The East Carolinian, February 4, 1986






She 3Ea0t (Kartflttuan
Serving the East Carolina campUs community since 1925
Vol.60 NO34-35
Tuesday, February 4, 1986
Greenville, N.C
14 Pages
Circulation 12.000
Simon Urges Voters To
Create New Strategy
a
�fit'
Seasonal Break
IHHIMHtKI I hr h �rl,m�r.
Melissa I.aughton. a sophomore in General College, takes a break in between classes to take ad-
vantage of the unseasonable weather Monday. Today's forecast also offers the opportunity to enjoy
a warm break, because the expected high is in the mid-sixties.
Most Requested Course
B JAY STONE
Senator Paul Simon of Illinois
was the featured speaker at the
1986 winter conference of the
North Carolina College
Democrats The conference,
which took place this past Satur-
day, was held at Meredith Col-
lege. It consisted of workshops
on campaign organization,
publicity, fundraising and ways
to increase membership in youth
organizations, getting out the
vote, and voter registration.
Senator Simon's remarks
focused on the issue of campaign
finance reform. Pointing to the
record-shattering cost of the
Hunt-Helms race in 1984, Simon
said North Carolinians can help
enact reforms b "testifying
from "the scene of the crime All
of America knows the excesses ol
North Carolina's Republican
money machine. But nobody can
tell that story better than you
Simon added: "Today's
system of financing congressional
campaigns is a scandal
The 1984 North Carolina
senate race resulted in costs of
S16.2 million for Helms and S9.1
million for Hunt, because of the
expenditure of such vast sums,
Simon said, the flaws in today's
campaign finance system are
especially evident in North
Carolina.
Thus. Simon urged North
Carolina democrats to help lead
the way in creating a new system
of public financing for congres-
sional elections, "to insulate the
legislative process from undue in-
fluence by well-oiled money
machines
To support his charges Simon
pointed to figures tracing the rise
of special interest campaign spen-
ding:
1) Political Action Committee
(PAC) contributions have risen
from $12.5 million in 1974 to
$104.5 million in 1984.
"General Electric is the largest
corporate contributor in tne na-
tion Simon added, "and they
taid less in taxes than most
janitors
2) PAC contributions to unop-
posed house incumbents rose
from SI.2 million in 1978 to $6.4
million in 1984.
3) Between 1974 and 1984, top
defense contractors boosted their
overall contributions from $4.7
million to S9 million and increas-
ed their average individual con-
tributions to armed service and
defense appropriations subcom-
mittee members from S800,000 to
S3.1 million.
Simoti said a bipartisan public
campaign financing plan for
senatorial elections that he has in-
troduced with Maryland
republican Charles Mathias, Jr
'would bring more public in-
terest and less special interest to
our political system The plan
advanced by Simon and Mathias
would extend the current system
of financing presidential general
See SENATOR Page 6.
Self-Paced Program Successful
By Beth Whicker
ssistanl News hdilor
Seventy to 90 percent of
students enrolled in the Per-
sonalized System of Programmed
Instruction (PSP1), section of
Philosophy 1100 receive an
"A"in the course. The success of
the class has made it one of
ECU's most requested classes.
Aproximately 350 studenis are
currently enrolled in the pro-
gram, while many had to be turn-
ed down due to lack of staff and
space, according to Gregory
Ross, coordinator of the
Philosophy Special Services Pro-
gram
Ross designed the program in
1979 when he recognized a great
difference in the abilities of each
student.
"1 felt that students were being
graded on their high school
achievement rather than what
was being learned in class said
Ross.
"PSP1 allows the student
freedom while learning. I here is
no absence policy and no re-
quired lectures, "according to
Linda Horowitz, course director.
The student is given a copy o
the course schedule tor the
semester, which specifies
deadline dates, uniform pace, lec-
ture dates for bonus credit, and
any special regulations.
The student is required to
master eighteen units, called
modules. Following the instruc-
tions in the study guide the
students proceed through the
material at their own pace. When
a student feels ready to take a
quiz (mastery step) on a module,
the student can come to class and
take the test.
The test is evaluated by a stu-
dent proctor. If the test is
mastered, the student moves on
to the next module. If mastery is
not complete, the student reviews
and prepares to retake the
module test.
Students mav retake the steps
until they are mastered. The
students progress and final grade
depends on the number of tests
mastered. The student's progress
is kept in a folder and on com-
puterized records.
"1 feel the student excels in
PSP! because he or she is not
threatened by a teacher. The stu-
dent's progress is evaluated by
the proctors, who are their peers.
This creates a calm, stress free en-
viroment for the student said
Horowitz.
"Most students are select in the
proctors that they choose to help
them. The proctors create a sup-
portive and friendly atmosphere
that makes students want to
learn she added.
According to Horowitz. PSP1
teaches the student to disipline
himself in order to achieve a goal.
"There is no reason a student
cannot earn an "A"m the
course
In a 199 study conducted by
Ross, 61 percent of students tak-
ing PSP1 Philosophy 1100 made
an "A as compared to 11 per-
cent taking the lecture and discus-
sion form of the same class
"The lecture method of
teaching is ineffective tor some
students, because they fail to see
what is expected of them said
Horowitz.
PSPI is unique because it
allows the student to get im-
mediate feedback that he or she
would not get in a lecture discus-
sion. When the student gets the
feedback so quickly, steps are
mastered more rapidly as no con-
centration is lost she added.
Ross has been asked by other
universities to enter the PSPi
program into a computer to be
used by other institutions.
By putting the PSPI program
on a computer, we would lose the
success of the program. It's the
student proctors who provide the
motivation necessary for the suc-
cess of the students said Ross.
SGA Votes For
Future Funding
B LANCE SEARL
Miff nlr
The SGA voted Monday t
corporated a Future Funding
Program which would enable
well-establtsehd student
organizations to plan their
budgets two years m advance.
The plan, which would cur-
rently effect only nine organiza-
tions, would allow constitutional-
ly stable groups who have been
funded by the SGA for five years
to possibly save money through
long-term planning.
According to Kirk Shelley,
SGA speaker and defender of the
bill said. "This will allow groups
to have an idea of how much
money they will he able to spend
down to road. They won't have
to go through the legislative pro-
cess every year. Of course, no
group is forced to participate
The Body also granted Pirate
Walk $75 for advertisements;
however. Legislative member
Gordon Walker expressed his
concern over the organization's
inability to have a fixed annual
budget.
"This is the third time Pir '�
Walk has come to us for money,
each time saying it will be the
last Walker said. "It's about
time they began planning better
for the future � not continually
coming back to us for funds
In other business, the Body
granted the Frisbee Club $950 for
a nine hole course near the Allied
Health Building. They also
changed the amount of time to
pay back student loans from 6
months to 60 days.
J
Seven Million Needed For Proposed Addition To Ficklen
Editor's note: This article,
written ' v Chip Alexander, has
been reprinted with the permis-
sion of the Raleigh es and
Observer.
At East Carolina, The Pirates
are building toward a better
future.
Some ambitious plans have
passed the drawing-board stage
at ECU but have not reached the
point at which alumni and fans
will be asked to come up with the
$7 million or so needed to make
them happen. In the works is a
15,000-seat addition to the north
side of Ficklen Stadium, which
"It's a move we have to
make in order to continue
our scheduling thrust
�Ken Karr
would boost its capacity to
50,000, officially making it the
largest stadium in the state.
Also planned is a row of
swanky sky-boxes, game-day
penthouses available to in-
dividuals or corporations at a
nominal price.
But the biggest question isn't
how to raise the cash. The biggest
question is: Why? ECU has sold
out Ficklen only once � last
season, when South Carolina
came to town. It's not exactly a
hot ticket. Even some ECU in-
siders are wary, spotting poten-
tial problems.
"Heck, until someone makes
Highway 264 four lanes between
Greenville and Wilson. 1 think it
will be a physical impossibility to
fill up the place on a Saturday
said Cliff G. Moore, ECU's vice
chancellor for business affairs.
"You can't bring that many
people in the night before the
game because we don't have
enough hotel rooms for 'em, and
we couldn't get 'em into town the
day of the game because of ac-
cess. It would probably be a
logistical nightmare
But ECU's athletic director,
ken Karr, says he will stick to his
stadium plan. It is, he says, the
right direction and the right ap-
proach the university must take
to remain in the NCAA's Divi-
sion I-A.
"It's a move we have to make
in order to continue our schedul-
ing thrust, to try to get some of
the known teams into Ficklen
he said.
Moore says he understands
that reasoning. "At 50,000. we
might even get N.C. State here
occasionally, instead of having to
play at their place with their bats
and balls all the time he said.
East Carolina also must use its
athletic program to broaden its
identity nationwide, Karr in-
sisted. Call it an identity crisis,
call it costly, but it must be done.
For ECU, long-term gains must
overshadow any short-term
losses.
See KARR page 12.
Sex Misperceptions Common
MANHATTAN, KS (CPS) - He
thinks she's flirtatious and seduc-
tive, but it is all in his mind.
That's what a Kansas State
University psychologist thinks.
Frank Saal studied college
students to see if sexual harass-
ment is prompted by men
misinterpreting women's friendly
gestures as flirting.
His study found men "tend to
misperceive females' behavior,
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds13
Editorials
Features
Sports1J
Self-love is often rather ar-
rogant than blind; it does not
hide our faults from ourselves
but persuades us that they
escape the notice of others.
�Samuel Johnson
and are more likely to view in-
teractions in sexual terms
"A lot of people wonder if sex-
ual harassment isn't just a power
play, a way of using sex to keep
women in their place, but 1 main-
tained � and found � that there
is a sexually-toned element to it
Saal explains.
Saal made videotapes of two
"totally business-orineted"
scenes: one of an assistant store
manager briefing a new female
cashier, and one of a female stu-
dent asking her male professor
for a deadline extension.
After viewing the tapes the ma-
jority of 100 males said the
cashier and the student were both
trying to be "flirtatious, seduc-
tive, promiscuous, attractive and
sexy
Male viewers also interpreted
the behavior of the professor and
the store manager as "sexually-
oriented
Female viewers thought both
situations were "completely asex-
ual and that the cashier and
student were "outgoing and
friendly
"Males see their social en-
vironment in sexual terms Saal
concludes. "Because of that, they
ofter misperceive women's ac-
tions, which might prompt them
to ask a woman on a date, make
an off-color joke, or commit
ather of the mild forms of sexual
harassment
Saal will study men's attitudes
in the workplace next. He'll show
the same tapes to male and
female employees to see if male
misperceptions contribute to
harassment on the job as well as
in school.
"1 want to know if the same
discrepancy exists (between
men's and women's views of the
sexual connotations of a situa-
tion) with people who've been in
the workplace for a while he
says.
Captive Audience
J 1. HIMFRT - TW IhKMMH
The beginning of the semester sees the highest class attendance, will it continue with the coming
weeks? However, those taking the pre-programmed Philosophy course can enjoy setting the- own
class hours. See the related story on page 1.
v
lb

i
1





I HI I s I c R()I IN1AN
FEBRUARY 4, 1986
WATER SKI CLUB
Announcements
The ECU iHa'er Ski Club will tie holding a
meeting Tuesday night Feb 4th at 8 in
Mendenhall Student Center room J?l
General membership meeting we en
courage new members beginners to ex
perts T shirts tor sale bring a tr.end
FRISBEE CLUB
You better run and get comfortably numb
The ECU Fnsbee Club ano 'he irates pre
sent Pink Floyd's motion picture "The Wall
at me Attic tor 2 shows Wed , Feb 5 at 8 and
10 30 Don t miss this cult classic rock n roll
experience on the IS screen and the Attic s
sound system The irates will see you there
SIGMA TAU DELTA
Will hold a meeting on Tues Feb 4 at 7 30
p m m room 104 ot the English Annex We
will be mak.ng plans tor a trip to
Washington DC so be sure to attend1
PHI SIGMA PI
Our first dinner meeting ot the semester
will be held Wednesday Feb 5 at 5 p m at
Western Sijjlen Please make plans to at
tend
PIRATE WALK
For sate walks around campus cal Pit ate
Walk tor an escort 757 6616
GUARDIAN CARE
Guardian Care Nurs.ng Home will sponsor
a tree workshop on Alzheimer s disease on
Von Feb 10 at J 30 p m The workshop Is
open to the public Guest speakers
elude Dr Kallman from ECU Scha
Medicine Gerontology Dep ar.c a Ian
member ot a patient a ft A �.
Disease The public is invited to attend ��
informative workshop to learn abou'
alrheimer's disease Refreshments .
served Contact Brenda Cherry a' S27 51e
COLLEGE SOPHOMORES
Would yoo like a challenge? wv' �
your body and challenge your m rid ways
you've never done before' Unless ,ou test
yourself Ou II never know iust how sue
cessful you can be You can dc this by spen
dmg 6 weeks ot your summer vacation at the
Army ROTC Basic Camp at Fort Kno� ��
tucky. learning wha' it takes to be an a � rr ,
Officer you II be paid more than J60C for
your 6 weeks of framing pius room ana
board There s NO OBLIGATION to the Ar
my and you can leave any day it �ou don '
like it' it you qualify you couid be awarded
a J year, full tuition college schoia-sr p
Basic camp aiso Qualifies �ou for the ROTC
Advanced course when yoc return (�.
in the Fall Get ail the deta s � the -� �� ,
ROTC Smoker on wed 5 Fe6 h n j -
p m . m the Cotteehouse 3tudeT Cent) I i
contact Captain Alvin Mitchell at '5' 6M7
ICE HOCKEY
AH players and new people interested in
playing ice hockey are to call Mike at
752 1332 or George at 752 0045 We will have
practue this week and you need to get the
deta,Is as soon as possible
ECU KARATE CLUB
Beginning Karate Anyone interested in
oegmning karate classes can take FREE
lessons with me ECU Karate Club Classes
are on Tuesday nights 7 30 for women, 8 30
tor men. and on Wednesday nights 7 30 tor
men 8 30 tor women in room 108 Memorial
Gym Please tell me instructor if it is your
frst class For more into call Chuck or Anne
at 758 0370
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Phi Beta Lambda, a club for Business Ed
and all Business maiors, will meet Wed
Feb 5 at 3 m Rawl 342 All persons interested
m becoming a member of this club are in
vited to attend
CHINA
Dr Marilyn steele Assistant Professor m
food nutrition and institution Management
visited China during Fall, 1985 She will
discuss her impressions and share slides on
Feb 5 For more info call Dr Kathryn
Kolasa. School of Home Economics. 757 6917
DIABETIES
Anyone interested m a Diabetic Support
Group on campus please call 758 9604
NURSING STUDENTS
students who plan to declare nursing as
a maior and wish to enroll m the sophomore
nursing courses in me fan semester 198
should pick up an intent to Enroll Form in
the Nursing B'dg . room 157 and return by
Feb 15 1986 This applies particularly to
present freshmen However this torm must
also be submitted by students wtv- wish to re
enrol in the nursing program
COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
ECU Couege Democrats win meet this
Thursday in room 212 Vendenhail Elections
will be held, so all members are urged to at
'end For more info contact Hugh Carroll at
"52 5611
CAMPUSCRUSADE FOR
CHRIST
IS sponsoring Pnme T.me" this Thurs
n �� a' � 30 p m in me Old Joyner Library
second floor please iom us for fun
ASh.p ana Bible Study We are looking
forward to meeting you
PPHA
Pre Professional Health Alliance will
meet Wed , Feb 5 at 6 30 in room 221
Mendenhall Student Center All members
and interested guests are encouraged to at
tend
ECU HILLEL
On Wed . Feb 19, ECU Hillel will sponsor a
visit to Greenville by Mr Gideon Lowy Mr
Lowry is the Assistant Managing Editor and
News Editor of me Israeli daily newspaper,
Ha'areti He has served as a spokesman for
the Israel Labor Party and personal aide to
Simon Peres Since 1982 he has been at
f iliated with Ha'areti, where he has also held
the position of senior reporter tor Ha'areti
weekly maganne
Mr Lowy will give a public address on
Wed evening at 7 30 p m in Brewster Hall,
room C 103, in addition to meeting with me
Political Science Dept Arrangements can be
made for personal interviews by contacting
Rabbi Bonnie Koppell at 830 1138, or Or
Bramy Resnik at 757 6232
VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE,
ECU STUDENT UNION
The Visual Arts Committee of the ECU Stu
dent Union is holding me 1986 illumna Art
Competition This is open to anybody at
ECU Entries will be accepted February
19 24 in room 221 of Mendenhall Student
Center between the hours of 1 00 5 00 The
lUdgmg will take place m the Mendenhall
Gallery on February 22 There will also be a
iau theme reception on the 24m of Feb
from 6 30 8 30
POETRY FORUM
The ECU Poetry Forum will meet on Tues
day. Feb 4 1986 at 8 00pm In Mendenhall
Student Center room 248 Those wanting
their poems discussed should bring 6 to 8
copies w.th them Listeners Welcome'
PRE MED
Alpha Epsilon Delta will hold a business
meeting on Tuesday. Feb 4th at 7 Xpm ,n
room 307 Flanagan to fmalue plans for the
initiation ceremony and banquet on Feb 8th
it is very important mat all pledges and
members attend this meeting
ECU MARAUDERS
The first Marauder meeting of the
semester will be held 10 Feb at 1700 hrs In
room 248 of Mendenhall All present
members are urged to attend, and beret
wearers will be required to attend All those
interested are invited to come and fnd out
what me ECU Marauders is an about
COMPUTER CLASSES
Computers in Education. Sat . Feb 22. 9am
4pm
dBASE III, Sat. Feb 22. 9am 4pm
Multimate. Sat , Feb 22, 9am 4pm
Word Processing Sat March 1, 9am 4pm
Lotus II. Sat , March I, 9am 4pm
Continuing Education Erwin Hall or can
757 6143
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
Dance Factory, Thurs , Feb 12 Apr 24,
5 30 6 30pm
Speed Reading, Thurs , Feb 13 Apr 10,
7 9pm
CPR Race for Life Sat . Feb 15 9am 4pm
Camera I, Tues , Feb 18 Mar 18. 7 9pm
Halleys Comet. Mono . March 17, 7 10pm .
Tues , Mar 18, 4 5 30amn
Continuing Education, Erwin Hall or call
757 6143
CAMP DAY
Students interested in summer camp
employment should visit the Co op Office m
Rawl 313 to learn more about this year's
Camp Day Opportunities for counselors
arts & crafts instructors, lifeguards, and
many other positions foi students m all ma
lors
LUTHERAN STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
LSA will meet this Sunday at 6 00 at Our
Redeemer Lutheran Church on E'm Sti eet
before going to a congregation member's
home for a hot dei.oous home cooked meai
We will be finalizing plans for our Spring
Beach Retreat All members please attend
and new students are weicor.ie if you have
any questions or need a ride call 756 7058
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
Campus Crusade for Christ invites you to
Fun and Fellowship at me international
House on Feb 8. Sa' at 5 p m Come ioin the
fun and fellowship etc Bring a friend'
MASSAGE CLINIC
The Physical Therapy Club will be holding
a massage chnic on Tues Feb 4 The place
� s me Aii.ed Health Bidg The time is 6 30 un
til 10 Come get your massage only Jl for 10
minutes Be there! !
SOCCER PLAYERS
Ail people interested m part.opating In the
ECU Women's Soccer Club indoor soccer
tournament please contact Lisa
Grosshanoier at 758 8325 The tournament
w.ll be held Feb 28 and March I d J There
w II be a minimal entry tee
i'RIENDSOF PERSPECTIVES
Monday. February 3. CHARLES RICHARD
DREW THE MAN AND THE MYTH
Charles E Wynes. Ph D Professor of
History, University of Georgia In Recognt
tion of Black History Month, A Charles E
Culpeper History of Medicine Lecture
Monday. February 10. EHTiCS AND
HUMAN GENE THERAPY Leroy Waimer
Ph D , Director, Center for Bioethics, Ken
nedy Institute of Ehtics Georgetown Univer
sity Both Presentations will be held 12 30
1 30pm, PCMH Cafeteria Upstairs Con
ference Room Sponsored by The Depart
ment of Medical Humanities. East Carolina
University School of Medicine. 757 2797 The
public is invited to attend
ALPHA PHI BIG
BROTHER ORGANIZATION
Alpha Phi meeting Sunday night at 8 00pm
at the house Dues should be paid by Sunday
or a late charge will be added
DRAMATIC DISCIPLES
You don't have to be an actor to enioy
reading plays' Beginning TONiGHT, and
every Tuesday night a group win mee' '
read and discuss plays mat provide MM �� �
into me Christian message We wm mee'
from I XI 30 at the Methodist Itwoonl
Center (501 E Fifth St across from Gar re-
dorm) Can 752 7240 tor more intormat.or
Sponsored Of Presbyterian Campus Crr s
tian Life
FOOD FOR THOUGHT
Come to the Methodist Student Center M �
Wednesday night at 5 30pm and ever,
Wednesday mgnt for a delicious an you car
eat home cooked meal with a short program
afterwards The meal is $2 at the door 11 it
if you sign up in advance Can 75 2030 roi
reservations Sponsored by Presbyter tr
and Method'St Campus Ministries
Carolina Manufacturers ForeseeRobotics
(L'PI) � Low-wage labor and
the high cost of robotics arc keep-
ing manufacturers in the
Carolinas away from automa-
tion, some industry officials say,
but others foresee an increasing
desire for companir.es to use the
machinery.
"Taiwan and Japan have even
lower wages than the United
States. Yet Japan is one of the
biggest users of robotics said
Jeff Burnstein, a spokesman for
Robotic Industries Association, a
Dearborn, Mich trade group
"It's more a matter of can
robots do what small manufac-
turers need Burnstein said.
"As more robots are used and
people see the benfits, people will
start to think about how can I use
them in my company. There's a
lot of interest
But some robotics suppliers
argue most manufacturers in the
Carolinas avoid industrial robots
because their average price stand
at S 100,000. Instead the com-
panies use machinery known as
"pick-and-place" equipment to
perform one routine, repetitive
steps. Pick-and-place machines,
also known as "hard automa-
tion generally sell for between
$3,000 and $4,000.
Robotics have been around
since the 1960's, but the concept
did not really catch on until the
late 1970's and early 1980's.
Some industry executives
predicted at the time that robots
were the wave of the future
because they would free human
workers from mundane tasks.
"I think people were optimistic
about the growth potential of
robots three, four years ago
said Jack Lane, a Michigan con-
sultant to the robotics industry.
"There's been growth but not
what they had projected
A joint five-year study by the
University of Michigan and the
Society of Manufacturing
Engineer's robotics international
division predicts domestic robot
sales will double by the end of the
decade to 10,000 units and to
about 20,000 units by the end of
the century. The study, released
last year; also predicts robotics
will displace about 4 percent of
the nation's manufacturing
workers during the next 10 years
while creating 50,000 robotics
related jobs.
In the Carolinas, some fur-
niture and textile companies have
ventured into robotics, but most
believe automation will be largly
confined to the Fortune 500 com-
panies and the electronics and
auto industries for some time.
Other robotic suppliers are op-
timistic that smaller
manufaturers,
Even in North Carolina, where
the hourly wage of $6.68 ranks
the lowest in the nation, will be
using robotics.
"We'll see robots becoming
commonplace said Lloyd
Nelson, who owns a Raleigh
company that distributes robotic
machinery. "There'll be more ap-
plications as the price comes
down
Look What surfaced
Free Delivery For $5.00 & Over Purchases
Every Tuesday
is
College Night
7 p.m11 p.m.
99C SUBS
Your Choice Of
Ham Si. Cheese
Bologna & Cheese
Ham, Salami. & Cheese
Pepperom, Salami, & Cheese
Turkey Sc Cheese
Ham, Turkey, & Cheese
Not Valid On Deliveries
60 OZ Pitchers $1.99
inctutk
11 a.ml 1 p.m.
'52-2183
� i�
E 4th Si
CLIFF
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington H.ghway (N.C. 33 Ext.) Greenv.ile. North Carolina
Phone 752-3172
V
3
(Past RiverbluffApts.)
25
Flounder $3
Popcorn Shrimp 53
Hours 4:30-9:30 MonSat.
-NEWLY REMODELED -
Tuesday Ladies
Nite
with Bruce Frye
$1.25 Highballs $3.00 Pitchers
Ladies Admitted Free

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PIZZA &SA LAD BAR SPECIAL
� $2.49 All You Can Eat 5 til 9
� $1.50 Frozen Drinks All Dty
� $2.50 Pitchers
PIZZA & SALAD BAR SPECIAL
same
� $1.50 Margaritas
Unlimited
Cheese .20
Tomato No Charge
Valid at all Greenville, Wilmington, Havdock Jacksonville Location

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with any othar oflar or KIDS' MEAL.
Pleose present coupon when or dor ins
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B HA I'll KKMMIs
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the meeting
"1 - i
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710 Noi
Take-outs
Welcomed
ALL
Seafood
$
Fried Shril
Steamed
Fried Floi
Fried Troi
Fried Clai
21
Mo
Greenvilli
A





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEB RUARV4, 1986 J
ORAV.ATIC DISCIPLES
j' Ji'of to enioy
rONIGHT and
tig �'ii meet to
i- provide msiat1'
-ssage We will meet
t wodi�t Student
�� trom Garret?
K -o'e nformation
. ipu Chn�

FOOD FOR THOUGHT
enter tnn
. -a . ana every
� voo can
- " � jhort orogram
V "� ooor $1 $0
� ?030 �or
. P-eiovterian

surfaced
uesda
IS
he Night
ll p.m.
SUBS
eese
,ersS1.99
mcudes tax
215 E. 4th St.
I
J-
Only
to No Charge
icksonvill Locations
1
�oting Wendy l. Net valid
IcH.f or KIDS Mf Al.
lcoypon who ordering,
i cuitomc
� tro and �� whoro op
I EX�IRIS: 2 � �
Babes Promote ECU Life
By PATTl KEMMIS
M�'ii' ewi Mltor
Recruiting players for the ECU
football team takes a tremendous
amount of time and energy from
the coaching staff. While busy
answering questions about the
toot ball program, the coaches
sometimes do not have the time
to introduce the recruits to other
varied aspects of college life. In
1979 the coaches got the help they
needed with the organization of
the Buccaneer Babes.
A football support group, the
Buccaneer Babes consist of ap-
proximately 30 girls.
Kerrv Marcum, a four-vear
Buccaneer Babe, said "Buc-
caneer Babes has given me the
opportunity to be involved in
school activities and in return it
had open doors for me. Besides
having fun, I get a lot of satisfac-
tion out of knowing I might be
helping to get an important
recruit to sign
The individual duties of the
Buccaner Babes includes conduc-
ting campus van tours, staffing
home games, and hosting the
possible recruits and their parents
during both the football season
and the recruiting weekends in
the spring. In the past the Buc-
caneer Babes have also par-
ticipated in homecoming ac-
tivities, the Coaches Clinic,
Media Day and the spring Purple
and Gold game.
"We're here to promote the
school remarked Deidra Lewis,
"I feel that trying to sell the
school to better the football team
is a big reponsibility. 1 also really
enjoy meeting people
"The girls are a very important
part of the football program
commented Steve Milligan, a
football graduate assistant, "not
only do they help with recruiting
but they also help our secretaries
here at the field house
To become a Buccaneer Babe,
any student may apply and sign-
up for an interview conducted
during the next open house. It is
required that the applicant main-
tain a 2.0 GPA, be a full-time
student and be willing to dedicate
a minimal amount of time each
week.
"Buccaneer Babes are an in-
tegral part of the program. They
give the recruits someone better
to relate to replies sophomore
football player Joe Molineaux.
"They answer a lot of questions
and give the recruits a break from
the coaches and players
TYPESETTER
NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY
Contact Shannon
at the
EAST CAROLINIAN
Mondays and Wednesdays
between 2-4 p.m.
to set up an interview
757-6366757-6367
Crowded Demo craticTicket
RALEIGH, N.C. (L PI) �
Former Insurance Commissioner
John Ingram, saying an indepen-
dent poll shows him the frontrun-
ner. Monda became the 10th
Democrat to file for the U.S.
Senate seat being vacated b
retiring Sen. John East, R- N.C.
"I'm signed on the dotted line,
I am now a candidate for the
I'nited States Senate said a
beaming Ingram after emerging
from the office of state Board of
Elections Director Alex Brock.
'Te been advised that an in-
dependent poll found that John
Ingram can win the primary and
also win the general election. At
10:50 a.m. 1 became the fron-
trunner
Ingram said he would cam-
paign for a strong national
defense and a solid social security
System. He labeled himselt a pro
business candidate who will work
to balace the federal budget.
former Gov. Terry San ford.
widel) considered the Democratic
frontrunner, met with Ingram
last week, but Ingram declared
the meeting a stalemate.
"I was not able to persuade
him to get out of the race at this
time and he couldn't persuade me
to stay out Ingram said. "That
fact that he met with me means
he thinks I'm a formidable can-
didate and I will be
Ingram declined to reveal any
details about the poll, but said it
was taken by a group called
North Carolina for a Strong
America.
He said he was "disappointed"
with his showing in his most re-
cent political race, a 1984
Democratic gubernatorial
primary in which he garnered less
the 8 percent of the vote.
"The loss of any election is a
big disappointment Ingram
said. "But I'm the only candidate
in this race who has shown he can
come back from a losing election
and win. One of the candidates
has lost a lot more elections than
I hac
Ingram had lost a 1978 Senate
bid to Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C,
after upsetting Luther Hodges Jr.
in the Democratic primary, then
won re-election as Insurance
Commissioner in 1980.
He said that showed his
"resiliency to come back and win
for the people
Ingram declined to specif) how
for a compaign.
"Luther Hodges spent $1.7
million in the Democratic
primary and I won with
$50,000 Ingram said. "You
talk about how you're going to
raise this and that and the other,
but you just raise what you can
He said he has a statewide net-
work of supporters and has been
described as a "populist pro-
gressive conservative
Displaying a poem titled
"Always Have a Dream" � a
Christmas gift from his daughter
Michelle after the 1984 election
� Ingram said, "I keep it in my
lavatory . d look at it every mor-
ning when I'm shaving. That is
my dream, to represent the peo-
ple of North Carolina the best
way I know how
Other Democrats in the race
are Raleigh businessman Milton
Croom, Graham city council
member Walt Adkins, Newton
textle worker Clinton Moore,
Fayetteville realtor Theodore
Kinney. Deputy Assistant
Secretary for Public Instruction
Betty Wallace, and Charlotte
Democrats Bill Belk, Thomas
"Fountain" O d o m and
much money he hoped to raise Katherine Harper.
rl
710 North Greene Street, Greenville. N C.
Take-outs
Welcomed
752-0090
Hours:
Sunday-Thursday 11:00 A.M9 P.M.
Friday 11:00 AM -10:00 P.M.
Saturday 4:00 P.M10:00 P M.
ALL YOU CAN EAT
Seafood Buffet & Salad Bar
a
Fried Shrimp
Steamed Shrimp
Fried Flounder
Fried Trout
Fried Clam Strips
Deviled Crabs
Crab Cakes
Fried Chicken
French Fries
Slaw
21 Item Salad Bar
6 Dressings
Monday-Tuesday
Wednesday
5-9 P.M.
Greenville's Leading Catering Service
Republicans in the race are
Rep. Jim Broyhill, R-N.C,
Campbell University professor
David Funderburk, and Glenn
Miller, leader of the White
Patriot Partv.
. k - uJmABORTIONS UP TO 12th WEEK OE PREGNANCY $195 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cost. Pregnancy Test, Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For Further information, call 832-0535 (toll free number 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. weckdavs General anesthesia available. RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS 917 West Morgan St. Raleigh, N.C.
Liquidation of
Oriental Rugs By
Public Sale
Under arrangements with insurance companies and various distributors of
oriental rugs, we have now received instructions to liquidate and totally clear a large
number of water damaged and other slightly damaged pieces incurred in shipping.
Also collection includes some undamaged and fine pieces as well as Kashan, Tabriuz
and Trible old rugs.
Sale
70 to 80 Off
Damaged Persian Rugs
& Other Oriental Rugs
Over 300 Pieces all Sizes Small & Large
ONLY ONE DAY SALE
Sheraton Inn Sat. Feb. 8
203 West Greenville Blvd.
264 Bypass
Each rug coma with certificate and appro
Greenville Terms: Cash, c keck, .vr( ard, and i ea
Oriental Ku(j I iquidators l)rus (201 p 22-64X4
10 AM to 6 PM
i i �"�-������
A





Stye iEafit (HutalMun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
TOM LUVLNDER, Ommri Marnier
Jay Stone, ifiwufju
Miki I i dw k k. w� �� gri-ci Winchester. (�����
Scon Coopi k. s Anthony Martin. kMBitavr
Daniel Maurer, John Peterson, om,
JOHN SHANNON, .� SHANNON SHORT, -
DeChanile Johnson, a Debbie Stevens, v
1 ebi uan 4. isK6
OPINION
Page 4
I'm Not Herb
Ads To Embalm By
A recent edition of one of the
political journals that I subscribe to
included some comments on a new
invention by the McDonald's cor-
poration. From Janie Higgins
Reports I gleaned this quote regar-
ding McDonald's multi-million-
dollai promotional campaign for
the "McD.l.l "It's a daring
new culinary concept, a hamburger
� get this � with lettuce and
tomatoe! Now Higgins went on
to say. "progressives have
sometimes been skeptical about the
social value ol capitalist con-
sumerism, but we're big enough to
:ip our hats when the private sector
comes through Higgins' ironic
jab a! McDonald's underscores ye!
mother national obsession related
to the fast food business.
He shuttles across your television
screen between regular programm-
ing onl to wind up staring blankly
into your livingroom from the set
���! The David Letterman show.
He's interviewed like a celebrity in
national magazines. Bumper
stickers, I -shirts and hats proclaim
it. I'm not him. You're not him. No
only Herb can be Herb.
But what, we must ask ourselves
as consumers, does it mean for
Madison Avenue to build an entire
campaign around a uhm well,
a nerd lor, after all. it doesn't
make a great deal ot sense for a
company to spend millions to draw
a parallel between its product and
everything that is obtuse, spastic
and utterly lacking in social finess
does it Vet, that is precisely what
the Burger King corporation has
done. Why? Theories are in short
supply.
A few people like to think that ad
men want to give us somebody to
look down upon. They do this, it is
said, because so main other com-
panies sell their products with sexy,
suave sophisticated male and
female prototypes. The perfect peo-
ple in these ads might make us en-
vious, but they also intimidate us,
or so it is thought. Thus, we might
rebel against them and choose not
to buv. Nerds are safe.
But then, what if the ad men on
Madison Avenue look upon us con-
sumers as Herbs � millions and
millions of Herbs. Think of it.
jgrafrkfrflcwfepyaxu-
Perhaps it is they who look upon us
as doltish philistines and clods.
Such an interpretation is not
altogether implausible.
The hordes of people who flock
to the local McDonald's or even to
Disney World are bound to lose
their identity and take on a generic
appearance in the eyes of one strug-
gling to define the commercial
Zeitgeist. In an age and a land where
cola wars are front page news and
whole industries thrive by selling
the idea that smoking tobacco pro-
ducts and drinking alchoholic
beverages is rugged, individualistic,
American or even healthy it's not
surprising that the P.R. men for
some o' America's largest corpora-
tions might grow a bit cynical. It
shouldn't shock anyone if they
discover that advertising campaigns
are often founded upon a contempt
for "the masses
Perhaps our society manufac-
tures news and sensationalizes the
banal in order to ignore or trivialize
the truly sensational � the horrific.
The fact that the United States and
the Soviet Union each spend more
on their armed forces than the com-
bined national incomes of the
world's 62 poorest countries is truly
sensational, even horrific. So is
what our largest hamburger chains
are doing to rain forests in Brazil.
But few people pay to advertize on
behalf o jungles, the world's
destitute or even world peace. This
despite the fact that a safe stable en-
vironment and peace ate important
and necessary for all of us.
In the present age, then, it mav
truly be said that "the medium is
the message If any doubt remains
about that, look at the rising stars
o American politics: Bill Bradley,
Jack Kemp, Steve Garvey (a possi-
ble California senatorial
candidate), and, of course, the
daddy-o � Ronald Reagan. Now
Fred Gandy, who plaved the purser
"Gopher" on the "Love Boat is
running as a Republican for an
Iowa congressional seat (ves, I'm
serious). Why not? And if, in the
near future the script somehow goes
awry we tire of phony palliatives we
can always have "the real thing" �
a coke and a smile.
yroffeayrmavac).
L
OF COURSES5U. ARM0R-P1ERWAI6 aUO�75 WHO
KNOWS WHEN M&ARGRflRfjl6l SH09HMIVW?.
iume ABOUT TV
our Missiles
-HPffr
Campus Forum
Anti-Abortion Position Criticized
My, how the issue of abortion
rages unabated (no sick pun intend-
ed). I am a mite surprised by the
vocal opposition presented by men
who, opposing a pro-choice stance,
usually base their case on the ar-
bitrary and ultimately uncertain mo-
ment of fetal validation as something
with which we'd best not trifle.
"Playing God I believe, is the
usual terminology of protest.
I address myself to Mr. Conway,
although not to him alone. In his let-
ter to the paper he argued earnestly
on the apparently sacred concept of
the "potential" but alas, like so
many anti-choice individuals, he
states a series of inappropriate
qualifications.
I should point out, Mr. Conway,
that no one would ever mistake a six-
week-old fetus for a full-grown com-
atose patient � except perhaps so-
meone hailing from Uranus who is
accustomed to a reproductive process
based on, say, osmosis. It is also
strange, methinks, that many people
manifest a bizarre mixture of humili-
ty and fanatical arrogance, which
then debases to exalt human life
while holding all other life forms in
contempt. (Not all such people
belong to the Christian religion, I'm
sure.) Life is life, Mr. Conway, and
are you a carnivore? Do you daily
consume the flesh of an unknown
and unthanked animal � the unwill-
ingly surrendered body of what was a
"potentially" life-loving hog, or
bull, or worse � a cow: someone's
mother. Egads indeed. If life is holy,
sir, then all life is holy according to
my religion. You dismiss the animal
consciousness much too readily and
then defend a nebulous, minute
number of cells growing not unlike
(altogether) a cancer in a woman's
body, all on this principle of
potential-ness. More to the point: It
now seems absurdly and most
logically necessary to hold every man
accountable (et tu, Mr. Conway?)
who has ever spilled his seed in sleep,
or by the act of masturbation, or in
an infertile woman, guilty of an
atrocity: denying the life potential to
those million sons and daughters.
And women, you too must be held
accountable for each precious egg,
unfertilized and dying inuterine .
Can we stop this before ad
nauseam sets in? I think the point
will take. Abortion is a difficult
issue, an emotionally grim issue.
There really is no decisive answer and
so yes, we must indeed play God and
decide for ourselves. In keeping with
the laws of freedom and principles of
integrity, the choice on abortion
should remain an individual decision
and primarily, a woman's decision.
Margaret Shearin
Graduate, School of Art
Moderation Please
To the authors of the remarkably
civilized letters of the Jan. 28 and
Jan. 30 Campus Forums.
After reading your letters about
the two "sides of the fence" I wish to
represent a third side, those of us
who have opinions of our own, not
entirely siding with the "suicide-
condoning" liberals or the "let
livelet die" conservatives.
I would first like to enter some
previously unacknowledged view-
points to the abortion issue. I would
like Miss Averett to consider, for in-
stance, the rape victim. Of course I
realize that this ridiculously "stupid"
woman should have to live with her
"mistake" for the rest of her life, but
I truly feel that it is a monstrous
crime to make this person re-live the
incident for nine months, not to men-
tion the rest of her life. The abortion
would not erase the incident, but it
could speed recovery. It would then
be unfair of the government to decide
who should have one and who should
not. Incidentally, Mr. Conway, in
many cases the family of a coma vic-
tim will opt to disconnect life support
systems and let nature take its course.
With my second topic, I once again
side with the liberal point of view
Although having a defense arsenal
which could blow up the world is a
'wonderful source ol secuntv, it
seems that after we blow it up, and
alter the Russians blow it up. there
won't be much left for the other
countries to blow up. And as far as
that goes, is the murdering o con-
scious people in a war more moral
than aborting a fetus?
With my last topic. 1 find myself
agreeing with the conservative point
ol view. I come from an area ol
average unemployment and unusual-
ly high job availability (northern
Mass.). and 1 find the laziness or the
stubborn pride of many of those on
welfare to be extremely frustrating.
Ot course there are many people who
are truly needy who deserve aid, but
Mr. Lucas has a good point.
ro conclude, I think that represen-
tatives ot the two parties should take
the logical stands which their partv.
on a greater scale, intend. Regardless
ol who started the "mud-slinging
it's getting more boring as the
arguments become more idealistic.
As a third party. I'm asking that vou
authors organize your facts and ex-
press your ideas to cornice readers,
not get them muddy.
Andrew Miskavage
Music major
Capital Punishment Yes!
Surely Miss Liberman's letter in
the January 30 edition of Campus
Forum is not suggesting that protec-
ting the life of an insane criminal is
comparable to protecting the life of
an unborn child. I am not pro-
abortion in every case, but 1 feel no
remose for any criminal, whether he
be insane or ingenious, that receives
the death penalty for the act of
murder and, in my opinion, the act
of rape. When an individual exhibits
that much utter disregard for the life
of another, then he does not deserve
to be among the living. I am in no
way repudiating the criminal's right
to a fair trial or the right to legal
counsel; nor am I referring to death
through euthanasia, self-defense, or
times of war. I am talking about
murder and rape.
People today view murderers and
rapists (and other criminals for that
matter) as victimes of society, and it
is true. The United States today
fosters an atmosphere conducive to
criminal activity. If a person is
caught, and he or she goes to
prison, he is not being punished. In
many cases, society is, in exchange
for one (1) mutilated body, giving the
criminal a better way of life. The
criminal, after becoming a "media
event" (a hero in the eyes of his
cronies), can now expect to receive
clothes, a bed, and regular meals. He
can spend his days playing basketball
and committing crimes against
nature. Who pays for his new
lifestyle, for his needs and for the
armed guards that must watch over
him constantly? Who else but the
families of his victims. What a
grotesque reality.
Do you think that the majority of
the criminally insane, or criminally
intelligent, hold jobs? Do they send
their children to school or church?
Do they have a concern for the rights
of the next person? Do they pay taxes
or vote? Do they do anything of
value or make any effort to better the
American way Ol life? 1 ask you, are
they really citizens of the United
States0
While capital punishment ma
be a moral act. it is a realistic and
practical way ol discardii rash
that inhibits the United States
must realize that a murderer
has not committed a crime tga
just one individual, he has assa
the ideals of this country, and
fringed upon the rights of ever I -
citizen. I will gladly flip the
any murderer that drags j �
undermines r h e I S.
criminal activities.
1 know our legal -�
perfect, and I. at th
correct its short,
never contribute to the
siding with anyone wl
rights of the criminal
portant than the rights
citizen, whether b
Richard Pond
Senior
History and Engli
Martinez Defended
Your Jan. 23 issue c
ter that criticized a
about ECU's tor
coach l)r Ra Martinez H
writer of that letter.
athlete, can derive a ;
of Dr. Martinez's remai k i
mystery.
Granted Dr. Martinez sa d
never reallv been impress
sports but the rest of his qu
"except as a test of whai v
done in your training Man
continues m the story b saying
me the most important thing
tice
Training and practice was th
to Dr. Martinez's success
coaching. As the story told
developed new techniques to prs
swimmers for competition. He
phasized the use of weights and
isometric exercises long before thev
became an accepted part of a swim
mer's training. And he was among
the first to use cinamagraphic studies
to analyze and improve a swimmer's
strokes. All of this resulted in two
NA1A national championships tor
ECU. 20 national champions and 45
All Americans.
While Martinez candidly said that
an "age group swim meet" is "as ex
citing as watching grass grow" he ad-
ded that "The important thing is how
well the child did. Did he learn
anything?"
It should be obvious that Dr. Mar-
tinez's professional interest is in stu-
dying how athletes develop and how
they achieve their results. The com-
ment by the letter wnter that
Maybe" Dr. Martinez "finds srass
growing more exciting than watching
the development of fine young
athletes, aspiring Olympians, in ac-
tion" is an incomplete interpretation.
George Threewitts,
ECU News Bureau
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office m the Publica-
tions Building, across from the en-
trance of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authors). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted
Winth
" K Hill St (I.p
Winth
idr
Wintii
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New La
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Health G
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depressed. What is depression
and what should 1 do to help?
Dep- is a n
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depressed
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develop ph;
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digestion, we
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On
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of or loss
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situational among c
Tuesday, Febru;
dmission Si. 50
10
Wednesday, February
Adm.$ 1.50 Guys
L
10 D
vi
J





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 4, 1986
5WB0T7OAI
i -ABOUT W
AMM-
2UPM AN.
Criticized
� u, arc
rtited
a not
and
. trash
You
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against
issaulted
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cannot
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f the US
Marline intended
i let-
Ian 16 story
ming
Wow the
himself an
opinion
is a
said "I've
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tote was
u have
Martinez
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told he
prepare
He em-
ghts and
they
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tdies
iwimmer's
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ex-
ad-
learn
Mar-
in stu-
p and how
The corn-
writer that
"finds grass
. matching
fine young
ans, in ac-
� interpretation.
Forum Rules
The Existarolinian welt omes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
them by our office in the Publica-
Building, across from the en-
hance of Joyner library
For purposes of verification, all let-
ers must include the name, major and
lassification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. AH
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted.
'
Winthrop Adopts Revised Curriculum
ROCK HILL, S.C. (IP -
While maintaining Winthrop's
traditional role as a leader in
teacher education, Winthrop's
School of Education has expand-
ed that role by adopting a revised
curriculum, Winthrop has chosen
not to pattern its curriculm on the
five-year models recenth adopted
by some large universities.
"We still think it can be done
in four years if time u used effi-
ciently James Rex, dean of the
School of Education, said.
"We've done this with the addi-
tion of a Maymeste' between the
junior and senior year. Since
public schools are still in session
during this time, our students
have yet another opportunity to
gain the necessary hands-on-
experience.
"Along with faculty and ad-
ministration from the the College
of Arts and Sciences, we began to
conceptualize (his new teacher
education curriclum about three
years ago he said. The primary
thrust of the revised curriculum is
that it is team-taught, field-based
and performance-oriented. The
first characteristic of the new cur-
riculum is tougher entrance re-
quirements.
At the end of their sophomore
year, students wishing to be ad-
mitted to the education program
must go before an admissions
committee of education faculty,
arts and science faculty, outside
teaching practitioners and
outstanding seniors. To help
these students prepare for the ad-
missions committee review, a
new, team taught freshman
course has been implemented that
will give freshmen an idea of
what teaching is all about.
The School of Education iden-
tified five area public schools as
"Teaching Learning Centers"
where students can get a first-
hand idea of what teaching en-
tails. "If you want students to
really understand what teaching
is all about, a good portion of
that process has to take place out
in the schools; you simply can't
get it all by staying on campus
Rex said.
This new approach reverses a
major problem in the traditional
curriculum's approach, where a
number of students did not
discover until their senior year of
practice teaching that they did
not like working in the
classroom. Now students in their
freshman year can investigat
teaching as their potential profes-
sion.
In this new freshman course, a
faculty team from four education
speciality areas (Special educa-
tion, elementary education,
secondary education and physical
education) work with 120 to 130
students each semester in all four
areas. Students visit elementary,
middle, senior high and special
education schools, where the
principal and faculty provide a
brief orientation.
Such a process does lead to a
relatively high attrition rate of
approximately 30 percent. "We
are losing some people-hopefully
the ones we should be losing-and
picking up some outstanding
undecided students who hear
about the course and decide to in-
vestigate teaching as a career
Rex said. One positive spin-off
from introducing freshmen to
classroom experiences is that
some students have become so
enthusiastic about their ex-
periences, they have begun shar-
ing these experiences with
freshmen friends.
Another requirement under the
revised curriculum is that seniors
must take the National Teachers
Examination to graduate.
Teacher candidates must pass the
exam to be licensed to teach in
South Carolina. However, Win-
throp students will be required to
take it as a part of their program
requirements.
"In terms of the School of
Education's successes over the
past few years, these
developments put curriculum
revision at the top of the list
Rex said. "If you want students
to really understand what
teaching is all about, a good por-
tion of that process has to take
place out in the schools; you
simply can't get it all by staying
on campus Rex added.
Students are required to look
for certain behaviors and
methods in the classes they
observe. Following the visits, a
panel composed of the principal,
parents, faculty and, in the case
of juniorsenior high schools,
students from that school discuss
the experiences with the college
students.
rflflU.
&
New Law Threatens State Budgets
WASHINGTON (UPI) �
Most state governments, many
that now enjoy budget surpluses,
will be plunged into deficit spen-
ding under the Gramm-Rudman
law that will rob them of $12.4
billion in 1987, a study released
Monday said.
The study, conducted by the
Villers Foundation, the National
Council of Senior Citizens and
the Service Employees Interna-
tional Union, said 40 state
governments would run deficits if
they tr to offset the cuts in
federal spending in 1987. The
new Gramm-Rudman budget-
balancing law. which goes into
effect March 1, requires across
the board cuts in all government
programs il lawmakers fail to
come up with an alternative way
to reduce the national deficit.
"The automatic cuts under
Gramm-Rudman-HoUings will
devastate the middle class and the
poor, the young, residents of
rural and urban areas and affect
people in all regions of the coun-
try said Ronald Pollock of the
Villers Foundation, a non-profit
advocacy group for the elderly.
If Gramm-Rudman is triggered
in 1987, federal funds for state
and local governments will be cut
by more than $10 billion, the
study said. Cuts in two major en-
titlement programs � Medicare
and student financial aid � will
add another $2.4 billion to the
states' losses.
William Hutton, director of
the National Council of Senior
Citizens, said at a news con-
ference the budet-cutting law is
"a mindless instrument of fiscal
policy which makes computers
and bureaucrats the final arbiters
of our future
Hutton said the cuts also
would drastically reduce federal
and state programs for the elderly
such as nutrition services, senior
enters, low-income energy
assistance and Medicare.
The Nation's most populous
states will lose the most money
under the law, which hits Califor-
nia and New York the hardest
with cuts of more than $1 billion
each.
lexas, Pennsylvania and Il-
linois would lose more than $600
million, and Ohio, Florida,
Michigan each would lose about
$500 million, the study said.
However, sparsely populated
states in the West and New
England would be affected
drastically on a per capita basis.
The five hardest hit, the study-
said, will be Alaska, Wyoming,
Montana, Vermont and South
Dakota.
Could the states recover from
this?" Pollock said. "The answer
is an emphatic no
Main states have balanced
budget laws and many now enjoy
surpluses, the study said.
Pollock called for increasing
revenues by closing corporate tax
loopholes, "making corporations
pay a minimum fair share and
decreasing "fraud and waste" in
defense spending to reduce the
deficit.
Leaders of the nation's public
housing and community develop-
ment agencies also called Mon-
day for a federal tax increase to
reduce the deficit and asked for
level funding in housing and
development programs.
Conserve Water
Shower
With A Friend
OPTICAL
PALACE
$15.00 OFF
I Any Complete
J Pair of
I Eyeglasses
V (excluding sale items)
Ray-Ban
and all other
non-prescription
SUNGLASSES
20 OFF
l
l
I
i
I
i
i
J
ASK ABOUT OUR 207o
SENIOR CITIZENS
DISCOUNT
OPEN SATURDAYS BY
APPOINTMENTS ONLY
WcCuArmt
AftEyeEun
For Yov O
The Sum Day
Soft Contacts
$59.00 pair
Phone
756-4204
Offer Expires Feb 2k
703 Grceavtlk Blvd. (Acroa Froa Pitt Plaza, Next To ERA Really)
Gary M Harrtt liceaied Optician Opea 9.30 .m. to 6 p.m. MoaFri.
Health Column M with
Mary Elesha-Adams
M roommate says he is
depressed. What is depression
and what should I do to help?
Depreion is a mood distur-
bance. Depression includes feel-
ings of sadness, disappointment
or loneliness and may cause the
depressed person to withdraw
from people and activities, and
develop physical discomfort such
as aches, pains, fatigue, poor
digestion, weight loss or gain,
and sleep disturbances. The per-
son also looses the ability to en-
joy life.
One-fourth of all college
sudents experience some degree
of depression on any given day,
and 75 percent of all college
students feel depressed at some
time during the year. Depression
car. occur because of a loss such
as the death of a loved one or the
ending of a relationship. The lack
of or loss of goals and support
systems are common reasons for
situational depression among col-
lege students. Depression may
also appear in a cyclical pattern,
such as after the holidays or at
certain times of the year.
Moreover, depression can occur
without a recognizable cause.
Some feelings of depression are
"normal" or common, so there is
no need to feel weak or ashamed.
Most depressed people do not at-
tempt suicide. Nonetheless, any
talk of suicide should be taken
seriously. Professional help
should be sought if suicide
threats are given, if the depres-
sion lasts for more than a week,
seems to occur cyclically, or if it
interferes with school, work,
and or relationships.
If you or someone you km is
feeling down and blue, here a. e a
few suggestions:
� talk with a close friend, campus
minister, Counseling Center, or
Student Health Service staff
� take a break for a favorite ac-
tivitv. Have some fun!
� get some exercise
� avoid extra stress,
� F xamine your feelings to figure
out what's troubling you and
what you can do
� see a physician for a complete
checkup
� DON'T try to "cheer up" the
depressed person
� DON'T sympathize and claim
to feel the same way as the person
with depression
� DON'T get angry with the
depressed person
COMING ATTRACTIONS
RESUMES
Professionally
Prepared
Special Student Rates
Call 355-6810
Life Planning Institute
Presents
DRAFT NITE
Tuesday, February 4, 1986
Admission $1.50 Guys
9.O0-1:00 AM
$1.00 Ladies
1K DRAFT ALL NITE
& ECU Rugby Team
Present
DRAFT NITE
Wednesday, February 5, 1986
Adm. $1.50 Guys

9:00-1:00 AM
$1.00 Ladies
10 DRAFT ALL NITE
� �
A Russian Journey
Travel Adventure Film at
Hendrix Theatre
A Soldier's Story
From the Films Committee
At The Underground:
Laurel and Hardy in
Chickens Come Home
Wed Feb. 5
8:00p.m.
Th. and Fri ONLY!
7:00 & 9:00 p.m.
ThFeb.6
1:30p.m.
Gala Premiere!
PITCH A BOOGIE-WOOGIE
The first independently produced commercial Film
Presentation with special guests before the Film
7:00 p.m Sat Feb. 8. Admission is $7.00.
in NC.
It all starts at
ANY WEDNESDAY
Dinner Theater from the Productions Committee
6:30 p.m February 21 & 22 in Auditorium 244, Mendenhall
Admission:
ECU Students and Guest: $9.00
All Others: $14.00
Advanced Tickets Only � Get yours at the Central Ticket Office no
Annual Illumina Show
Exhibition of selected art pieces Feb. 23 through Mar. 2. Com-
petition is open to any currently enrolled ECU student. Works in-
clude sculpture, jewelry, painting, photography, and more. In-
terested students should bring works (limit three) to Rm. 221,
Mendenhall from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Feb. 19 & 20.
. OOI TO 10V WXJ
SMS
ering place
i







IIU I M �. Roi IN1AN
HBRl ARY4, 1986
Student Freedoms Challenged By Colleges
ft
(CP some tune this week.
the University of Massachusetts
a! mhersl is due to decide how
to punish IS students who staged
a sil in when an administrator
unilateral!) decided to seize con-
trol ot most student fees.
And in corning weeks, more
than 100 Cornell students will
'ace trespassing charges con-
nected to a fall anti-apartheid
demonstration. North Carolina
vate students will find their
dorms shut down to members of
the opposite sex. Underage
Syracuse students, meanwhile,
ngei be allowed even to
.c. w hich people age
lei are drinking
alcohol.
Student freedoms on those and
doens of other campuses across
nation, in other words, seem
g fasi.
he trend, which began
with a massive, nationwide
crackdown on fraternitj and
n the fail, pro-
mises to accelerate as the school
year wears on. obserers say.
"1 at that some of the
' the mid-
he coming
- ia Ham ot
the United States Student
Association (USSA), a student
lobby group based in
W ashington, D.C.
"In loco parentismeaning
college has all the legal obliga-
tions "in the place of the parent"
while a student attends the
school-was the rationale for
strict campus control of student
behavior up through the mid-
sixties.
Schools, ot course, carefully
controlled all aspects o students'
social and sexual lives by
regulating dorm hours, visiting
procedures, drinking, on-campus
entertainment, driving, political
group activities and even student
dress.
While the system was broken'
by student upheaval in the sixties,
there's evidence administrators'
concern for being held legalh
liable for students' misbehavior is
helping revive at least parts of it
this year.
"There is no indication ot ill
will on part of administrators,
li's really a crackdown on ad-
ministrators contends ,( Na
tional Association ot College and
University Attorneys (NACUA)
:ial, who asked to remain
anonymous.
"Third-party liability lawsuits
are one of the hottest topics on
campus adds D. Parker
Young, a University of Georgia
professor and legal affairs lec-
turer.
"Insurance companies can in-
fluence rules (on campus) by
threatening to withdraw or in-
crease premiums notes
Dorothy Stevens of Risk Con-
sultants, a Denver insurance
firm.
Northwestern, for example, is
debating tough new rules on what
fraternities and sororities can do,
in part because insurance com-
panies refused to renew liability
insurance policies for the 28
houses at NU.
A single multi-million dollar
judgment against NU in a greek
injury case could consume much
of the school's endowment, and
fiscally cripple it for years.
Last fall, a court did rule the
financially-strapped University
of Denver should pay $5 million
to a student who permanently
hurt himself by jumping on a
mini-trampoling inside a small
fraternity house room.
Courts recentlv have held a
variety of schools liable for rapes
occurring on or near their cam-
puses, for acidents suffered by
drunken football fans at their
staduims and for many incidents
common to any communities �
like campuses � the size of small
cities.
"Any increase in discipline is
due to drinking violations
asserts Jim Grimm, the Universi-
ty of Florida's housing director.
At Syracuse, an underaged
woman got drunk and fell of a
bridge despite strict new student
drinking rules.
Now the university is reassess
ing its rules. Its lawyer suggested
there may be behavior it simply
can't regulate.
Indeed, the American Council
on Education last fall warned ad-
ministrators not to go overboard
in imposing new drinking rules.
"Unrealistic rules which are in-
capable of practical enforcement
can actually invite greater liabili-
ty by defining a set of 'duties'
that schools do not and can not
satisfy the group warned.
But administrators say they
can choose either to live with in-
tolerable risk of lawsuits � and
huge settlemer's � or to keep
imposing new rules to prevent
them.
"It's a matter of plugging the
dyke to prevent a catastrophe
saysanisius College Dean
Thomas Miller
Some schools have become in-
creasingly worried about the
potential legal and insurance
costs ot student political activism
since the anti-apartheid move
ment heated up last spring.
"It definitely seems like the
university is clamping down
claims Pedor Noguera, student
president at C al-Berkelev "The)
are enforcing rules that were not
enforced before, such as hanging
banners on the trees
Berkeley officials also are
pressaring students to pay
clean up effigiess they burned in a
recent anti-draft rally. "They
want 600 Noguera gasps
"That's outrageous
More Uan 100 Cornell studr
are beinfc charged with tresps
ing in aa Ithaca, NY court,
although last spring protes'
were routinely "tried" thro
the campu; judiciary, adds a.
tivisl Prof. avid Lyons.
" I he acmimstration
trustees are siper-sensitive i
protests LywiS explains.
"Ihey feai they are be
viewed as hea-ies. It's bring
back real bad memories
late sixtiesobserves the USSA
Ham
COrnell Deai of Stud
David Drinkwater says
"crackdown" ains to minim
the school's habihv.
"t
Lunch Menu Sun
11.00 AM -2
Hormel Re-Opens Peacefully
Al SUN. hnn.pi) The
Geo. . H agship
pla today as
:arrying
riot
gate,
ossible demonstra-
� - n eatpackers.
mov-
I by ag tard
sme
said c
k'ees,
and
-

dud ant, which
a a -
sinkers blockade, there were
i& 100 members
P-9
vial
VY o r 1 i w
Mower
County Courthouse.
Governor Rudy Perpich
ordered an additional 300 V.
tional Guardsmen into Austin
S .nday night to reinforce 500
guardsmen already in
mumty .
I ocal authorities :Ad re-
quested the gu . present
keep streets adjacent to the plant
clear for the workers.
The governor called in the
guard to maintain peace Jan. 21
week ordered the troops
withdraw to the armory five
minutes away from the plant,
saymg they would be used only if
lives were endangered
1 he State Agriculture Depart-
ment planned to expand an in-
vestigation today to determine if
consumers' reports ot razor
blades found in two packages ot
Hormel hot dogs were related ;o
the bitter five-month strike.
Minnesota Agriculture Com-
missioner Jim Nichols said the in-
vestigation involved "fairlv
Senator Simon
Featured Speaker
Continued From Page 1.
� � rial general
elections. The bill � : prohibit
pi"�'� ntributii . neral
elec whether from in-
� political action com-
If passed, the Simon-Mathias
bill would take effect in 1988 and
the estimated cost would be
$70-100 million over a two-year
election period. This would be
paid for completely by tunds
designated by tax-payers in
voluntary tax checkoffs.
$1.00 Off With Coupon
i Wednesday, February 5
� �
widespread" tampering with
Hormel products. All tampering
reports so tar appeared to have
been in the Twin Cites area, he
said.
Police in West St. Paul said
they asked grocers to check their
stock after the raor blade pieces
were found in Hormel's Frank
'V Stuff hot dogs. Consumers
reported the tainted products Fri-
day and Saturday. One man was
cui when a raor blade piece
stuck to the root ot his mouth
alter he finished eating a hot doc.
Due to the Fire at
FOR HEADS ONLY
Melody Furci and Beth Long
Will Be Working with the Fine Staff of
SHEAR HAIR DESIGN
Located on 14th St. next to Sammy's Country Cooking.
752-9706
(Tina hurci's clients may contact 1elod or Beth for more information
Lun
4-6 Ml
6-8 Veg
PI
Tues - BBQ Rib
Wed - Chicken
Thurs - Texas Si
cv
Go Krogering and celebrate
o
Festa Italiana
v
Ll
Frie
Friei
Frie
Cral
Clan
Devil
Coui
Frie
KROGER GARDEN STYLE
OR TRADITIONAL
Spaghetti
REGULAR OR DIET
PEPSi OR
Pepsi
Sand
BBQ Be
BBQ Por
Chicken
T�ma Sail
Egg Salaf
Fish Sanj
1.99
Served on '
Whole Whel

Bull
SALADBAK
Cou '�
. t's .
Bever,
Soft Drinks
Iced Tea
Greenvil





y
I HL LAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 4, 196
Colleges
als also are
s o pay to
uned in a
) "They
Sog era gasps.
� I nell students
respass-
N court,
- protestors
through
adds ac-
on and
v e about
: ns.
are being
bringing
es of the
I i SSA's
Students
says the
minimize
LY
h Long
.Gn
'13 �
tk-
Pepsi
Free
&
r
"M
��t-r
�i

Seedless
Grapes
Snow White
Mushrooms . . . p.
990
$159
Skim
Milk
$

t
159
St B �roi�'SlvOr
H C Mm '� tignts RSrva
Son� sold 0 D��ir�
Kroger
�Ok' ok-� 0 1 EO0W0SHSW ���� ����� IIUKM ft1
" MHfime its gr n� aw�Ti�0 OW �fw W ��� 3"
RIVERSIDE
STEAK BAR
315 STANTONSBURG ROAD
Lunch Menu Sunday-Friday GREENVILLE, N C
9 (Across from Doctor s Park)
752 5001
A
11:00 A.M2:00 P.M.
Lunch Buffet
4-6 Meats
6-8 Vegetables Daily
Plus
Tues - BBQ Ribs
Wed. - Chicken & Pastry
Thurs. - Texas Style Beef BBQ
$395
Includes Tax & Beverage
Salad Bar
Choice Of At
Least 21 Items
6 Dressings
$199
1
� s Not Include
Bt'vvraye Or Tax
a
Lunch Specials
Fried Shrimp
Fried Trout
Fried Flounder
Crab Cakes
Clam Strips
Deviled Crab
Country Style Steak
Fried Chicken
Served With 2 Vegetables
Or French Fries & Slaw
Price Includes Beverage & 1 ax
Choice Of $3 m 50
1 item
Choice Of $4 A A
2 items "�V
Choice Of $4 50
3 items
Cold Boiled Shrimp
O � Jf D Large TT � f J
Smali
Take-outs Welcome
Sandwiches
BBQ Beef
BBQ Pork
Chicken Salad
Tuna Salad
Egg Salad
Fish Sandwich
�1.99
Served on White or
Whole Wheat Bread
Side Order
Vegetable
75
Served With
French Fries
2 pc Chicken Bag
3 Hushpuppies
�1.50
11-2 P.M. Mondav-Friday
tj
Banquet Facilities Available
DINNER MENU
Hours: 6:00 P.MlOiOO P.M. DAILY
I
Welcome to Riverside Steak Bar. We offer to you a unique din-
ing experience. We expect the worlds greatest chefs to gather in
our restaurant, because here you are the chef!
We offer two (2) cuts of meatsthe"BuHV cut. which will be se-
lected by you from the glass-front cooler; and the Cow's" cut
which will be delivered to you at your table.
All dinners include all the Salad. Potatoes, and Bread you care to
eat Enjoy yourself at Riverside Steak Bar
Menu
We serve USDA Choice Beef that is always fresh and cut daily
Bulls Cut10.95
Filet Mignon 112 oz)
New York btnp (16 oz)
T-Bone (24 oz)
Sirloin (22 oz)
Rib Eye (16 oz)
Includes all the Salad. Baked Potatoes, dim Bread you want
SALAD BAR & POTATO BAR ONLY '5.00
, split one of our Bull's Cut Steaks, there will be a $5 00 charge for the
SaladPotatoandBread wm mmmmmmm
Cow's Cut8.95
T Bone (14 oz)
Sirloin (16 oz)
Rib Eye (12 oz.)
Filet Mignon (8 oz)
New York Strip (12 oz)
Includes all the Salad, Baked Potatoes, and Bread you want.
Beverages
ALL ABC Permits
Soft Drinks65
Iced Tea - Coffee55
Greenville's Unique Dining Experience
710 North Greene Street, Greenville, N.C.
752-0090
Take-outs
Welcomed
Hours:
Sunday-Thursday
11:00 A.M9:00 P.M.
Friday 11.00 A.M10:00 P.M.
Saturday 4:00 P M10:00 P.M.
DINNER SPECIALS
Fisherman's Platter
Select 3 Items
Of Your Choice
Shrimp
Flounder
Trout
Crab Cakes
Deviled Crab
Steamed Shrimp
Clam Strips
Steamed Crab Legs
Shrimp Creole
(Ffi. & Sat Only)
Oysters
Scallops
Catfish
Barbeque
Fried Chicken
s5.50
Steamed
Oysters
$8.00
$4.75
Peck
1 -2 peck
Steamed
Oysters
Served
5.00 P.M.
Til Closing
Oysters On
12 Shell
$3.50
Captain's Platter
Select 4 Items
Of Your Choice
Shrimp
Flounder
Trout
Crab Cakes
Deviled Crab
Steamed Shrimp
Clam Strips
Steamed Crab Legs
Shrimp Creole
(Fri. & Sat. Only)
Oysters
Scallops
Catfish
Barbeque
Fried Chicken
Doz.
$
6.50
All You Can Eat
Extravaganza
Fried Chicken
Fried Shrimp
Crab Cakes
Clam Strips
Trout
Fried Oysters
Flounder
Deviled Crab
Barbeque
Fried Catfish
Shrimp Creole
(Fri. & Sat. Only)
$
7.50
With Alaskan
Crab Legs
$9.50
Soft Shell
Crabs
2 Large Crabs
2 Vegetables
$A95
6
Steamed
Shrimp
1 Lb
In The Sr
Baked Potato
& Sal.d
$A99
6
Steamed
Seafood Feast
Alaskan Crab Legs
Steamed Shrimp
Sauteed Crabmeat
Baked Potato
Salad
$"795
7
Super LUNCH Specials
Thursday Only
Hickory Smoked
Texas Style
Barbeque Beef
$099
2 Vegetables Jr
Served
11:00-
2:00 P.M.
Tuesday Only
BBQ Ribs
2 Vegetables O.jU
Vegetable Plate:
Choice Of Four Vegetables
s3.35
Includes Beverage & Tax
Catfish
Nuggets
$3.35
lnc
ies Beverage & Tax
Wednesday Only
Chicken & Pastry
2 Vegetables O. jD
Meats and Seafood
Shrimp
Trout
Oysters
Deviled Crabs
Crab Cakes
Clam Strips
Flounder
Fried Chicken
BBQ Chicken
Country Style Steak
Veal Cutlets
Hamburger Steak
Barbeque Dinner
Catfish
CHOICE OF
1 Meat &
2 Vegetables
Only
$Q35
3
Includes Tax
& Beverage
Vegetables
Beets
Slaw
Boiled Potatoes
Potato Salad
French Fries
Yams
Black-eyed Peas
Collards
Rice
Mashed Potatoes
String Beans
Applesauce
Brunswick Stew
Cabbage
Steamed
Shrimp
(6 0z)
In The Shell
With 2 Vegetables
$Q50
3
Alaskan
Crab Legs
With 2 Vegetables
$O50
3
Steamed
Seafood Feast
Includes Crab Legs
(6 Oz )
Sauteed Crab Meat
(2 0z )
Ik Steamed Shrimp
S150
4
5 0z.
Rib Eye
$375
SEAFOOD DELIGHT: Choice Of Three Seafoods. Shrimp. Oysters, Clam
Strips, Trout, Flounder, Crab Cakes, Deviled Crabs. Bay Scallops & Catfish Nug-
95 $3.99
2 piece Chicken Bags s1.50
BBQ Sandwich s1.35
Chicken Sandwich $1.35
Fish Sandwich
$
1.35
.TSWBBTKBn
��





FEBRUARY 4, 1986
Page 8
Resident Artist
Content In Program
Artist-in-Residenee Michele Amateau adds a brush stroke to one
of her paintings, a selection of which will be on display at Gray
By TONY RUMPLE - ECU Ntwi Bureau
(.alien this month along with work bv Nade Hale and Dennis
(obb.
Artist To Install At Gray
i a r�.B
Nade Haley, a teacher at the
Rhode Island School of Design
will be at ECU Feb. 3-8 as part of
the School of Art's visiting artist
program.
Haley will spend the week do-
ing an installation with the help
of students in the ar: school's
Gray Gallery. Today. she will
present slides o' her work at 7:30
p.m. in Jenkins Auditorium.
School of Art.
In addition, a reception will be
held for Haley on Saturday from
7:30 until 9:30 p.m. in Grav Art
Gallery. The public is invited to
attend both functions.
Haley describes hermit as a
"post minimal constructionist
She received a BFA from the
Atlanta College of Art and an
M F A in sculpture from
Washington University. She has
taught in Washington, DC. as
part of the Smithsonian! Resident
Associate Program, and in
Maryland at Montgomery Col-
lege, Rockville and Takoma Park
campuses.
She has conducted slide lec-
tures and symposia at the Min-
neapolis College of Art and
Design
Penns)
School
Galler
DC.
Haley is represented b Diane
Swarthmore College.
vania, and the Corcoran
o Art and Corcoran
of Art in Washington,
Brown Gallery in New York City.
She has numerous solo exhibi-
tions and commissioned installa-
tions to her credit. She recently-
participated in a performance in-
stallai ion for A
s
s
s
Disappearance a collaboration
with Akim Novak and Wendy
Woodson, Washington. DC,
Project for the Arts.
Other commissioned installa-
tions include "Ascention for
the Southeastern Center for Con-
temporar) Art, Winston-Salem,
and "Key Bridge The Mac-
Dowell Colony Inc Peter-
borough, NH.
In 1983 Haley was awarded a
MacDowell Colony Fellowship.
In 1980 and again in 1982 she
received a National Endowment
for the Arts Individual
Fellowship Grant.
Haley's isit is funded by the
NC Arts Council and the Na-
tional Endowment for the Arts.
For more information, contact
Blanche Monroe at 756336.
1 l Nr�i Bureau
Oil painter Michele Amateau
turned down a similar offer at a
school located only an hour-and-
a-half from her home in Texas to
come to ECU this semester as
artist-in-residencc in the School
of Art. Although she would have
to be separated from her husband
and wouldn't save as much
money, Amateau chose ECU.
"The other job didn't sound as
interesting as this on Amateau
said. "And I decided this would
be a good opportunity to be on
the East Coast again because I'm
from New York
Amateau was also anxious to
work with Dr. Edward Levine,
art school dean, whom she had
met earlier. "In large part it was
because of Ed that I came here
Amateau said. "I respect him
tremendously. He's a very bright
and skilled administrator and ar-
tist
Amateau, who is teaching two
painting classes at ECU, says the
visiting artist program is "fan-
tastic both for the students and
herself. "Artists come here, and
they have all sorts of energy and
all sorts of new attitudes and
ideas, and they don't have
preconceptions about who
they're dealing with Amateau
said.
From a personal standpoint,
the program allows her to teach
only when she wants to. "It gives
me the opportunity to work tor
longer stretches of time just on
my own pieces Amateau said
"And I love to travel � you're
able to go and be in a new situa-
tion and pick up new stimulation.
I come to my teaching with a cer-
tain amount of energy because I
don't do it all the time
Amateau admits that she
teaches only when she and her
husband, a sculptor and part-
time instructor, need the money.
"He brings in our steady income,
and I bring the income to get ma-
jor things done she said "We
need to build a larger studio
This is the first year Amateau
has accepted two positions aw
from home: last semester she
taught at the University
orado at Boulder. "Usually 1 .
only for a semester somewhere,
and sometimes it's only a t�
hour drive from where I live
she said. "It's a nice kind of a
thing to do, but as I get older it
gets harder
Amateau, who is Spat
Turkish and Greek, says the
primary source of her work
the past 15 years has beer,
wall paintings found in Fg
Crete and Rome. "Through the
influences of the Oriental rugs
that we had all over the I
the painted pottery, and tl
� feta cheese, olive oil a
lemon, grap leaves � somehow
all of that has formed a verv
strong indentification that I have
with the Mediterranean world
she said.
A selection of Amatc �
tings and drawings will open
a 7:30 p.m. reception a1 Gray,
Gallery in the Jenkins 1 ' r
Center, on Saturday.
In addition, Amateau will pre-
sent a lecture in Jen-
Auditorium on Monday, 1 I
at 7:30 pm. "I'll be talk g
my work and the sources I
work n ate . i
Also opening on Saturda
be shows by tw ilptoi
Nade Haley, a teacher at
Rhode Island Scl Desij
and Dennis obb, a I
graduate of EO bb w I pre-
sent a lecture in Je -
Auditorium a; 7:30 p.m. on Feb
24. All events are free a
the public.
Gray Gallery i rn 10
a.m. until 5 p.m Monday
through Saturday, and unti -
p.m. on Wednesdays
will remain on view thro
March 7.
Nade Haley's work will be displayed in Gray gallery
Premiere Film Re-premieres
! C1 St�. Ht�
The re-premiere oi a locally-
made all-black-cast jazz film
revue, Pitch a Boogie Hoogie,
has been scheduled for Saturday
night at ECU's Hendrix Theatre.
Noted jazz saxophonist Lou
Donaldson, a member of the
Rhythm Vets when the band of
Navy veterans recorded the film's
soundtrack in 1947, is returning
to Greenville for the screening,
along with a dozen other per-
formers who appeared in the
film.
ECU faculty member Alex
Albright, who arranged for the
vintage film's restoration bv the
American Film Institute,
some of the returning .as:
members have never seen the
finished film.
See THIS 1. page 10
An Alternative Approach To Medicine
By JAY STONE
Managing hriltor
When I got to Doctor James
Massey's farm, two hours late
with dusk falling fast along with
a light rain, I had begun to ques-
tion my own sanity. What was I
doing far from home in the mid-
dle of nowhere interviewing a
man I had never met about a sub-
ject that most of the readers of
The East Carolinian had never
heard of? But after finding the
good doctor clearing land with a
small chainsaw and talking with
him while we walked around the
rest of his 70 acre farm the
doubts that I had been harboring
were dispelled.
Jim Massey didn't start out to
be a doctor of Naturopathy. In
fact, in the early 1960's he went
to the University of South
Carolina to play basketball for Al
MacGuire, but after being
greeted by something short of
southern hospitality because of
his north-eastern origins he
decided to transfer to the Univer-
sity of Maryland and major in ac-
counting. After school he served
a short hitch in Vietnam and then
went to West Germany. It was
during this time that Jim sent his
father some money to invest in
land in the Raleigh-Durham
triangle for him. As a result of
that deal Massey ultimately
migrated to North Carolina after
growing disenchanted with his
future in insurance, the vocation
he had gone into after being
discharged from the service.
Upon moving to Carolina with
little more than the $6,000 he had
garnered from selling a 1973 Cor-
vette he owned, Jim began to
work on clearing his land and
building a home for himself and
his first wife. But he soon realiz-
ed that he would need some
source of steady income. So, with
most of the money he had left, he
opened a health food store in
Durham.
Though his health food store
proved to be a phenomenal suc-
cess, Massey was soon having
problems with his marriage.
After a separation he left for
Oregon to put some distance bet-
ween him and his first wife and,
at the suggestion of one of the
employees at his health food
store, to attend the National Col-
legeof Naturopathic Medicine in
Portland.
That was, he says, one of the
best decisions he ever made in his
life, for it was there that he met
Karen, the woman to whom he is
now married. Five years later, he
found himself back in North
Carolina running a naturopathic
practice out of Chapel Hill.
According to Jim,
naturopathic medicine is a
holistic approach to healing
which focuses on interaction bet-
ween the body, mind and spirit of
an individual and on the in-
dividual's interaction with his or
her environment. It assumes that
health is not just a physical state,
but also has mental and emotional
components. The naturopath sees
disease not simply as a response
to a disease-inducing agent such
as a virus, but a breakdown of
the resistance of the body to
disease. Hence, naturopathic
treatment tends to rely less upon
pharmaceutical drugs and
surgery than upon nourishing the
depleted system and strengthen-
ing its own defenses.
In his practice, Jim Massey
employs a variety of therapeutic
techniques from many different
disciplines. He uses homeopathic
remedies which are based upon
the idea that a remedy can cure a
disease if it produces symptoms
similar to those of the disease in a
healthy organism. This idea
underlies many current
treatments for diseases such as
small pox vaccinations. Massey
also makes use of acupuncture,
herbal extracts, therapeutic exer-
cizes, chiropractic techniques,
hydrotherapy and even
psychological counseling.
The reason for the varied ap-
proach to treating patients? Ac-
cording to Massey, different pa-
tients with different problems
don't always respond to the same
treatments, though the same
basic principles are involved in
treating them all. Naturopathic
remedies, he stresses, work.
"Botanical medicines, for ex-
ample, work, and they work
without all the side effects of the
drugs that the medical profession
prescribes
Massey talks about cases that
he has had in which more
established therapies were not
yielding results and his methods
met with success.
"1 had one case, a 21 year old
girl who was a manic depressive
on lithium. 1 put her on
L-Phenyialanine and now she's
healthy, off drugs and enrolled at
UNC hading a happy, active
life
He adds that there are many
diseases that conventional
medicine has a poor track record
with, such as AIDS .cancer and
schizophrenia, that naturopathic
principles might offer some hope
for. Massey says that there has
been work in Portland with AIDS
patients which focused on
boosting the immune system us-
ing zinc, vitamin C and thymus.
"Diseases like herpes and
AIDS Massey alleges, "are
prevalent partly because our im-
mune systems are weakened from
repeated use of antibiotics, ex-
posure to pollution, excessive
drinking, cigarette smoking and a
variety of other poisons
But the good news, he says, is
that we don't have to treat
diseases like herpes, AIDS and
cancer simply as curses from God
that are hopelessly incurable. In-
stead, he suggests, they might be
seen as instructive catalysts for
personal and social change.
"Maybe AIDS will teach us
something Massey reasons,
"about the kind of society we
should build. People who have
AIDS arc not evil he adds,
"and they are not being punished
by God for being promiscuous,
but they might be weakening
their immune systems by smoking
and drinking too much. And our
society might be worsening the
whole problem by polluting the
air and people's drinking water
Despite Massey's criticism of
conventional or allopathic
medicine, he is quick to point out
its strong points.
"The hospitals are great for
crisis-oriented medicine, though
preventive medicine is not their
strong suit. But in cases where
naturopathic techniques don't
work I don't hesitate to refer a
patient to an M.D
Yet Massey contends that
allopathic medicine receives too
much emphasis and exerts an in-
ordinate amount of influence.
This is true, he says, because of
inescapable economic realities.
Like the fact that pharmaceutical
companies fund much of the
medical research that takes place
in the countrv.
"Duke does research on new
drugs Massey says, "and the
pharmaceutical company that
manufactures that drug gives
Duke the money to do the
research
Massey maintains that it is
largely because of the influence
of the allopathic medical
establishment and a lack of fun-
ding that naturopathic medicine
is not more accepted today. In
concrete terms what this means
for him is that he doesn't have a
license to practice medicine in
North Carolina.
Though in Oregon and seven
other states there are licenses for
certified naturopaths, there is no
such state licensing of
naturopathy in North Carolina.
What this means, Massey says, is
that anyone, regardless of
whether he has formal training or
not, may call himself a
naturopath and treat people.

Uooneshurv
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN H BRl ARY 4, 1986 9
Artist
Program
We


awa
t KS
day
-
premieres
?� IHIn IS, pane 10
dicme
nev
and the
npany that
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monev to do the
tor
fch
ieir
re
ir't
a
la;
too
in-
Md dins that it is
the influence
the allopathic medical
nment and a lack of fun-
ding that naturopathic medicine
is n re accepted today. In
crete terms what this means
for him is that he doesn't have a
license to practice medicine in
North Carolina.
Though in Oregon and seven
other states there are licenses for
certified naturopaths, there is no
such state licensing of
naturopathy in North Carolina.
What this means, Massey says, is
that anyone, regardless of
whether he has formal training or
not, may call himself a
naturopath and treat people.
Ooonesbury
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
H0NEi?GETiN
HERE I CAN'T
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PAMN' WHAT ISlTlAJI m
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BLOOM COUNTY
by Berke Breathed
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s

Hey Wait � John Madden Wrote A Book
tm i
By Greg Anderson
Sl�n Wrtlfr
From the sidelines to the
typewriter, America's most
boisterous and animated football
genius has finally collected his in-
sight and antics on the printed
page. After the highs and lows oi
an illustrious career of coaching
in the National Football league,
John Madden has compiled his
memorable moments into an
entertaining autobiography.
Hey. Wait a Minute (I Wrote a
Hook! offers a kaleidoscopic
view o' Madden's football fer-
vor, off-the-field adventures and
any lifestyle. With the help of
sports columnist Dave Anderson,
the former NFL coach shares his
stories of life in the pros.
Rekindling the excitement and
emotion of his coaching days, the
author relives his early years on
up to his Super Bowl champion-
ship.
Madden's career began in 1960
a; an assistant coach at Hancock
Junior College. He later spent
three vears at San Diego State as
a defensive coordinator. In 1967,
with an opening in the Oakland
Raiders organization, Al Davis
hired Madden as his linebacker
c iti I wo years later his dream
came true when he became the
Raiders' head coach. For the next
ten years he was to become the
winningesi coach in professional
football. as well as the most ag-
iive. I he autobiography ex-
plains the key to his success � he
did it his way.
He). li ait a Minute (I H rote a
Hook!) is a collage of events in
� coach John Madden.
The chapters follow no real
ological order, yet
mehow piece together the ex-
citing career ol pro football's
st successful coach. Hundreds
� : antes are given of friends,
players, and coaches who mi one
wa : another influenced the
an:hot. Madden writes in a loose
� national style, rambling
tale, ottering behind-
sccne facts o his life in foot-
ball. His biggest games, his
greatest players, and even stories
of his Lite beer commercials are
all part of his collective work.
Describing them as only he could,
Madden paints a portrait of the
personalities that made up his
championship Raider team His
colorful remembrances seem only
limited by the pages of his book
Madden's strength and
weakness are both found in his
loose, casual style. His conversa-
tional manner flows well and is
very readable. However, his style
often causes him to wander ofl
on several pages of dull trivia
His opening chapters seem to
fumble around, and one wonders
if Madden really has anything to
say at all. Other than his account
of the Jack Talum Darrvl
Stingley accident, the coach starts
by going nowhere tast. The bits
and pieces offered on his per
sonal background provide some
explanation for his "haywire"
structure. Madden is simply a
coach � not a writer Yet here
lies the popularity o this enter-
taining work. The sports en-
thusiast and football fan can get
the behind-thecene story
straight from the horse's mouth
For those sports fans who en-
joy sorting through tangents of
trivia and feel at home with Mad-
den's style of storytelling, Hey,
Wait a Minute is quite a work of
entertainment. For those in-
terested in the life of a profes-
sional football coach, Hey, Wait
a Minute is some great first-hand
information. Lastly, for those re-
maining who are interested in
none of the above, Madden's
book is boring at best. However,
regardless of personal taste, the
reader must certainly applaud
Madden for his accomplishments
during his years as a professional
coach.
S TL DEN T OPPOR TUNI TIES
We are looking for girls in-
terested in being counselors �
activity instructors in a private
virls camp located in Hender-
son ville, NC. Instructors need-
ed especially in Swimming
tUSh, Horseback riding. Ten-
nis. Backpacking, Archery,
Canoeing, Gymnastics, (rafts.
Also. Basketball, Computers,
Drama, Nature study, Field
Hockey, fj your school offers a
Summer Internship program,
we will be glad to help. In-
quiries: Morgan Havnes. P.O.
Box 400-C, Trvon, NC, 28782.
University Optometric Eye Clinic
DR. DENNIS O'NEAL
Comprehensive Eye Exammafions
Contact Lenses
Soft, Hard, das Permeable Tinted
Extended Hear, Contacts tor Astigmatism
Glasses tOne Dm Service in Most C usesy
Student & Faculty Discounts on Contacts &
Classes
Convenient to Campus
Evening & Sal Appointments Available

612 E. 10th Street
(Across from campus security)
758-6600







Eastern Carolina Fitness Center
Aerobics












Bring in this coupon and get three months of
aerobics for only $25.00. This offer is limited to the J
first 100 people.
Eastern Carolina Fitness Center
Formerly Nautilus
1002 South Evans Street
758-9584
"Where Winners Train"









i
Rush
Tuesday, February 4
Jones Cafeteria 7:30-11:00
Eor more info or rides C all 7- m or 752-5149
-






10
1 HI EAST -K l IN1AN
I I UK;
This Is "Pitch A Boogie Woogie Week

Continued from page K
Made in Greenville foui
decades ago and original!) in
tended to circulate national!) as a
musical featurette for black au
diences, Pitch a Hngit u
oogie
By Students
Poetry
Beginning � h this issut
Features Depot
weekly j poem by an ECL
dent in the Styh sei � Thi
Easi at inian. This is
por unity foi �
at the Rebel. , � wen
rejected by American Poetry
Review, or simpt wt r, mifft .
when the ea � � he Atlantic
r t to ba -
ur out"
(he politico, r, �, -( . . a
� Submit
rP l " Hree at a timt
it tfo FfiC( � The
East
he inaugura
"fou' � ' by Ellu
Reit
America Gone Bad
we always
e amei ; .
we arc all bi
we are a! sistet -
we dri- but a n
we arc imm i ta
ue a . me
we are

we I
we ire
e came to a ca
we can :
we came :� .ea
we didn't n
ue die a
we dissent
we elect a presid
we few, we happj few
was li
when its prodiu
the booking i.
te .i few
Carolinas,
dete
torg I
in the ;
theatre a
makei s, lohi W �
ville
Lord ol V
the
Saturday evening re
miere will include not only
- ol the newly restored
tilm, but also performances b
Donaldson and the reunited
't the Rhythm V
ds ol Rocky Mount.
I homas iavin, alto sax and
' iones, trombone, both
n layetteville; and from
Waltei Carlson,
. lehovah Guy, drums
( ai i 1 osier. piano I error
saxophonist Raymond Pettiford
also lives in Greensboro and mas
attend the screening but is unable
to play now, AJbright said.
I rumpetei Otto Harris ol
Vsheville died earlier tins month.
Mso appearing on the film
program will he the ECl i
C hou, an award winning tout .
group ol E( I studei
Pianist fnomasofield ol
Mouni will open the program a
with an inform;
jazz pie
I he Saturday film s i
held in conjum ti m w
hibition ol still phi
� at the Greenvilh M
t rhe
"Boogie V
White In.
m ivei n
Pitt h
Womet
CAA H

l i
i M
a H
H
"t'i
PRt( t ! I
SUN f I
SAT FEB
A& P IN
I - K.
r MS v
OR WH
W R i
M
QUA.
HPBUUKEr WITH
WAUIHOUSI- PRICES
11 IlliJP AillS StToBTonthe � MS you want most �
wall" wall price reductions
S win
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Week Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality:
o u r

we gathei ti igether
we have a gospel
we have a pope
v,e have . . iway
e hae always lived it
castle
we have tomorrow
e hae joined the
v�e live to be free
we live with our eyes open
we mainline dreams
we saw it happen
we shook 'he family tree
we speak no treason
we stood alone
e take this child
we that are left
we the accused
we the bereaved
we the citizens
we trie peo
we took to
we took to the wo
we touch the sky
we wanted to be tree
we went thataway
we were there
we wuz robbed
Ellie Reinhold
DIET PEPSI-PEPSI FREE
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Purex leach
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Chunk Light Tuna
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REAMSTYLI RWH I � KERNEL CORN OR
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Process & Print
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From 110, 126. J5mm or
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(re 2VCMi$l 49dev ch (reg S2 98)
Example 24 exp tilm reji Ss� i
NOW $4.97!
Carolina East Mall
(North Entrance - Sear Belk's)
756-6078
OPF.N MOV-SAT.
8 AM lo 9 PM
limit one roll per coupon
N ' .�lid with other offers
Green
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Round Top Bread
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Kl I'iralt � i,r
Uilel to defeat th I nth: I





Week

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VANT MOST
IN GREENVILLE.
is. Bring Current
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FRESH
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PEN SUNDAYS 7" til 11
I HI- EASTCARCH 1NIAN
Sports
H-BRl.AKY 4. ivx
Hajie I
Women Escape In
CAA Win Over A U
B MM C HAN 1)1.KR
Sport Vinif,
I he 1 ad Pirates escaped
urdav Might with a 73-56 win
American University in
ges c oiiseum.
rhe final score was in no way
-a;no ol the closeness of the
le With 2:09 to go in the
e, the Pirates only held a
ree-point lead at 59-56.
nerican than went cold from
floor and the Pirates shot a
itionaJ 12 of 12 from the
throw line in that span.
first half of the game prov
� be I lie Alma Bethea show a
sophomore center poured in
I her game-high 21 points in
all Bethea got the Pirates
. scoring nine o the team's
13 points. Her three-point
with 13:04 left in the first
: put the Pirates in front, and
e nevei trailed again after
d Coach Emily Manwanng
ented on Bethea's outstan-
performance. "Our game
was not to go to Alma
ed Manwanng. "She was a
on mark as to how she
perform. Againsi .lames
Madison she had no rebounds
Senior guard Lorraine Foster,
who returned to action after be-
ing out for a week because of an
injury, poured in 20 points.
Foster played 33 minutes, even
though she didn't start.
Coach Manwaring said that
Foster only practiced Thursday
and Friday. "She was the missing
ingredient at James Madison
stated Manwaring. "She gives the
team confidence, and helps take
some of the pressure off
Following Bethea and Foster in
scoring was Sylvia Bragg with 16,
Lisa Squirewell with eight and a
team-high 11 rebounds. Also
scoring for the Pirates were
Delphine Mabry with six and
Monique Pompili added two.
The Pirates held a tremendous
advantage on the backboards as
they outrebounded the Lady
Eagles 41-25.
Shooting percentage also went
the Bucs' way as they shot 49.1
percent from the floor while
American shot 40.3 percent.
The next game for the Lady
Pirates will be Saturday when
they travel to Richmond. Va to
battle the Lady Spiders.
Tracksters Slowed
At George Mason
IIMll! I � S- ihr tax �x.linian
Lisa Squirewell (31) scores inside in F( I 's 73-56 vin Saturda night.
Swimmers Dunk Blue Devils
H l)W IDMcGINNESS
.s�n! Sport r dttor
e ECU Pirate tankers re-
:d from their deteat at the
� I N( -Chapel Hill last
;sda with a resounding
's), 65-4h- (women's)
,ei another ACC opponent.
I ni ei sit 1 he win came
Saturday at Duke's own
:entei. in Durham. NC.
kei coach Rick Kobe was
than pleased with the per-
ance f both his men's and
omen's teams.
"1 keep saving this said
Kobe, "bin once again, this was
ur finest meet this ear. These
ids just keep getting taster and
tster
I he Pirates dominated the
en's events completely, winning
� oul ol 10 swimming events
both doing events. The
nen, while not dominating
� Duke opponents, still per-
d well enough to have the
� sewn up with one event left
e competition.
With the win, the Bucs now
a three-ear winning streak
Duke, and the margin ofvic-
gets larger each year.
Pirates' overall record this
now moves to 19-5. their
ever. The former record was
ins in one season.
Pirates now come down to
final meet o' the season.
Inesday at 4:00 p.m. against
mond University at Rich-
J. Should they win there, it
their first 20-win season in
c school's 'listory.
Although the Pirates have been
� :ing right through their
ets, and will continue to prac-
Monday and Tuesday, they
iw iess than two weeks from
leir conference tournament in
Wilmington. In preparation for
that event, they are gradually
tapering the yardage and dura-
tion o their workouts, so as to
build up to their peak energy
levels near or at tournament time.
Coach Kobe does not expect
the Richmond men's team to pro-
ve troublesome for his men. But
according to Kobe, "Their girls
could be tough, it will be a
challenging meet tor them
UNC Men's Results:
400 M Relav: UNC (Stevenson,
M cGeough, Johnston,
Himebaugh) 3:33.82.
1000 Free: Killeen (EC)
9:48.65; Hamilton (UNC)
9:55 Wilson (UNC) 10:13.66.
200 Free: Williams (UNC)
1:44.91; Fuller (UNO 1:46.61;
Stratton (UNC) 1:46.78.
50 Free: Himebauch (UNO
22.32; Fleming (EC) 22.72;
Stecher (UNC) 22.79.
400 LM: Brockschmidt (EC)
4:08.57; Meekelnburg (UNC)
4:17.63; Brennan (EC) 4:19.71.
1 M Diving: Hunter (UNC)
181.0; Gasse (UNC) 179.4;
Durkin (EC) 177.7.
100 Fly: Stevenson (UNC)
50.69; Johnston (UNC) 53.08;
Hidalgo (EC) 53.5.
100 Free: Kaut (EC) 49.11;
Meekelnburg (UNC) 49.11;
Stecher (UNC) 49.42.
100 Back: Williams (UNC)
54.49; Brockschmidt (EC) 54.63;
Himebouch (UNC) 57.24.
500 Free: Stratler (UNC)
4:44.97; Killeen (EC) 4:45.41;
Hamilton (UNC) 4:48.51.
3 M Diving: Gasse (UNC)
202.4; Scott (UNC) 197.60;
Durkin (EC) 179.15.
100 Breast: Williams (UNC)
1:01.62: 2nd place tie - Hicks and
Fleming (EC) 1:02.02.
400 FR: INC (Hinebauch,
Winston, Stecher, Meekelnburg)
3:13.89.
UNC Women's Results:
200 MR: INC (Stroupe,
Williams, Montford, Powers)
1:54.64.
1000 Free: Beauie (LtNC)
10:38.61: Miller (EC) 10:56.77;
Wentink (EC) 11:30.59.
200 Free: Pritchard (UN I
1:58.97; Durstein (UNC) 2:00.10;
Pierson (EC) 2:01.06.
50 Free: Stroupe (I NC) 25.72;
W instead (EC) 26.17; 1 tvingston
(EC) 27.78.
400 LM: Stroupe (UNC) 4:41.6;
O'Connor (UNC) 4:45.55: Pousl
(EC) 4:50.87.
1 M Diving: Schmidt (I NC)
162.95; Campbell (EC) 161.0;
Went (UNO 160.75.
100 Fly: Pierson (EC) 1:01.52:
Montford (UNC) 1:01.76;
Stroupe (UNC) 1:01.97.
100 Free: Stroupe (UNC)
55.31; Wentink (EC) 58.28;
Wilson (EC) 58.99.
100 Back: Powers (UNC)
1:01.45; Poust (EC) 1:02.9 Liv-
ingston (EC) 1:04.34
500 Free: Beattie (UNC)
5:08.41; Durskin (UNC) 5:14.62;
Miller (EC) 5:25.33.
3 M Diving: Schmidt (UNC)
269.5; Wentz (UNC) 261.15;
Campbell (EC) 159.85.
100 Breast: Wentink (EC)
1:10.75; Williams (UNC) 1:11.1;
Stroupe (UNC) 1:11.97.
200 FR: UNC (Pritchard,
O'Connor, Beattie, Powers)
1:42.49.
See SWIMMING, page 13
Sports Fact
I ht sports staff will present an
interesting sports fact in each edi-
tion of The East Carolinian on
fht corresponding da) oj which
. t nt : � k plat e
2 4 C4
Terr) McDermott, a barber
from Michigan, pulls off a
tremendous upset when he wins
the 500-meter speed-skating gold
medal at the Innsbruck Olym-
pics. l"o make the scenario even
more implausible, McDermott
wins the race on borrowed skates.
By RICK MeCORMAC
M 1 Sports Informal.n
The ECU track team en
countered some bad luck this
weekend, as they competed in the
George Mason Invitational in
Fairfax, Va.
Due to illness, neither Julian
Anderson nor Craig White were
able to make the trip. The ranks
of the Pirates were thinned even
further as Chris Brooks and
Eugene McNeill were both in-
jured during the meet.
Lee Vernon McNeill did com
pete for the Pirates, and he
finished in third place of the
55-meter dash with a time of 6.20
seconds. Herb Daniels and Sam
Graddy, both o' Tennessee,
finished first and second with
times tif 6.19 and 6.20 respective
ly. The race was not without con-
troversy however, as a number of
competitors thought that Daniels
had false started coming out ol
the blocks.
"Lee (McNeill) let up because
he thought it was a false start
ECU coach Bill Carson said.
"Daniels was right beside him
(McNeill) and I think that ef-
fected Lee more than anyone
else. It was a shame, because
everybody was really expecting
an exciting race
I ee McNeill's younger brother
(Eugene) had his best meet of the
young season before being in-
jured He finished fifth in the 55
meters with a time o 6.42
seconds. The younger McNeill
would have probably been in the
6.3 second range had he nol in-
jured his hamstring during the
race. McNeill (Eugene) is ex
pected too miss at least two weeks
with the injury.
Ruben Pierce was the only
other Pirate to place, finishing in
fifth place in the quarter mile
with a time of 48.SO. Coach Car-
son was pleased with Pierce's ;
formance, as the win
was 47.89, and Pierce wa
with the eventual winner, bel
fading 10 yards from the Fmi
Brooks went down in
quarter mile when I
cramped up and gave
as he was negotiating a cut
"Chris (Brook
hard fall or he w
qualified tor the natii inal
son said. "His lef
long to handle these ' .
this is the second
this has happened. v
mg to run him in an
door meet- except m lybe
son because they ha
track
Due to all
son has decided :
the number oi ind
1U will participa
will now ci imj -
weeks instead oi we � �
trv
door season.
"We're beat
and we just iren'i
much progess as 1 w
Carson said. "W
not worry al
now and get inti
"1 he team
things arei 'i � ei �
a he c .i
there's nothinj
We're ha
and we're nol a i
right now
will be 1 eb 14 �
pete in the W a
New York, N
"We're just -
-ee w hal e i I
��� irk hard tl ese
and get in shape (
"I've done Th
every two weeks) and -
ed. hopefullv h � ill worl
Bucs Win Three Straight CAA's
Midshipmen Dump Pirates
444 444 444 �U .44 4i. 444 44
f ' v.
JIM LEI TCENS -TkcEM
ECU Pirate swimmers try to edge out their UNC opponents as the starting gun fires. Although the Pirates
failed to defeat the Tarheels, they did pick up a big win over another ACC power, Duke University.
B scon COOPER
Sporta I diior
Vern Butler's 26 points paced
the Midshipmen to a 71-56 AA
win over the ECU Pirates last
nigh1 in nnapolis, Md.
Navy, who has won 4" o their
last 50 home games, improved
their record to 17-4 overall and
8-1 in conference pla
Kylor Whitaker was Navy's se-
cond leading scorer with 16 while
all-CAA performer David Robin-
son was held to just 1 1.
Although the final score may
have indicated a one-sided con-
test. ECU hung close throughout.
The Pirates did not shoot well,
however, connecting on just 36.8
percent o their field goals while
Navy threw in 54.5 o their at-
tempts.
"I thought we played hard
ECU coach Charlie Harrison
said, "but we were too anxious
when we got behind.
"We got inside, but we didn't
get a lot out ol it Harrison add-
ed. "We didn't score sometimes
when we had a chance to, while
they shot well and didn't make
many mistakes
The Pirates played well in the
first half as they stayed with a
tough Navy team. The Bucs'
defensive effort kept them close.
After Navy built as much as a
seven-point lead, ECU steadily
came back as a Curt Vanderhorst
follow shot cut the Midshipmen
lead to 21-16 with 6:15 left in the
first period.
Both squads matched baskets
over the next few minutes. The
Pirates' Marchell Henry, who
had 12 first-half points, then nail-
ed a turnaround jumper off the
glass, cutting the Navy lead to
29-28 before the halftime buzzer.
The second half action saw-
Navy come out and outscore the
Bucs 20-8 over the first 13
minutes. This included a eight-
point scoring run from the 15:40
mark, resulting in a 47-36 lead
for the Middies with 9:10 remain-
ing to play. From this point,
ECU went into a full-court press,
which saw Navy break the
pressure and get some easy
baskets.
Robinson fouled out with 4:49
left, but the Navy advantage was
too much for the Bucs to catch as
the Midshipmen went on to win
71-56.
Despite the loss. ECU played
well particularlv on the defensive
end of the court, according to
assistant coach Lee falbot.
Marchell Henry
"Overall we're pleased
Talbot said. "When we stuck to
our game plan, we were fine �
but there's still room for im-
provement
Other Bue scorers were
Vanderhorst with 12 points,
Keith Sledge added 10 while Scott
Hardy chipped in eight.
Sat. Feb. 1, 1986
For the first time since being a
part of the ECAC South con-
ference (currently the Colonial
Athletic Association), ECU has
been victorious in three con-
secutive conference meetings.
After defeating both George
Mason (75-67) and James
Madison (51-48) at home, the
Pirates topped American Univer-
sity 65-63 on the road in Alexan-
dria, Va Saturday night. This
gives the Bucs a 5-3 conference
mark with a respectable 10-9
overall record.
The Pirates were led by junior
forward Marchell Henry's 23
points and 10 rebounds. Curt
Vanderhorst, who snarred nine
rebounds, connected on five of
eight field goals and was six of six
from the line for 16 points. Leon
Bass hit seven of nine free throws
to finish with 13 points and 10
boards.
With the Eagles committing 31
fouls, it wa- no w � �
spent
the charit) sti ;pe V
the Bucs made 2 �
ten: pis.
ECU opened art
let thai go - Xme-
trol with as much as a 14-
advantage (22-8) with 9:25
the opening halt.
The Pirates showed tl
however, as the) slowly climb
back. Jack Turnbill, nl
saw one minute of action, ink a
turnaround jumper just be'
the half, giving rhe Bucs a
lead at tntermissioi
Lhe second half saw the Pirates
take control as they built as m
as a nine-point lead (51-42) mid-
way through the second half. It
was the Eagles turn to retalial
they chopped the I (1 lead
His! two, 5-s with 3 291
the game.
After a Henry lav up inc i
the Pirate advantage to 62 c
Mike Sampson brougl
Eagles to within three (62 59)
with just under a minute rema
ing.
American was able to cut I
lead to two late in the game
After Keith Sledge hit vine of two
free throws. Pat Witting scored
to trim the Pirate lead to 63-61 It
was Vanderhorst's free throws
with :10 seconds left that lifted
the Bucs to their third .
secutive CAA victory, 6 M
"Our shots wouldn't fall and
they (Al) were breaking oiv (in
the first half) ECU coach
Charlie Harrison said, "but our
kids kept to the boards and show
ed a lot of heart and that's the
way you win games on the road
Chuck West led American with
23 points as Frank Ross had 14
and Witting scored 10.
The Pirates will finish their
three-game road trip Wednesday
night when they battle Wake
Forest. ECU will then return to
Minges Coliseum Saturday even-
ing for a big showdown with the
CAA league-leading Richmond
Spiders.

� I 1 �





12
I Ml I AM t AKOI IM N
ft BRUARY4, 1986

Karr, ECU Need
Continued from pane one
"Before the bowl games, 1
the Iowa coach, Hayden
talking about Penn State's
Kan said in a recent
erview. "He was saying they
didn't deserve to be No. 1
ause the) played people like
lie and East Carolina and
Ken Karr
it's exposure. Ten
'ne even mentioned
a n 'ha: level. Of
� foi them to sa.
e LOST to. Last
In NSC we gained
' recognition, and
re aiming tor in
mort s at stake here
ill program or
W e have a
dv.d medical
� identity. too
tposure � tha
� eason Kai i sets
most of the
games at
ai tune -o that
el up The Sews
Sunda morning
n in (ireenville,
any column in-
I a game
he -aid. "With a
i couple ot
v ireenville edi-
� : i oi tant to what
we're trying to do to have those
column inches, those photos in
the papet. To ignore that is not
good management. A school can
gain so much identity through its
athletic program. N.C. State's
basketball championship in 1983
gained so much positive exposure
for the university as a whole.
"That's why we must work at
our image, to be a class act.
That's why we can't take a step
back Karr said.
That's why the Ficklen seats
must go up.
"Ideally, we'd like to have it in
place by the 1989 season � the
earliest we can have that in
place Karr added.
Although the stadium expan-
sion may be a class act, ECU's
football record for the past two
seasons has not been. As the
Pirates struggled through back-
to-back 2-9 seasons as a major in-
dependent, a question was posed
many times: Can ECU afford to
stay at I-A, or would it be better
off dropping back a notch to
I-AA?
"I really think the cost of do-
ing business is virtually the same
in both said Karr, the ECU
athletic director since 1980. "The
difference at I-AA is you have
approximately 20 fewer scholar-
ships, perhaps one less coach.
But the shoulder pads and
helmets cost the same. The same
expense is there.
"1 think East Carolina must
match ECU's will with a way.
And he will do it under the wat-
chful eyes of administrators such
as Mooi?, who keep a firm grip
on the purse strings of the
17-sport, $3.8 million athletic
program that has been hit in the
past with deficits of nearly
$600,000.
ECU's financial resources are
limited, Karr acknowledged.
"There are a number of pro-
grams in the country that average
75,000 in football he said.
"They have plenty of fat in their
total budget, but we do not have
that luxury. Some conferences,
such as the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference, have such a tailwind
from outstanding marketing
jobs, basketball TV, now foot-
ball TV. We don't.
"They don't have to gear their
decisions to how many tickets are
going to be sold. But we do. We
don't have that golden parachute
the ACC schools have
At ECU, the latest audit
figures available (for the year
that ended June 30, 1985) show
football providing more than
$1.1 million in ticker receipts and
guarantees, and the Pirate Club
raising $600,000, an increase of
$135,000 from the previous year.
Basketball was the biggest finan-
cial loser, with more than
$200,000 in red ink. though the
athletic program now has an
overall surplus of more than
SI 64,000.
fVe can be successful, but we'll have to maintain
a successful stance, and our constituency will very
much determine where we're going to be
�Ken Karr
maintain an aggressive stance and
set its sights on continuing in I-A.
At this part of our development,
that's what most of our consti-
tuency wants. The reason we get
stronger every year is because
they are committed to us reaching
the goal of being solidly in I-A
"But to truly go after the best,
they must come on-board for the
long haul. They must have stay-
ing power
And if East Carolina is to hold
fast to Division I-A and be suc-
cessful, it will be Karr who must
TV offerx no windfall, not for
ECU. Karr said the Bucs should
pocket about $130.000 as part of
the College Football
Association's football package
next year � "not the whole loaf,
but better than not having the
crust
But there will be no reduction
in the number of sports or severe
budget cutbacks in the next vear,
Karr promised.
"Actually, the real question is
not whether we can afford to stay
I-A, but whether we can afford
IRS Swim Meet Registration
your mark . . .
missed out on last
meet regisua-
have time to enter.
The IRS Word
By
Jeannette Roth
:heduled for Feb. 4
stponed On the week
7, the Department ot
� e reational Services
again offer all in-
raternities, sororities,
ice halls and independents
pportunitv to take part in
special event. Be sure
e balcony of Memorial
1 eb. IS tor the man-
� captains' meeting.
ig begins at 6:00 p.m.
til w you to officially
event. To find our
.ion and to pick up
ti at ion packet, come by
� Memorial Gym.
Department of
Recreational Services
thei sport swimming up
Water-basketball
' ion doses Feb. 6.
is the newest sport on the
activity calendar and pro-
mis he one of the most
trious events of the semester.
1 ,r all you interested in earning a
k participation points in-
cluded m the point system, be
ster this week. You
ube your way into the
i
intramural record books as the
first intramural water-basketball
champions.
Are you considered armed and
dangerous? You can be if you
enter this month's arm wrestling
action in Memorial Gym. Spon-
sored by Budweiser, the annual
arm wrestling tournament offers
a variety of weight classes in both
the men's and women's divisions.
Anyone can enter and will
automatically receive a free in-
tramural t-shirt.
Registration will be held this
week in room 204 Memorial
Gym. Pick up your information
packet and practice slamming
your roommate around for the
tournament!
Co-rec bowling, basketball and
racquetball doubles are in play at
the present. Upsets are not only
attacking the ACC powers lately.
In the women's league, top-
ranked Enforcers were shocked
into their first loss at the hands of
Full Force. Other surprise vic-
tories are sure to come about this
season.
Be sure to pick up your copy of
Tennis Shoe Tidbits next week. If
you've missed out on the Depart-
ment of Intramural-Recreational
Services bi-monthly publication,
you've missed out on a variety of
activities, services and programs
made just for your � the stu-
dent.
The Tennis Shoe Talkshow, a
bi-weekly program airs each
Tuesday and Thursday at 2:30
and 5:30 on 91.3 FM WZMB. All
the latest activity deadlines,
highlights and interviews are
COUPON
presented by host Stephanie
Luke. Tune us in!
Iks HOURS
SWIM' n�. POOLS
Memorial ooj
M-W-F 7an8a.m.
M-F 12 No 1:30p.m.
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MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
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3 p.m4:45 p.m.
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�4:45-10 based on availability
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Valentines week starts
February 9 so send early
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not to said Moore, a member
of ECU's Board of Trustees and
its Athletics Council.
Look at our (financial)
statements. Basketball is break-
ing our back, costing us about
what we get from one of those big
payday (football) games at
Auburn or LSU. Our booster
club is doing a decent job of rais-
ing money now, but it still
doesn't cover our scholarship
costs ($750,000).
"But if we drop down to I-AA,
how much will our people con-
tribute? And would they come to
see us play? Even if we were 9-2
and shooting for the (I-AA) na-
tional championship every year,
look at the I-AA crowds. If their
alumni and fans are so loyal, why
are the crowds so small?"
The NCAA News recently
reported that the average football
attendance nationally at I-A was
41.915 for 1985, a slight dip from
the 42,548 mean of '84. But the
I-AA average was just 10,961.
"An unusual thing Karr
said, "is that even with a losing
season, our average home atten-
dance still was up 4,500 a game
for 1985 (to almost 32,000). I
guess I use signs like that for
making the generalization that I
think our hard-core (fans) are
making an investment on a long-
range basis
But how strong is their resolve?
How long do they keep pulling
out the wallet with the football
team taking three-touchdown
poundings?
Next year, ECU will play West
Virginia, Auburn, Penn State,
South Carolina and Miami,
among others. Future years offer
more of the same. Can ECU fans
stomach many 2-9 seasons?
"That's hard to say Moore
said. "It's also kinda hard to tell
someone. "We'll be good in 7-8
years; just have faith
"We have some hard-core peo-
ple who love the Purple and
Gold. As long a.$ we struggle
along, whipping a good team
every once in a while, it seems to
sustain them for another year.
But to stay in I-A, you've got to
play at least eight I-A teams, and
where do you find eight you can
beat? Yes sir, it's a big problem
For Karr, the immediate goal is
to reach a breakthrough level of
6-5. then shoot higher. And he
recognizes all the trouble spots.
si'ch as the need for an increased
recruiting budget and Proposi-
tion 48, the NCAA freshman
eligibility standard for Divison-I
schools that should shrink the
pool of recruitable athletes. The
UNC System also has recom-
mended limiting the number of
academic exceptions for athletes
"First, we must get to a
scheduling standpoint where
we're 6-5 against the people we
line up against Karr said
"Then, we need to reach the
point where we're 6-5, we're 6-5,
we're 6-5. At that point, you have
begun to stabilize and have a base
to build on, then go after 7-4, an
occasional 8-3 and maybe luck in-
to 9-2.
"That is somewhere out there
in the future for us. Maybe it's
not realistic to say it'll be next
year or two years from now, but
our short-term goal is to get to
the 6-5 position as quickly as we
can. We must give our people
something to hang their hats on
� to show we're gaining, no ma'
ter how slow, but we're gaining
And it ECU continues to lose.
season after season karr con-
cedes some tough decisions will
be necessary if the Pirates "reach
the point of diminishing returns"
in terms of generating dollars
"There's no wa you cat
pect people to do things with mir
rors he said. "You have
make reasonable resoui
available to them
That means the faithful II
must continue to give �
patient.
"We can he successful h
said, "but we'll have to m i
a successful stance, and our ,
stituency will very much deter
mine where we're going to be
years from now. as it should I
"You're either gonna I
support position or not in a
port position
And be prepared to fi
M),(XX) seats on Saturday
1989.
See For Yourself
on All Frames, Sunglasses,
and Contact Lenses. .
Everyday.
Now that at two tooBoa torn Ha � tfkmt - . ��. r�
tamatevcrydq vmt �-60 6 reguta retai � h
i:yr Sir ji rtte Pfao. and Pic Eye jr-aid a fe i pai n�
In ilfl�r esc rvdnundu�, ur mfaktk n the I are Coaa
"s- fl"��� nxrvvtr. Call fa cva ban
rr Hoa,
OROMC7WC
�E CARE 0�K1�R
For rramr Srlrvtion and Eye Examinations
l.irrntiltr Blvd I I ipton nrw,
Phone Sfe-sCKM
Dr rVlrr Hollis
O.D
l�.A.
Hamp SBAFAma
&
CAMP COUNSELING� for those who love children. Sea Gull and
Seafarer are character and health development camps on the coast of orth
Carolina serving children ages 7-16. Recruiting staff for sailing, motorboating
aquatics, golf, tennis, riflery, archery, canoeing, basketball, lacross soccer
nature studies, arts and crafts, nursing, office, food services and horseback riding
(Seafarer only). Qualifications: interest in children, abilitv to instruct one phase
of the camps' programs and excellent references. For further information write to
Don Cheek, Director, Camp Sea Gull (Boys) or to Judv Bright, Director Camp
Seafarer (Girls), P.O. Box 10976, Raleigh, orth Carolina 27605.
Representatives will be at
Camp Day
February 11, 1986
Get your body ready for Spring Break
with our Fantastic February Special
We have: Six Aerobic Classes Daily, AII New Free Weic
Machines, Yoga Classes, TANNING BOOTH, Hot Tub, Sauna
and Steamroom, 2 Beverage and Beer Bars, Pressing Rooms,
Lockers, Showers and Live Entertainment every weekend
Aerobic Clou SchadtiW
Monday 10 15 315 4 30 5 45 7 00 800
Tuesday 10 15 3 15 4 30 545 700 800
Wednesdoy 10 15 3:15 430 545 7 00 8 00
Thursdoy 10 15 3 15 430 545 7 00 800
Friday 10 15 430
Saturday 11 00
Sunday 300
Monday-Friday
Saturday
Sunday
1000 am-9 00 pm
1000 am-7-00 pm
100 pm-600 pm
DOWNTOWN
FtRESTATION
LJGREENE ST
OPEN PARKING AREA
HOME AUTO .
NC CAR TAGS D
SOUTH PITT ST
2
8

o
Dgoooyear
JOHNS
UVttSAl NUB HIAITM CtUi HARDWARE
�It SOOTH PTTT ST
Bring this ad by for a free visit to the club for you and a friend
Classifi
PERSONALS
ROSES Sena a
special Bo. Feto 4
12 Only $4.50 ea
tie siste
Store
TO JSW -
Thank you
m, life, ar
Happie Annversa
CDf
LAYSCHIP '
been 'he N
from Day On
rose ;ove ,
ADTT s rhank .
your hosp ra I
Suppor'
LOv- . M
SPRING BREAK
BAHAMAS 1 �
nights, ro-
to Nassau Bea- �
Jenni ?s SO �
SPRING BREAK ME)
CRUISE'
Me -
tips oratu � es r
ALL RESPECTABLE rOUN
LADIES
ma s �
Our spr nq - ,
p.n
Oent Ce
GRATEFUL DEAD FANS
DacK Deac -�
available at A
sure
Records
ZBT RUSH
you ca
gooa time a
abou' Tuesda
Undergrour
LITTLE SISTER RUSH
have ts Lil' S s1
from 7:30-11 00 a f�
n Mend
BETA KAPPA S �
sse soc a with trw
Chi's It was a Das
pledges rhe c v-
SALF
WORD PROCESSING
perience m typ,ng resi
techmcai documents and
papers vVe a-age a
names ana addresses
letters, labels, envelopes oi
cards. Our prices are extre-
reasonable and we always offe-
percent discount to ECU studen's S
& F Professona Computer
sack of Fran rt's 115 e
3472.
MOBILE HOME FOR SAlE
Ee'a d IsieN iew :� t I
and souna Across e sr- �
" e Emerald sle Fishing
Aa'er a c, par a furn s
or oest offer ac assume a
SENIORS! SENIORS' SENIORS
Enjoy the :as cas
career emDicyme s&p
puters is otferng a pacKag
help you send ouf your resumes
eluding all of the � wing eer
quality typea resumes. Ma ergec
cover letters name anc aaaress of
each company as ns.de ma ig ac
dress on ieter Lette'qua ,Ded
envelopes with coca acoress
and you- return address
envelope. Everyh,ng fciaec stut
and even stamped A sting �
panies sent to (for your follow �ds
Just brmg us your nanc wr I
resume and cover :eter anc the
businesses you a th c ace . to ac
we'll do the resf Per resume for
your names ador we stuff $2.30
(min 10 resumes �ve stuff ac
stamp) Si 90 2 page resume pnees
slightly highe Tn,s offer aDso'w'e
ly expires Marc 15 198 S&F Com
purer Company 115 East Fifth S
Greenville NC 27834 757 0
TYPING SERVICES: Sues
term papers eses Low -aes
Spelling and graatca correc
tions mcludeo Cindy 757 0398 ai
5 30 pm
CHEAP TYPING Report etc Ca
758 6011 and leave a message
FOR RENT "rwo room ap? for-en
Call 752 7212 or 75 01 "4
HOUSE REDUCED 5 bedroom
near university 305 E 14th S'
Available immed ateIy $390
758 5299
FOR SALE 1979 Cutlass Da"ti Biue
with vmyi top Great depenoabe
car $3,200 or pest offer Ca
830 1140
TYPING AND RESEARCH SER
VICES: Call Nancie at 355 7502
(leave message! or 752 3916 MF
8 305 30
HOUSE FOR RENT Near universi
ty. 2602 Tryon Dr 3 bedrooms, living
room, den, large eating area
Available immediately $420
7585299
FOR SALE: 3 ft refndgerator $100
negotiable. Call 758 8019
WORD PROCESSING: Contact
BECKY LATHAM 752 5998 (8 am 5
p.m.) 17 yrs. experience in typing
theses, scientific reports,
manuscripts, business and form let
ters
FOR RENT: Apartment in A unit of
Ringgold Towers $250 per month
Call 637 6885





I Ml
V I ' k IM S
IIHKl CW
13
Success
i

� t HI
anr.trier,
Classifieds
PERSONALS
. $�� �
� �
Ain � . & itioi
II
� v �.
.�
i
S 1�

� �
BREAK IN THE
H A V A S




BREAK MEXICAN
. '
s
N .�.

RESPECTABLE YOUNG
ES T

1
FATEFUL DEAD FANS







.� �� .
iR BUS"
KAI
MASSAGE CLINIC $1 per 10
�� massage Sponsored by H U
ipy Club Partial pro
� ,s i eb -i
F irsl tioor Belk Bldg
Passages g sr P t
students
FOR SAt E: Ui Fi ame, Sub-
components spe ialized
t- it ha Ion qr ade $450 NAD
n S900 Call 758 6784
HOUSE FOR RENT I
m ap � i N( � Univer
$350 i- itn Far' ly
� nts 757
ENTERTAINMENT PROVIDED
D J cru in the galax�
il bead rock
. � � , � RASHMAN
mytin
EXUBERANCE I1 J besl
town . l � � �� musii ' -

-� N a1 ?52 3587
NEED A DJ'
�. , For the I
lop 40, b � a
v � � 7 30
rates F

FOR SALE
Vink I
FOR SALE
E ��
GMAT
'
WANTED
CABIN COUNSELORS &INSTRUC
TORS
SALE
MOBILE HOME FOR SALE
SENIORS' SENIORS'


-
f the f
i
-
.
ettei
r t a '� � api
lo ti � ' '
t.
�� � ' AC �- �' ' I
page re!
1 � s rffer abs
h 15, 1986 S&F C
115 East F iftl
27834 757 -
P I N G SERVICES R
'ates
d gram- correc
. led �. .398 after
HEAP TYPING 9eP ' Call
.age
FORRENT ta
52 7212 'St f

'
NATIONAL COLLEGE
VARKETING COMPANY

� students ana
- ' - it 1 80C . .
SUMMER JOBS FOR COLLEGE
STUDENTS . �
� ��
REB N THI
� � - .
No
- .
at te Cami
� �
P O
PERSON WANTED For full or
part time sales work in men's store
Must be fashion conscious of men's
wear and enjoy working with the
public Fxpenence preferred Good
hourly salary and ability to earn
� mission Apply at Brody's for
�Men The Plaza Mnn Fn , 25p.m.
ROOMMATE WANTED To share 2
bedroom apt at Eastbrook For
more into call 752 4270
Swimming Results Vs. Duke
JdTS
;rt,s
AD ASSISTANT NEEDED Brod
has a position open In their Adve
mg Department for a full time assis
tant Ad lay out visual display, and
personal organization are a plus Ap
pl Brodys The Piaza Monday
( ontinued liom pane II M) Free Winstead (E I 2t 6i (DK) c
R (gei, (DK) 2 99; Mi P � Ba - ��
Hidalgo (EC) 1:58.02; Maxwell (fc (26.72
(DK) 2:02.47. 200 IM. lebe (DK) 2 14 )6
100 Free Kaul (EC) 48.39; Pousl (EC) 2:17.57 G
Swedenborg (DK) 48.86; Pidl (EC) 2:20.17
(DK) 49.72 1 M Diving Campbell (E I
200 Back Brockschmidt (EC) 213.08; (DK) 203.03;
1:58.01; Horgan (DK) 2:00.91; Poff (EC) 2:01.53
Smith (EC) 2:06.97.
I . 16
ivingston (E I 2 IK
43.
�Free Rogers HJki' 21 99
Miller (Ec 22 � H
' 27 90
M Diving i �
221 25; ampbel! (EC) �
200 1 � Keough (DK) 2 1. Pofi F IS" -
Friday
DESPERATELY NEEDED: Tutor
tor Chem 1120 Call after 5 pm and
ask or Jodi 758 9223
HELP WANTED Waters &
Wa tresses needed Flexible hours
working with school schedule To
work lunches (2 per week), nights
and weekends Apply at Green
Country Club �23pm
Tuesday Friday
ROOMMATE WANTED A C
dii'a laundry room, cable
$130 ' t,es $123.33
� I
Valentine's Day love
Lines will be published
on Feb. 13, at a cost of
SI per 25 words for
students. Remember
your sweetheart this
Valentine's Day.
Deadline is lues. Feb.
11, at 5:00 p.m.
500 Free: Killeen (EC) 4:46.36 Augustus 1 2:17.42; SI
Buerger (DK) 4:51.57; Landis (DK) 2:17.65
(DK) 4:5.62. 100 Free P (EC) 5(
Wii il i c' 92; Sa �
3 M Diving Durkin (E I
230 03; Stevens (E i 207 01.
200 Breast Hicks (E( )
2:12.90; Van Steven (DK)
2:14.2; Brennan (E2 15 66
4ixi IK: Dl Kl (Swedenborg,
Pibl. Horgan, Buerger) 3 15 43
Duke Women's Results:
4ixi MR HI (Poust, Wentik,
igustus, W instead) 4:09.51.
1000 1 i ee Millei 11 ! !
4 12, Keough (DK) 10 lJ '
Hi rton (EC) 11 08 35
1 : ee (EC)
2:00 79; Wallace (DK) .
Sacketi (DK) 2:04.42.
200 Breast Jebe (DK) 2 30 20.
Wentinl (EC) 2:32.77 1 ni
'Ii 2:35 44
� �Ik Dl Ki c' �
HOUSE REDUCED
305
5 bedr
E Utl
FOR SALE
$390
iss Dar Blue
top Great dependable
or best offei
.1
TYPING AND RESEARCH SER
VICES Ca Nancie at 355 7502
a ,� r 752 3916 M F
I 5 30
HOUSE FOR RENT Near universi
602TryonDr 3 bedrooms, I'vmg
len, large eating area
Available immediately $420
'58 5299
FOR SALE 3 ft refridgerator $100
liable CaM 758 8019
WORD PROCESSING: Contact
BECKY LATHAM 752 5998 (8a m 5
Dm17 yrs experience in typing
ses, scientific reports,
manusrr.pts, business and form let
ters
FOR RENT: Apartment in A unit of
Rnggold Towers $250 per month
Call 637 6885
DON'T
BE LEFT
THE COLD!
CENTRAL BREAK
RESERVATIONS
USA A HAWAII
1 800-321-5911
COLORADO )C -(X
1-800-321-5912 �
� , � i IS ret �"�� ' �' ��
Special Rush Editior
Vol. 2
u

CONTENTS
TRADITION, HERITAGE,
ATHLETICS, ACADEMCS, PRIDE
j
OLDEST AND MOST FRESTIGjOUS
FRATERNITY ON CAMPUS'
,p
WHERE SOUTHERN BELLES ARE
SURE TO BE FOUND
I

FEB. 3, 4
RUSH
"Be a part of it"
752-1005 j





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 4, 1986
13
Success
show we - low,ng, no mat .aiinng
1ro lose,
Kan con
Us will
- reach
eturns
lars
can ex
nir
� have to
sources
. 1 v I
and be
Karr
,i main
deter-
be five
d be.
in a
a SUp-
� 11 up
. ome
Yourself
es. Sunglasses,
d Lenses. . .
ciav.
aHPER
( Sea Gull and
coast oj orth
iiiliru motorboating,
net ball, lacross, soccer.
er nd horseback riding
Hit) to instruct one phase
further information write to
ud Bright, Director, Camp
arolina 27605.
8
e Weights and
Hot Tub, Sauna
ismg Rooms,
iweekend
" � ' ON
GREENE ST
Z
OPEN PARKING AREA
HOME AUTO ��.
NC CAR TAGS Lj
SOUTH PITT ST
Dgooovear
j D PHONE s rj v
f ' JOHN'S
UNfVIKSAl MUi HtALTM CLUi HARDWARE
�!� SOUTH fTTT ST
tb for you and a friend.
Classifieds
PERSONALS
ROSES Send a rose to someone
special Buy them Feb. 4, 5, 10, 11,
12 Only $4 50 each from the ZBT lit
tie sister table in front of the Student
Store
TO JSW: You are my inspiration!
T hank you for the BEST two years of
my life, and here's to MANY more.
nappy Anniversary I LOVE YOU!
CDK
LAY'S CHIP: This is a bust! You've
oeen the Natural Light of my life
from "Day One Thanks for the
rose Love ya severely. Peanut.
ADTT'S: Thank you so much for
.our hospitality Friday night. Your
support is greatly appreciated!
Love. The New Sorority.
SPRING BREAK IN THE
BAHAMAS: S289 includes 6 days. 5
mghts, round trip flight from Miami
to Nassau, Beachfront Accommoda
�ions, nightly cocktail parties, more!
Jenni 756 5078 or Angela 758 9540.
SPRING BREAK MEXICAN
CRUISE 5 nights, 6 days cruising
Mexican isles. Only $445 includes
tips � gratuities. CALL NOW! Not
many spots left! 758 0074 or 752 3178
ALL RESPECTABLE YOUNG
LADIES: The sorors of Sigma Gam
ma Rho would like to invite you to
our spring rush on Feb. 5, 1986 at 7
p.m. in room 221 Mendenhall Stu
aent Center.
GRATEFUL DEAD FANS: RTU is
back! Dead tickets will soon be
available at Apple Records. To be
sure of your place on the bus, leave
your name and number at Apple
Records
ZBT RUSH: Why join the rest, when
you can join the best! Come have a
good time and see what we are ah
about. Tuesday 7:30 11.00 at the
underground in Mendenhall.
LITTLE SISTER RUSH: ZBT will
have its Lil' Sister Rush, Tuesday
from 7.30-11:00 at the underground
m Mendenhall Come join the fun!
BETA KAPPA'S: Thanks for the
surprise social with the Lambda
Chi's it was a blast "We love you
pledges The Sisters of Alpha Xi
MASSAGE CLINIC: $1 per 10
minute massage. Sponsored by ECU
Physical Therapy Club. Partial pro
ceeds to go to charities. Feb. 4
6:30-10 p.m. First floor Belk Bldg.
Massages given by Jr. and Sr. P.T.
students.
FOR SALE: Univega Frame, Sun
tour Components, specialized
wheels. Triathalon grade, $450. NAD
Stereo system, $900. Call 758 6784.
HOUSE FOR RENT: 2 bedrooms, 1
bath with appliances Near Univer
sity $350 per month Family or
female students. 757 1798
ENTERTAINMENT PROVIDED:
D.J. cheapest rates in the galaxy,
the choice in funk, rap, beach, rock
and oldies! Contact the TRASHMAN
at 752 3587 anytime.
EXUBERANCE: D.J. best rates in
town. All types of music, funk,
beach, rock, the whole nine yards.
Contact the TRASHMAN at 752 3587
NEED A D.J.?: Are you having a
party and need a D.J? For the best
in top 40, beach and dance, call
Morgan at 758 7967 between 5 7:30
p.m. Reasonable rates References
on request.
FOR SALE: 1) Blue sheared long
rabbit fur coat size 8. 2) Black seal
fur cape size 10. 3) Mink boa, and
assorted party purses. Call 756 8549
and leave a message.
FOR SALE: One lazy boy recliner in
good condition, $50 and one
decorative mirror $10. Both items
negotiable. Also, wall mirror very
large. Come by after 3 MWF and
930 T-Th. 38 River Bluff Dr Green
ville.
GMAT: Improve your score 12 hour
prep course in Greenville Feb. 13,
20, 27, March 6. Call 756 2751
Register by Feb. 9.
PERSON WANTED: For full or
part-time sales work in men's store.
Must be fashion conscious of men's
wear and enjoy working with the
public. Experience preferred. Good
hourly salary and ability to earn
commission. Apply at Brody's for
Men. The Plaza, MonFri 2 5 p.m.
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 2
bedroom apt. at Eastbrook. For
more info, call 752 4270.
WANTED
SALE
WORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
perience in typing resumes, theses,
technical documents, and term
papers We manage and merge your
names and addresses into merged
letters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards. Our prices are extremely
reasonable and we always offer a 1�
percent discount to ECU students. S
& F Professional Computer Co.
(back of Franklin's) 115 E. 5th St.
757 0472
MOBILE HOME FOR SALE:
Emerald isle NC. View of both ocean
and sound Across the street from
the Emerald Isle Fishing Pier
Water, ac, partial furnishing. $750
or best offer and assume land lease.
SENIORS! SENIORS! SENIORS
Enjoy the last phase of our college
career employment. S8.F Com-
puters is offering a package price to
help you send out your resumes in-
cluding all of the following: Letter
quality typed resumes, Mail merged
cover letters (name and address of
each company as inside mailing ad
dress on letter), Lette' quality typed
envelopes with company address
and your return address on
envelope, Everything folded, stuffed
and even stamped, A listing of com-
panies sent to (for your follow ups).
Just bring us your hand-written
resume and cover letter and the
businesses you with to apply to and
we'll do the rest. Per resume for
your namesaddr (we stuff) $2.30
(min 10 resumes) (we stuff and
stamp) $1.90 (2 page resume prices
slightly higher). This offer absolute
ly expires March 15, 1986 S&F Com
puter Company, 115 East Fifth St
Greenville, N.C. 27834 757 0472.
TYPING SERVICES: Resumes,
term papers, theses. Low rates.
Spelling and grammatical correc-
tions included. Cindy 757 0398 after
5:30 p.m.
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc. Call
758 6011 and leave a message
FOR RENT: Two room apt for rent.
Call 752 7212 or 7560174.
HOUSE REDUCED. 5 bedroom,
near university, 305 E 14th St.
Available immediately. $390.
758 5299
FOR SALE: 1979 Cutlass. Dark Blue
with vinyl top. Great dependable
car $3,200 or best offer. Call
830 1140
TYPING AND RESEARCH SER-
VICES: Call Nancie at 355 7502
(leave message) or 752 3916 M F
8:305:30.
HOUSE FOR RENT: Near universi-
ty. 2602 Tryon Dr. 3 bedrooms, living
room, den, large eating area.
Available immediately. $420.
7585299.
FOR SALE: 3 ft. refridgerator. $100
negotiable. Call 758-8019.
WORD PROCESSING: Contact
BECKY LATHAM- 752 5998 (8 a.m. 5
p.m.) 17 yrs. experience in typing
theses, scientific reports,
manuscripts, business and form let
ters.
FOR RENT: Apartment in A-unit of
Ringgoid Towers. $250 per month.
Call 637 6885.
MARCH
B 1-8 0 15-22
0 8-15 0 22-29
CONDO OR MOTEL LOOGING
PARTIES I GOODIE BAGS . MORE'
AD-ASSISTANT NEEDED: Brody
has a position open in their Advertis
ing Department for a full time assis
tant. Ad lay out, visual display, ano
personal organization are a plus. Ap
(ply, Brodys The Plaza. Monday
tFriday
DESPERATELY NEEDED: Tutor
for Chem. 1120. Call after 5 p.m. and
ask for Jodi. 758 9223.
HELP WANTED: Waiters 8.
Waitresses needed. Flexible hours
working with school schedule. To
work lunches (2 per week), nights
and weekends. Apply at Greenville
Country Club between 2-3 p.m.
Tuesday Friday.
ROOMMATE WANTED: AC, pool,
tennis, sauna, laundry room, cable
$130mo. � V3 utilities. $123.33
deposit. 752 2341.
CABIN COUNSELORS & INSTRUC
TORS: Male and Female for
western N.C. 8 week children's sum-
mer camp. Over 30 activities in
eluding Water Ski, Tennis, Heated
swimming pool, Go-Karts, Hiking,
Art. room, meals, salary and
travel. Experience not necessary.
Non smoking students write for ap
plicationbrochure: Camp
Pinewood. 19006 Bob O Link Dr
Miami, Florida 33015.
NATIONAL COLLEGE
MARKETING COMPANY: Seeks
individual or campus organization to
work Part time assisting students in
applying for credit cards Flexible
hours, excellent $, full training
Meet students and haje fun. Call
Sharon Grand at 1 800 592 2121
SUMMER JOBS FOR COLLEGE
STUDENTS: Openings available on
the Food Service Staff at CAMP
SEAFARER ON THE COAST OF
NORTH CAROLINA. Good salary
plus room and board. Excellent op
portunity for friends to work
together. June 8 through mid
August. Must be at least 18 years of
age. No experience necessary only
ambition and good references re
quired For more info, and an ap
plication, write: Camp Seafarer,
P.O. Box 10976, YMCA, Raleigh,
N.C. 27605.
Valentine's Day Love
Lines will be published
on Feb. 13, at a cost of
$1 per 25 words for
students. Remember
your sweetheart this
Valentine's Day.
Deadline is Tues. Feb.
11, at 5:00 p.m.
� �
Swimming Results Vs. Duke
Continued from page 11
Hidalgo (EC) 1:58.02; Maxwell
(DK) 2:02.47.
100 Free: Kaut (EC) 48.39;
Swedenborg (DK) 48.86; Pidl
(DK) 49.72.
200 Back: Brockschmidt (EC)
1:58.01; Horgan (DK) 2:00.91;
Smith (EC) 2:06.97.
500 Free: Killeen (EC) 4:46.36;
Buerger (DK) 4:51.57; Landis
(DK) 4:55.62.
3 M Diving: Durkin (EC)
230.03; Stevens (EC) 207.01.
200 Breast: Hicks (EC)
2:12.90; Van Steven (DK)
2:14.52; Brennan (EC) 2:15.66.
400 FR: DUKE (Swedenborg,
Pibl, Horgan, Buerger) 3:15.43.
Duke Women's Results:
400 MR: ECU (Poust, Wentik,
Augustus, Winstead) 4:09.51.
1000 Free: Miller (EC)
10:54.12; Keough (DK) 10:59.36;
Horton (EC) 11:08.35.
200 Free: Pierson (EC)
2:00.79; Wallace (DK) 2:04.28;
Sackett (DK) 2:04.42.
50 Free: Winstead (EC) 25.66;
Rogers (DK) 25.99; McPherson
(EC) 26.72.
200 1M: Jebe (DK) 2:14.36;
Poust (EC) 2:17.57; Gorenfio
(EC) 2:20.17.
1 M Diving: Campbell (EC)
213.08; Youngs (DK) 203.03;
Poff (EC) 2:01.53.
200 Fly: Keough (DK) 2:12.92;
Augustus (EC) 2:17.42; Shaw
(DK) 2:17.65.
100 Free: Pierson (EC) 56.22;
Winstead (EC) 56.92; Sackett
(DK) 57.92.
200 Back: Poust (EC) 2:15.06;
Livingston (EC) 2:18.71;
Johnson (DK) 2:21.43.
500 Free: Rogers (DK) 5:21.99;
Miller (EC) 5:22.03; Horton (EC)
5:27.90.
3 M Diving: Youngs (DK)
221.25; Campbell (EC) 197.03;
Poff (EC) 196.58.
200 Breast: Jebe (DK) 2:30.20;
Wentink (EC) 2:32.77; Ennis
(EC) 2:35.44.
400 FR: DUKE - 3:56.97.
LIFEGUARDS
The City of Greenville's Recreation and)
Parks is now accepting applications for Swim-
ming Instructors and Lifeguards. Full-time!
and part-time available. Applications may be
picked up at City Hall, West Fifth Street. For1
more information, contact Charles Williams,
752-4137, ext. 205.
Eating Is A Picnic . . .
at
special
ofGnrnvilli
The Princess
Chicken Salad Croissant $3.00
Baby Bear
Rare Roast Beef Baby Swiss Cheese $3.50
Aerobic Special
RaisinPumpkin Bread, Shaded Apples,
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205 E. Fifth Street
757-3636
Lunch: M-F 11:00-2:30
Dinner: W-Sat 5:30-1:00
Beer & Wine
Lr
CENTRAL BREAK
RESERVATIONS
USA & HAWAII
1 -800-321-5911 J&Z0
COLORADO e A
1-800-321-5912
or contact a local Sonchaae representative or your
local travel agency TODAY!
Special Rush Edition
Vol. 2 I
CONTENTS
TRADITION, HERITAS,
ATHLETICS, ACADEMCS, PRIDE
BH
OLDEST AND MOST FRESTIGIQUS
FRATERNITY ON CAMPUSNBL
jlHI
WHERE SOUTHERN BEL LES ARI
SURE TO BE FOUND
FEB. 3, 4
RUSH
'Be a part of it"
752-1005
J
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f- - - - -f 1 -v
n





14
I Ml I M t VKm INI AN
I I Ukl KS i 8
NBA's Hawks Seeking Success In 1985-86
NIA (l PI) The NBA
is hae never reallv caught
on i Atlanta in the l1 and-a-hall
ns since thej moved into the
east from St 1 ouis.
Ihev've had a couple of sue
seasons winning then
ii in 1970 and again a
le later But, basically,
e been a 500 basketball
with minimal fan interest
ilv token playofl success
're playing better ball this
than last, standing six
over .500 tat 26 20) aftei
the tit st stop (at New
, ol a nine game road ti ip,
interrupted bv the NBA
H game, won't see them
again until Feb. 21.
lat's whv it was important
w e won at home 1 n
v said Hawks scoring
. 28 ppg) and lone All Star
Dominique V ilk ins "We're
lo be on the road almost
ole month of February and
got to establish ourselves,
it we san.
very pleased with the way
on is laying said
"It reflects
1 thmk it we can l
to do that, keep our intensi
we'll go a long wav

himself, Wilkins, who
ished a reputation tor being
loj on offense and a sou
on defense, insists
ting to get respect ai
i sue
�pic are starting to res
ime more said s ilkins,
Simms Leads
FC To Pro
Bowl Win
'1 11 l (l PI) New
Giants quarterback
threw tor three
uchdowns, the last
maining, to rally the Na
ootball C onference u
� Bow! vid
merican C crc:
Simms, making his
n the Nat
tal I

. all-star ga I I5
Washington's t M
touchdown in the
and two yards i Dallas'
osbie early in the fourt I
� hen hit Jimmie Giles i
Bay with a 15-yard
strike to climax the NFC's
ick from a 24- halfi
its, who completed 15 ol
es tor 212 yards, got a I
lying time because NFC's
luarterback, Chicago's I m
hon, sat out the st
vIcMahon was forced out
tion after aggravating a
f.nee he suttered in the
� Bowl a week earlier.
FC capitalized on two
.hon mistakes to help build
halftime lead.
McMahon, one of the heroes in
tgo's 46-10 Super Bow
ig of New England, lost a
and threw an interception
Af-C scored 17 points in
minutes in the second
1 he I os Angeles Raiders' Mai
Allen, the NFL's n
ible player for the season,
buted to the AFC's first
uichdowns. Allen ran tor
� ards for one score and
a 51-yard scoring pass to
Diego's Wes Chandler tor
her.
�lerback LeRoy Irwin of
I os Angeles Rams, who made
pro bo il debut, was a stan-
for the NFC defense, with
nterceptions off AFC
irterback Dan Fouts ol San
Diego. Irwin preserved the vic-
� with his second thett, pick-
' a 1 outs pass in the NIC
one with one-and-a-half
rs remaining and the AFC
at the NFC 34-yard line.
NFC's other score came in
the second quarter on a 48-yard
interception return by Min-
nesota's Joey Browner, with
Fout� again the victim.
v '4 yard AFC field goal by
Pittsburgh's Gary Anderson
followed an interception o a
k.Mahon pass arid an 11-yard
1 I) pass from the New York Jets'
O'Brien to the Pittsburgh
iers' Louis Lipps came after
the recovery of McMahon's fum-
Die.
coop
his fourth NBA se ei lea and passing. When I do that, it
ing the I niversity ol Georgia makes mv offensive game
following his junioi yeai "They easier
know now it I don't have the shot
I can dish it of I to I he next guv
Ml around, 1 think I'm helping
mv team more bv rebounding
more, by playing bettei defense
Kev in Willis, a seven fool
second yeai performer out ol
Michigan Slate who is second to
Division as a three-team race K a complete collapse can keep
"Hopefully said Willis, "it Atlanta out ol this year1
we continue to play well, we'll be plavotts and they even have a de
on top and they'll have to chase cenl shot at a home court ad
us tage tor the opening round
With tour ot the 11 Eastern "When we
Wilkins among Hawks rebound Conference teams playing less we thought we could hav
leaders, sees the NBA Central than .400 ball, it appears that on team, but I couldn't pri
ild come I -
Hfwl Mike I r :�
- :
B 11 e re
: we'll live '
But ��� � -
USDA Choice Beef Round
Whole
Sirloin
Prices in this ad good thru
Sunday. February 9. 1986.
FOOD LION
Boneless Roast
We Reserve
The Right To
Limit Quantrtes
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White Potatoes
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I
USDA Choice Beef Chuck
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20 Lb. Bag
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Head
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DEL MONTE CATSUP
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Pkg. of 6 12 Oz Cans
2 Liter - Diet Coke. Caffeine Free Coke.
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15 Liter Chablis Blanc. Rhine. Pink Chablis.
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Great For Homemade Soup
1 Lb. - Keebler
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EXTRA LOW PRICES





Title
The East Carolinian, February 4, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 04, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.453
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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