The East Carolinian, January 30, 1986






�he
(Earolintan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No.3- '
Thursday. January 30, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 12,(KM)
Dump Sites Proposed In N.C.
(UPI) four proposed or
potential projects have some
North C arolina residents worried
the staic miaj supplant South
Carolina as a regional hazardous
and radioactive waste dumping
ground.
"Win is North Carolina being
bombarded with waste applica-
tions?" asked an angry Bladen
County resident at a recent public
hearing "Does the commercial
waste industry think we're easy
prey ?"
Two projects have created an
uproar in southeastern North
arolina a low-level radioac
live waste incinerator proposed
b I s Ecology for Bladen Coun-
ty, and a hazardous chemical
waste treatment facility propc
for a site near 1 aurinburg b
GSX, a Canadian company.
In addition, the state is an in-
voluntary candidate for the na-
tion's second high-level nuclear
waste repository � with a site
near Raleigh and a site near
Asheville still in the running.
Finally, the state is considered
a leading candidate to provide a
burial ground for low-level
radioactive waste for the eight-
state Southeastern Compact
Commission. Officials say that's
because North Carolina is cen-
trally located and a leading waste-
generator among the states.
"Right now. North Carolina is
in an interesting situation said
Linda 1 ittle, executive director of
the Governor's Waste Manage-
ment Board.
"We are a candidate for a
high-level radioactive waste
repository, and we are a can-
didate for a low level radioactive
waste disposal facility (to serve
the southeast).
"There are applications in the
Department of Human Resources
for a low-level radioactive waste
treatment facility (in Bladen
C ounty) and a hazardous waste
treatment facility (near I.aurin-
burg)
Besides those planned oi
potential projects, state
lawmakers have said disposal
facilities must be provided for
chemical waste generated by
North Carolina industry.
"The General Assembly has
directed the Hazardous Waste
Treatment Commission to make
sure there is adequate treatment
capacity in this state, even it they
have to go so tar as to find a site
and build a facility Little said.
"We're going to have to make
it possible for them to manage
their waste in a cost effective
way she said. Otherwise, "We
will suffer severe economic con-
sequences
North Carolina's new waste
woes are partly due to a stiff -
spmed stance on the part of
South (arolina leaders tired of
serving as the region's dumping
ground, officials say.
The Barnwell landfill in
Sumter County, SC, is scheduled
to close in 1992, meaning the
region must find a new low-level
radioactive waste disposal facility
� most likely a landfill. A deci-
sion by the Southeastern Com-
pact is expected by July � and
many observers say a North
( arolina sire could be selected.
Space Shuttle Challenger
Now Clean-Up Begins
JIM !J4T(.t Ns Ihr t.�l (. arohman
In Memorium
Today, in front of the Pitt County Courthouse the flags of our
nation and state fly at half-staff honoring the seven crew members
of the Space Shuttle Changeller.
Faculty Senate Votes
To Change Break
Bv PATTI KEMMIS
SUf f � rtlcr
ECU students will have to wait
two weeks longer than previously
scheduled to pack their bags and
head home for their 1986 Fall
Break.
During their meeting Tuesday,
the Faculty Senate Committee
agreed to change the 1986 Fall
Break from October 13 and 14 to
October 27 and 28. The proposal
to change came from the Student
Government Association, the
Homecoming Steering Commit-
tee, the Athletic Department and
the Alumni Association.
The original date of Fall Break
would fall in the same week as the
1986 Homecoming, which is
scheduled for October 18 and 19.
Because an earlier request to
move the date of Homecoming
was denied by the Athletic
Department, the SGA proposed
the compromise to move Fall
Break.
Kenneth Wilson, head of the
Faculty Senate Committee,
remarked, "If having Fall Break
later in the year is going to make
See SPRING Page 7.
( l'lV! RAI . Ra.
(I PI) light Coast Guard and
Navy searched 5,500 square
miles of the Atlantic Ocean to-
day rec vering debri � 10
feet long from the exploded space
shuttlehallengei
"We will search until dark
today and at tl nd I today's
search we will evaluate what's
been done said Cmdr. Jim
Simpson, a (. oast Guat d
kesman. "Each day's ac-
tiviti 11 depend on what's
bee before
He said me search area had
been extended from New Smyrna
Beach south to Vero Beach and
east into the ocean about 60
miles The range and area of the
search, was due to new discoveries
o! debris and the shifting of tides.
"What they will try to do to-
day is get wluit's floating before
it sinks Simpson said.
"Today they're making plans
to get divers and what equipment
they will need
Debris collected was impound-
ed and "held under lock and
kev" at Patrick ir Force Base to
be used bv investigators probing
disaster, an Air Force spokesman
said.
Aircraft in the search were
grounded before dusk Tuesday,
about six hours after Challenger bring it m individually
disintegrated in flames and Officials warned civilians not
smoke 2 seconds arc: launch, to handle anything washed up on
Ships remained in the search area beaches due o possible con
overnight, Simpson said, but lamination from hazardous
were forced to anchor tor fear of chemicals,
striking floating shuttle debris in
watei.
Recovery ettorts resumed at
davbreak, with eight Navy and
Guard ships and seven air-
craft searching tor clues to the
worst disaster in the history of
manned spa.e flight.
New Coast Guard cutters Point
Robert and Sweetgum and Navy
ship 1 S. Semmes joined the
Navy frigates U.S. Fitch and
U.S. L nderwood, destroyer U. S.
Sampson and Coast Guard cut-
ters Dallas and Dauntless.
A Navy P-3, two U.S. An
Force C-130s, one Coast Guard
C-130, two Coast Guard H-3
helicopters and one H 52
helicopter scanned the ocean tor
debris.
"There's plenty of debris out
there of different sizes and
shapes. The largest piece that 1
know they've recovered was 10
feet long Simpson said. "The
plans are to put the debris on a
barge and a Coast Guard buoy
and have them shuttle it in. rather
than have each of the eight ships
"There's been a tew tiles
found, actually pieces of tiles,
washed up on the beach south ot
Cape Canaveral said Air horce
Master Sgt. Charlie Miller, a
search operations spokesm i
The fatal moment Tuesday mor ning.
ECU'S Pirate Walk Sets Record, Observed By ASU, WSU
By CAROLYN DRISCOLL
Staff Wrtlcr
Recently, both Appalachian
State University and Western
Carolina University approached
Kurt Bubenhofer, director of
Pirate Walk, ECU's escort ser-
vice, for information so that they
could implement similar pro-
grams at their schools.
Last semester, Pirate Walk
recorded 1238 walks, an all-time
high in the organization's three
and one-half year histroy.
Controversy surrounded the
funding of Pirate Walk last
semester when the newly-elected
SGA legislature reviewed deci-
sions made during the summer to
give Pirate Walk additional
financial support.
The funds were made available
by David Brown, SGA president
and former director of Pirate
Walk, Chris Tomasic, SGA vice
president and Pirate Walk's
former assistant director, and
Tony Braswell, SGA treasurer.
Although it "is not required
for the new legislature to review
decisions made by the summer
people states David Brown, the
legislature did review the funding
and took back part of the money
the SGA had promised Pirate
Walk.
According to Kirk Shelley,
speaker of the house and senior
class president. Pirate Walk was
the only organization having
been appropriated funds during
the summer to have part of the
funds recalled.
Explains ShelleyThey just
couldn't justify the additional
money, we (the SGA) get re-
quests for seven times more
money than we have to ap-
propriate
From his former association
with Pirate Walk, David Brown
says that he "Knows that they
need an advance budget to plan
for advertising, printing fliers,
and promotion
However, he adds, "everything
seems to have worked out for the
best Pirate Walk has since
worked closely with the Ap-
propriations Committee, and by
going through channels they
thought they had avoided this
summer, they have recovered the
funding needed to continue
operations
Says Shelley, "Pirate Walk is
designed to prevent the type of
rape that occurs when females
walk from building to building
on campus. ECU is a very safe
campus and rapes like this do not
occur as often as date rapes
doso really. Pirate Walk is just
to make people feel better about
walking around campus
Counters Brown, "Pirate
Walk is like wearing vour seat
belt
Student Union's New Leaders
Bv BETH WHICKER
AaatiUBl Nrwi Ullor
The ECU Student Union
Board of Directors met Wednes-
day and selected the President
and the Vice-President of Student
Union for the upcoming year.
The Student Union Board
On The Inside
'
Announcements2
Classifieds5
Editorials4
Features8
Sports11
and (they) slipped the sur-
ly bonds of earth and touched
the face of God.
President Reagan's Address
To The Nation
January 28,198(
selected Liz Dupree.a junior ma-
joring in marketing to perform
the duties of Student Union
President, and Susan Haynie, a
junior psychology major was
named the new vice-president of
the organization.
Dupree, who has chaired the
Student Unions Production
Committee has been involved
with the student union for the
past two years.
As president, Dupree will be
responsible for the student union
funds and serve as a liasion bet-
ween the student union and the
student body. Moreover, Dupree
hopes to enhance the relations
between the union and it's respec-
tive committees
"I would like to see more in-
volvement among the student
union and the student popula-
tion said Dupree.
"Students are confused as to
what the Student Union does. I
would like to create an awareness
among students and get more of
them involved in the Student
Union. By being involved with
the organization a student gets as
much out as they are able to put
in she added.
"As president of the Student
Union, I hope to gain experience
and the ability to coordinate,
which will further me as a person
and also help the ECU Student
Union cited Dupree.
Haynie, who currently chairs
the forum committee, has been
with the Student Union since
September.


vs.
sJi$$
Future Classroom Building
IMUUCINI TWEadC
Work progresses on the future classroom building behind the Graham building. Included in the
new building will be 65 classrooms and laboratories and 180 faculty offices. The new building is
scheduled for completion in August 1987.

, � - . .
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I HI I M CAROi MAN
IANI -R JO, I486
Announcements
LACROSSE CLUB
There u � mandatory i��inw tor a
it�rxi to ciav ��lfl�� fht� �pfinj Trie
'?e'lrnj ,� a' 4 p m Jan 30�ri In 105
Memorial Grrr' We neeo too' 'Hng on to a
tfood ttart �o Jon t mus mu meeting An,
;���'ons (til Va'k a'
A STARTLING REVELATION
� In u� 30 TriuJa a 10 at 24
Menoenna In Ool e� Niyg IK r.
"� Book of Kfvf �� New. nambers ar
enovrageo to otn out t vanoje ca
Study For more Info all Kavin at "w
or Chn� a� t1 06'
STATE EMPLOYEES
ASSOCIATION
T rv� E CI
�� n.x a' o
at 5 JO o m
Auditor l ryi
"�ffW! a'
LUTHERAN STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
L SA will meet at 6 p m this Sunday at Our
Wedeemer Lutheran Church on Elm St We
. have a dalic .ous home cooked meal and
a- a'� oegn plan; for our Spring Break
Retreat ah members please attend and new
students are welcome it you have any gues
H need a r.ae call 'SA X)S8 oi "S� l )�e
SIGMA TAU DELTA
a how a meet w rues eet at t 30
p m In room to o fne English Anne We
DC ' rf� � y p'ans lor a tr,p to
WasJ �� � DC so ne sure to attend!
MODELS NEEDED
Ae.
� r ran GorO
rice 1307
from 13 vw f
day 10 12
6259 or come by ot
I ' � � Arts. Center
Chapter
WATER SKI CLUB
' he ECU wa �
neat � "ue�cia- SI
Mendenhai stuoe
Gf"�'J rnemfcf
.outage new membet
parti T ahlrti H� sa ��
b � : . � lmg a
f p. ,�� �� I
e te
"��� ifl We en
�. el
rig a ft enci
PHI SIGMA PI
Our firs! Iin meeting of he semester
be held a dnesdav 1 eD S at s p m at
ien Please make plan
VISUAL ARTS
FRISBEE CLUB
y Ou be'ter runjnojf
' i� ECU Fi sber Club ir
se��� Pins Fiovc I mo1
at he Attic i shows Wc
10 JO Dor miss this . �
� � tai
� �� , itet
A a
ass �
exp' ence on 'he !S Si ree
souna system The rates v
!

�"e w
the . ���
1 his IS OfN
a :� a acted F et � .
the Mendenha - ery on f el
� v re a a 'hemp ec et �
COLLEGE SOPHOMORES
Would you like a challenge Want t .�
your body and challenge your mind In ��,
you ve never done before? Unless you test
yourself, you'll never knovy iust how su
cessfui you can be You can do this by spen
ding 6 weeks of your summer vac ation at the
Army ROTC Basic CampatFort Know, Ken
tuiky learning what t takes to be an Arm,
Officer You 11 be paid more than $600 tor
your 6 weeks ot framing plus room and
board There's NO OBLIGATION to the Ar
my and you can ieave any day if you don t
he "if you qualify you could be awa-deo
a 2 year tun tuition college scholarsh 1
Basic camp also quaiif.es you for the BO I C
Advanced oorse when you return to college
m the Fall Get an the details at the Army
ROTC �Smoker" on Wed 5 F eb from 46
p m m the Coffeehouse Student Cente
contact Captain Alvm M ' hell B1 '57 6�67
CEREBRAL PALSY
One out of ever, 500 bit ths are atte. ��
Cerebral Palsy it has a ser.ou. affe I
newborn s bra.n which in turn
in an areas of an
(e
On Thursday Jan JOth from 8 a .
E a Si Carolina Occupation
Students will be collecting pledges out!
�he student bookstore These doi attons w
go to the Greeny.lie United Cerebra ; �
Center Any amount donated would be grea'
y apprei a ted Any m fi not make
. edge and would like ti at a � n
Jones at T52 3491
DIVER DOWN
the u b thai s
newhere The Cora1 Reef D
� � st meel ng s Fefc ,
'��� lei ha -oom 23
meeting Ar-�one non dive' �
Eastern N.C. Loses Hero
In Space Shuttle Disaster
BEAUFORT .N.C (I P
The North Carolina native wh
tollowed his dreams of flying on
the coastal winds that lifted the
Wright Brothers' test plane to
earn his life's goal t I piloting an
outer-space mission had won
place in history
Astronaut Michael Smith, se-
cond in command on the space
shuttle Challenger that blew up
and disintegrated in trailing wisps
of smoke "2 seconds after lift-off
Tuesday, was honored by North
Carolinians ranging from janitoi
to governor.
"Mike Smith makes history
was enblazoned on a banner
adorning an antebellum balcony
in Smith's hometown. A blak
ribbon was draped over the gay
slogan when the spacecraft ex-
ploded with Smith and his six
crewmates aboard.
"Mike Smith is a hero. Thai
was the banner for his ac
ccmplishments. Yesterdav we
draped it in black Beaufot
Mayor Joyce Fuiford said Tues-
day.
Smith, who was to give the
commencement address for the
town's high school graduates
next spring, carried Beaufort's
white-and-blue flag with him on
the ill-fated flight, Fuiford said
"He was to have it auto
graphed by the space shuttle crew
and when he returned, we were
going to display it in City Hall
she said
Govervor Jim Martin ordered
all flags lowered to half-mast and
lauded Smith for giving a special
pride to North Carolina who first
learned to fly in Beaufort Mar-
tin said.
Smith's two brothers spent a
restless night at the wreath-
marked family home keeping
their plans open until the
aut's wife, Jane, and sister,
gave instructions from
Houston about memorializing
the distinguished Navy five,
whose only boyhood dream had
beer. v: flying.
'A henever 1 was conscious of
what I wanted to do. 1 wanted to
fly. 1 can never remember
anything else I wanted to do but
flying Smith told The News
ana Observer I Raleigh in an in-
terview last month.
"it's not easy, but it you ask
me. it's the greatest job in the
world Everyone looks at flying
shuttle as something that is
dangerous. But it's not Smith
said "By the time it's lifted oW
the pad, it's undergone a lot of
tests and quality control checks.
It's a good program and
something the country should be
ud 't"
His brother. Patrick, told the
paper, "Mike was known to
top ball games to watch military
airplanes go over.
He'd call time out They'd go
on out oi sight and then He'd go
back and plav football
Early Wednesday, a janitor in
Garner, N.C, Thomas Allen,
Parted a drive to keep car
headlights burning throughout
the day in tribute to Smith and
Ronald McNair, a Challenger
crew member from Lake City,
Si who graduated from Nor-
the Carolina A&T State Universi-
ty. McNair was the second black
astronaut to go into space and
was making his second space
voyage.
"The horror of the explosion
in front of all the cheering people
& the only thing comparable was
the Hindenburg disaster � kept
me up all night. There is such a
sense of loss about this � to ac-
tually see these Norht Carolina
volunteers getting killed was a
teetotal shock Allen said.
Michael Smith, 40, and wife
Jane had three children
Michael Scott, 16; Allo
Taylor. 14; and Erin, 8. I he c
pie v at the beach in Cherry
Grove, S.C when they were
both 16 and were married in 1S6
after he graduated from the I s
Naval Academy
Smith's flying career began 25
years ago with flying leasons in
Beaufort. He beat long odds n
becoming an astronaut in 1980
when he was chosen one o N
candidates for the m ou
,500 applicants.
The 25th shuttle launch in the
nation's history �- for more than
five years, and he considered the
mission a filer's ultimate goal In
his youth, Smith read eve: �
he could about the first
astronauts � John Glenn, �
Shepard and Wally Schirra
and began to dream while leafing
through issues of Life magazine
that chronicled the nation's space
program.
The Rev. Wilbur Teachey,
pastor of Beaufort's Ann Street
United Methodist Church where
Smith and his family were
lifelong members, said Smith
never was deterred from his mis
sum because of the possible risks
"This had been his ambition, a
dream of his Teachey said
"He dearly loved it no matter
what "
"Some of it was pretty
dagerous. Sone of it wasn't
said Smith's uncle, Robert Safrit.
"But he liked it. It was his life
"He was a very fine young
man, an achiever all the way
through said Ann Brown, a
family friend who broke down in
sobs remembering Smith.
fresh
Daily
What '5 new in Good Eatin'
at Student Stores in Wright
Building and at the Croatan?
SUBS
also coming February 3rd
Wa tch For
BUTTERMILK
BISCUITS
Sausage
$1.09
Steak
$1.09
Cheese
.65
Plain
.45
Bacon
$1.09
Ham
$1.09
The "Country5'
ham, turkey, roast beef and bacon
with two k inds of cheese
$1.90
The "Tree Top"
ham, turkey and roast beef
with two k inds of cheese
$1.90
DailySpecial"
$1.65
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
FORENSIC SOCIETY
r m M - ��"
r iSA �
(ii i �1
Oft'

. '
CAMPUS CRUSADE
FOR CHRIST
� �v-irt�g P
j" ii I -
fellow . a. � �
forwird , �
ICE HOCKEY
-
FEVVAVA PROGRAM
ACCOUNTING SOOt 1
-

jre A
State
i I a SIGMA
ALPHA PHI ALPHA
MICORDj
ACNE CLINIC
NEED A TRUE FRIEND?
OMEGA PSI PHi
Blank Tapes
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Maxell XLI190 $2.98
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112 E. 5th St.
75t-429t
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NEED CASH?
Southern
Gun & Pawn
752-2464
500 N Gr�n�
'$
$
AEROBIC SPECIAL
The'firstiOO people to sign up get
the rest of the semester for
titfl f that com es out to just'
Miv � over10 a month
m
Then jt goes back upto $75. This offer ends
Friday January 31st.
Our Aerobic room is 2 to 4 times bigger than
any other club in Greerville (except GAQ.
Check Us Out! WE LOVE AEROBICS!
and you will too at
'The Aerobic Workshop"
757-1608
417 Evans St. Mall
Downtown

Aards :�iu Wednesday.
"I believe c wa
V :
N.C.
Chicken
Biscuits
830-1591
A11 Day Specials
Sun. Feb. 2, Steak Biscuit, Fries and Med. Drink SX.99
Mon. Feb. 3, 3 Wing Dinner, Med. Drink $1.99
Tues. Feb, 4, Hot Dog, Fries, Med. Drink $1.99
Wed. Feb. 5, Steak Biscuit, Fries, Med. Drink $1.99
Thurs. Feb. 6, Chicken Biscuit, Fries, Med. Drink $1.99
Fri. Feb. 7, 5 oz. Burger, Fries, Med. Drink $1.99
$1.99 All Buffets
Breakfast 6 a nil 1 a.m I unch 12 p.m. to 3 p.m
Dinner 5 p.m8 p.m.
Come By A Try The Best
Luncheons In Greenville!
Located Corner Of 10th & Cotanche Streets
Offering The Best Food On The Corner!
SPRING BREAK
MARCH
t? 1-8 ' 15-2:
8-15 22-2
OFFICIAL
BEACH r0"
TRIPS
V800-321 vX





I HI- I AS I AKOl 1MAN
JAM AKY JO, 1V�6
GSOCIETY
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� oiuiHary
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Downtown
;urt$
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State Loses Model
GREENSBORO, NC (DPI) -
North Carolina university lost
a "role model par excellence"
but held on to a dream after this
week's space shuttle tragedy
claimed the life of astronaut Ron
McNair.
"It's his legacy that taught us
to dream and to dream big said
Stuart Ahrens, an associate pro-
fessor of physics at North
Carolina A&T State University,
from which McNair graduated in
1971. "The dream is still alive,
even though he may not be. He
was a role model par excellence
"What he did is show students
that they could succeed, that they
could really do it said Thomas
San din, an A&T physics pro-
fessor who taught McNair. "He
taught them that what they learn-
ed here would enable them to
scale the highest heights
At A&T. where flags were fly-
ing at half-staff, a memorial ser-
vice will be held at 11 a.m. ESI
Friday for the astronaut-physicist
who gave birth to the school's
space-age dreams and who died
along with six crewmates Tues-
day when space shuttle
Challenger exploded.
Several local officials and the
Rev. Jesse Jackson, a friend and
fellow alumnus of McNair's,
plan to attend the service.
"From the depths of our pain,
agony and sorrow, we are taught
that suffering may endure for a
night, but if we hold on, joy will
come in the morning Jackson
said in a statement.
McNair, 35. loved to teach and
inspire children and students,
said Donald Edwards, who
resigned as chairman of A&T's
physics department the year
McNair graduated. Edwards
cited a 1984 parade honoring
McNair, the nation's second
black astronaut, after his first
space shuttle flight.
"He saw a group of eight or 10
white and black children waiting
to see an astronaut. He stopped
the whole parade and went over
and shook their hands Ed-
wards said Wednesday.
"I believe what he was saying
with those handshakes wasy, T
have done this, but you can do it,
too That was the message he
carried all the way through. He
always said it would be a pity not
to cultivate the minds of inner-
city blacks Edwards said.
McNair inspired the
university's $250,000 space pro-
gram that involves 78 students
designing two science ex-
periments, which focus on the
variablity of weightlessness, for
MARCH
0 1-8 0 15-22
0 8-15 0 22-29
CONOO OR HOTEL LODGING
PARTIES GOODIE BAGS MORE
OFFICIAL
BEACi
TRIPS
launch in a future space shuttle
flight, Ahrens said.
In the school's space lab hangs
a photograph of McNair in his
blue NASA uniform and a letter
from the nation's space agency
accepting an A&T payload for a
future space shuttle flight.
"It's Ron's room said
Ahrens, who directs the universi-
iv student space program.
"Our student space program is
because o him. It's that simple.
If there was no Ron McNair,
there'd be no space program
here
Ahrens said the school planned
to continue "full throttle" with
the space program- Students are
constructing foi a payload one
experiment to determine the ef-
fect ol weightlessness on the birth
of insects and one ii .ting
how zero gravity affects the
growth o crystals.
"We're committed to doing
this he said. "Our determina-
tion to the space program is more
solid than ever. We'll have
(Ron's) name on it somehow
McNair had received A&T's
highest alumni award, had the
main street in his hometown o
Lake City, SC, named after him
limited Spate AvauaWe
CENTRAL BREAK
RESERVATIONS
USA a HAWAII
1-800-321-5911 aTC
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1-800-321-5912 v
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and had received a key to the city
of Greensboro He was a black
belt in Karate, a fisherman, a
chef and an accomplished jazz
saxophonist who played his tenor
sax during his 1984 space shuttle
flight.
Sandin said McNair was keenly
aware of his position as a role
model.
When McNair underwent the
astronaut selection process in
Houston before his 1984 flight,
"he said to himself, 'If I'm
selected I'll be one of the first
blacks in space I'll be a role
model for others. I'll have to pre-
sent myself to others Sandlin
said.
McNair is survived by his wife,
the former Cheryl Moore, and
their son, Reginald, 3.
Space Shuttle Challenger
Salute To McAuliffe
CONCORD, N.H. (UPI) Just
six months after lining Main
Street to saltue Christa
McAuliffe, residents of her
Hometown gathered in churches
today to grieve and pay homage
to the High School teacher turned
astronaut.
"These sevices are to let people
come together to share grief
said Dick Lower, pastor ol Si
John's Church. "It's like when
Kennedy was assassinated in 1963
� no one wants to be alone
A morning prayer service was
scheduled at St. John's for about
300 student from the Parish's
grade schcx
Subscribe
Sire �aat (Earoliniati
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Memorial services also were set
for St. John's and other churches
tonight.
Last July about .
lined Main Street tor pa'
honoring McAuliffi
teacher chosen
space They watched
Tuesdav as she an
astronauts were killed in
plosion o the shuttle'
"In.
whose child had i .
. hit. I'm encourai
talk these thins
. ters
"We're going to �
a familv unit
( harles Foley. "The statt in par
ticular is taking this very, very,
very sorrowfully
I hear Preservation (enter,
repair shop across the
el from St. John's, had a pre-
launch sign saying "Reach for
us, Christa
Peter Robinson, a former
McAuliffe student who runs the
- the sign down today
placed it with the usual
W : rade-in
"I put up the sign yesterday
the explosion I left
because Christa did reach
he said "Like
Reagan said, she touched God
AH()RT1()S I r
TO 12th WEEK
Ol PREGNANCY

Prcgnai
.
and 5
ible.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917 West Morgan St Raleigh, N.C.
MONDAY FEBRUARY 3rd
Sexy Mexican Night
Come party with ECU's sexiest women.
TACOS � NACHOS � SENORITAS
"Come check out the hooters
��
TUESDAY FEBRUARY 4th
Seafood Feast
at the Phi Tau Mansion
'Come See What Makes Us Best
l
r -
r





J
o.
� -
MM)
- mtm






�iE iEaat (Kar0linian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
TOM Ll VENDER, Gnmlnr
Jay Stone, tfa��vMj tdu,r
Mike Ludwick, v Greg Winchester, MwriMMMq
Sc o! i Cooper, � & Anthony Martin, ��,�� m.�
DANIEI MAURER, Emtrummen, EdUo. JOHN PETERSON, Crtdti Managf
John Shannon. s,w, &�� Shannon Short, product�Manager
DeChanili Johnson, (mawm, Debbie Stevens, sk?
anuan .V), lto
OPINION
Page 4
Space Shuttle
National Loss Mourned
The explosion of the space shut-
tle Challenger 74 seconds after lif-
toff Tuesday shocked the world and
catalyzed a national climate of
grief. The deaths of pilot Michael J.
Smith, a native North Carolinian
from Beaufort, and Robert E.
McNair, a graduate of North
Carolina A&T University, made the
shuttle explosion particularly hard
for the Tar Heel state. But we were
not the only group with cause to
feel that one of our own had been
taken from us just a we were on
the eve of chronicling a first.
At many schools around the
country students watched on televi-
sion sets in mute horror as the first
teacher to be slated for a space mis-
sion plummeted to earth in the blaz-
ing hulk of the Challenger. Accor-
ding to Janie Manning, Principal at
Bethel Elementary School,
students' initial reaction to the blast
was dismay.
"We observed a moment of
silence within our school in grades 4
� 8" Manning said. "In K � 3,
the teachers talked with the children
about what had happened.
Black Americans and Japanese-
Americans also have special cause
for remorse as McNair was only the
nation's second black astronaut
and Ellison S. Onizuka was its first
Japanese-American astronaut.
Finally, Judith A Resnick was just
the second woman to be selected as
a crew member for an American
space mission.
The shuttle tragedy was a great
loss for America. This is not true
simply because of the failure of the
mission or the set-back to science
and technological progress, it is a
national tragedy particularly
because the crew of this shuttle mis-
sion typified ideals that our country
has sacrificed and bled for.
We are a democratic nation with
a conviction that fostering equality
among our peoples is the truest way
to promote unity and strength. Our
constitution speaks of noble virtues
which we continue to strive after
even if we have not yet come to em-
body them. America is a state of
mind just as much as it is a place, so
many writers have remarked. And
perhaps the space program, first
launched during the Kennedy Ad-
ministration along with the Peace
Corps and other New Frontier pro-
grams, is the highest expression of
the American pioneering spirit and
of the nobler values that we
possess.
That is why President Reagan
was correct when he said that the
seven people who died in the shuttle
blast are American heroes and
heroines. For their bereaved
families there is hopefully some
consolation in knowing that and in
knowing that the entire country
joins them in mourning.
We should all be heartened by the
President's Oval Office address in
which he rejected the notion that
the Challenger explosion marks a
death knell for the space program.
"The future doesn't belong to the
fainthearted Reagan said. "It
belongs to the brave And as a
footnote we might add that space
itself belongs to no one nation. It
belongs to all and the space pro-
gram should symbolize and further
the highest aspirations of humanity
� the yearnings for peace and pro-
sperity for all. We should dedicate
ourselves to seeing that future space
projects serve that goal so that
those who have died, both in the
Challenger and in the Apollo ac-
cidents, will not have died only to
have their sacrifices turned to the
service of ignoble ends.
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Classifi
Campus Forum
More On Politics From All Sides
To Susan Haynie, the liberal who
had a letter printed in the "Campus
Forum" on January 28, 1986:
What makes you think we conser-
vatives refuse to express our political
views0 I am a freshman in the College
Republicans and I nor any of my
fellow College Republicans are afraid
to express any of ou. oolitical points
of view.
Everyone, including us conser-
vatives have a right to an opinion or a
belief. We may not respect some
political beliefs and opinions;
however, you are entitled to your
own liberal views Since everyone is
entitled to their own view, here's my
view on an issue or two!
Women who have abortions are
baby killers! Everyone is pro-choice,
but no one has the right to kill an in-
nocent LIVING fetus. A woman
should be responsible for her own
body. Therefore, she should protect
herself from an unwanted pregnancy.
A woman can obtain contraceptives
from her doctor, a free clinic, an in-
firmary, or a drug store. Paying five
to fcrty dollars for contraceptives is a
lot cheaper than paying over two
hundred dollars for an abortion.
Sure, abortion is a hard decision for
a woman to make. HOWEVER, she
shouldn't need to make that decision
if she took some responsibility for
her actions! That is HER OWN
STUPIDITY!
As for spending money on defense,
it is well worth it. We can't have
good weapons. We can't have better
weapons. We have to have the BEST
weapons and we can't settle for
anything less! Although quantity is
important, quality definitely comes
first! Without top-notch weapons,
our country will be in trouble.
So to all you liberals who are whin-
ing and crying about too much
government spending on defense and
weapons better get out your boxes of
kleenex and stop whining like a
bunch of immature spoiled brats.
Strong military power is the only way
of our beloved country staying free
and secure.
Jill L. Averett
Freshman, Poli Sci
Democrats Criticized
From observing the recent political
letters to the East Carolinian, I have
concluded the liberal Democrat's
statements on the issues are weak, if
not ignorant. Jan Higginbotham
should know only liberals approve
the cowardly act of suicide. This is
proven by the students at Brown
University when they voted to com-
mit suicide by cyanide pills supplied
by the school in the event of a nuclear
war. Also, liberals approve of so-
called "mercy-killings" or
"euthanasia" or more aptly called
murder, not to mention abortion.
Jan, don't impose your immorality
on society.
Ms. Haynie has assumed Mr.
Walker's and Mr. Hardy's comments
were in the same letter or from the
same person. One example out of
many in her letter is when speaking
about Mr. Hardy's stand on com-
munism, she used quotes from two
letters other than Mr. Hardy's. She
needs to get her facts straight before
accusing somebody of something
anybody can see someone else said or
did. Excluding Mr. Walker's letter I
don't see any comment in Mr. Har-
din's or Mr. Hardy's letters bullying
people. They just intelligently
debated the views of conservatives.
Ms. Haynie claims the liberals enjoy
legitimate debate, but the liberals'
vociferous letters show differently.
Ms. Haynie, how many people
starve to death each week or even
each month or year in America?
Should the government provide food
and shelter for poor people or should
it give each person that is disadvan-
taged, disabled or plain lay (those
who chose "the freedom to fail") a
choice of what they eat, how big their
house is or how many cars or TV's
they will have? At what level do we
stop aid? As Republicans have said
before in the East Carolinian,
"America being the great country she
is should take care of its legitimately
disadvantaged, but has no business
guaranteeing a middle-class lifestyle
to everyone" just because they want
it.
Do you know in the countries.
where work-fare has been im-
plemented unemployment drops and
welfare paymentsapplications
decrease. In other words people go
back to work; it might not be ten
dollars an hour, but it isn't a free ride
on the taxpayers' back.
In the past several years states that
have increased welfare payments
unemployment has risen; in the states
that have lowered payments
unemployment has dropped. As for
the homeless, they have increased as
deinstitutionalization of the mentally
feeble has become more popular. I
am not saying all homeless are men-
tally incompetent, but the deinstitu-
tionalizing has increased the number.
This "mudslinging" began with a
letter telling one person's opinion of
the basic differences between the par-
ties. The editor irresponsibly titled it
"Republican Lambasts Democrats
The liberals started the mudslinging
the next week, while the Republicans
have used intelligent arguments.
Bob Lucas
Sr Planning Dept.
ECU CR Action Chairman
Editor's Note: The letter from Lance
Hardin for which I wrote the
headline "Republican Lambasts
Democrats" read, in part, as follows:
' 'Democrats, or liberals, on the other
hand, claim to be in favor of the
'common man They favor a society
in which everyone works for the good
of the whole. Their's is a system
which rewards substandard perfor-
mance and punishes acheivement.
Thus they stifle man's individuality
and constrict his freedom, all in the
name of the "common man My
headline would appear to be accurate
to me.
Reply To Republican
This letter is in response to a state-
ment made by Mr. Walker (Campus
Forum, Tuesday, January 21). He
stated, "Reagan and Helms are not
stripping individuals of their rights
by seeking to ban abortion. They
merely are performing one of the ex
plicit duties of our Federal Govern-
ment which is to protect the lives of
all Americans
The argument stated by Mr.
Walker and those who believe this
way is internally inconsistant. These
individuals would have the govern-
ment protect the unborn, but yet they
pass laws to allow society to kill the
criminally insane who are not able to
protect themselves, in the same way
the unborn are not able to protect
themselves. If abortion is immoral
then one must say capital punishment
is also immoral.
These arguments aside, the real
issue here is that these "conser-
vatives" are attempting to use the
government to impose their inter-
pretation of their religious and moral
beliefs on others whose religions or
philosophies do not impose such
rigid interpretation of "God's Law
In essence, they are telling tens of
millions of Americans that their
religions are inferior. This conser-
vative point of view represents the
ultimate in arrogance. I do not
believe arrogance is a Christian vir-
tue.
Dana Beth Lieberman,
Sophomore
Health Column Wrong
L am writing in response to the
health column on dysplasia and cer-
vical cancer by Miss Adams.
1 feel that it is erroneous to claim
that sexual promiscuity and sex at a
young age are 'he primary causes of
dysplasia resulting in cervical cancer.
There are millions of women with
this problem and they have a variety
of sexual histories.
There is a high risk of cancer of the
cervix in married women (women
who are not promiscuous) and it is
important for married women over
30 to have an annual Pap smear in
order to detect this problem.
Cervical cancer is higher among
low income women, regardless of
age, and many of these women have
had nutritional deficiencies so this
may be another possible explanation
for this disease.
There is a definite correlation with
cervical cancer and women whose
mothers took D.E.S.
(Diethylstilbestrol) in order to pre-
vent miscarriages. Girls that know
their mothers have been exposed to
D.E.S. should have Pap smears at
least once a year.
1 think it is wrong to make a moral
judgement on women by correlating
dysplasiacervical cancer with pro-
miscuity. There is an attempt in our
society to make women feel guilty
about their sexuality, by some doc-
tors, by the press and certain
religious and conservative political
groups, by giving women misleading
and biased information. Women in
our society need to become educated
on their own about problems relating
to sex and the reasons as to why their
problems occur, rather than living
with a cloud of guilt over their heads.
Jennifer Zeigel
Senior, Foreign Lang.
Thanks Fans!
Everyone knows that there is sup-
posed to be an advantage associated
with playing athletic contests at
home. The spirit and enthusiasm that
was displayed by the ECU students
and fans at the George Mason and
James Madison basketball games this
past Saturday and Monday were
perfect examples of why that advan-
tage does exist.
It is no coincidence that the fans
were vocally involved in both con-
tests and that ECU won both games.
Minges is a great place to play and it
becomes even greater with the type of
support that was provided by you at
the Mason and Madison games.
THANKS!
The Pirate Basketball Team and
Staff
- � HHHfjl .
PERSONALS
S'G EP GOLDEN HEARTS We I
be having a fappy Hour at me El
ow afternoon thai
r'9rt TOOR ROW AFT I
NOON�! Gr.b all of your friends I
go dowr th�re and party your fj
(' Our net meeting will Oe
Sunday at 9p m at the house &
board, please oe there at 8 15 fq
' eetng beforehand
WHATEVIR HAPPENED T(
ege fun vater sides, panty ra
and maso' lappings' Bo'
ment nas jeer �-et jmec to the
AH hat we wanted was a
6 packs obeer RE a f
MATT u a I u V a
rhe Ur ripsec:
mark s rour 'ea
excited
RUSH'LAMBDA CHI ALPH
fraternit packed by trac
PHI KAFPA TAU R ISl
tke rush Come ' tst
largest t-ater � E this Tl
cay 7:9 I 11:00 Spe
na imei '
ALL RESPECTABLE Y O Ul
LADIES: Tne sorors Of S 5r- j
ma Rhc won
our sprng rush or P"
en ha
' Center
TERRIIK M. This S
ia' oer want ano1
' ke last nighl
� cy ab pain
SPC: t-a
to ta a gir
rr jcn onger
-� H
PHI TXU LIL SISTERS ere
oe a MANDATORY meet nq
! trend
seor Lisa Allen B'gaue�
not miss r s m ee r�g
rebecca y x an
s ster I ca a .
rhanks "sc 'a"
YLS
SISTERS OF AOTT: You now k
�he 3a'e but what s CUT!
REALTY about? Be prepare
The Beta Zea s
PI APPA PHI SPRING Rl
Tie orotners of p Kappa p- a
extenc en oper r�v fa' or
young i-er interested r
of the stronges arc mos' aar
n g ratern,ties or- th s ca-nl
Come out to MerKJenra; Sul
Center Tuesday night from 7
10:30 and meet the brohers a-(
tie sisters of Pi Kappa Phi Ai
should vou go when yot re
sr& Pi Kappa Pti
"OUR REACH SHOULD EXCI
OUR GRASP- OR WHAT S
HEAVEN FOR? Da. c Sea
USA 'oca. z he Space Dogra
NEED INANC A A D' SC
sh z Researc- Foundation can
We have over a billion doiiars .vd
of f.nanc ai aid - our c 1
banks $135 Million oo ars w
went jnusec as' vear ve
f "anc al aid sources for -
sophotiores. athietes and
the student w s rg to a'
graduate schoo. Our a:
receive an average of frorr u
sources 'or . en the qua �
guarentee resu!fS: Por free I
tion write to us and please �ncil
vear n school. Sc h o I a r s
Research Pounca on 829
nhaven Parkway Su fe
. rginia Beac- va 23432
SPRING BREAK CRUISE! Dei
now tc cru se c the Mexican
$445 ips ' gratuities ictud
nights 6 days Can now for A GRI
SPR NG BREAK ! '58
752-3171
needadj Are you having a i
ty and nees a D J� For the os
Top 40, Beac- anc Dance
Morga- a '56 ?(?6 between 5
p m ReasoaCe "ates reerer
on requesr
SENIORS FACULTY GRADUi
PORTRAITS w be taken
3 13 Appointments can be rr
beginning Jan 22 by coming by
Buccaneer office and signing up
appointments by ph
Undergraduates will be a
March 7 27
PI KAPPA PHI The brothers
Kappa t along wi'h the stud
and faculty of ECU express
deepes sorrow to the families
friends of the crew of the Space Si
tie Challenger These brave sf
will be missed by ail they
some of the brave hero s that leal
to the stars and we shall su
follow
PIKA LITTLE SISTERS: Wi
having their very first happy hi
Word has it, they will be breakinj
and throwin' down Come party
them at the Alley. Sunday F
from 9 until!
EXUBERANCE: D J best rat(
town All ypes of music, fl
beach, rock, the whole nine y
Contact the TRASHMAN at 752
ECU CAMPUS BEWARE)
Mama and White Trash are ir
ting them in this weekend L
you J.M.U grads, the KCJ girli
on the loose! PS As SH.
"TMWYL"
PIKA'S: We had a jammin' tir
the campgrounds last Thur
night. Love, The Tri sigs
.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 30, 1986
:i a
ww$ou
IBM 300
um Ai
�W&lftBP
V
y
J
All Sides
punishment
de, the real
� ese "conser-
- to use the
rpse their inter-
gious and moral
0S� religions or
impose such
� "God's Lav
. e telling tens of
that their
I � is conser-
presents the
I do not
itian vir-
I
health Column Wrong
s in response to the
dysplasia and cer-
Miss Adams.
�rroneous to claim
cuit) and sex at a
primary causes oi
�ervical cancer.
miii. ' women with
thev have a variety
I high risk of cancer of the
married women (women
promiscuous) and it is
married women over
annual Pap smear in
- problem.
is higher among
a men, regardless of
iny of these women have
� al deficiencies so this
t possible explanation
i definite correlation with
and women whose
D.E.S.
trol) in order to pre-
sages Curls that know
:rs have been exposed to
aid have Pap smears at
a year.
k it is wrong to make a moral
cnt on women by correlating
cal cancer with pro-
1 here is an attempt in our
make women feel guilty
- sexuality, by some doc-
� press and certain
and conservative political
� ips, by giving women misleading
and biased information. Women in
our need to become educated
heir own about problems relating
and the reasons as to why their
problems occur, rather than living
with a cloud of guilt over their heads.
Jennifer Zeigel
Senior, Foreign Lang
Thanks Fans!
knows that there is sup-
d to be an advantage associated
with playing athletic contests at
me. The spirit and enthusiasm that
was displayed by the ECU students
and fans at the George Mason and
fames Madison basketball games this
past Saturday and Monday were
perfect examples of why that advan-
'age does exist.
It is no coincidence that the fans
were vocally involved in both con-
tests and that ECU won both games.
Minges is a great place to play and it
becomes even greater with the type of
support that was provided by you at
the Mason and Madison games.
THANKS!
The Pirate Basketball Team and
Staff
Classifieds
PERSONALS
SIG EP GOLDEN HEARTS: We will
be having a Happy Hour at the Elbo
tomorrow afternoon. that's
rightTOMORROW AFTER
NOON Grib all of your friends and
go down there and party your face
off! Our next meeting will be this
Sunday at 9p.m. at the houseExec
board, please be there at 8:15 for a
short meeting beforehand.
WHATEVIR HAPPENED: To col
lege fun. water slides, panty raids,
and mascot mappings? Baby Cle-
ment has oeen returned to the 10th
floor Ail hat we wanted was a few
6 packs 01 beer. REALLY Crow
8. Co
TRI SIG PLEDGES: This week is
almost over. Hang In there- Ya iftare
doing great! Love, The Sisters
MAX, DAVID, STEVE, VIRGIL:
Are you ready to relive the Iceberg
Weekend? Let's roadtripl -The Girls
SALE
LOUISE:
Phi Taus
Preesh the good job I -The
MATT: Uv ya luv ya
The Uninpressed.
MARK: S your real
Off? TheUnexcited
luv me too?!
name Jack N.
RUSH LAMBDA CHI ALPHA:
fraternit backed by tradition.
PHI KAFPATAU
it!
Rush, don't miss
SPRING BREAK IN BAHAMAS:
$289 includes 6 days, 5 nights, round
trip flight from Miami to Nassau,
Beachfront Accommodations, night-
ly cocktail parties and more! -Call
Jenni at 756-5078 or Angela at
758 9540.
LET'S GO DOWN Get involved
in what promises to be East
Carolina's most dynamic clubThe
Coral Reef Dive Club. The first
meeting is Feb. 3 from 3-5 at
Mendenhall Room 221. This is an
open house meeting. Anyone, non-
divers included, is encouraged to
drop by.
LOST: Td 53 III calculator probably
in Brewster area. Needed im-
mediately. Reward offered. If found,
please call 758-9521.
WORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
perlence in typing resumes, theses,
technical documents, and term
papers. We manage and merge your
names and addresses into merged
letters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards. Our prices are extremely
reasonable and we always offer a 5
percent discount to ECU students. S
8, F Professional Computer Co.
(back of Franklin's) 115 E. 5th St.
757-0472.
MOBILE HOME FOR SALE:
Emerald Isle NC View of both ocean
and sound. Across the street from
the Emerald isle Fishing Pier.
Water, ac, partial furnishing. $750
or best offer and assume land lease.
FOR SALE: 20 gallon fish tank with
top, heaters and underground
filters- $30. Twin bed, box springs
and mattress $25. Call 758-0047.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
tronic typewriter. Reasonable rates.
Call Janice at 355 7233 after 5:30.
TAXES: Will do your taxes for
reasonable rates. Ten years ex-
perience. Call Doris at 355-2510 after
6 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1978 Datsun 280 Z. Good.
condition. Metallic Blue. $3,700. Call
752-4908.
FOR SALE: Univega Frame, Sun-
tour Components, specialized
wheels. Triathalon grade, $450. NAD
Stereo system, $900. Call 758 6784.
FOR SALE: Footsball Table. Exc.
Condition, call 752 2445
HOUSE FOR RENT: 2 bedrooms, 1
bath- with appliances. Near Univer
sity. $350 per month. Family or
female students. 757-1798.
Get the
word out
in the
Announcements
m Ta East CaroUalae
TKE RUSH: Come rush the world's
largest f-aternity, TKE, this Thurs
day, 7:� till 11:00. Special Live
Entertainment.
ALL RESPECTABLE YOUNG
LADIES: The sorors of Sigma Gam
ma Rhc would like to invite you to
our sprfig rush on Feb. 5, 1986 at 7
p.m. in room 221, Mendenhall Stu
dent Center.
TERRICK M This is to let you
know 'Nat I (Amber) want another
night Ike last night. This time I
won't cry about the pain.
SPC: Hang in there! Tri Sig is lucky
to have a girl like you. There's not
much bnger. -Love, RMH
PHI TU LIL SISTERS: There will
be a MANDATORY meeting on
Thurs.at 5. If you cannot attend, call
Louise or Lisa Allen. Bring dues and
do not miss this meeting
REBECCA: You are the best big
sister I can't wait until the big I.
Thanhs for all the inspiration. Love,
YLS
SISTERS OF AOTT: You now know
the date, but what is CUTOUT
REALLY about? Be prepared
The Beta Zeta's
PI KAPPA PHI SPRING RUSH:
The b-others of Pi Kappa Phi wish to
extend an open invitation to all
young men interested in joining one
of the strongest and most award win-
ning fraternities on this campus.
Come out to Mendenhall Student
Center Tuesday night from 7:30 to
10 30 and meet the brothers and lit-
tle sisters of Pi Kappa Phi Where
shouic you go when you're in a
rush& Pi Kappa Phi.
"OUR REACH SHOULD EXCEED
OUR GRASP OR WHAT'S A
HEAVEN FOR? David Seavey,
USA Today on the Space Program.
need Financial aid?: Scholar-
ship Research Foundation can help!
We have over 4 billion dollars worth
of financial aid in our computer
banks S135 million dollars worth
went unused last year. We have
financial aid sources for freshmen,
sophomores, athletes and also for
the students wishing to attend
graduate school Our applicants
receive an average of from 15 to 20
sources for which they qualify. We
guarentee results! For free informa
tion write to us and please include
year in school. Scholarship
Research Foundation, 829 Lyn-
nhaven Parkway, Suite 114-118,
Virginia Beach, Va. 23452.
SPRING BREAK CRUISE Decide
now to cruise to the Mexican Isles.
$445 tips gratuities included. 5
nights 6 days Call now for A GREAT
SPRING BREAK! 758-0074 or
752 3178.
NEED A D.J Are you having a par-
ty and nees a D.J� For the best in
Top 40, Beach and Dance, Call
Morgan at 758-7967 between 5-7:30
p.m Reasonable rates, references
on request.
SENIORS, FACULTY, GRADUATE
PORTRAITS: will be taken Feb.
3 13. Appointments can be made
beginning Jan 22 by coming by the
Buccaneer office and signing up. No
appointments by phone.
Undergraduates will be taken
March 17 27.
PI KAPPA PHI: The brothers of Pi
Kappa Phi, along with the students
and faculty of ECU, express the
deepest sorrow to the families and
friends of the crew of the Space Shut-
tle Challenger. These brave souls
will be missed by all- they were
some of the brave hero's that lead us
to the starsand we shall surely
follow.
PIKA LITTLE SISTERS: Will b�
having their very first happy hour.
Word has it, they will be breakin' out
and throwin' down. Come party with
them at the Alley, Sunday Feb. 2
from 9 until!
EXUBERANCE: D.J. best rates in
town. All types of music, funk,
beach, rock, the whole nine yards.
Contact the TRASHMAN at 752 3587.
ECU CAMPUS BEWARE HO
Mama and White Trash are impor-
ting them in this weekend. Look out
you J.M.U. grads, the KCJ girls are
on the loose! P.S. As S.H. says
"TMWYL"
PIKA'S: We had a jammin' time at
the campgrounds last Thursday
night. Love, The Trl Slgs
WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Eastbrook Apartments, 2 bedroom,
will have private bedroom, will need
bedroom furniture, will share Vi rent
$142.50, Va deposit $142.50 and Vt
utilities. Call 758-6618.
CABIN COUNSELORS ft INSTRUC-
TORS: Male and Female for
western NC. 8 week children's sum-
mer camp. Over 30 activities in-
cluding Water Ski, Tennis, Heated
swimming pool, Go-Karts, Hiking,
Artroom, meals, salary and
travel. Experience not necessary.
Non-smoking students write for ap
plicationbrochure: Camp
Pinewood, 19006 Bob O-Link Dr
Miami, Florida 33015
DEPENDABLE PERSON: Seeking
dependable person to answer phone,
hours 8:30a.m. 1:30 p.m. M-F, send
resume to P.O Box 8587, Greenville,
NC 27834.
WANTED: Student or non-student to
do paperwork 9-5 p.m. Mon. Fri.
Feb. 3-13 Will be paid.
NATIONAL COLLEGE
MARKETING COMPANY: Seeks
individual or campus organization to
work Part-time assisting students in
applying for credit cards. Flexible
hours, excellent $, full training.
Meet students and have fun. Call
Sharon Grand at 1 800 592 2121
SENIORS! SENIORS! SENIORS
Enjoy the last phase of your college
career employmentSftF Com-
puters is offering a package price to
help you send out your resumes in
eluding all of the following: Letter
quality typed resumes, Mail merged
cover letters (name and address of
each company as inside mailing ad
dress on letter), Letter quality typed
envelopes with company address
and your return address on
envelope, Everything folded, stuffed
and even stamped, A listing of com
panies sent to (for your follow ups).
just bring us your hand-written
resume and cover letter and the
businesses you with to apply to and
we'll do the rest. Per resume for
your namesaddr (we stuff) $2.30
(min 10 resumes) (we stuff and
stamp) $1.90 (2 page resume prices
slightly higher). This offer absolute
y expires March 15, 1986 S&F Com
purer Company, 115 East Fifth St.
Greenville, NC. 27834 757 0472.
ATT
ROBBIN
THOMPSON
BAND
THUR. FRI.
Sat. In Concert
Swimming Pool Q's
ONE OR TWO ROOMMATES
NEEDED: TO SHARE 3
BEDROOM, 2V2 BATH WITH
WASHERDRYER AT WINDY
RIDGE TOWNHOUSES. NO
DEPOSIT REQUIRED. $125 � $150
PER MONTH CALL CONNIE OR
DEBBIE AT 757 6935 OR 355-2775.
SUMMER JOBS FOR COLLEGE
STUDENTS: Openings available on
the Food Service Staff at CAMP
SEAFARER ON THE COAST OF
NORTH CAROLINA. Good salary
plus room and board. Excellent op
portunity for friends to work
together. June 8 through mid-
August. Must be at least 18 years of
age. No experience necessary only
ambition and good references re
quired. For more info, and an ap
plication, write. Camp Seafarer,
P.O. Box 10976, YMCA, Raleigh,
NC. 27605.
PERSON WANTED: For full or
part-time sales work in men's store
Must be fashion conscious of men's
wear and enjoy working with the
public. Experience preferred. Good
hourly salary and ability to earn
commission. Apply at Brody's for
Men. The Plaza, MonFri 2-5 p.m.
TUTOR WANTED: For STATS
HYPRO 5022. Call 758-4013.
TYPING SERVICES: Resumes,
term papers, theses. Low rates.
Spelling and grammatical correc
tions included. Cindy 757-0398 after
530 p.m.
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc. Call
758-6011 and leave a message.
FOR RENT: Two room apt. for rent.
Call 752 7212 or 756-0174.
HOUSE REDUCED: 5 bedroom,
near university, 305 E. 14th St.
Available immediately $390.
758 5299.
FOR SALE: 1979 Cutlass Dark Blue
with vinyl top. Great dependable
car. $3,200 or best offer. Call
830-1140
RESEARCH SERVICES: Writing,
editing, typing, promotionals.
355 7502. Nancie Allen 752 3916.
2803 B Evans St Suite 107.
TYPING: All your typing needs
done by a professional secretary.
Call Doris at 355 2510 after 6 p.m.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom apt IVi
bath, living room and large kitchen.
Cable and central air. Near Pitt
Plaza Call 830 1769
-v
i-X'

A Complete Meal On A Bun'
HW WdChMM
Boiagm and ClMkM
HW. SUM! �MJ CIMHI
SlllM CtMKI Md PtapVMi
10 T�rU� Md CkMH
11 TMlfM MdChMM
12 All CkMM iPrmtaM.
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II SatMM Chant Hmrnmk Md Nm
14 Ruti Bm! Tarkai Md Cnaast
15 Mm. IdMMa Md CrMM
it. Carnal ftaat Md Omm
17 Cawicdto Md Cham
It letMaa. Hml Omm Md CappicaU
II $UffR ViakL Utmi ftotogru
Chaast Turktv CapotcaU. Hm
Md NpptTMi
20. fmnm m Ry Md Chaati
?! Satan M Wv� wMi Ctnwd Baal.
Sw�� Chats Bastard i Sauartravt
ZL Italian Muttotl m uactl
?3 llaiiM Sana �It �taar� ki uaca)
M Omm Slaa
2S Cheat Siaak md Wwhraaau
2ft. Mat Dag
27 Chat Salad IMfejca. tmato. tarn turkty
chant aapaera. aicfclat aoj. cracttrel
28. Italian Extract (tautao and
MVaH mi��) fM f�aSPaaj
5 Chaatt Turin and Mm
I Rant Baat and Cheat
7 Chant PtoaarMl and Mm
8. Chant SalMi and Caapicaii
9 Mm. Chan and Caapiotu
No. 1-19 Sandwiches Include, lettuce, tomato, onion, oil. vinegar, oregano. sett and pepper.
Sandwiches also available on white, wheat, rye or ptta bread.
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
ASK ABOUT OUR SUB CUT 6 OUR 8 FT PARTY SOI
DAILY - FREE DEL,VERY � SPECIALIZING IN LARGE
WEEKEND SPECIALS! mMA AA BUSINESS ORDERS
752-2183
21S E 4th ST , CORNER Of 4th ft REAOE
GREENVILLE
FOR SALE: 3 ft. refridgerator
negotiable. Call 758 8019
S100
WORD PROCESSING: Contact
BECKY LATHAM 752 5998 (8 a.m5
p.m.) 17 yrs. experience in typing
theses, scientific reports,
manuscripts, business and form let
ters
FOR RENT: Apartment in A-unit of
Ringgold Towers. S250 per month.
Call 637-6885
MASSAGE CLINIC: SI per 10
minute massage. Sponsored by ECU
Physical Therapy Club. Partial pro-
ceeds to go to charities. Feb. 4
630-10 p.m. First floor Belk Bldg.
Massages given by Jr. and Sr. P.T.
students.
�bmmhI
We
Open
Special
ofCreenvHle
205 E Fifth Street
75 7-3636
Hours
Lunch: M-F 11:00-2:30
Dinner: W-Sat. 5:30-1:00
Something Special For
Every Appetite
Call ahead for takeout
4ttt FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED: For nice duplex 1 mile from
ECU. Fireplace and sundeck $93.75
� 14 utilities. Please call 752-0319.
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 2
bedroom apt. at Eastbrook. For
more info, call 752-4270.
�&$&��
SHOE OUTLET
NAME BRAND SHOESAf
Quality Casual Shoes $15
Ladies Dress and Casual Shoes
at discount prices
Large Selection of Name Brand
Tennis Shoes $12.88 to $29.88
752-2332
203 West Ninth
one block off Evans Street
' ' yss. -
fS,SSW?"S's.SSSJS' WSSSSSS
7uesdaifi !ede&(tup Tfwx&up frnba.
oatawou
I
I
i
Carolina East Mall
(North Entrance�Near Belk's)
756-6078
OPEN MONSAT.
� AM to t PM
Until one roa per coupon.
Not vand with other offers
Process & Print
with this coupon
From 110, 126, 35mm or
Disc Coior Print Film.
19 Vac per print
Featurlng HAPPY PAYSI
DOQ GONE IT
DAY
No Cover
Build the "perfect"
Hot Dog
House High Balls
$1.75
WING IT
DAY
Chicken Wings
With All The
Condiments
Draft $.50
Pitcher $2.00
Disc Color Print Film. S ���
19 Vac per print "
(ref.29)A 11.98 dev. chg. (reg. $2.98) I! �-��
Example: 24 exp. film reg. $9.94 Chef
NOW $4.73 Special
nrattsitiM ei
The Arbor
SOUTH OF TH
BORDER FIESTA
Build Your Own
Taco with all
the ingredients!
Margaritas $1 75
Tequila Sunrise
$1.75
Dos Equis XX $1.50
Join us for HAPPY DAYS, Mon.Fri serving Hoi and Heavy Hors
d'ouervres, 5-7p.m.
Band hours are 9 p m. -lam. Daily drink specials are available all day
long. Dress Code Enforced. Open 6 p.ml a.m.
ftamada Inn � 301 Greenville Blvd. � 756-2792
Chef
Special
Shrimp &
Chablis
$9.95
PIRATE PARTY
Featuring our
Fabulous Pizza
Spread
Draft $.50
Pitcher $2,00
Schnapps $2.00
FESTIVE
FRIDAY
Chef's Choice
of Hot & Heavy
Hors d'ouevres
Irish Coffee $2.00
Hot Cider $2.00
Crab legs
& Shrimp
with Chablis
$9.95
i
Choice of our
3 all you can
eat specials
$10.95
BAND
Jan. 27-31
Prowler
�' '
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mMWmmwmm0vmmawMmm�m





rHE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 30, 1986
College Tuition Keeps Rising, Students Have Mixed Feelings
B HKTHWHICKKR
I l students have mixed opi-
nions as the cost o public educa-
tion, once traditionally among
the best buv, is getting more ex-
pensive
The average cost is now $4,587
foi tuition, room and
board
EC
� NC lesidents feel the
ion is a fair and
�onable sum.
I think ECU's tuition is a
good buy as compared to out-of-
state tuition and in-state tuition
in states elsewhere cited Starla
Moore, a senior majoring in
psychology.
According to Claire Ward, a
senior majoring in sociology,
"the price of tuition is fair, but 1
feel there should not be any in-
creases in the near future
Ninety percent of the out-of-
state students surveyed felt the
$1805 tuition was far too expen-
sive.
"The price of out-of-state tui-
tion is greatly escalating. With
tuition being nearly two-
thousand dollars, spending
money is left at a minimum
cited Steve Rumney, a
sophomore business major.
"1 feel pressure to excel
because of the price of a North
Carolina education added
Rumney.
Tuition alone rose last year
eight percent for students atten-
ding college in their home state.
The increase was 11 percent for
out-of-state students.
The average public college bill
is nearly half of the cost per year
to attend a private university.
Meredith College, a private col-
lege in Raleigh charges in excess
of two-thousand dollars per
semester for tuition, room, and
board.
The cost of a private education
has led many students to apply to
public universities. The Universi-
ty of North Carolina at Chapel
Kill is considered a "public ivy
league school" by many college
guidebooks that have recently hit
the market.
The University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill. NC
State University and ECU's tui-
tion border near the same price.
North Carolina raised it's
charges by less than 5 percent, as
did Alabama, Arizona, Arkan-
sas, California, Idaho, Mainer,
Michigan, New York, Ohio,
Tax Revenue Growth Causes Concern
R 1 E1GH, NC(UPI) � Two-
straight of sluggish
North Carolina tax
is officials on edge
ethei the state will
budget crisis when
urn to the General
)1 in June,
latest figures show a 1.94
percent increase in revenue for
last month when compared to
December 1984. Statistics for
November 1985 showed an in-
crease of 3.57 percent over
revenue collected a year earlier.
The figures were well below the
6.3 percent yearly growth rate
projected when legislators last
summer adopted the state's
1985-86 budget, which must be
balanced. The sluggish revenue
collections stunned some officials
who worry the state may face
financial problems if the decline
continues at a time when North
Carolina also faces cuts in funds
because of the Gramm-Rudman-
Hollings law requiring a balanced
federal budget.
"It causes all of us a great deal
of concern said Sen. Tony
Rand, D-Cumberland, chairman
of the Senate Base Budget Com-
mittee. "We believe the (revenue
estimates) we based the budget on
will hold up.
Student Aid Programs Recently Shrink
W SHINGTON,D.C. (CPS)
leni aid programs will
� : 4.3 percent as of
I. figures released by the
ol Management and
si week indicate.
� are the first mandated
Gramm-Rudman for-
balance the federal
while educators say black.
d middle-income
the brunt of the
the) now think the
l-Rudman law � named
: ing senators Philip
(R-Tex.) and Warren
R H.)� will have a
on students when
und of cuts it requires
t ii (tetober.
� illowing years, reduc-
have to be tour to five
urge as this year's in
he budget by
sducators think cur-
i! cuts will hurt certain classes
while convincing
give up making
s' udent Loans
� certainly accelerate
d � declining black and
ticipation in post-
�- education contends
Mitchem, director of the
incil of Educational
� Vss viations.
as 80 to 90 percent of
dents in black colleges
me federal aid, Mit-
another straw on the
ick, but how many
.an the camel take?"
Winston Brown, dean of
d a; Xavier Universi-
� primarily black school in
( leans.
We have seen a significant
in minorities applying
Princeton financial aid officer
! inda Ensor reports.
isor speculates, however,
middle-income students
i will suffer the most.
"If there are fewer and fewer
dollars, the pressure will be
greater to be more careful in
needs analysis, adds Tom
Wolnin, an side to Rep. BUI Ford
(D-Mi.).
Moreover, limited funds will
force Pell Grants into a
"statutory reduction" in which
students with less need will get
smaller amounts of aid.
But lower-income students
may have a harder time getting
Guaranteed Student Loans as
Gramm-Rudman's cuts continue,
says Bill Clohan, a lobbyist for
the Consumer Bankers Associa-
tion.
Gramm-Rudman will cut the
�'allowance" that banks get when
they make GSLs from 3.5 percent
interest to 3.1 pervent.
The initial allowance cut,
which applies only to the first
year of a loan, "will have a
minimal impact, " Clohan says
But cutting the allowance fur-
ther, as some legislators want,
will provoke banks to make sure
students are good credit risks on
their own.
In banks' views, of course,
students from middle-and upper-
income families are better credit
risks than students from low-
income backgrounds.
"Making (loans) more restric-
tive will make loans available on-
ly to the white middle-class he
adds.
When the allowance on loans
to students was cut back in 1973,
"the program crashed" because
bankers refused to continue len-
ding due to the squeeze on their
profit margin, Clohan
remembers.
As for the next few years, "it's
a very tenuous program he
adds.
The cuts would hurt all the
more because Pell Grants, unable
to keep up with inflation, forced
low-income students in recent
years to borrow more under the
GSL program, observers say.
Others expect the current cuts
will hurt private schools with
high tuitions the most.
They could force still other
schools to eat into their en-
dowments to get money to help
Interested In
Studying Abroad?
Information on academ ic
exchange opportunities th roughout
the world through the lit ernational
Student Exchange Prog-a m (ISEP),
at ECU. Cost information available
from:
Dr. R. Hursey Jr.
ISEP Coordinator
Austin 222
Phone 757-6418 (office)
756-0682 (home)
ata&
eat P"cC
Lunch Special
Mon-Sat
11-3
9 oz. Chopped sirloin
King Idaho Baked
Potato, Texas Toast
Small salad & Drink
v $2.87 j
s4 pieat falcicc t eatf
STEAK HOUSE
students who used to depend
more on federal aid in school.
On the other hand, some com-
munity colleges think the cuts
might actually help them.

Oregon and Wyomiig. Fees for
both residents and non-residents
dropped in Oklahorm.
Room and board cost $2,343 at
the average public campus this
year, up $101 from last year
For graduate school, state
campuses charged tiition and
fees averaging $1,42" for state
residents and $3,199 for non
state residents.
Tar Landing Seafood
January Specials
All You Can Eat
$6
9
Any One Or Any Combinational To4 items
Shrimp, Oysters, Trout,
Clam Strips, Deviled
Crabs, Flounder
Alaskan Crab Legs Or
Steamed Shrimp
Served With Fried Or Baked Potato, Cole Slaw.
Hushpuppies.
&
yx
.
AiAiJO AMtAL
A
105 Airport Road
Greenville, NC
- - i . ,

11 undi r AM. i v
v v
cou
Kentucky Nugget Snack
6 Kentucky Nuggets
Kentucky Fries
1 Large Drink
Plus Tax
"We do Chicken Right"
Coupon Redeemable at
Greenville locations only
Expiration Date 3-3-86
RUSH
SIGMA PHI
EPSILON
LIFETIME
EXPERIENCE
Thursday, Jan, 30 if
Pizza, Pepsi and the Tri Sigs
at the Sig Ep House
Monday and Tuesday if
Campj
Question: Ho do vou tee! th
space program in the tuture?
trate on manned or unmanned
tott Long
H
"I
real
at tea
anothc
centra
more
about hair rr.ar
ned
Kristi thervtrrt!
Physical 7 �
"The spa
jus-
thing, but the ;
knevs u hat
I think the pul
with,
V

I)ae Hanoartk
Busiru
"1 don't thii �
will
much. Thev
manned flij
will be a lot sal :i
were ir.
ast
Fall Bre
Continued hrom Page 1
a better Home,
requeo
reasonable
The SG
numerous
would arise witl
Break and H g in
same c Pres dei
SGA, David B
not on! v.
time to buii.
houses and d i
time to ga;r
students.
Associate De Al
ander agreed "with Homecominj
v
V)
t�
K
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0

cov
2
A.
tf
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fit
4&
o�r
$�
i

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it

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00
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.1)1 I
d Feelings
tyg Feesfor
v. and non residents X
pvtii i 1 $2,343 at
iOimpusthis
- vear
! ol,state
i ionand
vfoistate
non-
ng Seafood
Can Eat
linutinn
$6
W
sOr $8"
1 J
Road M
HHMUBBMi
N
E
CE
igs
W7
Campus Voice
Question: How do you feel the Space Shu d isaster will effect the
space program In the future? Do you thirN ASA should concen-
trate on manned or unmanned missions?
Scott Long
Biology, Sophomore
"I think what happened will
eally slow down the program for
at least one year until they have
another flight. They should con-
centrate on unmanned missions
more than they do now to make it
about half manned, half unman-
ned
Reggie McDonald
Industrial, Technology Senior
"They should continue with
manned missions. I don't think
the disaster will affect the pro-
gram as much as people think.
It's understood that these people
are taking a risk when they go in-
to space
kristi Overstreet
Physical Therapy, Freshman
"The space program should
just continue. It was a terrible
thing, but the people (on board)
knew what they were getting into.
I think the publicity was handled
with such distaste
Herb Bean
Sociology
"The program should concen-
trate on unmannedexploration,
looking at the cost-effectiveness
of having manned space flights.
I'm glad the schoolteacher had
insurance- I wish the others had.
It's a risky business
Dave Hanczarek
Business, Freshman
"I don't think what happened
will affect the program that
much. They should continue
manned nights; the next flight
will be a lot safer just as they
were more careful after the three
astronauts died in 1967
Stephanie Taylor
Communication, Sophomore
"They should have manned
missions, and instead of putting
people into space so often, they
should take time between flights
to make sure they're safe. I don't
think that future flights will be
delayed that much because of
this
Fall Break Change
Continued From Page 1.
a better Homecoming, I think the
request is more than
reasonable
The SGA pointed out
numerous complications that
would arise with having Fall
Break and Homecoming in the
same week. President of the
SGA, David Brown, stressed that
not only would there be shorter
time to build floats and decorate
houses and dorms, but also less
time to gain full interest from the
students.
Associate Dean Rudolph Alex-
ander agreed "with Homecoming
on the weekend after break, the
student committee would run in-
to problems trying to get their
work done in time The Student
Committee is appointed by the
Homecoming Steering Commit-
tee to assist in organizing and car-
rying out Homecoming plans.
Brown commented, "I think
it's fantastic we were able to
reach a compromise that is acep-
table to all
Now that the proposal has
been accepted by the Faculty
Senate, it will go to Chancellor
Howell for final approval.
R9



O
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I
Gtf
oo

sVev
tP' ,A
306
-
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.sriS
�� 3 0K�
SME Ties For First Place In Contest
Bv JENNIFER MYERS
SUflWrttar
The Society of Manufacturing
Engineers, or SME, is a national
professional and student
organization for people working
or studying in the field of
manufacturing.
Student Chapter No. 152 on
ECU's campus was chartered
about a year ago, with the aid of
William McPherson, head of the
Industrial Technology Depart-
ment. The chapter had 35 initial
student members and two faculty
members. But now ECU's SME
has over 100 active members.
Recently, the chapter tied for
first place in the National
Membership Contest with 55 new
members along with Alford
University in New York.
SME is open to all students. 90
percent of the members are In-
dustrial Technology majors, with
10 percent in majors such as com-
puter science and business.
By being associated with the
national organization, whose of-
fice is in Dearborn, Michigan, the
student chapter can benefit in
many professional areas. A stu-
dent member seeking a job can
send his resume to the national
office for review from a wide
range of manufacturing
organizations. Information on
interviewing can be provided,
and a national monthly magazine
published for SME is also sent to
all members.
"The SME strives to promote a
professional organization on the
local level according to
McPherson. "We have meetings
twice a month, where we have
speakers or go on fieldtrips. In
the past, we have gone to Con-
solidated Diesel in Whitakers,
NC, and are in the process of set-
ting up trips to IBM and Nor-
thern Telecom
In order to become cerified as a
manufacturing technologist, a
student or professional must pass
a three hour fundamental test. If
you have 10 years of manufactur-
ing experience, on the job, a test
is also required in your area of
specialization. The tests are sent
to National Headquarters, where
they determine if you pass.
The test is offered twice a year
on campus. Four weeks before
the tests, workshops are held
where canidates spend two hours
a week going over the areas on
the test. This semester the test
will be offered in late March or
early April.
Elections for new officers will
be held in February. I hen in
March, a workshop, held in
Charlotte, and sponsored hv the
National SMF, will help the nr
officers learn the duties oi tl
offices. This is also a time tor stu-
dent chapters to sher' idea on
membership drives, fundraisers,
and other
If any 51 interested
the SME, please contact Dr.
M Pherson rid rial
I echnology DT)
in Flanagan
Spring Breal
DAY ION A Bl H !
Designers of I ravel
is your best
Foi inicall I an 757-1520
HOME COOKED FC
Dailj Specials
1 meat, 2 vegetables & bread for $1.99
Large Plate � All You Can I at Vegeta
1 Meat, Bread & Tea $4.07 plus I a
MEAL PLANS AVAILABLE $2.50 �
lr
512 E. 14th St. Near D
Call for Take-Outs 752-0476
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEI K I I a.m. 8 p.m
�p r
B
THE YEARBOOK OF EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSIV
Portraits 1986
SCHEDULE
All dates: 9-12am & 1 5pm
februaru 3i3
ne�fl
Seniors�
(Sign up at the Buccaneer)
Underclassmen �9larcb
and seniors & retakes y7Oy
Faculty
b
aoove
chh
es
�5poses �yYo charge�
Questions? 757-6501
2nd floor�publications building
�� rf �� me
��-��
�'���-�'�
a





THEE AST CAROMNIAN
Entertainment
JANUARY 30. 198ft Pac 8
The Peoples A eta
Stallone Strikes In 'Cobra
(UPl) - Question: How do
you direct an actor who earns $12
million per movie?
Answer: With tender loving
care.
The actor is Sylvester Stallone,
the highest salaried per former in
the history of a town profligate
when it comes to paying actors
The director is George P.
osmatos, who directed Stallone
in Rambo: First Blood II and in
he recent film Cobra
Noi only was Cosmatos faced
with Stallone's power as the
world's No. 1 box-office star, he
also had to live with the fact thai
Stallone is a seasoned directoi
himself.
Stallone directed Rocky 11,
Rocky III, and Rocky IV, in
which he starred, and Paradise
Alley and Staying Alive in which
he did not.
Cosmatos has only directed
five films himself. o which the
besi known is The Cassandra
Crossing.
The Italian-born filmmaker is
no stranger to high-powered
stars. He directed Sophia I oren,
Richard Harris and Burt Lan-
caster in The Cassandra Cross-
ing, and Richard Burton and
Mar cello Mastroianni in
Stallone
Massacre in Rome He also
directed Rogei Moore, David
Nivei V tm Holder, in
tpe to Athena
But ;ari ied the
intin I; e weighi o
ne, res have
Si
-
gi sses
around the world.
Cosmatos, who now makes his
home in British Columbia,
speaks five languages, all of them
heavily accented in a gruff
baritone. Evidently he's learned a
seventh tongue � Stallonese.
From all reports, Cosmatos
and Stallone never had a cross
word during the course of Rambo
II and the recently completed
Cobra.
"Sly never told me where to
put the camera Cosmatos said
the other day. "But he makes
suggestions about the way he
thinks scenes sould be played. Of
course, we discussed those sug-
gestions.
"On the set Sly left the direc-
tion to me. Like many actors, he
was interested in getting the best
possible performances in every
scene
And if actor and director were
not in agreement?
"When our ideas clashed, we
did it both ways or his way
Cosmatos said with a laugh. "He
is a very creative man who
changes dialogue and bits of
Stallone has made it big as the strong silent character who prevails in th
Albums You Migit Have Missed
A Look At T
business. Don't forget, Sly is also
a writer. Fortunately, we have the
same tastes.
"We both make pictures with
passion and love, which is what
has made Steven Spielberg so suc-
cessful.
"Not many people know it,
but Sly is a true intellectual. His
image as Rocky and Rambo
would make it seem otherwise
But he reads a book a day and
has keen insight into human rela-
tionships.
"He doesn't watch films in
projection rooms. He goes to
theaters and sits in the back to
watch and listen to audience reac-
e end.
tion. S!v is a student of
psychology who understands
what audiences want
C o s m a t o i d v � a 11 o n e
displayed almost no temperament
during ; tion, ad .
was unne essry to handle the star
See MA . Pa�e 10
By DANIEL MAI RKR
y nlrruinmrnt Mm.r
In the world of music, it's too
often that certain albums go
through the vears as un-
distinguished works of
Hopefully, we in The East
Carolinian's features Depart
ment can set the record s;ran
We're not the only ones who ow:
several albums that are of top-
notch listenability, however, and
we don't claim to know the entire
musical spectrum. rherefore,
with your help, we can dig up
of those dusty albums that never
received justifiable sa
th the reader
' e mure
of the past
ol course,
b il
decid( . sen(j in a ls
' ev � reach-
1 �e ; e a hit or
tw� �� na even have
one on the
V isking is no
Thriller, Horn to Run. I ed Zep-
Pl� f v similar
:�- reached
� e to dwell on
Of
HI NKY DOREY - David
Bowie. Probably the most ac-
cessible Bowie album that ever
was carved into vinyl. You'll find
"Changes "Andy Warhol
"Bitch" and a whole lot of other
progressive jewels on this collec-
tion. Unfortunately, it's hard to
find, and a trip to your local
record store whould prove
fruitless. However, Hunky
Dorey is not just an album for
eclectic Bowie fans. Au Con-
iraire. This album contains very
listenable music that most pop
and progressive cnnosieurs
would find entertaining.
MADMAN ACROSS THK
Jazz Band To Appear Feb. 3
The immortal sound ol jazz, as
performed by the Preserval
Hall Jazz Band, will appear on
Monday. This traditionally sold-
out event is sponsored bv the Stu-
dent Union Special Concerts
Committee of East Carolina
University, and will begin at 8
p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
"Oldest of the Living Old "
The motto is apt for Preservation
Hall, showcase for the last of the
the � ea
n m e
ieland, I
playing tradi-
v Orleans jazz. Called
article, in contrast to
ial, 2-beat, and
"white" Dix-
.1 is high-spirited
simple and dignified,
sometimes ragged but
uninhibited!) incandescent.
New is the home ol
iav. But the musk and many ol
the musicians followed the
The Preservation Hail Jazz Band will appear in Hendrix Theatre on
Monday at 8 p.m. Tickets are available now from the Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall Student Center. Tickets a re $3 for ECU students
and guest, $7.50 for ECU faculty staff, and $9 for the public and at
the door.
money up North after World
War I. The distinctive, tradi-
tional jazz continued to be played
in the Negro community in New
Orleans, but it was lost outside
the city to all but historians and a
few buffs.
Preservation Hall was founded
in 1961 to give audiences a chance
to rediscover the vitality and
charm of the original jazz form,
played live by the dwindling
ranks of the original musicians,
all contemporaries of Louis Arm-
strong, Bunk Johnson, King
Oliver. Bessie Smith and Jelly
Roll Morton.
Art dealer Larry Borenstein
and a sm?1! group of interested
jazz fans tounded the center in
Borenstein's French Quarter
gallery, originally as an open
rehearsal hall for a recording ven-
ture. Sandra and Allan Jaffe, a
young Philadelphia couple, soon
took over. The small hall still
stands � a plain, dingy room
with wooden benches � and
many of the same rules apply to-
day.
Emphasis is on listening. There
is no dancing and liquor is not
sold. Admission once was free,
with listeners expected to con-
tribute to a kitty; now there is a
small charge. The musicians are
paid just above union scale. For
many it is the first time their
musical ability has provided them
with a living income. The Jaffes
sell recordings of the group and
book trips for them, such as this
engagement.
Two standing-room-only
engagements at the 1967 and 1968
Stanford Summer Festival in
California brought the band to
increasing national attention and
a standing-room-only perfor-
mance at Philharmonic Hall in
New York's 1968 Lincoln Center
Festival. Following this they suc-
cessfully captivated the rock
world with an impressive stand
(and repeat engagement, at San
Francisco's famous Fillmore
West.
WATER � Elton John. There
are those who believe the only
thing that could possibly be con-
sidered an E. J. classic is Goodbye
Yellow Brick Road. Not true.
Madman evokes a serious mood
that none of his other albums
could come close to, and on top
of that, the record is just plain,
no-nonsense, incredibly good
music. If you happen to get a
chance to listen to the thing, try-
out the title track, "Holiday'Inn
and Indian Sunset and if
you're the tasteful person you
claim to be, you'll be hooked.
What a great album.
PRIMITIVE MAN
Icehouse. This record, released
three years ago, is no classic, but
the sounds eminating from the
grooves should grab you all the
same. The group came out with a
blase album last year entitled
Sidewalk, and the critics shot
more than one hole through the
vinyl as they cited too many
similarities between Icehouse and
the copyrighted sounds of Roxy
Music. The critics were right, but
Sidewalk was a poor attempt at
copying Roxy Music, unlike
Primitive Man which was a grand
interpretation of Bryan Ferry's
group. Very layered production,
insightful lyrics and surpris:
hooks make songs such as
"Street Cafe "Trojan Blue"
and "Goodnight Mr. Matthews"
instantly likeable and timeless.
No earnest listener should be
disappointed.
WAR'S GREATEST HITS -
War. A greatest hits collection?
Why not? This group deserves a
lot of credit for some of the more
enjoyable and engaging cross-
over music from the 70s. we're
not insinuating that none of their
other albums are wonderful, but
we are saying that their greatest
hits present a nice, tight package
that is more accessable to the ear.
Do you remember "Cisco Kid
"Why Can't We Be Friends0
"Low Rider "Summertime
"The World is a Ghetto and
the list goes on and on. You get
the idea. Buy it. Play it. Name
your children after it.
MOST ANYTHING BY
PETER GABRIEL - The man is
a musical and lyrical genius who
warrants more attention than he
gets. Our
purchase Peter Gabriel P
Live, as sort of a Gabriel
sampler '�Biko "1 Go Swimm-
ing "San Jacinto"
everything else shines verv brig
ly on this, one of the better live
albums. Speaking of live
albums
YOU HAD TO BF THERE -
Jimmv Buff en. Before his demise
following the release of Volcano,
Jimmy stood high in our book
favorite fun artists. Mosi m
snobs dismissed his music as be-
ing trite, stupid and ; (of
course, music snobs are no fun at
parties) and after Volcano, Buf-
fet! had slipped into a mellow-
maturity bracket m music.
My God, though. You Had To
Be There is one of the funniest,
tenderest, most endearing and
tun live albums ever recorded.
Pretty good b ast, huh'1
Anyway, listen to this album and
have fun. Some of the standouts:
"God's Own Drunk
"Margaritaville "Pirate Looks
At Forty" and much more.
See CLASSIC, Page 9
From The Not So R ight
Where There's Smoke
By DANIEL MALRER
liimilmni E4Hor
Smoking.
Here we lie in the tobacco belt, paradise to
Philip Morris, R.J. Reynolds and the millions of
smokers who pollute our air. That's ok, though. I
smoke, and I'm not one bit sorry about the pollu-
tion.
Funny. As 1986 dawned over
the hazy horizon, resolutions
went through my mind, resolu-
tions filled with thoughts of
chivalry and health. Naturally,
quitting tobacco was on the
forefront of my health ideals,
but that ideal scared me. I
began to think about the
ramifications of giving up
smoking, and if there's one pro-
blem I have, it's thinking too
much.
First, I thought about gaining
weight. Now, I'm not too trim
to begin with, and extra tonnage
seems unappealling. I know how the ladies think
and how they judge men by the size of their
tushies. I simply do not need that extra pressure
and extra buildup.
Second, I thought about parties. In the beginn-
ing of my love-affair with smoking, parties played
an important role. I needed a beer in one hand and
something else in the other, and since a female
wasn't always available, a cigarette filled the
vacancy perfectly and nonchalantly.
A cigarette at parties is a wonderful device.
Waving the tobacco stick casually through the air
felt comfortable. Pauses, periods and passes were
accented nicely by the motion of the cigarette. Try
motioning with a beer and see how awkward it is,
especially when you spill brew all over a girl. Sure!
it's fun to look at the stain, but she's not going to
let you stare at the result of your handiwork for
longer than two seconds.
Of course, if you wave the cigarette and burn
somebody, the situation can prove equallv embar-
rassing.
�. Back to the point of the mat-
ter. 1 would be at a loss during a
party when I'd find my spare
hand empty. And since I'd pro-
bably be fat, few girls would
want to occupy my free hand. I
also wondered that if 1 couldn't
have a cigarette or a girl, what
would occupy the emptv? Then
I thought, what if 1 had a joint?
Obviously, there is a point to
be made here. Quitting smoking
leads to harder drugs. Next
thing you know, you'd see me at
parties carrying a pharmacv in
my pockets.
Parties and obesitv proved to
sway me from thinking about breaking the
hab.t.For health's sake, I thought about the good
points of not smoking.
My breath undoubtedly would improve. Also
financially, I'd be better off while the money as �f
by magic, would start reappearing agam. After
walking up two flights of stairs, I wouldn't fee
like I was scaling Everest. Fr.ends would probably
look at me with big, proud eyes and say
"Dan, we're so proud of you "
But, as I would turn around, my ears would
See THERE'S, Page 9
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 30, 1986
Saturday Morning For Sale
r
inyl
Good morning little
of sunshine. School's
me to snuggle up to the
d tune in to Saturday
at the massacres
rdaj mornings and televi-
mere thought dredges
ids of sugarplum isions
) B iggs, Daffy, Elmer,
tspei Pebbles,
Woody, Rocky.
e, (.iumby and lin.
ries alone arc enough to
i g grown ups
miniscent smile. We
cai toons with wide-
and they were our
enough, cartoons
by a few com
( orn Flakes
sonable
i time of the
n the cartoon
. even in col-
he lei sons and
guess those were
New York
ol middle age.
Morn and Dad
yelling from the bedroom for us
to shut up she said. "We would
get up at 6 in the morning and the
cartoons were what kept us from
waking our parents. Oh, yeah.
Mighty Mouse was good, too
It's tough to get up that early,
but have you taken a look at
what's on Saturday morning
television lately? We're not talk-
ing horror, or even horrible.
We're talking borderline
criminal.
"Dangermouse" wears a patch
over his eye and fights a villain
that is a green frog. "Thunder-
birds 2086" features marionettes
in space. This is the mild stuff.
High-tech, high-violence car-
toons include "Robotech
"Terrahawks "Silver Hawks"
and "Voltron On the low-tech
side there's "Hulk Hogan's Rock
V Wrestling" and "Mr. T" the
cartoon.
In the "old days a duck
would smack a rabbit or a cagey
mouse would clobber a hungry
cat. In today's cartoons, people
hit people.
There is something even more
offensive than the violence. Now
there are shows that do nothing
but sell, sell, sell. Here are a few:
"Pole Position" after the video
game, "GoBots" after the toy,
"Dungeons and Dragons" after
the adventure board game,
"Gummi Bears" after the
candy. Used to be that cartoon
characters, when they became
very popular, were used to sell
something. Fred Flintstone's
daughter Pebbles would sell
cereal. That's OK. But now they
start out with the product and
then figure out how to wrap a
cartoon character or concept
around the for sale sign. Entire
marketing campaigns come com-
plete with cartoon shows.
A child's mind is easily maim-
ed, and is certainly no match for
a marketing man accustomed to
twisting an adult's eye toward a
product that no one needs until
the slick ads appear on TV. To an
adman, the child must be like a
play toy compared to an ad-wise
adult.
The selling of Saturday morn-
ing is not something that has slip-
ped by without notice. Peggy
Charren of Action for Children's
Television even testified before
Congress about the ugly state of
affairs on such a happy day of
the week.
Since then things have gone
down the tubes, so to speak. You
can be sure that the advertisers,
marketers, syndicators and net-
works will do nothing to change
their tactics for one good reason
� the ads work. Think about the
most popular toys last Christmas
and then think how many come
to us in cartoon form. It's easy to
understand why every kid on the
block wants the same toy at the
same time. TV made them do it,
especially Saturday morning TV.
The old cartoons were far from
perfect, and certainly were not
free of violence. But there was a
line the cartoon dared not leap
beyond. That is the difference
between the Saturday morning of
today and yesterday.
Wf!
ss?iMMuitss2.ofllIc�rrMEENs
THEATRES
BUCCANEER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greenville Squere Shopping Center
Twice in a Lifetime
1-3:05-5:10-7:15-9:20
md
ecture Dispels Old Rumor
Waiting time Is over.
My Chauffeur
1-3-5-7-9
COMING NEXT FRIDAY
THE COLOR PURPLE
L
� �,���-���� �����r.Y,iirMi.ri rrnnJ
A V FU"npi�ofessor
thersity of
speak oi le tnsth
surrouiidiitg Dr.
i !) i �ai4 p.m.
dendenhall Student
in"1 44
.lysician esponsi-
a ny oiperson, lure for v hole
�and
" 'e bat-
tlefield and other emergency
situations where transfusions
were needed, according to Wynes
in a recent telephone interview.
Drew was also responsible for the
training of many other black
surgeons during a time when
blacks were just beginning to
enter the medical field.
Monday's presentation will
seek to dispel the myth of Drew's
death. Titled "Myth and History-
How the Famed Black Physician
Dr. Charles Richard Drew Was
e e e
There's Dan
I Fi �m Page 8
n a lot
HKRi
lun at parties
member that beer he
I how many
oar on
oui n quit-
I be an
v h o
ispecting
: breath
still be
d) and
ip the
� b � � . .luse I
the staii well).
ieed.
! inuai ! came
�und the bend. I
ing for one hour. 1
was fidgety, nervous and, above
all, hungry. I felt like the pounds
uere suddenly bulging out of my
body. As I made my way through
the smoke of other people, I
found the keg and poured myself
a cold one.
Then, I saw her. Beautiful,
gorgeous and unintelligent. 1
went up to her and started talking
about how great the new year was
and how great her eyes were.
Unexpectedly, my beer-hand
started swaying, and just in time,
I caught myself.
1 sat the beer down and reach-
ed for her hand.
"Do you have a cigarette?" I
asked.
"Why?" she said.
"Because I said with a leer,
"1 love you
She bought the act, and I
haven't quit smoking since.
SOT Allowed to Bleed to Death
Outside a Whites Only North
Carolina Hospital Wynes'
presentation will probe into the
details surrounding what has
become a very widespread
rumour.
After Drew's tragic death
following an automobile accident
just north of the Haw River in
Burlington, rumours spread that
he was allowed to die outside a
whites only hospital. Drew's
death was not due to any
negligence on the part of the
hospital staff, according to
Wynes. The bleeding was too ex-
tensive and the hospital did its
best to save Drew, Wynes said.
Drew was forty-five at the time of
his death, and in the intervening
days, the story has grown and
distorted grotesquely.
Wynes is working on a
biography of Drew that will cover
Drew's life as a boy on the streets
of Washington, DC, up to and
following his death. He authored
a book, Race Relations in
Virginia, 1870-1902, and he joint-
ly authored A History of
Georgia, with Bartley, Boney,
Coleman, Holmes, and
Spaulding.
ST. PETER'S SCHOOL
Grades K-6
OPEN HOUSE, 1-3 p.m.
Sunday, February 2, 1986
Classic Records Continue
Continued From Page 8
25 O'CLOCK � Dukes of the
Stratosphere. These guys won't
fool you if you know what XTC
sounds like. XTC found another
way to have fun, and they decid-
ed to put out a tongue-in-cheek
tribute album to the acid age of
the 60s. Complete with
backmasking, strange Beatlesque
orchestrations and lyrics reminis-
cent of your last acid trip, 25
O'clock shines with what it set
out to do parody the 60s.
Listen to the title track and
"Mole of the Ministry" just to
sample some of the insanity.
You'll be impressed.
EDITOR'S NOTE:
Suggestions and comments are
welcome, and may be dropped
off at our offices or mailed to
Albums You May Have Missed,
CO The Features Department,
The East Carolinian, ECU,
Publications Building, Green-
ville, NC, 27834-4353.
1986-87 Applications Available
Meet our Teachers and Parents
Learn more about our programs
St.
Peter's School 2605 E. Fourth St Greenville
Phone: 752-3529
oIXlOiCv � �
a hat
Then
- ing
v
. ee me at
� �� pharmac
. �
a) g the
�' ut the .
� ng
ibtedly improve. Also,
j be better ofl h:le the money, as if
fould start reappearing again. After
wo flights of stairs, 1 wouldn't feel
ping Everest. Friends would probably
ith big, proud eyes and say:
0 proud ofou
Aould turn around, my ears would
Ht THERE'S, Page 9
LAMBDA
ALPHA
ftale4
C3
C-3
-&Zg�E&G&@&Z:
N 16 NT
BeWSHI
?:oo
PARTY
with Campus Marketing
YOUR BEST DEAL TO FLORIDA
S PRING BREAK: March 8-16
YOU DRIVE (TO THE PART)
$124.00
WE DRIVE (THE PARTY STARTS HERE)
$189.00


INCLUDES:
� "0u"3 ,rC TKKOI COOC- -C"SCC-3'C" -C MOut.fu
Dov'c-c 3eac- WE DRIVE aoges On . e -se
not ng Dui -oae' n grvway ;occes
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coa'oea rocs ciy o"a a " ce rjic's1
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gooa tim�
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MO Mr -g paN CM t �'C
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SPEND A WEEK - NOT A FORTUNE
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION D0k P�nr�fl II
AND SIGN UP �T TwT,
D 752-4801
For Reservations:
Tuesday & Thursday
Joyner Library (lobby)
5 to 7 p.m.
Spontortd by Campul Marketing mmommmni coumi x�
- m m
1 - � �- w






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BY JARRELL & JOHNSON
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Continued Krom Page 8
with kid gloves.
"But he knows what he wantv
On the set he is totally natural.
He acts so audiences can unders-
tand him and the character he
plays.
"He is successful because he
has the vulnerability of Robert
Mitchum and the strength of
John Wayne.
"On Cobra we worked in some
o the worst slums in Los
Angeles. In bars and other places
the lowest of the low would ap-
proach Siy with love and admira-
tion. He is an intellect who ad-
dresses himself to the real
public
According to Cosmatos,
Stallone was cooperative and did
not throw his weight around as
co-producer.
"The actors who give dire.
the most trouble are usually the
up-and-coming performers or the
very insecure ones he said.
"Sly, of course, is neither oni
those. He is a veteran and secure
like most real stars a'e.
"We shared the same vision on
Rambo 11 We had long discus-
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searched the
Thailand a
tes. V c finaih
on Mexico beca
to Hollyw
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"1 think wei � t $
ftcr two pictui
change a e i
know hat the
for the
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That's great. s hen a
works with a star i I S
he gets what he warn
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Walkii he Plai
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Overkill
BY FRIEDRICH
Pi Kappa Phi Fraternit
Tooth
SOU S�XI5T SUH�
TO THC riCTUM-Z
BY BROOKS
Monday, February 3
Mendenhall Student Center
Multi-Purpose Room
7:30-10:30
Tuesday, February 4
Jones Cafeteria
7:30-11:00
t
Pi rait- will
Ladv B
K I1M(i
and 6-U in t)
The Pirate-
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17
1 herese Iin
Henry
B JAM 1 sisii'N
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simple as c ossirtf
Vftei spending
collegiate yea s
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waiting in the wings, (all
transfers have
Henry is now takii
place on 1(1 basket! I
If anyone had an d f
about Henr, the f 5 jun
Virginia Beach. Va , d
laid the
the James Mad: ne
: IHI � I





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I HI- EAS1 C AROl INIAN
Sports
JANUARY 30, ISW
Page 11
Rejuvinated Pirates
Third In CAA Race
By SCOTT COOPER
Spurt MKw
After a dismal 7-21 record and
a 1-13 conference mark a year
ago, things are certainly looking
brighter for the ECU Pirate
Basketball Team.
The Bucs have shown tremen-
dous improvement after the first
half of their 1985-86 campaign.
With consecutive CAA victories
over George Mason (75-67)
Saturday and James Madison
(51-48) Monday evening, the
Pirates are 4-3 while sharing third
place (with George Mason) in the
conference standings.
ECU head coach Charlie Har-
rison is delighted with the team's
success thus far, but feels hard
work is still necessary.
"We have played within our
means � as a unit. We're a
smarter basketball team Har-
rison said while contrasting his
84-85 squad to this year's team,
"that's the reason for our success
in the first half of conference
play.
ter defensive play. ECU has made
126 steals this season, with 4h oi
those coming against CAA foes
Curt Vanderhorst leads the Bucs
with 32 thefts while Scott Hard)
is not far behind with 29. i
Harrison feels that good defense
is a key for the Pirates.
"We must continue to play
good defense Harrison said.
"Our half-court offense is not
dominating, so we need good
defensive effort to get easy
baskets
Pirate fans have especially, seen
the Bucs at their best ECU's 7-1
record at home exemplifies the
fact that they enjoy the con tines
of Minges Coliseum. "We played
awfully well at home, and tan
support lends to playing we!
home) Harrison stated.
However, Harrison feels �
there are other reasons for his
club's recent achievements
"The kids are a year older and
have improved over the
summer Harrison said. "We
The Steam-Roller Effect
"Going into the second half have the addition ol new kids �
fter two consecutive conference wins, their first in four years, the
Pirates will try to maintain their winning ways as they embark on a
three-game road swing including games against conference rivals
American and Nav.
Lady Bucs Fall To Madison
(of conference play), we've got
ourselves in a good position
Harrison added. "We can't rest
on what we've done, we have to
push to get better
Perhaps one reason for the suc-
cessful Pirate turnaround is bet-
they have helped our pr .
Our second team, so called,
helped also. Even it they hav
played, they've helped in pra
� because you're only as good as
See Pirates. Page 14
By IIMC'HANDI ER
mJsUMM Sp.H is f -
iefe
into an
team
he
for ECU,
at 15-4 � . 'ail and
5-1 in the conferenc e ! he I adv
1 overall,
and 6-0 in the conference.
The Pirates had only one lead
in the ballgame. That came at the
1 minute mark o' the name,
when the Bucs took an early 5-4
lead. ECU managed to stay close
until the five-minute mark oi the
half, with the Dukes leading at
the time 26-22. James Madison
then went on a 14-4 run that put
the Pirates down 40-26 at the
half. The Pirates never caught up
again after that.
Head Coach Emily Manwaring
commented on the outstanding
play of the Dukes. "The game
was totally dominated by James
Madison stated Manwaring,
"especially on the inside This
Therese Durkin (24) handles the ball in early season action.
was quite apparent as the Dukes
outrebounded ECU 38-21 for the
game.
Coach Manwaring also stated
that the Pirates' defensive efforts
have not been consonsistent thus
far this year. "It finally caught
up with us Manwaring said,
"you just can't fake your way
through defense
Lisa Squirtjwell still managed
to have a good game, despite the
defeat. She led the Bucs in scor-
ing and rebounding as she chip-
ped in 21 points and pulled down
nine boards.
Delphine Mabry was the only
other Pirate in double figures
witn 12. Other Pirates that helped
in the scoring total were Monique
Pompili and Gretta O'Neil with
six points each. Alma Bethea and
Sylvia Bragg each added five
while Pam Williams rounded out
the scoring with two points.
Pompili, seeing her first action
after returning from an injury, is
not yet 100 percent, according to
Coach Manwaring. Chris O'Con-
nor missed the game due to an in-
jury, and Loraine Foster didn't
make the trip for the Lady Bucs.
The next game for ECU will be
Saturday night at 7:30 in Minges
Coliseum. The pirates will be
playing host to American Univer-
sity, who they defeated 77-73
earlier this year at American.
Coach Manwaring stated that
American was very similar to
James Madison. "They are very
strong inside and are good
shooters Manwaring stated.
"They have an excellent player at
forward, Kelly Lane
Lane, a freshman, is currently-
leading the CAA in scoring and
shooting percentage. She is
averaging 18.4 points per game
and is shooting 59.1 percent from
the floor.
UAHi Uili til til m m tu ,u ht Uli u7
4 AU M.A AJU
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I he men s and women s swim teams faced a tough Tar Heel opposition last night as both squads suffered
79-34 defeats. See Tuesday's paper for further results.
Scharf Heads Scuba Instruction
By DAVID McGINNESS
uaianl sport. Mllor
Thanks in good part to Ray
Scharf, head of Aquatics at
ECU, this school has had scuba-
diving instruction since 1977.
From the first basic class of
seven students in 1977, the pro-
gram has expanded to advanced
and instructional levels, and has
become the most popular elective
on the ECU campus. Some 80
students enroll in the basic class
alone each semester, and over 500
have received NAUI (National
Association of Underwater In-
structors) certification.
But although scuba has
become very popular at ECU, no
university club has existed to
serve the needs of ECU divers.
All that is changing now, with
the formation by five ECU stu-
dent divers of the Coral Reef
Dive Club.
It is being created by Wade
Bunting (Pres.), Butch Varker
(Co. Vice Pres.), Clint Charles
(Co. Vice Pres.), Jim Swinson
(Secretary), and Alan Broadhurst
(Treasurer). The Coral Reep
Club's advisor is Ray Schark and
NAUI Divemaster-Assistant In-
structor Mark Hanna will serve
as its public relations manager.
The club is classified as com-
petitive, instuctional, and recrea-
tional. Its purpose is: A. To pro-
vide students, faculty and staff,
with the opportunity to meet with
diving enthusiasts and furl
their skills in the field of diving.
B. To provide members with the
opportunity to meet and ex-
change ideas and interests to pro-
mote safer and more enjoyable
diving for certified scuba divers
C. To provide individuals with
the opportunity to learn and par-
ticipate in skin diving-snorkelme,
adhering ;o the ECU Diving
Manual.
The club will sponsor trips
year-round to both North
Carolina and more distant diving
See ECU, Page 13
Henry Provides Scoring As Pirates Prosper
By JANET SIMPSON
sports Writer
He's finesse out on the
perimeter. Pure power
underneath. Mure hell Henry and
a basketball � a combination
pretty hard to beat.
1 rom Laurenburg he came, br-
inging his sweet, automatic jump
shot and awesome inside game in
tow
A move from a Division! 11
school to a Division-1 is no easy
task, yet Henry made it look as
simple as crossing the street.
After spending his first two
collegiate year's at St. Andrews
Presbyterian College and a year
waiting in the wings, (all in-state
transfers have to sit out a year)
Henry is now taking his rightful
place on ECU's basketball team.
If anyone had any doubts
about Henry, the 6-5 junior from
Virginia Beach, Va definitely
laid them to rest with his play in
the James Madison game on
Mondav night. Playing for the
entire 40 minutes, Henry knock-
ed in a game-high 16 points and
grabbed six rebounds. He also
had four assists and three steals.
Statiscally, Henry is doing real-
ly well. Henry leads the team in
scoring with his 14.4 per game
average (14.9 against CAA com-
petition) while he is the team's se-
cond leading rebounder with an
average of 5.4 per game. Henry is
third on the team in steals with a
total of 17.
Winning games and high
averages are no strangers to
Henry. During his two year's at
St. Andrews, he was involved
with back-to-back conference
titles and more than 40 wins. He
was voted all-Conference and all-
South both year's and won DIAC
Player-of-the-Year honors during
his second season.
His high school days weren't
bad either. Henry won three var-
sity letters and averaged 17 points
and eight rebounds his senior
season. He started his high school
career at Princess Ann High
School in Virginia Beach;
however, opted to play his senior
Marchell Henry
year in Portsmouth, Va at
Frederick Military Academy.
During his senior season,
Henry, like all other talented
ballplayers, had to deal with the
recruiting process. He was going
to sign with American University
but chose not to. Eventually he
decided to attend St. Andrews.
"I was ready to sign with
American, but my parents didn't
want me in the Washington D.C.
area stated Henry. "I waited to
see what other offers I would get
and when I didn't really get what
I wanted, I called American
back. After the coach told me he
had given the scholarship to so-
meone else, I decided on St. An-
drews
"The coach from St. Andrews
saw me play and offered me a
scholarship. They were the No.
1 Division-Ill school in the coun-
try Henry added. "St. An-
drews was a good four year in-
stitution, and I figured I would
go there and work on my
academics
Henry was even prepared to let
basketball go, but things changed
somewhat during his sophomore
season. St. Andrews was put on
probation, and with the help of a
good friend of his, Gil Reynolds,
Henry found himself in the posi-
tion to get to play Division!
talking to coach Harrison, 1 felt 1
could come in and help the pro-
gram said Henry.
Coach Harrison seems pleased
with his star forward, but would
like him to do a little more. "I
want Marchell to do more, not
meaning to score more, but to be
more positive in rebounding, on
defense, etc. Marchell Henrv can
'7'm comfortable when the ball's in Marchell's hands. "
�Scott Hardy
basketball.
"Gil Reynolds told me he
could help me get into a Division-
I school stated Henry. "My
choices were ECU, Appalachian
State and UT Chatanooga. I
chose ECU
Location and Coach Harrison
were two of the main factors that
brought Henry to ECU. "Green-
ville is close to home and after
mean as much to this basketball
team as Marchell Henry wants to
mean stated Harrison.
Henry takes his role as a team
captain, along with teammate
Scott Hardy, very seriously. "Be-
ing a team captain, I'm looked
upon more by coaches and
players to take more control. I
See Transfer, Page 13





12
Hli EAST? VROI IN ! iM VRY K, l�8h
Transfer
( ontinued from p I 1
have to be prepared
each pra
game he stated
Be .
Her
against
wouldn't n
particular
teams
play a!
Hen: .
antii �
against thei
Henr vva
the IS
Marcheil Henry (25) Xoes up for rl
weekend as George Mason's Vjncf
vV
r
I
Cheese.20
Valid at all Greenvili
S
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a.
I
I
I
ALL YOU CAN
SALAD BAR
Good at participating Wondy t Not volid
with any �thar o�or or KIDS AAEAt
Float protant coupon whan ordoOng
Ona coupon par cwtomor.
ChooM bacon otra and tax aitro
whara appltcobto.
Orf Et EXPIRES: 2 � M
�I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 30, 1966
13
Continued from Page 11
Transfer Henry Paces Bucs ECU Scuba Program Popular
have to be prepared and ready for
each practice as well as each
came he stated.
Being the gentleman he is,
Henry does get fired up to play
against some teams, but he
wouldn't mention any names in
particular. "There are a few
teams that didn't think I could
play at the Division-1 level said
Henry. use their comments as
an emotional factor when we play
against them
Henrv was quite elated about
the Na game. "1 was reallv ex-
cited about playing them. Playing
against David Robinson was an
experience he said. "With a
few minor adjustments, we could
have beaten them. I'm looking
forward to the rematch
The game against the Universi-
ty of Kentucky also stuck out in
Henry's mind. "I feel we played
better than the final score in-
dicated he stated. "Going into
the game, 1 felt Kenny Walker
was the No. 1 player in the coun-
try, after playing them, I have my
doubts
There are always inspirational
people in an athlete's life, and
-Jl
W m�i ai-��a
MarcheU Henry (25i noes up for two in the Pirates' big C AA win this
� weekend as George Mason's Vincent McQueen (50) defends.
Henry has his too. "My mom
and dad have both had a great
deal of influence on me as well as
a good friend of mine, Mr.
Lietner stated Henry.
Most memorable moments
come few and far between, but
Henry remembers his well. "We
were playing against Coker Col-
lege my sophomore year. I scored
39 points and (we) won in double
overtime remembers Henry.
Henry feels confident about
the team itself. "1 feel we are
much more improved than last
year he said. "When we're
playing together with emotion,
we're a tough team to beat,
especially at home. 1 also think
Scott Hardy does a fine job runn-
ing the team.
"Our goal as a team is to be in
the top four in the conference
added Henry. "This way we can
get a first-round tournanment
game on our home court
Scott Hardy had nothing but
good things to say about Henry.
"MarcheU is a valuable asset to
the team. With him on the court
it keeps people from bunching up
on Curt stated Hardy. "I'm
comfortable when the ball's in
Marchell's hands
Praise also came Henry's way
from prep-school teammate and
buddie Keith Rivers. "Ever since
I've known MarcheU, I think he's
been quite a an exceptional
athlete. I think he should have
the green light said Rivers.
"Off the court, I think he's a
great person
Although the student fan sup-
port has been better for the last
couple of home games, Henry
feels it could be better. "I'm real-
ly disappointed in the student-fan
support. I would like to see the
fraternaties add sororities getting
involved in basketball aspects.
We do need the student's sup-
port Henry said. "Also, I
would like to thank the students
who have been coming out and
supporting us, and ask them to
please continue
Henry really enjoys listening to
music, especially jazz. He also
likes driving aroung in his new
1986 candy-apple red Fiero. Mar-
cheU Henry has definitely proven
to be St. Andrews loss and
ECU's gain.
Va lb. Single Only
February 4 &
ght February 5
h
Unlimited
Cheese .20
Tomato No Charge
Valid at all Gr�nvill�, Wilmington, Hemlock & Jacksonville Locations
Continued from Page 11
spots.
During spring break the club
will travel to Key West, Fla. Non-
divers who wish to observe the
sport andor do some snorkeling.
For Christmas 1986, the club
will travel to some of the famous
Florida springs to dive with the
manatee.
In addition, there will be year-
round trips (summer included) to
North Carolina quarries and
coastal-offshore dive spots.
These trips will involve activities
such as spearfishing, wreck div-
ing and night diving.
The club will sponser competi-
tions such as spearfishing
tourneys, treasure hunts and
underground trash collecting
trips with prizes for bringing up
the most trash.
According to advisor Ray
Scharf, the need for a student-
faculty-staff dive club at ECU
has existed for some time.
"It's a good idea, I've been
after students to do something
like this for years, but it's
something that had to be initiated
by them Scharf said. "It will
I
I
o
Cl.
5
I
I
I
ALL YOU CAN EAT
ONLY
SALAD BAR 99c
Good at participate Wondy'�� " vo,id
with any other oHer or KIDS' MIAL.
Please present coupon when ordertno
One coupon eer customer.
Omw, bacon o�tra ana" ta� e�tra
where applicable.
OWM EXrWIS: frfrM
KIDS' MEAL
Good at participating Wendy's. Not valid
with any othor offer or KIDS' Mf At.
PUo�� present coupon whan orderinf.
Ono coupon par customer.
Cheese, bocom extra and tax whore ap-
plicable.
OFFER EXPIRES: 2U
help to maintain interest in the
sport from recreational stand-
point, and it might get them in-
volved in the scientific aspects as
well
Club President Wade Bunting
felt that, "there's not that much
opportunity for the occasional
diver to meet with other divers
who have different interests
Bunting added. "Also it provides
an economical way to diving. It
cuts costs and gives people more
chances to go diving with a
group, experiencing a variety of
diving conditions and en-
vironments
The first meeting will be held
Monday, Feb. 3 from 3:00 p.m.
to 5:00 p.m. in Rm. 221
Mendenhall. Divers and non-
divers who are interested in join-
ing and-or finding out more
about the club, are urged to come
by even if they cannot attend the
entire meeting. A slide show will
be presented at the meeting,
showing scenes form past trips to
Key West.
The officers are in search of a
club logo which they could use
the T-shirts, etc. Anyone who
would like to contribute a design
should contact Butch Varker at
830-1715 or Clint Charles and
Tom Fore at 785-5321.
Once again, the club is open to
all students, faculty, and staff
and the officers would like to en-
courage all interested parties to
join. The club's success depends
on your support so get involved.
r009�00400�0��'����
Ho�rr Mrawrul Chmaa Owes
(DUctpl� ot Cbrtet)
llllOuwHtkBM 7Se1175
"In essentials. rUnUy
In non-essentials, yMAtm.
In all things, -Coot. "
Special Class For College Students
945 a.m. Chriatiaa Education (all aflat)
11:00 a.m. Worship- Open
Y
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�W����M����������W������W������������
IPfl
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�amp Seafarbx
CAMP COUNSELING � for those who love children. Sea Gull and
Seafarer are character and health development camps on the coast of orth
Carolina serving children ages 7-16. Recruiting staff for sailing, motorboating,
aquatics, golf, tennis, riflery, archery, canoeing, basketball, lacross, soccer,
nature studies, arts and crafts, nursing, office, food services and horseback riding
(Seafarer only). Qualifications: interest in children, ability to instruct one phase
of the camps' programs and excellent references. For further information write to
Don Cheek, Director, Camp Sea Gull (Boys) or to Judy Bright, Director, Camp
Seafarer (Girls), P.O. Box 10976, Raleigh, Sorth Carolina 27605.
Representatives will he at
Camp Day
Februan 11,1986
Rush
TKE
Thursday January 30th
RUSH PARTY
Monday February 3rd
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
Both Parties Begin at 7:30 and End at 11:00
�1





14
I HI FAST CAKOl INI AN
JANUARY o,l9K6
IRS Water Basketball
By STEPHANIE DEW
Miff Writer
Water sports are a big item on
the Intramural-Recreational Ser-
vices spring calendar. With
water-basketball, the latest in
water competition and swimming
meets to be held in the Minges
Aquatic Center, students should
dive for these IRS events.
The swim meet wil take place
Feb. 4; registration ends Jan. 30.
Basketball is now underway,
with 134 men's and 19 women's
teams hitting the courts. The lop
five picks are as follows:
1. The Fellows.
2. "Sultans of Swat
3. The Road Warriors.
4. The Y-Team.
5. Phi Kappa Tau.
The top five women's picks arc as
follows:
1. Thriller.
2. Umstead Jockettes
3. The Enforcers.
4. Campus Crusade
5. Sigma Sigma Sigma.
Games will be played:
5-11 MonThurs Minges
8-12 MonThurs Memorial.
4-11 Sunday, Memorial.
7-11 Sunday, Minges
Racquetball doubles competi-IRS HOURS
tion is swinging into action withSWIMMING POOLS
these No 1 top picks.Memorial Pool
Men'sM-WF7 a.m8 a.m.
M-F12Noon-l:30p.m.
1. Raymond Song, Al SmithM-F3:30 p.m6:30 p.m.
(returning champs).Sat.1 p.m5 p.m.
2. David Patton, Rick Kobe.
3. Andy Altman, Mike Shatle.Minges Pool
M-W-F8 p.m9:30p.m.
Women'sSun.1 p.m5 p.m.
1. Robbie Tweed, Kim Swen-
son (returning champs).WEIGHT ROOMS
2. Jackie Kirbv, Lisa Rohlet-Memorial
ter.M-Th
Friday9a.m5:30p.m.
Sat.11 a.m5 p.m.
Sneakei Sam unites you toSun.1 p.m5 p.m.
travel to the Iwharrie National
lorei. located near Asheboro,Minges
N.C. on a backpacking trip.M-F3 p.m7 p.m.
Pirates Seek Road Success
Continued from Page 11
you work in practice
In the two ECU wins over
Mason and Madison this past
week, and a nail-biter at William
& Mary (Jan. 13), the Pirates
showed their ability to win the
close ones. This was something
that ECU has not accomplished
in the past. Coach Harrison
believes it is a mental improve-
ment as much as a physical one.
"We had a close game against
William &. Mary and pulled it
out. The kids feel they can win
these games now Harrison ex-
plained. "(Their) mental attitude
is just as important as anything.
"We want to win the games we
can win Harrison added. "Our
goal is to have the home court ad-
vantage when the (CAA) tourna-
ment comes
The Bucs, however haven't had
a great deal of success on the
road, winning just twice in eight
attempts. The Pirates will make a
three-game road trip this
weekend.
"It's awfully tough (to win on
the road). Wc had a tough (five-
game) road trip earlier, unfor-
tunately we didn't play well
Harrison said. "Anytime you win
on the road, you have reason to
celebrate
Included in the Bucs' three-
game road swing is conference
games at American and Nav,
followed fcy the ACC's Wake
Forest.
�j� Af �J � � � . � X �X� �vi� -i� si sL� X� A vi� v� As �yl�� si- -si� �vX' -sl �X� -X� sl vir V
�T T T 'T 'T T T 'i T T T "T T T 'T t T 'T "t t t �t� T T T T � � � 'T r
Gear-up with some soft wearing
shoes for steady-stepping
through the beautiful mountains
of North Carolina. The registra-
tion deadline is March 17.
The IRS offers the Inra-Action
Hotline, lor daily facility hours,
major team sport games and
cancellations, call 757-6562.
Also, tune into an our weekl)
lalk show on campus radio sta-
tion WZMB, 91 3 FM, with the
one and only Stephanie I uke.
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
Free Play
M-Th 3 p.m45p.m.�
Friday 3 p.m5:30p.m.
Sat. i la.m5 p.m.
Sun 1 p.m5 p.m.
�4:45-10 based on availability
EQUIPMENT CHECK-OUT
Memorial Gym 115
M-Th 9a.m-9 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m5:30 p.m.
S"T 11 a.m5 p.m.
Sun 1p.m5 p.m
Young Bird Lives In Shadow
FRENCH LICK. Ind.(l PI) -
In typical Larry Bird fashion, the
ball was rushed into one corner,
flung almost without a glance
across court to a waiting team
mate and deposited into the
basket.
The crowd roared. An ex
uberant fan yelled out, "Waj to
go, Larry Lhe plaver grimaced
He is Eddie Bird, the 19-yeai
old brother of the Boston Celtics'
superstar.
Eddie looks like Larry, i a
lanky 6-feet-6, he's three inches
shorter than his brother, hi.
has the familiar curl) blond hair
and country-bo face. He carries
the ball like Larr. Even his high
school coach, Gar Holland,
sometimes slips and calls him
Larry.
"I'm not Larry savs Lddie.
the leading scorer on the Springs
Valley High School team at 22
points per game "1 jus: ti
out there and be myself
Eddie is used to living in
Larry's shadow and the in-
evitable comparisons. But there's
no resentment.
"I go to see him in Boston a)
least once a year he says
Larry, two-time Most Valuable
Player in the NBA.
Eddie also listens to lan
advice, particularly now, when he
is considering his choice of a col-
lege. The youngest Bird, a senior
at Springs Valley, says he hopes
to visit Boston College, where fie
could be close to Larry, or he
might remain close to home at
some college such as the Universi-
ty of Evansville.
"Evansville has been to two or
three of our ball games already
Eddie says. "The reason I'd go
there is because Larry told me
their coach (Jim Crews) is ex-
cellent. Larry said that coach
would definitely tell me the truth
about my game
Larry went to Indiana State
Advice is given and taken free-
ly, but how often do Eddie and
Larry get together on the court?
" lo tell the truth, we played
just a little hi! las! summer Ed
die says. "We Sad to mow the
lawn and things like tl
Eddie's mother, Georgia Bird,
attends every one ol Eddie's
games Last week, when the
C en us were playing the Pacers in
Indianapolis, about 80 miles nor-
theasi f the Bird home in French
lick, she stayed to watch lddie
"because everybody else was go-
ing to see I a r r . Larry
und ds
M Bird says I ddie
sometimes falls under a Km ol
pressure because of the Bird
n a m e.
"He feels like everybody ex-
pects him to be like Larry, and
that's no! tau she says.
"I here's no comparison, because
Larrv hes and breathes basket-
ball "
Bui 1 Ad � ' will get a
�iarship to p! . Mrs.
Bird i although she is firm
she will no! allow tier
youngest son �.�. too far
from home.
"l! will be in Indiana or Illinois
somewhere, it 1 can help it she
says.
I ddie's teammates respect his
desire to be treated as just
another member oi the team. But
coach Holland doesn't hedge the
issue of talent. "We have some
really good placers, but Eddie's
the star, no doubt
If inie thing hurts Eddie's
game, his teammates say, it's li-
ing ui 1 arry 's shadow .
"Having the name is great, but
it puts him on the spot savs
teammate Mike Woolsey.
Eddie just shrugs it oft, saying,
"It's just a bigger challenge to
me
Holland, who also coached
Larry, agrees with his players'
praise o lddie.
"This boy's a good shooter.
He's got all the tools to be a great
shooter Holland savs "He's a
good rebounder without being
able to jump. He's a good passer
M
JAZZ
THE AUDIENCE IS DEVASTATING
Monday, February 3, 1986
Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall Student Center
Admission: ECU Students, S3.50
ECU Faculty and Staff, $7.50
Public and at door, $9.00
Tickets at Central Ticket Office
757-6611, ext 266
A Student Lnion
Special Concerts Committee Presentation
and. like 1 arry. he wants his
teammates to be noticed, too
The major difference Holland
sees between the big Bird and lit-
tle Bird is the mental approach to
the game.
"Larry concentrated a little
more than Lddie does he says.
"A lot of things didn't bother
1 arr thai bother Lddie. But a lot
of that is because Lddie finds it
hard to be I arrv's brother
X Be a part of the newest tradition. The Brothers of Pi�
Kappa Alpha invite you to take part n the building of
this new fraternity. Our Rush will be held at The Attic.
If you are goal oriented, disciplined and know where
you're going in life, then PIKA wants you. Come join
us, help us; we want noth ing but the best.


Mon Feb. 3, 1986 �
8:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.

A "sA' A "si A � X '�A' X' A" X'sX' X �A� X X� X' X X f X? X -X" X X X X f 'vX x X X� y
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to
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y
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ssv -?ry
DAYS
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd � Greenville
WASHINGTON STATE
EXTRA FANCY GOLD OR
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mi
y
m1
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Hundreds of Dollar A
Days sale items
-Wkik Supplm �a&l-
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REGULAR OR DIET
PEPSI OR
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-m.
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For
ALL VARIETIES
LAY S
ALL VARIETIES
Kroger
Pot Pies
SWISS MISS
Cocoa
Mix . . .
am m
CREAMY OR
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Pkg
Superman
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Potato -i
KROGER
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Jam
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4 ytmcAaiv Iheatte iw
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Hundred of current
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AND MANY
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 30, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 30, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.452
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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