John Martin
in the eighth. That homer
brought in Pirate reliever Craig
Vai Deventer foi Danny Culpep-
per.
Van Deventer then shut out the
gs while a Dean Ehehalt single
in the bottom of the frame scored
� E I , tying the game.
Ehehalt then came in on Jim
Riley's sacrifice bunt for the win-
ning run.
lohnson's 2-for-3, one double
rt led ECU. Van Deventer
the win, raising his record to
� , March 11, 1986
On Tuesday a major-league
rhubarb was the highlight
I 9 B Pirate win over Virginia
mmonwealth. With VCU
holding an 8-5 lead up to the
itc eighth. ECU rallied for the
win, despite a confused umpiring
crew.
W ith one gone, Sullivan doubl-
ed and McGraw got on with an
: Sides drove one to
- itfield, which the defender ap-
parently trapped, though the m-
bj the field umpire
ad gone third,
� -was a hit, while
Ve ECU, page 9
Softballers Off To Impressive Start
By LANCE SEARL
While most of us were off
roasting at the beaches, the ECU
Lady Pirate softball team spent
most of their spring break on the
playing field.
As a result ol a sticky defense
and pinpoint pitching, the Lady
Pirates ran their 1986 record to
an impressje 12-1 start.
Stacey Boyette and Robin
Graves guided the team to seven
victories and only one defeat as
the pitchers gave up only ten
runs.
After splntmg a doubleheader
with Frances Marion, winning
4-0 and losing 2-0, the Pirates
proceeded to sweep
doubleheaders from the L'niversi-
ty of Connecticut (3-2, 2-1) and
Virginia Commonwealth (9-0,
6-1) while taking single games
from Eastern Connecticut State
(4-2) and Seton Hall(3-2).
Head coach Sue Manahan had
nothing but praise for the team's
early-season success. "After los-
ing strong players from last
year's 24-P-l team Manahan
said, "the girls have come
together exceptionally well, mak-
ing up a good chemistry.
"The defense has definitely
been the key for us this year
she continued. "We've had
several pleasant surprises this
year � especially in right field
and at first base
Manahan praised the play of
outfielders Eva Hughes, Julie
Farrow and first baseman Diane
Ludsford for several outstanding
plays.
Farrow, for example, made a
spectacular running catch with
the bases loaded, turned and
fired to catcher Lynda Barrett
who promptly made the tag on a
would-be scorer.
Boyette and Graves, who alter-
nate their pitching duties, have
been no less than dominant this
year. Boyette has a 6-0 record
with an impressive 0.34 ERA and
25 strike outs while Graves is 6-1
with a 0.59 ERA and 19 strike
outs.
The pitchers will have to per-
form at their peak this weekend
as the team travels to Florida
State University to participate in
a round-robin tournament.
"Several regionally ranked
teams are involved in the tourna-
ment Manahan said, "and
us to have any hope of
ticipating in post-season action.
we will have to play well there
Jeannie Murray leads the
Pirate hitters with a .368 average
and 7 RBIs while leadoff nil
Wendy, Ozment is second at .323.
�ett has seven RBF while
Mona lackson has six.
Before the all-important tour-
nament in Florida this weekend,
the ; Virginia Cem-
ealth at 2 pm today,
25K�
- .
k�
TBk �"�-
Stacey Boyette makes contact in some earV'wason action!
Men Netters Jump To 2-2; Women Fall To 1-2
K !)4 II) Mr.lVM-KS TV i - �. nv, ,
By DAVID McGINNESS
The ECU men's tennis team
evened up its spring-season
record at 2-2 with wins over
UNC-Greensboro and
Christopher Newport.
John MHhorn
The 7-2 victory over UNC-G
on March 6 was the first one of
the year for the men, who lost on-
ly the No. 2 and 4 singles slots in
the match.
No. 1 player, L.in Lamont, led
the way for the Pirates, taking his
singles and doubles matches in
straight sets.
No. 3 singles player Greg Loyd
was the only Buc forced into a
three-set singles match, as he top-
ped his UNC-G opponent 6-3,
5-7, 6.
Last Saturday, the team blank-
i ed Christopher Newport 9-0, in-
5 eluding straight-set victories in all
six singles matches.
In doubles action, only the
� team of John Anthony and Pat
� Campanero had much difficulty
f in putting away their Newport
� opponents. They came back after
I a 6-2 first-set loss to win the next
1 two sets 6-4 and 7-5.
In ECU women's tennis action,
the Lady Pirates lost two in a
row, bringing their spring-season
record to 1-2.
The losses (both 9-0) came
against Penn State and Davidson
College. Against Penn State, the
women gave up the match
without winning a single set,
while winning only two sets
against Davidson.
The ladies are doing without
the services of No. 1 singles
player Ann Manderfield, who
severely sprained her ankle in the
women's Feb. 25 win over Camp-
bell University. The date of her
return to action is uncertain as
yet.
The men will see action next
this afternoon when they face
conference rival UNC-
Wilmington on the ECU varsity
courts at 3 p.m.
The women play next against
Peace College on Wednesday,
also at the ECU varsity courts at
3 p.m.
Individual Success For
Swimmers At Nationals
'
By DAVID McCINNESS
9parWrMtr
The pirate swimmers com-
pleted their '85-86 season at the
Independent Nationals in Colom-
bia, S.C. on Feb. 27-March 1.
Although the tankers failed to
come away with an overall win in
the highly-competitive meet,
several of the Pirates emerged
with excellent performances.
Freshman David Killeen,
sophomore Ronald Fleming,
juniors Kevin Hidalgo and Strat-
um Smith all turned in season-
best times during the three-day
competition.
Killeen turned in a 17th-place
time in the 500-yard freestyle.
Patrick Brerman also placed 17th
in the 400-yard individual medley
and 22nd in the 200-vard
breastroke.
Sophomore Bruce
Brocksehmidt places 14th in the
200-yard IM, freestyle and
backstroke events.
Sophmore Al Smith placed
23rd and 21st respectively in the
100 and 200 breastroke events
Fleming also placed 22nd in the
400 breastroke, just .06 seconds
ahead of teammate A. Smith.
Sophomore Lee Hicks beat
both A. Smith and Fleming in
that event, taking 20th with a 3
seconds advantage over
Flemmg's 60.60 seconds time
In relay action, the Pirates'
,eam of KiHeen. Kaut
�? Strong, page 9
Softbah
b n anf rri roth
Spring breal
but you cai
ot fun anc � �
Depart me
Recreate

ECU Holds
VCU Ra
( ontinued from pujj.
Mci' a
natural!
the urn; '�
-
homepiate
first and n
nd.
V( I
der.
righi �
did '
in hi

be
cau.
were futile He
bumpec
� �
Regard
wit-
let another
Carter e
.
Peters
l
McGra ��

Strong Futu
For Kob
Continued fr

ed 10th
relay.


relay
Ac
coach Rick K �
-
participate
"It was
K �
eighi
w ere mak �
be was
x champ
"A lot . �
� here tl
said Kobe
pleases
well, they
than I thougl
The compel
as the las
vear. It was
was undoubi.
men's and w,
ECU historv
The Pii
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cording to K
need to haw
voted into the
tionals in '87
"I think a
Ste
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A





THE EAST CAROL IN I AN MARCH 18. 19�6 9
. I,
at Cavs
-
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ii

j
$v� Star
ni
JIM l�I !I,�S. iw tm
early waion action.
en Fall To 1-2
ey face
NC-
� arsity
against
V-ednesday,
irts at
al Success For
s At Nationals
B� the 200-yard
re Bruce
idl places 14th in the
ird 1M. freestyle and
n 1 icstrokc events.
re A! Smith placed
win in 23rd and 21st respectively m the
meet. 100 and 200 breastroke events.
merged Fleming also placed 22nd in the
ces 400 breastroke, just .06 seconds
lilleen, ahead of teammate A. Smith.
Sophomore Lee Hicks beat
ic rat- both A. Smith and Fleming in
season that event, taking 20th with a .3
ee-day seconds advantage over
Fleming's 60.60 seconds time,
th-plae In relay action, the Pirates'
feestyle. team of Killeen Kaut
ted 17th
medley vt Mruog, page 9
Softball Tourney Registration
By JEANKTTKROTH
Spring break is but a memory,
you can still break into a lot
fun and excitement with the
Department of lntramural-
Recrcatumal Services. Registra-
deadlines fill the air this
week as the spring-activity
calender begins to close out.
Be sure to stop by room 204
Memorial Gym before 5 p.m.
Wednesday or you will miss out
on the annual pre-season Softball
tournament, team handball and
regular season softball leagues.
ECU Holds Off Late
VCU Rally Tuesday
C ontinued from page 8
McGraw, seeing the signal,
irally held at first. However,
umpire changed his mind
r conterring with the
teplate amp, put Side- on
and moved McGraw to se-
d
V( U coach Tonv Guzzo sud-
ily realized that the
. fielder's throw to second
. be tore McGraw reached it
result in an out. He then,
is own words, "lost it Guz-
i ged the umps, contending
someone somewhere should
�ut, whether the ball was
ght or not � but his protests
e futile. He then vigorously
nped both umps, and was
ed out of the game, only to be
owed by both of his assistant
Regardless, Cockrell followed
: smgle for one run, a walk
ther in. then a double by
ter game ECU a 9-8 ad van-
. which proved to be the win-
s edge.
Peterson picked up the win,
king over as the third Pirate pit -
� atter Johnson had relieved
nan starter Jake Jacobs.
McGraw homered tor ECU,
e Sullivan picked up two
�- es. Greg Hardison went
- a � a double, while Sides
three single- and Carter
wo.
Sat. March 8, 1986
Earlier in the week, the Pirates
opened the CAA season with a
twinbill sweep of William & Mary
10-1, 2-0, with Johnson and
Peterson on the mound respec-
tively.
A grandslam by Johnson led
1 CU in the first game, while
Chris Bradberry added a two-run
shot and a pair of doubles to aid
the Pirates.
In the nightcap, Peterson held
the Indians scoreless as Sullivan
singled in a run in the third.
Bradberry, who singled, moved
up on an error, and scored on
Johnson's single in the fifth for a
narrow 2-0 win.
Peterson limited W&M to a
pair of singles, while ECU only
managed five singles oi its own,
two by Steve Sides. The win game
ECU a temporary one-game lead
in the conference.
Sun March 9, 1986
The Bucs picked up another
win Sunday, by blowing Fair-
field's Stags away in a 20-3 rout.
McGraw led the wa with a
three-run homer, while
Bradberrv and Johnson each had
two-run shots for ECl . McGraw
went 3-for-4 while Johnson
totalled four RB1V Craig Van
Deventer went to 2-0 with the
win.
The Pirates will take to the
field today when they host
Pittsburgh-Bradford for a
doubleheader at 1 p.m.
Thursday marks the last day to
: egister for tennis doubles.
This year's preseason softball
action is sponsored by Easter
Seals with a 24-hour marathon
format. The tournament will
begin this Friday and continue
through the weekend. This is the
perfect opportunity for all cam-
pus regular-season hopefuls to
get in a few licks of practice.
With an entry fee of $20.00 (pro-
ceeds going to the Faster Seals
foundation) your teams can serve
a dual purpose. 28 men's and
four women's teams will be
allowed to enter.
Team handball will once again
highlight the spring calendar.
Each participant will be required
to attend at least one clinic held
to explain rules and regulations
essential for safe play. The
season begins March 24 in
Memorial Gym. For more infor-
mation drop b room 204
Memorial Gvm for your informa-
tion packet. Be sure to check into
any upcoming co-rec and in-
dividual sport events while you're
there.
Aerobic fitness class registra-
tion for the second session will be
held throughout the week.
Aerobic drop-in classes, advanc-
ed toning drop-in classes and
aquarobic drop-in classes will be
held this week. For a schedule of
all drop-in classes and a schedule
of second-session aerobic class
opportunities come by room 204
Memorial Gym. An $8.00 fee for
students will be changed with a
slightly high fee for facultystaff.
Remember, your dorm may be
hosting their own aerobic
workout. Information on dor-
mitory sponsored classes will also
be available.
Be sure to check into all the
after break excitement sponsored
by the Department of
Intramural-Recreational Ser-
vices.
TRY OUR NEW
DINNER COMBINATION
Comes nth egg drop soup or ontori
soup, egg roll, fried rice, fortune
cookie and hot tea
Choice Of
�Beef with Broccoli
�Sweet and Sour Pork
g Pao Chicken
Goo Gai Pan
mp with Lobster Sauce
�Pork Szechuan Style
Hours: Monday thru Thursday
11-30 A M to 10 00 P M.
Fr.day and Saturday
11 30 A M to 1100 P.M.
fc discount on
See For Yourself
Sunday: 12 Noon to 10:00 P M
1 Peking Palace
Chinese Restaurant
756-1169
ONLY
Strong Future Squad
For Kobe's Tankers
on All Frames, Sunglasses,
and Contact Lenses.
Everyday;
here k�attw that ortei ft!) tiflerert frame. k d��nt
rrvxii ,ii everyilav savings of M '� itl avuui rvtaii ;xxis Itv
t ye siu .ii rtu Plaza and IV Eye (.uvena .u t?i- i pun nnex
inaDDRs are available ai Pi Eye aft c chil-i
. appu : � i� aj '� . -i. 'Hil
tkt1
Cm v. n
( ontinued from pae g
d and Hidalgo plac-
i 300-yai i freestyle
while r- lemi rig .
tckschmidt, Hidalgo arid Kaul
k ninth in the 4X)-yard medley
rela
According to Pirate swim
tch Rick Kobe, this v as the
fastest meet that ECL has ever
ticipated in.
"Ii wav an extremel) tast
Kobe said, "tour of the
T (swimmers) in every event
a ere making NCAA cut o
;s
Kobe was surprised and pleas-
if the v.a his swimmers were
� to bounce back after the
championships.
"A lot of our kids swam even
ter here than in the CAA's
-aid Kobe. "We were really
�sed to come back and swim
well, they did a little better
an 1 thought they would
The competition in Colombia
was the last one for ECU this
ir. It was the finale of what
was undoubtedly the best overall
men's and women's season in
L history.
I he Pirates should continue
r winning ways next year, ac-
ting to Kobe, and they will
need to have a strong team to get
ed into the independent na-
,als in '87.
"I think we'll be even stronger
next year Kobe said, "we'll
lose four seniors on the men's
squad, but we should be able to
fill those gap 1 he women's
'earn will lose only one senior, so
we shouldn't have any problems
there
OTO6TWC
0� CARE CEN1CR
ti.r I-ram Selection hiuI t v� Examinations:
11M t.rrvimll. HImI I iplorl nn�l
PbOfM 6-M44
lr Peter HoUb
O.O
�A
Marathon
Restaurants
Greek Owned and Operated
Since 1979
SUBS
Steak and Cheese S3 45
Steak and Mushrooms $3 45
Meo- . S3 45
Reuben th French Fi'es S3 95
Ham and Cheese S3 45
Roast Beet and French Fries $3 95
Cold Sub S3 45
Chicken Salad Sub $3 45
Pastrami Sub $3 45
Turkey arid Cneese $3 45
Super Sr S3 95
B L T S3 45
Greek Dishes
GYRO Sandwich $3 35
Souvlaki Sandwich $3 35
GYRO Platter $3.95
Marathon Special $3 95
Athenian-Style Chicken $3 95
Pizza Menu
SMALL 12"
CHEESE PIZZA
ANY 1 ITEM
ANY 2 ITEM
ANY 3 ITEM
ANY 4 ITEM
ADD'L ITEMS
MUSHROOMS
GREENPEPPERS
ANCHOVIES
HOT PEPPERS
LARGE 16"
S4 00 $6 00
S6 85
$7 70
$8 55
$9 40
$1 00
SAUSAGE
ONIONS
PEPPERONI
OLIVES
$4 65
$5 30
$5 95
$6 60
$85
GROUNDBEEF
MARATHON DELUXE:
12" 16"
$8.00 $11.00
Pepprroni, Onions, Ground Beef
Mushrooms, Green Peppers
Soft Drinks Small .60C Large 70C
French Fries Small 55C Large 65C
560 Evans Street
Greenville, N.C 27834
FAST FREE
DELIVERY
752 0326 or
752-3753
VOTE
Steve Cunanan
for
SGA President
and
Gordon Walker
SGA Vice President
Low, Low
Prices
Interest Free
Payment Plan Available !
Interest Free
Payment Plan
Available !
w
$10.00
Deposit
Special
A vote for ttudont Intorott � not tpociol intorott
ECU Student Store
Wed. March 19
Thurt. March 20
TIME: 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.
S
Htff SOftfffS
Onino of C�tnation Comtny







K(M MAN
( ontinued (rum pn 7
ROOMMATE wanted
� � DUS
ROOMV
A A N T E O
am
iQBS FOR COLLEGE
IDE NTS
Staff
Efi ON THE

� �

;� tee
i
a d good
i
IMMI AROING JOBS
ei
S AVAILABLE
� I
� TED
PEX,SftNAf&
k' S AND
S!G F
A T E S
'
IS SK; TEAV
��
-

BROTHERS
. it tt e
it Dis
CA KATIE DEMISE C M. C
BOOGER .�. i! ng but
g F
��
' : VOU
HOW
scream
' atl , get a
ALPHA S!G
" �
ird to
the se
par
DELTA SIGS AND SIG TAUS
Bo
ana '�� legs guys!
-T a tula
ng Greek
ud o you
� " � ight 8 30
Ca 757 0127
Hap � Hour Wed
j raffle
- - � tudent store
� da i sots of
PITCHER NIGHT ! S2 Bud pitchers
� Top 0ur spring
� Come to
Pantana B " Wednesday
jjgtng - ed to be at Pan
v it h 19th at 10
pm k aopa Tau, Sigma Nu,
Theta Cf Tau Kappa Epsilon. Pi
Kappa P :jda Chi Alpha, Kap
pa Sigma Alpha Phi, Chi Omega,
and Alpha Xi
' check in at the
Gazebo between 10 and 10 30 p.m.
MARCH IH. 198ft
DEAR P.O It was the best
ever and so much more Thanks.
DIG
PHI TAUS Welcome back from
ng Break We missed you
Love. Your Lil Sisters
L.L.B What s iT like to be "yodenz
? Had a blast! Looking forward
to next wmter let's do it again! Love
� a l B
FREE PREGNANCY TEST Con
fidential counseling Carolina Crisis
Pregnancy Center 111 E Third ST
ee Building Call 757 0003 tor ap
Domtment or information
VOTE STEVE CUNANAN: Vote
Steve Cunanan SGA President and
Gordon Walker SGA Vice President
Make your vote count and vote for
student interests and not special in
'erests!
FACULTY AND STAFF: Year!
portraits taken March 17 27 No ap
pointment necessary1 Walk in
anytime and be photographed im
mediately No waiting!
FIRE I: Class portraits taken Mar Y
17 27 V 5 p m except 20th and 26th
12.30 8 pm No appointments
available Ask about portraits con
test for dorm and campus organiza
tions
361 WOMEN: "I don't need you to be
bringing me down HAH1
Snowshoe was a blast Let's hear it
for apres skiing! Love, Anne
VAN NUMBER 4 If you're happy
and you know it, you can play w "
my ding a ling What happen-
The side mirror? ! Let's play a game1
JAMES FORD GRIFFIN m
22nd Birthday, one week at�
Love, Shannon &. Anne
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
WINNER OF THE AOTT
ASSASSINATION GAME: We hope
Keith Ablufon TKF, made good use
of his $100 prize over Spring Bread
SIG EPS ' � ai - n �� .ng our
parry � sters so much fun!
Can't wait to do it again! Love
new s sters of a
AOTT We hop u had a blast a1
cut out' Yoi '00 cool1 �
hope yru ha ited from th�
8 00 siiow1 We love you1 1' � new
sistei
361 WOMEN . mny,
and Miss Nanny Wha1 an awesome
l wa i t 1
PALACE Ibun
ister Break!1 Be
prepared
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster BeV
Washington Highway N C 33 Ext Greenviite. North Carolma
Phone 752-3T72
(Past Riverbluff Apts
Flounder
Popcorn Shrimp
$325
$325
Hours 4:30-9: jO Mon. Sat.
- NEWLY REMODELED
PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH SAT MARCH �2 AT SAV A CE NTf R IN GREE S
At
RESERVE 'Hf RICH' Tr-LIMIT QUAN' "JUH � OB �fcl - Ml W B
and 4 Jl Uzg-
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli, Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality
JUICY SWEET
RED OR THOMPSON WHITE
Seedless Grapes
DIET COKE � TAB � SPRITE
Coca Cola
PURE CANE
Dixie r� P
Crystals
FLORIDA IS CITRUS
Juicy Oranges

8ff-fe 1298c
Y(ftsca
DUKE S
Mayonnaise
78c
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADDlTIONAi
PURCHASE AT EVERYPAY LOW PRiCE
R IM OR WHOLE cERNEi CORN 1
FRENNSTYLI �' I I ftfl ' iRI t N BEANS
K Vegetables
16 oz
cans
LUNCHEON MEAT
Armour Treet
LIMIT ONE
WITH AN
ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE 12 QZ
EVERYDAY
A PRICE
can
703 GREENVILLE BLVD. � OPEN 24 HOURS SSKS,�T OPEN SUNDAY 7 A.M11PM
6 COL. GREENVILLE EARLY WEEK AD WE 3-22-86





10
: HI I AM iAROl 1NIAN
MARCH 18, 1986
Continued from page 7
ROOMMATE WANTED: For 2
bedroom apt 4 blocks from campus.
. ondit.oned $130. month 'j
utilities '58 0341
ROOMMATE WANTED Private
bedroom unfurnished $75 deposit,
$75 rent ' j utilities, 7 mi from cam
pus Call Patty 758 6191 after 6 00
o m
SUMMER JOBS FOR COLLEGE
STUDENTS Openings available for
� e Food Service Staff
at CAMP SEAFARER ON THE
COAST OF NORTH CAROLINA.
Good salary plus room and board
Excellenl opportunity for friends to
work together June 8 through mid
August Must be al ieas? eighteen
irs of age No experience
necessai 'on and good
refen 'ed. For more mfor
ition, write:
P O Box 10976 YM
'� � . ?J05.
SUMMER LIFEGUARDING JOBS:
arding cer
' � � a CPR required
rar I is, Rt. 4, Morehead
�� � 6 247 5295.
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE
$135 I nancial aid
went unuse � � � Freshmen,
Sop' n g graduate
student; I help cashing in on
those fund sdem Data
BOO 544 1574, ext.
r write � '6483. Chat
LOST. -ala face watch
a ea ind Lost at
� � i fid call
Me ssa ward offered
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
3 bed ,� ties
Nor
please
PERSONALS
S I G k f
PLEDGES
hope
breai i Lc�
BROTHfcRS AND
! � v e
at spring
. '� � ' fers
SIG EP GOLDEN HEARTS COM
AfILL BE
EN T - S
T H U R SI 2011
THE � T THE
H O U SI BE
N
ONI - E UPS! !
- this
DEAR P.D It was the best
ever and so much more Thanks.
DIG
PMI TAUS: Welcome back from
Spring Break We missed you
Love, Your Lil Sisters
L.L.B What's it like to be "yoderiz
ed"? Had a blast! Looking forward
to next winter lef sdo it again! Love
ya, LB
FREE PREGNANCY TEST: Con
fidential counseling. Carolina Crisis
Pregnancy Center 111 E. Third St.
Lee Building. Call 757 0003 for ap
pointment or information.
VOTE STEVE CUNANAN: Vote
Steve Cunanan SGA President and
Gordon Walker SGA Vice President.
Make your vote count and vote for
student interests and not special in
terests!
new SOROR'TY fhei will be an
nfoi � ' � sorn 221 on
�� 4 Please
. al I if y
TO MY MARDI GRAS MATES:
� 'ake
officers
Buos on the Daggage. water
. jvhere I ap
r a
bre' � � ' �- Problen island
mus B eyed gii you
t whicl : are
js smuggled
anx
those S10C Mm
PHI TAU LIL SISTERS Aelcome
back fron - Don't
Pizza inn near
Eastbr Also, there
j Weds at 5
TO THE ECU APRES SKI TEAM:
' the Apres was
r another rock
Frank- I hope that
eye � I ears up rea' soon!
LB . mud ECSTASY
as Burger Cl � � the 361 women
� iga real
ALPHA PHI BIG BROTHERS.
Meeting at 8 p m Sunday at the
house. Vei . i portant Discuss rush
ana beacr r p
C A, KATIE, DENISE C, M.C
BOOGER: The trip was long, but
those moons kept shining. Florida
was a blast and i cant tell you how
much i appreciate what ou did You
all are great friends, if i hear "How
i Know again I'll scream.
Denise, you're a tourist Kathy, get a
reai tan Love Always, Robm
alpha SiGS Looking forward to
the soe a sa i fs better the se
cond time arouna Get ready to par
ty gus �� �'� :pha Phi's
DELTA SIGS AND SIG TAUS:
Thanks for a iammin'social! Box
and ox was a blast Cute legs guys!
The Alpha Phis
LISA WHITFIELD Congratula
tions on recieving outstanding Greek
Woman We're so proud of you.
Love, The Alpha Phi's
RUSH Sigma Tau Gamma,
midsemester dry rush tonight 8 30
at the Sig Tau house Call 757 0127
for r.de or info Happy Hour Wed
night at the Elbo Sig Tau raffle
tickest on sale at the student store
Wed , Thurs and Friday lots of
great prizes
PITCHER NIGHT! $2 Bud pitchers
all night long Why stop your spring
break partying so soon' Come to
Pantana Bob's this Wednesday

: he following
chugging teams need to be at Pan
tana Bob's Wed , March 19th at 10
p.m Phi Kappa Tau, Sigma Nu,
Theta Chi, Tau Kappa Epsilon, Pi
Kappa Phi, Lambda Chi Alpha, Kap
pa Sigma, Alpha Phi, Chi Omega,
Alpna Delta Pi, and Alpha Xi
Delta You need to check in at the
Gazebo between 10 and 10 30 p.m.
FACULTY AND STAFF: Yearbook
portraits taken March 17 27 No ap
pointment necessary! Walk in
anytime and be photographed im
mediately. No waiting!
FIREI: Class portraits taken March
17 27 9 5 p.m. except 20th and 26th
12:30 8 p m. No appointments
available Ask about portraits con
test for dorm and campus organiza
tions
361 WOMEN: "I don't need you to be
bringing me down. HAH
Snowshoe was a blast Let's hear it
for apres skiing! Love, Anne
VAN NUMBER 4: "If you're happy
and you know it, you can play with
my ding-a-ling What happened to
the side mirror?! Let's play a game!
JAMES FORD GRIFFIN: Happy
22nd Birthday, one week late
Love, Shannon & Anne.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
WINNER OF THE AOTT
ASSASSINATION GAME: We hope
Keith Abluton, TKE, made good use
of his $100 prize over Spring Break!
SIG EPS: Thanks for making our
party for the sisters so much fun!
Can't wait to do it again! Love, the
new sisters of AOTT
AOTT: We hope you had a blast at
cut out! Your Pj's were too cool! We
hope you have recuperated from the
8 00 show! We love you! The new
sisters
361 WOMEN: LLB, Annie's Fanny,
and Miss Nanny. What an awesome
spring break, can't wait to do it
again LB
PALACE: Surprises are in abun
dance around Easter Break Be
prepared
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster
HUsliing�on Highway (N C. 33 Ext.) Gre�nviU�, North C�rotm�
Phone 752-3t72
(Past RiverbluJfApts.)
Flounder
Popcorn Shrimp
$325
$325
Hours 4:30-9:30 MonSat.
- NEWLY REMODELED -
PRICES EFF r CTIVE THROUGH SAT MARCH 22 AT SAV A CENTER
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES
the super
ENTER IN GREENVIU E MA
market with - 1I7�
�u�SrrtTtt
and W�m SsJsss
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli, Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality:
703 GREENVILLE BLVDOPEN 24 HOURS ffiS OPEN SUNDAY 7 A.M11RM.
6 COL. GREENVILLE EARLY WEEK AD WE 3-22-86
9h
11 !
A
,� m,






Title
The East Carolinian, March 18, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 18, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.463
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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