The East Carolinian, February 18, 1986






She
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
ol.60o.3tt- � ?
Tuesday, February 18, 1986
Greenville, N.C
10 Pages
Circulation 12.000
Weddington,SchIafly Debate;
Abortion Point Of Contention
ByPATTIKFMMIS
The right to equal pay. the
right to abort a fetus, and the
success of Reaganomics were
among the topics argued not only
by the debators, but also b the
audience Monday night iri Hen-
drix Theatre.
The debators. Phyllis Schlafly
and Sarah Weddington, discuss-
ed everything from the appoint-
ment of Supreme Court Judges to
the number of sex partners a h
school student has or should
have. The debate, sponsored by
the ECU Student Union forum
Commute, was held Monday
night at 8:00 in Hendnx Theatre
and witnessed bv a near capac
crowd.
Sarah Weddington, chief ass -
tant to Jimmy Carter tor
Women's and Minority Affairs,
is a foremost attorney in the
feminist movement not to men-
tion the victorious lawyer in the
Supreme Court case legalizing
abortion. She stresses women no
longer want the "American Kit-
chen "Women todav want
education for their children, de-
cent housing, and good jobs
summed Weddington.
Schlafly stressed the women in
America are luckv that they are
regarded so highly and not forced
out into the work field. She
reportedOur status of women
makes us unlike almost any other
sountrv Schlafly, a top ranked
woman on the Republican com-
mittee, noted author oi main
�ks including several against
ERA, continued throughout the
debate to cntize the women's
movement and defend President
Reagan.
One of the many topics which
was brought up several times was
abortion. "1 believe in maximum
choice, as long as it's not killing
anyone else argued Schlaflv.
But when, argued Weddington.
did the fetus become a human?"
Weddington stressed she did
think the father should be involv-
ed in the decision, but that the
final choice should be to the
woman since "the greatest im-
pact is cm her bodv and life
Schlaflv argued "neither man
nor women should have that
choice
Although the use of contracep-
tives is one wav to avoid the
possibility oi requiring an abor-
tion, Schlaflv ngly
against the distr ibuti m
traceptives in public
Wedding i .
ing oi no sch hich
provided such devic
� �
ed the giou
believes infu
to al fly came
right back �
� is still a
W eddington sumn
men: bv
was ma I
jus' go
it wa
The subie f Rea
opened mam
Weddii g'
e DEBATE pa 5
Ratings Based on Teacher Evaluations
The Battle Is Joined
I H Ml MRr HI
I br k marnlimsn
Phvllis Schlafly and arah Weddington squared oft in a debate
Monday night in Hendriv I heater. Weddington is the foremost at-
torney in the feminist movement and Schlafly is the leading oppo-
nent of the ERA. For further details see the related story on page 1.
By JENNIFER MYERS
Miff ttnlcr
Beginning this Apt il EC!
students will be able I
university teachers eacl
instead of once a year. leather
evaluations are used I
determine a p r o f e
classroom performai ce
The Institutional Research
Center distributes, collects.
processes the forms. The results
are seen only b the individual
teacher and the chairman o that
department.
fash department on campus
an ECU Faculty Code, which
is a poliv sta'mg how much
evaluations weigh: in rating the
tructor along with other fac-
tors sucl .is :eaJc effec-
tiveness and publications oi the
instructor, or other criteria
depending on the department.
According to Dean olpe,
: � Academic Ai'airs. "The
evaluations are used for feedback
on the individual teacher, to le'
him or her know the strong and
weak points, a . te is
doing. The evaluations are also a
means of letting the department
chairman know the teaching
fectiveness of the instructor. I: is
one important but small part oi
the teacher
These evaluations plav an im-
portant part in the ratings of eac I
teacher. According to Ussery,
"the personnel divisions oi each
department are required to use
the evaluations to some extent,
along with other information, in
evaluating each teacher. The si .
dent plays an important role
this. h e v
opportunity
ice.
Wed � -one else
it 'hese e
� 1 hej are the n 51 .om-
petair judg luse they ki ��
.
-
ne can ai
like the
Ussery stated that 1 a
evaluai
ner. ECU use
trdized ai
Plan Ensures Best Educators;
Scholarships For Brightest Campus Will Enforce Law
Bv MIKFLtDWK k
Nr�s Fditor
A loca ed cat 1 � .
present lawmake
multi-million dollar pi in 1
sure that North arolii
have "the be j 1 .
public scho tea
future
Jay Robinson, sl-
ot' the Charlotte-Mecklenburg
county schools; is devising a
scholarship program for high
school students who wait! to
become public school ;cachcrs.
Charles Coble, dean of the
School of Education here at
ECU, said he thinks the idea is a
good one and would support such
a project.
"1' sounds like of good idea
event hough there are limited
funds; it would highlight the im-
portance ol teacher education
Coble said. Moreover, he added
the scholarships would .is' as a
lighthouse tor other students
According to Coble, other
states have tried simular projects
and that they have worked except
for a few problems. One ol those
problems Coble said is the pro-
bability of a student who started
college intending to tead: chang-
ing his or hers maior.
"It has been suggested to give
scholarships to those people who
have already entered the upper-
division of teacher education in
order to combat the problem
students changing their majors
Coble said in a telephone inter-
v lew .
V �� ;eiess. Coble said the
is to keep the esteem ot the
teaching profession rising, and
" e proposed scholarships
. : an idication of the rising
esteem accorded to teachers and
'iie teaching profession.
"1 teel like we need to do
something pretty dramatic in
order o start attracting bright,
talented public school teachers
Robinson said Monday, "I here
is going to be a real shortage in
both numbers and quality
1 he project, which he hopes to
introduce to the General
Assemblv this year, calls for
awarding scholarships to 500
qualified high school seniors each
vear. The students would each
receive $5,000 a year during their
lour vears of college.
The state would guarantee the
teaching scholars jobs after
graduation, and, in return the
tents would agree to teach in
North Carolina public schools
for at least five years.
"We've got to offer scholar-
ships competitive with the best
scholarships if we want to attract
some of the best and brightest in-
to teaching he saidYou can't
offer a $1,000 scholarship and be
competitive
North Carolina will need as
many as 38,000 teachers, one
estimate says, at a time when
universities and teaching colleges
are producing fewer teachers
The state's recently approved
basic education plan calls for
16,000 more teachers m addition
to replacing retiring teachers,
whose number "will be larger
than ever in the i980 Robin-
son said.
"With the magic 30-year retire-
ment benefit cycle coming up,
with the basic education plan,
plus increasing student enroll-
ment, you see a decreasing
number of good teachers
Robinson said. "I think it's an
absolute design for disaster not to
respond to those clear signs
"I think this is obviously one
ot the ways to recognize
teachers said Zane Eargle.
superintendent of Winston-
Salem Forsyth County schools.
"This would give us teachers for
at least four or five years. If we
have them that long, we might
have a good chance of convincing
them that teaching was a good
choice for them permanently
"Certainly, it's worth looking
at and studying said state Rep.
William Watkings, D Granville,
Chairman of the House Ap-
propriations Committee. "It's
just a matter of whether the
money is there of w hether this is a
year to jump into it
Gov. James Martin has pro-
posed to attract public school
teachers by allowing prospective
teachers to finance their educa-
tion at low-interest rates.
B PAITl KEMM1S
Uimf Sr� Mn�
Due to a Federal Mandate the
N.C. General Assembly raised
the legal age, as of Sept. 1, 1986.
for purchase, possession, and
consumption of all alcoholic
beverages to 21.
How will this affect the LCI
campus? According to Carolyn
Fulgham. Dean of Resident Life,
approximately 4,900 of 5.500
Night Transit Stops
Bv LANCE SEAR
si.fl Wnlrr
The SGA Night Transit as of
next semester will discontinue
their services due to the increased
drinking age.
According to SGA President
David Brown, "the Transit just
isn't going to be very cost effi-
cient. It will have to look for
other sources to fund it
September 1. 1986. will mark
the date that North Carolina will
change the drinking age to 21.
and according to Kirk Shelley.
SGA Legislative Speaker, "fun-
ding a program that will effect
only eight percent of the student
body isn't good business.
"However, this semester's
Night Transit has been a pleasant
surprise � people have been pil-
ing onto the bus in recent
weeks
Costs to operate the Night
Transit run near S4.000. "Carpet
sales, the Joint Judiciarv Trust
Fund and Refridgerator Rentals
paid for the Transit's
operation Brown said. "We
owe that to the good work the
Appropriations Chariman
Dwayne Wiseman did
However, when the drinking
age does change to 21, the SGA
feels the efforts of Wiseman, and
others, can be put to better use
stude
be 1. -e : ext � B
there be
policy ?
1 ne -
law ii said I ulgham
"We've alwavs c: I 1 ced the
age before and we will continue
to do so
According to Fulgham, Resi-
dent Advisors and Security Per-
sonnel will enforce the rules in
the usual fashion. Rooms will not
be searched, but if an R.A or
Security Guard does see alco
in the room of a minor, it will be
reported.
The new state law makes it
clear that anyone 19 or 20 who is
caught purchasing or with the
possession ot alcohol is not com-
mitting a crime, but an infrac-
tion. An infraction is an unlawful
act that is not a crime, and in this
case, will be punishable bv a fine
not more than S25.
N.C. Collects Unpaid Taxes
RALEIGH, N.C. (LPI) � The
state Department of Revenue has
turned over to a private collection
iummm��w����i��
On The inside
Announcements2,
Classifieds9
Editorials4
Features6
Sports8
Pens are most dangerous
tools, more sharp by odds
Than swords, and cut more
keen than whips or rods.
�John Taylor
agencv the chore of tracking
down about $900,000 from peo-
ple who have left North Carolina
without paying their taxes.
Financial Collection Agencies
Ltd is investigating 1,519 delin-
quent accounts in hopes of collec-
ting back taxes 'hat the Revenue
Department has been unsuc-
cessful in retrieving.
"These are the bottom of the
barrel � accounts that we
haven't had any luck with
ourselves said James Sentor,
deputy secretary of revenue.
"Other states have done this
(turned to private enterprise for
back tax collection) and have had
success, and we wanted to try it
Before the state enlisted the
help of private enterprise, the At-
torney General's Office handled
the collection of delinquent taxes
owed by people or businesses
who had left the state. But of-
ficials hope the private company
can do it more economically
while relieving some burden from
the attorney general's staff.
The Revenue Department turns
over accounts to the private agen-
cy only as a last resort, Sentor
said.
Mary Cockerham, the agency's
supervisor for North and South
Carolina, said that the company-
had no figures available on the
amount of taxes collected but
that they were showing "very
good results
Dorm Life
i � HI M1FUT T fjmt (mnUmm
Dorm life, come this Fail, will not be as fun as it used to be because a new N.C. law will go into ef-
fect that raises the drinking age to 21. For further details see the related story on page 1.
a � - -
e .
.
� - ����� I
��
f"PIW"





JTHE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 18, 1986
Announcements
BIBLE TALK
A practical �nformai Oiscusvon ex lut Boie
�� appiteo to our i v�'ooay Gun 713 Oar
'ett Dorm at 7 jo j 30 pm ana 70 C Beik
Dorrr- at 9 � 10 JO pm G.n� 313 Cotton
H�' at 9 30 10 JO pm Thnejrf ,Vfr, j�
dav Everyone nv eo
DO YOU GO DOWN?
Tut iev'� to'mec Corai Reet Dve Club i)
"oidmg a meeting Feo 24 from 7 �pm in
room 748 Mendenhan Vembershpi ana a
Spring Break trip to the taou'ous Fior.aa
Keys wih oe discussea All interested non
j.vers nciuded are welcome Join the club
,ha'( going somewhere The Corai Reel
D �p C ub
PRE MED
� e.r -neeting crt Alpha EpS'ion Dt'a
he heid on Tuesday Fee 18 at 00pm n
room 30? Flanagan The guest speake' w M
be Dr Coco DDS no Drill speak abOUl I s
e�pe' e" es n Sent sfi . A ntcrasim)
� 'f are we
SLACK ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
T here will be a meeting tne ECl B a. h
Assocaton or Monday Va
"J8 Tr,e me rtg wtl te held a" Vein I �
studen CeriVr room 248 a 6 00pm
ALPHA PHI ALPHA
OMEGA PSI PHI
thers ot Alpha Ph, Alpha and Omega
I s o- '�(��� lies will be t-avmg a Lin,ted
Fraternal jam Thursday Fee 20 a' '��
' �' Ever yore s fed I
�lm� Jut and be a par" ot h'Stor, ana ro pa'
c.pate m a dognasi. ac ce ce too cold
- 1 � Kh � tamisi tl 90 Be
� e
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
ere� Be a meeting tonight at 6 30 pm r.
� � Wfioenfisi Qr Harold Zallen
� :�'��� lot �� �� state house will be ou-
FREE TAX HELP!
! ' ea' . � � accou-
Mr - q a "ee -a" crepara
the s'uden' booth
steers w b working
Thursdays from be�
pedera' forms anc
at e jpoi -oques'
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
Members piease g
� ' � . f - boa
'�JtS ft ru -a� seas
ind reward - � 1
� ntor meCPA ear
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
SCUBA DIVING
ADVENTURES
� ' s popular 'ee
�- lays ants � �� lank boa' 0 e aa
& ' Jive rK ijdes 'jius a"
icfcpacks and weights - �'
" - �: - J1 i-ijwa-c: johnsor
oreaas :a . ;��
ay s- . - � 1383 �-����(
" -i H a, 5 hart Director � � q -1
v -14" Ope" waer certifications
JON JORDAN ECU PHOTO LAB
Watch Out
One of the more common
sights on campus is bicycles �
especially during the warm
weather. Bicyclists, remember
the ECU Traffic regulations
say that riding on the
sidewalks is illegal, as riding
down a one-way street is too.
Watch out, or you may get a
ticket from a friendly campus
policeman.
2 Pieces of Chicken
(Original Recipe� or
Extra CrispyTM
1 small mashed potato
and gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR
CHRIST
Campus Crusade for Crirtsl s spons
Prime Time this Thursday night at
I 30pm in the Old joyner Library second
tioor Please ioin us tor tun fellowship ano
B-ble study We art looking forward to
meeting you
BLACK GRADUATE
SUPPORT GROUP
There wm te a meeting erf fe B a
Graduate Support Group Sund. a1 E
in nenaenhaii ai nTeres'ed persons are
v'ted to attena For more informatio
Dwight at 75? 9267
FERRARA 1986
The deadi.ne tor subm.ssion of appi -
�o participate in the Ferra'a Iv8� pi igra
as been e�tendeo Appica' 1 toper.
until February 28 information aboc H s
program is available by a - '57 4; �
T his study abroad tor college crec
s open to ECU students s'uaer ��
schools and tc 'he public
COPING WITH STRESS
A free mini class offer e- r �
Counseling Cer - . lentil,
sources of stress ake pos '
"anage your response to stress!
t'Ons. 'earn v- .pia. mpr sell fide
Tuesday February 25 Thursday f�
27 Tuesday War. ' 4 ��v.a, Va-
Plan to attend all four n eel rigs
meetings will be (rom �- 1. � A
Anne
BLACK AWARENESS MONTH
tree t gti diooo press - � - � -
ee" ijs w be he d Friday
tl Menoenha; STuoen Centei I
?ptr as oa � " � B - a esi
11 ' v � es Sponsorec by Kappa
fratern Associai I . � ��
ana �� � � �� � Hean . �
Nofcomi! regory
PIRATE WALK
ECU AMBASSADORS
' ir get jr general meeting Wed
February Wth at 5 1 5pm ,n the Multipurpose
at Menden' a
VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE
� . sua Arts Com"� "ee wmio like to re
nients here a'E CU about the 198
liiurr.naartcompetit.on Th.s contest is open
� . East Cai ; na Student currently
test S 1 '��� ' all forms of
"led-a and N . �- � � �?�.� lot mi' piece is
� loitars upoi-subni.ssion Works are to
be subn rted � � �'� Ihrougti the 21st
pi room 212 Mendenhaii
� � ' � K5 - � 'ake place on the
'�� � it a I an amount of S600
ere w . 1 be a re eption on the 24tr
� � - � I you have an, iuest.onscaii
ECU WOMEN'S SOCCER CLUB

lact
1 � � � a
� �
s � ei xirnament
lief at '58 8325
- -ti 28 and

AF ROTC
� iei
' es and e�
���
ooks and HOC oe' n
�� . - �. ing Tesi
- ��' - .ar T T hur s
� . � .
1 � arsnips for the fa
� t Air For
� A .
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
� �� . . � . . �
. - �
� -

ECECC
-�
EARLY CHILDHOOD CLUB
ECC - � ext meeting
lav c at�. a � � ' - Hi . � . � . - �
peake
AFROTC
-
INDT
-
� -�
NC STATE PARKS
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
M
j'gec � . s � v -
BCC Ihesf - �
a TSl 65��
Soccer Coaches (Indoor Soccer)
Part-time coaches, work 10-20 hours weekly.
Hours Monday-Friday, 3-5:30 and a couple of
evenings, 7-9:00. Indoor soccer games at Elm
Street Gym.
Must posses skills and be able to coach,
officiate youth ages 5-18, in soccer fundamentals.
Contact the Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department, 752-4137, ext. 262, 259, for
application information. Application deadline is
Friday, March 7. $3.46hr.
FREE
RENT
Going Home For The Summer
But Need A Place For The Fall?
Tar River Estates has a summer special for
ECU students - Rent an apt. by March 1 st &
keep your appartment RENT FREE for June &
July! For details call or come by Tar River
Estates Info Center 1400 Willow St. No. 1.
752-4225
Tired of waiting in line for the phone or shower3 Leave the
dorm doldrums behind there is an alternative Your own
place at Tar River Estates Select a one-bedroom garden apart-
ment or a two- or three-bedroom townhouse Enjoy fully equip-
ped kitchen, washerdryer connections in some apartments,
spacious clubhouse, swimming pool, and picnic area by the
river. Conveniently located near East Carolina University -
with SGA Transit service Come by today or Call:
TarRivery
ESTATE-
752-4225
i 400 Willow St
Office Hours
M-F9 0O5 30
Sat & Sun 1 00 5 00
' �� I '� Corporation
-COUPON
$1.99
plus tax
FOR ONE COMPLETE
COMBINATION
2-PIECE PACK
We Do Chicken Right
Coupon Redeemable at
Greenville locations only
Expirotion Dote 3-3-86
-COUPON
w i
BKA
Despite tre various rumors that you have
'eara Bka .s alive and well Tnere .n te
ar organ.jatiooal meeting on Weonesaar
Feo 19 at 4 00pm ,n Rawi 10? All people in
ferested in Inance & Dan ing art welcome to
attena
PHI BETA LAMBDA
pn. Beta Lambda will meet wed Fee !� at
3 00 m Raw! J42 We will nave a speaker
Lloyd Gardener who �. II tam about state
competition
SOCCER PLAYERS
AM people interested in participating � the
f CU Women's Soccer Cub indoor socce'
tournament please contact i-sa
Grosshandier at 7S8 8325 Tne tournament
will be held Feb ?8 and Marcr- I 8.T- �.
will be a minimal entry fee
DIABETES
Do you nave questions tha were neve.
nswered7 Do you need someone To la �
"c really understands' H you are � �
� suppor' and a productive recourse tor a
seem.ngiy intimate situation D'eas a
'�8 �60 Together a abetes ana ts
�iponainq , ornpliat.ons car- be o"c
prel inidM and overcome
Stash
your trash.
NO NEWS
IS BAD NEWS
Interested In
Studying A broad?
Information on academic exchange
opportunities throughout the world through
the International Student Exchange Program
(ISEP), at ECU. Cost Information availahle
from:
Dr. R. Hursey Jr.
ISEPoordinator
Austin 222
Rhone 757-64IX (work)
756-06X2 (home)

SUBSIBIIOIfl
Every Tuesday
is
College Night
f rce Deliver)
�� $5,00 6
Over Purchases
7 p.m. to 11 p.m.
99C SUBS
Your Choice
Hun: 8 ('heese
Bologna d Cheese
Hum. Sulunit d Chi ese
Pepperoni, Salami d (heese
Turkey dheese
Hum. Turkey d Cheese
Vl aiid (�n deliverit-s
60 o. pitchers Sl.W
11 � m 11 p m :iii ;i I 4in v
COMPARE and SAV�!
pCOUPON
ItjU O OFFl
I All Frames In Stock '
I (With Prescription Lenses) �
Must present coupon u.ith
order for disc mint
wiith
Not qood
I
I
i. - -COUPON J
uitn other advertised spe
cials Expires 2-28-86
SOFT
CONTACTS
$CQ00
Includes (are Kit
eiml"
SUNGLASSES
20
off I
I
J
WeCaa An�ft
A ge ExMim
For You Oa
Tbc Same Day
The
OPTICAL
Gar M. Harm
licensed Optician
703(,rreo�ille Bicj
Acro� From
The Plan
PALACE
OPEN 9:30 AM lo 6 PM MONDAY fHRl FRIDAY � PHONI S6l2o4
ENGINEERINGSCIENCES
YOUR DEGREE
MAY BE WORTH AN
OFFICER'S COMMISSION
IN THE ARMY.
The Army is looking for 1986 graduates in Engineer-
ing and Science disciplines to serve as commissioned of-
ficers. For those who qualify, this program could be an
important step toward a rewarding career � in or out of
the Army.
You've worked long and hard to earn your Bachelor
of Science degree. A commission in the Army is a good
way to use your technical expertise while gaining
valuable supervisory experience. And the opportunity is
available now!
An Army placement officer is available to discuss op-
portunities and qualifications with those about to
receive degrees in Engineering or Science. Contact him
direct to arrange an appointment convenient for you.
Call:
Captain Mallette
752-2908
Cpt. Mallette will be conducting interviews ot
The Career Planning and Placement Office
on 13 Feb. from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon.
ARMYOFFICER.
BE ALLYOU CAN BE
New B
From Stafl Krpi.n.
Reagai Adminisi
ed budgci
- federal
SEA P
H
I

I
i
-
n his f �
��

-� when id
The
.
taxe
In
-
billion in dome i
indirectly � wl
33 bill
The Adm
YOUI
SP
YOU DRIVE
$124.0
Wi DRIVE
$189.00
INCLUDES
e ,ccec
-

� - p cv r-se
MM l
SPEND AUEEK- NO
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION!
AND SIGN UP
Reservations Any T
Call 752-4801
Or Come By 113 N. Ea
(5rh House on
After Feb. 14, Full Pa
Required
Seats Still Availabl
Spontofea Dv Campui Moving mm





I Ml IAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 18, 1986
NO NiWS
IS BAD NEWS
,nd SAVE!
my
I
I
off
20
ar M. Harris
rn.M-d Optician
reaviUc Bld.
cnm from
� t Sfc-42lM
!�
. Lngineer-
sioned of-
ild be an
in or out of
ir Bachelor
rmy is a good
hile gaining
.nd the opportunity is
ible to discuss op-
those about to
?cience. Contact him
convenient for you.
ferviews at
jnt Office
noon.
ER
A
New Budget Cuts Education
From Slaff Reports
The Reagan Administration's
proposed budget cuts in aid to
education would, it" adopted,
"close the book on the federal
commitment to education
reform" triggered by the Ad-
ministrations' own "Nation at
Risk" report, declares the Na-
tional Education Association.
"The Administration is fond
oi saying it seeks character, con-
tent and choice in education
notes NEA President Mary Hat-
wood Futrell. "but this new
budget has no character, little
content, and no choice
The Administration budget
proposals, which call for an
overall cut of more than 15 per-
cent in education programs, were
sent to Congress for the 198"
Fiscal Year February 5
Chancellor John How ell said
he was not sure if the budget cuts
would go through Congress and
if they did he would not be pleas-
ed. "The point I want to make is
over the years the Reagan Ad-
ministration has made bigger cuts
and Congress has gone ahead and
appropriated the money
Howell said.
Student financial aid would
bear the brunt of the cuts said
Howell. "It causes students to
become discouraged and not app-
ly and try to get the aid he add-
ed. Howell added the biggest pro-
blem with the whole issue of
budget cutting is the uncertainty
that goes with it.
Futrell said the Administra-
tion's proposed education cuts
would "sabotage the education
renaissance" President Reagan
lauded in his February 4 State of
the Union Address. The cuts,
Futrell said, would come at a
time when schools can least af-
ford them.
"The proposed federal educa-
tion cuts could force states and
local communities to either raise
axes or cut education
programs adds the NEA Presi-
dent.
In the new budget. President
Reagan is asking for about S23
billion in domestic program cuts
it affect education directly or
indirectly � while adding about
$33 billion to military spending.
The Administration suggests
reducing the federal education
budget to $15.2 billion in Fiscal
1987. This is $3.2 billion less than
the original 1986 education ap-
propriation. In 1985, the federal
government provided $19.1
billion in aid to education.
The Administration's propos-
ed cuts come on top of $678
million that will be slashed from
federal education programs
March 1 under the Ciramm-
Rudman-Hollings budget law.
The federal government's new
fiscal year begins October 1.
NEA President Futrell notes
that the education share of the
federal budget dollar has shrunk
significantly since the Reagan
Administration took office in
1981. In 1980, for every 100
federal budget dollars spent.
Si.10 was spent on elementary
and secondary education. If the
Administration's budget pro-
posals are adopted, elementary
and secondary schools would get
only 66 cents of every 100 federal
dollars spent � a 40 percent
decline.
"Quality education � our
greatest resource and the best in-
vestment we can make to ensure a
strong economy in the future �
cannot withstand these kinds ol
draconian cuts Futrell sas
The NEA president points out
that many states are now suffer-
ing some of the worst times since
the Great Depression as farm
bankruptcies, falling energy
prices that slice production taxes.
and factory closures threaten a
decent standard of living foi
millions of Americans
"All is not well out there
despite the rosy picture the Ad-
ministration attempts to paint of
the nation's economic
landscape says Futrell.
The heaviest of the federal
education cuts, Futrell adds,
would come in vocational educa-
tion and in financial aid for col-
lege students.
Many education aid programs,
including general aid (impact aid)
for school districts that have a
high concentration of military or
other federal installations, would
be eliminated entirely under the
Administration's 1987 budget
proposals.
Most federal education pro-
grams, particularly those pro-
grams for elementary and secon-
dary schoolchildren, provide ser-
vices to poor, handicapped and
minority children.
The Reagan Administration
budget proposal also calls for
1986 rescissions � Si billion in
cuts that will automatically go in-
to effect in 45 days if Congress
fails to act � in vocational
education, college student aid
libraries, immigrant education,
and many other programs.
'o make matters worse, Futrell
notes, the Administration is pro-
posing school voucher, tuition
tax credit, and other legislation
would weaken public
schools. "The Administration's
proposal to convert the existing
federal compensatory education
Ltram (Chapter 1) into a
vouchei system, says Futrell. is
nothing more than a ruse to
divert tax dollars from under-
funded public schools to pay for
private schools. The Administra-
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tion proposes freezing spending
for Chapter 1 at $3.2 billion for
Fiscal 1987.
In higher education, some $1.4
billion less in college student
financial asistance, reports the
American Council on Education.
There are currently about 5.7
million college students receiving
grants or loans.
Cuts in higher education pro-
grams would eliminate millions
of dollars for poor as well as
middle-income students and shut
the door for most students for
low-income families to attend the
college of their choice. The cut-
back proposed for the special
allowance to college loan lenders
threatens the collapse of the en-
tire Guaranteed Student Loan
program, the largest of the stu-
dent aid programs, which now
aids more than three million
students.
More than 800,000 of the near-
ly three million students receiving
Pell Grants � 290.000 this fall
alone � would lose their eligibili-
ty for aid if the Administraiton
proposals are approved by Con-
gress. And special remedial pro-
grams for nearly 500,000 disad-
vantaged students would be cut in
half.
"Cuts in education and in
other domestic programs that af-
fect our daily lives constitute a
double or even triple whammy
explains NEA President Futrell.
"States are going to be hard-
pressed to make up lost federal
funds for education at the same
time they face huge shortfalls in
other vita! services
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Si? iEaat (Sar0Htiian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
TOM I l VEND! K�, , Han.gr,
I STON1 . Mmhj .
MlKI 1 I l) IC K Vn .
Scoi i Cooper, v �.
Danh i Mm r k.
Jons Sh NN().
Di t n-ii i Johnson, i
ClKI (, WlM HESTER, D i
Am honv Martin, r. ��. i
John Pi ii ksos, ��
Shannon SHORT, p . wa�r,
l)i huh Stevens, &
&m w&HaQitwew�. VNivwp&mx' sca
1 cbni.t: 18, 1986
Opinion
Pas
Debate
Comparable Worth Proposal
Last night in Hendrix Theater
Sarah Weddington and Phyllis
Schlafly debated over topics rang-
ing from abortion to the Equal
Rights Amendment. An issue which
also figured prominently into the
debate was a proposal aimed at
eliminating discrimination against
women who are confined to the
"pink collar" ghetto. This proposal
has been christened the comparable
worth proposal because it is design-
ed to insure that women get equal
pay for comparable work even
though, that work may be different
from that done by men.
In order to understand the com-
parable worth proposal one must
first understand the nature of the
problem that it seeks to address.
First, in the American economy
women are largely confined to jobs
that pay poor wages, while men
working similar jobs, even within
the same industry, earn significant-
ly higher wages, for example,
within the food and beveridge in-
dustry the workers who earn the
most money are brewery workers.
In 19S1 they earned around $496 a
week, high on the scale of
American industrial workers. The
lowest paid food industry workers
are found in poultry dressing
plants. T "hey earned an average of
S169 a week in 1981 � a poverty
level wage for a worker with three
dependents. 85 percent of brewery
workers are men while 53 percent of
poultry dressers are women.
More than 90 percent of the
workers who make tires or inner
tubes out of rubber are men, and
they earned about S450 a week.
Two-thirds of the workers who
make toot wear out of rubber are
women and the) earn $169 a week.
The apperal clothing industry has
traditionally been among the
poorest-paying industries in
America. Apparel workers averag-
ed only about $175 a week in 1981,
barely above the federal poverty
line for a family of four. Thus it
shouldn't surprise anyone to
discover that more than four out of
five clothing workers arc women.
Yet within this generally poor in-
dustry there is a category of
workers who make automotive and
apparel trimmings. In contrast to
all other apparel workers, these
workers make S400 a week � far
above the average for American
manufacturing. Half of these
workers, also in contrast to other
apparel workers, are men. And the
list goes on.
Moreover this state of affairs has
only deteriorated under the Reagan
administration with poverty among
single female headed households in-
creasing and the federal commit-
ment to social programs and
fighting for equality decreasing.
Of course the statistics cited
above say nothing about the fact
that women earn consistently less
than men even doing the same jobs
as men.
More to the point, women are
not getting anything near adequate
compensation for their years of
schooling relative to men. A man
with a high school diploma still
makes more on the average than a
woman with a college diploma.
What all of this suggests is that
sex-based wage discrimination is
rampant in the American economy
and bold steps must be taken to end
it. What tiie comparable worth pro-
posal would mean is that the
government would establish some
means bv which it would evaluate
the comparability of jobs and make
recommendations on wage levels
tor public employees accordingly.
In other words, the government
would presumably be setting an ex-
ample which private employers
would be expected to follow in br-
inging an end to discrimination.
I his is not withoul precedent.
The State Employee's Union for
the state of ashington won a com-
parable wortli decision against the
state in 1982 in U.S. Federal Court
and was ordered to pay back pay
and to pay equal pay in the future.
And in 1981 the Supreme Court
joined in this recognition that une-
qual pav for jobs of comparable
worth is discriminatory, though it
tailed to define how the problem
was to be solved or to address the
comparable wortli issue. Also as
early as 1945 representative Claude
Pepper and another legislator put
forth the "Equal Pav Act which
would have required equal pay for
comparable work, though it was
defeated.
Women are not in lower paying
occupations because the free
market has magically decided that
these occupations are worth less
than those filled by men. They are
in those occupations because it is
profitable for employers to pay low
wages. And the only way to redress
this injustice is for the government
to intervene in the marketplace �
not to destroy it, but to humanize it
and make it more democratic. It
has done so to some extent with the
1964 Civil Rights Act. It should
continue that tradition by im-
plementing the comparable worth
proposal.
y
Philippines May Not Be Ready
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Democracy Doesn't Work
l! is time, thanks largely to
developments in the Philippines, to say
some unkind tilings about democracy.
The first of these is thai democracy does
not necessarily usher in virtuous govern-
ments or tolerable human conditions.
The second is that democracy, par
ticularly in its currently accepted,
fanatical application (one-man. one
vote) is nothing more than a Western
superstition. We are entitled to our
superstitions and to our taboos, hut it
does not make much sense to assume
that they are readily universalized.
On The Right
B VW1 1.1AM K. BtMTA JR.
Tvao episodes, illustrative in purpose.
The movie, a doen years ago, and the
startled reaction to il b an American
who saw it in Lagos, Nigeria Scene: an
18th-century American slave ship,
engaged in transporting West fricans
for sale in the slave markets
Charleston, S.C. There is a mutiny hy
the blacks against the white captain and
his white crew. But it is suppressed, the
ring leaders of the mutiny are
segregated, and they are made to walk
the plank. Wild cheering from the au
dience. "What goes on here?" the
American asked himself.
His host, a native Nigerian and a pro-
fessor of anthropology, explained that
Africans are trained to believe in the ab-
solute authority of the chief. And the
chief, in this picture, was the captain of
the vessel, and that mattered more than
that he was corralling Africans into lives
of slavery in the New World.
It was certainly self-serving when
President Marcos told me eight years
ago on television that the American
legacy ol democracy had not been firmly
enough rooted in the Philippines. But, ai
the same time, he was absolutely right.
One doe not deduce from his be
right that he should also be preside
for-life, but it is true thai democracy had
become a sham before President Marcos
invoked martial law in 1ST2. Contenders
were luring private armies, and were
then � as now � refusing to abide bv
the apparent results ol elections. 1; is
-ate to sav simplv that democracv was
not working, and democracv has ha-
had a workout under Mr. Marcos ol the
kind that gives us confidence it is now
ready to work.
Democracy is primarily valuable, the
late Max Eastman wisely summarized in
a book on political philosophy, as a
negative instrument, a way tor a people
to sa: We do not desire the existing
rulers to continue to rule. 1 he notion
that democracv is actually aninstrumt
bv which the people can fine-tune pubh.
policy is a Western superstition, along
with the notion that anyone I 8 vears old,
whether literate or illiterate, instructed
oi dumb, should participate in political
decision-making.
They are talking now about elections
in Haiti where HO percent oi the people
are illiterate and about one-man one-
vote in South Africa. The Washington
Post editorializes, with reference to
Subic Bay and Clark field in the Philip
pines and the implied threat against
them if Mrs. Aquino should win: "He is
right: The bases are important to the
United States. But they are not more im-
portant than the condition oi democracy
in the Philippines What utter
nonsense. We hope thai
rule will come to the Philippim
whether or not it does, we have imp
responsibilities in the W.
that have nothing whatever l
civic progress m that country.
J Whal matters mosl is the -
� liberty. John Stuart Mill, the pr
don: a � v estern democracy.
this when he opted I
intentioned, rather than d
an instrument oi totalitaria
chaos. Ask not, in frica
Vmerica, how many people voted I
the incumbent governor: ask wl
of life are the people permitted I
Are they tree' Are they protected fi
' itrary rule'7 Are their holding
from inflation and theflC an tl .
the country with their saving
Proceed to deplore this b
allegiance to authority, as we all
�v ii away as a fact of life ii
pan � the world. It certainly has ii
- when the Hitlers and
Stalins tind it easy to conscript
Holbca . maintenance men.
Next: n American scholar.
research into the balloting aftei one
those elections we in effect presidt
in South Vietnam during that country'
brief interregnum with self-rule, elici
from the majority of the pea- .
terviewed an attitude toward whal
were doing that amounted to condesc
sion over Western eccentricities
idea, as one man put it, that bv di
a piece ot paper in thai box, over aga
that other box, von were substantially
even intelligently guiding vour i m
future was � well, he just laughed
"Democracv" may triumph, ii
Philippines, and life max become n
intolerable as the result.
Reagan Cuts In Education Unsound
By DARRYL K. BROWfN
WASHINGTON last month, a
White House advisory panel handed in
the preliminary results of its study on the
"Health of U.S. Universities and Col-
leges It concluded "substantially
greater investments" by the federal
government are necessary for American
campuses to upgrade deteriorating
research facilities, outdated equipment
and understaffed science and engineer-
ing faculties.
This month, the White House released
its proposed budget, which discontinued
federal loan assistance to upgrade
academic facilities and college housing.
It also requested that such funds for this
year be rescinded.
There's something to be learned here
about this administration's priorities,
and how much those are based on
evidence and common sense. When a
panel headed by a corporate
businessman (the chairman of Hewlitt-
Packard) says colleges need substantial
assistance in order not to hinder the
training of scientists and engineers and
to slow research for industrial and
military development, most people
would not think to instead do away with
that assistance. How does one read that
report and decide to increase defense
spending 8 percent, instead of 6 or 7 per-
cent and also heed the caveat of one's
own White House Science Advisory
Panel?
In the wake of that (naturally) little-
publicized study and the continuing
scrutiny of public education that brings
calls for reform, the president's budget
reduces spending for education by $2.5
billion and cuts higher education ap-
propriations much more than the
Gramm-Rudman-Hollings deficit reduc-
tion law requires. Reagan's State of the
Union address mentioned rising SAT
-cotes and prayer in schools (why not
prayer foi schools), but his budget
eliminates a small program known as the
Perkins Scholarships, which go to bright
students planning careers in teaching.
Perhaps the advisory panel will take
comfort if those declining facilities
receive less wear and tear, which could
happen if the Guaranteed Student Loan
program collapses. The American Coun-
cil on Education and others believe that
is very possible under the Reagan plan;
at minimum it would be drastically cut.
President Reagan would like to cut the
interest subsidy to banks, which makes
students safer and cheaper loan risks
Without that subsidy, many banks may
simply pull out of the GSL program and
stop making loans, which 3 million
students now use. The presidential
budget is less severe, though, on PLUS
loans, which have high interest rates and
which students must begin repaying
while still in college.
The Reagan cuts in Pell Grants would
make 290,000 students ineligible, and
would reduce the awards for another
half million recipients, whose family in-
come are under $20,000. Other odds and
ends would also get the ax: Supplemen-
tal grants, State Incentive Grants, most
graduate student aid.
Further, the administration put forth
no alternative to student aid as it does
for other government handouts it dis-
dains, such as welfare. Conservatives at
least advocate jobs instead of aid to the
poor, saying those who will work will
subsist and perhaps prosper. For college
students, they cut grants and loans but
also work study. And by some abysmal
wisdom, cooperative education too, in
which students not only gain career skills
and pay their tuition, but also give back
10 times more to the Treasury through
income taxes than is spent funding co
programs. One would expect this
ministration to innovate a work sch
that allow- students to earn
education through effort.
Tuitions have doubled in ten v.
which means colleges are having
time making ends meet. The Re.
budge; cuts their assistance and adds
their costs of the work-stud prog-
Students depend on loans now n
than ever, yet the Reagan budget v-
make less loans available and those lefi
more expensive. It does nothing I
alleviate that loan burden, nor to ins
faith in the work ethic by making w
harder to get, or by making more work
hours necessary to meet rising college
costs.
Congressional Democrats have an
idea oi what to do with the Rea,
budget: hold public hearings around the
country and let citizen's know what-
it (or out of it) for them. Thev feel co-
dent Reagan's fiscal wish list will cause
mourning in America. The show needs
to play on American campuses.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica
tions Building, across from the en-
trance of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two tvpewritten pages,
double-spaced or neat I v printed. All
letters are subject to editing for b.evi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted.
.

'
1
I have heard
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10
Wednesday, February 19,
10





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 18, 1986
Debate Rages
Work
I haw heard a lot recently
about what constitutes a proper,
balanced diet. What should I eat?
Hardh a d.s goes by without
eone telling us what we
aid and should not eal
Newspapers, magazines, televi-
. books, and radio give lots
idvice about the "idea! diet
lusion, however, ts because we Jo not know igri about nutrition to iden the perfect die! for each in
! l(dividua Mi people diffei . needs a
. sical a � - rtei con
� egnanc and 1!
- asmmended Dietary � i (R DA) are su �. . and and vitamins ad Fot the I S. I � t wl and
trs, and alcohol) is sensi-
. eave;s can irante w all being.
I � . jnvironment, in
pptng
tinst
. or
on Unsound

� :heme
llege
years,
. a hard
Reagan
adds tO
g ram.
more
gel will
.osc left
hing to
to instill
� ng work
�mure work-
l allege
have an
the Reagan
and the
�iw what's in
-�v feel confi-
sl will cause
show needs
ruses.
Forum Rules
arolinian welcomes letters
ill points of view. Mail or
I our office in the Publica-
� g, across from the en-
r I ihrarv.
r purpo verification, all let-
include the name, major and
ation, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted.
1 isted below are some general
dietary guidelines for the average
�mci ican.
� Eat a variety ol foods daily in
adequate amounts, including
fruits, vegetables, whole-grain
and enriched breads, cereals and
other product; made from grain,
milk, cheese, yogurt, and othei
products made from milk, meats,
poultry, fish, eggs, and dry beans
and peas.
� Maintain your desirable weig
Eat slowly, lake smaller portions,
and avoid "seconds la: more
fruits, vegetables, and whole
grains and less fai dv.J fa
foods, sugar, sweets, and di
less alcoholic beverages Increase
your physical actis it.
� Eat foods with adequate starch
and fiber, including whole-gi i
and cereals, fruits,
vegetables, and dry beans and
peas Eating foods high in fibei
duce s nip
toms chronic constipation,
di erticulai disease, and
ii ritable bow I It has
also been suggested tha
: ma increas(
developing col
� . �id sugai becaus . ides
it ic's but few otl er is
� Avoid too much
Continued Krom Page I.
issue o working women deserv-
ing credit for child care, Schlafh
was insistent that women should
not be drafted into the military.
Schlafly demanded that to give
credit to working mothers was
unfair to those mothers who
choose to slay home with their
children. Weddington
saidThere are mothers who
need to make an income and I
think they deserve good child
care
()n the subject ol women in the
military, Schlafly jeering urged
"it von want to fight for your
country, run, don't walk . to the
oU'kc and sign up she accused
men, however, ot not being
"wimpy enough to let their wives
go oui into the fields and fight
Weddington debated the fad
that most of the women in the
military have as high, if not
higher, 1Q as the men in the
military. She remarked. "Iqual
rights means equal respon-
sibilities
While Weddington openly
defended formei President
Carter's views, Schlafly wasted
no time defending Reagon's. At
one point, Schlafly accused the
V artet administration ol only ap-
pointing members who went
along with Carter's beliefs. Wed
dington quickly, and firmly, an-
nounced. "You are absolutely
wrong. I he people appointed
i ol had those qualities, but
they were never questioned it
had them before they were
appointed
Schlafly commended Reagan
making nine million more
jobs available for Americans dur-
his term in office. One
member o the audience ques
re 1 h ise jobs were and
who wa: g them.
Sv hlafh ottered an explaina
tion thai women choose the
degrees that they earn, s i
refore, are setting themselves
up for their salaries. She also ad-
ded "I don't believe women are
underpaid Weddington argued
back that fields which were once
stereotyped as being female are
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sk R 1 urtleneeks K
Located on 264 Bpass
next to (,reenille IV & Appliance
& kappa Sigma
Present
DRAFT NITE
Tuesday, February 18, 1986
9:00-1:00 a.m.
10C Draft All Nite
Adm. $1.50 Guys
$1.00 Ladies
& Pi kappa Phi
Present

DRAFT NITE
Wednesday, February 19, 1986 9:00-1:00 a.m.
10 Draft All Nite
Adm. $1.50 Guys
$1.00 Ladies
still being underpaid, such as
educators and nurses. She made
no move to agree with Schlafh
about women being paid fairly.
After a round of audience
questions, ranging from the
availability of contraceptives to
gaining fair salary for educators,
the dabate came to an end. One
of the questions asked was how
each was going to continue
strengthening her cause.
"We are going to continue
reintroducing FRA to Congress.
Right now we don't have enough
votes, it just depends who is put
into office next commented
Weddington.
Schlafly calmly replied. "We
won't have any trouble defeating
ERA
The debators not only
disagreed on the subjects thev
discussed, but also who came out
with the most support. According
to Schlafly, "The response was
great, and the majority was
definately with me
Weddington stressed that she
was "very happy to see the
response the debate received. It is
good to see people really think
and .react, not just lie back and
accepl things the way thev are.
The people here at ECU proved
they wanted to think. 1 sensed a
large amount o support tor
Phyllis Sehlaflv, but just as large
amount for mysell
St. Paul's Episcopal Church
WELCOMES YOU
401 East Fourth Street
The Rev. Lawerence P. Houston, Jr , Rector
The Rev. Middleton F. Wotten, 111, Associate Rector
Marty Gartman, Directory of Campus Ministry
LENTEN SCHEDULE
Sunday
7:30 a.m. � Holy Eucharist
9:00 a.m. � Holy Eucharist
10:00 a.m. � Christian Education � Parish Hall
11:00a.m. � Holy Eucharist
Monday
5:30 p.m. � livening Prayer
Tuesday
5:30 p.m. � Evening Prayer
Wednesday
5:30 p.m. � Holv Eucharist
6:30 p.m. STUDENT FELLOWSHIP SUPPER
7:15 p.m. � Video Series: "What Episcopalians Believe"
Thursday Friday
5:30 p.m. Evening Prayer
Saturday
9:X) a.m. � Morning Prayer
See For Yourself
STUDE vrOPPORTUNITIES
We arc looking for girls in-
terested in being counselors �
activity instructors in a private
girls camp located in Hender-
SOnville, NC. Instructors need-
ed especially in Swimming
(WSI), Horseback riding, Ten-
nis, Backpacking, Archery,
Canoeing, Gymnastics, Crafts
Also, Basketball, Computers,
Drama, Nature study, Field
Hockey. It your school offers a
Summer Internship program,
we will be glad to help. In-
quiries: Morgan Haynes, P.O.
Box 400-C, Trvon, , 28782.
on All Frames, Sunglasses,
and Contact Lenses
Everyday.
Now tt-rc arc ri KaUirr trm .rter HI) Jillercrt mule u vi�i�r
' .11 tcriAa sjvuip i! N � . '�� tt rcjraui rccui prvc I"he
K- sat at IT Haa. jnl I Eye l arc i ena ji iJc Tipm Annex
In lditki. l-c iAjjiiiiiit��. arc avaiiabk af I"hc hye Cire Ccnur
No ajvinCin 'txtvW tail fof cxjjji hiurs
ft llaAi
"��� StT
OPTOMETNC
CrtE CAA� 0EKTCR
tor rraim Selection and Kve Rxuminationv
11 t.rnrntillc Blvd iliptun nnr�i
Phone 75t-MM
)r Peter Hoilis
O.D.
.A.

"
r
A





1IH I AM i AUDI INIAN
3M COUNTY
Haley Answered Cal
To Find His Roots
By JOHN SHANNON
M�l. Miit.r
Alex Haley, best known .is
autl 01 of Roots, will speak ai
Hendrix I heater tonight at
p.m. Haley will talk aboul
changing role of the family in
American life, particularly in
relation to the subject ol Black
History in America, in a lecture
entitled "The Background ol
Roots: The Significance ol the
I amily
For Haley, the subject is a par-
ticularly vital and relevant one.
B vii in 1921 in a rural Tennese
ill-town called Henning,
best selling author has experie
ed the pride of possessing
ancestral heritage, and the
ficulty of discovering the ;
ulars of t hat am t
firsthand. His latest book, nai
alter his childhood hometowi
chronicles his impressions ol rl
place and time, and highlit i
important role his family played
m preserving the history that
became Roots.
I he well-known stoi ol Kunta
Kinte and his capture into siacrv
was only an or a! legend, passed
among Haley's relatives during
miniscences on the front
porch, until Alex concretized the
information through painstaking
research. But thai record was un-
written until much later, after
Haley had made his reputation as
a writer. I he toad to becoming a
prominent writer was a long otic
Males graduated from high
school at 15, and entered college
�n Mississippi, only to transfer
North c arolina, at
i ty reacher's College,
aduate, opting
�ng stints
ped his
g, which
landed him a position
1 oasi c iuard.
from
inste
PR m
Broadway At ECU
the Coast Guard he was 38 years
old, and determined make a liv-
ing at writing. Eventually he was
assigned by Playboy to interview
Malcolm . The interview led to
a book -� The Autobiography of
Malcolm X � which was so suc-
cessful that Alex Haley's reputa-
tion became firmly established.
At this point in his life, Haley
must have felt the need to answer
some inner call or compulsion,
because the work he embarked
upon after his first bestseller ran
contrary to what most people
would expect. Instead o' settling
into the comfortable life of a suc-
cessful and respected writer and
social figure. Hale) began his
massive research for Roots The
story of his trials during tins
twelve-year excavation into fami-
ly and cultural history would
comprise a book in itself (or at
least a lecture or two � "The
Background of Roots"?).
rhe hardship Haley brought
on himself during his researches
(which would have seemed
unreasonable to most people and
included a trans-Atlantic voyage
' the hold ol a ship), paid off.
With the publication of Roots,
Alex Haley's good fortune soared
unimagined, global propor-
tions. Between the ABC televi-
sion s-ncs based on the work and
es in the multi-millions of
dollars for its paperback ver-
sion. Rooix became one of the
most popular stones ever to hit
the media.
roday, ten years alter Roots'
initial publication, Halev has
relaxed into a role more like what
people expect trom an extremely
successful writer. He is touring
college campuses, holding rap
sessions with students, and
generally playing the teacher, an
act thai will surely benefit all of
those seriously interested parties
who would like to dig for their
ow n roots.
In his lecture tonight, Alex
Halev will reveal some of the
background behind his now-
egendary project. Admission is
free, so come hear this Pulite;
Pne winner's story from his own
ips.
44 Chicken Action With Recoil
9 ?
Art. � ' n?Druar -4 at 7-30 p.m. in the lecture hall at the School of
Restaurant In Review
Fast Food Alternative
By DAVID McGINNESS
Crackling Comedy
ny Wednesday, by Muriel
Resnik, has been on Broadv
over two and one-half years.
"Good fun. A crackling g
champagne of a comedy
Ellen Gordon is a girl who just
can't say no very oftei
especially to l'ycoon John
Cleaves, lor Internal Revenue
purposes, she is a tax dodge His
corporate returns list no e
ecutive sweetie, only the ex
ecutive suite she occupies reni
tree. Casanova John, however is
irrai ge to meei
week any
v ednesd
a a �zy lit) le love nest until
� - retari; dent" sends a
young, eligible out-of-town
businessman to the apartment.
followed soon by the Tycoon's
wife d the fun really begins.
It's a captivating and light
hearted comedy that for 982 per-
formances kept Broadway au-
diences steadfastly entertained,
the funniest, wittiest
comedies of the decade said
critic Emory Lewis of Cue
Magazine.
The ECU Student Productions
Committee will present Any
H ednesday, by the Alpha-Omega
Players, this Friday and Saturday
at 6:30 p.m. at Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. Tickets are still on
sale at the Central Ticket Office
at Mendenhall, S9 for ECU
students and guest, $14 all others.
No tickets will be sold at the
d
si.ft Wrilrr
Are you tired of IV dinners
and hamburgers? Submarines
and Pizza?
Well, you're in luck. Now
there's a Greenville restaurant
with good, sit-down food that
even students can afford.
Caitlyn's, located in the
southwest corner of The Plaza
shopping center, has been open
since November of last year, but
many people don't know about it
yet.
Caitlyn's is a cafeteria, but
don't stop reading. The food is
tastier and more varied than that
of most cafeterias you would run
across.
The fare at Caitlyn's ranges
TON M'MFI.E - Ml Nnrt
Opera Theatre
A bnde, portrayed by Renee Sullivan of Wilson (center) and her hw �f hrirf.� ia .
all the fixings A daily special is
run Monday through Saturday
tor $3.54, which includes an en-
tree, two vegetables, bread and
butter and a beverage.
Among the entrees available
are roast beef, chicken (baked.
fried, teriyaki), turkey and dress
ing, flounder, trout (fried, or
broiled upon request), and
various Chinese dishes All dishes
offered at Caitlyn's can also be
ordered take-out style.
A large variety ol vegetables
are offered daily including broc-
coli (with or without cheese
sauce), corn, green beans,
potatoes (mashed, boiled,
scalloped or baked), peas and
mixed vegetables. A vegetable
plate is available which includes
four vegetables, bread and butter
and a beverage for S2.99
On Friday and Saturday
nights, a prime rib special is serv-
ed for $4.99. Many other Green-
ville restaurants offer similar fare
for $10-512.
Obviously, one of the things
that make Caitlyn's appealing,
especially to college students, is
the price. The cost of an average
dinner at Burger King is com-
parable in price to a meal from
Caitlyn's. But the food from
Caitlyn's just doesn't taste as if it
came from a cafeteria.
According to Gary Gallo, who
along with his brother James
owns the restaurant, that is
precisely their aim.
"We try to run a restaurant
that's a cut above the average
cafeteria Gallo said. "A lot of
cafeteria food is pretty bland. We
spice up our food a little more,
and try to offer more variety
Another factor that makes the
food here have a more home-
cooked taste is the Gallo
brothers' attitude toward buying
processed foods.
"We don't buy a lot of pro-
cessed items Gallo added. "We
try to go for as home-like a pro-
duct as possible. We make all our
own breads, pastries and pud-
dings � excepting cakes. Those
� iap ���.
we can buy better than we can
make
The atmosphere in Caitlyn's
distinguishes it from the generic
look of many restaurants of its
type. The interior is open and
airy. Hanging and potted plants
decorate the walls and hang from
the ceiling, lending color to the
subtle shades used in the decor.
The tables are spaced widely
enough to give customers some
elbow room.
The only drawback is the lack
of intimacy in the main dining
area, which results from too little
screening between tables.
However, Gallo plans to add
more large plants and dividers to
achieve a greater degree of
privacy.
One of the most attractive
features of the restaurant's
layout is its split level area on the
west side. About 20 of the 50 or
so tables are in this area, which
also includes three large picture
windows which face the sunset.
Prior to coming to Greenville,
the Gallos worked in the
restaurant business in Charlotte
The section of the The Plaza
which houses Caitlyn's was once
Valentine's Cafeteria, which was
in business there for about five
years. The Gallo brothers
renovated both the dining and
kitchen areas extensively
According to Gallo, there were
two reasons for the name
Caitlyn's First, some per-
sonal research determined that
people tended to remember
names with hard "C" sounds in
them. Second, they liked the
name Caitlyn, which belonged to
imle girl they knew �
Charlotte.
Gallo stressed that he and his
brother stood behind the quality
of their product. "
"Anything we serve that peo-
ple aren't satisfied with weSl
replace with another dish or re-
fund their money. We feel that
customers are doing us a favor by
coming inhere, not the other way
around, so we want them to le
feeling they had a good meal �
w1
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fi I
1 �
I
ech Phobia
Try

space V I
a
Slow
p you
ii ur speal
i ap
.
Wednesday
One show nigl
Doors open at
Amateur Hot
Following the Cor
For Show
Information
Call 758-3943
Rt 264 Bypass N�
A orivatc dab
$1.00 OffW
Wednesday, Fi





OM COUNTY
by Berke Breathed
I Ml hM KdllMAN
1 1 UKl KV 18, IV8f
rnative
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was
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na
I
remember
tnds in
liked the
� belonged
knew m
ed That he and his
� hind the quality
pi
� thing we -erve that peo-
ttisfied with we will
with another dish or re-
thcir money. We feel that
mei s are doing us a favor by
6 n here, not the other way
-e want them to leave
feeling they had a good meal
f til
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FOtC
GrVC� AW N
Mi5b�5 THE
WHOU THING.
UPI � Of all the end ot the
world as we know it books that
have been written since H.G.
Wells' War of the Worlds,
Margaret Atwood s The Hand-
maid's Tale is among the most
improbable.
But it is also one of the most
chillingly fascinating, with its vi-
sions of Biblically subservient
women and a society drawn from
a feminist's nightmare.
The book's style is like a
dream, skipping from past to pre
sent to future in the mind's eve
view of a woman known onlv hv
the name of the man she serves
Off red.
Offred is one of the chosen
women, the handmaiden of the
Lord, whose role in this new
society is to bear children foi the
barren wives oi' the upper class.
Offred speaks with a kind oi
fatalistic desperation, recalling
her life with her husband and
daughter betore women were
reduced to their roles as silent,
subseiv lent shadows.
"I have them, these attack
the past, like taintness, a wave
sweeping over mv head
Sometimes it can hardly be
borne
Offred's story jumps back and
forth like any reminiscence, but
Atwood's crystalline wrii
prevents confusion, and the story
becomes instead like a web in
which the rcadet becomes en-
tangled ii is almost like
reading a diary
It is like readme' a diary, the
diary oi a victim ot a brui
ralistic nation ol zealots -
use the name ol (�d to bl
power to themselves.
I he knots and twists in the
tory finally resolve themsel
� to a degree � and the r
closes abruptly, but not jarringly,
with an inventive epilogue
emiinst, fundamentalist,
anyone who loves to be consum
� will enjoy
Handmaid's Tale
Va .�.I has outdone herse
a � a parable ol an immoral
n hiding its sins behind a sh
� r it calls morality.
ll()RTH)S I P
l() 12th M I IK
Or tRl (, 1 C
Siv Abortion froi - �
additional cost Pregnancy rest,
and Pro 1 . inscling. Foi
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HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917 West Morgan St.
eech Phobia?
Try Speakeasy, Inc.
ask dps
Jen:
1 � 1 Sfh a m as 1. Irn .

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be a iiood
s means being
11 sell a- othei -
.1 p
bjective
c as ii ei s !�ee
�s �'�
al ig style
u Build
vv I al vou
is: "1
: � dent
"The best
. e ac r oss is
stance - !cet
�veighi even
� elaxed
gestures and
� uural by just letting
1 ;ier than
. them, rhe im-
member is that
lei and torso
think more
� g youi whole body
oui speaking than
appropriate
and pause. One o
the best things you can do tor
yourself � and your audience �
during a presentation is to stop
talking. It's a good way to collect
your thoughts, decide what to sav
next and let your audience digest
your previous comments, h also
allows you time to inhale to give
your voice the breath support it
needs.
Open your mouth and really
articulate. If your mouth isn't in-
volved in what you're saying, it
won't matter how much the rest
of vou is involved.
Reallv see your audience. Real
eve contact doesn't mean scann-
ing the audience. It means look
ing at and seeing each individual
a if he or she were the onlv per
son in the room.
Lstablish a clear objective.
Even the most effective speaking
style won't work for you if you
don't know what you want to get
across to your audience
Don't take yourself too
seriously. Executives who have
earned reputations for "doing
things right" often strive for
perfection when they speak. But
perfection is an unrealistic goal
for anyone.
Don't take speaking for
granted just because you do it
every day. Be as concerned how
vou speak in everyday personal
encounters as vou are with a
scheduled presentation. Whether
you're talking to one person or a
thousand, the challenge is
same: to make a meaningful con-
nection with your audience, to
make something happen.
Co Krogering and celebrate
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Wednesday, February 19
�- i �

t





I HI l-ASlAROI INIAN
Sports
1 I HKIARY 18, I �
IH HI MHIKI I h. t i � xJim.ti
Seahawks Top Bucs
In CAA Battle
B X Ol I COOPKR
Brian Rowsom's 19-second
� spui red a tough UNC-
v nington team past the Pirates
t night in Minges Col-
Seahawk victory pulled
I i o within one game of
I ates in the CAA. UNC-W
to .1 5-7 mark w hile the
1 to a 6-6 conference
g.
i all scorers with 25
Bobby Jo Springer had N
Cherry was the onl
aw k scorei in double
� also grab
even rebounds.
V ��. all thai was at stake tor
iad ' was no wonder
ild be a phy sical game.
. both, teams compiled a
43 fouls while tour
disqualified with
al fouls apiece.
coach Charlie Harrison
pointed with the loss,
ed by the effort of his
i game up on
n Harrison said.
- tunate thai we didn't
game. We played ex-
md we played
kids Cer-
awa
Hat


'� i
I U
. i-2 a tfiei
r
' 5 tO
$4 B
isl
first

tme was tied
assions.
� c herry umper tied
Sports Fact
lues. Feb. IX. 17
tba pitcher Eddie Feigner
e las, Willie
�. Brooks Robinson,
Clemente, Maury Wills
n Killebrew in succes-
ing a celebrity exhibition
Feigner and his team.
worldwide as King and
irt, are so invincible that
pitcher has only three
' ie lei - behind him.
the game 18-18 with 7:51 left in
the first period. Henry then toss
ed in consecutive buckets to put
ECU up 22-18.
The Pirates did not connect on
another field goal throughout the
first half. However. Sledge, Jack
Turnbill and Vanderhorsl sank a
pair of free throws each, giving
the Bucs a 28-27 halftime lead.
After a Cherry five footer put
the Seahawks up 29-28 just
seconds into the second half,
I NC W never trailed. The
Pirates remained close
throughout the second half as
thev closed to within one point on
six separate occassions.
The Pirates had a chance to tie
when Bass scored inside and drew
a foul. He came up short on the
free-throw attempt as UNC-W
led 40-39 with 1 1:23 still to play.
Sledge slam cut the Seahawk
margin to one (46-45) with 8:40
left to play. I N( -W managed to
hold on as this proved to be the
closest that ECU would get.
The Seahawks then wen; on to
outscore the Pirates 18-8 over the
next six minutes of plav, in-
cluding eight points from center
Rowsom.
UNC-Wilmi ngi on , w ho
desperately needed a win to stay
in the CAA race for fourth place,
opened a 64-53 lead on a Cherry
lav up and two-shot (deliberate)
foul wnh 2:2 emaining.
The Pirates could gel no closer
seven (64 57) as I N
sank 1 1 of their last 13 free-throw
mpts, dropping the Bucs
loss foi the Bucs marks
rd in 11 out
liseum
1L ssed in sever: ol 1 I
field for 17 points and five
rebounds in the losing eff i
Vanderhorsl added 15 and five
rebounds along with tour assets
Hardy connected on five of eight
shots for 10 points and a game-
high six assists.
"1 have to give Wilmington
credit Harrison said.
"Rowsom got them going, and
little by little took the game
away
The Pirates will conclude their
home schedule against non-
conference foe C eniral Connec-
ticut. This game will mark the
final home appearances for
Vanderhorsl and Hardy. The
Pirates will conclude their regular
season on the road against
George Mason on Feb. 22 and
James Madison on Feb. 24.
Ladies Crush 'Hawks
Conclude In Minges
By TIM CHANDLER
SporU Wrtltr
The Lady Pirates finished their
road schedule for this season with
an impressive 6716 victory over
UNC-Wilmington Saturday The
two remaining games for ECL
will be in the home confines of
Minges Coliseum.
With the win, the Bucs moved
to 19-6 overall, and 9-1 in the
CAA. They remain one ga
behind James Madison, wl
they will face ir. their last gam
the season on Feb. 24.
The Pirates got of! to a
start Saturday, trailing bv
many as seven points dSi 12)
14 minutes left in the I
I isa Squirewell's two I
put LC I on top 22 2 a
never trailed again 1
then rolled to a 31-21 lead I
settling for a halftime lead I
32-30.
In the second half, the P
defense totally dominated p
as thev outscored the Hawks
35 16
Head coach Emily Manwa
said that detense really he
Pirates. " Thev only
baskets in the se md
stated lanwai
Another ke to tl
cording to Manwaring, a
Keith Sledge's dunk brought the Pirates to within one 46-45 with 8:40 foul situation. "W
left in ihe gamt I N(Wilmington picked up thi-CAA victory 75-67. to their 20
'SLEDGE' HAMMER!
"We got 1" points at the free-
throw line
The Pirates held the Hawks,
re in the t�p ten in field-
goal percentage in the nation, to
a 41 percent average from the
r, including a 31-perceni
in the second half. The
44 percent from the
field for the game.
E( i ah ndd the advantage in
� department with oo-�
i( -Wilmington turned it
: 31 times.
I ah Manwaring said that the
ered the Pirates early,
�. were able to take them
is they built up
in I he Pirates
. ar-
-
they way as Lisa
wed bv
Bethea with 14, Sylvia
. in 13, and 1 ora
irier, (.red O'Neill.
im Williams
i
M Pompili l unded
point.

ght.
�'
M
Ma
Swim Teams Capture First, Second
B DWID McGINNESS
11 � 11
captured
pionship at -
.on fere: "A
f
( h
Bruce Brockschmidt
Ihe Pirate women nearly
equalled the feal ol their male
counterparts, coming from
ake second place
erfully deep James
im.
they were all season, the
Bui men were lead bv sophomore
Bruce B � I midr. w ho netted
:e individual wins, including
two ECU v arsity records.
"Bn the most outst
he meet head
swim coach Rik Kobe said. He
cut three seconds ofl his 4m if
lividual medley) time, and
broke a varsity record in the 200
backstnike
Othei outstanding individual
formers included Al Smith.
who took home a win in the 100
breastroke, Keith Kaut. who nail-
ed second in the 50 and 100
freestyle, and Kevin Hidalgo,
i captured second in the 200
butterfly.
In relay action, the team of
Brockschmidt, Hidalgo. Kaut
and David Killeen won the 400-
.i 800 freestyle relays.
Brockschmidt, Hidalgo, Kaut
and Ronald Fleming came home
with a win in the 400-medley
relay as we
As a teat
mance was
the 14 comp
in their events K
and
mam
" We' re
Kobe "We ��
"They trained harder
this season than any
other team I've
trained.
�Scott Hernon
petition to lock dowi
conference chain;
we are happy as we can be
Although the men tool
the conference championship,
performance ol the women was
perhaps even more impress
The 1 adv Pirates came
from a disappointing
place after the first day ol c
I c ach
team,

- Bucs
performed
in (the
n's)
Hernon "They
m than
ained. They
.ally
e
he I ady
Wilm-
� Caycee Po
Went ink.
the 100 and
ke, A'hile teammate
� in the 100
placing highly in the com-
ia Miller with a
sh in the 1650
t and Lori Liv-
second in the 200

Wei - isistently per-
see WOMEN, page 10
WZMB's McVey, Har ward Successful Duo
Bv JANE! SIMPSON
to a brilliant idea by-
ports director. Mike
i nant
WZMB
McVey, the ECU campus radio
on is not only filling the air
vith music, but also with

ad been going to the men's
ketl - tmes and I went to
. ladies (plav) one night and
ced that the P.rate Sports
Network didn't cover the 1 adv
Pii . ames Mc ey said.
"So I called up (ECU) Sports In-
formation and found out that
they (the Pirate Sports Network)
didn't carry the women's games,
md would give us the right to
broadcast the sanies
This is how it all came about,
where WZMB's broadcasts of
Lady Pirate basketball all began.
McVey handles the play-by-
play duties while WZMB's Spike
Har ward does the color commen-
tating.
It didn't take long for McVey's
idea to become reality. "I took it
11 our general manager (Kate Ab-
bott) and got the idea approved
said McVey. "Then 1 called up
coach Manwaring and explained
the situation to her. We got
everything finalized and went
with it
Coach Manwaring was quite
happy and appreciative of
WZMB's coverage of her Lady
Pirates. "I was happy that
students at our campus radio sta-
tion think that our Lady Pirate
basketball program is worthy of
their attention and their efforts
stated Manwaring. "We really
appreciate them helping to pro-
mote our outstanding athletic
achievements.
"As players, female athletes
haven't had the opportunity lor a
lot of media exposure Manwar-
ing said. "They probably ap-
preciate it more than a male
athlete does. I think they work
harder when they know there's
more to basketball than just
walking out on the court to prac-
tice and to play.
"A lot ol other people are in-
terested in what they're doing
and that helps them become bet-
ter players added Manwaring.
McVey and Harward don't just
show up at Minges Coliseum ten
minutes before a game and put
on a headset. Preparation for a
game takes up quite a bit of time.
"I work on it hard for about
two days stated McVey. "We
have to get all the stat's from
both teams. I have to go through
them and make out a sheet of all
the players and the percentages
for the year, as well as some in-
teresting facts to relay to the
listeners. Usually, we try to get an
interview with Coach Manwaring
too
"We put a lot of preperation
into it added Harward. "Mike
more so than me, because he
organizes and gets all the statistic
sheets and programs from the
other schools. I'll spend a couple
of hours looking over the players
and getting some background in-
formation, such as where they're
from and their high-school
background. I just try to get the
feel of their name and all that
Harward was quite excited
with McVey's idea and the
chance to work with a good
friend. "As soon as Mike
presented his idea to me, I was all
for it said Harward. "I
thought it was a great idea.
"First of all, it gave me the
chance to work with Mike. He's a
friend ol mine and 1 respect him a
lot for his sports knowledge
Harward continued. "1 also
thought it would be great to bring
our listeners 1 ad Pirate basket-
ball. "Not much publicity is put
into the women's basketball team
and they've had such good team's
over the vears
Harward i- also a big sports
tan and feels that he has gained
valuable experience �"I've aiwavs
been a big sports fan. This was a
gieal chance for me. I've gotten
some good experience he said.
McVey has complete control of
the broadcast and sets the outline
for the broadcast. "I set up the
entire pre-game show, half-time
show, and post-game show
w as going to happen the first time
we went on the air, but it went so
smoothly Harward added.
"Mike was so professional and
easy to work with
McVey also thinks highly of
Harward. "Spike and 1 do a real
pood job together said .McVey.
"The first couple of games we
had a problem ot talking over
e ich other, but we finally devised
a swem that when he wants to
speak, he'll give me a cue and I
then know to be quiet.
"He'll keep it short con-
tinued McVey. "He's a real good
color man. He's real
knowledgable about basketball
and he doesn't say stuff that
doesn't make sense. He commen-
tates on the game or what's hap-
"Ifeel like I'm doing a service to the Lady Pirates
and Vm glad because they are a good basketball
team. They e one of the best athletic team's here
at the university
�Mike McVey
McVey stated. "1 make the
outline, get the interviews, and
find all the stats. Then Spike and
I will sit down before the game
and go over it all.
"Basically, 1 do what 1 want to
within the show, within the limits
of what the FCC will allow and
what I know a play-by-play man
should do
According to Harward, McVey
is a very good play-by-play man.
"Mike is really easy to work
with Harward explained.
"He's very professional, both in
his delivery and his background
in getting the facts.
"I was a little wary of what
pening during the game.
Coach Manwaring seems to
think very highly of both Har-
ward and McVey. "1 think Mike
and Spike are very enthusiastic
about what they're doing
stated Manwaring. "They really
care about doing a good job. 1
think it helps us as a program and
them as students at East
Carolina
Conveying a picture using only
words is one of the hardest
aspects of broadcasting, accor-
ding to McVey.
"The big thing about broad-
casting a game is that it's radio
and not television said McVey.
"You have to convey that pic:
to your audience. When they are
listening, they have to be able to
visually see what I say. and that
the most difficult thing. "1 have
to put a court in front of them
and let them see the action
Harward deals with broad
casting the games in his own wav .
"I pretend I'm talking to just
person he said. "I'm trvmg to
explain what's happening during
the game, so they can get a men-
tal image
Harward also shows the tin1'
and professionalism of a color
commentator.
"Basically, the only time I in-
terject is maybe to say what the
team should do to come back or
what they should do to win
commented Harward.
"I point out mistakes or good
plays and strategies � things like
what kind of defense thev're in,
what kind of pressure they're go
ing to put on, (and) keys to the
game, like rebounding and such.
McVey feels Manwaring is
pleased with their broadcasts
"Personally, I think she loves
it stated McVey. "I told her
about it and she was outwardly
excited, but shocked. I think
she's happy someone wanted to
promote the women's basketball
team.
"I feel like I'm doing a service
to the Lady Pirates and I'm glad
because they are a good basket-
ball team McVey acknowledg-
ed. "They're one of the best
athletic team's here at the univer-
sity. You can go to a game and
there may be 200 to 400 people
there. I would like to see them get
more support
McVey knows that without a
little help from your friends some
be done Two of the
or contributors to the broad-
- are the Sports Information
Ofl ice and engineer Mike
Buscemi.
"The Sports Information
Dept. has been very helpful with
our broadcasts said McVey.
"Thev are the ones that get us the
statistics, set up ur line, and
ke sure we have everything we
need. Rob Wilson and Bob Gen-
narelli do a very good job helping
Us
"Our broadcasts wouldn't be
possible without Mike Buscemi
stated McVey. "He goes with us
and runs the (control) board. We
don't go bv a stop watch for our
breaks when we have promos, he
gives us our cues. He also takes
care of all the technical aspects.
"He really makes the game
flow a lot easier for us. We don't
have to worry about anything but
watching the game and doing the
action McVey added.
Cietting along helps a great deal
in anything, but especially in
broadcasting a sporting event.
I ike Dick Enberg and Al Mc-
quire or Rick Barry and Bill
Russell, a play-by-play man and
the color commentator need to
get along � and McVey and Har-
ward do just that.
"Spike and ! have never
disagreed about a play said
McVey. "We even try to add a
little comedy in, everv once in a
while
WZMB's next two broadcasts
will be on Feb. 22 against George
Mason and then on Feb. 24
when the Lady Pirates will try to
avenge their early season loss to
the CAA's league-leading Lady
Dukes ot James Madison.
Classified
PERSONALS
BAHAMAS
qjW and ivDP
Scoop
ZBT A &' '
s.sters meet
Thursday c'
ZBT Than
Ssters tor a
I rfSSion puf
yy T. Happy �'
illy par
� � �
FeD 18
� emoer Be
� rt da.
RUSH
PHI KAPPA
BOSH i
1
� ' � � "
PIKA5

,AA PHI E
� �

DELTA ZETi
� �
DELTA ZET�
jEse
APPA SIGS
as a v �
-

SIG EPS
� -
51R L S: fi
ers. W
I

OST
sage C

LOST
- �
"oney ma
SasKea
- �
HI KAPPA TA
U S H
- " -
I AST CHANCE
r sprin
"s t ca.s ' ;
� uaed Ca
N OW ' C� �
lecide!
n
NEED A RIDE TO v �OR
SPRING BREAK?
' ding a bus �
uded call 758
One test v
you kiicy
it htM I
Yes No
DD
DD
DD
DD
�'piuf
WpSl. M3CIWW ��W'
I

v"





rush 'Hawks
e In Minges
he tree-
s Hawks,
n field-
t nation, to
in the
M percent
alf. The
rom the
i tagein
with oo
;urned it
. that the
ates early,
ike them
built up
Pirates
icoring at-
players
a is 1 ia
�ed b
u. Sylvia
.une
i 'Neill,
V illiams
i total.
I OUl
'boun-
Pirates
Minges
Mason.
Second
aci

i












H

1


; 200

� ys.page 1(1
ful Duo


thing we
lelping
.idn't be
iscemi
� 'h us
mos, he
ikes
i a pects.
ike the game
We don't
�. �. 'fwng but
:ing the
- at deal
especially in
r'ing event.
ind M Mc
� B rj dnd Bill
play man and
entator need to
! McVey and Har-
fiat.
"Spil � j I have never
eed about a play said
'We even try to add a
medy in, every once in a
WZMB's next two broadcasts
w iil be on Feb. 22 against George
n and then on Feb. 24
when the Lady Pirates will try to
avenge their early season loss to
the C Wv league-leading Lady
; .un.es Madison,
I HI 1 AMAKOI INI V-
I HKl Akl IK, 1986
Classifieds
PERSONALS
BAHAMAS Are calling my name
A and WDR Take me away.
r
IB! All Brothers, Pledges and Lil'
iters meet at Menaenhall 221 on
sday at 7
;BT Thanx Don and all the Lil
sters �or a great V day party That
punch really did its job.
1 Happy Birthday! Now you can
� . parry LEGALLY, that is!
� King of you on this special
. Feb 18 will always be a day to
bef Be home around 5 for a
. surprise! Love Always.
ATTENTION: SCUBA EN-
THUSIASTS: The newly formed
Coral Reef Dive Club is holding a
meeting Feb. 24 from 79 p.m. in
room 248 Mendenhall. Spring Break
trip and memberships will be
discussed. All those interested and
non divers included are welcome.
Join the club that's going
somewhere The Coral Reef Dive
Club.
LOST: Navy purse on purple bus
Thurs. afternoon (2-13-86) Reward
$20. No questions asked! If found
notify Amelia at 758 1023.
LOST: Green Army napsack on
ECU bus night of 2 11 86. If found
please call 752 8108.
LOST: Beige colored purse
call Yusotf 758 6285
Please
SH S gma Tau Gamma Little
Brother Rush Serving
iv rite beverage 9 TONITE.
�� e Sig Tau House
HI KAPPA TAU LIL SISTER
sH: Will be Weds
' vie Phi Tau house at 9 Come
d to party with the funnest
ampus
�VS. We had a wonderful time at
fine s social One thirty ar
j much too soon Hope we can
hearts together agam
. ove. The Aloha Xis
� A PHI EPSILON: And Pan
� ib's present the 1st Annual
3awg Happy Hour That's
folks the Maddawg himself,
� nes Green lil will be at
s on autographs and answer
- about his early years. $2
ers all night long. "He
ln'1 sit He wouldn't beg, he
� i : ad d
EITA ZETA: Congratulations to
� s sters Beth Eury, Beth
ldsm �' Sharon Goodwin, Karen
racey Grimaldi, An
� � Maggie Lawrence, Donna
Sue Moritz, Sherry Roll
�ort, Julie Smith, Terry
" md Natalie Thigpen. and
orrance We love you, your
'a Zeta Sisters
�ELTA ZETA: HAPPY HOUR at
Wednesday Feb 19
appa SIGS The Graffetti Social
- Id success We ail agree it
e of our best Tequi la
es, shots, and beer did us
. � R � now we must keep our
f sight Had a blast!
. � � r i -
G EPS N � Waste was the
� �� tor the night with
� �� rs and beer .�.� lid ' up
� - � : n trieaark from head
��� . - - ppec and
i si ��� A'e I'ked 't fine but not
'� " � bel nds of Dana, James &
�� L .� fi Sigs.
;RI.S Rus! p Kappa Tau Little
sters. Wednesday. Feb. 19th.
ome and party with the jamminest
.s on campus Call 752 4379 for
OST: Gold nugget necklace at
ige Clinic Tuesday Feb 4
� rmat on please call Susan at
OST: Navy pocketbook with
a Aaliet, etc inside Not much
ey mainly sentimental items
� sc returen S25 reward. No ques
iSked Just PLEASE PLEASE
RN Call 752 2648 anytime!
� �� Rawl or Brewster on cam
HI KAPPA TAU LITTLE SISTER
JSH: Wed & Thurs (invitation)
' 9:00 until. Call 752 4379 for
�'formation,
AST CHANCE Cruise to Mexico
� spring break! Great deal $445. 5
jhts 6 days, tips and gratuities in
Call 758 0074 or 752 3178
Only a few weeVs left to
.EED A RIDE TO MIAMI FOR
('RING BREAK?: If interested in
. a bus, keg and bar possible in
call 758 0074 or 752 3178.
LOST: Burgundy Saddlebred
keychain in case in the area of
Mendenhall parking lot, Joyner
Library and the Art Bldg. Reward
Call 753 3917
ALPHA DELTA PI: We are please
to announce our newly elected ex
ecutive officers! President Donna
San March, Vice President Wendi
Terrell, Pledge Trainer Jennifer
Brewer, Recording Secretary Cari
Miller, Treasurer Beth Herrington,
Rush Chairman Paige Luther,
Social Chairman Kathy Kittrick,
House Manager Blair Barnes, Cor
responding Secretary Stephanie II
ey; Reporter Historian Julie Wells,
Execs At Large Carol Gilbert and
Laura Ewmg, and Panhellenic
Delegate Naomi McLaurin. Con
gratulations! It looks to be another
jammin' good year!
SALE
WORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
perience in typing resumes, theses,
technical documents, and term
papers We manage and merge your
names and addresses into merged
letters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards Our prices are extremely
reasonable and we always offer a 15
percent discount to ECU students. S
8, F Professional Computer Co
(back of Franklin's) 115 E 5th St
757 0472
WORD PROCESSING: Contact
BECKY LATHAM 752 5998 (8 a.m. 5
pm.) 17 yrs. experience in typing
theses, scientific reports,
manuscripts, business and form let
ters
NEED A D.J.?: Are you having a
party and need a D.JFor the best
in top 40, beach and dance, call
Morgan at 758 7967 between 5 7.30
p.m Reasonable rates. References
on request
TYPING: Prompt service by ex
oerienced person with State of-The
Art Electronic equipment Call
756 5265.
ALTERATIONS: Thrift Shop 429
Evans St Special of this week will
be coats $2, womens jackets 50c
ladies blouses 3 pcs for $1, men's
shirts 3 pcs. for $1, skirts $1 or $2,
jeans $1, ladies pants $1, beautiful
suits $5 S10, ladies coats $5
SENIORS! SENIORS! SENIORS
Enjoy the last phase of your college
career employmentS&F Com
puters is offering a package price to
help you send out your resumes in
eluding all of the following: Letter
quality typed resumes, Mail merged
cover letters (name and address of
each company as inside mailing ad
dress on letter), Letter quality typed
envelopes with company address
and your return address on
envelope, Everything folded, stuffed
and even stamped, A listing of com
panies sent to (for your follow ups)
Just bring us your handwritten
resume and cover letter and the
businesses you with to apply to and
we'll do the rest Per resume for
your namesaddr. (we stuff) $2 30
(min 10 resumes) (we stuff and
stamp) $1.90 (2 page resume prices
slightly higher) This offer absolute
ly expires March 15, 1986. S&F Com
puter Company, 115 East Fifth St
Greenville, N.C 27834 757 0472
TYPING SERVICES: Resumes
term papers, theses Low rates
Spelling and grammatical correc
tions included. Cindy 757 0398 after
5:30 p.m.
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc Call
758 6011 and leave a message
FOR SALE: Math Statistics 3228. All
problems worked in current book
and workbook Make an "A" Call
Bob at 752 2579 or 758 1400
FOR SALE: 81 Honda Prelude con
version convertable White over
dark blue, stereo and air 51 000
miles, $4,300 negotiable or assume
payments at $175 per month Call
758 5111
THE $500 A MONTH PLAN: Work at
home, receive money daily. For
complete set up rush $1 to Umversi
ty Publications P O Box 2392,
Greenville, N.C. 27836 2392.
WETSUIT: O'Neill "Otter full suit
Medium, velcro neck, very good con
dition. A steal at$40 Call Jim after 6
at 758 6089
LOOK GREAT AT NO COST: Har
cut and style to compliment your
facial shape and bone structure Ab
solutely free for 1st haircut by a New
York City trained hair stylist Pro
fessional image Consultants
756 1945
FOR SALE: 3 ft refridgerator $100
negotiable. Call 758 8019
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Non
smoker, $140 per month, 2 utilities,
phone 756 0433.
GERMAN TUTOR: German native
needs work tutoring can help with
German classes. Call 752 0373
BABYSITTING WORK WANTED:
Day or night, experienced with
children. Call 752 0373
WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share
two bedroom house with couple 808
Mumford Rd Rent is $83
utilities and cable Deposit $53 mus'
like cats Available now 757 1160
Meianie or Reagan.
4th FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: For nice 2 bedroom
duplex 1 mile from campus in quiet
neighborhood Fireplace and
sundeck $93 75 - ' 4 utilities Please
call 75? 0319
IP
i pti
University Optometric Eye Clinic
DR. DENNIS O'NEAL
Comprehensive Eye Examinations
Contact Lenses
Soft, Hard, Gas Permeable Tinted
Extended Hear, Contacts for Astigmatism
Glasses (One Day Service in Must Cases)
Student & Faculty Discounts on Contacts &
Glasses
Convenient to Campus
Evening & Sat Appointments Available
612 E. 10th Street
(Across from campus security)
758-6600
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway (N C 33 LGreenville. North Carolina
Phone 75? 3172
(Past Riverh!uff AptS.)
�j;lUi�
Flounder
Popcorn Shrimp
$3
25
$325
Hours 4:30-9:30 Mon. Sat.
- NEWLY REMODELED -

Create
cleanness
A litter bit
at a time.







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() PI RFORMINC IALEN1
Here s your chance to represent North
ua ir. the 1986 Miss Venus USA
win prizes & awards valued
at S20 000 The state finals will be held May
18 it the Raleigh Marriott Hotel If you are
single at least 18 and UNDER 29 as of Oct
1 1986 you may quality For FREE entry
information, send name, address, age &
pnoru Pageant Productions 2258
N B 1 St Suite 12 Alexandria.
'03-379-1414













Low, Low
Prices
NvVL
Interest Free
Payment Plan
Available
'1
$10.00
On All Rings
Special
$10.00 Deposit
Special
ECU Student Store
Wed. Feb. 19 & Thurs. Feb. 20
TIME: 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.
if
HiRFF JONES
Oi�'iior at Ct'Tlion Compsny
One test where only
you know the score.
(Check One)
Yes No
an
an
an
DD
Do you want to be the
only one who knows
when you use an early
pregnancy test?
Would you prefer a test
that's totally private to
perform and totally
private to read?
Would you like a lest
that's portable, so you
can carry it with you and
read it in private?
And how about a simple,
one step test with a dra
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GO FROM COLLEGE TO THE ARMY
WITHOUT MISSING A BEAT.
If you checked "Yes" to
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you. Use it, and only you
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The hardest thing about break-
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music is- well, break-
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music. So it you re
looking for an oppor-
tunity to turn your
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a full-time perform-
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good kxk at the
Army
its not
all parades
and John Philip
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bands rock,
waltz and boogie
as well as march,
and they perform
before concert au -
diences as well
as spectators.
With an average
of 40 performances a month, there s
also the opportunity tor travel
not only across America, but possibh
abroad.
Most important, you cm
expect a first-rate pro-
fessk nal environment
from your instructors,
facilities and fellow
musicians. The Army
has educational
programs that
can help you
pay forotT-
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vou qual-
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Itvoucansmht-
read musu p rton ling in the Arm
reak Write:
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Benjamin Harrison. IN 46216-5005.
On , I SOC USA-ARMY
ARMY BAND.
BE AU YOU CAN BE.
� �: ���
NMMMMB
����� �
�r





10
1 HI S I i. KO! 1MN
M-BRl'ARY 18, 1986
Power Weight Lifting Meet
1 he Depari mem ol
Intramural Recreational Services
� old its annual powei weight
it'tn eel Wed Feb. is at
J (a in
The IRS H ord
by
Jeannette Roth
eai 's meet vmII begin a!
:h the ladies of ECU
the competition.
located on the
S reel Mall in dow mown
Spectators are en
�me out and watch
ei and women of
�s n u eight
�restling has
mi-iinal stage with
upsets I as!
i men's 200 lb.
. 'Big Don'
- ci �'i Mark
paved the
a fa I
t '� be held
al Gyn Kul
- v dek and
fa 'heir
Feb 22, all final
held dui ing the
askei bal game
. ai ed! 1 he In-
Swin � eel will begin
th( Minges
With close
a ai ming up 1 i
the N1
March 19.
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
M & W 2 pm-5 pm
T & Th 12 noon-5 pm
Friday 11 am-6 pm
Sat 11 am 5 pm
Sun 1 pm-? pm
EQUIPMENT CHECKOUT
(Memorial Gym Rm 115)
M-Fh 9 am-9 pm
Friday 9 am-6 pm
Sat 11 am-5 pm
Sun 1 pm-5 pm
OUTDOOR RECREATION
M & F 1:30 pm-6 pm
T & Th 3 pm-5 pm
TRAINING ROOM
M Th 10 am-12 am
M lh 2 pm-6 pm
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Pool
M 1 7 am 8 am
Ml 12 noon 1:30 pm
M & W J:30 pm 7:30 pm
T & Th 3:30 pm 6:30 pm
Friday J:30 pm 6 pm
Sat 11 am 5 pm
Minges Pool
M-W-F 8 pm 10 pm
Sun 1 pm-5 pm
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
M Th 9 am-9 pm
Friday 9 am-6 pm
Sat 11 am-5 pm
Sun 1 pm-5 pm
Minges
M 1 3 pm-7 pm
This Style rome
With Single Vision R
Lenses for only
$27
95
All Other Fromes
30 to 60 OFF
with purchase of RX Lenses
RAY BAN Sunglasses 30 OFF
fC�
pucians
OHer Good Through 2 14 86
Open Mon -Pri 9am til 5 30 p m
PRICES EFFECTIVE
SUN FEB 16 THRU
SAT. FEB 22 AT
A4PIN
GREENVILLE
ITEMS NOT
AVAILABLE
TOOTHER
RETAIL DEALERS
OR WHOLESALERS
WE RESERVE THE
RIGHT TO LIMIT
QUANTITIES
P Kappa Phi are
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the supermarket with iitHtf�7ffl
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See
Stor(. For Of
nan muei eai ed
� Sneal ei Sam
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WOMEN
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE.
Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality
MhN
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRESH
Fryer Leg Qtrs
20 OFF POULTRY
YOUNG N TENDER
f Breasts
JUICY SWEET RED OR THOMPSON WHITE
Seedless Grapes
B"
e e n
10 LBS. OR
MORE
LIMIT ONE
Family Pack
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cheduled ft
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practicing vour
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deadline is K ed
Women
Conclude
Season
Continued from page 8
� ;a �. and is ac
Hernon, the best
the 1985-86
happy with her
� ear and at the
but thought she
� een capable of a lit-
� .��. consistent this
a : the two event con-
m pi n, "I till wanted
� . the kind of at-
ide a winning compctetive
mer needs.
Wentink dropped two full
nds in the Finals of the 10C)
tstroke to nail first in the

Both Kobe and Hernon would
thank the entire men's and
men's teams for their dedica-
tion and effort during the entire
on.
� couldn't have asked any
re from my girls Hernon
aid "They gave everything, and
met all my goals for the season
"I've never seen such team uni-
and spirit Kobe said.
"Everybody went crazy when we
it; lumping into the pool and
. their lungs out. Seventy-
ol our kids are still
too hoarse to talk today
The coaches would like to ex-
tend their special appreciation to
the graduating seniors: Keith
Kaut. Andy Cook, David
Robacewski, Eric Hawkins and
Nancy Cook.
DIET COKE � TAB � SPRITE � MELLO YELLO
Coca Cola
2
liter
bottle
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0
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703 Greenville Blvd Greenville, N.C. OPEN 24 HOURS
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CLOSE Sat. 11 RM. OPEN SUNDAYS 7'� m 11"





Title
The East Carolinian, February 18, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 18, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.457
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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