The East Carolinian, February 25, 1986






�he East (Earnltman
Serving the hast Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No:ffr H-l
Tuesday, February 25, 1986
Greenville, !N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Gramm-Rudmann
Spells Cuts For ECU
Cheap Gas
HI WBtHl Ihr t .r.Ji.
Students may be a little more eager to drive home or out of state for Spring Break when the find
out it is going to cost them less to fill up their tanks, as gas prices continue to fall. See related storv on
Page 1.
Gas Prices Drop Even Lower
cents per gallon for unleaded.
However, Kill Devils Hill's prues
are barely below the dollar mark.
Prices in the Western pa ol
the state range from 94 cents per
By BKTH WHICKER
itani Nr�� tdnm
In the past two weeks, the price
of self-service regular gasoline
has dropped to less than one
dollar a gallon at most area ser- gallon to 1.09 for unleaded fut
vice stations. Moreover, owners
and managers say the prices are
likely to fall even lower.
The per-gallon rate has fallen
about 10 cents reflecting a na-
tional trend created by a
worldwide surplus of oil.
Gasoline prices in Greenville
range from 85.9 cents to 94.9
cents for regular and 89.9 cents to
97 cents per gallon for unleaded.
One of lowest prices in the
Eastern part of the state can be
found in Havelock which is
reporting 79 cents per gallon for
regular gasoline, and 85 cents per
gallon for unleaded gasoline ac-
cording to Charles Talley,
manager of the Trade Station.
Prices in Charlotte could go
down to 70 cents due to the com-
petition among gas stations in
that area added Tallev.
Gasoline prices in rginia
Beach range from 8 cents to 92
probably, will not get much lower,
the operating expenses would not
be able to be met if the prices
See VETERANS Page 3.
By JILL MORGAN
Sl�ff Wrll�t
Ray Edwards, the director of
ECU's Financial Aid Depart-
ment, along with many others, is
being forced torealizethe implica-
tions of the Gramm-Rudmann
Act and react to them according-
ly.
The Gramm-Rudmann Act,
which is officially The Budget
Deficit Control Act, is an attempt
by congress to reduce the na-
tional debt by controlling spen-
ding. Depending on the projected
budget, the Budget Deficit Con-
trol Act makes cuts accordinglv.
The cuts that will be made are
"automatic, and across the
board
The Act is attempting to make
budget cuts more fair by cutting
every (area) the same amount.
For example, this year 1 1 percent
budget cuts are projected � in-
stead of the whole 11 percent
coming out of social or defense
spending, each (one) was cut by a
little over 4 percent.
The affect Gramm-Rudmann
lias on ECU lies in Financial Aid
for students. With 52 percent of
all students at ECU receiving
financial aid � cuts in aid will
have a "significant and im-
mediate" impact according to
Edwards. For instance, if 440
students get an average sup-
plemental grant of $734.00, next
year there may only be enough
money for 357 to receive the loan
� which is 83 people less
The 1986-1987 federal finan-
cial aid program alotment tor
East Carolina will suffer losses m
the college work studv C WSP)
program of over $41,000, Sup-
plemental Grant funds available
will drop over $61,000, and the
National Direct Student Loan
will decrease close to S7,000. Pell
Cirant is also greatly affected
Pell Grant is not a loan, but
money given to undergrade
bv the federal government. (
will be made on a relative scale �
low imcome families will not suf-
fer any cuts. Middle income will
suffer cuts on scale with the
cutoff point being lower for those
who get nothing.
With over half of all students
currently using financial aid � a
squeeze will undoubtedly be felt.
What Edwards wants us all to
know is that, "The rumors of the
death of financial aid programs
have been greatly exaggeiated
It's true that the cuts made b
this Budget Deficit Control Acl
will affect the amount of money
available for loans; however
there is still money available Ed
wards says, "Don't give up �
understand the situation is very
serious and some cuts are im-
mediate, but for '86 and 'H1 we
will be operating on basically the
same level (of aid available) as
the last 4 or 5 years "
With a lot of negative press
surrounding The Gramm-
Rudman Act. Edwards is afraid
that students will u away from
ng to get aid. Don't.
Fdwards feels that the federal
government will not overlook our
country's committment to its
future by depriving intelligent
young people of a higher educa-
tion.
To find out more about general
financial aid � the office is
located in "the old cafeteria"
between Jenkins and Joyner
Library. If you think you qualify
for aid � find out fot sure �
don't cheat yourself by not ap
plying. The situation is bad. and
worsening, but it isn't hopeless
Winston Salem's prices are a bit
lower with regular averaging 97.8
cents a gallon, and unleaded for
an average of 1.06 a gallon.
Prices in Wuiston-Salem and
larger cities may be lower because
of the vast amount of competi-
tion between stations; however,
last year prices were higher in
Winston-Salem than the average
for the Western part of N.C.
Officials of the AAA-Carolma
Motor Club completed a survey
last week that showed self-service
regular was selling for an average
of 97.4 cents and unleaded Si .06
a gallon statewide.
The prices are about 1.1 cents a
gallon higher than a year ago. but
unlike a year ago, prices show
every indication of plunging still
further, according to the AAV
"The low price of gasoline is
only temporary, the economy is
based on oil prices. I"he price
Media Board Defends Moratorium Rule
B CAROLYN DRISCOLI.
saff nlrr
Before an attendance of about
35 minority students, last night's
Media Board meeting switched to
a quest i on-and-answer session
regarding the Board's two week
old decision to place Expressions,
ECU.s minority magazine into a
state of moratorium.
After taking care of regular
business the Board opened the
floor to questions raised by those
who had come oul of concern for
the future o Expressions.
Ii wa ed at the Feb. 10
nice" ng " al it was due to pro-
blems with the staff organization.
Due to staff, budget and deadline
problems, ace irding to Rudolph
Alexander, director of Student
Veterans Club Offers Service
Bv JENNIFER MYERS
SMffWrita
Americanism is not the
stereotypical flag waver ; what it
really means is working together,
and that is what the Veterans'
Club is trying to do declared Jim
Reid, president of the ECU
Veterans' Club.
A veteran is anyone who has
ever been in the service. On cam-
pus, veterans account for almost
half of all male faculty members
as well as many students taking
advantage of their education ben-
fits according to Reid.
The club, whose history
follows a pattern typical of most
campus veterans clubs has been
active during the wars of this cen-
tury, but faded out in times of
peace. In fact, the ECU club had
been dorimant since about 1977
before it was revived last
semester.
Club membership is by no
means restricted to veterans.
Members range from veterans to
those in the reserves, to veterans'
dependents to those who are in-
terested but have no connection
with the service.
Continues Reid, "Our big aim
is to get people together, to keep
the lines open, to offer the oppor-
tunity for people to voice their
opinions
He stresses the fact that the
club members, as well as veterans
in general, do not follow many
popular stereotypes. "When peo-
ple think of veterans, they often
get a picture of Ronnie's
Marauders, wiping out com-
munism he says. "But we are
here to work together, we are
people helping people. If we were
not called the Veterans Club, we
would be the American Club
The club also strives to make
the community more aware of
veterans and their contributions.
For example, many people would
not be able to name the two
memorials on campus dedicated
to veterans. They are the on the
side of Memorial Gym and
Memorial Gym itself.
Memorial gym was dedicated
in 1953 to the men from ECU
who lost their lives in World War
II. The event which prompted
this dedication was the death of
an ECU football coach in 1944
while in the service. John Cristen-
bury was the only coach in the
school's history ever to have led
See GAS Page 3.
Unions, the Media Board decided
to freeze all funds going to Ex-
pressions and form a subcommit-
tee to review Expressions' situa-
tion.
The audiences' question raised
most often asked for the exact
reasons for the board's action. In
several seperate responses, the
Board restated in some form the
reasons previously given by Alex-
ander.
Another question put before
the board regarded the length of
Expressions state of moratorium.
It was made clear by Board
members Alexander and Michael
Smith, chairman of the Media
Board, that a state of
moratorium merely freezes the
funding; it does not take any
money away. Stressed Alexander,
"The money (for Expressions)
will not be frozen forever. The
money has not been issued to
anyone else; it is still there
Students also addressed the
Board with the idea that members
acted too quickly taking action
within one meeting rather than
placing the topic on the agenda,
to be discussed at the next
meeting.
In response, Elmer Meyer,
Vice Chancellor of Student Life,
stated that while the Board took
action which seemed appropriate
to them at the time, the decision
has been made.
In order to give students a
chance to further express their
opinions, a hearing will be held
Tuesday. March 4 from 3:00-4:00
in Mendenhall.
Members of the Media Board's
subcommittee include Keenan
Ward. Minority Affairsoor-
dinator, John Ebbs, professor at
ECU, Alexander, and Brian
I assiter and 1 isa Whitfield, stu-
dent members of the Media
Board.
Senior Council To
Offer Conference
Bv MIKFLIDWK K
Sf�s Fdtlor
Senior Information Night,
sponsored by the Senior C!a-s
Council will take place tomorrow
pm
in
!44
from 6 to
Mendenhall.
The purpose of the meeting,
said Kirk Shelley, Senior Class
president. "Is to give students a
better perspective of what they
are going to be facing when they
leave school
Shelley added S.I.N. would be
an excellent opportunity for
seniors to get "a leg up" on
graduates from other schools. He
reiterated the purpose of the con-
ference is to acquaint students
with life after school.
"Senior Information Night is
designed tor seniors
specifically said Shelley. "This
program will be ottered each
year, so freshmen don't have to
feel like they have to come. Main-
ly because we'll be in a room that
barely holds 200 people
Senior Information Night will
consist of six different lectures
dealing with life after graduation.
The topics range from lime
Management to Management and
Leaders of the Outside World.
Cindy Kittrell. Annual Giving
director, will deliver the Time
Management lecture. Shelley said
Kittrell will cover such subjects as
See INFORMATION Page 3.
SGA Changes Election Rules
By JAY STONE
Maaaglai Kdliw
In a lengthy session yesterday
the Student Legislature passed a
bill calling for a change in elec-
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds7
Editorials4
Features6
Sports8
When we cannot get what
we love, we must love what is
within our reach.
�unsigned French proverb
tion rules for SGA officers from
a plurality to a majority system.
The adoption of the majority
system means that candidates
who fail to win at least 51 percent
of the total vote when in a race
consisting of three or more peo-
ple will face a run-off election.
Current SGA Elections Chair-
man Sven Van Baars alleged that
such a change will result in added
expense for students, while
speaker of the house, Kirk
Shelley, denied that added ex-
pense will result from the new
system.
Van Baars also argued that the
majority system will result in a
lower turn-out in the run-off and
possibly in discouraging minority
candidates from running for of-
fice. Several speakers disagreed
with Van Baars' charges, claim-
ing that the new system will be
more democratic.
In other action, the legislature
voted down a proposal thai
would have set aside funds to pay
groups who staff polls during
SGA elections. It was alleged that
the legislature should not be in
the business of paying groups to
do something that should be done
by volunteers free of charge.
Those who argued in favor of
the proposal pointed out that the
elections committee was unable
to enlist enough volunteers to
staff polling places last year and,
therefore, had to close some
polls.
SGA
The SGA addressed topics including elections and medical loans at the meeting Monday night. See
related story on Page 1.






iy0iJUNIANFEBRUARY 25,
1986
Announcements
ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH
There win be a meeting of the E C U
Chapter of the Student National En
vironmentai Health Association on Tuesday
Feb 25 Please pian to attend we will
tmaiiie our fundraising protect The
meetng will be held at 6 00 n the 2nd floor
lab at thp Allied Health Bidg
VETERANSCLUB
There wii1 be a meet.ng Wednesday night
February 7 at 7 30 v p m n Room 248
Mendenhali There is a tremendous amount
of energy being created wth this new
organization Come on out and be a part of
r An students, faculty and staff are mv'ted
to attend Refreshments wii be provided
See you mere'
METHODIST PRESBYTERIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Come the Method's' S'ude Center th.s
Aednesdar night at 5 30 pm and every
Wednesday n.gnt for a dei'C .ous all you can
eat home coofced meal writh a short program
afterwards This week Kay Robert vofcsim
a native Sou'h African, will speak about the
system of Apartheid The meal is 12 at trie
door $1 50 'f you sign up in advance Can
' S8 2O30 tor reservations Sponsored by
P-esbyteran and Methodist Campus
v n �tr ��-
DRAMA GROUP
BIBLE STUDY
v Ou don ' ave to be an actor to enioy
reading piavs' Every Tuesday night a
group s mee'mg to read and discuss plays
that provide insight nto the Christian
"�essage Ac a meet from 30 8 30 at tne
Metnodfsi Student Center ,501 e Fiftti s-
across ti i- Gar re" aor call '52 '240 tor
reformation Sponsored b�
Presbyter an Campus Chi si nr . ��
ECU COUNCIL OF
HONOR SOCIETIES
There will be a meeting tonight at 5 15 in
BO 204 All members please plan to attend
LIBRARY SCIENCE CLASSES:
SECOND BLOCK
Students registered for second block
classes of Library Science 1000are reminded
that classes begin Monday March 3 (Sec
tions 21 32) and Tuesday. March 4 (Sections
33 411 Every student is expected to attend,
beginning with the first class meeting
AMERICAN MARKET!
ASSOCIATION
NG
APARTHEID
k ay
At- . a
P�eSD y
and p"
1 vokw'in a native
rren'ly working yy I "�
Churc n Durham will speak
" 0 scussion abou' his persona!
e�pe' ences �' "� Apar'ned system
Wednesday February 26 5 3C PV a iome
cooked mea1 wii precede the presenta'ion
cost S2 Me'hod'St Student Center 501
Eas f '�� 51 � is! �� � Garreti a
'58 203C
BLACK AWARENESS
MONTH
Free I gr biood pressure and sickle cell
ree -� be held Friday fec'gar, 28
1 � Me nde n h a1
10 00am 2 00pm
Awareness Montn
H appa Aipna Ps t
Nursing S'udents
ier� ice Call Nofcc
for more ntormat
S 'uden'
as par'
a tivities
fr aterntty
trorr
of the Biack
Sponsored by
Assoc a" � ��
�'udent "e rf
or a -5 9673
HONORS GRADUATES
a- , �.��' � � . ipei �- � graduate '� i
) with 24 semester "Ours or more ot
satisfa 1 � Mrorh � p Honors Program
qualifies 'or a sper a notificatior tx me
Transcr-p See Or Sanae'S a' the Honors
Office 2'2 Ragsaaie or phew � 57 437
PUBLICSERVICE
ANNOUNCEMENT
rt �- Minor �� S'uae Orgai l
E as' Care na l�i .e's
rtoi �. awe'e-es. ay � Saturday
�8� rue t -v.
trom I0AV 4PV
Cui'ura Center or ECU Campus 10 0C
AM Tne cr ss - "P Negr. f-a , r,r
ay v �
Sem nar s Wll rje - p
the edn a Wright
Donald Ensiey ECU School of A ec nea tf
1 00 av Toward an Econom c�
. nderstand ng rne Bas s tar the h storca
B.ack S"uggie D' Donaic Va'es ECt
Dep' of Economics i 00 PV Vus , From
an Apro Amer.can Pe-speie v
johnny Wooten Greenville St' :x Mus
2 00 PW The Book The Color Purple vs
� ' - The Coior Purple Or Gay
W en'7 ECu Engi.sh Dep 3 00 PM Afro
Amer.cans and 'he A"S v- v II
Pollock Biack Artists' Gu id
'he keynote address wi be g ,r by D-
Piem ngs of Sra. Un vei-s �. a' 7 00
PfA in the Jenkins Audi'or um jn ECU Cam
pus Other soecai guests include the Ecu
Gospel ChQir
Be a part of the PEPSI Generation Come
to the AMA Presentation 3 00 p m . Wed
Feb 26 m Jenkins Auditorium Guest
Leturer will be Kelly Smith
BREAD FOR THE WORLD
There will be a meeting of ail those who
want to help organize the )9tJ6 crop walk
against hunger Sunday February 23rd At
this meeting questions about the march will
be answered information packets will be
distributed and organizers will be signed up
The time of the meeting is 3 00 and it will be
held at immanuei Baptist Church the ad
dress is 1101 S Elm Street or can 758 2030
ATTENTION COLLEGE
SOPHOMORES
Learn how you can earn S3,200 during your
t-nai two years of college through the Army
ROTC Base Camp starts you toward ex
c itmg Army experience as a commissioned
officer For more information, attend a
Basic Camp information session Wednes
day 26 February, from 4 to 6 pm in the Cot
teehouse located in the basement of
Menoenhaii student center or call Captain A
J Mitchell at 757 667 BE ALL YOU CAN
BE'
HOME ECONOMICS
Home Econom.es Seminar HOME CAN
NiNG OF SELECTED SPECIES OF FISH
Ms Stocks conducted experiments to deter
m,ne the best way to can fish She worked
with Dr Zallen on the proiec' Ms Stocks s
a clinical dietitian Mee'mg February 26 a' 4
p m Room 237 For more information can
Dr Kathryn Kolasa School of Home
Economics 757 417
CAMPUSCRUSADE
FOR CHRIST
Campus Crusade tor Christ is sponsoring
�r rr-e Time "i,s Thursday night a' 7 30
n the Old Joy net L Drar, second floor
P ease 0 n us tor tu" fellowship and Bibie
s'udy We are looking forward to mee'ing
PSI CHI
ere wii be a Ps C �"�' ng m "ues
aa, February 25 at 5 30 in 'he Ps Ch,
bra-y a members urged '0 a'teno'
NURSING STUDENTS
g s'uoes eres'ed in oecom
ng a member the Eas- Carol,na Assoc a
��on of Nurs,ng S'udenrs are nv.ted to a
meeting Thursday 2 27at 7pm n 101 nb we
will oe eiect.ng 1986 8' officers Tn,s ,s a
mandatory meeting tor all members
Ref-eshments will be provided Non
members anc members are encouraged to
n"enc Looking forward to s?e.ng ,ou
'here'
SOCIETY FOR
ADVANCEMENTOF
MANAGEMENT
the Society tor Advancement of Manage
� w.shes to invite you 'o come and ,om
us An maiors are welcome Calendar of
Events Feb 27 Lecture and Tour Emp re
Brushes mc at 1 x p m Mar 5 Lecture
and Tour Quality Cycles Burrough
Wellcome- a 1 30 p.m.Apr 2 Guest
Speaker v.ce Pres John cennon -Cen'rai
Carolina Bank Banking Policies and Hiring
Practices For more information about SAM
and our ac'vites Contact j0rn Biana
752 2628
Classifieds
757-6366
Professionally
Prepared
RESUME'S
Special Student Rates
355-6810
FREE
RENT
Going Home For The Summer
But Need A Place For The Fall?
Tar River Estates has a summer special for
ECU students � Rent an apt by May 1 st &
keep your appartment RENT FREE for June &
July! For details call or come by Tar River
Estates Info Center 1400 Willow St. No. 1.
752-4225
Tired of waiting in line for the phone or shower? Leave the
dorm doldrums behind - there is an alternative. Your own
place at Tar River Estates. Select a one-bedroom garden opart-
ment or a two- or three-bedroom townhouse. Enjoy fully equip-
ped kitchen, washerdryer connections in some apartments,
spacious clubhouse, swimming pool, and picnic area by the
river. Conveniently located near East Carolina University -
with SGA Transit service Come by today or Call:
Tariyer;1
752-4223
1400 Willow St
Office Howes
M-F 9:00-5:30
Sot & Sun 1:00-5:00
Monogedby U S SrveKwCorporofK
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
The Accounting Society willl hold a
meeting on Tuesday March th �t 4 00 pm m
Mendenhali Room 244 Our guest speaker
will be Mr Mark Modan from TRW with a
presentation on Management Accounting
All members are encouraged to attend and
new members are welcome!
BLACK GRADUATE
SUPPORTGROUP
There will be a meeting ot the Black
Graduate Support Group Sunday March 2 m
Mendenhali at 8 15 p m Check the front
desk for room location For those of you who
came last week please come batk1 If m
terested call Dwight at 752 91t7
SRA
SRA presents Aloha Paradise Spring
Semi formal at Holiday inn Lots of your
favorite beverages hor d oeuvres and
music It takes place Friday Feb 28 from
8 OOp m 12 00 midnight, cost is 2 SO with
SRA card and 3 00 without SRA card Bus
service will be provided Last day to buy
tickets will be Tuesday Feb 25th Buy
tickets in any dorm
FREE TAX HELP
The Accounting Society is offering free ta�
services tor federal returns at me Student
Booth in Mendenhali from 4 6pm on
Wednesdays and Thursdays Federal forms
and instructions are available upon request
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
Accounting Society members are en
couraged to Sign up for our free tutor ng and
'a� service programs Sign up sheets are
posted on the accoun'mg society bulletin
boara 3rd floor Rawi This is excellent
review for 'he May CPA Le's get ready'
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
T r,t accounting socef? wrtll hold a meeting
on Tuesday Marr.n 4th at 4 00 p m m
VenoenhaH Room 244 Our speaker vvttt oe
Mr Mark Hodan v.th TRW and a presenta
t.on on 'Management Accounting' Nevw
rnemoers are welcome!
SCUBA DIVING ADVENTURES
Spring break Marc 9 U l�86 D.ve Pen
nekamp In the Fior.da keys Key Largo
Florida The worlds most popular reef
Five days and nights a two 'ink boat dive
da'iy one night dive includes tanks a'
oackpacks and weights Also snorkei w.tr.
the dolphins LOOg.ng a' Howard Johnsons
tul' breakfast daily sw.mmmg pool on the
bay snorkeimg Cos' 1385 for further ,nfor
mat.cm call Ray Schart Director of Aguat.cs
a' 757 4441 Open wa'tr cert.f ica'ons
Jvi 'able)
INTERVIEWING
Two more mterviewong workshops are
scheduled at me Career Planning and Place
ment Service To improve your presentation
skills, to learn about the questions
employers ask and to hear from Mr James
about opportunities on and off campus mark
your calendar to come to the Bioxton House
on February 25 and March 3 at 3 p m
GRADUATING?
Seniors and Graduate Students are en
couraged to pick up a Registration Packet at
the Career Planning and Placement Service
You are able to leave a resume with us and
establish a place to put letter of reference on
file You will be able to interview on campus
� f you meet the qualifications of the
employers who come to campus between Oc
tober and April
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FELLOWSHIP
A service of Holy Eucharist will be
celebrated at 5 30 p m each Wednesday
through March 2th. at ST Paul s Episcopal
Church. 4P1 East 4th Street Supper and a
video series on "What Episcopalians
Believe" will follow the service
FREETAX HELP
The Accounting Society is sponsoring a
ree tax preparation ana advice service in
he Student Booth at Mendenhali on
Wednesdays and Thursdays from 44pm
hru tax season Federal Instructions and
orms are available upon requests
SRA Presents
Aloha
Paradise
Lots of Your Favorite Beverages,
Hor a"Oeuvres & Music
Date: Friday, February 28th
Time: 8:00 p.m12 midnight
Price: $2.50 with SRA Card
$3.00 without SRA Card
Bus Service will be provided. Last day to
tickets will be Tuesday, February 25th.
Buy tickets in any dorm.
Veteran
ontiniu-d Fn.m Page i
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
tt-
are
And they re both re.
sented by the insignia v hi wear
as j member ot the Army N
( brps rhe caducous on tl
moans you re pan oi a heah
system in which educational
career advancement are the r
not the exceptii n The gold bar
right means you command respect as an Army oil
Nurse Opportunities PO
free I-80C I 'SA-ARMY
on ttu
earning a
Clifton. NJ 070
BSN
write:
5 Or
Army
call tol
i er
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE
Info Offe
Senior C
Go Krogering For A Study In
Total Value!

BAKERS DOZEN SPECIAL.
FRESH RING
Glazed
Donuts .
Glass Fol







cia
1'

:

j








1



beer,


WELL PAl
SHAI
�.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 25, 1986
loha
adise
. B( i erages,
Kebruan 28th
.m12 midnight
nh SRA Card
iihout SRA I ard
ESTO
HE ARMY.
It YOU CAN BE.
Will
!
J
� -
&,
�.�
M Pepsi
mi $
119
led Delicious m OOC
apples . t OO
llorida
irapefruit . .
lunch
ulips
�1
$499
KROGER
Lite
Ice Milk
IN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
;reenville Blvd. - Greenville
)
Veteran Support ECU Life
Continued From Page 1.
the football team to a no-loss no-
tie season. "Cristenbun showed
leadership � that was important,
" says Reid.
However, nowhere at the gym
is there a placque explaining the
meaning behind the dedication of
the building 1 he club is trying to
have a plaque mounted on the
wall in the near future.
The bell on the side of the gym
was erected in honor of veterans
who died in the Vietnam war. Ac-
cording to the club, the bell is an
overlooked memorial on campus.
The club hopes to enhance it by
trimming the shrubs around it ,
cleaning it up, and perhaps plan-
ting flowers near it.
In January, the club replaced
the flag which flies in the front of
Joyner Library.
The members of the Veterans'
Club will also attempt to improv e
upon last year's Memorial Day
celebration. "We want to create
awareness says Reid. On
Memorial Day, he explains, "we
are hoping to coordinate with
ROTC and other veteran
organizations to have a service at
the Vietnam Memorial
Annie Gallegos, the club's vice
president explains, "We (at the
club) share some common
ground. We are here to help each
other and the community
To veterans who may not be
aware of the club and its goals,
Reid says, "We veterans need to
get our act together and get
serious. Our members join not
for the social events alone, but to
get something done, Give us a
try. We're doing the best we
know how
1 ABORTIONS UP TO 12th WEEK OF PREGNANCY $195 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cost Pregnancy Test, Birth C ontrol, and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For Further information, call 832-0535 (toll tree number 1 800-532-5384) between 9 am and 5 p.m weekdays General anesthesia available RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS 917 West Morgan St.
v H
The club meets
Wednesday at
Mendenhall.
every other
7:30 in
Info Offered By
Senior Council
Gas Prices Fall
In Eastern N.C.
ContinuedFrom 1'ajji' 1.
how to gel u1 appintments and
work on timeMoieovei. Kittrell
will discuss how tobe your most
productive sei I .
AssistantDirectoi of the
v areei riant. : U I LlcCIIICIll
Service. JimWestmorland, will
talk on winniig inib inten iews
Westrru ad, acc rding
Sheliev will sa to best
present youisellob inter-
views. Mim poi t an i.
Westm � aspeak on how
to package aid sellelf in the
be . i.
Plannii .1 ofessional
Image w. of Lisa
Danials, asPersonnel
Managehe W� ia Bank.
lle said 1)s will propise
ah an: acl �� them
Jim Lanier, Vice Chancellor
for Institutional Advancement
will talk on being a young profes-
sional in the modem world.
David Cook's topic, Investing
Your New Money, will consider
what percentage of your new in-
come should be invested and how
to star! planning for retirement.
Edward Wheatly, chairman of
the Department of Marketing at
ECU will round out Senior Infor-
mation Night with a lecture on
Developing Your Professional
linage
"1 hope all the seniors come
out and take advantage of the
program said Shelley. "It's
real hard core info 'hat you need
to know
"It's something your advisoi
will never.tell you about con-
cluded Sheliev.
Continued From Pane 1.
were much lower said Tallev.
lallev explained that self-
service stations, such as the Trade
Station are able to sell gasoline
lowei than the full services sta-
tions becuase the) do not accept
purchases on credit cards.
Business is done bv cash or check
only. One to three percent of the
profit margin is lost on credit
card purchases.
Phil Springs, manager ol
I -FilPei l'p reports prices of
s.9 cents for regular and 89.9
cents for unleaded gasoline.
Silvers expect- the price to drop
even more this week, due to his
competition with other self-
service stations. The L-Fill'er Up
onlv accepts cash for gasoline
purchases.
Glass Found In Baby Food
C HARLOI it . C (UPI) �
Han ermarkets Inc.
fficia a variet ol
Gerber 1 i pulled from
the . es as a
precaution when glass was tound
d, companj of-
ficiais said Monday.
"There have been a numbei of
incidents reported � a couple of
doen in the las: several days �
so as a precautionary measure we
decided to remove from sale all
jars of that item in that size
said Harris Teeter President Bob
odale
A Gaston County woman
tound the glass Friday in a jai
macaroni and tomato beef dinner
purchased at a Charlotte store,
officials said
"To b afe Je. we've
withdrawn the item from sale
-aid Goodale.
The four ounce jar carries the
code number 406V4 and comes
from the Gerber Product Co.
plant in Asheville. But Goodale
said the product carries a number
of different codes and all have
been ordered removed from the
chain's 110 stores in North
Carolina. South Carolina and
Virginia.
C onsumers in at least 10 other
states have reported finding glass
in jars of gerber baby food, ac-
cording to the Food and Drug
Administration.
FDA officials say the problem
mav be caused by chipping and
breaking of glass during shipping
and handling or by comsumer
trying to loosen lids.
State inspectors have taken 21
iars of babv food from the
Charlotte ore tor testing, said
Bob Gordon, director of the food
and drug protection division ot
the North Carolina Department
ol Agriculture.
"We have no reason to believe
it was anvthing other than an
isolated occurrence, but we have
no wav of knowing that until we
get Ore testing done on the jars
collected
This Style Frame
With Single Vision Rx
Lenses for only
$27
95
All Other Frames
30 to 60 OFF
with purchase of RX Lenses
RAY BAN Sunglasses30 OFF
XA
pliaans
Offer Good Through 22886
3 i 5 Parkview Commons
Across From Doctors Park
752 U46
Open MonFri. 9 a.m. til 5:30 p.m.
WELL PAY YOU TO GET INTO
SHAPE THIS SUMMER.
It you have at least
run years of college left,
sou can spend six weeks at
our Army ROTC" Bask
Gimp thi.s summer and earn
approximately $600.
And if you qualify, you
can enter tru tlOTC 2-
Year Program this fall and
receive up to1,000 a year.
But the bty payoff
happens on graduation day.
That s when you receive
an officers commission
So get your body in
shape I not to mention your
hank account).
Enroll in Army ROTC.
For more information,
contact
Captain Mitchell
757-6967
ARMY ROTC
BEALLYOUCANBE.
"It is not going to stay this
way, it's economically impossi-
ble according to Bill Wheless,
plant supervisor of Quality Oil.
Wheless cited that regular
gasoline will eventually be phased
out and most consumers are not
as concerned with the prices of
the regular fuel.
"1 would like to see the price
for unleaded gasoline stay under
the dollar mark; but there is no
way to tell when the prices will in-
crease. Prices could increase as
the sprin- -md summer seasons
approach " Wheless added.
East Carolina Tanning Center
3 Beds � No waiting
Any member refering another receives 3 free visits
UBE Coupon Boc has free visits
Open 10 a.m. till Late Night!
Suntana & Wolfe Beds
2 Free Visits with purchase of package with this ad.
(Bring a friend and that makes 5 free visits!
Headphones and fan in each room
When nobody else can tan you �
We Can!
Located Downtown
Beside Heart's Delight
757-3385
for appointments
I
-COUPON
2 Pieces of Chicken
(Original Recipe" or
Extra Crispyiv
1 small mashed potato
and gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
$1.99
plus tax
FOR ONE COMPLETE
COMBINATION
2-PIECE PACK
We Do Chicken Right
L.
Coupon Redeemable at
Greenville locations only
Expiration Date 3-3-86
CQLEQB
From the Films Committee
MAD MAX
BEYOND
THUNDERDOME
7:00 & 9:00 p.m.
Th Fri Sat.
A t The Underground . . .
Marx Brothers,
Charlie Chaplan and
Laurel & Hardy Cartoons
1:30p.m.
Th.Feb27
Need a Student ID?
Making of Student ID's
in Multi-Purpose Room,
Mendenhall
2:30p.m.
Wed. Feb. 26
Discount Movie Tickets
Plaza Cinema $2.50
Buccaneer $2.50
Available at the Central Ticket Office
Bring Your ID
:
- - �
� -����� ��





�fte ?Ea0t (Earnlintatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender, �-nimi
Jay Stone, Manning etnta
Mike Ludwick. ,�,��.� Greg Winchester, iw w,
Scott Cooper, � &��� Anthony Martin. ,� ��,
Daniel Maurer. gmmm �� John Peterson. o�, mm,
John Shannon. �&��� Shannon Short, w�� ��,
DeChanile Johnson. ��iw�, Debbie Stevens, v,�.
February 25, 1986
Opinion
Page 4
Neo-Nazism
Something Ugly Thrives
There is an old idea that is being
quietly resurrected in our land. The
idea is Nazism, now known as Neo-
Nazism so that it fits in comfor-
tably with Neoliberalism and
Neoconservatism.
Today's modern Neo-Nazis are
not exactly like their less
sophisticated predecessors. They
are into networking � working in
coalition with groups like the Ku
Klux Klan and Posse Comitatus to
acheive shared goals.
In North Carolina Neo-Nazi
organizations go under such names
as The White Patriot Party. In the
rest of the country names like
Aryan Nation pretty well say it all.
These groups expound a peculiar
ideology that is part reactionary
and anti-democratic and part
populist and economically
egalitarian. While they profess to
believe that race is the basis of na-
tionhood and that, therefore, only
people of the same race should live
in any given nation, they also
believe that corporate greed is caus-
ing grief for farmers and working
people. They assert, therefore, that
corporate power must be opposed.
Yet, they twist the anti-corporate
populist side of their message bv
alleging that Jews are behind most
of the major economic institutions
in American society.
In addition, the Neo-Nazi crowd
cannot believe that the holocaust
ever happened. That, they say, was
just a propaganda ploy engineered
by Jews to discredit Nazism. In ad-
dition, Neo-Nazis maintain that the
United States suffered more
casualties in WWII than any other
allied nation even though it is com-
mon knowledge by now that we suf-
fered the least of all the major
allies. The Soviet Union alone suf-
fered 22 million.
That race is not the defining
characteristic of a nation should be
obvious to anyone who thinks
about it. To begin with there is the
fact that many nations have seen
the ultimate taboo in the Neo-Nazi
lexicon � racial inter-breeding. It
happened throughout history
everytime one nation conquered
another. It happened when the
Romans conquered the Greeks,
when the Moors conquered Spain
and when the British built the
British empire. Moreover, in the
modern epoch geographical boun-
daries, religious beliefs and
economics play more of a role in
defining a nation than does race.
The holocaust happened. It was
the real thing. Six million Jews
died. Socialists, homosexuals,
Poles and trade unionists were also
persecuted by the Nazis.
In other words, diversity was
eliminated and an attempt was
made to create a homogenous socie-
ty. All dissent was crushed brutallv,
without mercy and in the name of
country, family and Christianity.
The Nazis too claimed to have God
on their side.
Today the same claim is beirnz
made and the Neo-Nazis believe
they will be successful in building a
majority movement eventually. But
there are a tew things that'these
people do not realize. Their mo-
ment in history exists today because
of an economic crisis that is tearing
at the foundations of American
society. The internationalization of
trade and the slow decline of the
American standard of living over
the last two decades are making it
evident that widescale changes must
take place in American society and
in the economy.They are correct in
saying that corporate control of the
economy has got to go. But Jewish
Americans are not to blame for it as
a race. And the American people
will never embrace racism as a na-
tional creed. Though economic
crises have always bred bigotry and
prejudice historically, democracy
and egalitarianism have won major
gains in determining the direction
of social change in past epochs. The
same will prove true of the present
epoch.
THIS IS YOUR
NRAPOllAR.
THIS IS THE
GUM MOUR
NRAPOUAR
PROTECTS,
THISISTH6JUWIE
WRNRA POilAR
PROTECTS,
this is me cop
WOSKluePWTHE
0UNKI6 WHO SHOOTS
meGUNWURN&A
NUAR &o�e7S
Utl
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POtURSATWORK

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W PO YOU SET FOR
RRST W6REE MORPER
IN THE PHILIPPINES ?
EliCTEP
WE'RE LOOKING FOR
A FEW GOOP PLANES
US ARMV
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Campus Forum
Howe I I Criticized For Recruiting
I read the 2-14-86 article in the
Raleigh N&O about ECU chancellor
John M. Howell violating N(
regulations with disgust and surprise.
Why the ancient Chancellor of a
major N.C. University would take it
upon himself to hit the highway on a
toolhardy football recruiting trip re-
mains to be explained. DR. Howell.
don't you know that the coaching
statt is paid in recruit and you are to
keep the university running?
Chancellor Howell had no more
business recruiting a football pro
spect than coach Ed Emory would
have had awarding honorary doc-
torate degrees
et Coach Emory was unexpected-
ly fired due to such blatant acts as us-
ing Pepsi and I ance Cracker v ending
machine money to buy (lowers and
sympathy cards for relatives o
players and coaches oi his close knn
Pirate squads. This money came
from vending machines placed in the
tieldhouse by Coach Emory and used
by the football team and staff.
Perhaps Coach Emory's most
serious infraction was his use of
graduate assistant coaches to recruit
oii campus. � I guess if he would
have sent Chancellor HowelJ, it
would have been O.K.
Chancellor Howell's actions ap-
pear even more inexcusable since
AD. Ken Karr knew oi the visit and
apparentlv ignored it. Ignorance of
the rules is no excuse for violating
NCAA rules, especially wahen one is
the top administrator.
After practically sucker punching
Coach Emory by firing him and per-
manently tarnishing one of the most
hardworking, loyal and dedicated
coaches in the country, it has finally
been publically shown what
hypocrites Chancellor Howell and
Dr. Karr are.
Thank you Dr. Schwary for having
the courage to report Dr. Howell. It
seems that you are one oi the few sur-
viving Pirates who know what the
rules are.
Bill Evans
ECU Alumni
Nuclear Apocolypse
I'm scared. We live in an age in
which life as we know it could be
totally annihilated in less than twenty-
minutes. The threat oi nuclear ar-
magedon hangs over us like dark
storm clouds, booming their ominous
power. Yet despite the unthinkable
consequences of using such weapons
I'm seeing and hearing more and
more of today's youth, our future
leaders, defending and advocating the
build up of nuclear arsenals. This is
too dangerous a toy for us to play
around with.
I realize that we as a nation, are go-
ing through a resurgence of conser-
vatism, but I don't understand what
part having a death wish plays in it.
Mankind has never in its long history
developed a weapons system without
using it. I dare to say that this new
tendency is not a conservative reac-
tion, rather it is a barely disguised
shift towards l-ft-wing militarism. I
truly hope that we are not duped into
thinking that the threat of mutual an-
nihilation will keep the peace forever.
At the present time a conservative
estimate would place the capabilities
of the world nuclear force at being
able to kill every man, woman and
child on the face of the earth twenty-
three times over. Once you're dead
for the first time what does it matter?
It is a permanent condition, I urge
you to think.
What is life? I don't mean the
biological defnintion. I mean what is
it to each and every one us, deep in-
side? That is not a question that can
be easily answered. Everyone has
their own concept of what they are
really about. I want everyone to take
an hour and simply think about how
precious their life is, then think about
how valuable it is multiplied by over
four-billion times.
Why do we do this? Can people
really think that we could survive
even a limited exchange of these
atomic monsters? The world's
leading physicists all agree that if only
one-third of the United States' and
Soviet Union's intercontinental
nuclear weapons were used, that the
world would be plunged into a world
wide "nuclear winter I won't go
into all the horrid details of w hat that
entails but it is enough to point out
that when the soil and natural gasses
are rendered useless, that there is little
chance of life reviving itself.
This bring us to the question oi Irv-
ing to stop a nuclear strike once it has
been activated. The concept of "Star
Wars" or "High Frontier" is great in
theory, but do you reallv think it's
worth risking global death on a
svstem that can't be tested except dur-
ing a war? That is like saying, "I have
on a bullet-proof vest, so shoot me
Please people, think! Don't fall in-
to the age old trap of "Might Makes
Right This game is too serious to be
taken lightly. I don't want to die and
more importantly, I want a world left
tor my children to grow up in
peacefully. I am not a bleeding heart
liberal that wants us to forget na-
tional security, rather 1 want us to
think about plobal security. Life is ir-
replaceable, once it's gone, there is no
getting it back. For the sake of
everyone, don't follow a crowd blind-
ly This is America, each and
everyone of us has a say in what hap-
pens. Express your thoughts and feel-
ings, speak out! Be heard! Your life
may depend on it.
Gregg F. Lowe
Greenville Resident
Fraternities
What comprises a fraternity?
What makes a group of young men
feel so compelled to determine
whether or not a certain individual
should be or should not be allowed to
join them in so called brotherhood?
It's ironic that brotherhood should be
defined by Websters as "a state or
quality of being brothers or a
brother, or an associaton for any pur-
pose. Brothers do not ostracize
brothers. For some ECU fraternities
their's is a complete brotherhood that
prides itself on being a fraternitv of
individuals existing in a total state of
hypocracy. Their's is the psuedo
world of an autocratic state. It is a
sham that a person who comes to a
fraternity seeking more time with ex-
isting friendships and the advantages
and benefits it has to offer, should be
turned away after having been ex-
tended an invitation to join because
his individuality conflicts directly
with a few simple and closed minded
brothers caught up in their own in-
security. It is of my opinion, and I
have never been a strong advocate of
the greek system, that there are some
serious flaws within this system. I am
not writing this letter to completely
malign the fraternity and sorority
systems, for some of my best friends
have survived and adapted well
within the system and will continue to
do so. There are flaws within every
individual and within every system.
East Carolina University, from every
student to the highest position in the
administration, arbitrary to the
beliefs of some would -
Machiavellian administra
dent administrators, sclf-a ;
student judiciary members a:
"good oPBoy" authoritarian ca
police officers, is no different. I
Hemingway once said, "a mar; wl
filled with false convictions
dangerous man. I
him as he truely is
charge this oi me I believ
fraternity system is diseased a.��
men as these and perhaps I
that 1 stav outside and retain i
dividuality than to endurt
possibility of becoming-
member oi the sanctimo
Brothers oi Ronald R
see the real me. can ya
Jeffrey M Briti
Junior. Psychology
Edwards House
Officials at East Carotin
ty made a tragis: mistake
ing the destruction of the (
wards house on the northea;
of Cotanche and Eighth streets
handsome structure, rich in ev
and interior ornamentation. �a-
about 1929 from plans draw
Leila Wilburn. one of the first w
architects in the south and au
at least three books on poy
twentieth-century styles oi architec
ture. Recently Chancellor
Howell stated in an article in the Da
ly Reflector that the university had no
immediate plans for the Edwards
house. One wishes, then, that he had
given the house the careful attention
it deserved. It could have been
adapted for use as a faculty club oi
guest house for dignitaries visiting
East Carolina University. Properlv
refurbished and landscaped, the :
perty would have improved the ha
appearance oi the western edge ol
campus. Such a decision would have
meshed perfectly with current plans
to provide a proper "entrance" on
that end of the university.
There is more to a university than
parking lots and massive classroom
buildings. Some attention must be
given to the quality of the environ-
ment, including wooded areas and
tine architecture. Onlv in pleasant
surroundings can students and facul-
ty find the inspiration thev need to
produce their best work. In the long
run, I believe the university will deep-
ly regret that it has been so
thoughtless in destroying the appeal-
ing aspects oi campus that its
students and emplovees richly
deserve.
Maurice C. York
Greenville Resident
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the en-
trance of Joyner Librarv.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfsj. Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages
double-spaced or neatlv printed All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted. Students,
faculty and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they are limited
to one every five issues.
Booste
BRIGHAN

� .
gested �
caused hv a
fuel tai �
booster O l
Ha
pioneered
booster
shuttle
- V
y
I aM week you (lis; us
a balanced diet rt thi
food facts should h,
about?
Hat
i
-
Somel
Leaders
� Your

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ecruiting
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(doming
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ardv House

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Edwards
thai he Had
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Properly
tped, the pro-
ed the harsh
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ould have
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musl be
environ-
and
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ind facul-
. : eed to
long
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- she appeal-
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employees ruhly
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the en-
trance of Joy ner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted. Students,
faculty and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they are limited
to one every five issues.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 25, 1986
Booster Company Not Liable For Accident
BRIGHAN CITY, Utah (I I'D
The former president of the
company that made the
v hallengei booster rockets sag
nested the shuttle explosion was
.msed b a leak in the external
fuel tank � not a failure in the
ostei O ring seals
Harold Ritchey, who
meered solid propellent
boosters for Morton Thiokol's
ittle program, and other scien-
tists Slindiv uruect the nrt�tsi,l(Mi!
shuttle commission to consider
the possibilin a leak of liquid
hydrogen from the external tank
sparked the chain of events
leading to the Jan. 28
catastrophe.
"If there sere a hydrogen link
then almost everything else fits
like a glove said John Osburne.
former rhiokol engineer, rum a
rockety specialist at Purdue
University. "It's a tar better fit
rhan tn :r to arrange an explana-
tion using O rings
One major descrepancy in the
hydrogen leak theory, the scien-
tists admit, is the existence of an
extra plume of flame seen coming
from the lower booster section.
"The pattern (of the flame) is
clearly that of escaping
(solid)propellent gases said Rit-
chey, who retired in 1977.
� detailed scenario, prepared
by Ritchey, a copy of which was
obtained by United Press Inter-
national, makes these points:
A burning through of the O
ring seals, which separate sec-
tions of propellant, would have
split the booster in half or sent it
cartwheeling away; instead the
boosters performed smoothly
and had to be destroyed after tht
shuttle blew up.
A puff of black smoke, spotted
at liftoff, was consistent with the
burning of a small strip of cork
insulation and not the synthetic
Marcos Calls For
Emergency Support
last week you discussed eating
a balanced diet. Are there other
food facts I should be concerned
about?
Hardh a day goes b without
hearing that you should increase
certain food types, such a- milk,
or vitamins and minerals such a
zinc, vitamin C or . 1
Reearch continues to show tl
ide variety from all the
ton! basic food group fruits
: vegetables, whole gi
bread cereals, milk and diary pi
due meats and fish � every
is still the best wa to n
u b�dy 's nutritional net
- ste p � sis has re
widespn n tention dm .
pas; few ears and an
" are aware that
ndii on where indi iduals,
stl women, loose
from their bones thai results in
igurement, and bone
fractures.linical studies show
osteoporoses may be a
preventable disease by controll-
ing certain risk factors.
Risk Fat tors vou - a n �
includt
� fai story ol osteoporosis
� tan skinned and sm
� ancestoi s fi im Bi
; ' ope, v hina,
la Pa
Ri
.ssi ui u
I
ise
milk .
� Hea
MANILA. Philippines (UPI)
President Ferdinand Marcos
today called on all loyalists to
report to him with guns and vow-
ed to fight "to the last drop of
blood" against a newly formed
provisional government set up by
rebellious military leaders and
headed by Coraon Aquino.
"1 am telling you, our
loyalists, we are here. We are not
going to abandon the office of
the presidency Marcos declared
in a televised address, flatly rejec-
ting an appeal by the Reagan ad-
ministration for a peaceful transi-
tion of power.
1 le declared a state o( emergen-
cy and declared a 6 p.m. � 6
nationwide curfew to take
effect immediately.
"We have no intention ol go-
ing abroad he said. "We have
no intention of resigning. And we
will defend to the last breath of
our life and to the last drop of
blood
I o y a 1 i s t elements were
plotting a "do or die"
rebel forces to regain
control ol (amp Crame where
dhoti 'leaders It. den. Fidel
Ramos, deputy chiel ol the arm-
ed forces, and Defense Minister
Juan Ponce Enrile are holed up.
Militarv and Western
diplomatic sources said they
epected forces loyal to Armed
Forces Chief Gen. Fabian Ver
would attack the installation dur-
ing the night. Marines were
reported marching toward the in-
stallation.
Ramos appealed to the chief of
the 1st Infantry Battalion of the
Philippine Army to "disobey the
illegal orders of Mr. Marcos and
Mr. Ver" and call off the attack.
He said the troops could join the
rebel forces.
A crowd of 40,000 civilians
maintained a vigil at Camp
Crame and reporters said a huge
group of women carrying flowers
had formed a barricade where
they intended to stand against the
advancing Marines.
The massive display of
"peoples power" halted loyalist
tanks and soldiers during an ad-
vance on Camp Crame Sunday
and forced them to turn back for
the night
Elements in the Philippine ar-
my and marines appeared to pose
the mam challenge to what rebel
leaders called The New Armed
forces of the People. Rebel
leaders said they had at least 50
percent of the 25 000 member
military under their command
after mass defections
rubber seals, which have burned
for a much longer time.
There was no fiery brilliance
before the explosion, similar to
an arch welder's torch, which
characterizes burning metal, in-
dicatining the booster's metal
casings were not being comsum-
ed.
A sustained 4 percent decline in
thrust pressure fits neatly with
test data suggesting the pro-
pellent was cold, not that it was
leaking. "The hole or crevice
rapidly burned out said Martin
Summerfield, chief of Princeton
University's combustion research
laboratories. "It does not take as
long as 12 seconds to do so. One
second, maybe two, is more like-
ly
Other scientists who do not
suscribe to the O ring theory, the
focus of the commission's in-
vestigation, include Henry
Shuey, who has worked on space
and army missile propellent
systems in Huntsville, Ala for
45 years, Ed Fitzgerald, former
consultant for NASA's booster
program at Georgia Tech, and
Tom Sovoca, a former manager
of the Wasatch, Utah, division of
Thiokol.
Ritchey and the other scien-
tists painted this scenario.
Before ignition, the main li-
quid fuel tank sprung a leak of
hydrogen in the lower section. As
it leaked, the hydrogen acted as
coolant, causing a drop in
temperatures around the booster
casing. The hydrogen leak caught
fire, burning the cork and caus-
ing the puff of smoke.
The hydrogen cooling of the
solid propellant reduced the pro
pellant's thrust by four percent, a
phenomenon documented in
numerous tests.
Soccer Coaches (Indoor Soccer)
Part-time coaches, work 10-20 hours weekly.
Hours Monday-Friday, 3-5:30 and a couple of
evenings, 7-9:00. Indoor soccer games at Elm
Street Gym.
Must posses skills and be able to coach,
officiate youth ages 5-18, in soccer fundamentals.
Contact the Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department, 752-4137, ext. 262, 259, for
application information. Application deadline is
Friday, March 7. $3.46hr.
Ellie's Clothing Store)
Ladies and Mens Fashion and Sportswear
Special Low Prices
on Spring and Summer merchandise. Ab-
solute liquidation sale on winter stock and
brand name jeans.
With purchase of $25.00 or more receive
one of these free gifts:
Key finder
Credit Card Calculator
Musical Candle
2806 E. 10th Street Across from Highway Patrol 830-1239
i
Something your Advisor never told you about
ENIOR INFORMATION
IGHT
Leaders
An evening that will prepare you for life after graduation, including:
Time Management
by Cindy Kittrell, Annual Citing Director
Winning in Job Interviews
by Jim Westmoreland. Asst. Director, Career Planning & Placement Center
Developing Your Professional Image
by Dr. Edward Wheatley, Chairman. Department of Marketing, ECU
Planning Your Professional Image
by Lisa Daniels, Asst. Personnel Manager, Wachovia Bank
-Investing Your New Money
by David Cook, Senior Class President, ECU, 1981-82
Manager of Einance and Accounting, IMUTECH. INC.
Management and Leaders of the Outside World
by Jim Lanier, Vice Chancellor of Institutional Advancement, ECU
Management
Wednesday, February 26th � 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Room 244 Mendenhall Student Center
Wine & Cheese Reception - 8:00 - 9:00
For More Information Contact:
Page Aman, ECU Alumni Center - 757-6072
Kirk Shelley, SGA Office - 757-6611 or Home 756-6229
Sponsored by
S.G.A. & E.C.U. Alumni Association
I
"
'
9
M � I
A





'Ill I AM i AUDI INIAN
-StyJe
H BRLARY 25, 1986
Page 6
�X
Art Works For
The Environment
By JOHN SHANNON
.t
41
B JIM 1 r I I(,fS�.
!kr tanuinia
Artist Kinji Akagawa mav choose this courtyard beside the financial aid office as the site for his in-
stallation v.ork. which will become a permanent fixture on the ECU campus.
Si�l� Mm
ECU has commissioned an ar-
tist to design and install a perma-
nent fixture on campus in an ef-
fort to exhibit more care and
planning in the design ol public
places. To Kinji Akagawa, a 36
year old artist currently teaching
in St. Paul, Minnesota, taking
care means more than just show
ing concern. It's a deeply fell no-
tion rife with philosophical and
religious implications.
Akagawa was born in Tokyo,
Japan, where he lived for 22
years. A good bit of the inspira-
tion tor his way of thinking about
art came from there, from the
meditative atmosphere ol Bud-
dhist rock gardens and from the
thoughtful!) personal commer-
cial displays of Tokyo vendors.
"The rock gardens embody
Buddhist paradigm of man as
connected to the world said
Akagawa; "man is seen as par! ol
nature
Akagawa appreciates the s
timenis expressed in trie desigi
public places in Japan as well. "1
notice the wa things are arrang-
ed even in the store for in-
stance. In Japan 'hose who are
selling things will often lav -hem
out before the eve ol the
customer, ail together You can
see all the merchandise rif
there, accessible to the hand.
whether it's fruit, eggs or even
hardware
Akagawa showed slides of his
native country in a lecture he
presented last week, when he was
visiting ECU in order to find a
suitable location tor the installa-
tion. His enthusiasm for scenes
from his homeland carried over
into a display of slides from
current home in St. Paul.
"1 love the way the bicycle rack
i- positioned here � only in
America would you find this
said Akagawa, in reference to an
ordinary bike rack placed at the
foot of a huge building.
He later expressed his feeling
that the general case in the United
States was not as pleasing. "An
atmosphere of stress pervades the
social climate here, and too often
the individual experiences aliena-
tion In contrast he points to
Japan, where "the family is more
important than the individual.
There is always a sense of
rootedness in the culture
The idea of "rootedness" is a
central one to Akagawa. To him,
rootedness refers to a trans-
personal element in awareness.
and is thus in opposition to the
subjectivity that characterizes
much modern society.
"Our response to the art ex-
perience often begins with a ques-
tion he explains; "Am I theon-
lv one experiencing this
Paradoxically, another factor
is implicit in the subjective ex-
perience � a yearning toward ob-
jectivity. 1 look for mv own ex-
perience of wanting to be we, not
just me. As soon as you affirm
the subjective experience, you
begin thinking of its social
aspect
Akagawa tries to create spaces
in which people can carry on
private activities, such as reading
and writing, in public. He stresses
that the idea people have of a
place can determine the function
of the place. "Take gardens, tor
instance. There are gardens to
look at. There are gardens to
stroll in. And then there are
gardens in which people gather
The context is the important
thing
Asked if he feels that the en-
vironment of the ECU campus is
a well-planned one, Akagawa
replied, "On the contrary. I
joy the historicity, the vanefv,
especially the older buildings.
But, as far as the overall plan
in the 60s, it seems they began I
add without a long range plan
Akagawa seemed particularly
disturbed by the amount of ti
fie on campus. "Cars parked
the mall seem inappropriate
within the milieu of a more :
templative style of life
"North Carolina is rich in col-
ors, in nature and in culture,
said. "I would hope thai what I
provide would be for
students' education, to help them
become more involved in the
nature and culture of the reg
I hope it would reflect the
region
Akagawa also said he would
like to see students more involved
in future campus planni
"More breadth and depth of stu-
dent involvement may heir bi
valuable artifacts of the reg
out oi their indigenous sum
dmgs and onto campus, wl
they take on more meaning
S ime possible the in-
lation include the court.
of the financial aid building, the
entrance to the library and the
area of the me I .
Akagawa will return to ECU later
this vear to install his piece, when
he has finished designing it.
"Certain human needs are
basic said Akagawa, "sucl
food, shelter, and clothing. But
when so-called basic human need
is fulfilled � then what0 Art
becomes very important to the
notion of the �fulfilling' life
"It's a certain attitude, a
gesture 1 hope to reflect. It's the
mystery of daily life, the art in
clothing, food, and shelter. It
helps us in our constant search to
find equilibrium
May
By BECKY I ()
�x�fl Wnlri
:ked under its label,
rocery aisle marked
Wine.
As much of it as I drink, I
should be an expert, but with
lege life embracing me and my e
cess funds (which don't exceed
like they used to) the expertise lies
in finding good wine that's
cessible, i.e cheap.
I'm not talking about gallon
bouteilles of Ciallo or pints of the
illustrious, often purging.
Richard's. Too crass. In spite
the infamy of the latter two there
are many excellent young wines,
although I prefer something
BEER WINE turned up several
youthful surprises.
Since it's a favorite of mine,
I'll start with champagne, or
rather, mathode champenoise,
since we're not dealing with the
variety from the Champagne
region of France.
Often considered the king of
wines, champagne is certainly the
most popular and glamorous.
With an apology to Dom
Pengnon (at $70 a bottle it's too
chic for moi!) let's uncork a few
for inspection.
Great Western, New York �
some of the best young wines are
from New York and this wonder-
fully consistent company is no ex-
ception. Both their champagnes.
brut and dry (which for some
reason beyond me means sweet),
Restaurant In Review
Eat More Chinese
By KAREN HEIM
Slaff Mrilrr
It's the year 4684 Chinese style
� the year of the Tiger. If you've
never dabbled in Chinese food
you could be missing out on some
of the tastiest food around. Why
not make 4684 your year to try it?
Peking Palace seems to be one
of the more popular Chinese
restaurants in town. Its delicate
Chinese design and sott playing
music give it a true oriental
touch.
A glance at the menu will show
you the wide variety of food Pek
ing Palace has to offer.
Something is sure to tempt your
taste buds.
If you need something to tide
you over until dinner start off
with an appetizer like crisp won-
tons, chicken dainties, seafood
fingers, or egg rolls.
While waiting to order dinner
how about a Chinese Cocktail? If
you've come for more than just
the experience of Chinese culture,
you might want to try such drinks
as the Mai Tai, the Flaming
Volcano, the Suffering Bastard,
or the Scorpion, all hard core
drinks. On the sweeter side, such
drinks as the Mint Julip, the Blue
Hawaiian, or Lovers' Potion are
offered. A variety of non-
alcoholic fruit punches round out
the beverage menu for those who
want to concentrate on the food.
What to order? Your waitress
has arrived.
If you're a poultry lover look
no further. The Chinese do some
spectacular things with their
chickens. Peking Palace offers
such dishes as chicken with
almonds, chicken and vegetables,
Mot) Goo Gai Pan, Peking Duck,
and Peking Palace Chicken.
for the seafood lover Peking
Palace has dishes like Shrimp
Peking Style, Shrimp of Lobster
Sechuan style and Mandarin
Scallops.
True beef eaters will appreciate
Peking Palace's dishes of Peking
Palace Steak, Szechuan Beef,
Curry Beef or Double flavored
beef on a hot pan.
Vegetarian? Try a vegetable
sautee or Lohanchi, which is
assorted Chinese vegetables.
If all four types of food sound
too irresistable to pass up, Four
Seasons is the answer. Four
Seasons is a dish that includes
chicken, shrimp, beef, pork,
vegetables and rice.
Of course a Chinese menu
wouldn't be complete without
Chow Mein. Peking Palace has
three to choose from: chicken,
beef or shrimp.
Once you've finished dinner
you won't be able to resist a
browse over the dessert menu of
fried bananas, fried pineapples,
honey bananas, almond cookies
and naturally the infamous for-
tune cookies.
Peking Palace also has a family
dinner menu for groups of people
up to six, with group choices and
suggestions for their food.
No matter what size group you
want to feed, make the ex-
perience a special one. Whether
the table is an intimate one for
two or a festive eight-seater, Pek-
ing Palace has an atmosphere
that's amenable to conversation
and elegant dining.
are well balanced and full bodied.
At approximately $14 a bottle it's
a solid buy.
Korbel, California � another
American, this time from the
west coast. A quality company.
Again, both the brut and dry are
very smooth, with a nicely round-
ed figure (The adjectives you can
use with wine!). With a price of
about $13 to $15 per bottle, it's a
matter of coastal preference and
availability, between the Korbel
and Great Western.
Codorniu � ahh, my favorite.
This savvy stuff hails from Spain
and one of the oldest, largest
vineyards in the world. Its bottle
is a dead-ringer for Dom
Perignon (a nice extra).
They have two bruts available,
which are basically identical, ex-
cept for the bottles and the price.
Extremely dry, but smooth and
full bodied. At $5 to $7 a bottle,
this is an impressive looking and
tasting bottle of wine � an ex-
cellent buy.
Asti Spumante � preferably
by the Fontanfredda company.
An Italian bubbly, not quite in
the category of champagne, but
quite popular, for some unknow n
reason.
This stuff is very sweet and will
give you the hangover of your
life, but it's a top seller, which
may be a reflection on the taste of
the American public, or perhaps
just superb suggestive selling.
Give the people what they want,
right? At $13 to $15 a bottle,
however, I'll remain a cheap
elitist.
Storing and Serving � Keeping
wine stored on it's side allows the
King
cork to remain damp and flexi-
ble. A dry cork will break
halfway out of the bottle, and or
allow air into the bottle, which
will trash any wine beyond
repair.
When opening a bottle of
champagne, be sure to keep a
cloth between the bubblv and
your hot little fingers, unless you
like throwing half your bottle
away on theatrics. Also, don't
pull the cork out all the way until
the said theatrics have done their
thing inside the bottle. Then,
you're on your own.
Choirs Proud To Sing ECU
M I News ftureau
The ECU Show and Jazz Choir
is featured in a musical and slide-
show presentation, "Proud to
Say East Carolina sponsored
by the ECU Alumni Association
and local alumni chapters in four
eastern North Carolina cities.
The first of the hour-and-a-
half presentations will be staged
tonight beginning at 6:15 p.m. at
Minges Coliseum. The shows will
be preceded by a pig-picking at
each location. Tickets are $5 for
adults and $2 for children and are
available through the alumni
association.
"Proud to Say East Carolina"
will be presented March 6 at
Athens Drive High School,
Raleigh; March 20 at Roland
Gnse School in Wilmington and
April 3 at Rocky Mount Senior
High School, Rocky Mount.
Talk On The Tombs
The European Studies Com-
mittee of ECU's College of Arts
and Sciences, will sponsor a slide
presentation and lecture Wednes-
day by renowned classicist
Nicholas Hammond.
Hammond, a retired professor
at the University of Bristol,
England, will lecture on Alex-
ander the Great and the Royal
Tombs of Virginia, according to
committee coordinator Dr.
Robert Thompson of the ECU
political science faculty. All in-
terested students, faculty and the
public are invited.
The presentation is Co
sponsored by the Department of
History. It is scheduled at 3 30
P.m. in B102, Brewster Building
4 Story
PI Nine .
: States celebrated the
anniversary ol theDeclara-
dependence � the la
. will,
BLOOM COUNTY
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OFESSIONAL NAIL SER.iCE

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Carolinian a
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jse calls ava
�TH TUTOR: Courses at a
-
it 756-18
tPING SERVICES 3es
papers f'eses
g -� z -a-a' ca
jded. Cir
CHEAPTYPING ec
eave a message
POR SALE
� ems worked
� workbook Make an A Ca
b at 752 2579 or 75g u
FOR SALE: 81 Pre e
nv( rtable
� blue, stereo anc a' 51,000
es, S4.300 negot able zr ass.
� nts a' si75 oer Ca
sm
R WASH rhe Sti � � Nati
. ironmenTai Heaitti Associal
' have a car wash zare m ss
c Marcr 1st a Arby 5
pass) from 10 a.rr

FOR SALE: 1980 Cut ass Si
F,v stere: casse'te AC PS
' DB :ruisetil1 S4 joc ca
-054
1 CUTLASS: Gooa conait on and a
ewel to or ve. You re gonna love
'his car1 Give rre a
pr.ce negotiable
WORD PROCESSING
BECKY LATHAM "52 59�8 8a"
p.m 17 yrs exper ence n typ
'heses, see � i repc
manuscripts, business ac form let
ters
NEED A D J.? Are fK ha r�g a
�. ana need a D JFor the bes'
'op 40. beach ana aao
Morgan at 758 7967 bet-ween 5 7 30
o.m Reasonable rates References
'�quest
I
.liinmiiniiii
I
SEMI
Not just for Spanish may
students and advanced p
BEGINNER OR ADVANCFr
same as a semester in a u S coi
Price nciudes iet rounc
New York room boa'C anc
piete Gove"rr,eo. grants anc
applied towards our progas
�10'WS
�' you would Wit information or. utur pJ
D�rm�n�n! M�0� bem
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
H-BRl ARY 25. IV86
r
For
nment
ka�jaw a
4 King
1?and

1
ng ECU
' r Eastaruhna"
ne Pre March 6 at
Athens Une High
Raleigh; March 20 al Roland
Gnse School in Wilmington and
3 at Rock. M �uni Senior
High School, Rocky Mount.
ombs
'erested students, faculty and the
public are invited.
The presentation is co-
sponsored bv the Department of
History. It is scheduled at 3 30
P.m. in B102, Brewster Building
A Story Of The American Constitution
UPI � Nine years ago, the
nited States celebrated the
'00th anniversary of the Declara-
tion of Independence � the laun-
hing, if you will, of the
BLOOM COUNTY
American ship of state. Next year
will come the bicentennial of the
Constitution, which is the engine
that saved that frail vessel from
disaster before it lasted two
decades, let alone two centuries.
And make no mistake, the
American experiment in
representative government was
headed for the rocks when the
by Berke Breathed
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Classifieds
ROFESSIONAL NAIL SERVICE:
ering manicures ana nail tips.
� off of the regular salon price.
e can 758 5065 Mention The
� Carolinian and receive a
ial surprise during your visit
se calls available
,ATH TUTOR: Courses at all levels
� : by math major. Reasonable
- Can Kevm at 756 1611 after
I PING SERVICES: Resumes,
papers, theses Low rates
lling and grammatical correc
?ns ncluded Cindy 757 0398 after
K) p.m.
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc can
58 6011 and leave a message
FOR SALE : Math Statistics 3228. All
� lems worked in current book
I workbook. Make an "A Call
ll 752 2579 or 758 1400
for SALE: 81 Honda Prelude con
sion convertable. White over
- blue, stereo and air. 51,000
$4,300 negotiable or assume
lymenls at $175 per month Call
'�ill
-R WASH: The Student National
ronmental Health Association
have a car washcare mission
c March 1st at Arby's (264
bypass) from 10 a.m. 2 p.m Come
� support!
FOR SALE: 1980 Cutlass Supreme
FM stereo cassette, AC, PS
nod PB, cruisetilt. $4,000. Call
355 6354
77' CUTLASS: Good condition and a
ewel to drive You're gonna love
this car! Give me a call at 757 1351
Price negotiable.
WORD PROCESSING: Contact
BECKY LATHAM 752 5998 (8a.m. 5
p m17 yrs experience in typing
'heses, scientific reports,
manuscripts, business and form let
rs.
NEED A D.J.?: Are you having a
part and need a D.J? For the best
m top 40, beach and dance, call
Morgan at 758 7967 between 5 7:30
p.m. Reasonable rates. References
on request
FOR SALE: Rechner chair good
shape ($50), l set of
HART SPOILER snow skiis fair
shape, with Salomon bindings and
trezeta boots, size 10 ' 2 poles
.$100) Emerald engagement ring
for sale (2.200 or 2.000 cash) Must
sell all items
ALTERATIONS: Thrift Shop 429
Evans St Special of this week will
be: coats $2. womens iackets 50c.
ladies blouses 3 pcs. for $1, men's
shirts 3 pcs. for $1, skirts $1 or S2
ieans $1, ladies pants $1, beautiful
suits $5-$10, ladies coats $5.
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICE: Word processing. The
Dataworks specializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertations,
theses, resume's and more All work
is computer checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary Rates
are as low as $1 75 per page, in
eluding paper (call for specific
rates) Call Mark at 757 3440 after 7
p.m
JUNIORS, SENIORS, AND GRAD
STUDENTS: Internships available
with Fortune 500 Company Earn
$9 $12 per hour Call 355 7700
TYPING: All your typing needs
done by a professional secretary
Call Dons at 355 2510 after 6 p.m
TAXES: Will do your taxes or
reasonable rates. Ten years ex
pehence Call Doris at 355 2510 after
6 p.m
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. Elec
tronic typewriter Reasonable rates
Call Jamce at 355 7233 after 530.
UNITS AVAILABLE: At Ringgold
Towers. Shared occupancy or single
occupancy Call Estate Realty Co
830 1040
20 PERCENT SPECIAL DISCOUNT
SALE: On Vintage clothing,
iewelry, art and collectables at Uni
quely Yours 903 Dickinson Ave. By
the yellow awning. Open TuesSat.
11 5.
Please see page 10
University Optometric Eye Clinic
DR. DENNIS O'NEAL

Comprehensive Eye Examinations
Contact Lenses
Soft, Hard, Gas Permeable Tinted �p"mie ���
Extended Wear, Contacts for Astigmatism
Glasses (One Day Service in Most Cases J
Student & Faculty Discounts on Contacts &
Glasses
Convenient to Campus
Evening & Sat Appointments Available
612 E. 10th Street
(Across from campus security)
758-6600

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SEMESTER IN SPAIN
Not just for Spanish majors only, but for everyone beginners, "in between
students, and advanced Put some excitement into your college career!1
BEGINNER OR ADVANCED - Cost is about the
same as a semester m a U S college S3 480
Price includes jet round trip to Seville from
New York. room, board and tuition com-
plete Government grants and loans may be
applied towards our programs
F8
pgc vou atipd
�0U' "S"C
cese" '�p�' aid'es
It you would iik information on tutura programs giw
parmanani addraas batow
vou' p'�ar- si'ei address
HI HIT
�?���������������������
Live with a Spanish family attend classes
four hours a day. four days a week, four
months Earnl6hrs of credit (equivalent to 4
semesters taught m U S colleges over a two
year time span) Your Spanish studies will be
enhanced by opportunities not available in a
US classroom Standardized tests show our
students language skills superior to students
completing two year programs in U S
Advanced courses also
Hurry, it takes a lot of time to make all ar-
rangements
SPRING SEMESTER � Jan 30 - May 29
FALL SEMESTER - Aug 29 - Dec 19
each year
FULLY ACCREDITED - A Program of Trinity
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SEMESTER IN SPAIN
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(A Program of Trinity Christian College)
�afl
JKa
umimimmi
J
framers of the Constitution
gathered in Philadelphia in the
spring of 1787.
Christopher and James Lin-
coln Collier begin Decision in
Philadelphia with a survey of the
national condition under the Ar-
ticles of Confederation, and a
hair-raising tale it is.
Some of the problems have a
curiously contemporary ring: "In
1785, Algerians captured two
ships and held their crews and
passengers for ransom. The
United Stales, with its finances in
disarray, could offer only $200
per man. The Dey of Algiers
sneered at the offer and the
prisoners languished in jail, some
of them dying of the plague
Meanwhile, the British and
Spanish were hovering on the
frontier and inciting Indian tribes
to border warfare. Farmers in
western Massachusetts, crushed
by debt, took arms under Daniel
Shays in the winter of 1787. The
state militia put down Shays'
Rebellion (the U.S. Army
numbered about 700), but the
uprising scared the rice powder
out of bewigged gentlemen from
Boston to Charleston.
Having set this stage, the Col-
liers introduce and profile the
men sent by the 12 states (Rhode
Island, suspicious that its
sovereignty was about to be
deflowered, sent no one) to
Philadelphia to repair the Ar-
ticles.
There is George Washington,
who would have preferred to tend
his crops at Mount Vernon and
gave no speeches until the last
day of the convention; little
James Madison, who arrived
with a blueprint and took notes
on what happened; egotist
Charles Pinckney, who the
authors suggest may have in-
vented the presidency and the
two-house Congress; rough-hewn
and puritanical Roger Sherman,
who came up with the idea of
basing the House on population
and giving each state an equal
vote in the Senate; and James
Mason, who trusted no one and
fought to the last day for a Bill of
Rights the Constitution.
book is a celebration of
the genius of the framers, but it
also ticks off their mistakes, not
the least of which was countenan-
cing slavery and failing to see it as
the time bomb it was.
.
�- - -r
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I HI- EAS1 i AROI IMAN
Sports
FEBRUARY iy IV86 Page 8
C41 Co- Champs
Women Knock Off
18th-Ranked JMU
Jl HIMIHI! Ifer t�i i arnliaaii
lma Bethea (30) goes hih for the opening tap as Loraine Foster (13)
awaits the outcome in last night's action.
Buc Comeback Fails;
Mason Downs Pirates
B SCOTT COOPER
gamt
-IlOUk
So
Rick V Is
P rate
Masoi
in a CAA
Va
I
clinched the third spot in the con-
ferenc . le witl
the feated GMl
in Ming
year (75-67 15)
Foi the m pai the .
a � e ' teams grabbed
28 rebounds and committed 13
turnovers. Howe ei. VI i
tough. .
to overcome, accordinj
( hat Harris
"They aking pt
shots a '
an. igh to beat, espet
� al Harrison said.
"Ricky Wilson and Rob Rose
the played well, as I knew they
would in their las! home game "
George Mason rallied first as
the opened a 28-24 lead with
5:37 left in the opening period.
However, the Pirates responded
and tied the game (28-28)
moments later on a Leon Bass
jumper.
The Patriots later opened a
three-point lead (34-311 late in the
period on a Robe Rose jumper,
but Bass' free throws with 1:20
left gave ECU a 35-34 advantage.
This was the first Pirate lead in
the ballgame.
Earl Moore, who connected on
six of eight shots from the floor,
played a big role in the Mason
victory. He scored the final four
points of the half, giving the
Patriots a 38-35 lead at the inter-
mission.
In the second half, Scot: Hai
d 's follow k his own miss
lead to one, while Keith
Sledge's jumper gave ECU a
. . . � lead 44-43 with 14:51 left to
Pa ots, behind their
� d support ol 2,000
plus, managed to outscore the
ites 10-0 over a run that lifted
GMU to a 58-16 advantage.
Mason increased I e - lead to its
largest (a; 13.
I 1 � with 4:35 re
lining, before ECl began its
comeback.
The Bucs managed to hold the
Patriots scoreless the rest of the
a as It l had a chance to win
the final buzzer.
Marchell Henn, started the
ick while two Manuel
tes Baskets cut the margin to
70-63. Vanderhorsi and Sledge
� led long jumpshots
�re a William Grady steal and
slam dunk trimmed the Mason
adavtage to just one, 70-69 with
:22 seconds left.
Although the Patriots missed
ir fifth-straight front end of a
one-and-one, the Bucs could not
manage to sink the winning
basket as GML won 70-69.
Kenny Sanders and Moore
chipped in 15 and 12 points
respectively. Rob Rose added 10
and a game-high 10 rebounds for
the Patriots.
The Pirates were led by
Henry's 20 points. Vanderhorsi
added 16 while Bass chipped in 11
and Jones had eight. Hardy
scored only four, but handed out
six assists and surpisingly grabb-
ed a team-high six rebounds.
Check Thursday's edition of
the The East Carolinian for last
night's losing results of the
Pirates matchup at James
Vladison.
William Grady (40) throws down in Minges
JM t.l,TCiE'SS n � 'votimm
By TIM CHANDLER
IfrWHHflllM
The Lady Pirates claimed a tie
for the CAA regular season with
their 63-59 victory over James
Madison last night.
The Dukes entered the game
11-0 in the conference and 24-2
overall, and were ranked No. 18
among women's Division-
NCAA teams. Each team finishes
its conference schedule with a
record 11-1, as the Pirates have a
26-6 overall record.
A coin toss will he held today
in the CAA commissioner's of-
fice to decide which team will get
a first-round bye in the con
ference tournament which begins
Friday in Wilmington.
The Pirates, who were playing
in front of their largest home
crowd of the year, got off to a
fast start as they took a 4-0 lead
on Alma Bethea's 17-foot jump
shot with 18:1" left in the first
half.
The Dukes fought back. A
Donna Budd layup with 7:44 left
in the half gave JMl a 16-12
lead. Then the Pirates rattled off
10 straight points to take a 22-16
lead with 4:23 remaining in the
first period.
Thanks to great defensive play,
the Pirates took home a 26-21
halftime advantage. The Duke-
managed to -hoot only 33 percent
from the floor in the first half.
while the Bucs went 12 of 24 for
an even 50-percent mark.
The second half began with the
same aggressiveness that marked
the first. Sylvia Bragg connected
on a layup with 19:04 remaining
in the game, but thai was the iast
score for the Pirates for nearly
five-and-a-half minutes.
James Vladison ran off 10
straight points to obtain a 33-30
lead with 13:59 to play. The
Dukes built their lead to a main
as five points (39-34), with just
over 11 minutes to play before
the Pirates began to make their
move.
Bragg connected on a 17-foot
jumper with 9:48 to play,
boosting the Bucs back into the
lead 40-39. But the Dukes
managed to regain the advantage
once again, and stretched their
lead to three points (45-42) on a
layup by Betsy VVitman with 6:26
to play.
Then the Pirates ran off eight
straight, taking a lead they never
relinquished.
ECU stretched its lead to as
many as nine points (62-53) with
only :41 seconds left to play.
The Pirates improved on a lot
of the statistics that haunted
them in their earlier loss to the
Dukes (82-55 on Jan. 27). One
important change came in the re-
bounding department, as the
Pirates snagged 31 boards com-
pared to only 24 for JMU.
The Bucs also shot much better
form the free-throw line. Head
coach Emily Manwaring said that
ihe team really practiced them
(foul shots) a lot in the past cou-
ple of weeks. The Pirates con-
ected on on 17 of 21 chances at
the charity stripe, for a game
average of 81 percent.
Coach Manwaring commented
on the aggressiveness of the
game.
"It was a monster of an ag-
gressive game declared Man-
waring.
Manwaring also stated that the
win was a moral victory for ECU.
"We proved we could play
with them said Manwaring,
"that we could compete with a
top-20 team
For Manwaring, this was the
first time she had defeated an
NCAA-ranked team while at
ECU. She said that the game was
the most exciting one of her
career.
The Pirates were paced by
three double-figure scorers. Lisa
Squirewell and Sylvia Bragg led
the way with 16 apiece, and Alma
Bethea added another 14.
Loraine Foster chipped in nine
for the Bucs, while Delpine
Mabry and Monique Pompili ad-
ded four points each.
Last night's game was the last
regular-season action for four of
the Lady Pirates. They were Lisa
Squirewell, Sylvia Bragg, Loraine
foster and Therese Durkin. Each
of them were presented with a
plaque and a boquet of flowers
before the game.
Squirewell stated at the end ol
the game that it had been the
longest day of her life.
"1 kept looking at the clock
thinking it (the game) would
never end Squirewell said. She
also said that she feels that tins
year's team is more complete
than last vear's.
"We wanted to make a state-
ment tonight and we did added
Squirewell.
Live Broadcast
Lad) Pirate fans should take
notice that ECU'S tournament
action will be broadcast on the
airwaves of WZMB-FM, 91.3.
Mike McVey and Spike Harward
will be bringing the live plav-bv-
play action from Wilmington.
Sat Feb. 22, 1986
The Lady Pirates set the stage
tor their showdown, on Monday
night with James Vladison for the
CAA regular-season title, with an
impressive "8-46 win over the
Patriots of George .Mason on
Saturday night.
The final score was verv in-
dicative of the way the game
went, as the Pirates led the entire
wav.
Loraine Foster's 15-foot jump
shot with 18:10 left in the first
half put the Pirates up 4-2, and
from there thev continued to
build.
Bv halftime the Pirates had
built a convincing 19-point lead,
41-22. Foster and Alma Bethea
paved the way in the first half as
Foster chipped in 12 and Bethea
countered with 10 points of her
own.
The second half began with the
Pirates using a tenacious full-
court press that resulted in eight-
straight points for ECU, as they
increased their lead to 27 (49-22).
The Pirates' biggest lead of the
night came on a 20-foot jumper
by Cathy Ellis. That basket gave
the Pirates a 37-point lead (76-39)
with 2:09 left in the game.
The Pirates managed to get 10
Monique Pompili (14i and teammates celebrate their 63-59 victorj over
18th-ranked James Vladison in last night's regular-season finale.
CAA Champions
Swim Independents
By DAVID McGINNESS
The CAA-champion Pirate
swimmers are gearing up for their
final competition of the 1985-86
season, the National Independent
swim meet in Columbia. S.C
this Thursdav. Friday and Satur-
dav.
See LADIES, page 9
Rick Kobe
All 17 of the men (including
three divers) who traveled to the
championships in Wilmington
contributed points, and all 14 of
the swimmers made the finals in
their events. 12 made qualifica-
tion times for the Independent
Nationals. They are: Bruce
j Sports Fact
Tues. Feb. 25. 1961
St. Bonaventure's basketball
team losses to Niagara, 88-77,
snapping their impressive
streak of 99 consecutive wins at
home.
US the Patriots prepared
3.&ZOC-AH
OAMBPLAN i.
lx x X X. X
OOOOOr
lit
tw&
� i- College ess Se'vce
Brockschmidt, Ron Fleming, Lee
Hicks, Keith Kaut, Kevin
Hidalgo. David Robaczewski,
Eric Hawkins, v Smith, Strai
Smith, Patrick Brennan, Jet;
Brown and David Killeen
Now these twelve must ti
at their peak form for the se-
cond time this season ltl ough
the pressure will be somewhat less
than it was during the . tour-
nament, this will be the fastest
meet that the Pirates have ever
participated in.
" rhis is our first time for this
meet said Pirate coach Rick
Kobe, "and it's the taste one
we've ever been to
The Pirate's competition will
include: Miami, So. Illinois (both
ranked top 10 in the U.S.), S.
Carolina. Fla. State, Tulane,
Cincinnatti, Old Dominion,
Louisville, Va. Tech and
Miss.
In previous years, the Buc
swimmers have competed in the
Eastern Regionals. However,
that meet has been diminishing in
prestige over the last few years,
losing some of its strongest com-
peting teams. ECU jumped at the
chance to compete in the faster
Independent Nationals.
Although Kobe hopes his men
will be able to do well in the meet.
"knowing that they gave all thev
had to give in the CAA cham-
pionships he believes that this
competition should serve as a
learning experience.
"We'regoing donn there to
swim well and swim against
some of the fastest teams in
the country. "
�Rick Kobe
AND IF ALL ELSE FAILS WE CAN SAY WE WERE ON UBUGS
"We're not reallv worried
about the score Kobe said
"we're going down there to swim
well and swim against some of
the fastest teams in the country
We'll make plans to be reallv
competitive next year
One swimmer, in particular,
will be trying to put in his best
performance of the vear Bruce
Brockschmidt has a chance to
make the qualification times for
the NCAA National Champion-
ships.
TJl100 bark-
ed. He s (Brocksemidt) got a
chance though. He wasn't pushed
at all in the conference meet, and
wiU be held in a faster pool
against much faster competition
He will need to swim faster just
to make the finals " J
. Tonight at 6:00 pm on channel
nine, WNCT-TV's sports ancho
Greg Kerr will be featuring the
conference champ Pirates and
their coach, discussing their bsm
ner season.
IRS
The
Intramural R
swimi
lull
UK
LambdaI
the nit:
awav
wins ,��
powered I �
women
point �
finished se
Altl
past he
Dave 1 ea
Sid Dob)
sue '
year
I
V
The Eastern Carolina RUt
Cherry Point Vlarine Air Stal
Ladies Pom
( ontinued from pay
players
totals and
in the :
Three plaj
double figures. I .
and Bethea w th 14
and Sylvia Bra.
Lisa Su .
P
Miami
Recruit
Signs
The Pii
up another
earlier this wee!
total number
grants-in-aid bv 1
ECU sigr.ee
Miami, Fla. I
senior from Mia
School is a
Tynes -
10 players Dade (
The Miami Herald
The highlj
should
the Buc d
assistant c
"he's the best hitter we've $t
among
The Pira
remaining gra s year, b
are not e:
the next few davs
Tuesday, February 25, 1
Admission: S
Wednesday, February 26,
Admission $1
io
3mN�W� �
� -





V
tes celel
63-5 vieton �er
�avon finale.
ampions
dependents
J e 11
:vei

let
Si
M �Oilf (OHT! �7ier? fo
rn well and swim against
some of the fastest teams in
the country. "
� Rick Kobe
: ied
the score K be aid,
"v-e're going dov Aim
well and swsm aga ime of
the fastest teams in the country.
We'll make plans to be really
competitive next year
One swimmer, in particular,
will be trying to put in his best
performance of the year. Bruce
Brockschmidt has a chance to
make the qualification times for
the NCAA National Champion-
ships.
"It'll be tough Kobe remark-
ed, "He's (Brockscmidt) got a
chance though. He wasn't pushed
at all in the conference .ieet, and
this will be held in a faster pool
against much faster competition.
He will need to swim faster just
to make the finals
Tonight at 6:00 pm on channel
nine, WNCT-TV's sports anchor
Greg Kerr will be featuring the
conference champ Pirates and
their coach, discussing their ban-
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 23, 1986
IRS Competitions Results
The 1986 Department of
Intramural-Recreational Services
,wimming meet was an activity
uli ol iccord-breiikingaction.
asatttetteRoth.
I ambda Chi Alpha dominated
men's division swimming
with seven individual-event
eta lau -lpha over-
wered their opponents in the
men's division with a 120
point total, larvis Wonderfish
finished second with 29 points.
Although the records of years
-as! held true in the men's dii-
. I ambda Chi lpha, led by
e least, Rob Newman and
Dobrin made a gallant and
. cessful effort at capturing this
. s title with 61 meet points.
The men from Phi Kappa Tau
took second place in the meet
with 40 points, but came away
with the top total in the in-
tramural point-standings race.
Tau Kappa Epsilon placed third,
followed by Delta Sigma Phi.
Jean Keating led her team,
Zeta Tau Alpha, to all but two
event titles. Her team broke two
previous East Carolina in-
tramural records while she
smashed individual records of her
own. In the 50-yd. backstroke,
Keating got her name in the
record books with a 31.80 time -
two seconds faster than previous
record holder Beth Carroll. The
100-yd. Freestyle event belonged
to Keating as she touched under
one minute with a time of 59.46 -
only four seconds off the Na-
tional Intramural record held by
Kansas State. Zeta Tau Alpha
eliminated Alpha Delta Pi and
the Jarvis Wonderfish from the
record books in the 200-yd.
medley- and freestyle- relays.
The Intramural powerlifting
meet, sponsored by Golds Gym
was also a huge success with two
new records in the men's divi-
sion. Robert Washington over-
powered all of his opponents to
win the men's overall. Terry
Long is no longer the strongest
man from East Carolina as
Washington squated an amazing
675 lbs. and dead-lifted 710 lbs.
Teresa Connolly captured the
overall women's title weighting in
at a light 123 lbs. Lisa Waiser
won the 124-132 class, Diane
L ndsford took the 142-161 class
anc Becky Clark won the 162-up
weight class.
Other powerlifters showed
their stuff with the support of an
enthusiastic crowd. Congratula-
tions to the following men who
captured individual titles: Greg
Lipe, John Barns, Jim White,
Willie Lewis, Sam Miller, David
Stevens, and Walter Bryant.
The dates have changed for the
upcoming intramural backpack-
ing trip to the Uwarric National
Forest near Asheboro, North
Carolina. The hike, along the
Dutchman's Creek Trail will
begin Sal April 15. The group
will leave Fri April 14 and
return the 16th. The $30.00
registration fee covers transpor-
tation, tent, sleeping bags, cook
sets, water bottles and trail
meals.
For more information regar-
ding pre-registration deadlines
and the pre-trip meeting, contact
the Outdoor Recreation Center in
room 115 Memorial Gym.
YOU
DESERVE THE
BEST
Would 10 Lbs.
Make A
Difference?
H So, Coll
The Diet Center
Today And You
Can Be 10 Lbs.
Thinner By Spring Break
IT 'Mf i0.
A
Ste,
DIET
CENTER
&
103 Oakmont Protottional Plato
Caroline Worthington
B S (Foods & Nutnt.on)
756-8545
Lmdo Lynn Tnpp,
B.S. B A , M A Ed
(Counseling)
sss�iXii5�5��i
Rugby Club Tops
Cherry Point Team
See For Yourself
I he r astern Carolina Rutib club in
( htrr Point Marine Air Station.
action last weekend against
Ladies Pound Madison
( ontinued from pae M
in the scoring
4 playei - sa� ac-
he w a with
rhe were Foster
. i 14 points each,
ai t ith 13.
i jwell added
e Mabr
nine
con-
Miami
Recruit
Signs
i
e Football team pickd
er freshman recruit
� is eek, bringing the
n urn her of players given
m-aid by ECU 10 27.
signed Ernest Tynes of
i la. The 5-10, 170-pound
� from Miami Beach High
is a defensive back.
I) lies was voted one of the top
players in Dade County by
I he Miami Herald.
I he highly recruited back
i prove immediate help to
Buc defensive secondary as
istant coach Don Powers feels,
the best hitter we've seen
ng defensive backs
The Pirates have now have two
anting grants this year, but
not expected to use them in
next few davs.
tributed seven. Also scoring were
Therese Durkin and Jody Rodri-
guez with six each, and Gretta
O'Neil with Five points. Roun-
ding out the scoring for ECU
were Cathy Ellis and Chris
O'Connor with two points
apiece.
The Pirates grabbed 44 re-
bounds for the game while the
Patriots had only 35.
The Patriots did manage to ob-
tain a better shooting percentage
than the Pirates as they put in
44.7 percent of their field goals
compared to only 40.8 percent
for the Pirates. The Pirate
defense proved a factor in the win
as they forced George Mason into
35 turnovers.
Bv BILL Z1MMERMANN
(nalrtbatliii Writer
The Rugby Club opened its
spring season with a solid win
over their down east rival, the
Cherry Point Marine Air Station
Rugby team.
The game was held in "perfect
rugby weather" at the air station
in Havelock, as the Bucs downed
their marine opponents.
The fired-up marines scored
the first two try's of the game
with heads-up play and excellent
passing on the wing. They con-
verted only one of their extra-
point attempts, giving Cherry-
Point a quick 10-0 lead.
But the boys from Greenville
did not give up. With good
defense, the ruggers kept the ball
in marine territory during the re-
mainder of the first half � giving
them excellent field-goal range.
After Mike Brown converted
two field goals, Wales England
native Doug Eckley ended the
half with a 30-meter drop kick,
putting the score at 10-9 at the
half.
In the second half, the marines
were out for blood. Cherry Point
came close on several attempts,
but just couldn't put the ball in
the try zone, due to the Bucs
tenacious defense. On one at-
tempt, the Marines had the ball in
the try .one, but were denied a
score, due to the fact that the ball
must touch the ground with
downward pressure on it.
Brown then scored his third
field-goal of the day, giving the
Bucs a 12-10) advantage. With
two minutes left, Eckley iced the
game with an impressive drop
kick, making the final margin
15-10.
Unfortunately, the game was
not without injuries. Brown was
put out with a bruised kidney as
Rick Musgrove suffered a twisted
knee. Both will miss the UNC
game this weekend.
The match with UNC-CH this
Saturday will take place at the
corner of Fifth St. and Memorial
Dr. at 11:30 a.m. The Rugby
Club would appreciate your sup-
port.
Pollution
costs us
millions
each year.
& Kappa Sigma
Present
DRAFT NITE
Tuesday, February 25, 1986
Admission: $1.50 Guys
9:00-1:00 AM
$1.00 Ladies
10C Draft All Nite
& Sigma Tau Gamma
Present
DRAFT NITE
Wednesday, February 26,1986
Admission $1.50 Guys
9:00-1:00 AM
$1.00 Ladies
net season.
L
1 (K Draft All Nite
on All Frames, Sunglasses,
and Contact Lenses
Everyday.
Sou. tfrnr uv MO kuon, ft orta 8UU dittaenl trames w Jok:
mwn ji evcrda savings �t .Wt W afl regular recuJ pnee. The
hyc Sac at rhc PUca. ani Ttr fcye Care Center at the Tfcn Anne
Iri aJdiar, eve evaminatmns are j.adat at The bye Care Caiier
No appmrtmen neusar. Call faf cum hnus
eve si



i
i






It Plaa
t�)t "VT



i


0F1OMC1NC
�E CARE GCHTCR
I-or Frame Selection and Ke txaminations:
2ZS i.rrrnilk Kld iTipton Vnnci)
Phone 75-404
)r. Peter Hollis
O.D.
P.A.




i
�9SSK?iSS�9�l�
Opportunity
Challenge .
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s &' �� r j o
cS s5V t�T
i-fj' Mi (X lite
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4109 Wake Forest Road
Suite 202
Raleigh, NC 27609
Call collect:
(919)85o-4012
Air Force Officer Training School
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Find out how you can put your col-
lege degree to work for you and
your country. AIM HIGH. See
your nearest Air Force recruiter
today.
your
in a
� � ��
I





10
HI EAST R u N1S
( onlinutd Iroin l'a)i� 7
WORD PROCESSING We Offer ex
ence in Spun resumes these;
lechn cal dot uments a id f
� �- a � na lage a id nei ge �
names and addressee I i erged
ettei s labels ei metope: lode
cards Oui . � in extremely
i easonable ai I vi ilways � ��
I to EC! � '
& F Pi ofessional i p to
back of F ranklin s) 115 i
'57 j
SENIORS' SENIORS' SENIORS'
isl phasi .
are men 1 s & F
ters s offet ng a pat kage .
. . � , �.
1 the 1 ��� �'�
ility typed ��- v -
. � . � ad
ettei � " . a ty
pes wvitl npany

i � Everytl . � � � �
. � � �� si i of
panies sent to il � � .
.
esume
' ipply 1
a- �� � est I . � �
� �
esumes ���� I �� � I
� � � . i � 2 page re;
� . rhisoffi
. � �.
East Fifl
N
WANTED
HELP AANTED
- �
a
ROOMMATE WANTED
� " I
ROOMMATE NEEDED
HELP WANTED
RIDE NEEDED
ARE YOU A FUTURE BUSIN;
LEADER'
' �� ' kinqtcf � :� '

�-
ROOMMATE WANTED
LOST A
� . . .
LOST
. � �� �� .
��"�
� - � � �
RIDE NEEDED � for a I if 1
' � � � � pi .��'��� A
Day par' f thega ' . - � �
?or Dan
PERSONALS
HAPPY HOUR DIDN T DIE
:a 4 un
B y o b
PHI TAU BROTHERS AND LIT
TLE SISTERS New
auction Tues a 8 30 Fav: � r
beverage ur - led afti rwar �� �
:� � � � baskei � . � � � -1
11 00!
SUB SIRHfl
Every Tuesday
is
College Night
Free Delivt � �
for $5.00 A
Over Pun hases
7 p.m. to 11 p.m.
99C SUBS
Your Choice
Hum & ('heese
Bologna &heese
Hum, Salami & C heese
Pepperoni, Salami &heese
Turkey & Che
Hum, Turkey & (heese
Not valid on deliveries
60 or. pitchers SI.99
II � m II pm 15i :i� :i him
I I Hkl K
CHI o new
Spi ing � v � � Bra
da Hughes Paul i Pi

Storcl
PANTANA BOB S 10
I Breat party. 1
e Inesda i night!
i � . � eak. $2 I
NiGI

NEED A RIDE TO MIAMI FOR
SPRING BREAK'
I a bus. I1 � �
li �
LAST CHANCE '
,���� tu li
. . � � �
ALPHA XI DELTA Would like to
� iui new SISTERS1
� Bissette Wendy Croom,
en Edgerton, Clark Green,
a Hughes Tanya Hall, Kim
; � � - � am Maryot Kent,
.selma Kim Palmer
Angie Phillips Amanda Roberts and
A' itney Sm tl
HAPPY HOUR PRICES' 32 02
" i; botl eei ;sc so
' Cubbies Tues
I eb 25 9pm la m Happy
� � CSOTA
SRA PRESENTS "ALOHA
PARADISE"
it the Holiday Ini Friday Feb 28th
- . � Bus serv e will be
, � k e t' any do r n
� � Fel 25th Come oui
CONGRATULATIONS NEW PHI
TAU I IL SISTERS induct
will be Tues nite at 8 IS at
Mouse Wear a ni e skirl or dress and
be prepared tor the PARTY after
wards
CHI OS We're looking forward
oui social with you an on Wednei
irty Pika
PIKA'S O �
to par 1 we an'1 A.i '
Chi O's
NUGENE. LOUD HAWAII.
WOMAN AND 7 T S Mi
f eb I7th by the river and at Gi
� ebrating thi 200tl � i . � ary I
Moison ind � B day Fh� ill
life w,is heav a If th
� ar not too light T k t S ai �� thebi
Laura Lou
GOLDEN GROOVERS
party and need a D
funli beai h, rock a
Musi and light! � ih
T ASHMAN I I
ai , where
AOTT HAPPY HOUR
� � . � '�
9 1
AOT '
KAPPA SIGMA LITTLE SISTERS
. � ' AY
to I � ��.�
ey foi I s
CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS I,
� �
. , � .
I v 8 6 B i ne ei
Hardi I 757
BFL isfui
, wer e then h rai
ht 1 m o f h S � - r hei
���'� , � � �
e w
A
� " . � � �. ,
he Brail ana
� � evei e the mi
fake off y
.��� . � � .
� �
DONNA PRATT It dn �
ft etheari w� s,g
F P
SIG EP GOLDEN HEARTS
the supermarket- fM
aiul OHM X1V �!
See Store For Details.
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli, Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality.
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRESH
Fryer Leg Qtrs
10 lbs. or
limit one
DIET PEPSI � PEPSI FREE � MTN DEW
Pepsi Cola
liter
bottle
99
0
PURE CANE
Dixie
Crystals
JUICY SWEET
Florida Oranges
o fe 1? PR
LIQUID
Purex Bleach
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADOmONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
RN
PLAIN OR SELF RISING
Red Band Flour
BUTTER � REGULAR
Crisco Shortening
"OlCE WITH AN
I3.b. M
LIMIT ONE OF YOUR CHOICE WITH AN
ADDITIONAL PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY . OW CH . t
703 Greenville Blvd Greenville, N.C. OPEN 24 HOURS
OPEN Mom. 7 AM
CLOSE Sat. 11 RM. OPEN SUNDAYS 7 - til IF"





Title
The East Carolinian, February 25, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 25, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.459
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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