The East Carolinian, March 4, 1986






(She IraHt (ftarnliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No.442
Tuesday, March 4, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 12,00
12 Pages
Services Offered To
Assist In Job Hunting
Exercise For Heart
J.I HlMItll Iklullv
Make it burn for the Heart Association. Over $3,200 was raised Sunday at Minges b members of
local exercise clubs. See related story page I.
Health Clinic
Student's Health Screened
BvBr IH WHU KKR
? s P dit
AsMslanl New
itor
Many students took advantage
� he Blood Pressure and Sickle
(. ell Knemia Clinic that was of-
ai Mendenhall; the
clinic was sponsored hv Kappa
ha Psi with the help of the
ECU Student Nurses and the Stu-
dent Health Services, in honor of
Black History month.
"We had a really good tur-
nout, since there was such a big
interest, the activity could
become a yearly event said
Mary Elesha-Adams, health
Money Raised For
National Group
ByPATTIKEMMIS
Assislanl NewsF.dMor
Over S3.200 was raised for the
Hear: Association Sunday after-
noon in Minges Coliseum by
members of local exercise clubs.
According to Janice Dillion,
owner of the Aerobic Workshop,
"it was a lot of fun! There was a
lot of motivation and energv
coming from everyone. In fact, it
almost resembled a pep rally! "
Last year Dillion's club and
members of the ECU football
team joined forces and raised
SI, 600.
I he Body Shop, Eastern
Carolina Fitness Center, Gold's
Gym, Greenville Athletic Club,
ECU Intramural Aerobic
Classes, and The Spa were
represented this year along with
the Aerobic Workshop.
There were two fifty minute
sessions of aerobics with inter-
missions in-between, and during
the intermissions prizes were ran-
domly given away.
Six year old Meagan Duffus
w on the grand prize by raising the
most in donations, $310.
The prize was a 3-day and 2
night trip to Colonial
Williamsburg including brunch,
dinner and tickets to the surroun-
ding attractions.
educator. Student Health Ser-
v ices.
"It is verv important to be
tested tor Sickle Cell because it's
a disease that deals with the
blood said ringer Simmons, an
intern for SHS.
Simmons added that Sickle
Cell Anemia affects the red blood
cells of 50,000 Americans. Sickle
Cell occurs when the hemoglobin
molecules in the blood cells
release too much oxygen. This
results in the "sickled" cell.
Sickled cells die quickly and leave
the body without enough red
blood cells to supply the needed
oxygen.
"Sickle Cell traits are inherited
and most common in Blacks in
the U.S. However, it can occur in
others � people of Spanish,
Greek, Italian. Turkish, Asiatic.
Indian descent, and people who
originated from the Mediterra-
nean area. Everyone should be
checked, because one of your
ancestors could have had the
trait added Nokomis Gregory,
of Kappa Alpha Psi.
"It's real important that peo-
ple know whether or not they are
a carrier because it affects their
future said Elesha-Adams.
See BLOOD Page 2.
Bv JILL MORGAN
Sl.ff Wrtof
Summer is just beyond spring
break � (and we all know how
lose that is) � so the Co-op and
Career Planning Service here on
campus are eager to help students
land that perfect summer job.
There are several different
ways to go about finding a sum-
mer job � of course there are the
classifieds, or Uncle Louie could
et you work in his restaurant
(Again) this year � but even bet
ter than boring jobs listed in the
paper, or favors from relatives,
are the opportunities the Co-
operative Education and Cateet
Planning and Placement Services
provide for students here at
ECl .
The Co-operative Education
Program is located on the 3rd
floor ot Raw I Building. The ma-
jor purpose ot the organization is
to give students work experience
while they are in school. Bernel
Waters coordinator will, the C o
op program savs "it's the only
wav 1 know of to kill two bird-
with one stone The program
allows students to work in then
field of study while thev earn
their degree.
By the time the student
graduates they are alreadv ex-
perienced professionals. No Co-
op post grad job guarantee but
most companies do lake advan-
tage ot the program and use it to
recruite qualified employees, she
added.
Co-op does not limit its oppot
tunnies to students by requiring
they work in a job that suits then
major. Co-op also helps students
gel local part-time jobs.
bulletin board on 3rd floor Raw!
has information on all kinds of
employment opportunities
available to students.
I he Co-operative Education
Program (( o-op) also helps
students land summer jobs.
Presently, the (cup office is
now taking applications for
students who would like to work
at Disney World in Florida. Co-
op will send interested students to
NCSU where thev can meet with
a representative from Disney
World
Waters said Co-op also otters
jobs with the state of North
Carolina working in state parks
� jobs in uimpv are available as
well as in mdtistrv and other state
departments. .lobs with the state
are verv competitive � compete
with students from other univer-
sities besides E I
' I his is Co-op' busiest
semester Waters reported
Many ot the deadlines tor sum-
mer job applications have alreadv
e by. Students who are in-
terested in working through
op should get up t Raw . i
313, "a- sO( ��: as possible I I
are not a h f j bs availabl
1 ireenville tot the summei
earlier application? ai the bet-
ter!
Anothei to find an
interestii this summer is to
' the Bloxt ise here
campus Bloxton House is the
home o I lie . ju- Plat
and Plai 5 ce.
The (. areer Planning and
Placement office uses two mam
sources for their summer iob
listings. likeO-op,areer
Planning and Placement has a
summer jobs bulletin board. 1 he
information board has names
and addresses ot numerous
camps ottering employn
students lor the 1986 sumn
I he camps are listed by
as well as broken down into
specialty groups. lor example.
Special Education majors can get
excellent background and ex-
perience working at i summer
samp tor handicapped students.
There i also a summer jobs
notebook for oudt use as a
reference. I he possibility
opportunitic an virtually
endless � from selling vacuums
door to door to dancing through
vour summei at Opry I and. I he
notebook, moreover, supplies the
correct application information
and deadlines fi i interested
students.
The advantages to using what
is available to you h� am-
pus could make 'he difference
�seen another born t
e 1 ouie' kite 'sen
'Hilating job expo
lid provide Lie . �
tor vour proposed career.
lai - Westn rel tnd, ass
dire � Career P
and Placement Service u. "We
i u rage pe v
' : jobs down the toad, and su
r,s t ti: be tl e ke
many doors e and
urged
and explore youi op
break, because the earlier you
" the better off you will K
May
A dditional Parking Proposed
By PATTIKEMMIS
Student Government Presi
dent, David Brown, urged
legislators at the SGA meeting
Monday night to participate in a
forum being held in Mendenhall
Wednesday concerning the plans
to pave the field at the bottom of
college hill.
The plans would mean 400 ad-
ditional parking spaces for com-
muters. In the past the field has
been used by the marching band
and other organizations. The
Falculty Facilities Committee has
said that the parking lot would be
cleared of cars by 3:00 pm so that
the organizations could continue
using the area.
"I think it is being used much
more appropriately now said
legislator Sandy Hardy "As a
day student I can say that the
parking is there now. You may
have to wait for it, but it is
available
Brown aiso announced a Citv
Council meeting Marsh. 12th
where the issue ot parking on 5th
Street will be brought up.
The present time limit on 5th
Street is two hours. Brown said
he hoped to have it extended to
three or tour hours.
Plans to improve freshman
See SGA Page 6.
Accomodations Made For Non-Smokers
MEMPHIS, Term. (UPI) �
Smokers and non-smokers, used
to being separated at restaurants
and on airplanes, are finding that
hotels have followed suit.
The nation's largest hotel com-
pany , Holiday Inns Inc an-
nounced this month that it is set-
ting aside at least 10 percent of its
rooms at every hotel for non-
smokers.
Other hotel chains have recent-
ly adopted similar policies, and
industry representatives say the
trend will undoubtedly grow as
fewer people smoke.
"No smoking is a trend. There
are certain cities that do not allow
smoking in public places, and we
see more and more no-smoking
ordinances said Ray Lewis,
vice president tor Holiday Inn
Hotel System Marketing.
Bending to health concerns and
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds12
Editorials4
Features7
Sports10
H ho lets his wife go to every
feast, and his horse drink at
every water, shall have neither
good wife nor good horse.
�George Herbert
customer demand, the Memphis
based company is setting aside
some 30,000 rooms in its 1,400
U.S. hotels to be smoke-free,
Lewis said. That 10 percent will
be a minimum. Some Holiday
Inns already have set aside 30 or
35 percent as non-smoking
rooms, Lewis said.
Another large chain, Hilton
Hotels Corp announced a
similar plan this month, only
with 5 percent of its rooms.
Shoney's Lodging Inc a smaller
Nashville based chain plans to
have 36 inns by year's end, all
with 10 percent non-smoking
rooms.
And no-smoking signs do not
just mean no smoking. The
rooms are fumigated, carpets
scrubbed, walls repainted and
brushed down, and other steps
taken to remove all vestiges of
tobacco. The process isn't cheap,
but, "A lot of people are very
allergic to smoke Lewis said.
Of course, "No smoking"
signs too will remind friends ot
the guest with an inclination to
light up. Hilton is replacing
ashtrays with mint-filled trays.
Holiday Inns is keeping the
ashtrays, because people like to
keep change in them, Lewis said.
But they will read "No
smoking
Since smoke would travel easi-
ly from room to room, Hilton is
setting aside entire non-smoking
floors, said George Stamos, a
spokesman for the company.
But Stamos said Hilton is not
going to be obsessed with corner-
ing smoke.
"We're not going to turn out
hotels into police states, where
we've got armed guards looking
for someone who lights up a
Virginia Slim or a Camel
Neither is Hilton intent on
segregating its guests over what
has become a touchy issue,
Stamos said.
"We are very much wanting to
protect the rights of smokers and
non-smokers alike. We want to
treat them equally so that
nobody's rights are trod upon
he said.
"All medical aspects aside,
there are people who enjoy a
good smoke, let's face it. We can
only hope they'll be courteous
and punch-out when walking
down a no-smoking hall
Holiday Inns also is not wor-
ried about disenfranchising its
smoking guests.
"We still have 90 percent of
our rooms for people who can
smoke if they want to Lewis
said.
"AH we're doing is offering an
alternative said Jim Grout, vice
president of Shoney's Lodging.
"W'e're in no way telling the
smokers they're not welcome
What if all but the non-smoking
rooms fill up and a smoker needs
a reservation?
Grout said that situation isn't
likely to come up because the
non-smoking rooms are the first
to go. If it does, the hotel will
have to give the guest a room and
just ask him not to smoke, he
said.
The innkeepers feel that the
trend away from smoking will
continue, and that other hotels
will have to respond.
"As more and more hotels
have it, the traveling public is go-
ing to come to expect it Grout
said.
It's an economic benefit, too,
Grout said. It only costs $250 to
$300 to "detoxify" a room.
Smokers do quite a bit of
damage, so the non-smoking
rooms will pay for themselves, he
said.
Lewis said that Holiday Inns'
new policy reflects not just health
concerns, but the increasing need
for hotels to specialize and offer
amenities. "The people that take
care of their guests are going to
be the ones that survive
In addition, Lewis foresees a
day when the law will require
hotels to cater to non-smokers,
he said, he figures they will be
ahead of the game.
HI
tOOir - Tfc. Km (amttww
Concentration
Spring Break is just around the corner. Before sun, fun and vaca-
tion time arrives mid-term exams must be hurdled. Students may
find concentration on studies difficult while contemplating leisure
time. Only four class days remain. Students deserve a break.
I
-� -





IHt l s (, -xkoL INlxs MARCH4. 1986
BIKINI CONTEST
Announcements
SEANC
ECU SURFING
�' ' � -
a bikirA �. v ECU ChaD'Pr it S( AN' " H�� ketsrnere vmli be a mandatory meeting lor
�'� � be� � � ' . �� � � table For the l � � . �. � .�anyone going to Florida this Thursday night
and pledges Mice for iMa- � :� .� �� , k n�11at John McCann s house (F irst and Veadej
ujijf s sealA 1 . , . - ,�-� ' � � Stale i mployees asmk�at 8 00 Team t shirts are Imaily in and will
UL .�' , � " " � " ljisti . lumber 6 Alw in pei .be sold lor S7 (rash only) on a tirst
tv Mai ' 'v pants slea . � � i . SHJ I . �� � . � �.��ft ISJ ' attei ft IX) pmcome lirsl serve basis ECUS lavonte refreshment will be served and a video crl the
' a : lei � , �-SOCIETY FOR!�8?i Pipeline Masters ontest will be shown
' SSl Del� ' ��� i � PRE MEDADVANCEMENTOF MANAGEMENTDon't expect a spot on the van il you m.ss this meeting For more mlc call 757 1502 SUMMER JOBS
RUGBY CLUB
Alpria Ep; Delta � � ext
May v.i i i . � iopm ,n
an igan p. . (.
ept ot Humanities
. �
uraged l
PIRATE WALK
ESCORT SERVICE
F or a f r ii ��
an P i ate a � k
POETRY FICTION
READING

' � � � � � ii , .
� �
PHI SIGMA PI

ii
WATER SKI CLUB
EAST CAROLINA EARLY
CHILDHOOD CLUB
� � �. � � �. � v i
� � ties � invite you 1 � � and
us aii ��laicrc A. , �� , call
F vents Feb 37
Mar s lih lure
Quality
��' '30 cm Apr Gues
ice Pres
� �� � � . Hiring
Practu es For � sam
� ' � 'es � � . � � R'ana
'53 ?4?8
BLACK AWARENESS
MONTH
Fret � e and kie ci
isw e held I lay. f ��biuar, jg
�' �� . � �. , , �, . �
B ,i �
AWan � es M m jct.vit es Spi
ermty Associal
I tudenl ��� � n
.
ECU FRISBEE
. It RAT
torn . Pe ciub extends a

� � � �
. �
Meeting
. 4 ' V �: Watch tor me Ha .�'�
flMAX V, �� . .
STUDENTS FOR SANFORD
. � �
�. v i � �
V
HONORS GRADUATES
Blood Disorders
Common In Blacks
Continued Krorn Page 1.
According to i lesl a dams,
drugs. surger and medicines
help mosi ickle ceil sufferers.
Symptoms oJ sickle cell include
leg ulcers, hand-fooi ime,
slow grovvtl
ful joints
Besides checkin cklecell,
the clinic also screened par
ticipants for hij essure.
"About one in sis Americans
have high blood pressure and
more than hall ol thosf
blood pressure thai is v
serious H d pr. . can
often lead eai attack ��k
repoi ted
kidne Ji sease
Elesha-Adams.
Accord Elesha-Adams,
11 blacks are
p a 2 ued it h high blood
pressure. Ma
high blood pressure
diet, weight, and salt in-
take.
" I he amoui I odium eaten
ma have a do with high
blood presure i ower weight
�s bl od pressure for some
people Vlaintaini
weight ma) reduce the risk ol get
. high blood pressure added
Elesha dams
SxsxS�csx5i)'s-
See For Yourself i
s

on All Frames, Sunglasses,
and Contact Lenses
Everyday;
No There are two kx.aa.vt, rfc �rfer �U) dirterai trnns, u. dune
trim, s. even,J.i savings of 30' GO'S off regular retail prices The
Eye S�e j. The Plaza, and The Eye Care Cerier s he Tjn Annex
In dcUioon. eye examinat, are available at The Eye Care Center
No untment nooessars CaU tor exam huurs

eve s
Fhe PUm
HUk- "Sfvcw?!
1
i
OFIQMC1MC
�t� CARE 0EKTCR
for Fraat Selection and Kye Fjuuniiutions:
2M (.rcenvttlr Blvd. iTiptoo Annex)
OD.
�A.
Phone 7S6-9404 Z
Thomas Nelson inc will be on campus Tues
day, March 4 mterviewmq students tor their
summer internship positions All maiors
welcome but only students that are serious
about making 13000 and qeft.nq good 10b ex
per.ence should come by Interviews will be
at Brewster D wmg room 109 at 3 30 and 7 00
pm 1 s GPA required
LAW SOCIETY
ECU caw Sik ety will meet tonight (Tues
J at 8 OOpn �� Mendenhail room 231
' .iieaker will be recent law school
graduate and locil practicing a'torney
Wyron Hill We w.n also discuss plans tor a
Ii 1 ' ' the UNC. Law School Call Richard
� '58 3155 (Ol " �K -irttinn
SPANISH
fessor Raauei T Manning
epartmem � I gn Languages and
�tures 'opu A Pur'her Look at the
D'amatc Parallels in Garcia Larca and
��"��� v liams The Poet.c Qualities
�" ' n Yerma and tnp Pur.lica
T.mp Aednesda, Marc�- 5 1984
jOd- Place Mendentiali Student center
-��- mcxisp E vwyonp ,s crrl,ally .nvted
- as ' here s � admission
� aroe
FREE TAX HELP
� � ' � s . nsonng a iree
ind advici set . e
�� �;���� ,)� Mendenhail cr, Wednesdays
Thui � iv 4 6 c m �� ru lax
� �
1 ipii ,sis
LSS SOCIETY
GAME NITE! !
Meeting this Wednesday night at a 00pm 406
Rotary st Bahamas bound, let's rip
OMEGA PSI PHI
An informative meeting lor all men m
terested Ml Omega will be held Wed . March
5 at 7 30 pm m Mendenhail Student Center
room 244 Dress is informal
PHI ALPHATHETA
Phi Alpha Theta. theHistory Honors Sex lety
will conduct a book sale Tuesday March 4
from 9am until lpm in the History Depan
ment off,ce. BA 312 Hundreds of hardbacks
SI each and paperbacks 50 cents each
ECU COLLEGE
REPUBLICANS
There will be a meeting on Tuesday. March 4
at � 30 m 221 Mendenhail The spr.ng con
vention will be discussed
n r&r uim. tot ikU Cht6ti
w
Get A Start On
Your Summer Tan.
Scandanavian Tanning
System
Show ECU ID and receive ONE FREE Visit
318 S. Evons St. Mall 758-8553
(appointments.

" � � �
- .
me
p n Mendi
we'ri
' we � "oaia
MEDIA BOARD
� ' ' �"� � � � v -4 v 3 00
J � '��� � .tudenl
' - - mcei . . � ents

SGA Elections
All persons interested in running for:
President, Vice-President,
Secretary or Treasurer
Should file for candidacy in the SGA Office
Mendenhail Student Center, Room 226
Filing Deadline
March 7th at 4:30 p.m.
Election Date
March 26th, 1986


r 'c
Students! Take a
Break, Go Krogering
i� �?
iQ
'V
JUMBO 48 SIZE
CALIFORNIA
Navel
Oranges
10
$399
US FANCY ROME
GO10 OR
Red Delicious
Apples
99c
CRISP N TASTY
ASSORTED
Jeno's
Pizza
CHUNK LIGHT
IN OIL OR WATER
Star-Kist
Tuna
74
III!
10
Oz
Box
Crisp
TASTY
PIZZA
6 5
Oz
Can
M�
NEW!
RED MARK
Gummy
Star-Kist
c"u�m newt tu
CHUNK ItCNt
REGULAR OR DIET
PEPSI OR
Pepsi
Free
&
Lb
REGULAR OR
DOUBLE STUFF
Oreo
Cookies
$
119
jwer
1 1
KROGER
vS�a��
W
�99
2 Lowfat
Milk
M79
Gal m
Jug m
REGULAR OR LIGHT
Budweiser
IN OUR DELI-RESTAURANT
ALL YOU CAN EAT!
4:00-7:00pm MonSat.
Including 2 vegetables and roll.
Vt.
Wishbone
Fried Chicken
ALL VOUCAN-EAT SPECIAL
DOt� MOT APPLY TO
CARRYOUT ORDERS
Only
CODyrlgnt 1986
�roger Uv on
Ouintity eights eeservea
None soia To Dealers
items ana Prices
Effective tnru sat
Mar 8 1986
'Wilt '���.
SVXJiT " a �" ���� �
. 1-1 - t�w Mr �� ac -�� 3 v r-
ea-iiiTTiJii "0'� �tmrnri ���- �-
I � �� kv - , wnwr
rtT ���" � � 5-� r� .oc
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
Congre,
SHINGTON

"
y
Lv-4
I'm yoinc. lo Honda for S
Brt-ak and haveni seen tl
tor month Mow can I
from kjeilinc. sunburni?
The Health C olu �
Mar Elesha-Adams
I
i v

I V
t L'V
.
a- Sun Pri ;

Pei �ple w i

and
1
the sun.
traceptive p
pr
uon expi
other drugs
sensitivity S
are val
ne It j
Beaiitii
v
AMEI
Centr
Greenville Sq. Shopping
p f
-�





THh EAST CAROLINIAN
MARC H4. 1986

mf'i
AW UP
On
Fan.

.758-8553 appointments)
ions
resident,
usurer
ice
.t
t
DgpSl S
1 i
Budweiser
$
items an3 Pnres
elective tnru saf
Mar 8 1986
on
KTMM ��� I M �'� M4
- ' � ��. - �; Mm l�"t V I ?-
- -� x ww j '�-
IURS EVERYDAY
Blvd Creenvil
3

Congress Debates Federal Aid Programs
WASHINGTON, DC (C PS) students of out federal aid pro-
- In an unusually harsh flurry of grams with a bit of guerilla
words, college lobbyists lasi week theater, a public resolve to beat
greeted President Reagan's pro- back the cuts and a strange argu-
posal to push some one million men! on the street with a top
I'm going to Florida for Spring
Break and hadn't seen the sun
for months! How can I keep
from getting sunburnt?
fter a long cold winter, limit
sour first exposure to the sun to
about 15 minutes. Sunning, then,
can be gradually increased.
possible, try to avoid mid-da
tanning from 10:00 am to 2:00
pm when the sun is the most in-
tense. The burning componei
sunlight, though, ultraviolet
(LA) light, is not filtered b
clouds, therefore ii is possible to
gel tanned and, more imp.
burn: on a cloud Jas.
1 he Health Column by
Mar Elesha-Adams
Fort unath, sunscreens
available that can screen harmful
IV light, rhe PABA (Pa
Aminobenzoic Acid) compounds
1 power to 2! powei:
the 21 power will totally block i
I. light with 1 powei
ing, ask a pharmacist or other
health care provider.
rhe worst thing, however,
about sun exposure is damage to
the skin builds up. Physicians are
just now seeing the effects of sun
exposure of 10-20 consecutive
years Skin becomes leathers and
lough after main years of sunn-
ing. Moreover, UV radiation can
ise recurrences of both oral
and genital herpes, but using lip
sunscreens and avoiding prolong-
ed exposures may decrease the
likelihood of a recurrence. Also.
I exposure can cause solar
atosis, which is a non-
cerous growth on the skin,
but does base a slight chance oi
;oming cancerous. Never-
less, enjoj our lime in the
sun but please remember � use
moderation.
Education Department official.
On a Washington sidewalk, the
two sides in the budget battle call-
ed each other names, accusing
each other of being elitist and
selfish.
The heat was generated by the
president's Feb. 5 proposal to
slash the federal student aid
budget by $1.7 billion for the
1986-87 fiscal year, which starts
next Oct. 1.
The administration wants to
cut Guaranteed Student Loan
(GSL) funding by nearly one
third, make it harder for middle-
income students to get Pell
Grants and merge the College
Work-Study Program with the
Supplemental Education Oppor-
tunity Grant Program.
Under the plan � which Con-
gress svill debate during the next
five months � students also
would base to start paving in-
terest on their GSl.s while they're
in college.
Higher education leaders
wasted no time calling a news
conference outside Education
Department headquarters to blast
the plan and its authors.
Not to be outdone, the depar
ment's second-highest ranking
official stormed the sidewalk
meeting to rebut the criticism.
"You're only concerned with
your own programs
Undersecretary Gary Bauer
charged.
"You ignore all the progress
the economy's made the last five
years he insisted, adding the
leaders were unwilling to help
reduce the federal deficit.
Not true, countered Dale
Parnell of the American Associa-
tion of Community and Junior
Colleges. "We're willing to take
our fair share but only if other
programs, notably Defense, do.
th
UV lieht.
I . ,�� e - ir -
as Sun Protection Factors (9PP)
ch represent multiples
time it takes to get a minimal s
burn on your skin, it is imj
to remember that sunburn ofl
does nor show up until hours
after you have gone inside.
People with fair complexions
and red hair and have a -km tvpe
that is easily burned and should
use a SPF of 8-15. Dark haired
and darker skinned people who
rarely burn can use a SPI ol 2
Moreover, medications can
cause reactions when exposed to
the sun. Women on oral
traceptive pills have increased
sensitivity to sun and can gel
splotchy tans due to estrogen el
fects. Tetracycline, an antibi
can cause sun sensitivity which
produces a type of allergic reac-
tion exposed areas. And there are
other drugs that can cause sun
sensitivity. Some of those drugs
are valium, benadryl, and com-
paine. If you have am questions
about the medicine you are tak-
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too.
In all, the president proposed a
15 percent decrease in the Educa-
tion Department's budget and,
depending on who is doing the
estimating, an 8 to 12 percent in-
crease in Pentagon spending.
Inflation, budget cuts and
budget freezes, moreover.
already have diminished federal
college spending by about 20 per-
cent since 1980, estimates Kathv
Oer of the U.S. Student
Association.
"Bill Bennett lives in a dream
world Parnell said at the press
conference. "He fancies himself
as the high priest of education
who must make regular sacrifices
to the gods. The real world
escapes him. He has yet to pro
pose any real solutions to real
education problems. He engages
in elitist preaching instead oi
problem-solving
Bennett was prepared for the
broadside attacks.
Upon hearing of the plan tor
the theatrical protest outside his
office, Bennett reportedly joked
to an aide that "Maybe we ought
to make sure someone (from the
department) is on the root with a
tire hose in case it's not raining
Bennett then phoned the same
line to Robert Atwell of the
American Council on Education
(ACE), one oi the lobbyists plan-
ning to criticize the budge; pro-
posal.
But Atwell and the others felt
they had to stage the conference.
"We got the pants boat o us
(in Congress) in 1981 and '82.
and we've been trying to keep the
same thing from happening ever
since says one official of a
public college association.
The official, who requested
anonymity "because I'm speak-
ing only for myself noted "we
stand to get killed by Gramm-
Rudman (the budget-balancing
bill). We stand to get killed by the
new Higher Education Act, and
we stand to get killed bv this
budget proposal. We figure the
only way we're going to survive
this congressional session at all is
to fight as hard as we can
On the sidewalk last week.
resolve led to some blunt w-
from educators, normally a
strenuously decorous bunch.
The proposal, Phillips said,
does nothing less than "gut the
national investment in human be
i ngs
Soccer Coaches (Indoor Soccer)
Part-time coaches, work 10-20 hours weekly.
Hours Monday-Friday, 3-5:30 and a couple of
evenings, 7-9:00. Indoor soccer oames at Elm
Street Gym.
Must posses skills and be able to coach,
officiate youth ogee 5-18, in soccer fundamentals.
Contact the Gieeirvtlfe Recreation and Parks
Department, 7524117, ext. 262, 259, for
I application information. Application
Friday, March 7. $3.46 hr
Nightclub
Carolina East Centre
Off Highway 11
Near Plitt Theatre
Phone 756 6401
Professionally
Prepared
RESUME'S
Special Student Rates
355-6810
Wednesday Night
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All Lady Members Get In For $1.00
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Guys In At 10
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Friday Night
COLLEGE NIGHT
All Members In FREE Until 9 pm
50c Draft 50c Wine Coolers
$2.50 Pitchers
Bob "Daddy Cool" Hayworth is back playing the best
in Contemporary Dance Music both fun-filled nights.
Beau's, a private club
Located in the Carolina East Centre, Greenville.
Phone 75 6401 for more info.






2U?� iEaat (Earalftuan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
rOM 1 l l M)l-R,��lr. Manage,
Jay Stone, ���,�
llKl LUDWICK, vn.
Si oi l Cooper, � , �
Danh i Mai rer, . ��.
John Shannon.
Dt Ch nii i Johnson, i
March -4. l.v,
Greg Winchester. � �,
Anthony Martin, ��,�� ����,
John Pi rERSON, w,��.
Shannon Short, ����,
Dt unit Stevi NS. s �,
Opinion
SGA Legislature
Political Bias In Funding ?
ctions taken by the SGA
legislature yesterda afternoon
raise serious questions worth
pondering.
rhe legislature voted againsi fun-
ding The Great Decisions lecture
series and the appropriations com-
mittee voted against approving a
line item transfer for funding the
Michael Harrington lecture which
took place February 6 in Jenkins
fine Arts auditorium. Meanwhile.
in an earlier session, the legislature
oted in favor oi funding the
Marauders, a paramilitary student
group, to bring failed congressional
candidate Red McDaniels to cam-
pus to speak on the topic oi "Star
Wars
rhe somewhat muffled con-
troversy that surrounds these deci-
ms on funding speakers centers
on the fact that all of the speakers
concerned were to speak on
political topics. More to the point,
there is some question as to whether
funding for the speakers was decid-
m the basis of the merit oi the
'grams concerned and their
benefit to students or on the basis
the political leanings oi the
speakers involved.
In answer to this question it is in-
teresting to note that Michael Harr-
iton. a vocal critic of the Reagan
ectures
administration, writes and 1
m a democratic left perspective
while Red McDaniels is on the righi
wing of the Republican party. Bui
according to Maurice Simon, chair-
man of the Political Science
Department and a leading force
behind the Greal Decisions series.
the lecture series is non-partisan
and speakers are not asked aboul
theii political preferences.
Dins, it cannot be said thai the
Greal Decisions series was
necessarilly terminated after having
been funded for three years because
oi political bias. Yet, certainly
political bias may have played a
role m the decision to kill the pro-
gram as illustrated by the comments
of one legislator during debate last
week who said: there's not a
moderate on the political science
faculty It was further alleged that
because of the bias of the Political
Science faculty the speakers that the
department would bring would
be left-wing.
In scrutinizing the actions and
motives oi members in the
legislature it must be acknowledged
that everyone does not necessarily
share the same motives. Arguments
against funding the Great Decisions
series centered on the allegation
'hat the series is academic in nature,
is closely related to a class and does
not benefit students outside the
cal Science Department.
improper. It made this decision bas-
ed partly upon the fact that the
equipment being bought would
continue being used for classes and
thus the SGA should not be in the
business of funding academic pro-
grams.
Maurice Simon, however, argues
that the Great Decisions series is
unrelated to academics in the sense
that the lectures are not designed
around a class. Instead, he says, a
class was designed around the lec-
tures. (Simon teaches a class that
uses a textbook called Great Deci-
sions) The same thing might have
been done by any professor in
regard to any lecture, he says. The
lecture series itself is merely design-
ed in an effort to give students an
opportunity hear speakers address
current political issues such as
"Star Wars" and "Third World
Development In addition, no
equipment would have been bought
by the Political Science Department
that it would have kept.
In the case oi the Harrington lec-
ture the appropriations committee
decided unanimous!) to deny a re-
quest for line item transfers by the
Economics Honors Society and the
Philosophy Honors Socieiv so that
money could be allocated to pay
Harrington's honorarium. The
reasons given for the decision
centered on assertions thai the line
item transfei had been requested
after the lecture and that the deci-
sion to fund the Harrington lecture
was not reached democratically by
the membership oi the Economics
Honors Societv. 1; was also stated
that the Harrington lecture was
academic in nature.
Anwar El-Jawhar, President oi
the Economics Honors Society
maintains thai his group's decisions
were reached democratically and
fairly. And .left Whisnani of the
Philosoph) Honor's Society has
alleged thai the line item transfer
request for the Harrington lecture
was "stonewalled" despite the fact
that tlie SGA is alreadv legallv com-
mitted to pav Harrington on the
basis oi a contract. He added that
he was heckled by some members of
the appropriations committee
Whisnani further stated that he can
see little difference between funding
Red McDaniels and funding Harr
ington.
THE WET LrtuC,H!
Campus Forum
Get Involved In SGA Elections
Mam ol us have heard tl
SGA or thai aboul SGA; I
what is the
Association? rhe SGA is fii
foremost the represei tai �
student bod at ECl In
iv. the president of SGA repres
you and meal tvouncil Medi-
al Statewide Meetings, a
Board ol I rustees,
ning bodv of the I
also the controllei ol i
cial affairs, controllii . � ,
I) $40,000 per year,
propriating funds to ovei 5U
organizations. Finally, S i
association of students, each
Has a right to be a pa
Government. Whethei
voting student or a ��
holdei. no student
to make s( iA a pan
lite. ! urge anyone ,
make student lil
comcerned tor studeni affa
President, Viv P
Secretarv or Trea sc , r-fe.
I lime dale- t
SGA Pre
(S.K
( i

l1
K
are Mart
p.m.
Also.
"��
urge evervone wh
tde East C arolina I nive
aim �- . Sl x
to oiee theij opinion on a
want to he represented and
student activity tees are spent h
word VOTE, rhe 1 leel
Maui: 26 Make SGA rep
I

M.S.O ; Mi;
Uv.
� i ,
W iam
ons
duca
a areness
currently considering a
asphalt the recreational field at tl
bottom ofollege Hill Drive I
ode approximately 400
commuter parking spaces rhe 1
I acilities Committee
I hursday, March 6th at 11:00
I i igan building to
recommendation on this pr
B I rustees meeting on I �
dav M hh. S.G.A is pi
ublic forum tor stude
� input on this issue
w ednesdav Mar.fi 5th at 5:0
in Mendenhall Student c ei
peftons are encouraged u
Dav id Bi a
SGA Presidt

1 �
1 M i � !
'��
Forum Rules
rhe Eastarolinian welcomes U
expressing all points oj view. Ma
ur office m the Pi. !
Building, across from the
!rar oyner I ihrarx
For purposes of verification, a,
' include the name, majoi
ification, address, phone nut
and signature of the authorfs) I
are limited to two typewritten pc
double-spaced or neatly printed. �
rs are subject to editing for bre
ty, obscenity and libel, and no persona,
attacks will be permitted.
Nukes Help
We should all feel obliged to Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev tor having
done more than an peace committee,
conbination of Christum churches, oi
even � presidential speechwriter to
detoxify nuclear arsenals.
need to enact a) universal conscription,
Swiss style; and b) increase their military
budgets bv (depending on the nation in
n) something on the order ol 100
that technological sophistication SI
has an order in for Trident submarii
If we wish to see a crisis in the West
alliance, dwell on the possibility ofGor
P�n, - ?00 The ,a, of 'Z bacho 'J Re�rl,
-r is thai rh� r. m � vv v B vpuoiung
In summing up the debate o' fun-
ding over speakers it is clcar that
the SGA legislature is beinu
primarily run by conservative
students this year, with College
Republican members plavine a high
profile role. Speaker of the House
Kirk Shelley, himself a conser-
vative, must be commended for
Related to this argument ,s the fact asking legislators to eTrain from
h?M tintdinrecluesl as denied questioning the political leanings of
the Marketing Department for fun- speakers being considered for f�
ding last semester. The legislature ding or of members of the facuTy
deeded that the request of the Nevertheless it is clear fromTeeeni
Marketing Department lor funding actions in the legislature that hk
to purchase videotapes and other warning will havfhle effect
equipment to be used in a class was some quarters.
On The Right
mattei is that they are unwilling to do
And suddenlv they realize that sum-
miteering over their heads, Washington
and Moscow are talking about ar-
rangements whose hypothetical impact
on Europe would be exactly that, assum-
ing that Europe didn't have the power to
make its own decisions on the matter of
theater nucleai weapons.
By WILLIAM K Bt CKLE1 JK.
mm
What had happened during the past
10 days is that the Western community
Washington this summer, leaving
Europeans wnh their Ford Mode
theater missiles
This unlikely to happen, because Ml
Reagan is who he is. and in the
analysis he will not let our allies down
But the pressures are building: It does
sound dreamy, docs it not, th� removal
Ol all nuclear theater weapons'
What kind of luck would Mr. Reagan
have it he attempted to talk the Soviet
union into conventional desarmamen
Here he would run into extraideolog
Soviet lobbies. The Soviet Union needs a
t7��m,
WU ARg UCTtMATgW THg OME 7D &AM6�, VOU HIREp 05,
Well, Francois Mitterrand in France
lias, through a spokesman, made his
position perfectly clear. The United
States, he says in effect, hasn't the
� v, v uia, u,t- vcsicin eoiiiiiiuiiii power to disarm fiance. And, he goes j'1'onDies- ' ne Soviet Union needs,
in Europe had awakened to the tact that on, we don't care what the Soviet Union emnl ?V army to keeP �ls citizen
one can feel most awfully and definitive- does with its SS-20s. It can burn every and t ' and � '� keep its citizcns
ly dead under the persuasive power of one of them up in the presence of the The �'hers " dommates. subdued
conventional arms. In war talk, people World Council oi Churches, we're still rie-V grCat Soviet J
tend to use round figures, fair enough, not going to pledge a) to do'away with Great '� 'hC t0tal picture of lhe
They talk about 100 million dead in our atomic arsenal; b) to promise not jnjo m' tht reason �he Soviel
Europe in the event that the Soviet enlarge it; or c) to promise not to moder th-inTh'c" d never d'sarm it, anv more
Union decided it wished to resume its nize it. ne bovieI L'nion would consent to
military imperialism westward. The fcnd -ul incidental h f ,u JUTT 'tsJluclew strategic force to
overwhelming predominance of the pme, heTstattete Lt �&$� Jf 2 � th"
fn�enVarmH,nKt0nlyinmanp0Uerhut face with wha� !t � ��� disturb the 1Z uTthe world nudear
in tanks and other mobile machinery, in world communitv to uni ,h m !h f n. , t d'
fighter craft and amllerv. suddenly SAcSln? fo 1 anwh.le, we mus(
reminded European leaders o, .ha, the ;�,ue u!dowha 'he S o , UnLm J now P "?Sf �f f in'� ��
aternauveactuaUy is to doing away with doing t0 AfghanisIan ls no7 " weaps have served'S thal nudear
their theater weapons, the alternative is Western Europe is disposed to take ap�m have served th cause of peace,
to rearm conventionally. chances with by umlaterallv removmg
Now, ,t is one thing to sil comfortably the force feels is the operative deter
in a seminar on war and peace at Aspen. ren. force aganinsl an invasion of
or Hamman House, or Brookings. and Europe, namely its nuclear weapons William F RurUn ,
say that, really, moral hvgiene requires What it has most Br��tlv .o fZr ?u' w BuckIev � ' a widely syn-
that we abandon our nuclear weapons a , wUpons wh ch tZr ��p-
and exchange them for conventional weapons (the Pershins 3, r f? �� newsP�Pers He was
arms, quite another, in democratic ex- nSes) faogLv ZgZand hi IZVZ
changes, to put such counsel into effect, sophistication not now available to the 12 "debate nrn ' �f F�
If the French and the West Germans, the European powers unless rhv 1.1? t , ff Pro&�m airing on PBS
Italians and the Low Countries, were to �T the r .en "ts S Z r " !� BuCk,ey w ai� thor
build conventional forces sufficient to S25i SS. SJXSZ at 7alSn'rh MMa�
deter ex.stmg Soviet forces, they would had been counting QPn simply � �� � JJ�J � �- Stained Glass
Motor
K I , . (1
Lecture In
Educates
Bv I) U s hv XKI)
K irk S �
� topics
jj. SI
-ee time
lei
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4





� �.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 4,
1986
ections
me
pro-
I acul-
rum Rules
�� Ma
her
I etters
� es.
� �
e Peace
n: She
it marines.
e Western
(ior-
ning in
saving the
: Model-T
ausc Mr.
in the last
dlies down.
tilding ! does
� e removal
d Mr Reagan
the Soviet
armament?
leologkaJ
. needs a
p us citizens
to keep its atiens,
. subdued.
iei army is
ta picture of the
reason the Soviet
irn it, any more
- uld consent to
trategic force to
! at less than
next largest nuclear
: musl be grateful
� reality into the
reality is that nuclear
have served the cause of peace.
Buckley Jr. is a widely syn-
nservative columnist who ap-
pears in ovei 100 newspapers He was
� under of Sational Review
.uzme and he is (he host of Firing
Line, a debate program airing c t PBS
stations. Mr. Buckley is also the author
many books, including God and Man
at Yale, Saving the Queen, Stained Glass
g and Overdrive.
Motor Skills Necessary
til Nt� Bureau
rwisi a doorknob. Wind a
clock Use a fork and spoon.
For most people, executing
those routine movements is a lit-
tle like "tailing oU a log" �
something you don't even have to
think about. Unless you have
Down's Syndrome, or cerebral
palsy, or happen to be severely
mentally retarded.
c t u all y, e a c h o! t h e
movements listed above requires
a subtle rotation of the forearm,
a hum ion which is fundamental to
many ol the tasks we perform in
our daily lives. At the ECl
School ol Medicine, occupational
therapists like .lane Sauve refer to
' as a "fine motor skill and
they spend countless hours
developing it in youngsters who
can lake such things for
gram
"You have to develop that
earm rotation to have the
ability to feed yourself well, to do
a lot of things in the classroom
. to do simple everyday things
irn a doorknob says
Sau e "It's just something that a
child is going to have to learn to
be able to function in his environ-
i t
Consortium � teaching
apped children to do just
, the goal of one ol the
's most successful
known unglamorously as the
"()I PT Project and it has
nearly quadrupled the amount of
occupational and physical
therapy services it provides to
regional school systems and
developmental day-care centers
since it began in 1981.
Dewane Frutiger, director of
the medical school's
Developmental Evaluation Clinic
(DEC), calls the OT PT Project
an example of a "consortium
The idea, he said, is to make
therapists available to a group o
agencies that could not afford to
hire full-time therapists on their
own.
The project receives no direct
state funding through the medical
school; instead it is wholly sup-
ported by the local agencies, who
contract for its services by the
hour. In that way, the agencies
get some service, but only a
much as they need or can afford.
That the consortium concept
has worked is obvious from a
review of the numbers. Prior to
1981, Frutigei said, most schools
and day-care centers in the region
had to do without on-site occupa-
tional and physical therapy ser-
vices. Then, when the project got
under way, tour contractors sup-
ported a half-time therapist. To-
day 14 contractors are served by
five therapists, who are able to
reach more children than ever
.rams. 1: is before.
Lecture Informs,
Educates Seniors
Judy Davenport, director of
Exceptional Children's Programs
for Greene County Public
Schools, is unequivocal in her
opinion of the OTPT Project.
"To me it's wonderful she
said. "We don't have an in-
cidence of need sufficient to hire
a full-time therapist, (so) I have
only the highest praise for the
project and what it does for the
children of rural eastern North
Carolina
Davenport said the strength of
the project is its scope, the result
of its association with an
academic medical center.
Therapists are able to use the pro-
per equipment, even though it
might be expensive. They are ex-
ceptionally good at com-
municating with teachers and
parents about a child's needs.
And they have regular access to
physicians when their advice is
needed.
Motor Milestones � the
children served by the project
have conditions that run the
gamut from slight learning
disabilities to extreme physical in-
capacitation. They may be
located in the regular classroom
setting or in special classes for ex-
ceptional children. They range in
age from infancy to 21, and in-
clude youths with delays in
physical and mental develop-
ment, learning disabilities,
cerebral palsy, sickle cell anemia,
mental retardation, rheumatoid
arthritis, limb amputations, head
injuries, spina bifida and emo-
tional handicaps.
Pat Stavrakas is a physical
therapist with the program.
B DV STEW VRD
Miff W �
i
M
ednesday night in
til, about 50 stud
p u Senior nforn
N - irtu ant � �
fe af tei
; ii a ell and
Kirk Shelley, Senior Class presi-
. opened up the symposium
coming the crowd and
� ering brief introduction a
topics of discussion. Howell
and Shelley were followed by
three time aliottments in which
students could choosewhat most
interested them. Included
among these topics were Time
Management. Winning in .lob In-
iews, Planning Your Career
itegy and Investing Your
Mo:
(ill Opyke a freshman, en-
i a mmented that
aring Cindy Kittrell's
advice ' me management 1
eved a lot more on
an 1 had ever expected. I
� ore confident about
mys ' it : my interviewing skills
to Westmoreland's
help! ul advice
Westmoreland, Assistant
Dire I Career Planning and
Placement Services, advised
students that before going for an
interview, you should try to an-
ticipate the questions your poten-
tial employer will ask.
"I'm glad 1 came said senior
Susan McNeil. "I learned a lot
about what employers expect
She add you need to be confident
in yourself and know what you
war.t out o a company and if it
Joes not fit your expectations
then it is not for you.
Eddie Winicki, a sophomore,
elaborated. 'T ook into your job.
1 know the first thing I'm worried
about is winning in a job � the
money and investments come
later. The little time you put into
your college years will benefit
you for life
"Students should use
resources they have here on cam-
pus added Joe lewis. "There
was nothing that was said here
tonight that students can't find
on their own. The only way to get
ahead is to be a doer, that's what
1 think the students who came
here tonight are � doers
The concept thai Mark
Wisniewski was most impressed
with was the options to lecture
topics that the symposium of-
fered. He felt the main emphasis
of tonight and future goals is
career planning and strategy.
"The few hours you spend
researching a career topic may
turn out to be your future he
concluded. "Anyone can be a
doer and my advice to next year's
class is come to S.l.N. It will
help. Use your resources at the
library or career placement center
that's what they are there for
A s Jim L an ier, V i c e
Chancellor for institutional ad-
vancement, exclaimed several
times in his lecture, "No one
plans to fail they simply fail to
plan
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While her OT colleagues are
more concerned with the fine
motor skills mentioned earlier,
Stavrakas concentrates on the
gross motor skills � the way the
major muscles of the body work
to help a child crawl, walk or
stand upright.
In assessing a child's gross
motor abilities, Stavrakas pays
special attention to what are
known as the "motor
milestones Those are the
r Life
established norms health profes-
sionals use to tell them at what
age a child should be coming up
on his elbows and hands, rolling
over, sitting up, and walking.
"Children move their bodies a
lot before they begin talking
said Stavrakas. "Usually a physi-
cian will become suspicious if a
child is not meeting those early
motor milestones
See CHILDREN Page 6.
STUDENT OPPOR TUNTIES
We are looking for girls in-
terested in being
counselors � activity instruc-
tors in a private girls camp
located in Hendersonville, NC.
Instructors needed especially in
Swimming (WS1), Horseback
Riding, Tennis, Backpacking,
Archery, Canoeing, Gym-
nastics, Crafts. Also, Basket-
ball, Computers, Drama,
Nature Study, Field Hockey. If
your school offers a Summer
Internship Program, we will be
glad to help. Inquiries: Morgan
Haynes, PO Box 400-C, Tryon,
NC, 28782.
1st Annual Spring Break
"Bon Voyage" Party

ov j
"
y
Aei
S
a
G
c

e
The Alley-
No. 1 for Spirits
DowntoHti Greenville
Thursday niteMarch 69:00 P.M.
Drawings for Vacation
Spending Money
� All Night Long �
CASH PRIZES
Wear a Hawaiian Shirt
and Shades for FREE
Admission
� Free Food �
$1.00 Cover
CLASS PORTRAITS
The week following Spring Break
MARCH 17-27
ALL DATES 9am-12pm & 1-5pm
EXCEPT 20th & 26th: I2:30pm-8pm
Faculty, Seniors, Grads,
and Underclassmen
Appointments are not available
Come early & avoid the lines
2ND FLOOR PUBLICATIONS BLDG





IHl I AS!AKOI IMN
MAKc H 4. IVHf.
SGA Denies Reconsideration
( ontinued From Page 1.
Falcult) Senate t immmee ar(
debating concerning the i1-
semestei I he c alendei commit
parking were discussed. I he tee proposed the dates ol .
freshman parking lot on college 1" Decembet 14 while the I i
hill nia he enlarged and grael t Senate suggested the da
will be put in both lots, according be ugust 24-De
to the committee Brown asked
I ast week the SGA decided not nion
to lund a lecture series, "t.reai Dennis K e, a -�
Decisions 1986 proposed b the graduateol EC I
Children Learn Movements
KiU

a
keai
ontinued From Page 5
i
Political Science Department
Pol v.i Science Honors Societ
and I i Science c tub
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' e bod dei the hill
Political
s- - I epai ' m en I head
Maurice Simoi h nee
id �� ca Science
Honors Si a member ol
teal S enc Club
C omn � e political
science a ives were
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'v was pas
ed � . SGA would
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s g t a
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Seedless Grapes
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PEPSI
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Every Tuesday
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Free l)etner
for $5.00 A
Over Purchases
7 p.m. to 11 p.m.
99C SUBS
Your Chotca
Ham A Cheese
Bologna A C heese
Ham. Salami A C heese
Pepperoni. Salami A Cheese
Turkey A Cheese
Ham, furkev A Cheese
Not valid on deliveries
60 oi. pitchers SI.99
Dixie
Crystals

Sugar K Oranges
88cP �gjftc
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16 02.
cans
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Armour Treet
88c
12 oz.
II �� II ,m HI 1IIJ 215 I �k
703 GREENVIU.E BLVDOPEN 24 HOURS SSKtt OPEN SUNDAY 7 A.M11PM
Rebel
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I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 4, 1986
SGA Denies Reconsideration
Continued From Page 1.
parking were discussed. The
freshman parking lot on college
hill may be enlarged and gravel
will be put in both lots, according
to the committee.
Last week the SGA decided not
to fund a lecture series, "Great
Decisions 1986 proposed by the
Political Science Department, the
Political Science Honors Society
and the Political Science Club.
Legislator James Caldwell moved
that the body reconsider the bill.
Present were the Political
Science Department head,
Maurice Simon, the vice-
president o( the Political Science
Honors Society and a member ot"
the Political Science Club.
Comments from the political
science representatives were
heard along with discussion from
the bodv
Reconsideration ot the bill was
decided against by a voice vote.
Previously a resolution was pass-
ed stating that the SGA would no
longer fund any academic depart-
ment activities that did not serve
the entire student population.
"I'm not happy with the deci-
sion � it is a good program
-aid legislator Mark Simon, who
is a senior majoring in political
science. "But the decision is con-
sistent with the SGA policy
Recent action by the chairman
o! the Board ot' Trustees, Ralph
Kin.sey, in appointing a student
representative to the Chancellor
Search Committee was called to
the SGA's attention.
Some legislators stated the
SGA had no voice in the selection
oi the student representative,
-everal comments supported the
suggestion that thev should have
been involved. The possibility
that the SGA president or
another member of the SGA
should have been chosen was
discussed.
Elmer Meyer, vice-president
for Student Life, pointed out that
Kinsey was only trying to prevent
the SGA elections from having to
revolve around the search com-
mittee.
Brown also told the legislature
about an issue the Falcultv
Calender Committee and the
Falcultv Senate Committee are
debating concerning the I9N8 fall
semester. The Calender commit
tee proposed the dates of August
I7-December 14 while the Falcul-
ty Senate suggested the dates to
be August 24-Decembet 2 i
Brown asked for legislature opi
nion.
Dennis Kilcoyne, a 1985
graduate of ECU who was invited
to speak, asked the SGA to -up-
port congress in passing a bill
which will fund the contras in
Nicaragua
Kilcoyne, now the communica-
tions directoi of the College
Republicans National Commit
tee, stated that it congress does
not pass the contra aid program
Reagan will ultimately authorize
an inasion with U.S. ttoops.
Kilcoyne also told the
legislators to make the most
t heir college ears because
nothing will evei be the same
again
Children Learn Movements
Continued From Page 5.
Stavrakas also works with
shildten to improve th
and site helps wheelchair hound
patients with transfei activii
moving from thechaii to a bed oi
automobile, tot example.
When a child's problems in-
volve more specialized
movements ol the hand
- "r related difficulties in
perception, the occupati
therapists lake over.
"Occupational" in this
refers


I v c a r e ' �
level, the
helps the handicapped
i
lane Sa
i en
Kathj Hostet lei
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t y w i 11
PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH SAT MAR 4 AT A&P 'N GREt NVILLE
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT OuAN- fll
the supermarket w.xn �7JJ
Wfflfffw
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli. Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Brino Current
Week food Store Ad With you. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality.
Seedless Grapes
Sismnj
Every Tuesday
is yggg
College Night
Free Delivery
for $5,00 6
Over Purchases
7 p.m. to 11 p.m.
99C SUBS
Your Choice
Ham A Cheese
Bologna A Cheese �
Ham, Salami A Cheese
Pepperoni, Salami A Cheese I
Turkey A Cheese
Ham, Turkey A Cheese :
Not valid on deliveries !
60 oz. pitchers $1.99
Ilia -II pa 732-21 2IS E �fe Sf
LIMIT ONI
PURCHASE
Paper Towels
LIMIT TWO WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
Chunk Light Tuna
LIMIT TWO WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERVOAvToWHWCE
6.5 02.
can
703 GREENVILLE BLVD. OPEN 24 HOURS Sffig OPEN SUNDAY 7 A.M11 PM.
Rebel
B l ll� Hk
Italian
H HI K
:
a
Informa
Free Perf

V
.
week '
ASSOC i
This
I 7 2 8
- in mum:
COl
chu
to bring Mr, S
mances
discussions aboui dai
II 1- a V
sponsored b i R
Association, then
involved
wishing to host Mi -
ha: is called "an informa
A tradema -
Lists, "the informance" is
formal, entertaining and flex
performance that will take Mi
Small to a wide range of settings
in the community The informal
nature of the "the informance"
l! transform unhkeK local
.
A
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Armour Treet
ON A,
12 oz.
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DOUBLE "Q" INOU OR WATER
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MIT TWO WITH AH ADDITIONAL
CHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
6.5 oz.
can
IDAY7A.M11RM.
By DAVID BRADSHAW
yvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvThe Bandvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv
The band is playing again. I
mean, THE BAND is playing
again. This Friday night at the
Attic the legendary group The
Band will present their reformed
act to people who weren't even
born when the group began play-
ing in the early sixties.
The new Band consists of the
four core members of the original
Band, who make up the rhythm
section and all the vocals. Includ-
ed are Lcvon Helm, Rick Danko,
Richard Manuel, and Garth Hud-
son. Guitarist Robbie Robertson
is the only missing member.
The Band's new manager, Bob
Illjes, explains, "This is not a
nostalgic resurrection of a legen-
dary group. It is a major re-
shaping of a unit that has such
depth of talent and experience
together that there is no doubt
about important new material
coming forth
The Band got back together in
June, 1985 in their hometown of
Woodstock. N.Y for a benefit.
Band
Waltzes Back
This was the first time The Band
had been together since The Last
Waltz in 1976. That famous event
(along with an album and a
movie) showed The Band's
farewell concert and featured
such artists as Bob Dylan, Neil
Young, Eric Clapton, Van Mor-
rison and Joni Mitchell.
Until their break-up, The Band
had played together for about 16
years, releasing 13 LPs and play-
ing behind Bob Dylan during his
peak.
Their blend of easy-rhythmed
blues, folk, and country music is
what made The Band from the
beginning, and this is still where
they are coming from in 1986,
some 25 years after they formed.
So even if you only know "Up
On Cripple Creek" or "The
Night They Drove Old Dixie
Down" (or even if you've never
heard of the band), go check
them out at the Attic this Friday
night because, after all, much of
today's music owes The Band a
great debt of influence. In
preparation for the concert, the
Attic is showing The Last Waltz
on Wednesdav. Don't miss either
one.
Rebel Ranks All-American Once Again
B lA ID BRADSHAW
�x�f( �nm
I e Rebel is the art and literary
magazine ol 1 Cl . and evidence
at it ma well be the
paradigm publication for all
universities to follow. The 1985
Rebel received First Place with
Special Men; in the Scholastic
Magazine. Awards oi The
American Scholastic Journalist,
also named an
and il was
Associated Collegiate Press All
American.
However, awards and special
recognition are nothing new to
the Rebel I he magazine was
started in 195 and through 2"
volumes it has consistently been a
successful publication. Since
1961. the Rebel lias received All-
Amencan status, one of the
highest awards given b the
Associated Collegiate Press,
every year except 1965 and 1983
(these two years the Rebel goi
first Place awards). Also, in 1984
m agaz i ne received 11 e
Pacemakei award, the highest
award given b the Associated
Collegiate Press.
But what makes the Rebel am
bettei or different from othei col-
lege literary magazines? Dick
Williams, in a review ol the Rebel
in the Associated Collegiate Press
All American magazine, said the
Rebel was "the best executed col-
lege hterarv magazine I've ever
seen He thought a reason tor
par' of this success was the Rebel
benefactors. Without the finan-
Italian Wines Please
Bv Bht'kt vo
Staff Vknlrr
Italian food - you know it.
y ou lov e i Some of us live tor it,
that's an ugly story of excess,
nest forgotten. Everyone has
eaten Italian food somewhere,
sometime in their life, but what
about Italian wine? Before you
blurt out "Riunite" and totally
embarrass yourself, (as well you
should be embarrassed, drinking
that Kool-Aid swill) take another
look in the wine aisle and do
some comparative shopping. The
average price for a bottle oi
Italian wine is $4 � about the
same as a bottle of swill (Riunite,
I mean) and less likely to give you
the reputation and or ap-
pearance of one of the not-so-
illustrious street people. So �
let's go shopping
P1NOT CRICK) � 1 haven't
seen this on the shelves here.
which is a pitv. because it's one
of the top Italian exports. This is
an extremely dry white wine with
a delicate bouquet and subtle
body. Its crisp texture is similar
to the German wines on the other
side of the border. At S4-S5 a
bottle, it's a great buy, if you can
find it.
RUFFINO � Orvie�o and
Chianti � A white and a red,
both of which are drv and full-
1 s
bodied. 1 e Orvieto
reasonably delicate vet rich on
the palate, while the Chianti has a
full-blown character, similar to a
French burgundy. -V 54.50a bot-
tle, take v our pick.
BOI 1 Valpolicella and
Bardolino rhese two reds are
verv similar, although, 1 have a
preference for the Bardolino,
which is a little smoother. Both
are drv, full-bodied and nicelj
balanced. Even if you don't like
red wmes. you might reconsider
after trying one of these. At $4.50
a bottle, sake a fashion risk and
go for it.
See WINES, page 9
;ial backing the magazine
receives, it would be virtually im-
possible to have such quality
print and the large number o( col-
: plates that are used every year.
Tim rhornburg, editor of the
1986 Rebel, agrees that the finan-
cial situation is a very important
factor, rim explained. "The
Rebel receives almost al! of its
financial backing from the Media
Board, and we also have other
sponsors. Foi the '86 Rebel, the
sponsors arc the Art and Camera
SI op and the Attic
Tom Haines, owner o the At-
tic, has supported the Rebel since
the early seventies. Thus, the At-
tic will be the site ol a benefit
concert for the Rebel on March
26 (Nightwatch and Centaur are
scheduled to play, and admission
will be $2.00).
I ast vear's benefit raised $800
for the Rebel. o which MOO were
raised from admission and beer
-ales, and the matching $400 were
donated bv Jeffrey's Beer and
Wine. Jeffrey's will match the
money raised bv the Attic again
this year.
Aside from the financial aspect
contributing to the success ol the
Rebel is an area that is possibly
even more important. This area
involves the people who con-
tribute material to the magazines
and the tvpe of material they con-
tribute. All ECU students are en-
couraged to enter the Rebel con-
test, and sometimes works by
Alumni and faculty members are
included, depending on the
amount of space that is available.
Williams said in his review.
"The writers at Last Carolina are
well coached He also added,
"The Rebel is filled with more
striking and thought-provoking
art than I've ever seen in a college
magazine
Without question, both areas
covered in the magazine, art and
literature, are done skillfully.
Also, within each of these
categories is a wide range of
material and style. The artworks
range from paintings to illustra-
t i o n s to photographs to
sculptures, and the writings cover
short stories, poems, and non
fiction pieces.
This diversity of subject matter
and the creativity used by the
writers and artists have given the
Rebel the recognition it has
received for almost thirty years.
The contributors to the magazine
are given a creative freedom that
is not available in all literary and
art publications it is a medium
that allows experimentation �
indeed, a "rebel
Watch for the 1986 Rebel. It is
scheduled to come out at the end
of March, and copies will be
distributed around campus at
that time. It promises to be just
as exciting as previous volumes,
so don't miss it.
Restaurant In Review
Lines Form At Their Door
By KAREN HEIM
slaff rnrr
Have you ever tried to find a
parking place at Pitt Plaza on a
Friday or Saturday night, within
a half mile of the place? It's
almost impossible. Have you also
noticed the line that begins at a
stained glass door and stretches
through the plaza1 This line is for
the new restaurant Annabelle's.
Annabelle's is one of the
newest and most popular attrac-
tions added to Greenville this
winter.
See LOCAL, page 9
"Informance" Artist Scheduled For
Free Performances Later This Month
The Department of Theatre
Arts at ECU will present Affiliate
Artist Robert Small,
dancer choreographer, in a two
week Affiliate Artists Residency
sponsored by the Reader's Digest
Association.
This residency from March
17-28 is an opportunity for local
communities, arts organizations,
corporations, dance schools,
churches and secondary schools
to bring in Mr. Small for perfor-
mances and informal audience
discussions about dance. Because
it is an Affiliate Artist Residency-
sponsored by the Reader's Digest
Association, there is no expense
involved for any local group
wishing to host Mr. Small for
what is called "an informance
A trademark of Affiliate Ar-
tists, "the informance" is an in-
formal, entertaining and flexible
performance that will take Mr.
Small to a wide range of settings
in the community. The informal
nature of the "the informance"
will transform unlikely locations
throughout the United States and
Europe since 1978. Small comes
from the creative and innovative
tradition of dance greats Hanya
Holm, Alwin Nikolais and Mur-
ray Louis; in fact, he was a
member of the Louis Company
for eight years and performed
with them in Europe, Canada,
Mexico, South and Central
America and North Africa. He is
a four-time recipient of National
Endowment for the Arts
Choreographer Fellowship, and
has been awarded support from
the New York State Council on
the Arts and private foundations.
The New York Times described
Mr. Small as "a superb techni-
cian having choreographic fluen-
cy
As of today, "informances"
with Robert Small have been
scheduled to take place in Green-
ville at Rose High School, The
North Carolina Academy of
Dance Arts, Aycock Junior High
and Wahl Coates Elementary
School. In addition to these
� factory lunchrooms, church
basements, high school gym-
nasiums and even corporate
board rooms � into impromptu
arts arenas, and will enable Mr.
Small to establish a two-way
communication with the audience
that is often not possible in more
formal concert settings.
The goal of "the informance"
is to reach and involve audience
members m the enthusiasm of
dance. Alternating selections
from his repertoire with com-
ments and anecdotes about his
life, Mr. Small will offer insights
into the career and craft of the
professional dancer. The rapport
that has developed in previous
"informances" has given the
program a reputation as a one-of-
a-kind venture in promoting both
performing artist and the perfor-
ming arts.
In addition to his work with
Affiliate Artists, Robert Small
also serves as the Artistic Direc-
tor of The Small Dance Com-
pany, which has toured
schools, he will also appear at
several local corporations and
will be teaching modern dance
classes at ECU on a daily basis.
Mr. Small will also adjudicate
dance performances of the Mid-
Atlantic American College Dance
Festival which will be held in
McGinnis Theatre on the ECU
Campus on March 20-22. Ad-
judicating with him will be na-
tionally known dance critic
Camilie Hardy, Critic for
Dancemagazine.
Any local organization, cor-
poration, school or community
interested in hosting "an infor-
mance" with Robert Small is en-
couraged to contact Patricia Per-
talion in the Theatre Arts Depart-
ment at ECU, at 757-6332 (from
noon until 5 p.m.), and at
752-5528 (after 5 p.m.).
This project is jointly sup-
ported by a grant from the North
Carolina Arts Council and the
National Endowment for the
Arts in Washington, DC, a
federal agency.
No, this isn't the goose-step. This is Robert Small, a
dancerchoreograpber who will be coming to Greenville March 17
through 28 in a two week Affiliate Artiste Residency. He will per-
form for several local organizations in informal "informances" in
unlikely locations.





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARC H 4, 1986

BLOOM COUNTY
Undercover Cats
by Berke Breathed
By PARKER
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EAST CAROLIN
3 JARRtLL & JOHNSON
THEATRE
Hog Loves To Swill Champagne And Wine Classified
WalkiiT ihe Plank
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By A GUY
Wriri
(UPI) � When Norma Jean
makes her entrance into society
this ueekend � spruced up in a
pink tutu, white leather boa and
rhinestone earrings � she won't
he any ordinary debutante.
"She's really just a gorgeous
animal said Dr. Raymond Sal
tier, a Lumberton neurosurgeon
and Norma Jean's owner.
Norma Jean is a 600 pound
pig, who favors God
chocolate, but loves lobster and
champagne just as well.
More than 200 people will
gather a; Lumberton's Ramada
Inn Saturday for a black-tie
fair � complete with string
quartet and big-band dance
music � to honor the red haired
e part) date is ap-
propriate. Swine admirers widely
recognize March 1 as National
Pig Day.
"She loves champagne and
wine Saltier said. "But the
trouble is. she gets smashed and
just sits 'here and smiles at us and
move. It's hard to move
600 pounds ol pig
Sattler and his wife, Deborah,
who is a partner in his medical
practice, recently bough; a three-
fourths ton truck to help in the
endeavor The couple, who have
; � children, also moved to a new
house to make more room for
Norma Jean, who now has her
� iwn ' edroom along with a
reo-equipped pen.
Friends gave Sattler Norma
lean tor his 40th birthday almost
i years ago. He named the hi.g
in memory ol Marilyn Monroe �
born Norma Jean Baker �
ause Norma Jean "had sue
ty little pig bods "
The Sattlers sa they believe
Norma Jean enjoys sunbathing
on the beach and swimming in
the ocean, tends to favor classical
music, bin hates rock 'n' roll,
and is a Republican at heart.
"Her favorite program s.
has beer, Presidem Reagan giving
the State o the Union message
Sattler said. "There's something
about the president's voice she
seems to like
LOST: Goic
set or -i
Mef" �
Extrerr e
Rewarc
758 0191
WANTED
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By FRIEDRICH
energy conseriation
WE'LL PAY YOU TO GET INTO
SHAPE THIS SUMMER.
Tooth
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vH
It you have at least
two years of college left,
you can spend six weeks at
our Army ROTC Basic
Camp this summer and earn
approximately $600.
And it you qualify, you
can enter the ROTC 2-
Year Program this tall and
receive up to $1,000 a year
But the big pavotl
happens on graduation day
That's when you receive
an officer's commission.
So get your body in
shape (not to mention your
Bank account).
Enroll in Army ROTC
For more information,
contact
Captain Mitchell
757-6967
SCHOLARSH PS AVA
S135 MILLION
went unust
Soph , on -
for nelp casl
can Acadei
free 1 800 $U
PO B; �
37416
ROOMMATE WASTED
wo becroo
'on ca
ROOMMATE A A N '
HOUSE Neeo
aeposr S!0C'
smoker Clear a
FEMALE ROOVVATED NEEDt
IMMEDIATELY -
uM.tes Kings fi
758 0655
SUMMER JOBS A
save S3.000 M
like job exper �
you in your caret
inc will oe
March 4 nterv ��
P.m in Brewse-
Only serious '
2 5 GPA reau rec
&
DR
Tuesday March 4, 191
Admission SI.50 Guv
10D
&Sii
DR
Wednesday, March 5,
Admission $1.50 Guv
1OC Dn
�f �rflWWHw rM!r�wa
nmimm





BV PARKER
Ahi
And Wine
GET INTO
IMMER.
pend � �
I �
��
iion
r t k in
e (not to mention -
int)
rc
Kr riv we ini n,
Captain Mitchell
757-6967
ARMYROTC.
BEALLTOUCANBE.
L
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 4, 1986
Local Restaurant Packs Crowds, Preserves High Quality

Continued from page 8
Annabelle's is not a franchise,
: is associated with Campbell
ps General manager Garnette
n sas thai they are an in-
dependent entity and run
everything by themselves. There
are 16 other Annabelle's, mainly
he sinallei towns of North
i. arohna.
1 he inside of Annabelle's is
Liuite exotic. It is decorated with
soft plush chairs, wicker fur-
ire, brass railings, trees lit up
white lights and a dazzling
ety ol wallpapers.
1 he restaurant comprises two
sunk-in bar provides
central attraction.
! he cathedral ceilings are all
ass and decorated with ceiling
s and strands of while lights,
lust how much did the making
of Annabelle's cost? Ms. Tuten
revealed that the figure was about
1.8 million dollars.
Once you are seated, a glass of
wine is a fine way to start your
dinner at Annabelle's. They offer
Premium California wines, im-
ported selections of 1 ieb-
fraumilch and 1 ambrusco and
Robert Mondavi. California
Champagne is there for celebra-
tions.
"Munchies and starters" are
provided while you're waning for
dinner. (However, I h e r e
shouldn't be too long a wait �
ihev have 10 cooks in the
kitchen.) Annabelle's nachos,
chicken fingers, and fried cheese
are just a few of the munchie
samplers.
When it comes to dinner you
can go either ol two ways. You
can eat light and casual or you
can go all out and do it up right.
Lets take the light route first.
Annabelle's salad bar is a gargan-
tua. If you don't order it as least
go upstairs and walk around it. It
can be ordered as a meal or with a
dinner.
"Soups and such" include
baked trench onion soup,
vegetable soup, and Texas chili.
Annabelle's offers a variety of
sandwiches such as the reuben,
i oast beef dip. turkey BIT, and
shrimp and chicken salad
croissants.
Burgers come next with your
choice of Annabelle's classic
bacon and cheddar burger, fresh
mushrooms and swiss burger and
more.
Those who want to go "all
out" will want to look at the en-
trees next.
Beef is the firsl category on the
he East Carolina Playhouse presents
EAST CAROLINA
THEATRE

� . .

i -
� �
Classifieds
wanted
LOST. G -� ' �� " diamond
� n 24 ' .i n. Lost m or arouna
. n g r's locker room
Ex'reme sentimental vaiu-
Reward offered Ca:l Tracy al
758 I
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE
S135 M'LLlON in financial aid
.vent unused iast year Freshmen.
Soph , ongoing graduate students
� r help cashing in on those funds
� I Academic Data Services toll
ree 1 800 544 1574. ext 639, or wnte
p o Box 16483, Chattanooga, TN
'416
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share
two bedroom apt. For more informa
�on call 757 3760 Keep trying
ROOMMATE WANTED IN
HOUSE: Need roommate rent SI 10.
:pos.t S100. Prefer female non
-oker. Clean and neat person
FEMALE ROOMMATED NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY. Rent $88
jMites Kings Row Apts Call
758 0655
SUMMER JOBS: Wouia you like to
save $3,000 this summer? Would you
ke Ob experience that would help
ou in your career0 Thomas Nelson
wii! be on campus Tuesday.
March 4, interviewing at 3:30 and 7
p.m m Brewster D wing room 109
Only serious minded students and
2 5 GPA required
KEY WEST �� ible couple look
for i :� to Key West or vicin ' �
Spring Break Will help pay for gas
Can 758 6004 or 758 7975
LOST v . - - ackel
misplaced ai 1 �'� M night ot
Usuals x realize tl 1 N � �
� ike Please help � ie1
jacket ba US wear n �
t in Vantage pack. Please call
David B al 757 3631
SUMMER CAMP COUNSELORS
WANTED: Men and women
GeneraUsts ana specialists Two
overnight 8 week campus in New
York's Ad'rondack Mountains ' -
openings for tennis, waterfront
SI, ALS, sailing, skiing small
crafts), all team sports, gymnastics.
arts crafts pioneering, music
photograpl � � ma, dance, ana
nurses musi enjoy chiidr.
� fe Professor Robert Gersten
Brant Lake Camp, 84 Learmnqton
,� .ao Beach NY 11561
LOST: Tan, full length, double
isted trei I a1 in 206 Raw:
Keys v � ' Please return!
No questions asked
wanted Umbrella which was ac
cidentatiy taken from infirmary
lounge last week Small black pop
up type EXTREME SENTIMEN
TAL VAiUE Return to infirmary
No Quesons Asked PLEASE,
PLEASE PLEASE
menu. Annabelle's takes a simple
steak and gives you lots of ways
to order it. Steak Apollo, steak
teriyaki, and steak kabob are just
a few.
Annabelle's chicken is also of-
fered in a variety of ways.
Teriyaki chicken, Polynesian
chicken and chicken mornay are
their classics.
On to seafood: broiled
scallops, shrimp and scallops,
mornay and grilled swordfish
comprise Annabelle's seafood
menu.
Annabelle's menu has a section
for pasta entrees such as lasagna,
tettucini primavera and baked
rotini parmigiana, to name a few.
There are also stir fry entrees
with a choice of beef, chicken, or
shrimp.
For the smaller appetites of
those under 12 years old, An-
nabelle's offes a junior adult
menu of smaller portioned items.
All items ordered come with a
Wines
C ontinued from page 8
FOL1NAR1 � Soave �
(Folanari also makes a Bardolino
and Valpolicella, but the Bolla
brand is much better. Actually,
Boila's Soave is better too, but 1
didn't find it available.) This is a
nice, dry white wine, although
it's a little rough in character. It
tends to talk back to you once
you drink it (like Riunite?!), but
at S2.50 a bottle, who's com-
plaining?
TYTELL � Bianco and lam
brusco � These are the sweet
wines. Ihev're both full-bodied
and a little on the heavy side, but
foi $2 a bottle, you could use it
tor hand-to-hand combat, as well
as for your drinking excesses.
So put that dd bottle of
Riunite down and try something
a little more respectable. You on-
lv have one bodv per life and if
you're going to abuse it, do it
with a little panache'
complimentary glass of sar
saparilla.
Annabelle's is a place for hap-
py times and good friends. A
quote from Annabelle's menu
seems to sum up the atmosphere:
"It you told your boss off
todayor your mother-in-law
left townor you made your
final car payment, if its your bir-
thday, anniversary or any happy
occassion. . .Annabelle's
celebrates happy occassions
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
$195 Abortion from 13 to 18 week at
additional cost Pregnancy Test, Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For
Further information, call 832-0535 (toll free
number: 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5
p.m weekdays General anesthesia available.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917 West Morgan St.
Nte page 12
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway N C 33 Ext Greenvme North Carolina
Phone 752-31 72
(Past RiverbluffApts.)
Flounder
Popcorn Shrimp
$3
25
$325
Hours 4:30-9:30 MonSat.
- NEWLY REMODELED -
& Sigma Tau Gama
Present
DRAFT NITE
Tuesday March 4, 1986
Admission $1.50 Guys
9:00-1:00 A.M.
$1.00 Girls
10C Draft All Nite
& Sigma Sigma Sigma
Present
DRAFT NITE
Wednesday, March 5, 1986
Admission $1.50 Guys
9:00-1:00 A.M.
$1.00 Ladies
IOC Draft All Nite
FROM BEGINNING ID END.
A BRILLIANT ACHIEVEMENT
-UMIWS1M, M HEWrOK 1MB
WILLIAM PAUL SOHIA
HU&T JUL A BIMA
KISS Of THE SPIDER WOMAN
WILLIAM HU&T � BtST ACTOD � 1955 CAHHtS HIM KSTIVAl
1&W UOliAD � DAVID MCCTOC
i SOUNDED huSSm WtlSMAM BABtHCO
Starts TOMORROW!
Let
Get You In Shape
For Spring Break
Student Special
� $25.00month
� No Contracts
� No Initiation Fee
Wolff Tanning Bed
$4.00 per visit
10 Visits $30.00
�- � 11 ' H
'
' ijipimwiiiflfi
� � �;






III! I ASI AROt INIAN
Sports
MAR(H4, 1986 t'age 10
Baseball Season Outlook
Pirate hurler Winfred Johnson shut out Atlantic Christian College in
the Pirate home opener on Saturda Afternoon
White And
Tracksters
By RICK McCORMAC
y I Sports Information
rhe ECU men's track tean
captured two first-place finishes
this weekend in the Clemson In-
vitational indoor track meet in
Clemson, S (
Craig White won the 55-metei
hudles with a time ol 7.43 to lead
the wa for the Pirate runners.
ECl swepi three of the top
five places in an unoffical quarter
mile, with u � Phil I stes
finishing place with a time
of 489 seconds. Freshman
James Blue was second in the
event with a time o( 49.10 Roun-
ding out the Pirate trio was
freshman Wayne Ferguson who
ed in fifth place with a time
Estes Lead
At Clemson
this meet, was second with a rime
ol 6.26 seconds. Freshn
Eugene McNeill finished thud
� i'd, a time ol 6 ;
In the 500-meters no E( I run
nets placed. Howevei two run-
s did turn in excellent tin
I ransfei Kelwyn 1 ove, w
ran m the meet with no al I
1.04.51.
Junior Ruben Pierce also tun
in a good time ol i .05 00
s also tared well in
Senior Henr
die 55-mete
Williams, who ran unattatci ed in
� ild pi babh have
foi the finals had not I
knocked to the track .
Sophomore sensat ion I ee
McNeill did not compete in
Clemson Invitational,
compete in the I SA Mobil Ii
: 1 rack and field Champi
ships n I rida; instead. McNeill
finished fourth in the 5!
dash among an extrei
talented field.
B l()N BROWN
SpttfU ttnl.i
Once again Coach Gary Over-
ton's baseball Pirates will field an
experienced team, with only one
starlet lost to graduation. Pit-
ching, however, is another story.
1 he signing ol Pirate .ice Mike
Christopher to a pro contract was
bad enough, but junior Daniel
Boone who posted a 5-1 mark in
'85 and was expected to be an in-
tegral pan of the pitching corps
this year, has been sidelined with
an arm injury and may he out for
the yeai.
1 he burden will thus tail even
more heavilv on the powerful
aim ol Winfred lohnson, who
notched a 7 5 record lasi year
alter recording 7 1. in 1 marks in
1983 84.
"V infred's been con entrating
on pit more tins year
coa h I said, "die's been
working real ard to improve
thai aspect of I
Junioi lini Petei .on, 6-2 foi
's will take the second spot in
i, vv hile Junii n raig
Van De � � the
sai as will
'Van D i a
minimun nings last
: �" Ovi "but lie's
show : hn ugh
Par-
ting r :
I'� ' led
a 4.58
�it's!
i i ng �' 8
ed
I 3 -0 reci
Wayne's 4-A ch;
Dai
-
n i n g t a i
s mosi
untested asp
Overtoil's Bucs Top ACC
On the offensive side, the
center of attraction will again be
power-hitting Winfred Johnson.
He sets a new ECU record with
every hit, and has had the school
record of 350 total bases through
the second game of the '86
season.
Johnson was fourth in the na-
tion in homers and RBI's last
year as he swung for a .432
average. He was picked for the
all-ECAC South and all-ECAC
tournament team and named the
third-team All-America by
Baseball America.
He led the Pirates in homers
the last three seasons and holds
six single-season and three career-
batting marks for ECU.
Johnson's records include 51
career homers, 149 career RBI's.
most hits-season (73), best season
batting average (97 at bats) .432
and best sluggmg-percentage
season (,887).
He is not the only power hitter
on the squad, either. Center-
fielder Chris Bradberry (.405),
rightfielder Jav McGraw (.306)
and alternate first baseman Mike
Sullivan (.281) are all capable o(
hitting for extra bases.
Greg Hat di son. Steve Sides
and Mont Carter should pace the
team in on-base percentage. Sides
teturtis to second base after sit-
ting out one vear with an mjurv.
Robert I angston will return to
h.is role as primary utility m-
fieldei aftei anchoring second
base in '85.
"We've go; a strong nucleus
: Overton, "We had some
good davs ol weather where we
got a lot done, so we teel like
we're in good shape in thai
regard
One change from last vear
finds Don Conde backing up cat-
Jim Rilev. instead of
tight fielder McGraw. I his should
improve the depth quite a bit at
position as the Pirates seek
to improve on last year's 32-14
Ladies Fall To JMU; Seniors Honored
record.
"Our goal is to finish in the top
four in the conference and then
to win the tournament Overton
stated. "UNC W and James
Madison should be our main
competition within the league,
while Virginia, Carolina, State
and ODU will be the toughest
nonconference games.
Overton always faces the pro
blem o playing intense rivals
such as N.C. State and I N(
the face of having to save his best
pitchers for ieague contests. "We
treat all nonconference games the
same said Overton. "League
games are our mam concern
because they affect postseason
play the coach said.
It is those league games which
will propel ECU into the NCAA
play-offs, via winning the CAA
tournament. Only the top-tour
league teams advanced to the
CAA tourney, to be held at
ECU's Harrington field
Since the Pirates open
season with a 23-ga me
stand, the team should ha.
good chance i- repealing
regular-season champs. I
should occur, ()verton would like
to improve on last vear ECA
South tournament i)u'
where the Pirates ended their se-
saon.
"We had a good seas
vear Overtoil said. "We were
just disappointed thai
couldn't advance to the N( AA's
V e'd like to see a lol ol fans as
we had last vear. especi I
students, fheir suppoi
lot tO US
Recent Action
The Pirate basesball team took
a pair of games from Si
Augustine's 13-1. 8-2 yesterday
as they improved their record I
4-0.
In the opener. Damn Culpep-
per got the win m relief tor his
tirst victory ol the season. It was
an II-run fifth inning that broke
the game open.
After trailing 3-2 atter tour
and-a-halt innings, the Pit
sent 15 batters to the plate in
scoring 11 runs VK in t red
lohnson's three-run hornet (his
52nd career round tripper) spa
ed the fig inning.
lohnson led the Pirate hitting
ick, g -wig 2 i with a homer
and three RBI's. Junior Mike
Sullivan also went 2-3 foi
Bucs
In the sec i I ame, junior
raig .an Deventer picked up his
first victory in fine fashion wil
plete game.
With the game tied 1-1 after
two innings ol play, ECU
responded with four runs � three
oi which came on a Oreg Har
dison double.
added to theii 5 I
advantage with one run in the

� 3 -2 tory.
Hard I inished
t doubles, wen: 2-3 �
RBI's l
ECl . Jim R
was 2 1 - e RBI. while -
2-2
sat. March 1, 19X6
Last Saturday was a cold,
blu � ECU'S ope
P
. 2-0,
��
itl the e. . .ame

1' pile a
� � i c I defense, winch com-
11 e r r i
doublehead
rhe P i � � ffei
;an
: defense. 1 he mai i
double bv Greg Hard
and a single bv Mark C ockr�
See SLl GGERS, pane 1
Bv TIM CHANDLER
, hampionship game of the
women's CAA tournament Sun-
day was a true tight to the finish
I he eame in which lames
Madison .valked awa witl i t
championship 66-62, ovei the
I adv Pirates appeared to be more
o a war the a basketball game.
"V e knew it would b � a
physical game stated head
coach Emily, Manwaring, "that
Ul 45-41 lead. Bragg
James Madison chipp I tv
e lead and went up 57
a lav up bv Budd with 5:24 t ea
I
thev would come
to pi a
football
The first half was very hard-
fought, with both teams making
runs at various points. I
Madison obtained its biggest .
of the half when Julie I ranker,
hit a layup with 13:53 left in
half, taking a 10-6 lead.
Two quick scores from 1 isa
Squirewell tied the game at 10
with 12:39 tv- plav in the half.
Squirewell also made the shot
that gave the Pirates their beggest
lead o the half. It came on a
layup with 5:07 left in the half,
putting the Pirates on top 22-19.
The Dukes came right back
when Donna Budd hit both ends
ol a one-and-one. With 4:34 in
the half, James Madison regained
the lead 23-22.
The Dukes pushed the lead to
three. 2-24. on Franken's two
free throws with 3:27 m the half.
The Pirates roared back and
went up 28-27 on Loraine
Foster's jumper with 2:42 left in
the half.
The two teams exchanged
baskets until Betsy Witman's
jumper pushed lames Madison
out in front 33-32 with .06
seconds left in the half.
Lisa Squirewell paced the
Pirates in the first half with 10
points, even though she missed
part of the half after receiving an
elbow in the stomach from the
Dukes' Julie Franken.
Delphine Mabry put the
Pirates on top quickly in the se-
cond half, as she took the open-
ing tip and laid it in with 19:55 to
play tor a 34-33 lead.
The Dukes came back and built
the lead to three, 39-36, on a
Missy Dudley jumper with 15:47
to play.
The Pirates answered with a
run of their own. Alma Bethea's
layup with 13:01 to play gave
. ECl called a tii
egi oup
I he Pirates then scon d two
baskets to lead 58-57
with 4:03 to plav.
Atter a James Madison
timeout, the Dukes wenl to Julie
franken tor a Jumpei which put
them on top foi good �. ;
plav.
The Dukes built the lead I
manv as seven points (65 58) with
2s seconds to go, before the
Pirates rallied to trim the margin
to the final tally of foui points.
C oach Manwaring stated that
the Pirates had hoped to execute
their offense a hole better. "The
. iftei two
years a f the I adv
Pirate �
posed an impressive 43 16 record
a 72 " pei eni
sm. March I. I486
relied on
S,M: n senior Svlvia
Bra ; ghi to win their
�sen. to ame
over An University, 69 68.
Brag was touted bv the
Eagles' h .� 03
seconds left, and made both, ends
ol a one and-one t - give the
Lisa Squirewell (left) and Sylvia Bragg (right) were named to the all-
conference and all-tournament teams, as Squirewell took tourney
MVP honors. Bragg was named CAA player-of-the-vear.
shots were there, we just didn't
hit them stated Manwaring.
The Pirates were led in scoring
by Squirewell with 18 points
followed by Bragg with 12.
foster, Bethea and Mabry each
added eight points. Monique
Pompiii and Gretta O'Neil each
came off the bench to chip in six
and two points respectively.
The Pirates received some
good news at games end. Two ol
the Lady Bucs, Squirewell and
Bragg, were named to the all-
Tournament team. Squirewell
also received the tournament
MVP award.
The all-Conference team was
announced on Thursday after-
noon before the tournament
began. Squirewell and Bragg
were also named to that team.
Pirates the v ictory.
Coach Emily Manwaring said
that she told her players before
the game, that thev were going to
be involved in a 40-minute argue-
ment �- and indeed they were.
The Pirates stayed close the en-
tire first half, but still trailed until
just before the intermission. The
biggset lead American had was
six points, which they had on
three occasions.
I lie last six-point lead for the
Eagles came when Kia Cooper
scored with 3:11 left in the first
half, putting AU up 28-22.
The Pirates then ran off eight-
straight points. Bethea's follow
shot of a Bragg miss with :07
seconds remaining (in the half),
gave the Pirates a 30-28 halftime
lead. It was the first time the Bucs
had lead in the contest.
the second half, the Pirates
moved oul to take a five-point
(41-36) lead on Foster's jumper
with 15:38 left in the half.
Beth Shearer connected on a
lumper with 11:38 and once again
tied the game, this time at 44 all.
With the Pirates trailing 50-49.
Bragg connected on a jump shot
with 9:50 remaining. This mark-
ed the beginning of a run of 11
straight points by the Pirates, as
they jumped out to a 60-50 lead
with 6:41 to plav.
American refused to give in.
With :09 seconds remaining,
Darce Diller canned a shot from
the right wing to put the Eagles
on top 68-67. ECU immediately
called a timeout to set up one last
plav. Coach Manwaring said that
the play was designed to go to
Bragg. Bragg did receive the ball
and saved the day for the Bucs
with her last-second free throws.
The Pirates placed three
scorers in double figures for the
game with Squirewell paving the
way with 17 points. Bethea
followed with 13 and Bragg chip-
ped in 12. Foster added eight
points, while O'Neil chipped in
seven. Rounding out the scoring
for the Pirates were Mabry and
Pompiii with six points each.
Fri. Feb. 28, 1986
The Lady Pirates had an easy
time Friday afternoon in the
opening round of the CAA
women's tournament. The Bucs
handily defeated seventh-seeded
William & Mary 84-56.
In the process of the win, the
Pirates set a new tournament
record for field-goal shooting
percentage. They managed to
shoot 55.9 percent from the field.
The Pirates were challenged
early, but by the eight-minute
mark, had the game pretty well in
hand as they led by 14 (30-16).
Chris O'Connor's free throws
with 1:48 left in the first half gave
the Lady Bucs their biggest lead
of the first half (47-26). ECU
went into the locker room with a
47-28 halftime lead.
The Pirates started the second
half attacking once again. They
scored the first six points of the
second half to grab a 25 point
lead (53-28). with 18:10 to play in
the game.
Loraine Foster (14) shoots in traffic in Ed's 69-68 semifinal win over
American as Sylvia Bragg (25) battles for position.
The Pirates then went on a
eight-point surge starting at the
14:40 mark. They opened as
much as a 32-point advantage
(63-31) with 13:25 to play in the
game.
The Pirates were able to play
subs for a good part of the se
Sports Fact
Tues. March 4, 1968
Joe Frazier stops Buster
Mathis in the eleventh round of
their fight in New York, aveng-
ing his loss to the 300-pound
Mathis in the 1964 Olympic
trials. Frazier won the gold
medal in '64 anyway, replacing
Mathis when he broke a
knuckle while in training.
cond half - a goal that was
stated bv coach Manwaring at the
outset ol the contest.
"We wanted to dominate the
game and give everyone a chance
to play Manwaring said. "We
wanted to plav good defense, and
hold down their (William &
Mary's) points scored.
The Pirates put five players in
double figures for the game, with
freshman O'Neil leading the way
with 14 points. Mabry followed
with 13, and Bragg with 12 The
other two Pirates to score in dou-
ble figures were Foster and
Squirewell with 10 apiece
In addition to setting a new
tournament record for field-goal
Percentage, the Pirates also con-
nected on 18 of 23 free-throw at-
tempts - a 78.3 percentage.
A
Shape Ui
The D e
Intrarnurai-Recrcd
Physical!
opening up th
for aerobic exi
The IRS Word
by
Jeannette Roth
mediately aftei
rid sessii
held Mar.
Sluggers Pe
Continued from pane (j
but it vv,j
ECU h
shut
pitt
singles ai
Howev:
batsman
doubt ii
The Bi g
in the bi �
Cockrell
through cei
cond as Jii -
moved up
sacrifice h
Hardison tl
the deer
game' �
Bradberrv g
which moved H
Bradberrv
pair o oul
In going -
went to 1-0 '
Andy Clark
game ol the sea
double wa
ECU. while V u
two singles �
The Ptra
somewhat
though the ra
continued I
Wl
s
You
$10,000 ph
� $l,000pl
l
jgjjtrtC.
r
ENTER THE
M't.H 111!
WIN Rl
HOW TO ENTER
To be eligible to win a prize I
complete this entry form an
MHL Win the Finals Swe
PO Boi 4945
Blair NE 68009





s
op ACC
1 Cl
kv page 11

� � 4llM
1 s 69-68 se mi final vin over


i e 'he
1
� v e
�v
t
I
a
i i with
I !� a ay
�wed
Bragg with 12. The
re in dull-
er and
irewcil with K) apiece
In addition to setting a new
irnamenl record for field-goal
Per ' Pirates also con-
nected on 1 oJ 23 free-throv. at-
ptt � a 78.3 percentage.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 4, 1986
11
Shape Up With IRS Health Programs
1 he Department of
amural-Recreationa Services
�' ysical-Fitness Program is
ning up the regstration books
aerobic-exercise classes im-
The IRS Word
by
Jeannette Roth
ediateh after spring break. Se-
id session registration will be
: March 17-21 in Memorial
Gym. Drop-In classes will be held
during this week of registration
from 4:00-5:00 p.m. and
5:15-6:15 p.m. in room 108
Memorial Gym. For more infor-
mation, contact Susan Durr-
wachter, Assistant Director of
First Aid and Physical Fitness.
The Physical-Fitness program
is not the only area in The
Department of Intramural-
Recreational Services opening up
the registration books. Beginning
Wed. March 19, three of the big-
gest spring-semester sports will
close out their registration lines.
Be sure to get your preseason
softball tournament team, team
handball and regular-season soft-
ball squad together before the
deadline. Registration packets
can be picked up in room 204
Memorial Gym. Tennis doubles'
is not far behind. Registration
closes out for this two-some event
Thur. March 20.
The Informal-Recreation pro-
gram will have the following
facility closings due to spring
break: All Recreational Faclities
and Services will close at 3:00
p.m. on Fri. March 7 in obser-
Sluggers Perfect After Four Games
Continued from page 10
was enough.
ECU hurler Winfred Johnson
out ACC in a strong-
riing effort, scattering four
ngles and walking none.
iwever, six errors, plus a hit
atsman, kept the outcome in
ibi until the end.
1 he Bucs got both of their runs
the bottom of the third.
krell opened with a hit
ugh center and moved to se-
� as Jim Riley walked. Both
oved up on a Mont Carter
ifice bunt. Shortstop Greg
dison then poked a double to
jeep left corner to drive in the
tie's onlv runs. Chris
dberry got on via an error.
ch moved Hardison to third.
dberry stole second, but a
il outs stopped the scoring.
going the distance. Johnson
to 1-0 for the ear, while
dy Clark (ACC) lost his firs!
. ol the season. Hardison's
was the big blow for
LCU, while Murphy picked up
singles to lead ACC.
Pirate bats woke up
what in the second game,
h the rash of ECU errors
tinued Those errors helped
force the game into an extra inn-
ing.
After an ACC coring threat in
the fourth inning came to
nothing, the visitors finally
scored in the top of the fifth as
errors continued to plague the
Pirates. Two miscues put men on
first and second, then a two-out
single bv Mark Mouldin make it
2-0 ACC.
ECU cut the lead in half in the
bottom of the inning. Riley walk-
ed and his courtesy runner, Dean
Ehehalt moved to second on
another walk to Mont Carter.
After a failed sacrifice bunt at-
tempt, Winfred Johnson singled
to narrow the ACC lead to 2-1.
The Pirates rallied again in the
sixth to tie it up. Jay McGraw hit
a grasscutter to right, then an at-
tempted sacrifice bunt by Sides
left men on first and second �
when the play to second was er-
rored. Langston put down a
sacrifice bunt to move the run-
ners up and with two outs Riley
singled to knot the score at two
apiece.
Garv Kendall drew the only
walk (of the game) from Pirate
pitcher Jim Peterson in the top o
the seventh. He then stole se-
cond, but an alert play caught
him off base on a fielder's choice.
ECU had its chance in regula-
tion as Sides' line drive following
a McGraw walk put McGraw in
scoring position. Langston drove
a pitch to center that was barely
snagged by Chuck Moore, sen-
ding the game into an extra inn-
ing.
The game-winner for ECU
came in the bottom of the eighth,
ironically enough on an ACC er-
ror. Carter doubled with one out
and moved to third on a ground
out. Bradberry pushed a slow
grounder through the wet infield
dirt. Mauidin was unable to han-
dle the slick grounder, allowing
Carter to score for the 3-2 ECU
win.
Peterson picked up the win for
ECU, striking out six and walk-
ing just one, with no earned runs.
Reliever Scott Underhill took the
loss in his first ACC game.
Carter, McGraw and Sides each
had two hits for the Pirates.
Mauidin paced ACC with two
also.
The Pirates will open their con-
ference play in Harrington Field
when they host the William &
Mary Indians in a doubleheader
Sat. March 8 beginning at 1:00
p.m.
vance of Spring Break. Recrea-
tional Facilities and Services will
resume normal hours of opera-
tion on Mon. March 17.
All-campus men's basketball
championships will be held in
Memorial Gym tonight. Beginn-
ing at 8:00, the men's fraternity-
division championship will be
held full court. Be sure to catch
all the finest hoopsters in action
as they go for the all-campus
championship t-shirt.
The Outdoor-Recreation Pro-
gram will be offering it's first trip
of the year to the Uwharrie Na-
tional Forest on April 4-6. The
Uwharrie is located near
Asheboro, N.C. The $30.00
registration fee covers transpor-
tation, tents, sleeping bags, cook
set , water bottles and trail meals.
The terrain to be covered includes
grounds geared toward beginning
or novice trailblazers. However,
six miles of walking on hilly ter-
rain may be difficult for the most
experienced hiker taking into ac-
count the 20-30 lb. pack each per-
son will be carrying along the
trail.
For more information (a list of
gear, general information and
agenda) contact room 115
Memorial Gym.
East Carolina Tanning Center
3 Beds � No waiting
Any member refering another receives 3 free visits
UBE Coupon Book has free visits
Open 10 a.m. till Late Night!
Suntana & Wolfe Beds
2 Free Visits with purchase of package with this ad.
(Bring a friend and that makes 5 free visits!
Headphones and fan in each room
When nobody else can tan you �
We Can!
r -y
Located Downtown y
Bmkk Heart's Dolight & A
757-3385
for appointments
The Sports staff would like to congratulate
both Pirate basketball squads on fine
season performances.
-COUPON
I
2 Pieces of Chicken
(Original Recipe� or
Extra CrispyTM
1 small mashed potato
and gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
$1.99
We Do Chicken Right
Coupon Redeemable at
Greenville locations only
L Expiration Date May 9, 1986
1COUPON
plus tax
OR ONE COMPLETE
COMBINATION W
2-PIECE PACK s
ENTER THE
High Life.
WIN FINALS
t
You could win $10,000 plus a trip for four to
the College Basketball Finals!
Grand Prize:
SK).(KK) plus a trip for four to the College Basketball Semi-Finals
and Finals March 29-31 in Dallas, TX
5 First Prizes:
a 11,000 plus a Giant Screen TV to catch all the play-off action
25 Second Prizes:
VHS Video RecorderPlayer
1,000 Third Prizes:
Official Al McGuire Sports Bag
ENTER THE
71
OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM
(PLEASE HAND PRINT)
HHiH 1-1FE.
WIN ii" FINALS
ADDRESS.
HOW TO ENTER:
To be eligible to win a prize you must
complete this entry form and mail to.
MHL "Win the Finals" Sweepstakes
P0 Box 4945
Blair. NE 68009
CITY.
(No P0 Boxes Please)
STATE
2IP.
telephoneL
.AGE.
Yes. I would like to attend the College Basketball Finals with All
His seat number is: SectionRowSett
Please Note The section, row and seat number for Al McGwire's ticket can be
found on specially designed Miller High Life "Win the Finals" Sweepstakes
displays at your participating Miller High Life retailer See Official Rules for
complete details
I state that I am of legal drinking age in my state of residency and hold no
interest in any alcoholic beverage license. No purchase necessary Void in the
states of KS, M0. OH, TX, VA, WV. and wherever prohibited by law
OFFICIAL RULES NO PURCHASE NECESSARY
Here's How To Enter:
1 On an official entry form or plain piece of 3" x 5" paper, hand print your name and address and indicate the section,
row and oeat number appearing on Al McGuire s ticket to the College Basketball Finals
Please note the section, row and seat number appearing on Al McGuire's ticket can be found on specially
designed Miller High Ufe "Win the Finals sweepstakes displays at your participating Miller High Life retailer
If you cannot find the special Miller High Life Win The Finals Sweepstakes number, send a self-addressed stamped
envelope to Seat Number Request. PO Box 4046. Biair. NE 68009
Limit one request per envelope Requests must be received by Feb 28.1986 Residents of the state of WA only need
not affix postage to their self-addressed envelope
2 Mail your entry in a hand-addressed envelope no larger than 4vr x 9 (10 envelope) to Miller High Lite Win
the Finals" Sweepstakes. P0 Box 4945, Blair, NE 68009 Enter as often as you wish, but each entry must be mailed
separately and received by March 19,1986 We cannot be responsible for tost, late or misdirected mail
3 Winners will be determined in a random drawing from among all entries received under the supervision of the D L
BLAIR CORPORATION, an independent judging organization whose decisions are final on all matters relating to this
offer In order to be eligible for a prize, you must correctly indicate the section, row and seat number appearing on Al
McGuire's ticket to the College Basketball Finals
4 This sweepstakes is open to residents of the United States who are of legal drinking age in their state of residence
at time of entry The Miller Brewing Company, Philip Morris, Inc, their distributors, affiliates, subsidiaries, advertising
and promotion agencies retail alcoholic beverage licensees and the employees and families of each are not eligible
This sweepstakes is void in the states of KS, M0. OH, TX, VA, WV. and wherever prohibited by law Limit one prize per
family Taxes on prizes are the sole responsibility of prizewinners All federal, state and local laws and regulations
apply The odds of winning a prize depend upon the number of eligible entries received No substitution of prizes is
permitted Prizewinners will be obligated to sign and return an affidavit of eligibility within 5 days of notification In
the event of noncompliance within mis time period, an alternate winner will be selected
5 Grand Prizewinners and traveling companions must be of legal drinking age in tne state of Texas and must agree to
return and depart on dates specified by the sponsor Any prizes returned to the sponsor or to the 01 Blair Corporation
as undeliverable will be awarded to an alternate winner All prizes will be awarded The approximate retail values of the
prizes are as fouows: Grand Prize-$14,000, First Pnze-$3,000 ea . Second Prize-$350 ea Third Prize-$6 50 ea
6 For a list of prizewinners, send a separate, self-addressed, stamped envelope to Miller High Life Win the Finals
Winners List, P0 Box 4950, Blair. NE 68009

i
� i





12
I HI I AM i. AKPl IM N
Continued from page
ARE YOU A FUTURE BUSINESS
LEADER? Established, student
managed company ot over 3.000
students is looking for ECU students
tor full time summer Obs Protes
sional framing provided
$4,500 average summer profit For
more information send name, local
phone address etc to Summer Jobs
Suite 141 95 South Elliot Rd Chapel
Hill 2 75U
RIDE NEEDED Looking tor a lift
to New jersey for Spring Break W.h
pay part of th gas Call 752 0796 ask
tor Dan
NATIONAL COLLEGE
MARKETING COMPANY Seeks
' victual or campus group to work
r-tirru assisting students in ap
pl rig foi vredit cards Flexible
rs excellent pay full framing
' students ana have fun Can
Sharon at 1 800 592 2121
LOST: VA di iers liscense in Alley
weekend MUST nave ba N
Need for spt ng break Pli
Rew ffered 758 9802.
Carolyn
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
� i � . rss B1W
PERSONALS
HAPPY BIRTHDAY KERRY MAR
CUM! L OOk
SPC: Congratulations - � .
� � �
Break Love RAAH
ZBT MIDTERM RUSH AED
MAR S DO A N STAIRS
MENDENHALL COFFEEHOUSE
COME SEE WHAT ZETA
BETA TAU IS All ABOUT
DELTA ZETA v si es ever
safe ana rappv S Bread
DELTA ZETA
the Be'a Nu class ot new s stei
being awarded by PanheHe"
Best Pledge Ciass1 Ya'llan
Your Sisl
DELTA ZETA: Closed w. � -�
a blast1 Field Da . a1 ' - s ooge
was -��" trashed Ana thai
we al d d am to a party d J'eo
T rashman I won II � � � I . �
ist, cause
basl
KAPPA SIGMA LITTLE SISTERS
v eet ng ton � � .�. � � � �����.
� . ire 1 be paid at

TKE RING GIRL COMPETITION
' iace $100 and S-sC a
� ��� : � g suit 2nc place $50 i
allowae 3ra place $25 a
�vance Tuescay Mar '4"
" � Atti Opens �' � .
mforn at i � '57-304J
pika Ha a a if n �
soc a "�� � �� � jreat fim
the Cf O s
CONCRATULATIONS" '
new T - jma '� - �
Kristii Boyd haroi
Camp k im Carper - � ken
� Dickerson Case.
. � � vcLaurii Natali
.� � � . Kim Robert
si ce Schulli, DebD e Tav �
? � , Walker, and Tara West Gr if
iOb girls ! Lov � sters
HAPPY HOUR rhe Tri S.gs invite
you to chase away tne Monday
blues So come on down to Pantana's
and drmk a few brews Every Mon
day 9 til at Pantana Bob's $2 p I
chers
RIDE NEEDED Tc Virginia
Beach Will heir. tl . � , Pat
at 758 3431
SALE
GRATEFUL DEAD TICKETS Are
now available at Apple Records tor
their Fri , March 21st show Price in
eludes ticket and transportation py
comfortable bus Package deals on
ly Don't rmss out on this opportuni
ty, get our tickets NOW BE
THERE' !
NEED A D J? Are you having a
party and need a D J? For the best
top 40 beach and dance, call
Morgan at 758 7967 between 5 and
7 30 p m Reasonable rates
References on request
TUXEDOS: Aii gus attending the
Alpha Delta Pi, Delta Zeta. ana P
Kappa Alpha tomnais please contact
Jon Reibel at 757 0351 FREE
DELIVERY. FREE PICK UP' Best
prices in town
SENIORS! SENIORS! SENIORS
Enioy rhe last phase ot your college
career employment S&F Com
outers is offering a package price to
help you send out your resumes in
dudmg all of the following Letter
quality typed resumes, Mail merged
cover letters (name and address of
each company as inside mailing ad
dress on letter). Letter quality typed
envelopes with company address
and your return address on
envelope. Everything folded, stuffed
and even stamped, A listing of com
panies sent to (for your follow ups)
Just bring us your hand written
resume and cover letter and the
businesses you with to apply to and
we'll do the rest Per resume for
your namesaddr (we stuff) $2 30
(min 10 resumes) (we stuff and
stamp) $1 90 (2 page resume prices
slightly higher) This offer absolute
ly expires March 15, 1984 S8.F Com
puter Company, 115 East Fifth St ,
Greenville, N.C 27834 757 0472
1 Kc H 4.
FOR SALE R( good
shape $50), 1 st of
HART SPOILER snow skns fail
shape with Salomon bindings and
trezeta boots, size 10 ' . poles im
.$100) Emerald engagement ring
sale (2,200 or 2 000 cash Must
sell all items
PROFESSIONAL NAIL SERVICE
Offering manicures and nail tips
Halt off of the regular salon price
Please call 758 5065 Mention I
ist Carolinian ana receive a
spe ial surprise during your v
� � ivailabli
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICE: Word processing The
Dataworks spec ializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertations,
theses, resume's and more All work
omputer checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary Ra'cs
are as low as $1 75 per page, in
eluding paper (call tor spec if i
rates) Call Mark at 757 3440 after 7
p m
JUNIORS SENIORS, AND GRAD
STUDENTS: Internships availa
witfi Fortune 500 Company Earn
$9 $12 per hour Call 355 7700
CHEAP TYPING: Reports e1
758 6011 and leave a message
Call
FOR SALE: Carpet remnants, all
sizes, all colors, all prices Save
50 70 percent The Carpet Bargain
Center, 1009 Dickinson Ave 758 0057
FOR SALE : Super single size water
bed Almost new bookcase head
sheets and p c included $200
752 6032 after 5pm
FOR RENT: Two bedroom apt for
' 4 blocks from campus
$260- month 758 0341
WORD PROCESSING � Here
perience in ty i . -
technical document
papers We manage ana mei �� �
names and addresses into n ei
letters, labels, envelopes or
(ards Our prici extremely
reasonable and we alway ���
percent discount to ECU studi I
&� F Professional Computer Cc
(back o Frai - 115 E 5tl
757 0472
TYPING SERVICES R
term papers, "
Spelling and gi
tions included C ndy �
5 30 p.m
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 4, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 04, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.461
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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