The East Carolinian, February 11, 1986






She
(Earnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 �06- 37
Tuesday, Eebruan 11, 1986
Greenville, N.C
14 Pages
( inflation 12.(KM)
Improvement Sought ;
Upgrade Expressions
Warmer Days
I B HI MHtKI
I he �,tirotlniin
Siimc were lucky enough to take advantage of the warm weather while it lasted. But beware, winter
has turned cold on us again. Today's forecast includes rain and a high of 40 degrees.
Committee Begins Its Search
By CAROLYN DRISCOLL
SUM Writn
A committee was formed dur-
ing yesterday's meeting of the
Media Board to "look into ways
oi improving Expressions (ECU's
minority affairs publication) as a
separate medium to increase
minority student input and to
better meet the needs of minority
students oncapmusaccording to
Michael Smith, chairman of the
Media Board and president of the
Student Union.
In addition, the Board placed
Expressions in a "state of
moratorium slates Smith. In
effect, all operations within the
organization arc frozen until
organizational problems are
resolved b the committee.
"The Media Board has given
Expressions time and patience
explains Jeffrey Canady, general
manager of the magazine "But
because oi student apathy and
failure to be consistent the Board
has decided it coul I I e feasi
ble tor one or two people to con-
pressions.
Expressions, most recently
published one week ago. has
come under attack by certain
members of the Media Board. In
fact, it was initially suggested
that Expressions should be phas-
ed out and integrated with the
East Carolinian. However, not
all Board members were in agree-
ment on this proposal. Instead,
the committee to improve the
magazine was formed.
In light f the criticism
generated a! yesterday's meeting
and the action taken b the
Beard, Smith stresses I his is
not an issue, it's a publication.
We are dealing with h as we
would any oI her
publication(The Board's ac-
tion) was not in an wa a
criticism o the present staff. We
tgnize 11 . difficult situa-
tion and we are trying to improve
Expressions for the future
In an attempt to emphasiz
intentions oi the Board he con
tinues, "The Board has recogniz-
best interest of minority
students
Slates Canady, "The time is
passed tor all minority students
to become invloved and have a
voice. Another minority
organization is being phased
outmost of the Expressions
staft has done an excellent job
giving time and total devotion,
but the Media Board has taken
Expressions out of our hands and
put it where it belongs � on the
shoulders of the minority
students.
In response to the Board's
decision. Jimmie Hackett, editor
� Expressions viI think the
magazine is well on its wav
toward working out the major
problems ot the organizati m. I
I � �ard to the time when
tpressions becomes a powerful
voice for the minority students
I he committee to in,prove the
magazine will consist ot Media
Board members Keenan Ward.
Michael Smith. Kirk Shelley,
Chris fomasic, Dean Alexander,
B PATT1 KEM MIS
The search has begun for a new
chancellor of ECU after present
ancellor John M. How ell con-
firmed that he plans to retire no
later than June 30, 198
According to the EC'l B
ot rrustees, the person they are
looking tor must hold certain
characteristics. Berne physically,
emotionally and morally capable
of withstanding a sustained and
heavy workload; possession ot a
personality which will help
him her in the performance ol
duties; and a strong personal
identification with ECU and sur-
rounding areas are the basic traits
the Search Committee is looking
for in nominees.
Besides having broad ex-
perience in his her field, the new
chancellot is desired to have a
good liberal educati n, a ter-
minal degree, and a management
philosophy consisteni with the
goals ot the University. Anyone
can and is urged to nominate so-
meone who they feel not only fits
these qualifications, but shows
strong academic leadership.
The Search Committee will
review nominations and make
recommendations to the board.
The eleven member committee
consists of three members ap-
pointed from the faculty,
members o' the board oi
Trustees, and representatives
from both the student body .
the alumni oi ECU. The three
faculty members consists of one
from the major academic areas ot
the Arts & Sciences and profes-
sional schools, one from the
v oo : Medicine and a minori-
ty representative winch could be a
woman. Jo Ann Bell will serve as
I xecutive Secretary of the com-
mittee.
Although 'he initial period for
receiving nominations before
screening will be from the first of
Iehruary until the middle ot
�pril 1986. nominations will be
accepted until a chancellor is
chosen. After screening and off
site interviews are completed, a
visitation committee will begin to
visit the candidates' home institu-
tions. Chairman of the Board of
Trustees, Ralph kmsey Jr hopes
to conduct the visitation from the
last of October through the first
ot December.
No later than January, 1987,
the Search Committee will make
recommendations to the Board
and upon the approval of the
recommendations, two can-
didates will be presented to the
President of the UNC System.
The new chancellor will be named
after the president's recommen-
dation has been approved by the
Board of Governors.
The Search Committee will be
a working one with complete in-
dependence. All decisions or
tinue Expressions, "he reason ed that the problems have been General Manager of the Expres-
recommendations will be based they've formed the subcommittee going .r: tor a lonj ind sums Jeffery C anadv and Tom
on what best tor the university is to get students unloved and decided ir was mne to take as- Lu ener,general manager of the
and free from outside pressure. establish consistency within Ex- tion. What was dow was in the Eastarolinian.
will be a hard working com
miitee Kinsev said. "The
schedule is strenuous
According to Dr. Kenneth
Wilson, head of the Faculty
Senate, the committee should be
selected sometime m February
When this is completed, the
search, for a new Chancellor of
ECE will be underway.
Bacchus Plans Future Help
By PA I 11 KKMM1S
and
JILL MORGAN
The Campus Alcohol and Drug
program has now affiliated with
the National Organization BAC-
CHUS, a student group that
Tax Time Strikes
B DAWN STEWARD
Stiff Whirr
A time feared by most students
is here once again � tax time.
Taxes must be filed by April
15, 1986 for students who wish to
receive a refund from the govern-
ment. "Although students are to
receive refunds, they must file in
order to receive the money. Most
students forget this says Jan
Kanemtsky of H&R Block, She
also adds "students must be cer-
tain to endorse the forms; other-
wise, the forms will be
automatically bounced
Students must file taxes accor-
ding to these monetary
guidelines: if gross income is:
single: Federal $3,430 or State
$1,100; married (filing together):
Federal $5,620 or State $1,000;
married (filing separately):
Federal $1,040 or State $1,000.
A helpful word of advice to
students is make sure for all jobs,
See TIME Page 5.
Phi Kappa Phi
Offers Fellowships
By MIREl.l'DWIC'k
I lie ECU chapter of Phi Kap-
pa Phi National Honor Society is
inviting outstanding seniors to
apply tor a Graduate Fellowship
of up to $6,(KM) for first-year
graduate or professional study.
An additional 30 students will
receive Honorable Mention
Awards of $500 each.
"The purpose of these awards
is to encourage people of high
scholastic ability to enter the
graduate school of their choice
said Fred Broadhurst, professor
in Industrial Technology.
Each Phi Kappa Phi chapter
may nominate one student for
these awards. Accordingly, Phi
Kappa Phi requests faculty to en-
courage graduating seniors with
outstanding academic and leader-
ship abilities to apply for these
scholarships. Information about
the scholarships and application
process may be obtained from in-
dividual departmental offices or
by contacting the Fellowship
Committee Chair, Trenton Davis
at 757-6242.
Broadhurst said the Phi Kappa
Phi chapter at ECU was
established 15 years ago. "Our
purpose is to encourage scholai
ship among students from all
disciplines. We have the same
basic standards as Phi Beta Kap-
pa but Phi Kappa Phi accepts
students from all disciplines
Broadhurst said.
Besides nominating a student
for the Graduate Fellowship. Phi
Kappa Phi sponsors annual sym-
posiums on topics of current in-
terest.
"We choose a topic of world
interest, and then we distribute a
call for papers to students and
faculty. From the students'
papers we select one student
paper to include in the pro-
ceedings of the symposium
Broadhurst said.
Broadhurst said that because
of an overhaul, the symposium
will not be held this vear.
stresses responsible drinking.
Karen Palmer, co-president of
the organization savs, "The pro-
gram is not an anti-ale 'hol pro-
gram. Our purpose is to promote
the importance of the responsible
use of alcohol and to keep
students out of trouble "
BACCHUS, which stands for
Boosting Alcohol Consciousness
C oncerning the Health of Univer-
sity Students, originated in
Florida. One of the reasons that
the LCT organization became af-
filiated with BACCHUS was to
get national attention and sup-
port.
With the legal drinking age be-
ing raised to 21 in October 1986,
90 percent of ECl students will
find themselves illegal. Senior
Keith Kaut, co-president of
ECU's chapter of BACCHUS.
stressed that the changed drink-
ing age is going to directly affect
the campus.
BACCHUS meets every other
Thursday at 5:15 in 242
Mendenhall. Their next schedul-
ed meeting is February 20. Not
only are students urged to attend
the meetings, but also invited to
stop by their office, 301 Erwin. to
find out more information about
the group.
BACCHUS's main concern is
counseling students recommend-
ed to them by Dean Speier. A
recommended student attends a
workshop, provided by and run
bv the members BACCHUS,
and then has a follow-up inter-
view with someone from the
up. If a student has a second
ise dealing with alcohol or
drugs, he she goes through a
judiciary procedure.
Dean Ron Speier. Associate
Dean of Students and advisor to
fraternities, noted that this year
he was working more closely with
the program to encourage a more
professional attitude. He is also
encouraging more involvement in
other programs like Outreach.
"What's neat about this pro-
gram is that it's a peer group. It is
an organization run by students,
tor students savs Speier.
The 1986 ECU Handbook will
outline the changes that will be
made in campus procedures con-
cerning alcohol. One of these
changes is that alcohol will be
banned from campus beginning
with the fall semester. Dean
Fulghum of Student Life says ap-
proximately "4,900 of 5.500
students in the dorms will be
underage
BACCHUS hopes to aid the
situation by providing educa-
tional information on the new
laws. BACCHUS also plans to
sponsor activities for the students
where alcohol is not the main
source of entertainment and to
give non-drinking students a fun,
sober, social atmosphere.
Future Medical Loans Cut
Bv LANCESEARE
SUff Wilier
The SGA met yesterday and
overwhelmingly decided to ter-
minate the Emergency Medical
Loan Fund at the end of the
85-86 school year.
On Thelnside
Announcements2
Classifieds10
Editorials4
Features8
Sports 11
Truth is the highest thing
that man may keep
�Chaucer
Legislative member Gordon
Walker vigorously down-graded
the program and explained why
the University should incorporate
an insurance policy program.
"The SGA has put money,
money, money into this program
and it has been an embarrassment
from the very beginning
Walker said.
"If the University would incor-
porate an insurance policy for all
the students, the premiums would
be minimal he continued.
Tony Braswell, SGA Treasurer
said, "many students will be left
high and dry because it will take
time for the policies to get
through committees and red
tape
But member Mark Eagem said
that "there should be no ad-
ministrative hang-ups and
anyway, the fund is not ter-
minated until the end of the
school year
Mark Simon simply stated that
the University would take care of
the students regardless.
In other business, the body ap-
propriated $200 for an
honorarian for a seminar by a
former Vietnam POW to be held
in room 244 Mendenhall, Thurs-
day.
Also, projects to beautify the
campus will be enacted in the
near future.
SGA Meeting
J B HI MBFRT - TW tj�l i. MHH
Kirk Shelley addresses the SGA members at their meeting Monday night. During a relatively
uneventfull meeting the SGA voted to cancel all Emergency Medical Loans. See related story on page





1 HI I AS! c AROl 1NIAN
FhBRl'ARY II, 1986
Announcements
SOCCER PLAYERS
Ail people interested n parT.c.pa' ng .n the
ECU Women's Sotcer Clue .nooor soner
tournament please tonijii L,sa
Grosshandlet at 7� 8325 The tournament
iil be held Feb 28 ano Mai i h & 2 There
(Will be a minima' entry tee
DIABETES
Do you hae questions that were nevei
answered' Do you need sumeone to talK to
who r�ally understands' It you are looking
tor support and a productive recourse tor a
seemingly intimate situation please call
'8 �a04 Together diabetes and its cor
�espondmg complications can be better com
prehended and overcome
BALLOONS
The Student Diatetc Assoc ation is taking
orders in tront of the Student Supply Store
'or valent.ne Banoons on the nth and 12th
between 10 a m and 2 p m Baiioo snalv
be purchased on the 14th in tfte Horn I
Building between 1 ano 3
PHI BETA SIGMA
Pf Beta Sigma Frafern 'v ln presents
v ne Danse Pour Les Arrant ia Dante
1 � oversi at "e Ramada inn on Februar,
is i�8� from 8 00 I 00 a m T.cKet advance
s S3 a couple sr single At me door $4 couple
S3 smgle A semi formal affair
EARLY CHILDHOOD CLUB
ECC announces rs 'ifnt nieeting Tues
day February 18 1984 n Speight 208 at s
p m L'Hie Darden will be the featured
speaker on Learn ing D sal ties ECC GET
NVOlVED1
AFROTC
' forvii RO'l. S � ' �.
sr-eking education opo rtun I � and ��
� ��' �'�� �� A" r �' i f ROTC ��
sti.ps i.ir tu ' on boons and $100 oor m mtl
�'ie a.ir Force Officers Qua �.
AFOOT s offeree XI Februai . I
Irom 1 00 6 00 This snecessart � �
'S'dered for choiarsr- OS "� � ' -
� lei o( i�84 Aii interested lents are
urged lo visit Maior Patton al Ail �
ROTC n these indl x HwVi ghlAnnei h
a "�' ss�� � . � .
SCUBA DIVING
ADVENTURES
-i" g fl-r-an Marc! g 14 t�8t D ye Pen
'enamp n the Florida Keys Key Largo Fia
The world s most popu'ar 'eel S cia.s fl"C
q' ts a two tanK ooa1 dive daily one
� �� iciudes tanks air backpa �
a jhts �" : snorke � " me ootpf
idg ru a' Howard Johnsons tun breaktas'
la sw m.no poo' or the ba� s
Cos' 13�5 �or further � Ray S hart
� ' Aqual csat 757 taal Ope' ��.
PE PROGRAMS
s Eduiat
b programs are pei at st i
versify Faculty ana employees
� v ouais directing trie progr jno "�
ou'ension number are identified Delow
idditiona � il I they an
�heir office when ,�jiJi a message ca
efl al Ex'ensior. 600C Apixci ,Oar.en,
Pose E�t 6S8j meets va' -� .
V�r- �' - , . . . - j . .
PHI ETA SIGMA
Trere at- a meel r g 11 Fh
A 3C n rVVeoaenr.ai! 221 PleV I
r,rj tre shtrts 'irve arf vec
ECUGOSPELCHOIR
" � - East Care na G Sp� � '
- � De held on Feb'ua'v 23' I H He
li � rneatre in Mender-a Student Cei lei
The 1 me will be 3 00 L rr trr ss ' S ree
a public
METHODISTPRESBYTERIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Core to ?ne Vethod'St Student Centt-
Aedoesdar nighl a' 5 JO pn ano every
Aednesday night for a delicious al r;u �
eat home cooked mea' w-tr a shcrT program
afterwards This week Davo EOt of
AMNESTY tNTERNAT:ONAL Will speak
Tif meal s 2 at the door Jl SO it ou s.gn uc
advance Can 7S8 7030 for reservations
Sponsored by Presbyterian and AAethodiS'
Campus Ministries
DRAMA GROUPBIBLE
STUDY
You don t nave to be an actor to enioy
'eadmg plays' Every Tuesday night, a
group is meeting to read and discuss plays
that provide insight into the Christian
message We will meet from 7 30 8 30 at the
Methodist Student Center (501 E Filth St .
across from Garrett dorm I Call 752 7240 for
more information Sponsored by
Presbyterian Campus Christian Life
NURSING STUDENTS
All students who plan to de.Jare nursing as
a maior ana wish lo enroll in the sophomore
nursing courses m the fall semester 1986
should p up an intent to Enroll Form in
'he Nursing Bldg room 157 and return by
Fet) 15. 1986 This applies particularly to
present treshmen However this form must
also be submitted by students whowish to re
enroll in the nursing program
ECU HILLEL
OnWedFeb 19 ECU H'liei will sponsor a
visit to Greenville by Mr G'deon Lowy Mr
L owr y is the Assis'ant Managing Editor and
News Editor of the Israel: daily newspaper
Ha aretz He has served as a spokesman tor
'he Israel Labor Party and personal aide to
Simon Peres Since 1982 he has been af
tiiia'ed wth Ha'arei. where he has also held
the position of Senior reporter lor Ha aretz
weekly magazme
Mr Lowy will give a public address on
Aed evening at 7 0 p m in Brewster Hall
room C 103. in addition to meeting with the
Political Science Dept Arrangements can be
"iade tor personal interviews by contactmq
Rabbi Bonnie Koppeil at 830 1138 or Dr
B'jrn, Resn.k a' 757 6232
PANCAKE SUPPER TONIGHT
At 5 30 pm a' the Methodist Student Center
S01 E 5th St across from Garrett Dorm)
An nterdenomtnat'Onal celebration of
Shrove 'uesoar with a brief worship ser
. e and an offering for the Greenville Soup
. � � pr Can 758 20X for more information
Sponsored iomtiy oe the ECU Campus
v n s'r es
PHI SIGMA PI
Honor students ,t you nave a 3 3 or be'ter
GPA and have completed 32 96 hours you are
nvited to attend the smoker of Ph. Sigma P
National Coed Honor Fraternity it will be
held Tuesday Fee II, 1986 at 7 pm in
Biology 103 Dress nea'iy skirts tor ladies
sli rl a. tie for gentsi Then come enioy some
retreshments and find out how to become
part of our great brotherhood
STUDENTS FOR BROYHILL
ECU CHAPTER
OFNSSLHA
The ECU Chapter of NSSLHA will be spor.
soring the 16th annual Speech. Language and
Hearing Symposium on Feb 13 and 14, 19�6
m the Blue Auditorium of the Brody Medical
Sciences Bldg Guest speakers are Dr
Daniel R Boone presenting A 1986 Look at
Voice Therapy, Mrs Lynn S Kelly "The
Speech Pathologist Audioiogist and the
Geriatric Population' and Dr Theodore R
Sunder, Learning Disabilities A
Neurodevelopmenfal Point of View " II you
would like more info contact Carol Town
send or Martha White at the ECU Speech and
Hearing Clinic
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF
UNIVERSITY WOMEN
Ann w Chipley. national director lor
legislative programs lor the American
Association of University Women will speak
on social and economic issues before state
and federal legislators which affect women
at a Saturday brunch. Feb 15 Open to non
members of the graduate women s organia
lion, the meeting will be at Holiday Inn,
Route 13. Greenville from 10 to noon Reser
vations will be accepted through Feb 13
Call 756 1667 or 355 5025
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
The Dep' of Elementary Education will
schedule Upper Division Interviews begmn
mg Monday. Feb 24. 1986 Eligible students
must submit applications tor admission to
the departmental office (Speight I07B) by
Friday. Feb 14 1986 The application entiti
ed Application lor Admission to Upper
Division of Teacher Education at ECU is m
t luded m the appendices of Welcome 'o
Teacher Education .Apple Booki
RACQUETBALLCLUB
it is the T.me Hey guys what time is it
noNAf-5 it is spring time Time for an action
time to te n snape t.me to have tun ano be a
challenger Come to the Racquetbaii Oub
meeting Feb U Tuesday (today) 5 pm at
Memorial Gym Rm 102 and be a parT ot i1
Let's play the game
COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
join the best party in .�
meet this Thursday Rm 21?
00
Democrats w
Mendenhan a'
town' ECU College
CAMP DAY
a ReputMocfc E ec'roi be held
Tuesda t�. ff Front ol tes'uden'
S'orp -� sved '�epufc'icansplease
by bapt�n 9 3 LAW SOCIETY
� c-s starO A rl -1 , A y � Aspeak
Jl ei : i' 96 n room 22'
enha�Von � and e uegai Pro
�t�.S M . - . � artei 1 this neel
'SI4 ' -i �(i Cf B '3 Pona
STATE EMPLOYEES
ASSOCIATION
On Feb 12 me ECU Chapter of me S'a'e
� : . ees Assji a' im as scnedu'ed two
. meeting tor members and non
� . � . � E ANC Representa- ves from
'he S'a'e Membership Commi"ee a
me Denef'ts of membership n
SEANC T.mes 12 noon .n Mende a
room 224 and 1pm .n Brody Bldg room
it n
Students interested in summer carnp
employment should visit the Co op Office in
Rawi 313 to learn more about this year s
Camp Day Opportunities for t ounsetors
arts 4, crafts instructors i.feguards. and
many other positions tor students m an ma
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
There wa mee' ng of the ECU College
Repubicans in Room 221 of Mendenhan a'
6 30 pm or Tuesday Feb II We will d.scuss
plans for Red McDaniel who will speak a'
2 00 pm on Thursday in Mendenhan Cai
757 0711 lor more information
LASER PRINT SALE
m Mendeoai: S'uaei' Cenfe-f Febrod .
10 Fecuar y ' 9 arr p"
BIOLOGY CLUB
'�'�ECuB'OiogyCiuD s t Iding 'snext
meeting Von Feb 17 in B 103 (main
luditor ufn As a pa . preprofessona
month Dean Hayek dean of admissions of
'he East Carolina university medical school
will speak There will aiso be a social at 8 0C
a'V' 'he meeting in BN 102 if you would ike
to talk to Dean Hayek th s will be a gooc
ime An are welcome '0 attend
This Style Frame
With Single Vision Rx
Lenses for only
$27
95
All Other Frames
30 to 60 OFF
with purchase of RX Lenses
RAY BAN Sunglasses30 OFF
taans
Offer Good Through 21486
31 5 Parkview Commons
Across From Doctors Park
752 -1 446
Opan MonFri. 9 a.m. til 5:30 p.r
Best Prices In Town! !
Floral Boutique
3557469

fsu.
0$ ,VVV
Carnations
79C each
Many arrangements to pick from!
Valentine's Day
Friday, Feb. 14, 1986
Don't Forget To Order I
Early
VETERANS CLUB
There will be a meeting ol the Veterans
Club of ECU on Wednesday. February 12 at
7 30 p m m room 221, Mendenhan We will
be discussing our plans tor the semester and
other exciting stuff Don't miss out
Students laculty and staff who are
veterans. Dependents. Active duty person
nei. Reservists and any other interested per
sons are encouraged to attend See you then'
SURFING CLUB
ECU Surfing Club meeting at 221
Mendenhan Thursday night at 8 Three new
videos will be shown along with the events
for the spring semester Also all persons m
terested in going to Florida Spring Break
must attend! Any questions pertaining to the
meetmg, call John McCann at 757 1502
BEDTIME ENTERPRISES
Bedt.me Enterprises by Sco't Hall We will
read a bedtime story to a girl friend iShe
must live m an ECU Residence Hall) lor
S2 00troml0pm 12 midnight Von Feb 17
Wed Feb 19 Make reservations now by
calling 752 1081
PPHA
Pre Professional Health Alliance will
mee' Wed Feb 11 at 6 pm m room 221
Mendenhan Student Center All members
should make it a point to attend Any in
dividual interested in being inducted should
also attend
KING YOUTH FELLOWSHIP
Come study the Book of Revelations witr
us m 242 Mendenhan on Thursday, Feo . 13
a' 5 30 pm For more information contac'
Kev.n 758 5130 or Chr.s 757 061
OMEGA PSI PHI
The Omega Psi Ph. Fraternity is havng
an Essence Interes' meeting The meet nc.
will be he'd February 11 at 7 pm .n the
Ledon.a Wright Cultural Center The oesirec
attire -s semi formal For more intorma' or
contact John Little a! 752 94V5
Bahamas Cruise � Spring Break
March 10$341 per person DOUBLE
Bahamas Cruise aboard CARNIVAL, the 'fun ship
4 days of cruising in the Bahamas
AII meals and enter�ainmeni on ship
Port taxes included in price
Grab a partner and get with the 'Fun Group.
XQ Space limited � Book Now With:
QUIXOTIC TRAVELS
319 Cotanche St. (downtown Greenville)
(ireenville, NC
Phone: 757-0234
Students
atteras
mmocks
t
Needs You
Work Your Own Hours
NO Weekends
Easy to Learn
Apply 1104 Clark St.
8:00-5:00 Mon-Fri
No Phone Calls, Please
2 Pieces of Chicken
(Original Recipe" or
Extra CrispyTv
1 small mashed potato
and gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
-COUPON
plus (ax
FOR ONE COMPLETE
COMBINATION W
2-PIECE PACK
We Do Chicken Right
L.
Coupon Redeemable at
Greenville locations only
Expiration Date 3-3 86
your FM alternative
PRESENTS
the 4th Anniversary
v Wednesday Feb. 12th yA
at The Attic, 509 E. 5th St.
Doors open at 7:30
Bands start at 8:00

THE PHANTOMS
ROCKABILLY AND R & B
CENTAUR
HEAVY METAL
FEA TURING
GRAYWING
ROCK AN' ROLL
PBS
JAZZ AND R & B
OFF CENTER
ORIGINAL, PROGRESSIVE ROCK
Sponsored By:
The Attic
Budweiser
Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co.
Pirate s Chest
Door Prizes Donated By-
Fabricate Too G
Apple Records Franklins
Something Special Sunshine Video
Record Bar Subway
Stay tuned to WZMB 91.3 for more details!
Good Music! Door prizes! Great Party!
Come out and support
frpeciol Prices All nighfYOUR CAMPUS FM! �� ��nk, to:
Cho Rich Music
On Speciol Brands of Your Fovortte Beveroae Rocket Music
Study
� ' (I.P.) � A lettei
mendation on-
is likely to he
i
according i
H examined the eff
� � college
rated a
-
� i
-

Health Col
1 have heard a lot about acquain
tanee rape lateU . Hv doev that
differ from rape h a trar
and what � an I do to avoid bem
raped?
Ka:
i
e s t a 1
i


-

i
respond revemin -
se
��
The
-


N
sexual interaci
feel
leave
Remembei
terc
� it is nevei �
a woman, evei
you on
� w
sex, you
TWr





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 11. 1986
Uise � Spring Break
.U per person DOUBLE
trd t VKH XI . tho "tun ship"
Bahamas
on hip
i pi
t r mi (.roup
1 Hook Now With:
K A V EI.S
nville)
i dents
atteras
immocks
You
ir Own Hours
kends
f , I ai
irn
TV.

12th
5th St
30
:00

'
&
GRAYWING
ROCK AN' ROLL
PBS
JAZZ AND R & B
R
CK
Co
ted By:
Grogs
Franklins
Sunshine Video
Subway
more details!
ireat Party!
�ort
M! Special Thanks to:
Cha Rich Music
Rocket Music
Study Shows Forms Differ
H.ook What Surfaced
Ithaca, N.Y(I.P.) � A letter of
recommendation that is con-
fidential is likely to be less
positive than one that is not con-
fidential, according to a Cornell
study that examined the effects of
confidentiality on reference let-
ters written by college faculty. In
tact, researchers have found that
students are rated an average of
35 percent lower when they waive
their right to inspect letters writ-
ten about them.
As a result, many faculty tend
to dealue nonconfidential let-
ters, believing that their col-
leagues often inflate recommen-
dations when they know the
students will read them. Yet those
same college faculty members are
reluctant to admit that they
themselves urite different letters,
depending on their confidentiali-
ty, according to Stephen J. Ceci,
an associate professor in the
Department of Human Develop-
ment and Family Studies.
With Douglas Peters, an
associate professor of psychology
at the University of North
Dakota. Ceci recently conducted
a study and follow-up survey on
letters of reference and confiden-
tiality. They asked undergraduate
seniors at various universities to
request three letters of reference
for graduate school at different
times from the same professor.
Some recommendation forms
were marked confidential while
others were not. Those marked
confidential were mailed to a
rented post office box in the
town of the graduate school; the
nonconfidential letters were pick-
ed up by the students a week
later.
"We found that if a professor
categorized a student in the top
15 to 25 percent of the class in an
open, nonconfidential letter of
reference, the professor would
tend to rank that student much
lower, say only in the top half of
the class in the confidential
letter says Ceci, who teaches in
the State College of Human
Ecology.
These findings that confiden-
tial letters are harsher may also
be applicable to other types of
nonconfidential letters, such as
for jobs, promotions, and tenure,
although Ceci points out that this
is merely a hunch because he has
no data on these other contexts
Among the stipulations of the
Family Education Rights and
Privacy Act of 1974, also known
as the Buckley Amendment, in-
stitutions receiving federal funds
must allow students or applicants
to read files about them.
Students also have the option
to waive that right. Even though
students who waive their right to
inspect letters of recommenda-
tion appear to be at a disadvan-
tage, Ceci feels that students
should request confidential let-
ters.
"There's some evidence that
faculty who receive letters thai
were written under nonconfiden
tial conditions tend to 'discount'
them by about the same amount
that they've been inflated Ceci
says. "There is reason to believe
that students will actually fare
better in the opinion of the reader
when the letter is confidential,
despite the lower rating
In other words, when faculty
receive letters of recommenda-
tion, they tend to look to see if
they are confidential or not. If
they're not, the faculty often
assume that the recommenda-
tions are more favorable than
they would have been if the let-
ters had been confidential.
In a nonscientific, follow-up
survey of 1,000 randomly chosen
faculty, Ceci and Peters asked
professors if they devalue non-
confidential letters. About 70
percent felt that their colleagues
tended to write inflated letters
when they were not confidential.
However, about 60 percent of
those surveyed believe that they
themselves would write the same
letter regardless of confidentiali-
ty.
Specifically, faculty in the
natural and physical sciences
were overwhelmingly opposed to
allowing students to read their
letters, and the vast majority ad-
mitted to discounting noncon-
fidential letters. Many stated they
would not even consider a non-
confidential letter, but would call
the letter writer for a "candid"
evaluation. "More and more, we
are witnessing a shift from letters
to phone conversations Ceci
says. Faculty in the humanities
and the arts, on the other hand,
supported the right of students to
inspect their letters, yet they still
admitted that most teachers pro-
bably inflate nonconfidential let-
ters.
Health Column
Mary
Elesha-Adams
I hae heard a let about acquain-
tance rape lately. How does that
differ from rape b a stranger
and what can 1 do to aoid being
raped?
Rape, whether by a stranger or
an acquaintance use a sexual act
to establish povser and
dominance over another person.
A rapist may not always be a
stranger in some dark alley . Mine
often, he may be an acquaintance
of the victim. The trauma of rape
is devastating, especially wh:n
the attacker is an acquaintance.
Trusting someone who then
betrays her makes the victim
question her own judgement. A
woman, therefore, often feels
responsible for not preventing a
sexual assault. More important,
though, she is not to blame. Her
decisions in no way justify the
destructive act of others.
The surest way to aoid ac-
quaintance rape is to protect
yourself. It takes time to get to
know people; moreover, be
cautious when giving out per-
sonal information and be aware
ol our drinking limit when out
meeting new friends at parties or
in bars. Never accept a ride alone
with someone you have just met,
and if you become involved in a
sexual interaction that makes you
feel uncomfortable, trust your in-
tuition: immediately and directly
leave or confront that person.
Remember: forced sexual in-
tercourse is rape, not seduction.
Men should know that:
� rape is a crime of violence
� it is never okay to force yourself
on a woman, even if you think
she's been teasing and leading
you on
� whenever you use force to have
sex, you are committing a crime
called rape � even if you know
the woman or even if you've had
sex with her before.
If you are raped:
� remember that YOU committed
no crime; the person who attack-
ed you committed a crime
� contanl a friend or someone for
support
� seek medical attention at once.
All injuries are not immediately
apparent. Since all emergency
rooms have rape evidence kits, do
not bathe, douche, change your
clothes, or rinse your mouth. If
there is any possibility that you
will report the crime, you don't
want to destroy the evidence. It's
important to seek medical atten-
tion as soon as possible.
Every Tuesday
is
College Night
Free Delivery For $5.00 & Over Purchases.
7 p.m11 p.m.
99C SUBS
Your Choice Of
Ham & Cheese Pepperoni, Salami, & Cheese
Bologna & Cheese Turkey & Cheese
Ham, Salami, & Cheese Ham, Turkey, & Cheese
Not Valid On Deliveries
60 OZ Pitchers $1.99
11 a.ml 1 p.m.
752-2183
includes tax
215 E. 4th St.
,����,���,��HU�iin���niniM9f!m
Imported Candy Hearts
3; Sweetheart Baskets
Heart Shaped Cheddar Cheese
Unmentionable Chocolates for the Special One in your life
Chocolate Covered Roses
Fresh Amaretto or Grand Marnier Strawberries dipped in
j chocolate
Orders must be in bv Wed. 12th
Let Us
Sr Tempt
You
Greenville Square Mall
Next to Cargo Furniture
756-188s
f444�t4m
with our
Valentine's Day
Sample Platter
For Two$14.95
Sha, some of the
best from our menu
- with someone special.
February 14. 1986
JCotoncheSt, 757-1666
J5
8$t


s
"Wi

rA
I
Say something loving on February 14.
-J
r

Valentine's Day Cards
ft '
AMERICANBrGRll IINGS
tor that sfx kilxrson
Student Stores
Wright Building
T
V� -rv. � �v �-





Stye feust (Earnlimati
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender. ��, 1
J A Y S TON E, Mmw 'k a a n �
M,M LWWIO.a� GREG WINCHESTER .
VOI,C'�),nK- "� ANTHONY MART.N .
DANIE1 MAURER � JOHN PETERSON , �.
JOHN SHANNON. , SHANNON SHORT,
DeChanili Johnson. � Dl.BH� SllUNS
February 11. 1966
OPINION
Page 4
Express ions
Minority Publication Threatened
There is a plan, allegedly under
consideration by the Media Board
governing all campus media at
ECU, that would disband Expres-
sions magazine and force its staff to
merge with The East Carolinian.
The reasons which The Media
Board has ostensibly given for the
plan are not wholly without foun-
dation.
Expressions has, in fact, been
consistently late in meeting its pro-
duction deadlines and sporadic in
its publication as a result.
Moreover, the latest issue of the
fledgling minority affairs magazine
was over budget by an astronomical
sum. And, in some quarters, it has
been charged that the quality of Ex-
pressions is simply inferior to that
of other campus publications.
These problems have been com-
pounded by the almost constant in-
fighting which has marked the rela-
tionship of the Managing Editor
and General Manager of the
magazine, Jimmie Hackett and Jeff
Canady respectively. The friction in
the relationship has most recently
resulted in Hackett being fired by
C anady and, immediately after-
wards, in his petitioning the Media
Board to reinstate him to his job.
All of this may sound rather pet-
ty and uninteresting to most people,
yet what is ultimately at stake is im-
portant: Will ECU have a separate
and independant minority publica-
tion? Many people say that, based
upon the past performance o' Ex-
pressions, the answer to that ques-
tion should be no.
Vet, most black students resist
the notion that the school's only
minority publication should be
eliminated. Without it, they fear,
minority news will not be adequate-
ly covered and black students will
not have a fair shot at getting the
kind of experience thai aspiring
journalists need. Instead"
minorities will be relegated to the
same kind of back of the bus status
that characterized their position in
society prior to the civil rights
movement of the 1960s.
Critics of Expressions believe
that this argument is marked bv an
unreasonable paranoia. They main-
tain that the whole debate surroun-
ding the minority affairs magazine
revolves around economic con-
siderations. The school, it is said, is
not getting a good return on its
money. Moreover, the critics claim,
minorities would be treated fairly
on today's more racially egalitarian
ECU campus.
While it is true that the present
staff here at The East Carolinian
cannot be characterized as a group
of klansmen, it is also true that ge-
nuine racists have held prestigious
positions here in the past and might
again in the future. No one can
guarantee that in an institution that
is all or even predominantly white
blacks will be treated fairlv and
equitably. More importantly, in
regard to production problems. Ex-
pressions is a relative!) new
publication created only last year.
Certainly, The East Carolinian has
had its share of problems over the
years since its inception.
But, the criticisms that are of
some interest are those that have
been made bv the publication's own
General Manager, Jeff Canady.
Canady alleges that the problems
Expressions has had have largely
been due to the apathv oi minor it v
students. NAAC P Vice-Presidem
Eric Hughes says tl a tl e same pro-
blem lias plagued manv of the
minority organizations on campus.
It is unrealistic, thev say, foi black
students to sit back and remain
uninvolved and then blame the
leaders of black organizations for
the failures of those same organiza-
tions.
Yet, it must be said that students
on this campus appear.as a whole,
to be apathetic and uninvolved.
And with black students comprising
less than 10 percent of the total
population it should not come as a
surprise that there are not enough
of them who are active 10 run the
many organizations that thev are
asked to staff. In the end thev mav
have to make some hard decisions
about what their priorities are and
which groups they might con-
solidate and which ones thev want
to see eliminated. Nevertheless, for
my part, 1 don't want to see Expres-
sions go the way of The Ebony
Herald, its predecessor. I think this
is particularly true since the latest
issue appears to me to be the best to
date, expensive as it admittedly is.
smfjt.vi
V
r
S2
S �3T:
&A


iS-
K
THERE WO HAUgT,
F0LKS7HIS UM6UAN
6AVS HE PR&eRS
5CORW6 HITS ON
ARTIFICIAL GRAS5
CAU5ffHE(5�T57CO
BtrrzEp on snow
EKHM WENS, WU$MPS
LOF FARM CHflPREN S0A16 HUimf IN KAN5AS
i.vtf
m:M
'���� !�.
ELECT
MARCOS
(vote earlvmnp vote often)
ass
IPII
-&9W& pxjtfnBvewuvVtiV-�vArnSPf&er&t&SiXj
,� Campus Forum
Reagan's New Budget Bankrupts
"Hard choices" is the altruistic
label the Administration gives its
budget. Bad choices" is the kindest
label thai seems accurate.
Expenditures for human capital are
cut. And social capital already ac-
cumulated is put on the block to
lower the rate ol increasing debt.
I. tor one. can "do without" in the
interest of the greatei good. And I'm
worried about the deficit
But reducing the deficit seems to
have low priority. I he contras are
losing 1 Nicaragua? "Hard choices"
budgeting would find millions for
them. El Salvadoi alread) gets SI
million a day foi its civil war.
s � Vfrican-supported group
Aan,s m ne thei wai. and
'he President is listening, Also he
wants a trillion or so dollar- tor an
"impel e" shield against
K BMs. t ruise missies fly low
enough 10 get under Weil, the
research could lead to more Tang or
Nuts!
budget.
i et s have a SENSIBLE
one that will improve our
schools and transportation and quali-
ty ol life. I et's invest in things that
produce usable goods AND more
jobs per dollar. 1 et's balance the
budget.
The arms race is loading a wealthy
nation with deb: and forcing other-
wise comfortable nations to live like
pooi ones. Fortunately, Gorbachev is
wise enough to recognize a no-win
situation and strong enough to do
something about it. The window of
opportunity is open. I et's stop
building tins suicidal nuclear stuff
while he has the inclination and
power to cooperate. In this case.
ivl at's good for Soviets is good for
Americans.
Edith Webber
Retired Faculty
Abortion
One unfortunate aspect surroun-
ding the abortion issue as observed in
this column ha- been a tendency to
contuse opinion with intelligent opi-
nion. The difference is the difference
between "spouting off a kind oi
verbal tantrum aimed at making the
writer feel better, and a considered
observation aimed at influencing
other reasonable adults. The former
tends to polarize readers into con-
frontational camps oi "us" and
"them while the latter is a genuine
attempt at resolving complicated and
volatile issues.
To begin, it should be observed
both the "right to life" and the
"right to choose" elements contain
sincere and compassionate in-
dividuals dedicated to what they
beleive to be humane goals. The ques-
tion is primarily how these goals
should be observed; as a matter of
choice or of legislation. This turns on
certain claims concerning from what
point forward in pregnancy is the ex-
istence of a human life determined.
"Right to choose" advacates usually
defend viability as that point, while
"Right to life" advocates generaly
believe life begins at conception.
Viability (Webster's definition of a
fetus: having attained such form and
development of organs as to be nor-
mally capable of living outside the
uterus; 'a 7-month viable fetus) is
legally and scientifically the most
broadly accepted point for
distinguishing between potential
human life and actual human life. It
is the basis of the Supreme Court rul-
ing which bans third trimester abor-
tion and allows states to restrict se-
cond trimester abortion. This ruling
is a comprimise between totally bann-
ing abortion and "abortion on de-
mand
The "right to hie" advocates' in-
sistence upon conception as the point
from which a human life is determin-
ed often contuses religious conviction
with scientific evidence and produces
logically flawed, it earnestly inspired,
argument- Although one can reject
abortion personally on non-religious
ground the push to legislate a ban
on all abortion is pricipally a religious
push. This is one reason a Constitu-
tional amendment is being -ought bv
the "right to life" advocates, for n is
presently un-Constitutional to
legislate religious beliefs
I reel the present Supreme Court
ruling is a just anj moral reflection oi
the best objective evidence we have
tor when a human life begin- and
when it should be protected. I also
feel the movement to ban all abortion
is an unnecessary violation of free
choice and an attempt to legislate
morality. The latter is not only
misguided in this pluralistic society.
but would most likely not achieve it-
end- it instituted.
The religious community which
sees this as a moral cause should con-
tinue to vocally adress itself to the in-
dividual consciences, but no; seek
legislation. A precedent oi
establishing religious principles in law
to be enforced upon others could not
guarantee which religion might be the
basis ot tommorrow's laws, nor how
their enforcement might effect our
own personal convictions.
David Lewis
Graduate Student
School of Art
Bad Words For Bern
Facilities Inadequate
I would like to bring up an issue
that I'm sure has been brought up
before; it concerns the facilities at
East Carolina University. With the
increased enrollment at the school,
obviously all facilities are overcrowd-
ed.
My main concern, and many
others, is the athletic facilities at
ECU. East Carolina holds two, just
two racquetball courts on this campus
of approximately 15,000 students
plus faculty. N.C. State, for example,
holds fourteen courts plus an addi-
tional twelve just erected. This is
ridiculous considering both schools
are state funded. ECU also lacks in
basketball courts, weight rooms, and
many other indoor facilities that
other schools so enjoy for the student
fees they pay.
I feel that if this problem is brought
up by enough students and faculty
alike that maybe the school might do
something about this issue. If not, I
also think that maybe the students
and myself should get an explanation
for ECU seemingly ignoring this ob-
vious problem.
If East Carolina is going to expand
its student body, they must also ap-
propriate facilities to compensate for
this increase and action should be
taken immediately. And if no action
is taken, I think a letter of explana-
tion should be submitted to the
students and faculty. Thank you.
Patrick J. Ricci
Soph Business
This 1- a resp
( rady. the liberal �-�� I
authoi � the del
vative. and his in
1
tion. I lege k.
-ider ourselves
men; he- I
mittee ol the N.C. Re
- -��
Republicans, we ai
colleagues as
future
re I le.
You claim n ,1
don hold the ba
Mr. Hardin's lettei a; I
d I hen you use a qu
it Mi Hard

me defe
you. Pica to
m coge
Next, about Se
Mr Buckley, .
emphasis aren't pi
the research ou ei
doing tor yoursell Be
reader of Buckley's a
and magazine, and ai
v iewer ol Firing I ine, I
Mr. Buckley doesn't supp
creases because 1 I
would have the
double the increase H
doe- support a srx :
only to be spent on the g , �
debt, so liberal- like you
it on the many failed go
grams that liberal- wo
ble conservatives d
you the benefit of the doubt on B
Goldwater and 1 am a voracious
reader, but u is impraci cal for n
read a COMPI I II text
EVERY! HING these men have d
You misquoted me or;
come to be expected of you.
As tor the disagreements
Goldwater, Buckley arid Jesse H.
have, this shows conservatives can in-
telligently debate the important issues
of our day and come up w
solutions to our problems You can
make fun ot Ms Averett's
patriotism, but she is
her country and accept the resj
sibilmes oi citizenship instead ol do-
ing like liberals, manv ot whom
maybe not all, are selfishly only wor-
ried about their right- and hate
America, and always blame Amei ca
first for the world's problems
Yes. Mr. Bern McCrady, suicide is
a national travesty. That is why con-
servatives wish to keep it illegal, but
many, not all. in the self-proclaimed
intellectually enlightened liberal com-
munity want to see suicide and "mer-
cy" murders legalized. But to con-
sider suicide humorous is a sick
abomination. What kind of sick per-
son would consider suicide humorous
as you did? I pray you didn't mean it!
Yes, there are many oi superior in-
tellectual ability in the political
science department, especiallv when
compared to the ability you have
shown. I will not get into the few e-
amp's of inability in the department
for we all make mistakes and are
human made imperfect by our Lord.
E. Sandy Hardy
Chairman
ECU College Republicans
Editor's Note: Readers are advised
that no more such personal attack
will be printed. This one ends the
series.
Capital
pii
-
Br oy hill
B j y . 1 o(
Time Fo
( ontmued Krom Payt 1



r � ����.
;
Entries Mu
$10
- $50
$25.
Q 1 uesdav. Febr
PRIZES
flst-
l2nd
�3rd -







�Wednesday, Februarv 12, l0


sX "iA' "r "�A" �A' "SA si' �vX' sfa" i nX
�n n t r "r' -i
�5





THE fcASl CAROLINIAN
11BRLARY 11, 1V86
OS
�TX1" JH
Bankrupts
rd I-or Bern

.
ne
Bar
.
i i
an in-
sues
actical
. .an
.��: 's
-
pon-
i
� aie
i
hut
. :ned
beral com-
"mer-
con-
u s �i c k
ck per -
de humorous
ididn't mean it!
t superior in-
in the political
trtment, especially when
d to the ab111' you have
will noi get into the few ex-
ility in the department
we all make mistakes and are
human made imperfect by our Lord.
n E. Sandy Hard
I- Chairman
ie ECU College Republicans
Editor's Mote: Readers are advised
that no more such personal attacks
will be printed. This one ends the
d ampl
series.
Capital Punishment Constant Debate
RALEIGH, N.C. (UPI) -
t apnal punishment opponents
concede they are having difficulty
arousing sympathy for condemn-
ed murderer John Rook and fear
his Valentine's Day execution
could signal a new wave of state
sanctioned death.
"They picked some high pro-
tile cases that were ready to go
and 1 think you will see a much
increased use of the (death)
chamber said Raleigh lawyer
Joe Cheshire.
Cheshire represented James
Mutchins, the first person put to
death in North Carolina after the
death penalty vas reinstated in
1976. Hutchins died by lethal in-
jection in 1984, as did Velma Bar-
field.
Rook has also chosen lethal in-
jection and will die Friday, unless
'he Supreme Court issues a stay
or Gov. Jim Martin, a professed
death penalty opponent, grants
him clemency.
"It's kind o a cyclical
thingsaid Cheshire. "People
get used to it and they start killing
a whole bunch of people and then
they get sick of it and then they
quit again. The reason they quit
is it's barbaric. It just takes peo-
ple a little while to remember how
barbaric it is
Cheshire maintains the first
three condemned prisoners � all
white � were chosen for "ex-
pedited death" because their ex
ecutions would be more palatable
to the public.
Law Hurts Universities
By PATTI KEMMIS
The Gramm-Rudman Bill,
which is a budget balancing in-
strument, could mean cutting col-
lege funding by some 4.3 percent
by March 1, 1986.
Translated into a $244 million
drop in the amount o' federal
student aid available this sprint
the 4.3 percent would be raised
up to a 50 percent cut by August.
Even though the cutback is not
definite, coll" -es around the
country are not sure how they
will compensate for the loss.
Some wavs of compensation may
include raising tuition, increasing
the amount they charge students
to process student loans, and in-
tensifying their fund-raising ef-
forts.
"There are too many
unknowns. We don't know what
we are up against until we see the
president's budget says Bob
Aaron of the National Associa-
tion of State Universities and
Land Grant Colleges.
Here at ECU, one cut back has
already been felt. A three year
proposal in its second year was
just cut by 13 percent.
"No one knows the impact the
law will have, or if it will even
last said Robert Franke, Direc-
tor of sponsored programs at
ECU. "If it does last, its going to
hurt, but we don't know yet what
areas or how much
soxj,li io)t yoai"
BALLOON BOUQUET
frcrrw
Broyhill and Ho well Discuss Plans
BU STONE
Mm nagin r dii�r
In a closed meeting with
aneelloi Howell yesterday.
senatorial aspirant Jim Broyhill
said he would work to see that
inding for student work study
programs not to be eliminated.
Broyhill made his remarks
aftei Chancellor Howell express-
concern over the Reagan ad-
� a n's proposed budget
and what effect rumors of cuts in
ancial aid might do to enroll-
. :11. particular) am�n8
lorities. The Reagan budget
would end all financial assistance
ie million college students
and it would halt interest tree
loans for those students eligible
to borrow.
Howell also questioned how
much money would be available
in the new budget tor research.
He expressed particulat concern
about ECU'S Medical Sch
"hough Broyhill replied that
everyone had to look at the fun-
ding problem in terms ol what
the budget deficits do to the
country, he said that he did
believe research money would be
cut.
"There is a general recognition
that research is where the new
lobs are coming from " Brovhill
said.
fter his meeting with
Chancellor Howell, Broyhill who
has served in Congress for 23
years, shook hands with studei
and answered questions in the
iI Student Supply Store.
In responseto claims that the
current battle between he and
Daud Funderburk for the seat
being vacated by Senator John
East will weaken the North
Carolina Republican Party.
Broyhill said that his campaign
was doing wellWe're far ahead
ol where Martin was in W84. M
campaign is getting a positive
reaction He added "we are at-
tracting Republicans, Democrat
and Independents
Congressman Broyhill was in-
vited to ECU b Chancellor
Howell and Mark Simon of
Students for Broyhill.
Time For Taxes
( ontinued From Page 1.
'tier during the summer,
� ear or breaks, that
deductions are taken out of your
ecks. Anything oyer the Si,100
as far as North
Carolina is concerned, is taxable
'me advises Edwina Lee of
Carolina Department
of Revenue.
However, "do not file the
m entitled liability wains
Robert Mchamb, also with North
Carolina Department of
Revenue, "otherwise, you may
: h owing the government
which you will be
penalized
The majority of students file
1040-EZ. This is the simplest
fill out yvith self-
directions. "Make
. ou file you haye all of
your W-2's; otherwise, you may
have to ammend your filing. It is
besl to wait until late February to
counseled Lee.
Parents may claim
students as dependents
though the student
their
e en
files
regardless o the students in-
come, as long as the parents are-
paying half of the full-time
students support. "The parents
receive exemptions because they
haye students in higher institu-
tions of 'learning (even if the stu-
dent is in school out of state; the
parents, however, must be North
Carolina residents) explains
Kanentsky.
If a student needs advice main
avenues are open to him: The
North Carolina Department
Reyenue, located near the Green
Street Bridge; the Internal
Reyenue Department, located on
the corner o hirst Street and
Green Street; the accounting of-
fice o' East Carolina located in
Rawl.
Filing taxes does not have to be
painful, after all, just time con-
suming.
Win her x.
heartV J&
soul. rv
with a 0
Hearts'n'Flowers
Bouquet
Valentines week starts
February 9 so send early
Cull or visit us today
Greenville Flower Shop
758-2774
corner 11th & Evans
Master Card and Visa Welcome
� XlllrW & Sigma Sigma Sigma
hY�ljym Present The
t fjf ALL CAMPUS 5
! 1 MALE STRIP OFF I
" Tuesday, February 11, 1986 8:30-1:00 a.m. Adm. SI .00 �:
$ PRIZES
31st-
2nd
�3rd


ladies Only till 10:15p.m.
Entries Must Register At Club By 9:00 p.m.
$100.00 Cash
$50.00 Cash
$25.00 Cash
plus I vears Free Pass to the Elbo -)�
plus 1 years Free Pass to the Elbo
plus I years Free Pass to the Elbo
& Psi Chi
Present
DRAFT NITE
Wednesday, February 12, 1986 9:00-1:00 a.m. Adm. $1.50Guys
C $1.00 Ladies
10 Draft All Nite
or Grioose 0u
BALL0ON-IN-THEB0X
We vuiU be-
d�jujje,ruw crn,
)Q.UdunjLd Day
Pui your ordJer
LKeajrUj
Suppdea are tirnit&L.
CAROLINA EAST MALL
Phone 756-7235
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.

. r bolt repre-
u wear
- � . 'urse
ett


� cement are the r
� ev cptu ml
ight means v i I respect as an Army otticei It v
a BSN � '�. � Nuts Opp rti mil P.O Box , lv
N'10701
ret'
,
�s
v V
I 'SA-ARMY
CAN
COMING ATTRACTIONS
DOUBLE FEATI Kf
Lilies of the Field (G)
The Brothei From Another Planet
NRl
At The Underground
The Inspector from Pink Panther Cartoons
Brine your I unch!
Wed Feb. 12
7:00 p.m.
9:00 p.m.
Th Feb. 13
1:30p.m.
The Minority Arts Committee will sponsor a
Valentine's Dance FriFeb. 14
Multi-Purpose Room. Mendenhall 10:00 p.m2:00 a.m.
Admission: Advance Tickets: $1.00 for ECU students, S2.00 for
others. At the door: $2.00 for all.
The Filmsommittee Presents .
The Karate kid (PG)
Making of Student IIVs
Multi-Purpose Rrn, Mendenhall
Th Fri Sat.
00 p.m. & 9:30 p.m.
Wed Feb. 12
2:30 p.m.
ANY WEDNESDAY
Dinner Theater from the Productions Committee
6:30 p.m February 21 & 22 in Auditorium 244. Mendenhall
Admission:
ECU Students and Guest: $9.00
All Others: $14.00
Advanced Tickets Only � Get yours at the Central Ticket Office no
Annual Ulumina Show
Exhibition of selected art pieces Feb. 23 through Mar. 2. Com-
petition is open to any currently enrolled ECU student. Works in-
clude sculpture, jewelry, painting, photography, and more. In-
terested students should bring works (limit three) to Rm. 221,
Mendenhall from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Feb. 19 & 20.
3pc
Discount Movie Tickets
Available At Mendenhall
Buccaneer: $2.25
Plaza Cinema: $2.50
. tX1 TO ifirW HXJ






-JQj-LEASTCAROLINIAN FEBRL'AR Y 11, 1986
Florida Plans to Clean-up Act
DAYTONA BEACH, FL (CPS)
� The capitals of spring break
hedonism - Daytona Beach and
for! I auderdale - are trying to
change their images.
Both communities are sponsor-
ing organized activities aimed at
somehow moderating student
drinking during the spring break
invasions of March and April.
W hat has gone on before was
a Sodom and Gomorrah affair
says Jerry Nolan, spokesman for
Daytona's National Collegiate
Sports Festival, which is suppos-
ed to draw students into activities
more constructive than with
'hose with which Sodom,
Gomorrah, Daytona and Fort
I auderdale generally are
associated.
The festival demonstrates
that we are getting away from the
tarnished image of the past he
says.
Daytona and the other vaca-
tion spots m Florida don't have
much of a choice.
This is the first spring break
during which the state's new
21-year-old minimum drinking
age law is in effect, and rising in-
surance costs are forcing com
munities to find ways to minimize
the wild partying that has led to
injuries and even deaths in the
past.
Fort Lauderdale, for one, is
sponsoring an "Olympics"
featuring volleyball, a tug-of-wai
and various dance and tri ia con
tests.
City officials actively are
discouraging excessive drinking,
and have banned alcohol con
sumption on the strip along the
beach.
Daytona Beach hopes to at-
tract up to 20.CXX) students to its
first National Collegiate Sports
Festival.
The festival, scheduled tor
March 8 through April 6. will
feature about 20 different sports
ranging from rugby to golf
Four national corporations �
including Walt Disnej and
about 30 Daytona businesses are
supporting the events
Nolan hopes the festival also
will encourage more corporations
to support intramural programs
on campuses. 1M sports, he
notes, can use some fund-raising
help.
But no one pretends the ac-
tivities are not intended to
moderate revelers' drinking.
"We hope the level of drinking
will be lower than in the pas
Daytona Chamber of Commerce
representative Betty Wilson savs.
Daytona also will mount a
poster and radio campaign to
promote sensible alcohol con
sumption.
"Any planned activity will be
advantageous jn (controlling)
how students party maintains
Beverly Sander- ol Boosi Alcohol
Consciousness Concerning the
Health of University Students
(BA CHI S), a group that runs
"alcohol awareness"programs
on campuses around the country
Vel the hard partying spring
break tradition is still a favorite
ot some local businesses
"These kids are going to come
down, party and raise hell.
least I hope so sas tommy Fu-
quay, manager of The Other
Place, a popular Daytona Beach
club. "It's the only time of the
year we make money
Most of the national beer com-
panies, as well as long-term spr-
ing break isiting corporations
like Playboy, plan to return to
the area, too, to promote their
wares.
Coming, too, is Michigan in-
ventor Ronald Rummell to
market his new product: a vest
allowing its wearer to carry six
btnerage containers and keep
them cold.
"It's an alternative to bulky
coolers he explains.
Interested In
Studying A broad?
Information on academic exchange
opportunities throughout the world through
the International Student Exchange Program
(ISEP), at ECU. Cost Information available
from:
Dr. R. Hursey lr
ISEP Coordinator
Austin 222
Phone 757-64IS (work)
756-0682 (home
NASA
CAFF .
.1 PI) - - ;
board called a
day to re a
reportedK iw
potent
with shuti
before
( hallenger
The ru
Alternative Sentences Work
CHAPEl HILL, NC. (UPI)
� An Institute of Government
studv shows alternative sentenc-
ing programs can be effective in
diverting non-violent felons from
the state's overcrowded prisons,
officials said Wednesday.
Such programs have been
criticized as siphoning off
criminals who likely would have
been sentenced only to probation
for their offenses.
"It they do that the prison
population still climbs and pro-
bation people get more services
said Dennis Schrant, former Ex-
ecutive Director of Repay Inc
an alternative sentencing pro-
gram thai operates m the 25th
ludicial District.
But the study found non-
violent offenders who par
ticipated in the Repay Inc. pro
gram were less than half as likely
to get active prison time as those
in a statistically similar control
group.
"The study proves the question
of whether our program actually
affected sentencing, and the
results are pretty good said
Schrant.
Schrant. now a state employee
who helps set up local alternative
sentencing programs, said 64 pet
cent of felons admitted to prison
each year are convicted ol n
violent crimes.
Programs like Repay fnc .
which operates in aw taw I
Burke and Caidwell counties, a
to convince judges to dive some
would be ,m.
ty programs wl L h �
restitution
Bui Sc
cessful Mich programs must avoid
enrolling pe
have been
tits: place.
The I
study d "1
prison in
ol Government
' non-
. the
RePa 1: - P � active
prison red to 77
perceni in ntrol gi
convicted
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th i EEK
OF PREGNANCY
$195 Abortion from 13 to 18 w-ks �
additional cost Pregnano rest. Bin 1
and Problem Pregnano Counseling For
runher information, call 832-0535
number: 1-800-532-5384) between v ,
P.m. eekdas. General anesthesia ava
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917 West Morgon St. Raleigh, N.C.
illumina
An Annual Art Competition.
Open to any currently enrolled East Carolina University student
Open to all forms of media.
Limit of entries: Three pieces.
Entry fee: Three dollars per piece upon submission
Works are to be submitted February Nineteenth through the Twenty
first,
One o'clock to F.ve o'clock, Mendenhall Student Center Room Two-
twelve.
Juror. To be announced.
Cash Awards totaling Six Hundred dollars.
On exhibit February Twenty-third through March Second
Reception: February twenty-fourth, six-thirty to eight thirty in the
evening. 7
Telephone Seven-f,ve-seven, six-six-one-one for further information.
I LLUMI N A
Co Krogering
WHITE PINK
Spring Break in
DAYTONA BEACH !
Designers of Travel
is your best bet
For info call Tamara 757-1520
ICtV-
4
i
s
x . TO SAVE AT
15
AOE A
3e
is
LIMIT
DOZEN
in's
9

600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
756-7031
Gal
Jug
1�9
J Prices
tJt thru Sat
15, 1986
� � � -
Roses Kroger's Floral Shop balloons
$24.99 doz. wi.h free Gift Box Valentine's Day Special j&SJJk


)
loo much stuthiny and
relax and unwind h chatli
Mendenhall.
Valentine
Central Bo
The
has
The Exp





(�
w
Florida Plans to Clean-up Act
Ax In . -fc
�NA Bl H, II

Interested In
Studying 1 broad?
Information on a ad rni hanj
opportunities throughout the orld thro
the International Student Exchange Progru
(ISEP), at EC'l . osl Information
from:
A
Alternative Sentence
vh
' Q.
B()Rrio
fO With
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
91 7 West Morgan St
DA l() Bl
Designers of rravel
1 i
lamara 757-1520
rs opncNaiNC.
mttn 356-7070
IvMM
L U M I N A ' 8 6
$24 99 doz
Roses
with I REE
for ju ;
4 il C
yafiw
5
& m
Deli-Fresh' �� �"
Pizza �f
$

Polar
B'ars
Coca
Cola
.�
Large
Eggs
'
'
v r x-u Whitman's
:�, Sampler
wooer
� M . N
Sealtest Ij
Whole Milk L �
s-99 A3'
on
Gift H,
Kroger's Floral Shop balloons
Valentine's Day Special �n s"�Ab0
Starting a; 999
The Exp





'rested In
I broad?
uhange
rUI through
tiange Program
nation aailable
verity -
Two-
e
;ion.

d& & tfr
�L
I
. 7S
Coca
Cola
15
f 2
raj - Large
? Eggs
�r 49
LIMIT
2
DOZEN
Whitman's
Sampler
s399
items and Prices
Effective thru Sat
i r-s- ,x ,�� '
IP
cial
BALLOONS
On Sale Also ,
Starting at 99v
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY ll, 1986
NASA Reviews Documents
( V CANAVERAL, FLA.
I PI) � A presidential review
�aid sailed a secret meeting to-
a to review documents that
reportedly show NASA knew of
potentially dangerous problems
th shuttle rocket boosters
hefore the fatal launch of
( hailenger.
fhe rupture in Challenger's
right-side booster rocket allowed
its base to rip away from the
shuttle's external fuel lank, trig-
gering a titanic explosion, an
aerospace magazine reported to
day.
The space agency, which has
had little or nothing to sa about
its internal investigation of
history's worst space disaster.
tot used comment Sunday on
reports listing agency documents
that chart a history of trouble
with crucial seals between fuel
segments of the solid rocket
boosters.
But officials privately
acknowledge discovering eroded
booster seals after many if not all
shuttle (lights.
Challenger's external fuel tank
exploded January 28, blowing the
shuttle apart and killing its seven
member crew after an apparent
rupture at or near a seal between
the bottom two of the four fuel
segments that made up the ship's
right-side solid rocket booster.
Navy divers stood by today to
resume searching for shuttle
wreckage on the ocean floor
where one of the two solid rocket
boosters is thought to be resting.
NASA believes Challenger's
right-side booster has been
located in 1,100 feet of water
about 40 miles east of the Cape.
Former Secretary of State
William Rogers, chairman of the
presidential panel investigating
the Challenger disaster, Sunday
responded to a New York Times
report by asking NASA for all its
documents relating to solid
rocket booster seals.
LEARN HOW
TO FLY
HELICOPTERS.
It you ve ever wanted to fly a helicopter here s your oppor-
tunity The Army has openinjjs now in its Warrant On j: it
Iraining Program
To qualify y �u must i school di I v .it
least 17 years old, and not older than 27 at the time ol your enlist-
ment You must meet certain physcial ai quiremei I
tor enrollment in the Warrant i, )fhcer Right Iraining Progr
Prior ro entering helicopter flight training mustsu
cesstullv complete basic n d pre-flight training
It v 'ii� like t1 wear the wings i t an Army a iat ir st p K
or call Cpt. Mallette 752-2908
Planning & Placement Office
13 Feb.
9 a.m. to 12 noon
ARMY
BE ALLYOU CAN BE.
Students Relax
IH III MBIKI Ihr J��M �rlim�n
Too much studying and too many classes hae been known to boggle the mind, rhese students
relax and unwind by chattiny with their friends while playing a hoard game downstairs in
Mendenhall.
Valentine Day Cards
Central Book News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open 7 days a week
9:30 to 9:30
RESUMES
Professionally
Prepared
Special Student Rates
Call 355-6810-
Lite Planning Institute
TAIL-I 7 II TAIL-
GATE 1 WsC� � � I GATE
ime
0ut7
Delivers Fried Chicken
Why not order a 12-piece of fried chicken instead of a large pepperoni pixza
(1) 6-piece Bucket of Fried Chicken
2 Homemade Biscuits$5.74
(2) 9-piece Bucket of Fried Chicken
3 Homemade Biscuits$7.99
(3) 12-piece Bucket of Fried Chicken
4 Homemade Biscuits $10.48
(4) 15-piece Bucket of Fried Chicken
4 Homemade Biscuits '248
coupon1 Eat in, Take Out or We'll Deliver it
I Chicken Biscuit, French Fries . To You (In Our Delivery Zone)
I And Medium Drink
S1 87 Call 830-1591
$5.00 minimum delivery This month's delivery specials 1011 Charles Street
Icoupon' Compare the Prices Located at )th & Charles
CXPKMOflS
� i �
Magazine'
The Minority Affairs Publication of East Carolina University
OLD 5th BLDG EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY GREENVILLE NC 27834 TEL (55 757-692T
has openings for the following positions:
Typesetters
Photographers
Advertising Representatives
Writers
Associate Editors
Applications will be available at
The Expressions office or Media Board Secretary
in the Publications Building.
� c
w
'





IIH I AM i AKOI INJAN
Style
i l HKt XtO . IVKf,
ECU Student In
Operation Raleigh
-
JOHN SHANNON
Ca

"�i �- r dli
ronically, to most North
olinians the epithet "Opera
; Raleigh'1 implies regionally ,
imoning images of the state's
iwling piedmont capitol
ugh it happens to be head
rtered in Raleigh, this expedi
ry projeci is named foi Sir
lei Raleigh in recognition of
xploratory spirit, and makes
transcendence of national
ies one of its primary
in ;
on
� Mohamedali, an It I
majoring in philosophy, is
e process of raising $5,500 ii
to he a part of tins interna-
� al expedition. A fai cr from
expensive vacation
dents envision as an
"Mate capstone to
graduate c
edali's upcomii
be hard at
igerous work. In ad
himsell and
mi ways, pet
�peration Ra . e
l ol i se
ty young
St ut and ! -
' ai
n serving
d global i.

' t d d
ipplicants
demonstrating the ability to get
along well with people, sunn,
and survive numerous tests of
courage, initiative, and en-
durance during a gruelling selec-
tion weekend. Participants are
put in stressful and arduous
situations so thai their reactions
to fatigue and hunger can be
evaluated
Firoz Mohamedali has already
been through the selection pro
cess, which tor him was in Camp
Boweis (near Raleigh). He will be
leaving foi Australia this summer
provided he can raise the fees.
Bui $5,500 is a distant goal to
most college students, and Firoz
is no exception. He has already
raised ovei one-hundred dollars
bv participating in a bike-a-thon
m Florid but predicts that much
the money will still have to be
raised doo- to door, through
sponsorship and individual dona
Mohamedali is .
� will be able to raise the monev
ow, and a be orl
ab ngines. �:
"r Reel
ces I v
irn ol other
��
: - "
Doi e sui � i
M ili knocks on

� He is a q
eeds some help to do
tos.
t 1 V.� Hunan
Installation At Gray Gallery
alien with the hi
nationally acclaimed sculptor whose contribution to the
which England's Prince
elp to b
f the barriers .
mply and intolerance which have
a.s existed, but wl . �m to
� e r O i
be even more obv ious in to
d
��� �x7Tzr�Cr�"���"� ���-
curreiM slio� .1 (;r� is a highlight in th galleys 19�6 series! 'nlernalmnalK �cclumtd sculptor �ho� contribution lo Ihe
Grizzard Waxes Irreverent
'1 I'm Bestselling humorist
syndicated
! ewis Grizzard savs
� lumnist lewis Grizzard say
"f'hree Comedies For Opera
t ' I S.� . M .
I
� I nrcc
ted bv the ECl O
� Feb. 20-2 jn
pet -rmances scl
8 p.m. in the Fletchei Music
tei Recital Hall
i ach evening's progi tm will
Ml ide Trial by Jury b tl
peretta teai
' d Sullivan, Un Musi,
( � ' by Philip Hagemann
theastern premiere)
Gallantry by Douglas Moore.
! he three operas represe I
' pping stones, even it
&, into the latter half ol
20th century said Dr. j
; Opera Theatre direci
Trial by Jury, an early result ol
(�ilber- and Sullivan's col

immediately populai a �
luced, ,is a "cui a
" ' ' a D'Oyly C ai
' a Perichole
The Mushure is a sett
George Bernard Shaw p.t,
satirizing several elements
xiem society, as Gilbert a
Sullivan satirizing social and
itical trends or thei
Direct quotes from classic com-
posers highlight the work.
Gallantry, subtitled bv its com-
posei "A Soap Opera in One
presents a series ol
tytime serial" hospital scenes
interwoven with the obligatory
mmercials" in a parody o
iern daytime television. Com
: Moo
Ballot
several
�� Doe, has
i
i
mei
.
� ECl Opera rheatre, a
pany sponsore I I . the ECl'
ol Ol Musk, in Jades .d
ed voice students, faculty
from the
�l!
i its regular
ks presented
t are mhih in
rickets tor the February com-
edies production are available at
the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center, at S4
foi adults and $2.50 for ECU
students. Reduced rates on adult
ets are available tor persons
roups ol ten oi more.
people are getting so sensitive
no matter what r:e writes
e days, someone will be of-
fended
In an interview, the Atlanta
Constitution columnist also said
his three ex-wives appreciated his
humor, he doesn't plan to make
commercials, and the women's
movement needs a sense ol
humor.
Orizard is the author ol seven
books mlcudmg the bestseller,
Shoot Low Hoys � They're
Ridin' Shetland Ponies. Other
titles include. They Tore Out My
Heart And Stomped That Sucker
Flat, This Is Dead And I Don't
Feel So Good Myself, and If
love Here Oil, I'd He About A
Quart I ow.
"Things are more complex to-
day and I think humor has chang-
ed a great deal Grizzard said.
"People are more sensitive to-
day. I can tell from my mail that
no matter what I say, somebody
is going to be offended � you
know, left-handed Chinese
astronaut association or
something.
"I think people are a lot more
sensitive than they used to be.
And quite rightly so. I don't
think we should be using racial
jokes and things like that. You go
back a few years there have been
so many gaffes. Earl Butz got
canned for telling a joke
Grizzard, who is 39 and
already had two "valve jobs
� is more soph.
today. vet it is narrowing.
"I ike the women's movemi
I hey need a sense o humor n
than anyone in the world.
them going to start havn t
attacks hke us. I dorr u
about it. People write letters and
say you are biased. I am. 1
pav me to have my opinion.
"It's like teasmg somebody
the school yard. You are going
pick out the one that reacts, t
umnists have been doing tl
forever. When evervbodv starts
saying things are great and you
sav wait a minute. A little ir-
reverence is always important to
being a columnist. 1 try to do
that
Grizzard said he hasn't had
many columns killed because o
taste.
"I've had a few that weren't
tasteful, but I've taken on the
women and the gays. I've taken
on 'em all. That's really my job
Grizzard was asked how does
one become a sage, as he is
sometimes referred to
"1 don't know that I am one. I
just made a big career change
when I was 30 or 31. 1 decided 1
had been an editor for 13 years
and hadn't written a line. 1 wore
a tie, went to meetings, worked
on budgets and things like that. I
had to deal with computers and
unions. It just occurred to me this
isn't why I got into this business
to start with. 1 decided to see if I
i.
ed .seer;
"Hu
i
souther
!
i
soci eple
entertained themselves telling
;Cs Jerry ce told
me I don't tell fum
ny.
f ' peak tie south, I
ere's a line
1 ��' ' w hei rny asi wife
k my dog nd I say,
'A woman who w . .
would u We in the
South have always said people
I hey don say that in the
north. You in the back
oi something, I've used it in the
South they roll. It: -��; they
� at me "
Is there going to be a lewis
zzard bourbon or videos?
"1 think the first thing I am
newspap lumnist. I've I
numerous otters to do commer-
cials, endorse products The
paper I'm sure has a policy
against ii but it they didn't I
wouldn't do 1 ucandoaLite
Beet commercial, that's just
example, you do one, you write a
See I EWIS, paKe 10 '
Battle Of The Bands
WZMB's Anniversary
Learned Ladies Have A Laugh B wmsG RAY
David Blanchard, Brinley Vickers and Ann Coatney (from left to right) "
comic dialogue from the ECU Playhouse production of The learnedladlTlTiTZr?
mance Wednesday through Saturday at 8:15 p.m. in McGinnis theatre kes are on sa e'a t�he
McCmnes Theatre Box Office Monday through Friday. For Information call TSUaS
By JOHN SHANNON
Stile Kdlli.r
WZMB will be celebrating its
four year anniversary tomorrow
night at the Attic. The event is the
Battle of the Bands, and it's go-
ing to set an eclectic and electric
tone for the ECU alternative
radio station's fifth year on the
air.
Every year WZMB holds a
benefit. The purpose is twofold
� to promote the station and its
operating philosophy to potential
listeners, and to raise money
(WZMB is non-profit.) Part of
ZMBs philosophy is to get music
that's not well-known out to
students, so this year's benefit is
particularly appropriate � the
bands performing are all local,
and have not received major ex-
posure before. And since WZMB
is student-oriented, it makes
sense that the judges for the event
will include students from the
School of Music as well as local
musicians.
Five area bands will perform:
PBS � Jazz, R and B
CENTAUR - Heavy Metal
OFF CENTER - Original. Pro-
gressive Rock
PHANTOMS
and 8
Rockabilly, R
-RW WING - � and Roll
The doors wall open at 8 p.m
VVednesdayn.ghtattheAtt-c but
the bands will start at 7 Ad
mission will be $2.91. indud
free beer while ,t lasts. This ,s a
one-of-a-kmd opportune to
Participate ,n vour own local
musIc.scene SQ suppon
BandreOU,f�rtheBaUlCOfth"

Restaurant In Rev
Ho
B KAKFN HKIM
Vote Tl
� ran �

� - -
BLOOM COUNTY
fix mw'
kju svjnv am-
V

3f
J
ii
Cook s Corner
A V
Beth Danieb
alentine Hearts Delight
I ale mine's Lh.
no! -rt'j; Vour specie
this delicious hear
R( ; I i
Grease and Hour tw
heart-shaped cake pr
Pre-hea: over,
Cake
1 2 cup shortening
112 gar
2 eggs
2 tablespoons cocoa
2 ounces red food coloring
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup buttermilk
2 1 2 cups sifted cake fl
1 1 2 teaspooi soda
1 tablespoon vinegar
Cream shortening anj -
Add eggs and beat well Mai
paste of the cocoa and red col
ing. Add it to the crearr.ee - v
ture Mix salt, vanilla and b
milk together Alternate mix
buttermilk mixture and fl
the shortening Mix soc.
vinegar in a deep bowi (it
fold :his mixture into ake ba
University Optomi
DR. DENNIS
Comprehensive Eve Exo"
Contact Lenses
Soft, Hard, Oa Permeable
Extended Wear. Contact
Glasses (One Da Seru in M
Student & Faculty Discounts i
Glasses
Convenient to Campus
Evening & Sat Appointrm
612 E. 10th Street
(Across from campus se






THf i AS IAROl INI AN
II BKl Ak" 11. 1986
everent
WIS, page in '
lversary
I F H
I'r,
rn-
l'HMHMs H
(,R VV(,
Roll
p.m.
U the Attic, but
ai 7:30. Ad
52.91, including
i ' ITiis is a
'pportunity to
�ui own local
ipport WZMB
Foi the Battle of the
Rands
Restaurant In Review
Home Of The Slimwich
B KAREN HEIM
N��ff Writer
Editors Sate: This is the first in
a series of reviews of local
restaurants. Our aim is not to be
critical, but merely informative.
Any suggestions regarding
restaurants you think deserve
notice are welcome.
BLOOM COUNTY
It's dinner time and you've jusl
returned from your local fitness
club. You're starving but don'l
want to put back on what you've
just burned oft Jack Spratt's
could be your answer.
Jack Spratt's is the newest edi
tion to the fast food restaurant
chains in Greenville. What
separates Jack Spratt's from
HtY. A� you
MHitAti. 'HrWWXT
HwaiY oti;
644 rj Km v
VfJUK KbfDON HAS
BUM HKMiNffltl
VOU'Wt; KuWt
omou n
Wendy's, Burger King, and
McDonald's is the amount of
caloiies in their food.
At the bottom of Jack Spratt's
menu you'll find the Jack Spratt
Calorie Counter. This is a three
column list of calories for all of
lack Spratt's "slimwiches
soups, salads, spuds, beverages,
"splurges spirits and even
by Berke Breathed
NOWAIT I'U
Ill MfrOrFtm
efFiaetaiY
me wom
h� V
PLL RIGHT
X3U STURP OOME5
DRYER '?
d?

WCKYtR GONNA
LISTENING?'
i
n,
f
at
BKOOIH
� !Hf
- � V. .
�lrt
.t.

t N)V;i
-r 1 1J
(ft
&$
j
� V -
�IV,
V � i v1 i.M 1i
Cook's Corner
A Valentine Treat
Belh Daniels
N(,f! Wnlrr
I alentine Hearts Delight
a ten tine's Day is Friday. Why
not treat your special someone to
this delicious heart-warming ver-
sion of Red Velvet Cake?
Grease and flour two nine-inch or
heart-shaped cake pans.
Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees.
Cake
� please do not beal it! 1 ve
distribute the batter into the tw
prepared pans. Bake in
degree oven for 30 minute (
on a rack for ten min
carefully removing from pans.
Frosting
5 tablespoons regular Hour
1 cup regular milk
! cup granulated sugar
I . up butter
aspoon v anilla
k the flour and milk over low
heal until thick, stirring constant-
ly. Lei cool while creaming the
sugar, butter and vanilla. Add to
cooled flour and milk mix-
ture, beating.
2 cup shortening
1 2 cups sugar
eggs
tablespoons cocoa
ounces red food coloring
teaspoon salt
teaspoon vanilla
cup buttermilk
1 2 cups sifted cake flour
1 2 teaspoon soda
tablespoon vinegar
Cream shortening and sugar.
Add eggs and beat well. Make a
paste of the cocoa and red color-
ing. Add it to the creamed mix-
ture. Mix salt, vanilla and butter-
milk together. Alternate mixing
buttermilk mixture and flour to
the shortening. Mix soda and
vinegar in a deep bowl (it fizzes!).
Fold this mixture into cake batter
condiments.
Spratt's "slimwiches such as
chick filet, fish filet and lean-
burgers, are served with a low
calorie, high fiber bun of either
sesame-seed or multi-grain bread.
Comparison of a Wendy's
burger and a Jack Spratt's lean-
burger reveals the caloric dif-
ference. Wendy's � 472 calories,
Spratts � 224 calories. Of course
Spratt's leanburger doesn't in-
clude the amount of condiments
usually added to a fast food
burger.
Spratt's "salad patch" is a
complete salad bar featuring over
20 fruits and vegetables to choose
from, with low-cal and regular
dressings.
Spratt's spuds are baked
potatos with a wide choice of top-
pings, such as bacon bits, Ched-
dar cheese, broccoli and beef.
Spratt's thin shoestring fries are
made from Idaho potatoes and
cooked in pure vegetable oil to
reduce calories.
And for dessert, Spratt's
"splurges" include froen
yogurts in a cup with less calories
and cholesterol than ice cream.
This comes with a choice of topp-
ings too, such as sliced almonds,
flaked coconuts and granola.
There's also a fruit cup with no
added sugar.
For the spirited Spratt's
dieters, Miller Lite, lite rose, and
lite chablis are offered. The only
catch is that Spratt's Spirits are
served with food orders only.
The atmosphere in Jack
Spratt's is fresh and airy. The in-
tenor is decorated with green fur-
niture, ceiling tans, and lots of
plants, producing the illusion of
eating in a greenhouse
Jack Spratt's caters to people
ready for a fresh idea in fast food.
6 Day Cruise To Mexico
Over Spring Break
Cost: $445.00 from Miami
Call: Greenville Travel Center
756-1521
A Sweetheart of a
Deal
I Valentine
v Week Special
2 8-oz. Rib Eye Dinners
$9
Valentine Week at Western Steer-
rate �� ith specially priced
favorite Rib Eye Dinners lust for the
you 8 oz ch � - oked-to order F
include choi . ot.no and hot baked bread
member at V
sweetheart : a ; nee
ne Week Special t I M
Fel l(
3005 East 10th St
Greenville
.
'965 .Ves'e- Stee-Mo-r - Pqc
XrVcstcrn Steer
Family
STEAKHOVSE
Home of Affordable Feasts
georges
hair designers
Valentine's
Day
Tanning
Special
10 Visits
$35.00
For the . m . ,
Latest in Pale isn't your color.
Contemporary
8 Klafsun Suntanning Beds
World's 7 Tanning System
The Plaza
756-6220
Open 8:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
University Optometric Eye Cl
DR. DENNIS O'NEAL
Comprehensive Eye Examinations
Contact Lenses
Soft, Hard, Gas Permeable Tinted
Extended Wear, Contacts for Astigmatism
Glasses (One Day Service in Most Cases)
Student & Faculty Discounts on Contacts &
Glasses
Convenient to Campus
Evening & Sat Appointments Available
inic
illU
III?
� ��
612 E. 10th Street
(Across from campus security)
758-6600
The Debate
Sarah Weddington vs. Phyllis Schlafly
America's foremost opponents on the ERA, nuclear weapons, the Reagan administration, abortion,
economics and comparable wortli
Tickets: ECU students and guest: $1.50
ECU FacultyStaff and groups of 20 or more: $3.00
Public and at the door: $5.00
Tickets available Monday-Friday, 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m from the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall. Telephone: 757-6611, ext 266.
Sponsored by the East Carolina University Student Union Forum Committee
Monday Feb. 17, 1986
8:00 p.m.
Henui.x Theatre
East Carolina University
t
1





10
HI I SU .R (MAN
I HKi K 11 1986
Coffee Hounds Face Crisis
U IM HI pi ices are coming
down while the cost of cot tec is
on the upswing
t ach drop in the price of oil
presumably means lower gasoline
Although some analysts
doubt motorists will realize full
� ai the pump, certain
questions Jo arise.
�;c we nearing the point where
a gallon ol gas and a cup ol col
will cost approximately the
same? 1 sincerely hope not. It
ead to drastic changes al
ehouses An.i othei
. es where we go for a quick
� is
1 oi one thing, coffeehouses
kely install sell service
?rs 'S ou fill up your mug
i pay a cashiei in a bullet
pi ool v age
in on usmg a Folger's
i Mas ell house credit card,
� a different stool, 1
i feai most is w
will happen to those ol u.s who
put cream and sugar in out col
fee. Extras are hard to come by in
selt service lanes, you know,
the same ma be true al sell
sen ice counter s.
I'm at i aid the waiters
waitresses who now bring us
cream and sugai will vanish like
the gas station attendants who us-
ed to check under the hood
W ill coffee condiments be.
as difficult to obtain as a si
windshield and air in I
I oi the answer to thai ques
tion, wait until cot tee houses
start posting tour puces
for regulai, one for di ip
one for install! and one foi
titrated.
The next step will
grower nations to gel hei
and form an ii
to bolster the world
market. (XI C,
� The Organization
Exporting c offee
ss, naturally, w ill create
a new federal agency to deal with
the mallei the Depai tmeni of
Blahs, oi 1)( B, as it is know n,
lOI shot!
inks to l)( )B's consei v ation
v impaigns, Americans stop
dunking so much mountain
grow fee, switching to less
expensive brands, and the United
States is flooded with coffee
hal use more
V a result, average eonsump-
Is from aim
M tWO
also is ai
sn'l amount to
a ihsidie
OCE( members
and : �
Foi .i pei

Classifieds
SALE
SENIORS' SENIORS! SENIORS'
� ' � jst phase of your college
� � � nenl S&F Com
ffei g a package pi
r resume
f the 1 wing Lettei
e� - n � raec
lettei � aa address of
� . � is ii i act
� "� � Letter q ility ty ped
��� " company acaress
� -� ��" rn aaaress on
� � g foiaea stuffed
i:sting of com
� � - � .our follow ups
ring . and writti
and cover
��� ipply
�� . res1 Per n � foi
� � stufi s.
tuff ano
2 page resume pi
s offer absolute
��� �' � - 1986 S&f C
� : �' �
NEED A D J
For Tl
in fop 4 �
Morgan
Rea
equesi
WORD PROCESSING
tech- � �
- � �
ettei
cards Ou- ;� �
reasonab
perct- � � f to I
& F Prof
(Frank
47;
NEW SHIPMENT IN
-
FOR S-
WANTED
,D ASSISTANT NEEDED
TELEViBKET N i
POSITION
!
typing SERVICES: Resumes,
Low r?
-rec
i 757 0398 after
CHEAPTYPING Rep e1 Ca
' - � l leave a message
TYPING AND RESEARCH SER
'ICES Ca Nancie at 355 71 .
eave � g - 752 3916 v �

HOUSE FOR RENT: Near univers
. -n Dr 3 bedrooms, nving
den large eating area
mediately $420
WERE LEAVING FURNITURE S
STAYING' L "s . � r I fur
' for sale Double bee col.
'aoies etc. Must Go! CaM
758 4030 anytime!
BEDTIME ENTERPIRISE By
ft Ha � read a bedtime
i girl fr end sshe must live
in ECU Residence Hall for S2
� 10 pm 12midnightMon,FeD
Ved. Feb 19 Make reserva ons
� . s ng 752 1081
PLATTERS THAT MATTER:
Music ano Light Show provided for
an social gathering, oash or shin
) Contact the TRASHMAN a'
. :S67 antime
FOR SALE Ifridgerator $100
negotiaDie Call 756 8019
WORD PROCESSING: Contact
BECKY LATHAM. 752 5998 18am 5
'7 rs experience m typing
theses, scientific reports.
manuscripts, business and form let
r .
PARTY
YOU DRIVE 'TO THE PARTY,
$124.00
TYPINf P
A r 1 EI e c t r o i
756
FOR SALE Pan
�ai series speakers s.
ell for S
� '52 448
FOR SALE Cat
era Ii a ��
excellent condition Oi . i.
752 3389 �
ALTERATIONS
E ians Si � � �� � -
be coa1 s. � �

pcs. for 5 - :
eans S idi 5 � � �
suits S5 S10 ladie; al S
D TO APPLY
DE MNEl FOR
K E ND
'�'
,NTED
See ' RM 1 S. page 14
Tar Landing Seafood
Spec ials
All You Can Eat
An One Or An Combination
Shrimp, Oysters, .rout,
(lam Strips, Deviled
Crabs. Flounder.
$6
MM-
Alaskan Crab Legs Or
Steamed Shrimp
Served With Fried Or Baked Potato, Cole Ma
Fiushpuppies.

105 Airport Road
Greenville,
t
c
k � - -
.
W
with Campus Marketing
YOUR BEST DEAL TO FLORIDA
SPRING BREAK: March 8-16
open mat ket.
Soon there is worldwide disai
i.t and coffee prises star' falling
again.
I he hijj danger is what the
decline will do to the domestic
economies ol CK H members.
some ol whom base borrowed
ivily, using future crops foi
set ui
Defauli on the loans could
�e panic in banking circles,
md we certainly don't want that
( ne sine wa to deepen the lat
his scenario from
e true is to drink more col
1 don't care it it does make
'able, keeps you awake all
es you the utter
to your friendly,
d intet national

Lewis
( onlinued from paye 8
B
? roll V'ou lose
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway 'N C 33 E �� e Nortt
Phone 752-31 72
(Past Riverbluff Apts i
Flounder
Popcorn Shrimp
$325
$325
Hours 4:30-9:30 Mon. Sat.
- NEWLY REMODELED
See For Yourself
on All Frames, Sunglasses,
and Contact Lenses.
Evervda.
i

hi

nk it w
i
Sow a . i
� i
r The n i �
it: �- . �
OPTOMC1NC
e� CAR� OEKTCR
P A
One Of the Nation's
Leading Employers Is
Now Interviewing
On Campus.
One of the largest employers in the U.S. is accepting applications
and scheduling
appointments for
interviews. The
Department
of the Navy is offering
management
opportunities in
electronics, engineering
nuclear propulsion
systems analysis and
other vital fields.
These positions provide strong
technical and general management
training, rapid professional growth and
immediate executive responsibility.
VxW
KjT
To apply, you must be no more than 28 years old, have a BS or BA pass
aptitude and physical examinations, and qualify for securit) clearance I s
citizenship is required.
o make an appintmeni for an interview, sign up at your Career Placement
Of lice, or call:
Naval Management Programs
Suite 120, 801 Oberlin Road
Raleigh, NC 27605-1130
1-800-662-7231
Get Responsibility Fast.
L
11
oer w
� h� i s
leai
Bucs C
H l
I
I
I
K
talc:
The R
ed ,i s
for ;
not ha.





and Oyster Bar
I Ml EAS1 i AROl IN1AN
our self
c C
. Suiiglas.ses.
uses. . .
14�
1 rV a
am
lion's
yers Is
mg
Sports
M BRl.ARY 11. IW6
Page 1 1
Pirates Split CAA Pair
Bucs Slip Past Indians
Bv SCOTT COOPER
sporit (� dii'n
ave a BS oi B . pass
security clearance S.
our Career Placemen!
Irams
toad
(0
y Fast.
Curt Vanderhorst's 16 points,
including a clutch jumpshot late
in the game, was enough to give
the ECU Pirates a 52-47 Colonial
Athletic Association victory over
William & Mary last night.
The win marks the first time
that ECU has beaten the Indians
twice in one season (the Pirates
defeated the Tribe 54-52 on Jan.
13) since 1975.
With his game-high 16 points,
Vanderhorst moved past Herb
Krusen into eighth place on
ECU's all-time scoring list with
1.126 career points. Marchell
Henry was the only other Buc
player in double digits with 14.
Keith Sledge and Scott Hardy
each had six points and five
assists.
The win gives ECU an 11 12
record with a 5-5 mark in the
CAA. The 11 Pirate victories
matches the total number of wins
for ECU during the past two
seasons (ECU was 11-48 from
1983-85).
William &. Mary was coming
oW a big win over UNC-
Wilmington (Feb. 8), which saw
the Tribe connect on 63.2 percent
ol their field goals against the
Seahawks.
The Indians were read for the
Pirates, forcing ECU to retain its
composure to pull off the victory.
ECU coach Charlie Harrison was
pleased to get the win, and
prasied a tough W &. M squad.
"It's a nice win. An win is a
good win Harrison said. "Thev
(W & M) never ever get impa-
tient. This team's a helluva lot
better than the team we played in
Williamsburg.
"If they ever get you playing,
they can put you to sleep Har-
rison added. "They want to keep
you on defense. Thev try to get
you to shoot outside
Defense seemed to dictate the
first half as both teams shot par-
ticularly cold from the floor.
ECU connected on 40 percent o
their first-half attempts while the
Indians hit 3 percent.
After trading baskets in the
early going, a Vanderhorst
16-foot jumper knotted the game
at 10-10 midway through the first
period. However, over the next
four minutes, the Pirates
outscored the Tribe 10-2. A
Manuel Jones layup with 7:36 left
in the half gave the Bucs a 20-12
advantage.
Senior guard Scott Coval
brought William & Mary back bv
connecting on some long-range
jumpshots. A Mark Batzel shot
in the lane cut the Pirate lead to
two (24-22) at the half.
The Indians remained close
throughout the contest and even
tied the game twice in the second
half. However, the Pirates
managed to maintain their lead.
ECU forward Keith Sledge felt
that the Pirates' lost a bit of their
aggressiveness in the second half.
"In the first half, we did what
we had to Sledge explained.
"In the second half, we were a lit-
tle tentative � we weren't press-
ing the issue.
"We're used to an up-tempo
game Sledge added. "They like
to slow things up, so they can get
the easy basket at times
William & Mary's Ken Lam-
biotte had a chance at a three-
point play as he tied the game at
26-26. l.ambiotte's foul shot
missed and the Tribe lost their
opportunity to take the lead with
16:29 remaining to play.
The Pirates quickly opened a
34-26 lead with 12:54 left to play
on baskets by Hardy, Sledge,
Vanderhorst and Henry.
The Indians showed their poise
as they outscored ECU 11-4 over
the next five minutes of action,
l.ambiotte did most of the
damage, scoring five of those
points during the run.
The Pirates were once again
able to turn the momentum as a
Hardy steal and layup opened a
46-39 Buc advantage with 3:53
left to play. This lead diminished
thanks to a Coval "garbage
basket' and jumpers by Batel
and l.ambiotte. The Pirate lead
was just one (46-45) with 1:32
left.
The Indians had four fouls to
commit before putting ECU in
the bonus situation. Vanderhorst
connected on a clutch 17-foot
baseline jumper with :24 seconds
remaining, giving ECU a 48-45
lead.
The Indians quickly answered
and then sent Henry to the line.
His free throws hit nothing but
net as the Pirates went on to win
5247.
Although the Pirates were vic-
torious, ECU coach Harrison
noted the demanding routine that
his players' experience.
"The kids have respon-
sibilities. It's really tough on 'em
sometimes Harrison explained.
"Basketball is the toughest �
with all the traveling and the
scheduleIt's a helluv deman-
ding thing
Sat. Feb. 8, 1986
John Newman's 26-point per-
formance was too much for ECU
Saturday night as the CAA'a
league-leading Richmond Spiders
dumped the Pirates 71-42.
Although the Spiders con-
nected on 52.8 percent of their
field goals, it was their
dominance on the boards that
gave Richmond their ninth con-
ference win without a defeat. The
coach Charlie Harrison said.
"Richmond is an awfully tough
basketball team. They execute
well (on offense), and their
defense can cause you a lot of
problems
Richmond, who is fifth in the
nation in scoring defense, came
out hot as the 4,000 Minges Col-
iseum fans did not have much to
cheer about early.
The Spiders ran off the first six
points before a pair of I.eon Bass
tree throws made it 6-2 with
17:48 remaining in the opening
period. Richmond quickly open-
ed a 14-point advantage (18-4) on
John Davis' free throws eight
minutes into the game.
ECU battled Richmond over
the next six minutes of play as
they outscored the Spiders 14-8
during that span. A Curt
Vanderhorst 15 footer cut the
Richmond lead to 26-18 with 6:45
left in the half.
The Pirate tans then had a mo-
ment to cheer about. With ECU
making a run. Scon Hardy got a
steal and hit Vanderhorst on the
break. Vanderhorst's layup was
too strong and the trailing Mar-
chell Henry slammed the rebound
home, cutting the Spider lead to
26-20 with 6:32 until the intermis-
sion.
ECU was able to cut the Rich-
mond lead to tour (26-22) when
Scott Hardv nailed a 16 footer
Spiders grabbed 36 rebounds (22 with just seconds lett on the :45
of which came in the second half) second shot-clock. After a pair o
compared to 22 for the Bucs. Jack lurnhill lavup. the Pirates
"The storv of the game really
told on the backboards EC I see RICHMOND, pane 13
Lady Pirates Edge Richmond
IK HI MKINI 1 n. if I urOini.n
( I pt. Jack I urnbi
over W ilitam X Ma
above Ru hmond's .
leading Spiders.
II (34) goes inside for two in ECU's 52-47 victory
rv last night. (Bottom). Marchell Henry (25) goes
John Newman in the Bucs' 71-42 loss to the CAA
Sports Fact
Toes. Feb. 11. 1973
The Philadelphia 76ers lose
their twentieth consecutive game
in a dry spell that began on
January 9. They continue their
hapless ways throughout the
season, racking the worst record
in NBA history as they lose 73 of
82 tames.
By TIM CHANDLER
N$j.u Writer
The Lady Pirates continued to
stay hot on the heels of CAA
leader James Madison, posting a
67-59 win over Richmond on the
road Saturday night.
The win gave the Lady Bucs a
17-6 overall and 7-1 conference
record. JMU has a perfect 8-0
mark in CAA play.
The Lady Spiders outshot ECU
from the floor, shooting 51.1 per-
cent. The Lady Bucs only manag-
ed a 45.6 shooting percentage.
Turnovers proved to be a big
factor in the game. Richmond
turned the ball over 26 times,
while ECU lost control on 13 oc-
casions.
The Pirates only connected on
15 of 30 attempts at the free-
throw line. The Lady Spiders,
who went to the line 17 times,
managed to chip in 13 of those.
The Pirates had a very balanc-
ed scoring attack, as they placed
four players in double figures.
Leading the way was
sophomore center Alma Bethea
with 15 points, and a team-high
eight rebounds. Sylvia Bragg was
close behind Bethea with 14
points. Also in double figures
were Lisa Squirewell with 13 and
Delphine Mabry with 11. Mabry
also managed to come away with
four steals.
Rounding out the scoring for
ECU were Loraine Foster with
six points and a team-high four
assists. Monique Pompili and
Rose Miller netted three points
each, while Pam Williams and
Jodv Rodriguez had one point
apiece
1 ook in the Thursday edition
of The has; Carolinian for results
o last night's game against
William &. Mary.
Coach Emily Manwaring directs her Lady Pirate squad.
Bucs Cap Record Season; Crunch Spiders
B DAVID McGINNESS
Nswiani -sport ; d-i I
rhe Pirate swimmers capped
� best dual-meet season in
f i history with a double win
over conference rival Richmond
1 niversity last Saturday.
Fhe Pirates wen: into the meel
knowing that their men were easi-
ly capable of winning. In order to
make the competition closer,
Kobe had his men swim in events
that were not their specialty.
Even so. the men captured
tirst-place finishes and had the
meet won with three events lett to
swim.
"We went in and wanted to
win (the meet) Kobe said, "but
we weren't concerned at all with
our times
Senior ECU swimmer Keith
Kaut expressed his opinion of the
Spider swim team. "They're not
really in our league in terms oi
talent Kaut said.
The Richmond women provid-
ed a good deal more competition
for ECU, and the lady Bucs did
not have the meet clinched until
the second to last event. They
were all swimming within their
respective specialties, since the
ievel competition was close.
Among the standouts for the
women were Scotia Miller, with
wins in the 200- and 1000-yard
freestyle. Caycee Poust had a
first in the 200-yard backstroke.
Susie Wentink took first in the
200-yard breaststroke as Angela
Winstead nabbed a win in the
50-yard freestyle. Susan
Augustus won the 200-yard but-
terfly event.
Sherry Campbell contributed a
win in the three-meter diving and
a second place in the one meter.
With the win, the Buc men
move to 9-3, while the women are
12 2, tor an overall team record
of 21-5. The previous win total
has never exceeded 17 for any
ECU swim team. Although the
number of wins is not the only in-
dicator of a good season, coach
Rick Kobe feels that 1985-86 is
the Pirates' best year ever.
"A lot of things go into mak-
ing a 'best season " said Kobe,
"winning a lot of meets is only
part of it. It's also important to
swim fast whether you win or
lose, and just about the most im-
portant thing is for the kids to
have fun.
"The last couple of years have
been great Kobe continued,
"but this season was just
awesome
Indeed, not only have the
Pirates netted a record number of
wins, they have broken ECU
record times all through the
conference tournament, which
begins this Thursday. The ECU
men are ranked No. 1 along with
James Madison University. These
two schools are pretty much the
only ones in the running for first
place, so the remainder of the
CAA schools will be battling for
third.
"I don't think JMU is as good
as we are said Kaut. "I think
"A lot of things go into making a "best season
winning a lot of meets is only part of it
- �Rick Kobe
� 7 we win this, and win big, then it will set a good
precedent for future ECU swimmers. "
�Keith Kaut
season, which is something of a
surprise to their coach.
"It's not usual to break
records during the season Kobe
said, "and since the kids have
been breaking them all during the
year, we know they'll just get
faster
Now the dual-meet season is
behind them, and the Bucs can
concentrate completely on their
we have the best talent in the con-
ference
In the women's division, JMU
is the heavy favorite. ECU, Rich-
mond and William & Mary will
probably fight it out for second
place. However, each of those
three teams has what Kobe calls,
"an outside shot at winning the
conference But according to
Kobe, "It will take a great
meet tor any ot those three to
win it.
The Pirates have some definite
team goals for both their men
and women.
The men want to: 1. win the
conference championship; 2.
have eight individual first-place
finishes; 2. win all three relay
events; 3. qualify a swimmer for
the NCAA championships; 4.
swim four ECU varsity records.
The women's goals are to: 1.
finish in the top two teams; 2.
have four indivdiual first-place
finishes; 3. finish all five relay
events in the top three, winning at
least two; 4. set eight ECU varsity
records.
The entire team is really getting
psyched up, according to Kobe.
Since this is the first CAA con-
ference tournament, winning it
means all that much more.
"They're really pumped up
Kobe declared. "To have a
chance to win the ifrst conference
championship is always special
Kaut feels that the CAA tour-
nament will mean a lot as well.
"If we win this, and win big, then
it will set a good precedent for
future ECU swimmers Kaut
said. "Also, it's neat to know
that the winning times will
become the conference tourna-
ment records
As far as scoring is concerned,
the guys will probably win more
events, according to Kobe. They
have more outstanding front-line
swimmers. The women, on the
other hand, have the advantage
of a team with excellent depth, so
they can be expected to score
solidly throughout the tourna-
ment.
For the women, this tourna-
ment will be their last chance to
compete this season. But the
ECU men who make the
qualification limes will go the In-
dependent Nationals, held Feb.
27 through Mar. I in Columbia,
SC. Also, if one of the swimmers
should perform well enough,
he she might qualify for the
NCAA championships, the meet
with the fastest times in the
world.
The following are the men's
and women's times from the
ECURichmond meet which was
held last Saturday.
See PIRATE, page 13
u
s -





12
1 l Xv ROJ INIAN II BR1 Ki
Senior Player Profiled
B JANE1 simpson
Spoil, �nlr
'Scon does a great job runn-
Hardy Leader For Bucs
")N who allow me to taki the Hai tinned "li
who allow me to take
gambles I can take a i hath e and
ma he gel
led I
i let
'��-����
beat, and I kno ih
1
. our team. He pushes the ball will be someone to back me up
when he can and he knows when Harch stated "Defense is
slow it down He comes to play something that has always beei
every day and 1 think that makes successfu
the rest of us play harder He's a Icl coach Charlie ,v i
very vital part of our team. He's believes Hard is .in .
our leader stated teammate part ol the team "People
Jack lurnhill ol his senior guard realize what Scorn
Vl Hard earn Harrison said "He
� leader, but not just am always comes up ���
leader, a ver special one 1 he steal "
position ol point guard on a Being a . � capta
basketball team is vitalh impoi something Hard takes
�� '� and ECU's is in ver deal of pride in "Senio
capable hands "hese capable ship is ven imports
hands belong to none other than Youi lead
senioi vOv.ip.au. Scott Hardy when you step ofl the ba

ampa
"We were tanked No. 2 it
�i and we're playing
� ommunii. i itlege
rival Hard e
I "We beat them and �
0 I he win was the fii


ited Ha
Hardy's basketball playing court
- oegan m Northwestern High
Scl o Hyattsville, MD He
then attended Hagerstown Com
�v . ollege.
two veai 's Hardy srx
I1
1 i
i � i
te
two years at I1
i firm foundation
Mac.
1: w as
too U hile ai Hagei n,
av i s ms, 5 8 assits,
d 1 9 steals a game while
ding earn to an o(
record ol 52 wins and only
losses.
d , . Mary
g( : � ere won
iman year, but a firs
luring h.ts se
courl is w
ide a positive e
sed Hardy "Sui
going to ha
I
a
Hai pleaded with the
late "I'm glad
. so well in the son
Hard "I wani
a winnei I believe
n ay be a bu
bigger i i come I s
ill. I want i� �
ty � 11
ed'
� ibutes much ol
tion as well i ess
o Ins parents lohn and I) i
"My ts are my
li

Se
Hai
:

honor;
came.
reet wa
Men
His avei
I):
ECl i
$1.00
Wednesday, February 12
Something S
Your 11
Has kefs
To Order
helpet
omething
'penal
of Greenville. u t .
� Heart Shaped Cookies
� C'hoeo� Covered Pretzels
�Ik Put!
!

Scotl Hardy bombs away in earlv
� ason action
P.I
Hai
11 �
Hardy.
Hard
� a
;� ayn ,
Division I le
hai chance,
:eis thai "
I (
Valentine's Day Special
Show Your Sweetheart just how
much you care during the lover's
holiday
t; Thi .v team is really
improved . � a gear's We're
alot more mature and really more
agressiv ' said Hardv. "Now
we're making things happen in-
:ad �: a ishing they were hap-
ts.�r' ' t
Hard is praised as a greai
defensive player, but he gives
almost all of the credit I his
teammates.
"I'm a better team defensive
play ngle si pper i g
tremendous amount of help from
teammates because it1

Single letters
$12.95
ENGINEERINGSCSENCES
Double Letters
$14.95
Through Feb. 14, you can purchase
a sweatshirt with I f YOU or
substitute your favorite fraternity or
MOrOnfV 218 Arlington Blvd
7 -6001
Only ot Bonds �
YOUR DEGREE
MAY BE WORTH AN
OFFICERS COMMISSION
IN THE ARMY.
?,
J�
s �

The Hub
618 S Pin i
752 1946
Get your body ready for Spring Break
with our Fantastic February Special
i
We have: Six Aerobic Classes Daily, AII New Free Weights and
Machines, Yoga Classes, TANNING BOOTH Hot Tub Sauna
and Steamroom, 2 Beverage and Beer Bars, Dressing Rooms
Lockers, Showers and Live Entertainment every weekend
Aerobic Class Schedule
Monday 1015 315 4 30 5 45 700 800
Tuesday 1015 315 4 30 5 45 700 800
Wednesday 1015 315 4 30 5 45 700 800
Thursday 1015 315 4 30 5 45 700 800
Friday 10 15 4 30
1 1 00 f �
Sund 3 00
Club Hours
'on Fr, 1000am 900pm
Sat 1000am 500pm
Sun 1 00 p m 5 00 p m
� � N
Onlv
The Army is looking for 1986 iuates in Engineer-
ing and Science disciplines . commissioned of-
ficers. For those who qualify. this pi im could be an
important step toward a rewarding career � in or out of
the Army.
You've worked long and hard , vour Bachelor
ot Science degree. A commis in the Army is a good
way to use your technical experti . while gaining
valuable supervisory experience. And the opportunity is
available now!
An Army placement officer is available to discuss op-
portunities and qualifications with those about to
receive degrees in Engineering or Science. Contact him
direct to arrange an appointment convenient for vou
Call:
Captain Mallette
752-2908
Cpt Mallette will be conducting interviews at
The Career Planning and Placement Office
on 13 Feb. from 9:00 am. to 1 2 00 noon
I
ljnontofwtUmited club use I
I
. UNIVIRSai. HUI MlAlTMCllli
41 SOUTH PITT ST
Bring this ad by for a free visit to the club for you and a friend.
ARMYOFFICER
BEALLYOUCANE
Pirate S
(ontintH

.


Thomu-
Pa
Richmond
Knocks Oj
Pira
( ontinu
In �

Ricl
.
Ricl rr
.
� :
-
Mai
games
from
The

on Jan 6
SEME
prm�Fn' KJO-fli bs





?
V
1�'3
RIDE
. ty Ride
8 5570
GrtcovfOcNC
on
February 12
.4 -

ter
okies
red Pretels
PH AN
ISSION
4 V
I
; Engineer-
nn li cloned of-
amld be an
� � in or out of
r Bachelor
Army is a good
hile gaining
pportunity is
discuss op-
hose about to
:e. Contact him
enient for you.
rtti
interviews at
jment Office
00 noon
ICER.
ICANBE.
I HI I ASTAROI INIAN FEBRUARY U, 1986
13
Pirate Swimming Statistics
Continued from page 11
Women
�if) Medley: Richmond (Hall,
DeHainaut, Rusch. Wager)
4:09 23.
1000 Free: Miller (EC)
11:29.54; Grand (EC) 11:32.33;
Bavvlkey (UR) 12:12.33.
200 Free: Miller (EC) 2:00.62;
VHainaut (L'R) 2:00.82; DeMeo
R) 2:01.39.
50 Free: Winstead (EC) 25.63;
Mali (UR) 25.82; Meissner (L'R)
26 17.
200 lnd Med: Wager (UR)
4'4; Poust (EC) 2:15.67;
nflo (EC) 2:21.36.
M Diving: Robinson (UR)
225 0; Campbell (EC) 225.40;
n (UR) 205.30.
200 Fly: Augustus (EC)
6; Rusch (UR) 2:17.93;
ind (EC) 2:18.30.
00 Free: Meissner (UR) 56.24;
rson (EC) 56.71; Elder (UR)
,
200 Back: Poust (EC) 2;15.57;
Livingston (EC) 2:16.82; Bowlby
(UR) 2:24.57.
500 Free: Wager (UR) 5:12.52;
Miller (EC) 5:21.10; DeMeo (UR)
5:24.26.
3 M Diving: Campbell (EC)
238.85; Robinson (UR) 227.35;
Poff (EC) 208.25.
200 Breast: Wentink (EC)
2:34.41; DeHainaut (UR)
2:35.08; Ennis (EC) 2:36.04.
400 Free Relay: EC (Pierson,
Augustus, Gorenflo, Winstead)
3:47.22.
Men
400 Medley Relay: EC
(Hidalgo, Hicks, Cook, Fleming)
(time unavaialable).
1000 Free: Hawkins (EC)
10:43.67; Wells (EC) 10:44.44;
McGinnis (UR) 12:57.99.
200 Free: Killeen (EC) 1:46.30;
Edelman (UR) 1:47.11; Hidalgo
50 Free: Lewis (UR) 21:81;
Fleming (EC) 22:81; Galakatos
(UR) 22:91.
200 Ind Med: Brockschmidt
(EC) 2:02.95; S. Smith (EC)
2:03.67; Griffiths (UR) 2:07.69.
1 M Diving: Leigh (UR)
233.70; Durkin (EC) 226.50;
Newman (UR) 203.95.
200 Fly: Brockschmidt (EC)
2:01.25; Cook (EC) 2:03.17;
Prasswimmer (UR) 2:04.94.
200 Back: Hidalgo (EC)
2:04.70; S. Smith (EC) 2:07.57;
Viola (UR) 2:17.55.
500 Free: Cook (EC) 5:02.44;
A. Smith (EC) 2:07.57;
Galakatos (UR) 5:16.44.
3 M Diving: Leigh (UR)
234.65; Colehawer (UR) 200.50;
Laney (EC) 153.30.
200 Breast: Baldyga (UR)
2:33.26; McGinnis (UR) 2:43.10;
(EC swam exhibition).
400 Free Relay: UR (Griffiths,
Daughtrey, Galakatos,
Prasswimmer) 3:23.72; (EC
swam exhibition).
oLy
(EC) 1:47.30.
Thomas Carries East
Past West All Stars
)ALI AS (LP1) � In an NBA
Star game dominated by im-
ol" spectacular dunks, passes
Mips, the cool efficiency of
hiah Thomas prevailed.
"This wa Isiah's type of
ne aid West coach Pat
. after Thomas led the East
a 139-132 victory Sunday.
nature is to attack and he
es so many opportunities
he penetrates
The Detriot Pistons' star guard
d 12 of his game-high 30
in the fourth quarter, four
m during a decisie 8-0
late in the game. He was
unanimously as the
Most Valuable Player, an
iw ird he also won in 1984.
.ictory gave the East a
24 12 nulge in the all-time All-
ries. The West has lost six
as! seven contests.
i n the stretch, Thomas
ived with four teammates 6-9
e, negating the West ad-
age of Thomas having to
rd his close friend, 6-9 L.A.
I :i sensation Earvin "Magic"
� son.
r. had 15 assists, 10 of
in the first half as he and
Richmond
Knocks Off
Laker teammate James Worthy-
wowed a sellout crowd of 16,573
at Reunion Arena. But Johnson
was hampered by foul trouble in
the second half.
"This kind of game is tailor-
made for lsiah Johnson said.
"When he's in the open court,
nobody can contain him or stop
him
"Playing against Magic is hard
and it's fun Thomas said.
"He's so good, it's extremely dif-
ficult, but it makes the game so
exciting
Larry Bird added 23 points and
seven steals for the East. Moses
M alone had 13 rebounds and 16
points, seven of them in the
fourth quarter as the stronger
East continually pushed the ball
inside. Sidney Moncrief also had
16 points for the East.

Balloon Deliveries
On Valentine's Dav
Balloon In A Bt
Mood Underweai
Hand-Painted,
Personalized Items
Plus Other Gift Ideas
For Friends & Lovers
Gandalf's
Carolina East Mall
756-7235
Pirates
Continued from page 11
vNjni into the locker room trailing
32-28
In the second half, both team's
-aded baskets early as a Bass in-
s de jumper with 17:18 made it
36-32. From this point, however,
Richmond showed their strength
they outscored the Pirates 15-0
: the next seven minutes. A
Newman layup with 10:39 re-
rung gave the Spiders a corn-
ending 51-32 lead.
Richmond remained in control
ughout as ECU could only
ne within 15 points (57-42) at
6:21 mark. The Spiders built
much as a 23-point lead as they
ent on to win 71-52.
Marchell Henry led the Buc
scoring attack with 12 as
Vanderhorst added 10. Turnbill,
ho has only seen action in nine
ames this year, was four of five
"om the field for eight points.
The loss for the Pirates is only
their second defeat in Minges.
The first was a 67-62 loss to Navy
on Jan. 6.
COMPARE and SAVE!
r- -COUPON- i
ljU O OFFl
� All Frames In Stock J
I (With Prescription Lenses) �
Must present coupon with
-order for discount. Not (good �
�with other advertised spe- �
cials. Expires 2-28-86 I
I. - .COUPON- - J
SOFT
CONTACTS
$5900
Includes Care Kit
We C� An wur
AAEyeEua
For Yob O
TaeSuaeDay
SUNGLASSES
20 oft
I SP1R1 S FFBRUARY28. 1'
With Coupon Only J
Gary M. Harris
Licensed Optician
703 Greenville Blvd.
Across From
The Plaza
OPTICAL
�f� PALACE
OPEN 9:30 AM to 6 PM MONDAY THRU FRIDAY � PHONE 756-4204
GTYM
Located on the Evans Street Mall
(across the street from the Elbo)
THE LARGEST FREE WEIGHT
Nautilus Gym in Greenville
(Over 7,000 sq. ft.)
SPECIAL
STUDENT RATES
3 Month
$50.00
New Year Special 1 yr. Only
$99.00
Expires Feb. 25, 1986
Monthly $25.00
YOUR MEMBERSHIP INCLUDES
Nautilus Equipment
Over 50 Exercise Stations
10000 lbs. Free Weight
Aerobic Classes Karate Classes
Men & Ladies Shower & Locker
Rooms
Members Get Discounted Rates on Suntana
Tanning Bed
SEMESTER IN SPAIN
Not just for Spanish majors only, but for everyone beginners, "in between
students, and advanced Put some excitement into your college career"
BEGINNER Oft ADVANCED - Cost is about the
same as a semester inaUS college $3.670
Price includes iet round trip to Seville from
New York room, board and tuition com-
plete Government grants and loans may be
applied towards our programs
F 9
co�eg rou �"�rd
vou' c�r! �3J��
H you would �� mlorm��on on lutuf pr09f�m� giv
yow p �5d'�
Live with a Spanish (amiiy. attend classes
tour hours a day. four days a week, lour
months Earni6hrs of credit (equivalent to 4
semesters taught m U S colleges over a two
year time span) Your Spanish studies will be
enhanced by opportunities not available m a
US classroom Standardized tests show our
students language skills superior to students
completing two year programs in U S
Advanced courses also
Hurry it takes a lot of time to make all ar-
rangements
SPRING SEMESTER -Jan 30 May 29
FALL SEMESTER - Aug 29 - Dec 19
each year
FULLY ACCREDITED � A Program of Trinity
Christian College
For full information � send coupon to
SEMESTER IN SPAIN
2065 Laraway Lake Drive S E F-9
Grand Rapids. Michigan 49506
(A Program of Trinity Christian College)
GOLD'S SUNTANA
TANNING BED
Special
10 Visits � $40.00
Good until Feb. 25, 1986
NO INITIATION FEE
NO CONTRACTS
Hours: M-F 9:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M.
Sat. 12:00 P.M. - 6:00 P.M.
Sun. 2:00 P.M. � 6:00 P.M.
FOR MORE INFORMATION
CALL TODAY 758-4359
A Licensee of GOLD'S GYM ENT. INC.





14
HI I M i. Kl'l IN! W
! I BKl XIO
PERSONALS
l ondnued from pan 10
CHI OS Hr eakoul the ' -
pad � .ina insui ani e? I and l
psyched to skate torvighl ee a
e! The Alpha xi s
"OSES' Send � ros to some �
special Buy them fen 4 s io 11, portraits Sei
I Only �4.50 each from the ZBT til ry portrail ' �- until
stei table in front of the Studenl Feb 13th v s p rv Buccaneei
tore I or walk ii
�PRING BREAK MEXICAN
wuist I 5 nights, 6 days cruising
Sles Only $44.s txludes
PS ' eS CALL NOW Not
8 0074 or 7 3178
.JRAItHiL DEAD FANS R1
� - h ad � . kets will soon be
. � � Apple Re� ,is
us leave
e and ni 38 II
(VANNA wIVE A LITTLE LOVE?
.� � way Fhe T r
jes w irna
� � e' s Da -a
� �� � �� They

LOOK
.(1MB
��� , ' will hos' " �
irty . � �� "
, n . g 5 ot t
Doors
irts at 8 Door
��� ara' v � "
I supi
: t( A ��� - I fCM
lilS
G t P GOLDEN HEARTS .
ibout y
Peg
jt the
SUNDV
GDOG Re
�NTS � - � �
the week has a
� .
G BUTTONMAN Buti B tt



ar Hai
MARIE F Happy : Wl
� rward '� seei
Stevi
TKE

-
t be ttx ' �� � � '
drink again as
. � � ; � � �
BETA NU'S: Revenge of the
nreai, but our Big
.vas the deal Nerds in
was a sight the men
downtown won't ever forget that
night! Ya'll are the best1 Your en
� � you above fhe resl'
A. , � , , y out Delta Zeta
��
B.c Hope your week end ���i i ked
Ou1 well and I hope that I made your
tl lay a little extra special and
' we Shared Our present
� S B
tke rhe brothers of t k i wo
hke to congratulate the following
young men, Reid Fogelman. Todd
Mayo, traig Hedgepeth. Briar.
Dawdy, Mirhaei Lee. Jay N
Todd Askew, David Nalewaik, Chris
Glat.s Keittl Ablu ton
Johnson, Chip Brown T'
jetf Britl Gary Hurley
C lai k John R hards Ma l � i
rell eve K imm, David Koon
St hade and Bill Gleason
�� ak� this semestei
Memi tram the besl
history'
ATTENTION DIVERS
Carolina's newest club, the
Reef Dive Club w.n have
tat.ves in the Stud
well as the first I
Mendenhali Thurs Feb
Fel 21S1 Tr
' . � -
( iub members a: I fh
Spring Break 1
Florida �
�d meet � g v
� denhall's room
Room froi . �
and say I �
FOUND
KAPPA PHI FRATER
WANNA GIVE A LITTLE LOVE'
� . � I thi i way h
selling c arna
- rhey will
: '� e A " . OUI ' . '
"� Utl L�ook tor the
" � " ibby!
LOST . Burgn' ly i ithei oal
�ss King Prescription
sung n pocket Lost in A
Dixie parking Io' a1 Rive
$50 Pi' a �
B'H at S2 41 H or ;s8 9484
� -
LOST
- ' -
PRiCfcsMFK .
SUN FEB 9 THHI
SAT FEB is AT
A4PIN
GREENVIILS
ITEMS NOT
AVAILABLE
TOOTHEH
Rfc 'AIL DEAiEBh
ORWHOLESAl
WE RESERVE THi
RIGHT TO LIM"
QUANTITIES
the supermarket w- r?S
& ami �� VIV�
See 5to'
For 0
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE.
Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality.
TENTION ALL ECU MEN The
� tf Will I
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRESH
U.S.D.A. CHOICE WHOLE
Fryer Leg Qtrs. I Beef Rib Eye I Iceberg
CRISP WESTERN
NG JLATIONS t
p A a r '
SSINATlON GAME BY AOTT
' tV
�lousf 23 rd ,
10 LBS. OR
MORE
LIMIT ONE
tXJ k
I
I
iHN ft.NO THE PALACE " - �
� .
TT WATSON Mact lay
i g
f pi ha Werea � � - �'� � re
for a pa ester
iest Love � it Little
� rs
I'lKA: Sign up a friend to be tucked
� - - Little Sisters all M
� ont of The Student - I
IKA LITTLE SISTERS "fe.sa
� ting tomgn a " � rar Ri
phouse
TAUS: Slammers 'eau.ia.
' akazis and beer if s re �
that we're a ' ' ere
und the worid as quick as could
fhe tequ a roo affect .soovious
� � � ad a blast ana danced ah
night Aflf'oqcP.Taus reou'
- sigl �
wssmt
ON-
Process & Print
with this coupon
I run 110, I 26. 15mm or
Disi. C olor Print Film
14!iC per print
. 2W)A$I 49dev ch (reg $2 VHi
I sample 24 exp film reg Sv Y4
NOW $4.97!
t arolina hast Mall
I
i
I
I iimn ,n roll per k"up.T
N �' -�lid Mtt Ihft 'ffn�
�XPM� t
(NorthEntrance Near Belk )
756-64378
f)PKN MONSA1
8 AM to 9 PM
2
��vri
DIET COKE � TAB � SPRITE � MELLO YELLO
Coca Cola
r sw
2
liter
bottle
99
0
LIQUID
Purex Bleach
LIMIT ONE WITH ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
SEALTEST
swt
801
Ice Cream
i99
12 gal.
ctn.
WHITE
Round Top Bread
1 lb.
loaves
LIMIT FOUR WITH ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
III
MARKET BULK
Sliced Bacon
. 98c
DIXIE CRYSTALS
Pure
Cane
A&P
Sugar
Sugar
88'
n '
L
5 lb.
bag
88
0
JMIT ONE OF CHOICE AITH ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRlCf
,
IV
6.5 oz.
can
LIMIT TWO WITH ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
I
LIMIT ONE WITH ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
SUNSHINE REGULAR � UNSALTED
Krispy Saltines
1 lb.
box
DOUBLE "Q" � IN OIL � OR WATER
Chunk Light Tuna
SAVE
head
U S 1
ALL PURPOSE
White Potatoes

st -1U lb
50�-J ba9
98
0
P&Q
V.25'
Paper Towels
t
LIMIT TWO WITH ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE WITH EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
PLAIN OR SELF RISING
Red Band Flour
5ibQc
i 3V - bag WJ
1
BUTTER � REGULAR
Crisco Shortening
3 ib 1
can
68
r save ,
- Qlc can
O � LIMIT ONI ' �� A 'h ADDil Si
PURL "ASf 4 � 4. AC.
ANN � - �
Shortening
328
can I
DUKES
Mayonnaise
32 oz.
I
LIMIT ONE WITH AODI
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
703 Greenville Blvd Greenville, N.C. OPEN 24 HOURS
OPEN Mon. 7AM
CLOSE Sat. 11 RM. OPEN SUNDAYS 7" til 11
rTj





Title
The East Carolinian, February 11, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 11, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.455
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy