The East Carolinian, February 6, 1986






She
(Earoltman
Serving the Last Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No.35- 3&
Ihursday, February 6, 1M86
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Reagan Claims 1987
Budget Meets Law
Rub-A-Dub-Dub
IV l M ll.JNs I hr t aiarlinian
Gwen Davis, a junior majoring in therapeutic recreation. receives a professional massage from
Karen Muir, who is a senior in phvsical therapy. The Physical 1 herap Club regularly giyes massage
clinics and donates the proceeds to charity. See related story on pagr 1 for furthur details.
From Wire Reports
President Reagan sent the 1987
budget to Congress asking for
close to a trillion dollars Wednes-
day morning after declaring
Tuesday night in his State of the
Union speach that his budget
meets the deficit reducing re-
quirements of the Gramm-
Rudman bill.
Defense Secretary Caspei
Wemburger ignored a deficit-
cutting a. poised over the Pen-
tagon and presented Congress
with a S311.6 billion budget for
ihe next vear, an 8.2 percent in-
crease over 1986.
Wienburger insisted the in-
crease represented only 3 percent
real growth. The defense budget
includes S4.8 billion for the SDI
missMedefense shield, 75 percent
more than the $2.75 billion the
Pentagon received for the pro-
gram for the financial year begin-
ning Oct. 1. It is the biggest single
weapons research project.
The figure also included a 4
percent pay raise, or 2.6 billion,
tor the 2.1 million men and
women in uniform.
Reagan's budget also seeks to
cut the cost of federal health care
expenses b proposing cutbacks
in health programs for the poor
and elderlv.
Reagan asked Congress to re-
quire welfare recipients to work
in return lor their grants and re-
quire that single parents, who are
minors, live with their parents to
qualify for assistance.
The 1987 budget contained no
cuts tor Social Security recepients
and included a cost-of-living in-
crease for the millions of
Americans receiving old age sur-
vivor or disability benefits.
Reagan, in his budget, also
proposed consolidating all
federal AIDS programs under
one office and providing S213
million for research in 198" into
the deadly disease that attacks the
body's immune system. In fiscal
1986 the tunding level for AIDS
programs was S193 million.
Political Writer
Visits ECU Campus
Bv JAY STONE
Managing Idllor
Michael Harrington, noted
scholar and activist will present a
lecture entitled: "Beyond
Reaganism: Toward a New
Democracy" tonight in Jenkins
Fine Arts Auditorium. The lec-
ture will begin at 8 p.m. and i;
will last until 9 p.m. A question
and answer period will follow the
lecture.
Harrington is the author of 12
books, including "The Other
America which is often cited
for its role in inspiring the anti-
poverty progams of the 1960s.
His two newest books are "The
New American Poverty" and
"Idkmc Sides: I he Education
Ol A Militant Mind
Harrington received his M.A.
degree in English literature from
the University ol Chicago. Ik-
was later awarded an honorary
Ph.D in political science bv
Queens C ollege and the Board of
Higher Education of the City of
New York.
He now teaches political
science at Queens College Harr-
ington is also national co-chair of
the Democratic Socialists of
America. In addition, he is
secretary of the Socialist Interna-
tional, the international umbrella
organization for democratic-
socialists.
Students Examine
Business Park Idea
B DAWN STEWARD
siiff V nlrr
proposed business park to be
centrally located in the Green-
ville Pi" Co. area is the focus ol
a survey bemc conducted bv
ICl s Regional Development In-
stitute (RDl).
The survey has been mailed to
over K(X industries, retailers and
wholesale interests within a 15
county area surrounding Pitt Co.
The purpose ol the survey is to
determine the feasibility of
establishing a central business
park. The companies that would
make up the business park, a
group of business in one area.
. uld result from the survey's
findings as to products needed bv
large business and industries.
I he business park could sup-
plement Greenville's economy.
"More jobs should be available
to the local community while also
bringing in outside
businesssaid Mack Simpson,
RDl project manager. This
growth is good not only for
business; but also, for ECU.
Moreover, increasing attention
for the Pitt Co. area will draw
more students to the University,
he added.
The survey is being conducted
bv two ECU students. Political
See PARK Page 3.
Massage Clinics:
The Right Touch
Living Off Campus Offers Benefits
By BETH WHICKER
Muinni Smi Ldlior
Nearly 95 percent of ECU
students living in off-campus
housing are happy with their liv-
ing arrangements.
Eighty-eight percent of ECU
students living off campus prefer
the apartment complex to living
in a house or trailer. Students
chose apartments because of the
convenience they offered. Most
apartment owners fix any
mechanical problem in the unit,
maintain the yardwork, have the
unittreated regularly for residents
and care for the general ap-
pearance of the apartment.
Many students find the conve-
nience of apartments far out-
weigh any disadvantages such as
higher cost, less living space,
tight parking and less privacy.
Apartment owners in Green-
ville realize the need for qualtiy
and convenience and some have
tailor-made packages for the col-
lege student.
Seventy :o 80 percent of ren-
tors at Eastbrook and Village
Green Apartments are students,
and according to Sue Holloman,
manager, the students residing in
the apartments are their best
source of advertisement. "People
move out here because they have
friends. Most of our tenants
knew someone before they mov-
ed in
Village Green residents seem
pleased with their choice in where
to reside. Yet, three years after
the explosion some apprehension
still remains. "It's sort of an eerie
feeling described Linda
Horowitz, a senior, management
major.
According to Holloman the
fall after the explosion some
students were hesistant on living
in the apartments where the 1983
disaster occured.
Riverbluff Apartments adver
tise as "Greenville's Young
Friendly Community accor-
ding to Martha Jones, a senior
communications major, "the at-
mosphere is a nice, friendly, safe
atmosphere
Rose Cumpler, manager of
Riverbluff said, "we feel our
tenants are satisfied, we don't get
a lot of complaints
Ringgold Towers are located
on the campus and can be sublet
or bought. All units available at
the Towers are completely fur-
nished.
Ringgold resident Mike
I spejo, a sophmore and business
major, is highly satisfied with his
housing. "I like being so close to
campus and downtown. With the
DWI law in effect, it's convenient
and safe to be able to walk
downtown
Students were evenly divided
among factors that determine
their reasons for moving into a
particular apartment.
Nearly 50 percent of those
surveyed say the determining fac-
tor is cost. Twenty percent agree
that the social factor is also very
important in making the final
decision. Ten percent of the
students surveyed did not own a
car; therefore, the location of the
apartment and availability of bus
service was instrumental in their
decision.
By PVniKFMMIS
4s�H(gnl Nrw rditur
The Physical Therapy Club
raised over S300 at one of their
regular massage clinics.
Twice a semester, the massage
clinics offers studentsand faculty
a chance for complete relaxation
at the charge of Si for every ten
minutes.
"Our clinics are a great way to
raise money while ottering
something that can really be en-
joyed � but massage is only a
small part of Physical Therapy
commented senior Karen Muir.
Working with physicians and
other health professionals,
phy sical therapists are involved in
a broaJ field. Some areas ol con-
centration include Pediatrics, or-
thopedics, sports, car-
diovascular, and e 1 e c -
trophysicology.
"Physical therapy is on the
threshold of change as a result of
the North Carolina Practice Act
which provides for independent
practice by physical therapists
remarked George Hamilton,
head of the Physical Therapy
Department.
ECU offers one of two
undergraduate programs in the
state, the other offered by UNC.
A maximum of twenty students
at junior level are accepted each
year for the two year program.
Six weeks of the junior year and
ten of the senior year are spent
doing special clinical work. Many
students go out of state to places
such as California. Arkansas.
Tennessee or Colorado. During
their senior year, the physical
therapy majors are involved in in-
dividual research projects.
Alter graduation, job
possibilities are great. A physical
therapist can work in such areas
as private practice, school
systems or hospitals.
"1 got interested in physical
therapy through volunteer
work replied senior Janice
Hoyt.
"Not only does it give me a
chance to help others, but the job
opportunities are great
"I already have a degree in
sports medicine, but I think
"Our clinics are a great way
to raise money while offer-
ing something that can
really be enjoyed
� Karen Muir
physical therapy can otter me
more senior Al Cujas said.
Massages being one of their
specialties, the Physical Therapy
Club has gotten a good response
from their clinics. Proceeds go to
charities such as Diabetes, The
Ronald McDonald House. MS
and the Linda Fay Arrington
Scholarship. The next clinic will
be held in late March or early
April.
"You should give us a try
urged senior Jim Hunt. "You'll
come back
Minority Survey Planned
By CAROLYN DRISCOLL
Staff Vr1Uf
The University Committee on
the Status of Minorities at ECU
will be conducting a survey of
black students soon to "deter-
mine certain attitudes, percep-
tions, and feelings black students
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds8
Editorials4
Features7
Sports10
Lust of power is the most
flagrant of all the passions.
� Tacitus
have about the university
According to Gordon Walker,
a student representative of the
SGA on the committee, over the
past few years, black enrollment
and the retention rate of black
students are dropping significant-
ly at ECU.
"The purpose of the survey
he says is to be able to draw some
conclusions and make recom-
mendations to enhance blacks'
perceptions of ECU.
He stresses, "we are really
hoping to get enough responses
to make significant conclusions
The survey, which will be mail-
ed to one-third of the blacks on
campus, includes questions which
will hopefully determine attitudes
about all aspects of campus life,
from inter-student relationships
to academic programs.
For example, one question asks
if students agree or disagree with
the statement, "Blacks are
welcomed and encouraged to par-
ticipate in extracurricular ac-
tivities such as Student Govern-
ment Association, fraternities,
sororities, etc
Another question inquires, "If
given the opportunity, would you
join a predominatly white social
fraternity or sorority?
The results of the survey will be
distributed to several depart-
ments and organizations on cam-
pus. "Hopefully adds Walker,
"this will give us a good idea of
what is needed to make ECU
more attractive to black students
and to enhance their perceptions
of the university
Between The Eight-Ball
Ed Smith took a break between classes Wednesday afternoon at the poolroom downstairs in
Mendenhall. A quick game of pool refreshes the mind before again hitting the books.
� -
� '





THE I-AS 1 CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 6, 1986
Announcements
SOCCER PLAYERS
AM people mleresteo .npart.opating m tne
ECU Women's Soccer CluD maoor soccer
tournament please contact Lisa
Grossnandler at 758 832S The tournament
will be held Feb 28 ana Inarch 1 & 2 There
will be a minima! entry tee
CADP FIRST MEETING
The Campus Ate hoi and Drug Program is
having its first meeting ot 'he Spr.ng
semester today Feb 6 at 5 15 m room 2�2
Vendenhall All members and prospective
new members please attend Also our tram
mg session will be held Saturday at 5. if in
terested but unable to attend oiease call
Karen at 752 6231 We promote responsible
drinking
DIABETES
Do you have questions that yvere neer
answered' Do you need someone to taiK 10
who really understands' If you are looking
for support and a productive recourse for a
seemingly intimate situation please can
'58 �60 Together a abetes ana its
responding comprf � . n re petfe'
prehended and overcome
BALLOONS
The Studen-Diabet.c Asv- it � innq
orders in front ot the Studen Supply
tor valentine Baiioons on the Hth anc 12th
Defween 10 a m ano 2 d m Balloons cfl
be purchased on the Uth .n the Home Ei
Building between I ana 3pm
ECU PRINT GROUP
The ECU pr nt 41 ,1 a best g alert
tme cards on Fet 10 '2 m t 5 n �� e Arl
Bidg foyer t. c a be s ikscreenec
originals selling for V v
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Bea Pr. a o a
busmess mee'ing Thurs Feo 6 �n B
103 a? " p m ft members are u �
tena
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
There w.11 be a me ' r�g of the ECU College
Republicans on Tuesday Fec '��� �� . .
pm m room 22' Meoer.fl, For n �
call 752 8176 or 757 0711
DINNER THEATRE
iook.ng for a romantic vaien'ne s gift?
how about dinner and & pldy? The S'uden
Union Productions comrr (ee s Dfesp " ng
a dinner theatre comedy ftny Aednescay
on Feb 218,22 1986 t .cue's are available a'
'he Central Ticket Offce V c � "om II
am 6pm "r.cke's are J� tor EC s'udents
and a guest ana Si4 tor -� �� -
ECU KARATE CLUB
Beginng Ka'av Ai , rN nferested n
beginning karate asses can 'ake FREE
lessons witfi the ECu a'a'e C ub C asses
are on Tuesoay nights 7 30 tor yyomen 8 30
for men and on Weanesda. n 91 rs 7 30 for
men, 8 30 for women in room 108 Memorial
Gym Please tec 'he nstructor if ' s yOc
first ciass For more nfo call Chuck or Anne
at 758 0370
DIABETIES
Anyone interested m a Diabetic Support
Group on campus please call 758 9604
ACNE CLINIC
Would you like treatment for your acne'
The Student Health Center is pleased to an
nounce the opening ot its acne clinic Clinic
hours are Thursdays from 2 4 p m Call
Frances Lane for more info and or appoint
ments at 757 6841
COUNCILOF HONOR
SOCIETIES
There wilt be a meetng for members of
the ECU Council o Honor Societies tonight
at 5 15 n BD 204 Don't forget to bring your
into on membership requirements
BIBLETALK
A practical informal discussion of the Bi
bie as applied to our lives today Guys 223
Garrett Dorm at 7 30 8 30 p m and 203 C
Belk Dorm at v 30 10 30 p m Girls 313 Cot
ten Hall at � 30 10 30 D m These are every
Tuesday Everyone invited!
WESLEY FOUNDATION
Applications are available for studen's
ano staff at ECU who would like to take part
in a work team proiect m Mexico Cost will
be approximately S.J50 Stop by the
Methodist Student Center tor applications
HOUSING APPLICATIONS
For fail semester 1986 are being accepted
at the Method's' Student Center Call
758 2030 tor more nto
SCUBA DIVING
ADVENTURES
Spr.ng Break March 9 14 1986 Dve Pen
nekamp in the Florida Keys. Key Largo. Fla
The vonos most popular reef 5 days and
91 � a two tank boat dive daily one night
dve includes tanks ar backpacks and
jhts .Mso snorkel wth the dolphins
nog ng a' Howard Johnsons fun breaktas'
da ly sw mmmg pooi on the bay snorkelmg
Cos' J395 tor further .nfo can Bay Schart
D rec 'or of Aguafics a' 757 6441 Open wa'er
ertifK at-ons ava-iabi
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
Campus Crusade tor Christ invites you '0
cu" and Fellowship at the interna' ona
House on Feb 8. Sa' a' 5 p �� Come join the
fun ano feiiowst p etc B ic, a tr.enc1
RACQUETBALLCLUB
it is the time Hey guys, what time is it
now' it is Spring time Time for action, time
to be m shape, time t0 have fun and be a
challenger Come to the Hacquetball Club
meeting. Feb U, Tues at 5 pm in
Memorial Gym room 102 and be a part of it
Let's play the game
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
ECU Gospel Choir will be holding its an
niversary service on the 23rd of Feb at 3
p m The location will be Hendnx Theatre in
Mendenhall Student Center Admission is
free to the public Please come out and help
us exhault the Lord in song and praise
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement Ser
vice in the Bloxton house is offering one hour
sessions to help you prepare your own
resume Few graduates get iobs without
some preparation Many employers request
a resume showing your education and ex
per.ence Sessions to help will be held in the
Career Planning Room on Feb 5 at 3 and 7
p m
INTERVIEWINGSKILLS
WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement Ser
vice is offering these one hour sessions to aid
you m developing better interviewing skills
tor use in your iob search A film and d.scus
Ston on how to interview through this service
w.li be shared Each session will be held in
the Career Planning Room on Feb 6 at 3
p m
STATE EMPLOYEES
ASSOCIATION
On Feb 12 tne ECU Chapter of the State
Employees Association has scheduled two
ane hour meeting for members and non
members of SEANC Representatives from
the State Membership Committee will
Jiscuss the benefits of membership m
SEANC Times 12 noon m Mendenhall,
room 224 and 1pm in Brody Bldg room
2E 92
ECU CHAPTER
OF NSSLHA
The ECU Chapter of NSSLHA will be spon
soring the lath annual Speech, Language and
Hearing Symposium on Feb 13 and 14, 1986
m the Blue Auditorium of the Brody Medical
Sciences Bidg Guest speakers are Or
Daniel R Boone presenting A 1986 Look at
Voice Therapy Mrs Lynn S Kelly. "The
Speech Pathologist'Audiologist and the
Geriatric Population" and Dr Theodore R
Sunder. "Learning Disabilities A
Neurodevelopmental Point of View " If you
would like more info contact Carol Town
send or Martha White at the ECU Speech and
Hearing Clinic
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF
UNIVERSITY WOMEN
Ann w Chipiey. national director tor
legislative programs for the American
Association of University Women will speak
on social and economic issues before state
ano federal legislators which affect women
at a Saturday brunch, Feb 15 Open to non
members ot the graduate women's organua
tion, the meeting will be at Holiday Inn,
Route 13, Greenville from 10 to noon Reser
vat.cms will be accepted through Feb 13
Call 756 1647 or 355 5025
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
The Oept of Elementary Education will
schedule Upper Division Interviews beginn
mg Monday, Feb 24, 1986 Eligible students
must submit applications for admission to
the departmenta' office (Speight 1036) by
Fr day, Feb 14,1984 The application entitl
ed "Application for Admission to Upper
Division ot Teacher Education at ECU" ism
eluded in the appendices of Welcome to
Teacher Education (Apple Book I
FRIENDS OF PERSPECTIVES
Monday, February 3, CHARLES
RICHARD DREW THE MAN AND THE
MYTH Charles E Wynes, Ph D , Professor
of History, University of Georgia In
Recognition of Black History Month, A
Charles E Culpeper History of Medicine
Lecture
Monday, February 10, EHTlCS AND
HUMAN GENE THERAPY Leroy Walther,
Ph D , Director Center for Bioethics. Ken
nedy institute of Ehtics. Georgetown Univer
Sity Both Presentations will be held 12 30
1 30pm. PCMH Cafeteria Upstairs Con
ference Room Sponsored by The Depart
ment of Medical Humanities. East Carolina
University School of Medicine. 757 2797 The
public is invited to attend
CAMP DAY
Students inleres'ed m summer camp
employment should visit the Co op Office in
Rawi 313 to learn more about this rear s
Camp Day Opportun.t.es tor counselors
arts 4. crafts instructors, lifeguards anc
many other positions for students m an ma
� ors
,$"
NEED CASH?
Southern
Gun & Pawn
752-2464
500 N. Greene
r$.
RECORD
Blank Tapes
TDK $2.98
Maxell XLI190 $2.98
"Best Prices Paid"
112 E. 5th St.
758-4298
"P
Due to the Fire at
FOR HEADS ONLY
Melody Furci and Beth Long
Will Be Working with the Fine Staff of
SHEAR HAIR DESIGN
Located on 14th St. next to Sammy's Country Cooking.
752-9706
(Tina rurci's clients may contact Melody or Beth for more information)
MARCH
0 1-8 0 15-22
0 8-15 22-29
CONGO OP MOTEl LODGING
PARTIES GOODIE BAGS MGBf,
OFFICIAL
BEACi
TRIPS
T
BE LEFT
IN THE COLD!
CENTRAL BREAK
RESERVATIONS
USA ft HAWAII
1-800-321-5911
COLORADO

1-800-321-5912 S�
CMEKTON&
Juicy
Florida
2 Blocks from ECU -
Corner Third &. Jams Streets
"Home of Greenville's Best Meats"
We reserve the right to limit quantities.
Prices Effective Through Tuesday, Feb. 11
ORANGES
5 lb bog
$1.29
r.
T"X
'A
u
Charmin
3�t
s
Richfood 2
u LowfatMILK
h gallon
89
TOILET TISSUE
4 roll pkg
99
'?
BUSCH
BEER
6 pack � I 2 oz cans
Limit 2 Please
WIN
Grade "A" Fresh White
Jumbo EGGS
win Ok
CASH bTuHlouVt grocer,es
nTriiiiiimiiimiff;i
V-VrVkV
$1.89
69
Limit 4
dozen please.
dozen
fvrtm, or trounrS
CASH & GROCERIES GIVE-AWAY
$150.00 Cash Jack Pot This Week! ;
Complete Details in Store. �
Joy
DISHWASHING LIQUID
99 J
22 oz bortl
VALENTINE
Gain
DETERGENT
Minute Maid
Regular or Country Style
42 oz box
New, Diet, or Classic
COKE
2 Liter Bottle
99�
Grade "A"
Whole
FRYERS
lb.
39�
99?
fr Minute
SP
ORANGE JUICE
h gallon paper carton
99 c
Limit 2 Please
Limit 3 Please
Limit 2 of your choice. Additional Cokes each SI. 15
Overton 's Finest Beef
Sirloin Steaks lb. $1.89
T-Bone Steaks lb. $2.19
Star-Kist Oil or Water Packed
Chunk Light TUNA
696
Star-Kist.
TUNA
Oil Dr
Nl V YORK (UPI)
Id a creditors
mmittee that falling oil Pr
ive a "serious" imj
omic pr .
- 1
$y billion this year.
-Vngel Gurria, din
edit a- the 1
Ministry, led a M
what was called
al" meeting -
ttee of major .
a broke up la
-ar
Banl .
I
ild have
.


'
I
New UN
RALEK iH, N.( (UPI
B -
airman,
Board
B ard's ice (
-

Park Idea
Proposed
( ontinued From Pane 1
Science n i
he
Braxton, ;
jor, is ,
Students from tCU curremiv
make up the majority of RDJ'v
tesearch team, anc
the study is
students v �
computerized a
RDW cli
local governm
must remain �
cording to Mi
details � �
pub,
Kentucky Nugget
6 Kentucky Nugge"
Kentucky Fries
1 Large Drink
a
We do Chicken
Coupon Redeernat;e at
Greenville locations c
at'on Date 3-3-86
6h oz can
he Plazl
February 10 - February
Carol Manuel
Clmique Consultant
Brody's. The Plaza
(919) 756-3140. ext 39





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MARCH
1
15-22
?. 22-29
OFFICIAL
BREAK
" NS
- A A
-911
-
BEER
1.89
All
Ing liquid

lid
fuar or Country Style
ORANGE JUICE
paper carton
99 C
Limit 2 Please
Packed
ft'r-Kfetj
f� TUNA
6V2 oz can
Oi7 Drop as Impact
NEW YORK (UP1) � Mex
tcan officials told a creditors
committee that falling oil prices
will have a "serious" impact on
the nation's economic program,
torcing Mexico to borrow up to
$9 billion this year.
Jose Angel Gurria, director of
Public Credit at the Finance
Ministry, led a Mexican delega-
tion in what was called an "infor-
mational" meeting with the com
tnittee of major creditor banks
that broke up late Tuesday with
plans to meet again in the near
future.
Banking sources said much of
the meeting was devoted to
discussions of oil prices and Gur-
ria outlined the impact that they
would have on its ability to meet
foreign commitments.
Gurria told the committee that
lower prices for oil, Mexico's ma-
jor foreign exchange earner,
would "have a serious impact"
on the economic program that
was part of its plans 10 meet
terms of the refinancing agree-
ment, banking sources said.
Mexican officials had said the
countrv would need as much as
$4 billion in new financing in
1986 but banking sources told
The Washington Post the amount
could be between $8 billion and
$9 billion because of plunging oil
prices.
Gurria reportedly told the
committee Mexico expects to
average SI6 per barrel this year
after charging $25 or more before
the price war.
Gurria said Mexico is making
progress in talks with the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund and World
Bank.
The IMF confirmed that talks
with Mexico are continuing in an
effort to agree on terms that
would enable the country to
resume drawing on a Fund Credit
Line.
It was disclosed that Mexico
drew SUX) million last month
from a disaster relief fund set up
b the IMF following the
devastating earthquake that hit
the country in September.
The World Bank,which was
asked by Treasury Secretary
James Baker to take a more ac-
tive role in helping resolve the
Third World debt problem, has
been discussing developing loans
with the country.
There also is speculation that
the World Bank will be asked to
guarantee some of the new bank
money Mexico will need.
Mexico completed a refinanc-
ing of roughly half of its $96
billion foreign debt last year of
which U.S. banks hold roughly
$25 billion.
Even though the refinancing
stretched out much of the prin-
cipal and granted easier interest
terms, Mexico's interest
payments still amount to roughly
$10 billion a year, a burden that
many think it will be unable to
meet.
But many analysts also noted
that Mexico is the largest supplier
of oil to the United States.
Leave
forests
and parks
clean.
Night Club
Valentine's Day Love
Lines will be published
on Feb. 13, at a cost of
SI per 25 words for
students. Remember
your sweetheart this
Valentine's Day.
Deadline is Tues. Feb.
, at 5:00 p.m.
Carolina East Centre
Off Highway 11
Near Plitt Theatre
Phone 756 6401
Wednesday Night
THE LADIES ZOO
All Lady Members Get In For $1.00
Until 10 p.m.
Guys In At 10
25c Draft 75c 16 oz. Draf
Friday Night
COLLEGE NIGHT
All Members In FREE Until 9 pm
50$ Draft 50c Wine Coolers
$2.50 Pitchers
Bob "Daddy Cool" Hayworfh is back playing the best
In Contemporary Dance Music both fun filled nights.
Beau's, a private club
Located in the Carolina East Centre, Greenville.
Phone 754-4401 for more info.
New UNC President Elected
RALEIGH, N.C.(UPI)� The
gael changed hands Wednesday
at the State Board of Education
hen Mebane Pritcheti took over
as chairman, succeeding C D.
Spangler. the University of North
Carolina's new president.
The Board unanimously ap-
proved Lt. Gov. Bob Jordan's
nomination of Pritchett, the
Board's Vice C hairman and
Director of the Morhead Founda-
e I niversity of North
Park Idea
Proposed
Continued From Paye 1
Scic a Janice Caldwell is
he the team and Dallas
Braxton, computer science ma-
jor, is computerizing the survey.
Students from ECU currently
make up the majontv of RDI's
research team, and the data from
the study is being analyzed b the
students After the results are
c mputerized and returned to
RDI's client ("who is a unit of
tl government but at this time
ain anonymous ac
Mr Simpson) the
ieta th 51 udy will be made
public.
Carolina. Pritchett also vsas Go .
Jim Martin's choice for
Spangler's post, said Gene Baker.
one of Martin's education ad-
visors.
The Board elects its chairman,
but has traditionally abided by
the Governor's choice when mak-
ing its decision.
Barbara Tapscott, a fifth-year
board member, was unanimously
elected Vice Chairman. Tapscott
is Assistant Superintendent for
Instruct Kin for the Burlington Ci-
ty Schools.
"In choosing me (as President
of i lie University of North
Carolina System), the Board ol
Governors gave a clear signal to
the state that they believe in
public education said Spangler,
elected last week to replace UNC
President Bill Friday.
They gave a clear signal that
they expect a close tie between the
University System and the State
Board of Education Spangler
said.
Spangler, who plans to assume
Ins new duties March 2, said the
Education System in North
Carolina � from elementary
schools up to universities �
forms a circle.
See UNC Page 6.
Bahamas Cruise � Spring Break
March 10$341 per person DOUBLE
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4 days of cruising in the Bahamas
All meals and entertainment on ship
Port taxes included in price
drab a partner and get with the "Fun Croup
Space limited � Book Now With:
Ol IXOTE TRAVELS
M1) Cotanehe St. (downtown Greenville)
Greenville. C
Phone: 757-0234
ship"
.

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i

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t
y
i
-COL'PON
Kentucky Nugget Snack
6 Kentucky Nuggets
Kentucky Fries
1 Large Drink
"We do Chicken Right"
Coupon Redeemable at
Greenville locations only
Expiration Date 3-3-86
$1.99
Plus Tax
-coupon-
The Plaza
February 10 - February 22
Your Clinique Bonus:
The Right Chemistry"
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Brody's, The Plaza
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Yours at no extra charge whatever with any
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'Magazine
The Minority Affairs Publication of East Carolina University
;
If �
Has Openings
For The Following Positions:
Typesetters
Photographers
Advertising Representatives
Writers
Associate Editors
Applications will be available at EXPRESSIONS office or Media Board
secretary in Publications Bldg.
ime
Greenville, N.C
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Biscuits
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Chicken Biscuit, French Fries
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�COIPON
'
t





3Uje lEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender, owMp-gr
JAY STONE, Marwgins Ednor
Mike Ludwick, vr�fi�Mf Greg Winchester, DvKtorortorat
Scoi i Cooper, s,�,��� Anthony Martin, abmcsMmma
DANIEI MAURER. emenammtmiato JOHN PETERSON, cMiMmp
John Shannon, st&Ed Shannon Short. �,��� ��
Hi Cm ami i Johnson. � one Debbie Stevens, s�
February 6. ls86
Opinion
Page 4
Reagan's Budget
No Surprises Here
That President Reagan's new
proposed budget will meet the
target of the new Gramm-Rudman
budget balancing law of reducing
the federal deficit to SI44 billion in
fiscal 1987, if enacted, may cause
joy in some quarters, but not in
others. For, the President's budget
calls for a 12 percent increase in
defense spending while completely
eliminating federal programs such
as Amtrak rail passenger service,
the Small Business Administration,
the Interstate Commerce Commis-
sion, the Economic Development
Administration and others. The
Reagan budget would also sharply
reduce funding for the federal
housing program, health and
agricultural programs and funding
for the building of dams and flood
control projects by the Army Corps
of Engineers.
The elimination of the programs
mentioned above would, of course,
be ludicrous as would the continua-
tion of the sharply escalating U.S.
arms build-up. The News and
Observer reported in its February 5
edition that Reagan's budget calls
for actual defense outlays of $282
billion in 1987, an increase from the
present level of $266 billion. Yet,
the Raleigh based paper adds, the
budget also calls for giving the
military authority to contract to
spend even more in 1987, for a total
of S320.3 billion � a boost of near-
ly 12 percent from the current level
and about 8 percent more than the
level of inflation.
These defense increases are
justified by the Reagan administra-
tion as a necessary means of
demonstrating American resolve to
the Soviet Union. Whether or not
the astronomical military spending
increases asked for by Reagan will
make the Soviets more amenable to
the idea of making concessions dur-
ing up-coming arms talks is a sub-
ject that is open for debate. But
what current levels of military spen-
ding are doing is weakening the
American economy. Though high
military spending does promote
.some growth in the economy, a
dollar spent on rebuilding the in-
frastructure or improving schools is
more likely to provide a foundation
for future growth than a dollar
spent on MX missiles.
That is because arms production
is more automated and employs
fewer people than other industries,
the research that is involved in
weapons production has very few
commercial applications and
military goods are basically non-
consumerable goods. 1 say this not-
withstanding the fact that the
United States is the world's largest
exporter of arms. Still, the income
derived from arms sales is small in-
deed compared to the cost of their
production.
Of course the economic costs of
maintaining a strong national
defense should not deter the nation
from meeting its security needs. But
reality dictates that there is a point
at which the economic well-being of
a country intersects with the vitality
of its security apparatus. I say this
notwithstanding the fact that the
United States is the world's largest
exporter of arms. Still, the income
derived from arms sales is small in-
deed compared to the cost of their
production.
Of course the economic costs of
maintaining a strong national
defense should not deter the nation
from meeting its security needs. But
reality dictates that there is a point
at which the economic well-being of
a country intersects with the vitality
of its security apparatus. That point
has been reached by this nation.
While the sum of the national
debt has increased to in excess of 40
percent of GNP and interest
payments on the national debt have
increased by $70 billion since the
beginning of the Reagan era
military spending has increased
relentlessly. This means that money
that might have gone into laying the
seeds for future economic growth
was spent instead on arms procure-
ment. Thus it is unlikely that we
will be able to grow enough in the
future to compensate for current
expenditures. The reasons for this
are essentially twofold:
First, in mid-1985, the United
States officially became a debtor
nation for the first time since 1914.
This development has been directly
related to the trade deficit which is
in turn related to the strength of the
dollar relative to other currencies.
And the dollar is strong now
because of high real interest rates
and a successive string of federal
deficits. The strong dollar, which
has seen its real value rise approx-
imately 60 percent between 1980
and March 1985, has caused
foreigners to be reluctant to buy
overpriced U.S. goods. This has
caused the trade deficit to move
from $36 billion in 1982 to approx-
imately $130 billion in 1985. And it
has motivated foreigners to invest
in U.S. assets like government
bonds, for which they can collect
high interest rates, rather than in
U.S. products.
The outcome of all this is that the
buildup of foreign debt that is
presently occuring is threatening
U.S. economic security even if
measures are taken to restrain
deficit spending. This is particularly
true because the foreign debt is
presently growing faster than the
economy as a whole. Moreover this
basic trend is likely to continue into
the foreseeable future because of
the high level of military spending
relative to spending which pro-
motes sizable economic growth and
meets human needs. At present
even if the value of the dollar is
made to decline a financial panic
could be set off that would cause
foreigners to withdraw their
holdings in U.S. assets as they see
those assets decreasing in value.
This sell-off of U.S. assets would
lower the demand for dollars even
more, hastening its fall. Such a
panic might result in substantial
financial disruption � high
unemployment, low productivity,
and diminished international trade.
Yet, such a panic would only be
likely if the value of the dollar falls
precipitously.
Even if the value of the dollar
declines gradually, however, pro-
blems await. The drop in the dollar
could help restore a normal balance
of trade and make U.S. goods more
competitive, but a decline in the
value of the dollar will also increase
the rate of inflation in the United
States by making foreign goods
more expensive. The increase in in-
flation might move the Federal
Reserve to tighten domestic credit
supplies at the same time that
foreign lenders are cutting back on
their loans to the United States
(because of the weaker dollar). The
resulting credit squeeze could easily
be severe enough to counteract any
employment gains that result from
the normal value of the dollar and
increased trading overseas. It could
also throw the economy into a full-
blown recession. Thus, regardless
of how the dollar behaves the cur-
rent policies of the Reagan ad-
ministration make it clear that
workers and farmers will continue
to bear the brunt of any outcome
produced by the economy's crisis
managers.
THfc EAST
9mecVTZBOcvLViueuah- uurrteniaai tv.
Campus Forum
A Requiem For The Astronauts
I have listened to countless stones
of friends, teachers, familv
members,and even strangers, concer-
ning how the) reacted upon hearing
the loss of a public figure. 1
remember one high school friend cry-
ing over the loss of former Beatle,
John Lennon, while working on a
bulletin board. 1 remember a triend
recalling how she telt watching her
third grade teacher weep after hear-
ing that President Kenned) had been
assasinated.
It's amazing that with each storv,
we remember the exact locations,
whether it be a nostalgic scene of sit-
ting a: a school desk, hearing a prin-
cipal's voice ovet the intercom, or
watching a live broadcast on a black
and white television m a dorm room.
1 can now understand the national
despair that these people have telt. In
m 21 ears, I have never experienced
the sense o! loss so much as with the
space shuttle disaster occuring I ues-
dav morning. Jan. 28.
Along with millions of viewers, I
sal frozen in front of a television
screen at the sight ot twisted white
clouds replacing the Challengei
spacecraft. And just as any jet
streaks the sky, the Challenger
streaks have lingered a little longer
tor those watching the broadcast.
I ears have tilled my eves as 1 flip
channels one week later, here are
non-erasable clippings o mourning
family members. President Reagan
delivering a memorial speech,
newscasters with model rockets reliv-
ing the tragic incident, the faces of
classroom students watching their
teacher with ptoud smiles and then
heart-breaking frowns.
The loss of the seven astonaunts
indeed a loss all Americans share; the
funeral, one that we all attend.
America will hopefully lift its black
veils and again look into the skies
with optimism � not reminiscent of
a fatal vision. But until that day, I
console fellow mourners grieving
after everv news release, especially
the recent findings of human bone
fragments along the coast of near
Daytona Beach, in saying, we share
your loss.
Stephanie Dew
Junior, English major
More About Republicans
This letter is in response to the Col-
lege Republicans who have recently
had letters in the East Carolinian. I
wil never cease to be amazed by the
ludicrous statements they make. To
begin with, some of these people
claim to be conservatives, when in
fact they are really right wing ex-
tremists. Sandy Hardy claims that
most conservatives hold the views
stated in Lance Hardin's letter, but
this is far from the truth. Mr. Hardy-
fails to understand that he and his
College Republican pals are not con-
servatives, but are right wing ex-
tremists. True conservatives, such as
William F. Buckley, Barry
Goldwater, and Robert Dole, would
never make a radical statement such
as "sweep all pacifist, lazy liberals,
and moral outcasts back into the
closet Yes, Mr. Hardy, Barry
Goldwater and William F. Buckley
did say the things mentioned in my
letter. If you would look back to last
summer when the Reagan Ad-
ministration urged the Supreme
Court to overturn its abortion ruling,
you might notice a large list of people
that was immediately sent to the
Supreme Court. This list consisted of
Senators and Representatives who
did not agree with the Reagan ad-
ministration's abortion stand. Alo
with several other Republicans,
Barrv Cjoldwaier was on the list
Also, when Jesse Helms proposed a
measure that would prevent the
Supreme Court from ruling on
school praver sases, Goldwater
stated that he would have been
ashamed to propose mdi an idea. s
tor Mr. Buckley, 1 suggest that you
watch Firing Line on PBS and read
Mr. Bucklev's syndicated column.
here you will find numerous discus
sions oi Mr. Buckley's views on taxes
and the deficit. In the future, Mr
Hard). I suggest that you I
yourself "a complete text ' what
these men have said" before you
claim otherwise.
I have been extremely entertained
by the emotional, irrational exclam-
lions made bv these "conservatives
lor example. Jill Averett claims
"we can't have good weapons, we
can't have bencr weapon we I
to have the best weapons and we
can't settle tor anything less " Rah
rah-sis-boom-bah! Let's hear it I
weapons'
The all-time classic, 'hough, was
Bob 1 ucas' statement that "onlv
liberals approve the cowardl) act of
suicide An) intelligent person
should know that suicide is a natii
tragedy, committed bv desperate .
sick people, not "cowardh liberals
Jan Higginbotham was onl) using
humor to make a verv vood point;
life in a societ) dictated bv ECl 's
College Rubpulisans would be verv
difficult to take. Of course, there are-
still those who claim that abortion is
a one-sided black and white issue.
and that people who have abortions
are "moral outcasts God bless the
College Republicans (they sure need
it).
Lastly, 1 would like to thank M:
Hardy for his statement that I would
be offered a scholarship from the
political science department for
graduate work. Considering the
overall quality and superior intellec-
tual ability of the faculty in this
department, I have been paid a
tremendous complement. Appreciate
it, Sandy.
Bern McCrady
Junior, Political Science
Abortion
After reading Miss Shearin's
editoral response about abortion in
the February 4 edition. I now realize
how some people misinterpert life.
Yes life, the rights of the born and
the unborn.
First the born, you, me, and
everyone around us, Where do we
stand0 Especially the women who
have to face the abortion issue. The
women who have conceived these
babies do have a say about the child
they are carrying although God has
the ultimate say for it is His child like
you and I. Blow the dust off of your
Bible Miss Shearin and read how im-
moral abortion is. We a-e not talking
about a hog, a bull, or a cow, but an
innocent unborn human being.
The unborn have no say. In many
cases they are aborted so early that
their sex is unknown. Think of them
as babies that have been aborted;
future presidents perhaps, scientists,
doctors, lawyers, educators, and
more. Our future is with our
children.
The woman that faces the abortion
issue should take some things into
consideration. Just look at the adop-
tion agencies. There are many people
that would love to have newborn
babies to adopt. Alot of these people
are not able to have children I
own who want children. I i
'he mother hav tng the bal
ed a verv reasonable amoui
money to do so. You must adn
this is a bettet and mure moral al
ive than abortion. I'm sure .
are a nice person Miss Shearin. H
would vour family feel il
mother had did:
n w hile . �� .
ask them sometimes
other pro-abort
re, we cat
�e are othei a
sidei

more careful I I
ate will � � r. P
less ���
I - M
��. Business
Health Columnist Replies
This lettei is in response
tei to the editoi written bv Je
Zeigel on January 30. first let
' I was glad ' see that stud
are paving close attention to the
formation pn vided in the "He
Column " Second, the phrase
you objecicd so strongly to was not
written bv me: mv statement
"women who have had intercourse
with numerous male partners
V hen mv article appeared in The
East Carolinian it had been change
without mv knowledge or approval
as "sexually promiscuous I agree
with you that this implies a value
judgement and is certainl) not a
phrase I use in mv vocabulary.
I here are. as you mentioned.
:dn risk factors that contribute
the dysplasia. All those 1 listed are
true and have been validated bv
man) research studies. I did not
DLS as a risk factor in this particular
article because the vast majorit)
college-aged women were born ai
the drug DLS was taken off the
market and therefore would not be at
risk due to DES exposure.
Again, thank you for vour com-
ments.
Marv Elesha-Adams
Health Educator
Editor's Note: We apologize for am
contusion we may have created
Prisoner
Hi! Mv name is Kurt Douglas
Ravmer. Everyone calls me Doug
I'm white male, 5 ft, 8 inches tall. 160
pounds brown hair blue eves. I'm a
lonelv prisoner who's been in prison
for 4 years and have 6 more years to
go. I'm 29 years old.
I have no friends or family who I
can correspond with, I'd like to make
some friends who are open-minded
to life and would like to have some
mail in return.
I'll answer all letters and any and
all questions. I'm from Louisiana,
stuck off here in Kentucky. But I've
lived in North Carolina, California.
Massachusetts, and Indiana.
I had some nice times when I live in
Greenville at ECU.
If anyone is interested in making a
new friend feel free to write and ask
or say what you like.
Anyone wanting to write feel free.
My address is listed below.
Kurt D. Raymer No. 89573
K.S.R. Box 188
La Grange, KY 40032
U.S. Role I
Cd
I r.e Reagan Admi:
again submit a budge
which calls for S60 i
militar aid he
rebels who are, in Pre
clouded mind
our founding father
quiesces
demands, the 1 -
new, but r
phase of !
America
From The LI
Bv Rl( k HROVtN
Indeed
political ai
.
the econ rnjc
Vanderbilt
impany d
Nicaragua wa
significance t
i
of Ame
through the I
Nicaragua I
the American w
Nicaragua ai
tion inc
slave state
Communism
u
When .
send financ i
should know some
nation. On July 19, 1979, a
took place A group
known as the Sane
established govern- �
dent Somoza S
power for decade-
democratic values
dinistas rar -
were establishing a
was glad to help Pr
ting upon this pledge
creased financial a .
was before the rev
eighteen month
tion would give
financial aid and
of food to the v
From The RIG
B LANCE HRDIN
In late 1980, however
dent that the Sand -ere
what thev had prom
dinistas were engaged in a
build up Thev were
the radio and TV stal
already executed over 8,00 j
Sandinistas
majority of the people Tl
no more free elect
The Sandinistas, �
mous finam
they pledged to establish a ae
were in fact doing ea,
The Sandinistas, now ah j
Cuban and Soviet troops, had
ed a totalitarian regime
Not only totalitarian, but a
ly supported bv the Soviet
Nicaragua had become a pav
game of Soviet expansion H
had once again used their
cessful technique the teleguiJ
d'etat. This ;s the same method!
used to infiltrate Afgha .
Yemen, and Ethiopia The SaJ
ustng monev and equipment
provided b the Soviet I n
managed to overthrow the
government. Then, once the
power, the Sandinistas had turf
Soviet Union for aid, this aid si
being the first
With the help of their ally,
Union, the Sandinistan gover
been in power now for over i
Let's review two aspects of
dinistan government: their mij
their 'foreign polk)
As far as the military is conci
Sandinistas have ecn c
building up since they cam: ml
The Sandinistas currently hi
190,000 soldiers operating frj
than 40 new military bases





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ips then,
e the
olumnist Replies
1 e let-
nifer
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idents
Health
that
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was
irse

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Prisoner
! )ouglas
: Doug.
tall, 160
I'm a
been in prison
6 more years to
� famil) who I
I'd like to make
pen-minded
d like to have some
letters and any and
all I'm from Louisiana,
in Kentucky. But I've
North Carolina, California,
Massachusetts, and Indiana.
1 some nice times when I live in
enville at E-( I
It anyone is interested in making a
new friend feel free to write and ask
or sa what you like.
Anyone wanting to write feel free.
ly address is listed below.
Kurt D. Raymer No. 89573
K S R Box 188
La Grange, KV 40032
THE EAST CAAOUNIAN
Other Opinion
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 6, 1986
U.S. Role In Nicaragua Strengthens Communism
Contras Not Like Our Founding Fathers
The Reagan Administration will once
again submit a budget to Congress
which calls for $60 million in direct
military aid to the Nicaraguan contra
rebels who are, in President Reagan's
clouded mind, "the moral equivalents of
our founding fathers If Congress ac-
quiesces to the administration's
demands, the United States will enter a
new, but not altogether unfamiliar,
phase of U.S. hegemony in Latin
America.
From The LEFT
B RICK BROWN
Indeed, the U.S. has a long history of
political and economic interest in
Nicaragua. As early as the mid-1800's,
the economic interests of Cornelius
Vanderbilt (shipping) and the U.S. Fruit
Company dominated the region.
Nicaragua was of great politcal
significance to the U.S partly because
of America's desire to build a canal
through the Isthmus of Panama or
Nicaragua. For a brief period in 1856.
the American William Walker ruled
Nicaragua and attempted to have the na-
tion incorporated into the Union as a
slave state.
From 1911 to 1933, Nicaraguans were
subjected to U.S. military occupation.
The United States quelled revolutions
and installed governments sympathetic
to Washington in order to create a stable
environment for their economic in-
terests.
According to historian Walter
LeFeber, the United States solved the
dilemma "of how to inject force to stop
revolutions without having a long-term
commitment of US troops" by using
"native, U.Strained forces The U.S.
solution created the hated Nicaraguan
National Guard, led by Anastasio
Somaza. By 1933, Somoza had
destroyed his opposition and was firmly
entrenched as dictator with full U.S.
support.
During the period of 1934 to 1979,
Somoza and his sons ruled Nicaragua
with an iron fist. The family seized most
of the nation's wealth and a land area
equal to that of Massachusetts, leaving
200,000 peasants without land. The ma-
jor causes of death in Nicaragua during
this period were gastrointestinal and
parasitic diseases, and infant maladies.
U.S. support for Somoza was unwaver-
ing, partly because, as LeFeber argues,
"no regime in the world cooperated
more fully with the United States
When the Somoza family was deposed in
1979 bv the Sandinistas, thev left
Nicaragua bankrupt and destitute.
In the 80's, the United States has once
again resorted to the use of native,
U.Strained troops to overthrow a
revolution. Reagan calls these troops
"freedom fighters" and now asks Con-
gress to fund them. However, a brief
look at the makeup and motives of these
"freedom fighters" should cause Con-
gress instead to question the motives of
the Reagan administration.
In 1982 the Contras were 500 men
who supposedly existed solely to inter-
dict the flow of arms to El Salvador.
They were first funded covertly by the
Reagan administration and then overtly
by Congress. The Reagan administra-
tion's claim that the contra's purpose
was to pressure the Sandinistas into
democratizing Nicaragua held little
substance after the disclosure of the
secret CIA mining of Nicaraguan har-
bors and a CIA manual instructing con-
tra rebels in the fine arts of murder and
terrorism. Moreover, the Reagan ad-
ministration has repeatedly blocked
Nicaraguan attempts to obtain economic
aid from so-called non-political interna-
tional lending institutions. This
American "pressure" for Nicaraguan
democracy has only served to drive the
Sandinistas further into the Soviet-
Cuban camp and to give hardline San-
dinistas an excuse to continue their
repression of the opposition, the press
and the church. It seems all too obvious
to me that the Sandinistas will look for
economic and military assistance
wherever they can when the United
States continues a policy of military ag-
gression and economic strangulation.
Today the contras number 15,000.
According to Edgar Chamorro, who
served as a contra director from
December 1982 to November 1984 until
being fired for opposing CIA control, by
mid-1984, 46 out of 48 of the contra
comandantes were former Somoza Na-
tional Guardsmen.
The human rights atrocities
perpetrated by the contras have been
well-documented by numerous,
legitimate human rights organizations
such as Americas Watch. On the other
hand, Amnesty International and
Americas Watch have issued reports
showing that the Sandinistas have a vast-
ly superior human rights record to the El
Salvadoran Government, which the
United States supports. The Reagan ad-
ministration, however, attempts to
discredit these reports by questioning the
motives of those who gather the infor-
mation.
A newly declassified CIA document
attempts to deny charges that the con-
tras often slit the throat of captives
despite arguments by Chamorro and
former FDN officer Salvador Icaza that
slitting throats was a favorite method of
killing prisoners. The document further
states that "there is nobody in the FDN
who is there against his or her will � it is
an entirely voluntary organization
Chamorro and numerous other ex-rebels
have said that the FDN does practice
forced recruitment. Even a November
White House report said "instances of
forced recruitment and summary execu-
tion of prisoners . . . may well have oc-
curred So much for the "founding
fathers" rhetoric.
By continuing a time-dishonored
policy of military aggression and
economic blackmail, while adding a new
twist of terrorism, the Reagan ad-
ministration is doing everything possible
to add Nicaragua to the list of
"dominoes" it wishes to prevent from
falling. Americans of conscience abhor
our role in the region, which does not, as
President Reagan claims, make America
stand tall. Hopefully Congress will see
through this administration's despicable
charade and seek other, more sane
methods to help bring peace with justice
in Nicaragua. Somehow I just can't im-
agine George Washington slitting the
throat of a Tory sympathizer.
Rick Brown is a former English
Graduate student on sabbatical. He
is a member of Students for Economic
Democracy.
Communism Threatening To Spread
Support Contras; Fight Communism
When considering whether or not to
send financial aid to Nicaragua, one
should know some of the history of that
nation. On July 19, 1979, a revolution
took place. A group of rebels, otherwise
known as the Sandinistas, overthrew the
established government headed by Presi-
dent Somoza. Somoza had been in
power for decades and was a paragon of
democratic values. Thus, when the San-
dinistas ran Somoza out and said they
were establishing a democracy, the US
was glad to help. President Carter, ac-
ting upon this pledge of democracy, in-
creased financial aid to five times w hat it
was before the revolution. Over the next
eighteen months, the Carter administra-
tion would give over $140 million in
financial aid and airlift in 100,000 tons
of food to the Sandinistas.
From The RIGHT
By LANCE HARDIN
In late 1980, however, it became evi-
dent that the Sandinistas were not doing
what they had promised. The San-
dinistas were engaged in a huge military
build up. They were taking control of
the radio and TV stations. They had
already executed over 8,000 people. The
Sandinistas no longer represented the
majority of the people. There were to be
no more free elections.
The Sandinistas, who recieved enor-
mous financial aid from the US because
they pledged to establish a democracy,
were in fact doing exactly the opposite.
The Sandinistas, now also employing
Cuban and Soviet troops, had establish-
ed a totalitarian regime in Nicaragua.
Not only totalitarian, but also Financial-
ly supported by the Soviet Union.
Nicaragua had become a pawn in the
game of Soviet expansion. The Soviets
had once again used their most suc-
cessful technique: the teleguided coup
d'etat. This is the same method they had
used to infiltrate Afghanistan, South
Yemen, and Ethiopia. The Sandinistas,
using money and equipment secretly
provided by the Soviet Union, had
managed to overthrow the Somozan
government. Then, once they were in
power, the Sandinistas had turned to the
Soviet Union for aid, this aid supposedly
being the first.
With the help of their ally, the Soviet
Union, the Sandinistan government has
been in power now for over five years.
Let's review two aspects of the San-
dinistan government: their military and
their 'foreign policy
As far as the military is concerned, the
Sandinistas have been constantly
building up since they cams into power.
The Sandinistas currentl have over
190,000 soldiers operating from more
than 40 new military bases. Somoza
never found it necessary to have more
than 14,000 troops at eleen bases. Why
do the Sandinistas feel it is necesar to
have almost 20 percent of the entire
population enlisted in the military? (con-
trast that with the United States, which
has less than one half one one percent
enlisted). Why do the Sandinistas have
350 tanks, more than all of the other
Central American countries combined?
Somoza got along fine with only 28
tanks. Why are the Sandinistas building
the longest runway in Central America,
much larger than they need for their air-
craft? One can only speculate, knowing
that the Soviets have huge airecraft
which require just such runways.
When it comes to 'foreign policy' the
Sandinistas have but one thought: ex-
pansion. This they hope to accomplish
by promoting and supporting guerrilla
warfare in all their neighboring coun-
tries. Indeed, the Sandinistan interior
minister, Tomas Borge, said in 1981
"This revolution goes beyond our
borders It is a well-known fact that
the Sandinistas are aiding guerrillas in El
Salvador, Columbia, Peru, and Chile.
What do the Sandinistas stand to gain by
giving this aid? They are trying to create
the same situation in other countries that
enabled the Soviets to take control of
theirs. A Soviet control of Central
America would be a nightmare for all
citizens of the United States. The Soviets
would take control of the Panama
Canal, through which passes 40 percent
of all the foreign tonnage entering the
US as well as 50 percent of all our im-
ported oil. It would put the Soviets
dangerously close to the Mexican oil
fields, a major source of US oil. Also, it
would put the Soviets on the same conti-
nent as the United States. Anyone who
saw the movie "Red Dawn" can imagine
the possibilities of that situation. In the
movie's realistic scenario, it was
Nicaraguan and Cuban forces that at-
tackeu the US from the South as Soviet
missies struck from the North.
These are but two facets of the San-
dinistan government. There's not room
here to tell of all the mass graves, unex-
plained deaths, torture, and illegal ar-
rests. There's not room to describe the
burned churches and murdered priests.
There's no room to tell how food pro-
duction has fallen 50 percent since the
revolution, or to describe how San-
dinistan soldiers locked the men in barns
and raped the women for a month.
One would think that after an in-
dividual learned the facts, he would im-
plore our government to rush our forces
into Nicaragua to put an end to this
murderous, conspiratorial regime. In
spite of the impending threat a com-
munist Nicaragua makes to America, we
also have on our consciences the gross
injustices to human rights that are going
on right now in that same country.
But we, as American citizens, do not
have to make that terrible sacrifice of
going to war against the evil Sandinistan
government to protect human life, digni-
ty, and freedoms. Currently in
Nicaragua is a group of brave freedom
fighters, also known as "contras" (for
contra-communism). These freedom
fighters are vastly out numbered, but
they are gaining strength as more and
more people realize that the Sandinistan
government would mean a life of hell.
As American citizens, we need not risk
our own lives or our children's lives
fighting the Sandinistan cancer; we can
help the true Nicaraguans and ourselves
merely by sending financial aid to the
freedom fighters. With our help, they
can win. They've got the courage, the
spirit, and the perserverence necessary
for victory. All they need is money and
equipment to win this battle Lainst
communism. Let's give them our coun-
try's support.
It"s time we take a hard look at the
facts and make the right decision.
What's the difference between innocent
people starving in Ethiopia and innocent
people getting raped and shot in
Nicaragua? President Reagan has called
for our support for "those who are risk-
ing their lives � on every continent,
from Afghanistan to Nicaragua � to
defy Soviet supported aggression
Let's help President Reagan fight com-
munism. Let's help the Nicaraguan
citizens. Let's help the world remain
free. Let's support the Nicaraguan
freedom fighters.
Lance Hardin is a Sophomore major-
ing m Business. fr. Hardm is a member
of the ECU College Republicans.
5H0ULP EXERCI5E WUR
MUSCLES A LITTLE
SEMPTHg
SIXTH FLEET
TO UWA





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 6, 1986
Campus Voice
i
Where is your favorite place to study, and at what time of the day do
you study most?
�� 'A
4P
Felicia Abrams Danny Dodson
Therapeutic Recreation, Junior Math, Sophmore
"My favorite place to study is in "1 study in the living room of my
the stacks in the library at about apartment from about 10:00 to
7:00 midnight
fc
Mark DeSalvo
Finance, Junior
"I study in Mendenhall lounge
from 2:00-500pm evervdav
Betsy Hellmuth Harold Baglev
A rt, Senior Commercial A rt. Senior
paint m my art studio in the "I work in the Art Building and
in mv apartment from
7:00-3:00am
morning.
Deith Zambito
Biology, Junior
"I study mostly between 11:00pm
and 1:00am in mv room
Get the
word out
in the
Announcements
In The East Carolinian
Opening Soon
The
TEQUILA BAR
(pre viously Premiums)

& Sigma Sigma Sigma
Present








&


&








All Campus
Male StriD Oi











8:30-1:00 A.M.
Tuesday, February 11,1986
Ladies Only til 10:00
Admission1.00 85C Cans All Nite
Prizes t
1st � $100.00 Cash
2nd �50.00 Cash
3rd �25.00 Cash
�it
�a
Entries can sign up at the Student
Supply Store Friday and Mondav or call
758-4591
iV
Tar Landing Seafood
Specials
All You Can Eat
Any One Or Any Combinational to4 items)
Shrimp, Oysters, Trout,
Clam Strips, Deviled 4T Ji
Crabs, Flounder
Alaskan Crab Legs Or
Steamed Shrimp
$6
President
Elected
Continued From Page 1.
"The University of North
Carolina gets its students from
the public schools he said. "If
public schools do their job well,
the universities will have good
students. If the universities train
good teachers, those teachers will
become your teacher.
"Any part of that circle that
gets strengthened, strengthens the
whole state, the whole circle
Spangler said.
Pritchett, Jordan and State
Public Instruction superintendent
Craig Phillips praised Spangler's
3 12 year tenure on the Board,
saying his strong leadership
sparked much pubiic focus on
education in North Carolina.
Spangler "focused public at-
tention on many steps (taken by
the Board), resulting in un-
precedented political and finan-
cial support of public schools
Pritchett said.
Jordan, struggling for a title by
which to address Spangler,
"you're no longer chairman,
you're not yet president" he said,
"Mr. Normal Citizen, we are in-
deed fortunate that you're here,
and we look forward to working
with you and the university
This Style from
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Opon Mo�iFri. 9 a.m. HI 5:30 p m
Interested In
Studying A bro ad?
Information on academ ic
exchange opportunities th roughout
the world through the kiternational
Student Exchange Pro-am (ISEP),
at ECU. Cost information available
from:
Dr. R. Hursey Jr.
ISEP Coordinator
Austin 222
Phone 757-6418 (office)
756-0682 (hom0
presents
Friday, February 7
v
4 -
:1 - �
v f I
PLAYGIRL
CENTERFOLDS
Doors open at 8:00
Show from 8:30-0:30
Men Free After 10:30
GIRLS! 2:00 Off
for PLAYGIRL Centerfolds
with coupon at door
iz
� � � � � � � �. � I
Saturday, February 8
Bill Pinkney & The Original Drifters
Early Bird Special
$2.00 off until 9:30
Don't DRIVE Call the XiLxh, J?uL
for a FREE RIDE
758-5570
Private Club � All ABC Permits
The Debate
Served With Fried Or Baked Potato, Cole Slaw,
Hushpuppies.
105 Airport Road
Greenville, NC
Banquet Facilitin Available
758-0327
Open Daily Sunday thru Thursday II A M to 9 P M
Friday and Saturday II AM to 10 P M.
Sarah Weddington vs. Phyllis Schlafly
jjezzxtzz?he ERA-aack"weaponsh Re��n ��� �
Tickets: ECU students and guest: $1.50
ECU FacultyStaff and groups of 20 or more: $3 00
Public and at the door: $5.00
Tickets available Monday-Friday, 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m from the Central Ticket Offi�
Mendenhall. Telephone: 757-6611, ext 266. e Office,
Sponsored by the East Carolina University Student Union Forum Committee
Monday Feb. 17, 1986
8:00 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
East Carolina University
THF FASTf Aft
l INI An
Pool Qs, T
Take Attic
B WAI RISHM
"We like I
do things b
prettv rema �
Jeff Caldei
Pool Qs w
Three Hits, left lh�
day night cro :
and satisfied.
The Swimming P
veteran group of eu
have prod .
toured nati
The gr
Georgia
writer singer I
bined his
friend and guitai
and keyboard!
Richmond B W
from a bas
both even-
band, theii �
BelK Ring
led to the
album. Deep End
released in 198
In Apr:
picked up tw
Atlanta
became th
Come On An
Dorsey
There is
about the Tomm D
chestra which is conducted b
Buddy Morrow
peanng in Greer.v ,
Nitelife on Tues
Morrow is a �'
Band era and h
of the original Doi
However, peop
see the orchestra ,
men the same v
the original band
ed at the nun -
members on
Mos
cians are gra
fine mu
the country and.
seem to some fans
are often older :han we
the original Dorses ites
was still in his teens
with Tomnn Dorsey!
From The No
Co
By P MOl U)
"What the hell is
M editor. Dan, �a
when Dai gets angry be
color � I I of Hi
He continued. "1 as)
on gameshows; and 1 aske
I assumed you could d
Pat. 1 assumed �
of a sense ol humor
What did ou give mt s
gave me a monotonous
crap on Pat Sajack :na
funny as a turn
"But Dan 1 replied.
a piece of cold pi.
from my mouth "It's
be funny eer other week
Don't you think ou could
me a break?" What happened
next is rather hairv. so l urc.
of you who are weak
stomach to quit reading
Dan blew up Not in the
blew up like a big ol" biowfish 1 si
big as Ed McMahoo � and then fs
bleeding. Now folks, I'm
paranormal, but Dans hod was d
over by forces from anothe
He screamed. "A break' Yo �
By this time, his eves had s�
of golf balls set on fire 1 .
Molloy. Now drop that bee-
and write me an article on .
"Okay, okay, Dan. &
you please quit d: :y
� - � -





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ugh the hternational
njie Pro-am (ISEP),
information available
p.t?
LDS
.V 2:00 Off
YGIRL Centerfolds
lupon at door
sinal Drifters
cial
9:30
E��i
1� � � k
lie
Schlafly
igan administration, abortion,
S3.00
Intral Ticket Office,
Hendrix Theatre
East Carolina University
THE EAST CAROtlNIAN
Entertainment
IIHKI H 6, 1986
Pool Qs, Three Hits
Take Attic By Storm
ByWALTRlSHEL
Sl.ff Wrltrf
"We like to run the gamut
do things both brutish and
pretty remarked lead singer
Jeff Calder of the Swimming
Pool Q's who, along with The
Three Hits, left the Attic's Satur-
day night crowd both exhausted
and satisfied.
The Swimming Pool Q's is a
veteran group of eight years who
have produced two albums and
toured nationally.
The group began in Atlanta.
Georgia in 1978 when song
writer singer Jeff Calder com-
bined his talents with that of
friend and guitarist Bob Elsey
and keyboardist vocalist Anne
Richmond Boston. With support
from a bassist and drummer, who
both eventually retired from the
band, their first single, "The
Bells Ring was released. This
led to the formation of their first
album. Deep End, which was
released in 1981 on DB Records.
In April of 1982 the group
picked up two locals from an
Atlanta band. J.E. Garnett
became the group's new bassist
and Billy Burton was installed as
the new drummer to maintain the
group's active status. Shortly
thereafter the Q's played in
Greenville at what was then call-
ed JJ's.
Since their last performance in
Greenville, the band's popularity
has spread. They signed with
A&M Records and produced
their second album, Q. To pro-
mote their second album they
landed a tour with folk jazz ar-
tist Lou Reed.
The Q's have just released a
double single record in England
which was the first ever mixed
digitally on the digital mastering
console in London. The double
single will be available in
America as an import this month.
The band is concentrating more,
however, on their newest album.
Blue Tomorrow, which is due out
in March.
The Three Hits
The Three Hits, who consider
Greenville as their hometown, set
the mood for the Swimming Pool
Q's Saturday night with their
REMish accent and a strong in-
fluence of country rock mixed
with progressive rock intentions.
The two year band from
Raleigh has played at the now
defunct Premiums, The New Deli
and The Attic and consider this
as a home base and favorite place
to play.
Hollywood Corrects
Asian Stereotyping
IIM III ll,IS
I In- I- Msl arnlinmn
Jeff Calder of the Swimming Pool Qs in action at the Attic.
Sheila Valentine, the bassist
and co-lead singer, keeps a sense
of modesty and si vie to the band.
Mike Kurtze, lead guitarist and
co-lead singer, writes most ol
their material and provides the
backbone to the group's initial
sound. Mike's hrothet Damn
plays rhythm guitar, and Jim
Biddell paces the group on drums
and in Ins refined back-up vocals.
I he band is looking forward to
playing the 688 Premier Club this
month, and to their up-coming
�on; f the I astiias'
Come On An' Dance
Dorsey Band To Play TW's
There is something unique
about the Tommy Dorse) Or-
chestra which s conducted by
Buddy Morrow and will be ap
pearing in Greenville, at FW's
Nitelite on Tuesday ai 8 p.m.
Morrow is a veteran ol the Big
Band era and himself a member
of the original Dorsey brigade.
However, people often expect to
see the orchestra comprised ol
men the same vintage as those in
the original band and are surpris-
ed at the number of younger
members on board.
Most of these younger musi-
cians are graduates of the many
tine music schools throughout
the country and, strange as it may
seem to some fans of the 1940s,
are often older than were some of
the original Dorsey-ites � Buddy
was still in his teens when he was
with Tommv Dorsey!
Morrow, as leader of the one
and only Tommv Dorsey Or-
chestra, insists that the band re-
Jam the authentic sound and style
of the late Tommv Dorsey and
still have the elasticity to meet
almost every musical situation.
They can play a college prom, a
country club, a scholastic clinic, a
policman's ball or plav a jazz
concert for non-dancing au-
diences all with expertise.
They can play a college prom.
a country club, a scholastic clinic,
or a policeman's ball, or play a
jazz concert for non-dancing au-
diences all with expertise.
His repertoire embraces not
only the classics of the original
Tommy Dorsey Orchestra but a
spectrum of popular music from
Dixieland, rhythm and blues, and
intricate ballads to progressive
jazz or current rock tunes. His
library also has a nostalgic
representation of those familial
tunes of the 4(K so irreplaceable
to the many who loved and
remember Big Bands.
I he "Sentimental Gentle
of Swing" has able representa
tion in Morrow's extraordinary
trombone playing. Coupled with
these solos, the Dorsey so
stresses the ensemble feel featur-
ing the brass and reed sections
This fine blend ol instruments br
ings to life once more such great,
undying original Dorsey ai
rangements as "Mane "Song
of India "Opus 1 "I'll Nevei
Smile Again" and many mote
Once this band starts to blow,
there's no doubt that the drive
and spirit behind the musician
ship ol the original Iomim
Dorsey Orchestra reign once
more. Good music knows no
general ion gap in its ability to sw -
. and swing it does under Mor-
row's dneciton.
I he Dance, benefiting the Pitt-
(freenville rts c ouncil, will last
n. until midnight. The
Doors will open at 7 p.m. Tickets
are v foi EC1 students with a
d ID ai d s 50 pei person for
non-students oi S15.50 per cou-
ple.
(UP1) � The growing Asian
population in the United States
has finally rung some bells in
Hollywood's executive chambers.
An increasing number ol films
now involve Orientals.
To be sure, the numbers arc-
still small, but in relatively little
time Asia and Asians have played
prominent roles in Kambo: tirsi
Blood II, Year of the Dragon,
1'he Killing Fields, The Karate
Kid and The Year of I iving
Dangerously
Completed but unreleased are
dung Ho and The Karate Kid II
On the production schedules are
Tai-Pan. The I.ast Emperor,
China Marines, Empire in the
Sun and The Golden Child.
Most films involving the Orient
are tailored not for Asian -
Americans but for the rest of the
nation. Many are flawed by inac
curacies, prejudice or stereotyped
characterizations and events.
The Hollywood mentalitv has
traditionally focused on the
cliche of the "inscrutable"
Chinese or Japanese going back
to The Hatchet Man, The Bitter
Tea of General Yen and The
Mask of Fu Manchu
Eor years, there weren't
enough Asian moviegoers in the
United States to make a dif-
ference at the box office and too
few of them to register a signifi-
cant voice of protest. Conse
quently, producers and studios
became careless in the depiction
of Asian minorities. During
World War II every "lap ol
course, was a heavy and usually a
.adist.
But increasing trade and
cultural relationships with la:
and detente with China, begun bv
President Nixon, have opened
new vistas of understanding and
respect for Asians.
1 he flood tide of boat people
and others from Southeast Asia
and the growing Korean and
Filipino populations, especially
in Los Angeles, have further ex-
posed Americans to Eastern
cultures.
At long last. Hollywood is cat
ching up with the reality of the
expanding Asia influence in this
country.
Directoi John Carpenter, who
recently completed Bin rouble
In little China, .ails this the era
of the Asian.
His fantasy film, starting Kurt
Russell, involves a cast ol 200
Asians in an adventure-drama
about a mythical city beneath Sat.
Francisco's tamed C hinatown.
1 he cast is principallyhinese
but includes Japanese, Koreans
and Filipini
o prepare foi the film,
( arpentei spent mont
research and endless hours in
conference with fas as� iate ; i
ducer Jim I au (a scholar, master
ol martial arts and hi- and
projeel coordinator Daniel K
(a journalist and act �i I
"1 wanted to be as accurate
and fair as possible in repres
ting Asians in tins country as they
really are said '
ing a break in p Juction
work at the 2o ei tui � i i v
commissa
"We are seeing
about the Far 1
before, rhei - sal deal
curiosity about tha
planet thai ed ties
(with) I
namese v
"I get the feeling V in
coming into then their
See HI M. Page H
Pat Monta Karate Kid
Playhouse Presents Moliere
From The Not So Right
Commercial Criticisms
By PAT MOLLOY
Staff Wnu-r
"What the hell is this?"
My editor, Dan, was a trifle upset. I can tell
when Dan gets angry because he turns a greenish
color kind of like Gumby, but not as cute.
He continued. "1 asked you to write an article
on gameshows; and I asked you to make it funny
I assumed you could do that,
Pat. I assumed you had a trace
of a sense of humor in you.
What did you give me? You
gave me a monotonous piece of
crap on Pat Sajack that was as
funny as a tumor
"But Dan 1 replied, as half
a piece of cold pizza dangled
from my mouth. "It's hard to
be funny every other week.
Don't you think you could give
me a break?" What happened
next is rather hairy, so I urge all
of you who are weak of
stomach to quit reading.
Dan blew up. Not in the dynamic sense; but he
blew up like a big ol' blowfish. I swear, he got as
big as Ed McMahon � and then his eyes started
bleeding. Now folks, I'm no expert on the
paranormal, but Dan's body was definitely taken
over by forces from another dimension.
He screamed, "A break! You want a break?
By this time, his eyes had swollen up like a couple
of golf balls set on fire. "I don't give breaks,
Molloy. Now drop that beer, spit out that pizza,
and write me an article on commercials
"Okay, okay, Dan I said. "Say, Dan, would
you please quit dripping blood on my rough
im VVt fWWP rC. 1- �"�
draft?"
Alright, here's an article on commercials � 1
know 1 did one last year, but times change, and so
do the advertisements. Hopefully, these commer-
cials will touch a nerve in you as much as they did
in me.
The Sine-off commercial: probably the most
asinine piece of advertising ever created. In this
commercial, a platoon of Army women is stan-
ding at attention while their platoon sargeant, one
of the ugliest people ever to be
born of flesh, is screaming,
"What do you take for sinus
pain?"
Now, like the true simpletons
they are, the platoon answers,
in harmony, mind you, "Sine-
off, Sine-off My God, where
are people's brains? Any person
in her right mind would knee
that ugly she-wolf in the chest
and give her the number of a
plastic surgeon.
Another commercial that just
makes me cry is the ad for Eur-
niture Plus. It's the one with the
effervescent "Billy-Joe Bob You know, when I
first came to North Carolina, I pictured everybody
as being in his image. Of course now I know I was
wrong. However, why a state with the academic
reputation of North Carolina allows this pin-
headed yahoo to mock it is beyond me. Seems to
me good old Billy-Joe spent just a bit too much
time in the mountains before he found civilization
� probably frolicing with BigfootThose crazy
mountain boys.
Next is any commercial having to do with
Nissan. Good Lord, where did they find that guy
See RIPPING, Page I
"A little learning can be a
dangerousand
hilariousthing or at least
that's what the ECU Playhouse
hopes to demonstrate when it
produces Moliere's delightful
17th Century comedy The learn-
ed I adies, in McGinnis Theatre,
Feb. 12-15, at 8:15 pm.
Audiences the world over have
come to know The learned
I adies as one of Moliere's
brilliant comic plays that pokes
fun at phony learning, fake
poetry and pseudo-
intellectualism.
T he topic is also one of early
feminism as Moliere has some
fun at the expense of women who
fancy themselves intellectuals.
1 usting for learning, they convert
an upper-middle-class household
into a high fashion school. The
usual order of the house is turned
upside down; the women of the
house become the rulers and the
man their slave.
Some lines about the proper
feminine role may make 20th
Century women bristle, as when
the husband in the play mocks his
wife's intellectual interests � "I
don't know what your soul's
been eating of late, but it's not a
balanced diet, at any rate
Despite such sentiments, the
play isn't an attack on educated
women, but on pretentiousness.
Moliere ridicules the women only
because they stumble so
ludicrously in their pursuit of
culture.
Director Edgar Loessin calls
The learned ladies " the
equivalent of 17th Century
Vaudeville, with farcical
characters who behave as if they
were in a cartoon
Moliere, whose real name was
Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, is
generally known to have been the
greatest comic dramatist of
France and the author of some of
the most brilliant comedies of all
theatrical history. Some of his
best known plays include The Im-
aginary Invalid, Tartuffe and
The Misanthrope.
The ECU production of The
I earned I adies marks the second
time this particular translation
has been used in North Carolina.
Dr. Wallace Fowlie, distinguish-
ed professor of romance
languages at Duke University, is
the translator, and he has given
his permission for this work to be
used by the ECU group.
"Dr. Fowlie has an extraor-
dinary feeling for the humor in
this play said Loessin. "That it
is such great fun is in large
measure due to him. We are very
fortunate he has allowed us to use
his translation
The script's translation is not
the only story involved with the
production. Because the play is
set in fashionable 17th Century
France, the requirements of the
costuming and decor are par-
ticularly demanding.
Costsume Coordinator Keith
Lewis estimates that the actors
will be wearing costumes and
wigs valued at more tl
$10,000. Some of the women's
period silk dresses are from the
NC School o the Arts, and both,
men's and women's human hair
wigs have beer: especially design
ed for the production in New
York.
rhe scenery stafl or McGinnis
Theatre has raised the heigh; ol
the stage floor and extended it
out some 10 feet beyond its us
boundaries, over the orchestra
pit, so that the actors will be
much closer to the audience
is often the case in McGinnis.
The I earned I adies is I he
major production this season bv
the ECU Plav house. Reserved
seat tickets are currently on sale
in the McGinnis Theatre Box Of-
fice. The Box Oft ice is open
Monday through Triday. from 10
a.m. until 4 p.m. For reservations
and group sale intormation. call
757-6390.

arned 4 .
i presented by
The East Carolina Playhouae
Wednesday through Saturday
FeO'uary 12-15 -815pm
McGmnis theatre
;ome� n' 5th S Eastern
ECU Students S3 00
PuDC S4 00 W V
Foi Reservations
Can 757.6390
Delightfully Wicked Comedy" hy Moliere
'The Learned Ladies' will be playing Feb. 12-15 at 8:15 p.m. Tickets
are on sale at the McGinnes Theatre Box Office Monday through Fri-
day. For information call, 757-6390.
i





8
1 HI ! VST( VR H 1 t
Hkl rO r, ISM,
Films Examine Asian Stereotypes
Continued From Page 7
culture, mythology and a sensed
(who) they art- as people
Carpentei generally refers to
the Chinese when he speaks ol
Asians but much of what he sa-
pertains to other Eastern na-
tionalities. Asked it he though!
Asians were essential!) different
from Westerners, he hedged.
"Yes and no. I he are dif-
ferent because they are deeper
than any culture m the world �
especially the Chinese. Ihe en-
joyed a sohpisticated civilization
5,ix years .ij when Europe was
populated b barbarian tribes.
rhey developed science and art
while the West was still a cultural
desert "
To illustrate the essence of be-
ing Asian, Carpenter cites a line
from the film that was written In
a Chinese writer: "China is in the
hear and wherever they go,
I lima goes with them
"Theii basic difference from
Westerners is manifested in sub-
tle ways . . . m all areas of
religion, philosophy and interper-
sonal realtionships
"I find the differences
fascinating. There is a major
struggle going on with most
Asian-Americans. They would
like to be perceived as ordinary
Americans, professionals or
working people. Yet they also
want io preserve their culture and
maintain their distance from the
rest oi the population.
"It is an interesting am-
bivalence that frustrates Asians
in this country a great deal
Ripping TV Commercials
Continued From Page 7
in the tuxedo' I here ain't nothin'
like him nowhere thank Cod.
His voice is the most irritating
thing I've experienced since
buckle-in-front brassieres.
He sounds as i( someone, oi
something, very huge got pissed
�" at him, reached into his
mouth, pasi his throat, and simp-
ly ripped his lungs out. If that's
not the problem, I think I would
have no trouble in making it hap-
pen. I mean, you all know how I
feel about big teeth, but this guy
could pick up solar energy with
his.
Well, that's enough about
commercials for now. I'd hate to
think I wasn't being tunny, and
that I was just rambling on. I
hope Dan likes it. Hold on, I'll
ask him.
"Hey, Hoss, do you think this
is gooNo, Dan. Pu! your eves
back in! Oh lord, he's dripping
blood aeain.
Tras Valentine's Day,
go all out.
y
Classifieds
SALE
word processing We offer ex
per . �
techr cal d and fei
papers -nerge your
names a � m .
� � pes or rol le
extremi ,
vays offer a 15
' - ECU s'udents S
fessional Computer Co
f Frank - e 5tr St
757 04
ett rs
.v
MOBILE HOME FOR SALE
' Doth ocear
ana s Aci �� � street frorr
the Emerald p
� . � . �
� � � lease
SENIORS! SENIORS! SENIORS'
ist phase of v
m p n1

n � �

FOR RENT Two room apt for
Cali 75? 7212 or 756 0174.
HOUSE REDUCED 5 bedroon
��' ' .305 E utn St
mediately $390
758 5299
POR sale 1979 Cutlass Dark Blue
A " - "� fop Grea1 aepenaapio
; � . or best offer Call
830 l
TYPING AND RESEARCH SER
VICES: Ca.i Nanc.e at 355 7502
� �' 752 3916 V, F
8 30 5
HOUSE FOR RENT: Near univ
fV- 2602 Try
� �� eating area
� � � �bii �� v4
'58
FOR SALE
758 r. �
dres
company ad
� lea ��
��� ups
resumes iwe stuff and
. page resume prn.es
� ��� �
- - - - ;
WORD PROCESSING
� � I AM 752 i -
�' expei � �
the �� rec �'

"�
FOR rent artn eni ft � � �
Ringgoia
FOR SALE Gil S3 speed bike.$25.
Call 758 89
FOR SALE: is -� rida Ov.c, qood
conditio'1 � � , -
NEW SHIPMENT IN: S'op into U
quely Yours for un.que clothing, fur
niture ana k -ison
Open Tues rurs n 5 and Sat
11 5
MOUNDS OF SOLiND: Music and
s prov led for any
ict the TRASH AAN
unc
FOR SALE r TV.
Ca: � �
lassifieds continued on paye 11
IN GOD WE TRUST
GOD AND COUNTRY
�� �
AMERICA S T-SHIRT
(.o ahead, show that -pei iai
someone how much vou
i are by sending the HI)"
Hearts n' I lowers Bouquet.
beautiful arrangement
in an impressive
eepsake addy. It's
soeasy. Just call
our f 11) florist.
Co ahead Do
something really
exciting!
VAl I XHXl S 11 K IS FEBRUARY
HOUSE FOR RENT
.
NEED A D.J Are you having a
party ana need a D JFor the besl
top 40 beach and dance a
������
p.n Rea ��. Refen
TYPING
tern
SERVICES
p. m
CHEAP TYPING
GMAT
prep �
'e 12 �
i Fp'
�: -

ONSOLIDATED
"HEATRES
r
All Seats S2.00 Everyday Til 5:30 PM
ftffi
v-
l-44
"THI
( Ol OR PI KPI
PC 13
2-4: U2(�
IKON I (.l I
l'(, 13
PARTY
with Campus Marketing
YOUR BEST DEAL TO FLORIDA
S PRING BREAK: March 8-16
r
1:00-4:00-7:00-9:45
THE BEST PICTURE OF THE YEAR!
t
Soldier's
PG
Story
Hendrix Theatre
7-9 p.m.
a
� NATIONAL BOARD OF REVIEW
'More than a movie an emo urge intoj
a triumph of blinding brightness. It should be
against the law not to see 'The Color Purple
1 The Color Purple' Triumphs! It's hard not tc
be moved by Spielberg's film and its formidable
cast
NEWSW I : -
" The Color Purple' is the year's best film!
(4 stars-highest rating).
CHICAGO � Ml S R
YOU DRIVE
$124.00
WE DRIVE
$189.00
"A SOLDlt RS loHY is a marvetou
� � � � � � . Dtrti tot Sormw
� rfm fob with an
impei � abh � a
l H YORK POS1
1 SOLDIER'S SI()H) gets a 10
flawless film with superb performances.
See it
�KCBS-TV
Marls Frida
February 7
NO PASSES
NO DISCOUNTS
m
.
ttXXPHi i iAK � M,h( ,Ahf ! PM H I
. Ai ; ENUMbM

. . �- .� �.
ABORT I OSS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
S193 Abortjun from 13 to 18 weeks at
� '� Test, Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For
Further information, call 832-0535 (toll free
number: 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5
p.m. weekdays. General anesthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917 West Morgon St. Roleigh, N.C.
203 West Ninth Street
SHOE OUTLET
NAME BRAND SHOES
QVi m At Discount Prices
uality Casual Shoes $15
Ladies Dress and Casual Shoes at Discount Prices
Large Selection of Name Brands
OneBlock Off Evons StreetTennis Shoes $12.88 to $29.88
BLOOM COUNTY
1
i
JDHN'OLrryet -
T. '
OverkilJ
FVOURE IH RUSSIA TVCW
AND THAT'S OUT.A-4D si Ot
VOU 6ETr3Rui4K. ftLA, nmtiK. S
Fo a drimk NAKE t o.vt Ntoft fo&
-mi.m
Sneed
MObfJuSItoWtf l&.i
ME55PjE "f EBUTfcH fc�H'� r
MH.J
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Mmm 11
k

I





line's Day,
ill out.
sou
u'is Bouquet.
-vV
nK
RIDA
WMUk
!Hl E ASIC AROI IMAN FFBKI ARY6, 1986
BLOOM COUNTY
SCM � I f ft V -T'f
f X
1- i A
f (: �.
by Berke Breathed
By JARRELL & JOHNSON
8A 5P AU y US
trrwnok mna vchl
JfiQGflk ELTON JOHN V!f
JfcO OVf -Vf POT
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faul t, a oovtti um
TWX HNFUl t�Vl i wr
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80V CWU- Vtt SOMi
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HE. MAD
'SOflBLR' HAS
PEANTE.D A
TIME. BOMB
IN TmE EMPIRE
STATE BLliD
No A.NDMCK
AND THE BOYS
Ai?E Tf?APPP
rppt
ON - �. HAj rAiR
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STXTI B - - �� j

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john (xrr ww
HOto y& N 56. B6
AH WTFthAVCML m-
?e?jT' vie&� a. $�
'jjCfVS'iote, worn
6e0R6� VHJr7 �jy
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tif'fYoV 1
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IHACvSjjfi
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5AV( s: nM1 fHt rAAC
VAStYMOUT
�'� n � r. c.
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1
Qmcerto zombies
ot9�c FlyTrap,
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Overkill
P VOU RE IM RUSSIA THERE'S OL TWMG VOU WAkJT.
AND THATS OUT.AMD VJMENJ VOU CAT GCT THAT
VOU GET DRUMK. REAL bRjjK. SO TWt Mer T.e: VOu R�ACH
For. A driW HAKE it tc 0JEhlUDE ROSSES PREFER
By FRIEDRICH
Long hours, Low pay,
hard work, great company.
The East Carolinian
Sneed
By BRYANT
oacfcf Ml
AME55fl
SWWW'MPii�RfflNCt
CiE:F�RRTM- f JfSvUr�vl CQNatfPED THAT I
riMRgRTUNCt L,4Hj ?r" WflKTED WITH 6l
p� x r.HHr , �� tutor
Q&&
Tooth
By BROOKS
PEcenm,
PtKl.UU
ft
L
TtiXdRESiGtiS mm Kit
ML Rou Of'TOOTW
MR4im5coiMia rru fimwTTll
TbSfH
cptwa
ta great price
Fri. & Sat.
11 oz.
Sirloin
$4.
99
yteat place t& eatf
STUAK HOUSE
�h





I HI t S i R� N
Sports
I I UK
'?� W r-
(
CAA's Best Visits Minges
lohn Newman (20), shown here dunking againsl V.w in las. wear's
ih, Uau.ac-U.a1mu Richmond Spiders vill ,t in Minxesiiliseum Saturday
'i �ith the Pirates. Game lime is set tor 7:30 p.m.
champion-
niyhl for a
IRS Arm-Wrestling Tourney
Hv "1 I I'HWIl hi
A ii
nth all
tes Si
tl North Carolina
- n.)
lal clubs, ;
�� ' �� I. etc. com
red b.
NMem �! is
'iibs
1tit act�
'
� -( lubPresident

1 R S �Su � .Mc .
1beeBob Sew at
204 MIce HockeMike Wl
( yclingMark lav
la isi act i sseMark Seashi
foiRacquet ballRa
Want to showKarate huck Johnson
� ms Soccet1 isa (in isshandle
bWater SkiingBill 1 eil
�Scuba ade Bum
lei �urselt
mce bv am an original c iold's ivm
ntst-shirt& It's Hits b ills! j
n am ni � (some ofticipating in ihe annual strong
mpei tion.
1 �" a � IRS ire
" e evei I
I asi yeai : . B
division,
mpus
Robei ��'� at on won
1 - intei ested the
m 204
: ants
td Monda.
See NEW, page 12
Sports Fact
1 ' stafj will presi � an
� sports tact in em h edi-
! �' I ast ('arolinian on
. n oj wh
� � � a e.
2 6 71
stronaui Alan Shepard
demonstrated how weak the
pull on the moon is
by hitl g a six iron shot on the
lunat surface. Shepard claimed
the golf ball traveled foi miles
und miles.
CAA Basketball Standings
Men '$
Richmond
Navy
George Mason
last Carolina
I N( -Wilmington
James Madison
American
William & Mar
( on Overall
8-0, 17-3
8-1, 17-6
6-3, 12-9
5-4, 10-11
4-5, 13-9
2-6, 4-16
1-7, 7-13
1-8, 5-13
Omen
James Madison
Hast Carolina
American
I 'NC-Wilmington
George Mason
Richmond
William & Marv
on Overall
8-0, 17-2
6-1, 18-6
4-4, 14-6
3-4, 11-8
3-5, 9-13
2-6, 5-15
1-7, 5-15
Deacons Slip Past Pirates
B HI I i Nil I 1111 I
Muff Wrtlrf
WINSTON SA1 EM I he
Wake Foresl Demon Deacons us
ed a hot-shooting second half to
get past the ECU Pirates 60
last nigh) in a non conference
matchup.
I he Deacons connected on 53
percent of then held gi
throughout the game, including a
icd hot 75 percent mark in the se-
cond halt. I his was their best
second-half shooting effort of the
year. I his marks Wake Forest's
second best field-goal night of the
season. It was also the hrst time
that the Deacons have hit ovei 50
percent since Dec. 2
Wake was led by freshman
Rod W atson's lv points
seniot guard "yrone "Mugsy"
Bogues' 18 points and e .
assistsal Bo d, w h i connected
on five of seven shots, added in
points.
I he Pirates, who ended a
three game road stint, stayed
close throughout the contest,
despite sho i ist 38 pei.
in the opening half. In fact, I C I
at rai l lead as a pait of
Bass fret thi w
Pira ip 8-2 Ait 16 8 fl ii
first period
Deacon
the Bus �. 8-2 ovei
next few
� ,i �
kle in
29, )� a paii
throws 1
in 10 ��� tl 13:32 � �' ml intei
Bot ti ided . �
the next . n mte fa
Spring Break dames
Pirates had son
ting the ball inside
ing matched b Wal
side sib M Mai chell 11
free throws once aj
game, 19-19 with 1
maining
I he game remain'
lone Herb Di.xon Ire
brought 1(1
2 26 at the half
1 he Pirates can
ter m the second
bed the eai
Henn
"He didn't play as aggressively as we have in the
past five games. We were tenta but I thought
the kids gave a good effort.
harlie Harrison
Vandei:
1(1 a JO 27
19:1 X�
Boj
by s.�
�.
Has

lead

ftei
VVal

B

1I
.
i
A
6 1 SS -
Collegiate Festival Planned
B s II DON
1 rONA HI M H ! �
National . . - e S p r t
estival will consisi - as main as
20 different events whu I � .
elude flag football, softbal
(male and female) volleyball,
cet, tennis (male and fen ale),
' (male and female), i .
running K (male and U
sailing (co ed), c cling (m tie
female), crew (co-ed), swimming
tmale and female), tug- wai.
racquetball (male and female),
basketball, ultimate frisbee (co-
ed), foosball, cheerleading i
ed), roller speed skating (male
and female), and I rivial Pui
(co-ed)
The festival will be held from
the weekend of March 8 9 to the
weekend of pril 5-6. Events will
be held dating the week from si
am to 5 pm. No events will be
d Saturdav or Sunday unless
inclement weather forces
rescheduling.
All students who are currentlv
enrolled in any college or univet
sitv are eligible to compete. Vai
sit athletes are eligible only in
sports othet than those which
they are competing on a varsit)
level. All intramural participants
are eligible including club sports
(e.g. rugby, frisbee, soccer).
N.C.S.F
I aj � na Beach, I a
t e
I
��
S 2 5 . -KJ
i warded




bonus awai d foi
ment.
I he N v i A
bv ai rlai
compan (SPT
cast to cable
wide I N S.l
an athletic
tional Spring Breal
provide an outlet
400,000 stud
Daytona Bead �
Spring Break, and :
tramural and .
the opportui
talents
The first Annual S
hold weekly round robii
t.aments tot all 20 events. (i
consisting of five teams
dividuals will compete agaii
ft � �
a He
a .
nts in heir
: �
6 ountrv.
The Nationalollegiate Sports Festival will offer a varirti of r��m
pehtive activities such as frisbee. soccer, tennis, basketball and ruKh.
( ontinufd I rom )
POR SALE -
Movmc, ai
aier 'J p
TAXES A
reasonable
penence Co
6 p m
PROFESSION.
Tronic To �.
Call Jar �
TYPING
done � .
-
AANNA GIVE �
S.gma piedgi
� -
be hand
is r �' �
PERSONAL
ROSES
spec a
Only U 5
'� '
SPRING BRE
CRUISE
v e �
i
GRATEFUL DE;
� �
� �
afrc � p
iVANNA GIVE A i
. '

?ions �
De st
A
spec a �

-
R M H Ha
'
HAPPY BIRTHD-
" , ' -
De twice as �
ui '
i
bucka
Larry 1 �

TAVA LODAT
MADAME SUGA�
BRAYEH H A MIS H E H
5 . "
see RiCKar
THE FRAT PUNK A-
PIG Aea know I
VOur builSM XI
"screwing uo "
Procev Prim
141 ;C per prinl
now N4.ir:
Carolina fast Mall
N
756-6078
(Hi NMO -
I AM t 9 PN1
I
y vpikm
The Rest Pt
m
4
Oi
4
obics
Tvs- v
- eam R
Sauna
Whirlpool
Social Event!
I ockers
Nutrition Ins
Southpark Shoppin;
756-7991
-�





I Hi I AMAROUNIAN
FEBRUARY6,1986
11
Pirates
. w
son
-ecu
�acs
We

in the
fought
Lsrrison
( ontinued From Page 8
FOR SALE: Kitchen table chairs
Moving and must sell Call Ginny
itter 2 p m. 758 4474
TAXES: Will do your taxes tor
reasonable rates Ten years ex
perience Call Dons at 355 2510 after
6pm
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
c typewriter Reasonable rates
Call Janice at 355 7233 after 530
TYPING: All your typing needs
done by a professional secretary.
j Doris at 355 2510 after 6 p m.
WANNA GIVE A LITTLE LOVE?:
vc it the Sigma way The Tri
na pledges will be selling carna
� tor Valentine's Day They will
be nand delivered with your special
message on the 14th Look for the
5 mas in the Student Store Lobby!
PERSONALS
tfOSES Send a rose to someone
special. Buy them Feb. 4, 5, 10, 11,
: Only S4 50 each from the ZBT lit-
- ster table in front of the Student
re
SPRING BREAK MEXICAN
CRUISE 5 nights. 6 days cruising
vexican isles Only S445 includes
gratuities. CALL NOW! Not
iny spots left! 758 0074 or 752 3178
GRATEFUL DEAD FANS: RTU is
k Dead tickets will soon be
iva able at Apple Records To be
-�re of your place on the bus, leave
r name and number at 757 3811
jfter 5 p.m
WANNlGIVE A LITTLE LOVE?:
Give itthe Sigma wayThe Tn
- a pledges will be selling carna
' ons tot� Valentine's DayThey will
be soldFeb 3 7 and the10th They
a behand deliveredwith your
specialmessage on the14th Look
for heSigmas in the SKident Store
Lot'

Planned
� M.H Happy Birthday to a great
tie brother j P R
HAPPY BIRTHDAY MOOKIE
. that you are 21, Weekends will
� vce as fun We'll drink the beer,
�he rjg, raise some cheer and
g, chug, chug! I've got the Sam
.� a so get psyched Let's tell Fat
. tc ake a hike Love always,
Murpf
TAVALODAT MOBARAK
MADAME SUGAR ASHEGAT
BRAYEH HAMISHEH MOHSEN:
5 , the war fell Alma to stop by and
see Rickarco soon1
THE FRAT PUNK WHO WON THE
PIG Ae aii know it's rrue It's just a
aer o me Defore she wises up to
. ji bu c" :ci I may be sooner
than yen. M - latch a clue Quit
screwing up The Crew of 72
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA: Twas right
after the social and all through the
house, not a sister was stirring, not
even a mouse (Until the Lambda
Chi's broke into the house.) in
through the window, stumbling over
the chairs. Returned the next day, so
who really cares? Love, Alpha Xi
Delta
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
NEW ALPHA XI DELTA
PLEDGES: Susanne Barr, Susie
Crister, Kathy Evans, Becky
McLaurin, Denise Moor, Tracy
More, Meg Needham and Rachel
Winstead We love you pledges!
WZMB: Be sure to come out to
WZMB'S 4th Anniversary Battle of
the Bands. The Attic will host this
party on Wed Feb. 12th, featuring
The Phantoms, Graywing, PBS, Off
center, and Centaur everything
from jazz to heavy metal! Doors
open at 7:30 Battle starts at 8. Door
prizes and free draft while it lasts.
Come out and support your campus
FM stay tuned to WZMB, 91.3 for
more details.
CEN: Tomorrow's The Big Day It's
been a great year I hope we can
spend many more together! 143 RCC
PENTHOUSE PARTY: First
Annual BY.OB. The students need
it AND Naughton wants it. Fri. 9 and
Beyond. Big Bad
Vol�ntin�'� Doy: Valentine's Day
Love Lines will be published on Feb
13 at a cost of $1 per 25 words for
students Remember your
sweetheart this Valentine's Day
Deadline is Tues Feb. 11 at 5 p.m.
PHI TAUS: Can't wait to travel
around the world with you as tacky
tourists. See ya tonight! The Alpha
Xi's
HAPPY HOUR: Come party with
the Alpha Xi's at our Happy Hour
Monday, Feb. 10th at the Alley. 50c
draft, S2.75 pitchers BE THERE!
TY: I hope you have a Very Happy
21st Birthday on Sunday, make it a
good one! Love. Sharon.
HAL: Saturday is iust around the
corner Who believes you're
FINALLY going to be 19?! Watch
out Greenville! Happy Birthday
DELTA ZETA: Congrats to our four
new pledges: Kristy, Nora, Anna
and Erma We love you guys! Delta
Zeta
TKE: Tonight's the night! We are
ready to throwdown in neon! Delta
Zeta
DELTA ZETA: Congratulations to
Gina Troxel for Panhellenic Pres.
We love you! Delta Zeta
PI KAPPS: Thanx for the social, you
dudes were jammin! Delta Zeta
MICHELLE AND CAROLYN: When
things get rough you always have
your sisters. We love you! Delta
Zeta
ATTENTION ALL ECU MEN: The
Tri Sigma Male Strip Off will be held
Tuesday, Feb 11 at the Elbo Room
Sign up in front of the Student Store
begins Thurs. the 6th. 1st place prize
money is $100. Don't be bashful
men!
SIG EPS: Sigmas can't wait to party
around the world wth ya'H
tonightSo break out the drinking
loafers! Tri Sigs
TOMMY D Start a new line of
Head Gear! I'll finance you ana
we'll make millions! Garage Man.
LOST: Young male golden
retrieverhound mix. Thin white
blaze on face Very friendly.
Answers to 'Barney Please call
758 2479 with any information
FOUND: Pair of ladies glasses in
case on 10th St near Brewster. Call
758 6920
ANYONE: With information of the
whereabouts of the items taken from
Kingston Place last Saturday night
in the club house, please contact
Gret at 752 9312. No questions asked
LOST: Burgandy leather coat
(Chess King). Prescription
sunglasses in pocket Lost in Winn
Dixie parking lot at Rivergate shop
pmg center Reward S50. Please call
Bill at 752 4171 or 758 9484
WANTED
.
?&5�
Process & Print
with this coupon
f � rr. 110, 126, 35mm or
Disc Color Print Film.
I4V2C per print
reg 29C&$1 49dev chg.(reg.S2.98)
I xample 24 exp. film reg. $9.94
NOW $4.97!
Carolina East Mall
1 North Entrance�Near Belk's)
756-6078
OPEN MONSAT.
8 AM to 9 PM
limn one roB pet coupon
s .�; 1 'her often
MPIRI 2 2 it, t:
"A Complete Meal On A Bun'
Now Serving
Hand Dipped
Ice Cream!

Weekend Special
Roast Beef & Cheese
Roast Beef, Turkey & Cheese
Roast Beef, Turkey, Ham & Cheese
50C Off Large
25C Off Small
Thursday thru Saturday
Offer Good On Deliveries
CABIN COUNSELORS & INSTRUC
TORS: Male and Female for
western N C 8 week children's sum
mer camp. Over 30 activities in
eluding Water Ski, Tennis, Heated
swimming pool, Go Karts, Hiking,
Art room, meals, salary and
travel. Experience not necessary
Non smoking students write for ap
plicationbrochure: Camp
Pinewood, 19006 Bob O Link Dr
Miami, Florida 33015.
NATIONAL COLLEGE
MARKETING COMPANY: Seeks
individual or campus organization to
work Part time assisting students in
applying for credit cards Flexible
hours, excellent $, full training
Meet students and have fun Call
Sharon Grand at 1 800 592 2121.
SUMMER JOBS FOR COLLEGE
STUDENTS: Openings available on
the Food Service Staff at CAMP
SEAFARER ON THE COAST OF
NORTH CAROLINA Good salary
plus room and board Excellent op
portunity for friends to work
together. June 8 through mid
August. Must be at least 18 years of
age No experience necessary only
ambition and good references re
quired. For more info, and an ap
plication, write. Camp Seafarer,
PO. Box 10976, YMCA, Raleigh,
N.C. 27605.
PERSON WANTED: For full or
part time sales work m men's store
Must be fashion conscious of men's
wear and enjoy working with the
public Experience preferred Good
hourly salary and ability to earn
commission Apply at Brody's for
Men The Plaza, Mon Fri ,25pm
215 E. 4th St.
The Best Deal At the Best Club In Town
Student Special
7V& $25
per month
AD ASSISTANT NEEDED: Brody's
has a position open in their Advertis
ing Department for a full time assis
tant Ad lay out, visual display, and
personal organization are a plus Ap
ply, Brodys The Plaza Monday
Friday
DESPERATELY NEEDED: Tutor
for Chem 1120 Call after 5 p.m and
ask tor Jodi 758 9223
HELP WANTED: Waiters 6.
Waitresses needed Flexible hours
working with school schedule. To
work lunches (2 per week), nights
and weekends Apply at Greenville
Country Club between 2 3 p.m
Tuesday Friday
NEED ONE ROOMMATE: Wilson
Acres Apt H 2 1806 E 1st St $125 per
month - Vt utilities Tennis Court,
Sauna Call 752 0277 and ask for Pat
RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATE
WANTED: TO SHARE NEW HOME
IN ROLLINWOOD SUB $175 PLUS
Vi UTILITES 758 6784
Mac
ATTIC
"tt
'W
jd
R�FMC7I0NS OF
y
3i
The
Producers
THUR
FRI. In Concert
Buster
Brown
igAFAffiffl
CAMP COUNSELING � for those who love children. Sea Gull and
Seafarer are character and health development camps on the coast of orth
Carolina serving children ages 7-16. Recruiting staff for sailing, motor boat ing.
aquatics, golf, tennis, riflerv, archery, canoeing, basketball, lacross, soccer,
nature studies, arts and crafts, nursing, office, food services and horseback riding
(Seafarer only). Qualifications: interest in children, ability to instruct one phase
of the camps' programs and excellent references. For further information write to
Don Cheek, Director, Camp Sea Cull (Boys) or to Judy Bright, Director, Camp
Seafarer (Girls), P.O. Box 10976, Raleigh, North Carolina 27605.
Representatives will be at
Camp Day
February 11,1986
'V
fi.

V lb. Single Only
Our Full Facility Co-Ed Club
Features The Best In Weight
Training & Instruction
Unlimited
Aerobics
Two Weight Rooms
Steam Room
Sauna
Whirlpool
Social Events
Lockers
Nutrition Instruction
tl will offer a artet of rom-
�. tennis, basketball and rugb.
Southpark Shopping Center
756-7991
Private Dressing Rooms
Showers
Professional Personal Instruction
York Olympic Weights
(Including Bench A Squat Machines)
Dynacam Machines
Exer-Bikes
Therapeutic Massage
Call Lynn or Dave
For Free Visit!
Today o
Cheese .20
Tomato No Charge
Valid at all Greenville, Wilmington, Havoiock & Jacksonville Location.
�mu, ii i mi � a

I
8
a.

I
I
ALL YOU CAN EAT
SALAD BAR 99c
Good at participating Wendy t. Not valid
with any other offer or KIDS' Ml AL
PIoom present coupon whon ordering.
On coupon per customer.
Chooto, bacon oatra and tai axtra
whero applicable.
OFFER EXPIRES: MM
I

I
I

ONIV
I Good at portklpotlne, Wendy �. Not valid
I with any other offer or KIDS'MEAl.
Fleese present coupon when erderinf.
I One coupon per customer.
' Choose, bacon estre end tea whero op
OFFER EXPIRES: 2 � �4
pikeWe.
YfEiiDys






12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 6. 1986
Hoops
ATLANTA (UPI) � Surely no
one can challenge the Atlantic
Coast Conference's claim to cur-
rently being the best college
basketball league in the nation �
not with three of the top two
teams.
The eight-team ACC is
awesome. North Carolina is
ranked No. 1, Georgia Tech and
Duke share No. 2, N.C. State is
No. 19 and Virginia is No. 20.
Consider the plight of the
league's sixth-place team, Clem-
son. The Tigers are 14-7 and five
of those losses were to top-20 op-
ponents.
Tuesday night's North
Carolina-Georgia Tech game was
a fitting tribute to the strength of
the ACC. No. 1 playing No. 2
before a sold-out crowd of more
than 16,000 (in Atlanta's Omni)
and No. 1 winning by one point,
78-77, in overtime.
"What more could you ask
for Georgia Tech coach Bobby
Cremins said. "It would have
been better if we could have won,
but it was a fantastic basketball
game; one of the best I've ever
been involved with
The ACC has been a basketball
stronghold ever since it was form-
ed in the early '50's. North
Carolina (1957, 1982) and N.C.
State (1974, 1983) have each won
two NCAA championships.
North Carolina has been in the
Final Four nine times, Duke
four, N.C. State three, Virginia
two and Wake Forest one.
In the 14 seasons previous to
this one, North Carolina was No.
1 twice (1982, 1984) and a top-10
team nine times in the UPI rank-
ings. N.C. State was No. 1 in
1974 after ranking No. 2 in 1973,
and Duke has been as high as No.
2(1966).
"It's a tough, tough basketball
conference Cremins said.
"Georgia Tech knew when it
joined (in 1979-80) that it would
have to be very, very good to
compete
The Yellow Jackets were com-
pletely outclassed its first three
seasons of ACC competition,
winning only four of 42 con-
ference games those years. The
third of those was Cremins' first
at Georgia Tech and the job �
recruiting and coaching � he
made a Cinderella story.
Tech had the ACC rookie of
the year in 1983 (Mark Price),
1984 (Bruce Dalrymple), 1985
(Duane Ferrell) and is expected to
make it four-in-a-row this season
because of of the sensational play
of 6-8 freshman forward Tom
Hammonds.
With that sort of recruiting.
New Sports Medicine
Continued from page 10
Feb. 17 at 7 p.m. in Gold's Gym,
located in downtown Greenville.
The IRS Sports Medicine Pro-
gram is undergoing reconstruc-
tion. The name has been changed
to the Division of First Aid and
Physical Fitness.
Susan Durrwachter, assistant
director in charge of the program
has a qualified staff of student
personnel to assist in immediate
care and preventative taping at
every intramural contest.
Althogh the IRS provide no
follow-up treatment or
rehabilitation, they will refer in-
jured participants to qualified
physicians.
The First Aid facility is located
in room 111 Memorial Gym and
will be open Monday-Thursday
from 2-6 p.m.
We remind interested swim-
mers that the scheduled IRS meet
for Feb. 17-23 has been postpon-
ed. This gives you sufficient time
to register before the new cap-
tain's meeting date, Feb. 13, at 6
p.m. to be held in the balcony of
Memorial Gym. Go by 204
Memorial Gym and pick-up your
packet today!
Next week, be sure to grab a
Tennis Shoe Tidbits lying
around. This is a bi-monthly IRS
publication loaded with articles,
pictures, and players of the
month. That, along with the Ten-
nis Shoe Talk Show, a bi-weekly
campus radio program, hosted by
our very own WZMB's Stephanie
Luke, will keep you updated with
IRS information.
Remember, the number for
heavy breathing action is
57-6562, the Intra-Aetion
Hotline. For daily facility hours,
major team sport games, and
cancellations due to inclement
weather, just dial this number.
Valentine Day Cards
Central Book & News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open 7 days a week
9:30 to 9:30
�t�c ySvop
"For The Man Who
Wants To Dress To Impress1
Clearance
Sale
�i Price Off Most Items In Stock
Leather Coots & Leather Pants
All y2 Price
Reg. - $189.00 Sale - $94.50
Sweaters All Yi Price
Brand Names like:
Union Bay
Saturdays
and
Ocean Pacific
New Spring Fashions Arriving!
Come See Us!
Style Shop
Plaza Mall
355-5222
Jhes
Hqzq
M-Sat
10-9

the Yellow jackets were able to
post a 27-8 record last season �
tying North Carolina for the
regular-season ACC title, winn-
ing the ACC tournament by
beating the Tar Heels in the
finals, and winning three NCAA
playoff games before being
knocked off by the Georgetown
Hoyas.
Georgia Tech came into this
season ranked No. 1 by some,
and that concerned coach
Cremins.
"The first thing that comes in-
to my mind is the high rankings,
the high expectations Cremins
admits. "We had a similar pro-
blem last year. But then we were
dealing in terms of top-20. Now
we're talking about top five, even
No. 1
The expectations weren't far
fetched. After Tuesday night's
overtime loss, the Yellow Jackets
are 17-3 and all three of their
losses (to Michigan State in the
season opener and twice to the
Tar Heels) were to teams that
were ranked No. 1 at the time.
"Being No. 1 and No. 2 didn't
enter into it UNC center Brad
Daugherty said. "It was just the
idea of two good basketball
teams going out and battling
hard
"We never thought of the
rankings Tar Heel coach Dean
Smith said. "I know we didn't
and I'll bet Tech didn't either
North Carolina had to over-
come a 13-point deficit in the
closing 12 minutes to beat
Georgia Tech Tuesday night and
Carolina guard Steve Hale felt
the Tar Heels tradition was the
deciding factor.
"When you haven't done it,
you can talk about coming back,
but there's that seed of doubt in
your mind Hale said. "When
you have the tradition of doing it,
you have the confidence you can
do it.
NCAA
"That's why we didn't panic
Hale added. "When you're 13
down with 12 minutes to go,
there's so much time. That's an
eternity
"We never really thought we
had it because North Carolina is
such a great team Hammonds
said, playing in his first season of
ACC basketball. "We knew they
could come back at any time
The Tar Heels took over the
ACC lead with the win over
Georgia Tech, but Dean Smith
said the race is far from settled.
"There's still a lot of games to
go Smith said, reminding that
Virginia beat North Carolina last
week. "When you're playing in
this league, every game is a
challenge
PET
VILLAGE
DONNA EDWARDS
Owner
Good Selection of Reptiles
and Saltwater and Freshwater Fish
We Carry A Complete Line
of Dog, Cat, and Fish Supplies
Master Card and Visa are accepted and financing is available
507o Discount On
ANY Purchase Over $5.00
THURSDAY ONLY
511 Evans St.
Greenville, NC 27834
Phone: 756-9222








Eastern Carolina Fitness Center
Aerobics
Bring in this coupon and get three months of
aerobics for only $25.00. This offer is limited to the
first 100 people.
Eastern Carolina Fitness Center
Formerly Nautilus
1002 South Evans Street
758-9584
'Where Winners Train"
















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Title
The East Carolinian, February 6, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 06, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.454
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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