The East Carolinian, January 28, 1986






�te
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No.S3
Tuesday, Januan 28, ls�H6
Greenville. VC
12 Pages
Circulation 12,(KM)
W�
h
4
Temperatures Drop,
Snow Dusts Campus
Snow?
IB 111 MHI K I I fi I �-i uriiliman
Yes. it did snow �if ever so slightl) � Monday morning- Here an unidentified woman cleans her
car of the ear! morning snow. But with the dusting came bitter cold temperatures. 1 o Find nut how
to fight the bitter cold see the related story on page I.
Seniors Propose Bell Tower,
ECU Students Will Design
B CAROLYN DR1SCOLL
With temperatures last night in
Greenville dropping down to 10
degrees and with the wind chill
factor making it feel like 20
below, winter finally seems to be
here. In fact, what looked like a
small scale, short-lived blizzard
hit Monday morning leaving the
campus Justed with a coating of
snow.
Although there is some warmer
weather on the way, it won't be
until Thursday that temperatures
are expected to reach the
mid-40s.
'The problem with the
cither being this cold ex-
plains Skip Waters,
meteorologist for WCTI-TV, "is
that it will not even be coming
back up to about freezing until
Wednesday, so everything that
freezes lias a chance to freeze
solid
rhe bes I way to protect
yoursell from the effects of the
cold is to dress in layers, which
allows you to Add layers or take
them away as the temperature
changes, says Mary Elesha-
Adams, health educator for the
Student Health Services.
"Sixty percent of body heat is
lost through an uncovered head,
so it is very important to wear a
hat said Waters.
The National Weather Service
advises wearing mittens rather
than gloves, as "mittens keep
your fingers together, generating
more warmth
Keeping extra blankets in the
car in case you are stranded is a
good idea, says Elesha-Adams. if
you are stranded, however, be
sure to open a window while the
car is running to prevent carbon
monoxide poisoning.
In addition, Elesha-Adams
warns, alcohol gives a false sense
of warmth that can lead to
hypothermia or even frostbite, so
if you are planning to drink and
then be outside at all, take extra
precautions to dress warmly.
While people may be more
aware of the signs and effects of
frostbite, hypothermia is a more
common result of exposure to
cold weather, according to
Elesha-Adams.
Hypothermia occurs when
"heat and oxygen don't reach the
outer parts of the body, and as its
temperature begins to drop, the
body quits warming itself in-
forms Elesha-Adams.
Signs of hypothermia are signs
of lowered body temperature,
such as involuntary shaking, dull-
ed thinking process and amnesia,
and at extremely low
temperatures a person could lose
consciousness. The health
educator advises that drinking a
quart of water each day, staying
dry and wearing windproof
clothes are all ways of preventing
hypothermia.
Frostbite, according to the
American Red Cross, starts out
as a slightly flushed area of skin,
usually a small patch. As it con-
tinues, the skin "changes to white
or grayish-yellowblisters may
appear later Many times, the
frostbitten area feels only cold
and numb, not painful.
More important, in case of
frostbite, seek medical attention
immediately.
By MIKK1 I DWICK
Sr� fdllur
The Senior Class Council an-
nounced late Thursday that it will
hold a design conies! tor a pro-
posed bell tower on ECU's cam-
pus.
Laura Graham, speaking for
the Senior Class Council, said the
contest is open to all ECL'
students and faculty. Graham
mentioned two requirements:
� The design must be within an 18
by 24 inch format.
� The design or drawing should
be an elevation perspective or
detailed sketch provided it
depicts the design concept clear-
ly.
Graham added, "A considera-
tion should be that the tower
should relate with the surroun-
ding architecture
All entries must be submitted
to the Taylor-Slaughter Alumni
Center by 5:00 p.m. Feb. 21,
1986.
"Winning entries will be an-
nounced soon after Feb. 21
Graham said; however, she was
no. specific about a time-frame.
Graham emphasized the win-
ner of the contest will not be
guaranteed that his her design
will be used. "The final decision
rests with the Senior Class Coun-
cil and the Alumni Association j"
said Graham.
Students9 Writing Improves
fhe fir ivill win
S12. second and third place
designs will v $5 I and S25
respectively. Gi i lam added, "all
entries become the property of
ECl I u ion and non-
winning, entrie -vert to the
anis! aftei Mai 5, 1986
In an interview Friday,
Graham said the bell tower would
serve .is a symbol for ECU. "It's
supposed to he a symbol oi ECl ,
we need a symbol.
"It can be .t place where
students can gather, like UN(
Charlotte where here is a large
lower
See Kl I I Page 3,
PA1 O 1 rO, CALIF. (IP) �
Stanford is taking steps to
pel ts undergraduate
writing skills with some unusual
courses that give students more
practice And feedback on their
e orts and term papers.
Twenty-one "writing-
intensive" courses are being of-
fered this yeai through the
School of Humanities and
Sciences in such varied fields as
physics, anthropology, com-
munication, music and
Whereas typical 10-week
nities courses may require
. a lie-hour written mid-term
exam, a three-hour final, and
perhaps a 10 to 20-page term
paper, the new courses require
more concentration on written
assignments.
"We feel that we don't ask
students to write enough and that
improvement comes from writing
See WRITING Page 2.
ECU Cites Emory For Rule Violations
By TIM CHANDLER
Sport, Ytrltrr
East Carolina University
released its report to the NCAA
regarding allegations against
former head football coach Ed
Emory this past Thursday.
The report accused Emory of
maintaining unauthorized bank
accounts, paying various bills for
some players, using graduate
assistants for off-campus
recruiting, and getting player1 to
use assumed names in junior-
varsity games.
There had been earlier unof-
ficial reports that Emory had
paid large sums of money to
players, but this was not listed in
the report.
The charges came about during
an investigation by the University
while they were preparing a
defense for the lawsuit Emory-
had against the University, con-
cerning his firing in December of
1984.
Chancellor John M. Howell
has many times said that the
allegations had nothing to do
with Emory's firing, but no
reason was ever given for his fir-
ing.
Emory settled his suit with the
University last year, with what
had been initially offered to him
� SI40,(XX), which was what was
left on his contract.
The University sent athletic
director Ken Karr, faculty
athletic chairman Dr. Ernie
Scharz and Eddie Speas of the
N.C. Attorney General's office
to NCAA headquarters in Mis-
sion, Ka when they first learned
of the charges. The NCAA in-
structed ECU to complete an in-
vestigation and return a report.
Actions that the NCAA may-
take against the University are
not yet known.
In the investigation, three bank
accounts were discovered that
had been handled by Emorv
without the University's
knowledge. The three accounts
were: Ed H. Emory Account at
Wachovia Bank, ECU Football
Special Account at First State
Bank, and Ed Emory TV Radio
Show Account. Funds were taken
from these accounts to give
financial assistance to some
athletes.
On Mar. 28, 1982, Emory-
wrote a check for $100 to Tom
Carries, in order for Carnes to go
to Atlanta to see a doctor. Emory
See NCAA, page 11
Loans Not Repayed
Bv LANCE SEARI
si�ff WrllM
Student Welfare Committee
Chairman John Eagan informed
the SGA yesterday that students
who did not pay back loans from
last semester will be penalized �
in more ways than one.
Approximately 50 students
were summoned Monday evening
for not repaying S25 Emergency
Loans. They will be scheduled to
appear before the SGA Attorney
General on Wednesday at 5 p.m.
Moreover, there are 20 persons
who have not repayed their $150
Medical Loans, and they will be
summoned at the next SGA
meeting this Monday.
"Hundreds of Emergency
Loans are given to the students
each semester Eagan said.
"But only 20 percent of these
loans are paid back; then people
don't understand why we can't
give more loans
The following are penalties im-
posed upon persons not repaying
loans, not including loan money
that must be repaid:
� $10 fine for Emergency and $25
fine for Medical Loans
� 10 hour volunteer work or a $33
fine in its place
� Medical Loans may be taken to
small claims court
� Depending on each case,
students not abiding by the
above may be expelled
� Possible fine from the Judiciary
Committee
"We need 95 percent of the
loans to be repaid just to con-
tinue Eagan said, "if we don't
get reimbursed, we could be in-
vestigated by State Auditors
"Actually, this is relatively
light treatment for these in-
dividuals he continued. "If
these cases were taken to a higher
level, the costs would be much
more
In addition to the penalties
above, all persons who did not
repay their loans will be placed
on disciplinary probation.
NCSL Meets On ECU Campus
By DOUG ROBERSON
ECU News Bureau
North Carolina student
legislators discussed several issues
during this weekend's meeting at
ECU, among them was a recom-
mendation that terrorists be con-
sidered "international outlaws
According to North Carolina
Student Legislature (NCSL)
delegate Bryan Lassiter, the in-
tent of the "Rambo Resolution is
On The inside
Announcements2
Classifieds8
Editorials4
Features7
Sports 10
Let us have faith that right
makes might and in that faith
let us to the end dare to do our
duty as we understand it.
�Abraham Lincoln
to make a clear statement of our
opposition to persons who com-
mit acts of terrorism
Kirk Shelley, author of the
resolution and state-wide
membership chairman said, "We
need a new method of dealing
with terrorists. Our organization
realizes terrorism is a serious pro-
blem and new solutions are re-
quired
The NCSL is an organization
of students from 25 universities
and colleges throughout North
Carolina. Each month, the
delegates meet at one of the
represented campuses to discuss
and vote on proposed resolu-
tions.
Among other recommenda-
tions passed during this
weekend's session was a resolu-
tion supporting the right of
families to refuse to allow
medical treatment of terminally
ill relatives.
"We realize such a situation
can be hard on the family, both
emotionally and financially
said Lassiter. "We feel the deci-
sion to end a relative's life should
not be left up to a stranger
Other proposals considered by
the student legislators were
resolutions concerning warning
labels on smokeless tobacco con-
tainers; hearings on congres-
sional ethics; mail-order sales of
martial arts weapons and
Medicare payments to the elder-
ly.
Although the NCSL is not a
lawmaking body, more than 40
percent of its legislative ideas
have been written into law.
"The important aspect of our
organization is education said
Lassiter, "but we're glad others
take our ideas seriously
The NCSL is the oldest active
student legislature in the United
States with more than 5,000 stu-
dent members. Former members
include James B. Hunt, James
Holshouser, Robert Morgan and
Jesse Jackson.
Debating The Issues
The SGA Legislature met Monday evening and discussed the outstanding Emergency Loans that
the SGA offers to ECU students. The SGA Legislature decided to crack down on the debtors and ag-
gressively seek payment. For further details see the related story on page 1.
- tom � t �B,�Ma
i





M
� THt- t-ASI (, AKni INIAN
im -ka 28 i
Announcements
Blacksl
DRAMABIBLE STUDY
Enplore m� Scriptures In a new and ���
citmo, may througn reading and acting Owl
Christian ikits and plays Resources
provided you need only to bnng your Bible
No acting skills or experience necessary We
ill meet Tues nigMs at ' 30 p m at the
Methodist Srudent Center ,5th st aw ass
from Garrett dorm) beginning Fb 4 mot
Jan It as previously announced' 752 7240
Sponsored by Presbyter .an Campus Chris
�ian L.te
WEDNESDAY NIGHT SUPPER
Once agam at the Vethodist Center at s Jt
p m All you can eat homemade meal $1 5C
with reservation 12 at the door Great
teuowship Soonsorp t,
Presbyter an Methodist Campus Ministries
'Sa 2030
ACNE CLINIC
Would you 'ike reatment tor your acne?
Th� Student Meai'h Center is pleased to an
ourne thf opening o its acne i linit Clinic
hours are Thursdays from 24 pm Can
P'arves Lane tor more nfo and or appoint
ments a' 757 gi
CEREBRAL PALSY
One out ot every 500 births are a"e ��
Cerebral Paisy 11 fas a ser lc a�o. I
n�wbor" s bra � h m turn causes
j�sK Hon m ai areas of ,v � . uai s
i.te
0"Tfu'Soa� .��� 30fh fom 8 a m 4pm
East :�� ia Occupational Therao.
Students will be collecting pledges ou's
the s'uoent books'O'e These donations
go to the Greeny ne unec Cerebra! Das.
Center Any amoun' donated would be grea'
y apprecateo Anyone wp .a- I make '
to pledge and would kc to � k rr
jon�s at 752 3o�!
RESUME WORKSHOPS
e Career Planning ano P;a e
v.ce in the Bloxton Mouse isotfeng one hour
sessions to heip you prepare you-
resume Few graduates ge' re without
some prepara'ion Many emoioyers reQuf,s.
a resume showing your educa'i ar I .
per.ence Sessions to heic will be he -
Career Planning Room on Jan 3C f
p n- and ceb 5 a' 3 and - r m
FRISBEE CLUB
ou � "��� run a
The Ei
sen' Pin I , � s �
exper len. �
sound sys'i
he I)
he �! a
I l v numn
� e A �
� . ��
,oi " �� e
LUTHERAN STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
LSAm ��'�' �. �'
Redeen : a-
kvew a begin pi, �
Retreat A �� � i .
' I ' -At ' .

COLLEGE SOPHOMORES
A 'i ' . fc .� . ' � - j- A
body a way
� - -
ever know w .
tSStl M .
ding 6 � .

j i � , � � l takes 1
H � � � re than 1600 oi
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N to
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PI KAPPA PHI
FRATERNITY
� Brothers of P n ai pa Phi wii be � .
ing r � . - � it v . .tudenl
lei starting at 6 X �"�( . �. � sted
ig one of thf most outsta ling ind
ng fraternities on ,fs campus
" ' � Djht I I nhall
SENIORS & GRADUATE
STUDENTS
A GENE R AI N � � w v � IN ME E TI NG
explaining Registra' . nterview
campus and how tc best �. I . � .
nq and Pia em ervice He held
at 3p m on � � � . . . . Raw
ind Gradl
" s .�� . . . k ii e and learn
� re i: �� ' "r l ai ���� � i and Placi
WATER SKI CLUB
' � . � Waters � be I
Ith at I ii
- - ��- � �
PPHA
� � . � .
� '��'�: A.
ins and plan agi i -

ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
the �� mnting � ety w I old a
��� ' "g on Mon Fetj ll ��
� ri. I i- g . ' luf Buesl
speaker will be Charles Kranti ��'��
- evenue Ser. � , . ed -
and rhurss from 4 6 p i
inr orrif- Tfl, sr vu p program whii tl Mr Gor
� � shall .s uss New members
fi'f All C ')ME
A STARTLING REVELATION
Comr join us S 3 it 24
Menoe' ha . .
'he Book of Revelal on sa
iged ti Evangi
Study For more ml ill Key �t
� hi s a 757
EASTERN CAROLINA
RUGBY CLUB
-
rai Dp' � �
. . . "
.� . ��

� �
WESLEY FOUNDATION
IS O . ' P DS'
�� ei by .eraio Jampo s, Ml
. ' ,� Of Feai � . . meet!
� ��lay nigl ts Iron 30i 30 a
ciass
Jai J1 and run throug' Fel - �
Sions are conducted by Morga' Barclay
. � � � r a aroiina rne-rr-
charge � � �� . , and ind . d ials w� � �
� ����?VV.1 �. iH . . ,
. . � lerest l
available by ailing ;se 20i0
DO YOU GO DOWN'
I si - . e
� � . .
�� PC � � . ' .

pporl ii 'es
STATE EMPLOYEES
ASSOCIATION
� �� -
� �
-
LACROSSE CLUB
� �
. � � �

a Market
INTERVIEWING SKILLS
WORKSHOPNURSING STUDENTSFRISBEE CLUB
� � � fi' 11 ' ' ' � ' � . � . � tent to 1 � � ' � '� . � � � � . 786 This �� . � ���� �. ����.� �. the nuri - . . . ; � . , . . � . A �' ' . '� ' ' ' � . . � � the t�ai ���-� � � � � warn � � � .
� in 28 ai ��
Writing Gains New Emphasis
Continued From Page 1.
frequently and having close at-
tention and close feedback ex-
plains Carolyn Lougee. associate
dean of Humanities and Sciences
for Undergraduate Program�.
"Our objective is to ensure
that most undergraduates have ai
least one writing-intensive course
beyond the required freshman
writing course, primarily b mak-
ing writing-intensive the core
courses through which majors
normally pass en route to their
degrees in each department or
program.
Students in writing-intensive
courses are asked to write several
draft versions before turning in a
homework assignment that will
be graded. This is true whether
the writing assignments are short
or longer-term papers. Specially
trained teaching assistants then
go over the rough drafts, offering
suggestions for organization and
checking grammar, spelling,
punctuation, and usage. Finally,
students are being taught to give
each other feedback on their
rough drafts. This has a twofold
purpose: the students can learn
by helping each other; it also
saves faculty time in reading the
drafts.
In past senior surveys,
graduating students have given
themselves high marks for their
ability to write clear English pro-
se. Still, manyof their professors
see room for improvement.
"I think there are still many
students on the campus whose
writing is not up to the general
level that a Stanford degree
would imply says Marion
Lewenstein, professor of Com-
munications and a member of the
Writing Across the Curriculum
task force which recommended
the new courses. She estimates
that 25 to 30 oercent of Stanford
under j .
tra pra tic
"Many
organize, a ey n
in the basic i
writing I have found
other Oepa:

y. �
Chi. Stollei. acting assistant
fessoi ' ; hysics, agrees.
"La
for physi
ors which required studeni
' urn in weekly lab reports he
"Many oi these s seemed
to be written more in gibberish
English, even to me
� I'm not a native speaker. I
reports thai you could
understand only if you knew
yvere supposed
to write. I he stud I i
learn to write decent reports and
pay more atl �
o their English. I: they dor do
�w . � will cat � j
later
Look What Surfaced
ree �
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Every Tuesday
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i Wednesday, January 29
& bX. Rugby Team
Presents
DRAFT NITE
Tuesday, Jan. 28 9:00-1:00 A.M.
Admission SI.50 Guys $1.00 Ladies
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DRAFT NITE
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Admission $1.50 Guys $1.00 Ladies
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1 IH I Vs I ' H I MAS
R 28 ivs6
urfaced
x
Night
ery

OPEN TIL
2 A.M
ax. Well
minutes.
a Transit Authority! 1-4-
GET 1 FREE! Wj I �"ft - rtH�a c�ee I � ' � ft �-� �, tug �J 1 VJJ ��� �f;tuit 'Ji'if ��T� 1
Blacks Feel Optimism, Dismay, Racism
tnlclaal Nrv (�(
B
lav ks
optimis
ased
ns the have made
11 I I dill
Pi IS i
a .
-we:
.i. s
-
ing, economic opportunity and
affii mative action.
rhe poll shows dismay among
lacks as the reported chronic
u n e mploj m ent, shatter e d
families, extreme povert) and lit-
tle hope foi the future.
rhe Post -ItfCpoll found fears
ol lingering and widespread
eased discrimination,
m hehet thai chronic
povert can be eliminated in
- a.
dso brought to light a
am dil ference between
ks' perceptions oi the condi-
blacks in general and
theii o�n personal
M si blacks were op-
al en -elves hut not
ptimisti for theii race. (n!
k ' ej are improv -
�ercent said thii
are getting b r tor them per-
sonally and only 23 percent said
they are getting worse.
Iweniv three years after Mar
tin Luther King's Lincoln
Memorial Speech, the poll found
the majority oi blacks to believe
that then children received an
education equal to that of their
white counterparts.
However, hall to two-thirds of
those interviewed said they felt
blacks were discriminated against
in getting decent housing, skilled
and unskilled jobs and fair
wages. While nearly eight of 10
said they felt the white race did
not want to see the blacks in
Amenta succe
One of three blacks interview-
ed said thai wlutes have "a great
deal of pre iud ice" towards
ks Sis ol ten said at leas!
one-tenth of America's popula
tion shares the attitudes ol the Ku
Klux Klan, and 23 percent ol the
blacks polled said more than hall
of America's white belong in that
category.
Fifty seven pei ceni ol I lacks
surveyed fell their hvmg condi-
tions were better, 2 percenl
they were about the same, and lc
percent fell their living conditions
wete worse.
Blacks under 30 year- old,
rally were more optimistic
an blacks over 61, and bla �
with higher education expressed
I ntidence than those
with less education
Women Begin Arming Themselves
Corporations Donate For Break
Bell Tower
Contest Set
From Page I.
Study
. i oum ii ti
Education
.
Iped push
ms to educa
in $984, up
:

� h rhe
i
he gift-gi - hah
v n �anies. For the
third conecutive year, they found
education received 38.9 perceni
all coi porate donations.
An increasing proportion ol
gift? just over one fifth
impany products and other
property, explains l inda Cardillo
Platzei oi rhe onl i
Board.
1' itions jumped
pe ' company prod i
c OI UMBUS, Ohio (CPS) In-
creasing numbers ol women on
the Ohio State campus reportedly
are arming themselves with
weapons called "stun guns" to
defend themselves.
And despite some uncertainty
over the safety oi the weapons
which are about the size ol
calculators and tire electric cur-
rents of up to 50,000 '�
women on othei campuses also
are carrying them
In fact, college women are ex
pressing an increasing interest in
stun guns, reports dreg Pollack,
a salesman for Nova
technologies, which manufa
tures the devices.
Although Nov based
ustin, I exas, has : � � pe
demographic data aboul wh
buying its guns, the rerun
warranty slips indicates a Tend
toward studeni interest in the
devices, which sell for $70 to $90
Nova has been manufactui
stun-gun tor about tl
years, and has sold ah
175,000, Pollack notes you are paying lor the
However, a user "is I liege ol your tr-
io rhe patriarchal capitalist Man aintain
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,

Tonight, January 28th
8:00 p.m. College Hill Dining Hall.
9:00 p.m. Phi Tau House
(ECU's Largest Fraternity House!)
Ride the Bus To and From the House
ar - -
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night, January 28th
8:00 p.m. College Hill Dining Hal
9:00 p.m. Phi Tan Hour
(I I 1 argest FraterniU House
Ride the Bus I o and From the House






3U?e ?Eaat (Earnliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
TOM Li IM)I K,Gemm Mm
JAY STONE, HanagmtEditor
Greg Winchester, Doctoroj uhtmsm
Anthony MARriN, memea mw
John Peterson, mmmir
Shannon Short, produce wmuge,
Debbie Stevens, stmtan
Mike Ludwick, v�
Scott Cooper, v- i
DANIEI MAURER, Enunmm.
John Shannon, s
DfChanii i Johnson,
January 28, 1986
Opinion
Page 4
Student Fees
Student Control Under Siege
At many colleges there has
recently been a move by ad-
ministrators to take control of stu-
dent fees out of the hands of
students. According to the United
States Student Association, the ad-
ministration at the University of
Massachusetts at Amhersl has
already taken control of Student
fees, claiming that the student
government was fiscally irresponsi-
ble. Administrators at West Chester
University near Philadelphia are
presently attempting to take control
of the bookstore's revenue, most of
which goes to the student govern-
ment. And at Suffolk Community
College in New York last fall,
students lost what little say they had
in allocating student fees when the
administration disbanded the stu-
dent constitution, according to the
Student Association of the State
University system of New York.
When Randy Donant, the Stu-
dent Activities Director at the
University of Massachusetts at
Amherst, announced he would seize
control of about Si .5 million in stu-
dent fees, students staged a sit-in at
the Whitmore Administration
Building. Afterwards the ad-
ministration said that it is planning
to hold disciplinary hearings for 18
students who were active in the sit-
in.
While UMass-Amherst student
budget committee member Michael
Cerrato admits that the last two stu-
dent government budgets have had
deficits, he says that the books are
currently balanced. Furthermore,
Cerrato says that Donant, who is an
employee of the student govern-
ment, "worked with us all summer
long planning the '87 budget. There
was absolutely no hint from him
that we were doing anything
wrong
The recent wave of struggles over
control of student funds and stu-
dent institutions is not a completely
novel phenomenon. In the 1960s,
along with the protests and activism
surrounding social issues like the
Vietnam War, a revolution of sorts
took place in student rights. Up un-
til then, a school's administration
controlled virtually every facet of a
student's life. For, most ad-
ministrators believed that the
university should act as the
substitute for a student's parents
while he was in school. Students
were thought to be too young and
irresponsible to govern themselves.
Thus, students often faced
overbearing rules governing hous-
ing, discipline, off-campus
behavior and even some control
over political expression.
But the "Berkeley Free Speech
Movement" and the student ac-
tivism that followed in its wake
changed much of that. After alot of
protest and some lawsuits students
began to, not only gain more con-
trol over their own campus lives but
also to gain some control over the
general operations of the campus.
Since 1970, therefore, most
schools have established a broader
range of student activities and have
funded these through "student ac-
tivity fees These fees have been
kept separate from the regular tui-
tion and, in most cases, they are
under some sort of control by stu-
dent governments or student
boards. Only in the area of athletics
lias the administration retained
almost total control.
In the present epoch, however,
administrators seem to be trying to
turn back the clock to a time when
students had little real clout. Many
students think that the administra-
tion is trying to render student
government powerless in an era in
which many schools are trying to
constrict student rights. As Michael
Cerrato of UMass-Amherst was
reported to have said: "The student
government is very powerful. They
(the administration) don't like
that That the new repression is a
tactic which campus administrators
have devised to combat the recent
wave of student protest over CIA
recruiting on campus and university
ties to apartheid is widely suspected
among students.
That such tactics will ultimately
backfire and help fuel student ac-
tivism, however, is something that
the administrations at most schools
seem unable to see. As Cerrato said
of the struggle at UMass-Amherst:
the administration has been sur-
prised by the unity of liberal and
conservative students in trying to
restore their control of fees
Students will not sit idly by and see
their hard-won rights stolen from
them without a fight. One cannot
spend most of one's life in a
classroom learning about
democracy and justice without
developing a conviction that those
principles actually have a place in
real life.
MOK ATHI5 fMUIB BflH&J IMP W) MS WOULP HAPPfv If W
carHfM um id mm msofpcWAHpmm japes,
Campus Forum
Another Round For Democrats
After reading the "Republican
Counterattack" in Thursday's paper.
my first impulse was to respond in
the same mud-slinging fashion thai
both Mr. Walker and Mr. Hardy
have such a Hair for. It was very
tempting. However. I would like to
respond in a more civilized Fashion,
to show that at least some people on
this campus have respect for their
fellow man, regardless of how in-
sulting he may be.
My first response is to Mi
Walker's article. In his "careful
analysis' o the Campus Forum
dated Tuesday, January 21, he "con-
cluded that liberals set their agenda
around criticizing conservatives
Well, Mr. Walker, if you will refer to
your Psyc. 1050 text, you will
discover a defense mechanism called
"projection" listed there: attributing
disturbing characteristics ol yourself
(or your party) to someone else (or to
someone else's party.) You may
recall that the letter that started this
mud-slinging contest was entitled
"Republican Lambasts Democrats
The responses to that letter were
critical, to be sure, but certainly not
uncalled for. You and Mr. Hardy, it
seems, feel that if you insult us
"pacifists, lay liberals and moral
outcasts" enough, we will go away or
at least be run "into the closet 1
hate to burst your bubble, but it just
won't happen! On this, the left side
of the fence, we enjoy civilized
debates about politics with people
who disagree with us; this makes us
think through our position better and
helps us understand (if not agree
with) the opposing viewpoint. Accus-
ing us of immorality and lack of
character as Mr. Hardy did, and call-
ing us names only makes us wonder
why you refuse to communicate your
views. And why you have no respect
for your fellow students' right to
their own opinions and beliefs.
Secondly, Mr. Walker stated that
Reagan and Helms are not stripping
individuals of their rights by seeking
to ban abortion. Instead, he claimed
that they are in fact performing "one
of the explicit duties of our federal
government" which "is to protect
the lives of all Americans My
response to this is twofold. First o'
all, not all liberals are pro-abortion;
many of them do not personally
believe in abortion, but are, however
pro-choice. That is , they believe that
women should have the individual
freedom to choose for themselves if
they want an abortion or not.
People that get abortions are not
"baby-killers either. They are most
often desperate women faced with
one of the most difficult choices of
their lives.
The other aspect that needs to be
considered is the duty of our federal
government to "protect the lives of
all Americans The constitution
makes no distinction between born or
unborn, true; it makes no distinction
between rich and poor, either. When
you apply this governmental duty to
the hungry and homeless of this
country, an entirely different picture
emerges. In your untouchable
morality, Mr. Walker, you speak of
protecting the unborn child from
abortion only because it doesn't cost
you anything. If taxes had to be rais-
ed to stop abortion, would your
"morals" remain consistent?
And so, the basic difference can be
seen between Republican and Liberal
"freedom Republican freedom is
economic freedom in that the in-
dividual keeps the money he earns. If
he doesn't earn any (regardless of the
reason), then he has the "freedom"
to become a street person, and the
freedom to starve. The freedom to
achieve "all a man desires" is also
the freedom to fail. Yet "liberals"
believe that freedom of the individual
means a more basic, moral kind o
freedom. We do not, as you put it,
Mr. Walker, say "me first instead
we say "we first meaning that peo-
ple come above everything else (in-
cluding money and weapons). This is
a humai stic philosophy, certainly.
We are concerned with human in-
terests and human beings. How does
this make us moral outcast
Finally, about your "three little
(liberal) pigs Mr. Walker (or is it
"Mr. Wolf?"). I believe I have cor-
rected all of the errors m the "I av
liberal" and "moral outcast"
categories. That leaves the first
category, "Pacifists Pacifists were
tsed o thinking that "we really
Jon need a strong national
defense" because no communists are
interested in taking over America. I
personally doubt that the Soviets
would pass up an opportunity to in-
vade us if we had no national
defense, but that is beside the point.
We have a strong national defense
ahead The question is not "do we
' eed one but instead "how much
more do individuals have to give up
to finance more military build up,
and how much stronger does n have
to be?"
As for Mr. Hardy's comments on
communism, 1 would like to say that
I. too, view it as one o the problems
oi our world. However. 1 view people
who in one breath profess "logical.
morallv-enhaning solutions that do
not infringe on man's freedom
and, in the next, threaten to run all
people with opposing viewpoints
"back into the closet" as the greatest
danger our country faces, fell me
who imposes immorality on who
Mr. Hardy?
The only harmful point of
view is the one that tries to bully all
others out oi existence.
Susan E. Haynie
Junior. Psychology
Cyanide For Reps
To the College Republicans whose
letters appeared in "Campus
Forum" on 23 Jan 1986:
After you've purged the world of
all the "pacifists, lazy liberals, and
moral outcasts I'd suggest that you
carry a couple of cyanide tablets in
your back pockets. After all, death
by boredom in a society of nothing
but clones of yourselves could be an
insufferabley long, agonizing ordeal.
Jan Higginbotham
Greenville, N.C.
Abortion Not O.K.
I noticed from reading your article
that you seem to have encompassed
your support for abortion from the
idea of human consciousness and the
total development procedure of
human life. You even went so far as
to include minute pieces of medical
knowledge to try and give strength to
your position. I wish to reply to your
article based on those areas that
helped you make your decision for
abortion.
The argument surrounding human
consciousness that you illustrated is
one that should bring terror into the
lives of civilized human beings.
When human life is based on the
development of human con-
sciousness, we have entered into a
whole new realm of the abortion
issue, thai ol '
life. If society
based on the ii
conceive ol their owi
is to becoi
happen t
conceptioi
Even those ind .
trom the ridii
have little .
istence while ii
saythe ;
conceptioi I i .
to
this id
Just as the pal i
the p
sciousnes
tun the womb I i
for hun nsciousi
The word
portant. I o dei . i
� human I I
murder it. W
another man, he -
the p
Maybe, I can
ter if we take
Freshmen bi
concej
sperm unites wi
point, gene: ;
transferred, ai
is set with all
necessarv to dev
human being. I o
to cows, monkey -
simplv ludicrous ai .
The fetus can not b
anything else be(
possesses those qua
necessarv for huma
fetus is human, eve:
not have arms,legs or �
(as mentioned in your ai
fetus can be nothii -
because that is what it was des
to be at the point
conception. Your probaly w
ing where I'm coming fi
ideologically and philosophic
speaking (as you alluded to in
article). I'm satisfied in saying
I'm a Christian. "Born
ty" as you put it. But I d
that has much bearing as to the case
presented in this rebuttal So
people picture Christians a
ding behind a few verses in the B
in order to address current issues It
should be noted that Chris
everywhere have nothing
from the areas o science
technology, after all. isn't it Cod that
created all things, therefore it
his design that the laws ol nature .
ist. It is by the laws of nature that the
embryo has life. Therefore, it sh
be treated with the respect that God
intended from the beginning.
Whether human life exist as a IS
month old baby, a 12 year old child.
or a 1 day old embryo, thev ar
steps along the developmental pro
cedure of human life. If it is legal to
deny the existence o one of the
rationally should be legal to denv the
existence of all of these
Guy Conway
Junior, Chemistry
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes 'tetters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the en-
trance of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are suuject to editing
High


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I HI lAM k)l NIAN
I AM AkY 28. 1986
emocrats
uld.
� ail
the
Forum Rules
w welcomes letters
nt vie Mail or
in the Puhlua-
Buildini ross 'rum the en-
er Library
� r purposes oj verification, all let-
wusi the name, major and
rification, address, phone number
signature of the author(s). Letters
imuted to two typewritten pages,
bte-si -r neatly printed. All
. eel to editing
High-Tech Majors Decline
LOS ANGELES, CA (CPS) -
C ollege students increasingly are
interested in money, but they'll
"lake it as businesspeople, not
computer scientists or engineers,
says UCLA's 20th annual survey
Oi neu college freshmen.
The proportion of freshmen
planning to major in computer
science and pursue computing
careers has dropped b 50 percent
in just two years. Onl 4.4 per-
cent of the Class of 198 aspire to
be computer programmers or
analysts, compared to 6.1 percent
lasl year and S.s percent in 1983.
Declining interesl in computer
careers parallels dwindling in-
terest in engineering. Ten percent
ol respondents plan to pursue
engineering careers, down from
12 percent two years ago.
"Taken together, this decline
in student interest in
technological careers stands in
stark contrast to the growing na-
tional concern for increasing
technological naming in our
schools and colleges says the
survey's director. UCLA Pro-
fessor Alexander Astin.
The decline, however, cor-
responds with diminishing
demands for engineers in the job
market.
Recent surveys by the College
Placement Council, Michigan
Sate and Northwestern all found
American businesses plan to hire
fewer engineering and computer
science majors this year.
But Astin says students' declin-
ing interest in high tech is "all the
more remarkable" considering
the emphasis secondary schools
place on computer education. He
speculates that as students
become more familiar with com-
puters in high school, they are
"less inclined to pursue it as a
career and more inclined to view
it as a tool for use in other
fields
Among the 200,000 freshmen
surveyed nationwide, business
and teaching drew the most
significant increase in interest.
The proportion of entering
students aspiring to business
careers � an area showing rising
interest since the 1970s � in-
creased to an all-time high of 23.9
percent, more than twice the pro-
portion recorded in the 1972
survey.
For the third straight year,
elementary and secondary school
teaching rose slightly to 6.2 per-
cent, although Astin adds "we
still have a long way to go"
before there are enough teachers
"to meet the nation's current and
future needs
Astin was surprised to discover
students' social attitudes are go-
ing to extremes � sometimes in
opposite directions.
Seventy-three percent of the
freshmen oppose increased
defense spending, up 12 percent
from three years ago, and 73.3
percent � four percent more
than last year � say the wealthy
should pay a larger share of taxes
than they do now.
But conservative attitudes are
equally strong. Almost half of all
freshman think homosexuality
should be outlawed, and a record
low � 21.8 percent � want mari-
juana legalized.
By contrast, almost 53 percent
of 1977's freshmen favored
legalizing marijuana.
And while the Class of 1989
says the rich should pay more
See POORER Page 6.
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
m fcborti n fi ' Aes al
addn. � Pregnancy Test. Birth ontrol,
and (� Pregnancyounseling. For
er information, call 832-0535 (toll tree
number 1 six. 532 5 J84) heteen 9 a rn and 5
A , esthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917 West Morgan St. Raleigh, N.C.
p m
Corporations Give To School
AEROBIC SPECIAL
The first ld0 people to sign up get �5
the rest of the semester for I x
CAf f (that com es out to just
�PWPIf � V over10 a month
a
Then it goes back up to $75. This offer ends
Friday January 31st.
Our Aerobic room is 2 to 4 times bigger than
any other club in Greenville (except GAC).
Check Us Out! WE LOVE AEROBICS!
and you will too at
"The Aerobic Workshop"
757-1608
417 Evans St. Mall
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Continued From Paye 3.
150 percent and securities 100
percent.
Computers comprise an in-
creasing amount of property and
product donations, Plate: says.
Several years ago, Apple Com-
puter pioneered the practice of
donating computers to schools
and colleges as a wa to start
students using their products,
and, the company hoped, to keep
them buying Apples after they
graduated.
IBM, DEC . Zenith and other
computer firms quickl followed
suit, especially after Apple, in
1983, convinced Congress to give
� a specia tas break for donating
equipment to educational institu-
tions.
But such special tax breaks
uould vanish under some tax
reform proposals being debated
in the U.S. Senate.
In 1984, companies gae "1
percent of their overall education
donations to colleges and univer-
sities, and halt of those donations
� or 35 percent of the total �
were earmarked for certain
academic departments on cam-
pus.
In 1982. the firms earmarked
only 24 percent of their college
donations for specific depart-
ments.
"There's a double purpose to
this kind of giving the CFAE's
Arthur kammerman says. "Cor-
porations want students to be
taught with state-of-the-art
equipment, and they're anxious
for students to learn on their own
particular equipment, so they'll
be more inclined to buy it and use
it after college
Not surprisingly, telecom-
munications companies were the
biggest supporters of education.
They were only 18th the previous
year, when the mining industry
was number one.
Mining fell to 11th place in
1984.
"We anticipate the telecom-
munications industry will remain
education's biggest contributor
as long as it is such a leading,
profitable industry in this coun-
try Kammerman says.
Platzer says targeting of gifts
and grants to departments related
to their own business is "typical
of the high-tech industries in par-
ticular
Targeting gifts to math, com-
puter and science departments,
however, worries some educators
that liberal arts schools will
become poor academic cousins.
But Kammerman insists it will
not happen.
"The business community is
responding to the needs of higher
education and to the importance
for the business community of
having well-educated people he
says.
The Economic Recovery I
Act of 1981 spurred increased
corporate giving in the early pan
of the decade. That, combined
with two years of corporate pro-
sperity, probably accounts for
the 15.2 percent jump in the
dollar amount given in 1984,
Kammerman observes.
But while the dollar amount
continues to rise, the percentage
of corporate pre-ta net incmoe
going to charity actually has
dropped to 1.61 percent, down
from a 1982 peak of 1.76 percent.
Corporations gave 18.8 percent
of their donations to civic ac-
tivities in 1984, CFAE found, but
gave less to cultural events,
health programs and human ser-
vices agencies.
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SATURDAY:
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TEQUILA SUNRISES � BLOODY MARYS
MIMOSA � CHAMPAGNE � SCREWDRIVERS
Darryl's Delivers � Call 757-1973
Tues. Jan. 28
Mendenhall Student Center Multi-Purpose Room
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Mon. Feb. 3
Same As Above
Tues. Feb. 4
7:30-11:00.
Jones
For more info or rides Call 757-199� or 752-5149
R" �
0





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JAM ARV 28, W86
; W.
Drinking Is The Problem
ECU News Bureau
William Smith's first job was
in a new prison, set up in an old
military base. What had been
part of Camp Rutner, N.C dur-
ing World War II became an in-
stitution for youthful felons.
"They said. 'You can have this
street and these five or six bar-
racks as your prison he recall-
ed. The authorities enclosed the
area with a fence, probably
because they thought prisons
were "supposed to have fences
said Smith. "But we tore it down
in the course of a year. And it has
never had a fence around it
since
Now a member of the criminal
justice faculty in the ECU School
of Allied Health and Social
Work, Smith recalls that his
training and ambition lay in the
direction of athletic coaching.
"Correctional institutions were
looking for people who could
drive buses, manage softball
teams and live in the dorms with
the inmates. Anything that was to
be done, we would do it. There
were no guards; we, the staff, did
everything, and there was a lot to
be done
With this beginning � a highly
demanding, 24-hour-a-day job as
a residential prison counselor �
William Carter Smith was set
upon a path that ied him to ad-
vanced studies and further work
with the state Department of
Corrections. He has also come
within the scope of the social
work field, by natural associa-
tion, and into education and
mental health administration.
The corrections and social work
fields, Smith believes, are happily
married in his academic unit at
ECU. (He is a professor in the
ECU Division of Social Work.)
One of the strenghts of ECU's
criminal justice program has been
its ability to "piggy-back" on the
problem-solving methodology of
the social work program, Smith
said.
The tie between crime and the
abuse of drugs and alcohol is the
area in which corrections and
social work overlap most
significantly, he maintains.
"I deal with criminals and
drunks, and they are often one
and the same he said. "There
really is a very high correlation
between the use of drugs and
crime. People who get into dif-
ficulty with the law often are
under the influence. In other
words, to be an addict in our
society pretty much is to be a
criminal
Smith is serving a three-year
term as president of the N.C.
Council on Alcoholism. He
deplores society's tendency to
focus on drinking itself rather
than the drinker with a problem.
The state council, along with the
National Council, is experiencing
a decline of interest from tl.e
public, he said.
"People still think that
through current laws we have
solved our drinking problem. The
current emphasis is now on
'Don't drink and drive which is
good, but there are still a lot of
people who are dying from
alcoholism.
"We as individuals and a socie-
ty have a kind of philosophy that
if you throw enough money at it
and set up enough programs, a
problem will go away he add-
ed, noting ironically that "as
public awareness (of the problem
of alcohol and drug-related
crime) goes up, public interest is
down
Another hinderance to realistic
perceptions of alcoholism, in
Smith's view, is the traditional
stereotyped image of the
alcoholic, which he expresses as
the "chronic, down-and-out
stumblebum drunk
"We'd like for alcoholics to be
that way, so we could see them
and identify them Smith said.
"We could point them out to our
kids and say, 'You don't want to
be one of them
Smith conducts staff seminars
at a nearby prison and teaches
classes in corrections manage-
ment. His students do a last-
semester field placement, work-
ing in actual prison settings four
days a week, coming to campus
for weekly seminars.
"I try to address the question
of how you control and manage
prison populations and give these
people the kinds of things they
need to make it through life
Smith explained.
"Unfortunately, people
generally think of institutions
asyou go in; somebody shuts
the door, and nothing happens
for as long as the criminal stays in
there, which can be a long time.
"Instead, inmates live just like
you and I, day by day, with
similar problems, but probably
more because they are under con-
stant supervision. Where did we
get the idea that people die in
prison? Ninety-eight percent of
these people in prison get out at
some time
Smith applauds the way-
Alcoholics Anonymous helps
problem drinkers � by focusing
on the positive, on what the ad-
dict can do with his life � and
sees in this a pattern for the cor-
rections profession.
"We should focus on coping
and living he stressed. "They
need to have hope for the future
R
A
KAPPA
ALPHA
ECU's Oldest and Most
Prestigious Fraternity
Rush Orientation.
Thursday January 30 in Jones Cafeteria
8-til.
Rush at the KA house.
Monday and Tuesday February 3 and 4
7-til.
For More Information Call
752-1005 or 830-9922
Health Column
With
Mary Elesha-Adams
I just had my yearly Pap smear
and learned I have dysplasia.
What is it?
Dysplasia means that some of
the tissue at the mouth of the
womb (cervix) is not normal. The
Pap test, or Pap smear, is a sim-
ple test for the detection of ab-
normal cells of the cervix which
makes it possible to discover
dysplasia. The Pap smear collects
a random sample of cells;
therefore, the condition of the
cervix may be better or worse
than the Pap test reports.
Dysplasia does not, though,
cause pain, itching or discharge.
Consequently, a routine Pap test
is often the only way to detect
this condition. The detection of
dysplasia is important, because it
may lead to cancer if not treated;
however, dysplasia is not cancer.
Women who are at risk ot
developing abnormal cervical
cells include:
� those who began having sexual
intercourse before 18
� those who are sexually pro-
miscuous
What is the treatment for
dysplasia ?
When a Pap test shows abnor-
mal cells a special exam called a
colposcopy may be advised.
Public health departments and
university health services often
recommend that a colposcopy be
done. However, some physicians
take a less conservative approach
and may repeat Pap smears to see
if dysplasia still remains. The col-
poscope resembles a large
microscope and allows the doctor
to look more closely at the cervix;
a tiny sample of tissue will be
Poorer Students
Find Going Hard
Continued From Page 5.
taxes, members would like to be
among them.
Seventy-one percent of the
freshmen say "being very well-
off financially" is "essential" or
"very important
About the same number of
studnets agreed with the state-
ment that "The chief benefit of a
college education is that it in-
creases one's earning power
In 1973, only 55.8 percent of
freshmen agreed with that senti-
ment, while just 39.1 percent of
1970's freshmen felt being well-
off financially was important.
Poorer students are finding it
increasingly difficult to go to col-
lege. This year's survey showed a
five percent drop in students
whose parents make less than
S15.000 annually.
Now, only 15.9 percent of
students come from low income
families, while 24.5 percent of all
freshmen's parents make $15,000
to $29,999.
See For Yo
on All Frames, Sunglasses,
and Contact Lenses.
� �
Everyday.
No there are twu kxaouns that offer 8U0 diifcrai fran� to chouse
from at everyday saving of 30 -60 off regular retail prices The
Eye Sac at The Plaza, and The Eye Care Center at the Tjaon Annex
In ackimon. eye exammaoons are available at The Eye Care Center
No appointment necessary Call for exam hours
e eye si
The Plaza
Ptxioe 756-WI
0PIOMC1MC
�E CARE 0EKFER
For Frame Selection and Eye Examinations:
12 Grcnvillc Blvd Olptoa Annex)
Phone 756-9404
Dr. Peter Hollis
O.O.
�A.
taken from the cervix if the cervix
does not look healthy. This pro-
ceedurehelps the physician deter-
mine what is wrong. Then the ap-
propriate treatment can begin.
We're Open
S
fotnething
Special
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"T-T r- 1 nnMi hji, ii. " "�'
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Anth
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Study
JOHN Ml s
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Its stude:
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The deadline for appoint; k
formed and be ure to make �





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I HI I ASI (ARl)l INIAN
Style
JANUARY 21, 1986 Page 7
Sci-fi Writer Rails
Anthony Outspoken
il PI) � Bcstselling authoi Piers
nthony thinks most majoi
publishing houses are not doing
their work because they out-of-
hand reject without reading most
of the new material they receive.
"The cards are stacked against
the new writer. 1 hate it but it
seems to be true. It's a Catch 22.
1 hey won't bu unless sou have
an agent and you can't get a good
agent unless you have already
sold, and apparently it's just a
conspiracy to keep the newcomei
out Anthony said.
"1 hate to be a part of that. ()t
course I'm profiting from it now
because all these new books they
are not publishing are leasing
�oom on the shelves tor re-issues
by Anthony he said in an inter-
view from his home in north
Florida.
Anthony, who has had eight
bestsellers including Steppe and
Rjce Against Time, specializes in
science fiction and fantasy. His
next book. Shade oj the Tree,
will be published bs lot in May
It's about a Florida foi
" ac hines
naunted by animals,
and creatures that can't exist.
"I wrote that toe seats ago
and couldn't sell il "his is the
story of most vt m novels. 1 he
top copy had been lost and !
to show a partial manuscript in
struck-over carbon copy
But, Anthony said, lot gase it
consideration.
During the inters iew ntl �ny.
a natise of England who ha
in the I nited States sii
six, lashed out at the policies ol
most major publishers
"It seems tl al tl
wants to uet in and change thii -
Sometimes they make changes
that are wrong. 1 get ungram-
matical stuff coming out under
my name. I get critics calling me a
pedestrian writer and all because
some copy editor has messed with
my prose and I don't find out un-
til it comes out in print. 1 get
furious about it Anthony said.
The author said he would
prefer to write his novels on his
computer and send the work
directly into the typesetter,
bypassing editors.
'They could save money and
have a better product. The
editors operate under the
assumption that most writers are
idiots and can't write, and there
are some that can't but there are
some who can. I feel like some of
my best material is the stuff that
lias been messed over least
But Anthony said he doesn't
ssant to sound "too negative
He said one of the problems is
that authors are like little com-
panies svhereas publishers
operate like a committee.
"It takes forever to turn
around and make a decision. So
it runs years and decades
behind
Anthony said one bestselling
author had his "opus" rejected
4" times before it tinally got into
print. The book later sold
250.(Mm) copies.
"It seems like a closed society.
I'm horrified because sometimes
1 read novels by amateurs and
juite often there is a problem
e they aren't good enough
�aid "But the trouble is even
if the novels are good enough,
s publishers don't read it.
� send it back. It used to hap-
pen to me. I used to get them
back unread. I had a big novel
called Microscope, one of the top
novels of my career. It was
bounced by a publisher unread
with a note saying 'We are not
reading novels of this size
"There are a few publishers
that are doing their job and you
have to work through them. 1
agree that 99 percent of what they
see is going to be material they
can't use. The average person on-
ly thinks he can write. Yet you've
got to read them all to find that
one percent. It's like a diamond
prospector or an archeologist �
he has to look a long time before
he finds that one key thing.
"I don't know whether editors
are stupid as a class or it's
laziness. When they send
something back unread and they
require an agent, they are making
the agent do the editing job. The
agent is in the business of
representing the author to get
better terms. When the publisher
buys through an agent, he's going
to pay a good deal more for that
novel than he would have if he
had dealt directly with the
author.
Asked if he sees any hope for
change, Anthony replied,
"sometimes nature does get
back because those who re-
jected a novel unread sometimes
miss a bestseller.
"1 speak from an author's
standpoint. If I were an editor,
I'd probably be telling you
something else. 1 have been
writing and selling for 20 years. If
I had been doing it for one year I
wouldn't have a chance
Anthony's fans are glad he
stuck with it.
They Measured Out Their Lives In Plastic Chips
Tumble Dice In A Gambling
Frenzy On Casino Night
On Thursday, January 30,
1986, the ECU Student Union
Recreation Committee will pre-
sent a truly different form of
entertainment in the form of a
Casino Night. Grab this chance
to work out your fantasies and
bet the big bucks. Try your hand
at Black Jack or Poker or tumble
the dice at Craps. After an even-
ing of socking away your big ear-
nings, an auction will be held for
all. The items to be auctioned will
be gifts donated by local mer-
chants such as Apple Records,
Bond's Sporting Goods, and
many more of the Greenville city
merchants. To add to the festive
atmosphere, the Recreation
Committee will provide enter-
tainment, free food, and
mocktails.
The fun starts at 8 p.m. in the
Multi-Purpose Room of
Mendenhall Student Center. For
one dollar, you will receive a
thousand dollars (SI,000!) of
play money, and for each dollar
more (up to $3) you will receive
an additional SI,000 of play
money to wager. This gala event
is open to Faculty, Staff, and
Students. Don't miss this great
time when a little bit of Vegas
and Atlantic City come to Green-
ville.
Also, don't miss the oppor-
tunity to start practicing for the
ECU FacultyStaffStudent
Table Tennis Tournament
scheduled by the Student Union
Recreation Committee for Thurs-
day, March 20, 1986, in the
Billiards Area of Mendenhall
Student Center. Continue to read
The East Carolinian for further
information.
Survey Of Students Reveals A Staple Of Style and Fit
B MARIIAN BAl (,H M
si�ff Wnirr
What are E( I s students
wearing, and why0
Since the day Adam and Eve
donned their first fig leases, peo-
ple have been conscious ol �
they wear. What determines the
clothes people wear? Froi
survey taken in the fall by Dr.
Mel M ar k o w s k i' s ho m e
economics class, we get an idea of
why people wear what they do.
Ninety-eight female students
and ninety-three male students
were asked to rank a list of
clothing values from 1-12, accor-
ding to their importance. The
following table shows how both
the male and female students
tanked these values.
Now that we know why some
students svear what they do, what
are they shearing? Surveyors
observed the types of dress worn
by students, and the statistics
were calculated by Jan Mallard to
find the most popular styles.
Out of 165 females and 110
males, the all-time favorite �
bluejeans � ranked number one
among bottoms worn by both
r1 �very important 12 �east important
I RankFemaleAvg. RateMale Avg. Rate
ValuesValues
1St vie2.37Fit2.62
jFit2.67Style2.81
3Beauty4.83Function4.97
4Desirabilitv5.56Desirability-5.22
5Reflects Feelings5.70Craftsmanship5.84
6Function6.12Reflect Feelings6.07
7Versatility6.38Versatility6.53
8Craftsmanship6.80Beauty7.00
9In vogue8.20Impress others7.81
10Impress others8.26In vogue9.06
11Drama9.98Disposability9.94
12Disposability10.85Drama10.17
men and women, with shorts
coming in second. Oversized
shirts, T-shirts and sweatshirts
were the three most popular tops
worn by women while T-shirts,
knit pullovers and tailored shirts
were the top three among men. In
the footwear legwear depart-
ment, casual flat shoes, followed
by socks and athletic shoes rank-
ed the highest among women,
whereas socks followed by
athletic shoes ranked one and two
for men.
Among the most popular ac-
cessories for women were earr-
ings, necklaces and rings. For
men, sunglasses were number
one, followed by hats and
necklaces. Only a few wore an
earring or a greek pin.
Many factors influence what
people wear, such as the season,
the weather, the location and
ongoing activities. Yet the variety
of styles found on the ECU cam-
pus reflects a diversity of per-
sonalities and tastes among
students that can't be attributed
to the weather. Who would have
thought that Adam's and Eve's
fig leaves would have led to such
style as that exhibited by ECU
students?
Study Abroad This Summer In Costa Rica
JOHN SHANNON
future Kdll
ECU is a great place to learn.
Its students are surrounded by.
men, women and machines
whose function is to aid the diges-
tion of information, the pro-
liferation of which is, in its raw
form, often overwhelming.
How much "educational"
material finally does become
assimilated into the normal stu-
dent's sensibilities? The answer
depends partially on the student's
attitude, and partially on the ex-
ternal conditions of learning, the
latter being generally out of the
realm of the student's control.
Occasionally, however, oppor-
tunities arise which the far-
sighted individual can seize upon
to tip the scales of learning in his
favor. International programs
represent just these kinds of op-
portunities.
ECU Student In Costa Rican Woodshop
Pfeot fcy JOHN BOKT
The deadline for applying to the ECU Costa Rica Summer Program 1986 is approaching, so get in-
formed and be sure to make a decision by February 15.
This summer, the ECU Costa
Rica Summer Program 1986 will
again make it possible for many
students to experience the kind of
direct learning in comparison to
which classrooms pale. Those
who enroll by the deadline of
February 15 will spend the entire
first session of summer school
(May 17 � June 24) in Costa
Rica, a Central American coun-
try known for its long, mostly
orderly Democratic tradition, for
crops such as bananas, cocoa and
sugarcane, and for a landscape
rich in volcanic mountains, dense
forests, and both Pacific and
Atlantic coastlines.
Students will receive maximum
immersion in local culture by
residing with a Costa Rican fami-
ly during their stay. Participants
in the program need not speak
Spanish, yet those who have
some skills in the language will
find that their abilities and
understanding increase at a great-
ly accelerated pace.
In the more than ten years in
which the program has been of-
fered, hundreds of students have
reaped its benefits. Anthropology
student Jesse Daugherty, who has
been to Costa Rica twice for pur-
poses of research, started out
with "some Spanish in high
school, a little more in college
After spending three months liv-
ing with Costa Rican families, he
found that he had gained a
measure of fluency far beyond
what he had expected.
Daugherty remarks that he
"met some remarkable people,
one girl in particular, whom I
look forward to seeing again this
summer. I would say that the
Costa Ricans are mostly very
friendly.
Daugherty has talked to classes
at ECU about the program. "I
find that people have a lot of
misconceptions he said. "They
ask if they have cars and televi-
sion in Costa Rica, things like
that. Actually, Costa Rica is a
modern and comfortable place.
People ask if there are political
problemsI felt as safe in San
Jose as I do in Greenville
Students enrolled in the program
can earn between six and seven
hours of credit for courses that
will be taught in English. Courses
offered include Anthropology
3008, Peoples of South and Cen-
tral America, taught by John
Bort of the department of
Sociology, Anthropology and
Economics; Geology 1700, En-
vironmental Geography, taught
by Richard Mauger of the
Geology Department; and
Spanish 1040, Conversational
Spanish Practiced in a Spanish-
speaking Country, taught by a
faculty member of the Univer-
sidad Nacional de Costa Rica at
Heredia, Costa Rica, which is the
headquarters of the program.
Several activities are offered in
addition to classroom instruc-
tion. Participants will take field
excursions to both the Pacific
and Caribbean coasts to visit a
banana plantation, national
parks, and lowland tropical
forests; they will also visit
volcanoes, cloud forests, and a
coffee farm and processing plant.
Students will also take trips to
Costa Rica's major cities, San
Jose and Cartago.
What many students don't
know is that there are funds
available for foreign study
through the Thomas W. Rivers
Foreign-Exchange Endowment
Fund. Students interested in the
program should check with the
program directors (listed below)
to determine if they are elegible
for this kind of assistance.
Even without aid, this program
should be affordable to many
students. For residents of North
Carolina, the projected cost is
$975, which includes tuition and
fees, room and board with a
Costa Rican family, hotel and
transportation expenses on excur-
sions, and round-trip airfare bet-
ween Raleigh and San Jose. For
non-residents the cost is higher �
S1686.
Program Directors are John R.
Bort (757-6136) and Richard L.
Mauger (757-6016). Application
forms are available from them or
the Coordinator of International
Programs, Brewster A-102,
757-6249.
The deadline for application is
February 15, so act quickly to
secure yourself an important lear-
ning experience.
� I
� � , � . .
� - ��





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 28, 198f,
Doonesbur
Classifieds
PERSONALS
FOR SENIORS ONLY: The Senior
Class Council is requesting input
from the Graduation Class of '86 for
ideas regarding a Senior Class Gift
and Senior Class Party, if in
terested, submit name, address,
phone no gift idea and party
criteria to SGA office in Mendenhall
Student Center
MIKE SEATE: I've been an ad
mirer of yours for awhile & I truly
like your sweet smile. At first we
were cougars, then shared Northern
Nights. Think of the white house &
'II be in sight. Catch a clue, it's up to
you.
PHI ALPHA THETA: There will be
a short meeting Thursday, Jan. 30 at
3 p.m. in the Todd Room. All
members please attend!
(RUSH PHI KAPPA TAU
miss it! Tues Jan 28.
Don'l
RUSH LAMBDA CHI ALPHA: A
Fraternity backed by tradition.
AOTT: Congratulations to the new
Leaders Council: Pres Jennifer
Sheriff; v. Pres Nancv Nicol;
Treasurer- Anne Leigh vallory;
Recording Sec Ten' Baker, Cor
responding Sec. Pam Pugh, Pledge
Trainer Rebecca Lee, Social
Chairman Amanaa Jernigan
Chapter Relations Dee Dennison
Panhellenic Delegate- Karen Heim
Scholarship Chairman Patrice
Freda, Rush Chairman Cheryl
Holzman, Public Relations Amy
Miller. -Get psyched for a great
year!
M.S What else was said to the girl
you want to marry in six years?
FIVE-O: The latest word from the
frat boys is "say your prayers
Sure would be nice if you could make
it to the championship. Maybe if Jeff
and Don play as well as they talk
They're a legend in their own minds!
NEW SORORITY: There will be an
important meeting this Thursday at
7 in room 208 Whichard.
RUSH- SIGMA TAU GAMMA: Wed
7 30 Chicken Cook Come by and
meet the Brothers and Little Sisters
of ECU'S best Fraternity
PIKA BETA CLASS: Congratula
tions on completion of Hell Week We
Knew you guys were worthy and you
proved it. Let's make this semester
a good one. The Alpha Class
ATTENTION SCUBA EN-
THUSIASTS: Don't miss your op
portunity To join East Carolina's
first Scuba Club. The first meeting
of the Coral Reef Dive Club will be
Mon Feb 3 from 3 5 in Mendenhall
room 221. Get involved!
COMMODORE 44: Would the person
who ran the ad as a repairman
please call 758 0578
PUMPKIN: I love you like no one
has ever loved you. I live for the day
when we can be together permanent
ly All I ask is please love me the
same and the rest of our life will take
care of itself Yours Forever! Stud.
NEED FINANCIAL AID Scholar
ship Research Foundation can help!
We have over 4 billion dollars worth
of financial aid m our computer
banks. $135 million dollars worth
went unused last year We have
financial aid sources for freshmen,
sophomores, athletes ana also for
the students wishing to attend
graduate school Our applicants
receive an average of from 15 to 20
sources for which thev quality We
guarentee results! For free informa
tion write to us and please include
year in school Scholarship
Research Foundation 829 Lyn
nhaven Parkway, Suite 114 118
Virginia Beach, Va 2345:
SPRING BREAK CRUISE Decide
now to cruise to the Mexican I;
$445 tips ' gratuities included 5
nights 6 days Call now for A GREAT
SPRING B3EAK! 758 0074 or
752 3178
NEEDAO.J: Are you having a par
ty and need a D.J� For the best in
Top 40, Beach and Dance Call
Morgan at 758 7967 between 5 7.30
p m. Reasonable rates references on
request
RUSH: Pi Kappa Ph; Fratern ty
be having rusn ton ighl
Mendenhall Student Center. C
out and meet the P Kapps arc
part of one of the stronges- I
nities on campus. Pi Kappa
place to go when ou n- n a rush
DELTA ZETA'S: Be prepared for
one iammin' sooai rl dnesday
night at The Attic come as you � �
and be prepared not to attend
classes Thursca, ju
hangovers The Brothers c-
pa Phi
LOST: Burger .
(Chess King) Presc
sunglasses in pocket Lo; I
Dixie parking lot at Riverg i1
ping Center Rewara SS
Bill at 752 4171 or ?5b 9484
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc. Call
758 6011 and leave a message.
FOR RENT: Two room apt. for rent
Call 752 7212 or 756 0174.
HOUSE REDUCED: 5 bedroom,
near university, 305 E. 14th St.
Available immediately. $390
758 5299
FOR SALE: 1979 Cutlass. Dark Blue
with vinyl top Great dependable
car. $3,200 or best offer. Call
830 1140
RESEARCH SERVICES: Writing,
editing, typing, promotionals.
355 7502 Nancie Allen 752 3916
2803 B Evans St Suite 107.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom apt. 1' 2
bath, living room and large kitchen.
Cable and central air. Near Pitt
Plaza Call 830 1769
FOR RENT: Apartment in A unit of
Ringgoid Towers $250 per month
Call 637 6885
FOR SALE: 2 neon light beer signs.
Great for parties, or the perfect gift
for the person who has everything.
Price negotiable. Call 758 2133.
MASSAGE CLINIC: $1 per 10
minute massage. Sponsored by ECU
Physical Therapy Club. Partial pro
ceeds to go to charities. Feb 4
6 30 10 p.m First floor Belk Bldg
Massages given by Jr. and Sr P T
students
WORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
perience in typing resumes, theses,
technical documents, and term
papers. We manage and merge your
names and addresses into merged
letters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards. Our prices are extremely
reasonable and we always offer a 15
percent discount to ECU students S
8- F Professional Computer Co.
(back of Franklin's) 115 E. 5th St
757 0472.
SENIORS! SENIORS! SENIORS!
Enjoy the last phase of your college
career employmentS&F Com
puters is offering a package price to
help you send out your resumes in
luding all of the following: Letter
quality typed resumes, Mail merged
over letters (name and address of
each company as inside mailing ad
dress on letter), Letter quality typed
envelopes with company address
and your return address on
envelope, Everything folded, stuffed
and even stamped, A listing of com
panies sent to (for your follow ups)
Just bring us your hand written
resume and cover letter and the
businesses you with to apply to and
we'll do the rest. Per resume fo
your namesaddr (we stuff) $2.30
(min 10 resumes) (we stuff and
stamp) $1 90 (2 page resume prices
slightly higher). This offer absolute
ly expires March 15, 1986 S&F Com
puter Company, 115 East Fifth St.
Greenville, NC 27834 757 0472
FOR SALE: Montgomery Ward
Stereo with cassette, AM FM,
8 track and turntable $50. Call
758 6196 after 6
TYPING SERVICES: Resumes,
term papers, theses Low rates
Spelling and grammatical correc
tions included Cindy 757 0398 after
5 30 p m
FOR SALE: 20 gallon fish tank with
top, heaters and underground
filters $30. Twin bed, box springs
and mattress $25 Call 758 0047
ONEORTWOROOMMATES
NEEDED: TO SHARE JJ
BEDROOM, 2'j BATH WITH
WASHERDRYER AT WINDY
RIDGE TOWNHOUSES NO
DEPOSIT REQUIRED $125 � $150
PER MONTH CALL CONNIE OR
DEBBIE AT 757 6935 OR 355 2775
WANTED
DEPENDABLE PERSON: Seeking
dependable person fo answer phone,
hours 830 am. 1 30 p.m. MF, send
resume to PO Box 8587. Greenville,
NC 27834
MOBILE HOME FOR SALE
Emerald Isle NC. View of doth ocean
and sound. Across the street from
the Emerald Isle Fishing Pier
Water, ac, partial furnishing. $750
or best offer and assume land lease
Hill'
SALE
FOR SALE: 3ft refridgerat � S
negotiable Can 758 -
WORD PROCESSING
BECKY LATHAM 752 !
p.m.) 17 rs exper � 1
theses scientil
manuscripts business 11
ters
University Optometric Eye Clinic
DR. DENNIS O'NEAL
Comprehensive Eye Examinations
Contact Lenses
So, Hard, Gas Permeable Timed
Extended Hear, Contacts for Astigmatism
Glasses (One Day Service in Most Cases)
Student � Faculty Discounts on Contacts &
Glasses
( 'onvenient to Campus
ening & Sat Appointments Available
SUMMER JOBS FOR COLLEGE
STUDENTS: Openings available on
the Food Service Staff at Cavp
SEAFARER ON THE COAST OF
NORTH CAROLINA Good salary
plus room and board. Excellent op
portunity for friends to work
together June 8 through mid
August. Must be at least 18 ears of
age No experience necessary only
ambition and good references re
quired For more info and an ap
plication, write: Camp Seafarer,
P O Box 10976, YMCA, Raleigh.
N C 27605
Carolina Sunglasses
A$
wm I Sunglasses
from Bausch & Lomb
612 E. 10th Street
(Across from campus security)
758-6600
Lg. Metal
Outdoorsman
Shooter
Wayfarer
Cats
Reg.
49.00 (G-15)
59.00 (G-15)
64.00 (G-15)
Our Price
31.95
38.95
41.95
43.95 (G-15) 28.95
45.00 (G-15) 29.95
Barbequ
Bv li
Carolina Sunglasses
State Fairgrounds
Sat. 9-5
Sun. 9-5
Call for free cai
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
SHERRY H
think. YBS
It's sooner than you
SENIORS, FACULTY, GRADUATE
PORTRAITS: will be taken Feb
3 13. Appointments can be made
beginning Jan 22 by coming by the
Buccaneer office and signing up Nc
appointments by phone.
Undergraduates will be taken
March 17 27.
RUSH
SIGMA PHI
EPSILON
LIFETIME
EXPERIENCE
if Monday, Jan. 27 it
Fraternity Orientation at Jones Cafeteria
Thursday, Jan. 30 it
Pizza, Pepsi and the Tri Sigs
at the Sig Ep House
Monday and Tuesday it


BLO
At
Sponsor
Wedi
Thui
12
Me
A
'�� ; ����!
i





SE OR EEOEDTWO ROOMMATES SHARE 3 BATH WITH
! AT WINDY
NO . S 25 $150
INNlE OR
5 2' fs
coR COLLEGE
jva ab � � CAMP

ent op
work
mid
ears o?

s re
i i ap


in ill asses
9.00 (G-15) � I �
t oo (G-15) 38.95
0 (G-15) 41.95
3.95 (G-15) 28.95
5.00 (G-15) 29.95
HI
N
E
CE
Cafeteria
Mrs
WAV
Doonesbury
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY28, J986
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
tANHONEi
I WKSK
ofclvrse rve
COME HQHARt
. FOLDING TOBE
I I? -RjEMP? HONEST, SIR
sL WTSO
C 1 meu
h
i4k� YOU EVER HAD AN AFFAIR. OF
THE .HEART, SIR, HJHERE AFTER YEARS
OF DENIAL AND LOVING FROM AFAR,
THE POORS OF BASSCN WERE FINALLY
w FLUNG OPEN, ONLY TV
rt HAVEYOURLOVERCfUEL
�js& ly snatched away
' bythefates?
Z
?
3Ta
UMWELL,
LET ME
see
ME NEITHER
BUT He CAME
THAJCLOSE1
In Chilly Weather
FV
Some Like It Hot
mer two minutes and let soak for Cover, bring to a boil, and sim
one hour. Drain the beans reserv- mer genty for two to three hours,
ing the liquid. adding more liquid as needed.
I Mu EARN
i . . . . :
�OU iAVl
I ��. 06 VOL'GOT
RSAi ��
KITS' OR
"UJHATCAN YOU SAY ABOUT A 25-
YEAROLP&RLUJHOPIEP? that
SHE MAS BEAUTIFUL AND BRILLIANT
WT SHE LOVED MOZART ANDBACH
AND THE BEATLES AND ME '
' 5 ROM 'LOVE
CURTIS UJHAT STORY' T WAS
THEHEUIS THE CLOSEST!
THAT COULD FIND IN
THElISRAR
� V
K

, IP
'am I

�?�
CHOOl ONDHE LOVED
5 WEfiN �SU ONItHCHHl
OUNCE ' a f � -w tfuJS?
0� � WRMVST jet
j i
1 SEEMS FfniNG.THEN HAl AS
ACT! NO PRESIDENT I HEREfr PlttCT
AU PKOFiTS REALIZED BY THIS COL
LE6EBE TURNEDOVERTOUXA. . '
ERACY PROGRAMS -
r
- f -
7)W SURtr
BE PROUD � -
V KNCU WINNING
Bv BKTH I)AMi:i,S
Sl�ff WrtUr
Mexican Chil Con Came
1 pound dry red beans
3 quarts o water
4 pounds oi hamburger
3 tablespoons oil
i large chopped union
1 clove garlic mashed
2 1 pound cans tomatoes,
quartered
1 6 ounce can tomatoe paste
2 and one-halt teaspoons sail
2 teaspoons chili powder
2 teaspoons oregano
one-halt teaspoon ground cumin
one-half teaspoon cayenne
Soak the beans in water overnighl
or brinu the water to a boil, sim-
Brown the hamburger and onions jms recipe makes 12-16 servings,
in the oil, add the soaked beans, serve wjtri ri0( french bread, a
garlic, tomatoes, paste, the spices tossed salad with dressing, and
and about three cups of the bean vour favorite beverage,
liquid.
r
Hooker Memorial Christian Church
(Dtactplea of Christ I
111 ! Greenville Blvd 756 227S
W�f
. w
i!
A.
T
;rH
In essentials, 'ii.ni.lij
In non-essentials Jxttdom
In all things. .Lovl
Special Classes For College Students
945 a.m. Christian Education (all ages)
11:00 a.m. Worship- Open Communioo
R�v H Vann Knight
mmt.
Barbeque Techniques Endure
HvH KI ()1 llllllh


1 a N


is unique to the area. It is
flat, crust) and crisp on the out-
side and mushy on the inside. A
cal Grifton cook, Adelide Mur-
cooks hers the same way her
lei and grandmother did. It's
isn'1 in any
cookbooks I've found.
1 olk-cooking is nisi one aspect
- a pi �jeci being done
' anded partially w ith a
th S.( rts Coun-
cil, a state agency Any skill
handed down through genera-
tions of families, neighbors and
friends is of interest to us. I et us
hear from you it sou feel you
have a skill that qualities. Also
while we're dealing with folk
cooks, we're ; nt crested in
everybody's family recipes Give
us a call. Grifton liaison foi the
protect is Mrs c riarlotte Betts ai
524-5356.

's.
'
Tar Landing Seafood
January Specials
All You Can Eat
Any One Or Any Combination
shrimp. Oysters, I rout.
( lam Mrips. Deviled
( rahv. Flounder
$6
99
Alaskan Crab Legs Or
Steamed Shrimp
Served Vith Fried Or Baked Potato, Cole Slaw
Hushpuppies.
& i
V ft.
105 Airptrt Road
dreenillf. N(
, A - . U.
BLOODMOBILE
At Mendenhal!
Sponsored By ECU Biology Club
Wednesday, Jan. 29, 1986
Thursday, Jan. 30, 1986
12:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Musi Heigh At I east 100 pounds
Mendenhdl Student Center
Room 244
American Red Cross
Blood ServicesTidewater Region
?
BURGER
KING
Executive Lima Service
355-LIMO

( arolina V a Mall
756-6078
Ol'r N MONSA1
K M Io9 I'M
Process & Print
it h 11
F i
19' 3C per print
�. &J � . . s; I
; 4 � Eg. $9.94 !
NOW S4.73
t M'IKI s ; i h
Sophomore and Freshmen Women
Congratulations to all of you who made
a 3.0 G.P.A. or better last semester'
You are cordially invited to
the Alpha Omicron Pi Sorority House
on Wednesday. January 2b, 1986 for a
tea honoring your scholastic achievement
at Last Carolina University
for the 1985 Fall Semester
5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
905 Johnston Street
Greenville, Sorth Carolina
The Panhellenic Association .
Alpiia Omicron Pi Sorority
COMING ATTRACTIONS
Wed Jan. 29
8:00p.m.
Thurs Fri. &Sat.
Fn.&Sat.
Thurs. Jan. 30
1:30p.m.
Need A Student ID?
Making of Student ID's
Mendenhall Multi-Purpose Room
The Film's Committee Presents
Another Country (PG)
The Falcon and the Snowman(R)
7:00 & 9:30 p.m.
The Late Show:
Phantom of the Paradise (R)
12 midnight
At The Underground:
Early Musical Cartoons
Bring Your Lunch!
CASINO NIGHT
Compliments of the Recreation Committee
Blackjack, craps, poker, bingo and lots more!
Mocktails and refreshments served
One dollar per $1,000 play money-
Three dollar per $3,000 play money
It all happens on Thurs. Jan. 28
In February, Look For
Special Concerts Committee
Preservation Hall Jazz Band
Appearing, Mon. Feb. 3
Tickets: Central Ticket Office
Mendenhall from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Don't Miss It � A Must for Music Lovers
Wed Jan. 29
2:30p.m.
V
XAJk
From the Productions Committee
Dinner Theatre Any Wednesday
6:30p.m Fri. and Sat. Feb. 21A 22
Advance Sales Only
Tickets at Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall
n.mmWCVmtmmm&m
tUMtrnWCVtmBtftmitmetmaoOmn
i OUT TO JWVT WXJ

-�����-

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1 Ml S i K(1 INIAN
Sports
Pirates Take Pair
From CAA Rivals
JANUARY 28, 1986 Page 10
J B HUMBERT The East C�rol.nn
Splitting The Defense
�Junior-forward Niarchdl Henn .plits .he Janus Madison defense for
wo of his jame-hiKh 16 points K�t's 51 -48 win over the Dukes
in Mingesoliseum.
Lady Bucs Defeat
GMU Lady Pats

a
B IIMCHAMJi KR
ira
to
rge Mason 72-61 v ;
Saturday night.
With 10:54 ieit in the
the I ad Patriots wei
19-14. However, this u
Alma Bethea went
the Pirate- went n
outscoring GMl 19-3
who led the charge, sc
points during the spurt
put ECU on top 33-22 with 3:4.
left in the first half. Be
12 ol her 16 points in the first
half.
In the -econd period,
Pirates saw their lead trimmed to
three, 45-42. when Veronica
Gilliard hit a baseline jumper
with 11:52 remaining.
1 he Pirates went back to
ending their lead to itsgrea
of the game, 13 points (63 5
with 1:49 left to be played
Bel hea
The run
i wa for
s The only
d �uble figures
with 16 and
' 15. Roun-
i g �'�.is i iSa
seven while Liret-
d lod) Rodriguez

shot 48 percent
11 r the name. This
time this year that
�not under 50 per-
r for the game.
id coach Emily Man-
g -aid that she felt the game
� ' Jam effort and that
ites played well on the
ates were playing a bit
ded as they were without
' I oraine Foster,
Monique Pompili and Chris
. 'aho had injuries.
With the win, the Pirates move
A play. Look for the
of last night's game
- Madison in Thurs-
on o' The Last Caroli-
By SCOTT COOPER
Sport Editor
Marchell Henry and Scott Har-
dy combined for 31 points as
ECU's second half comeback
resulted in a 51-48 Pirate victory
over CAA rival James Madison.
The win not only gives ECU a
4-3 conference record and sole
possession of third place in the
CAA (and 9-9 overall), but is on-
ly the second time under Pirate
head coach Charlie Harrison that
ECU has won consecutive con-
ference games.
Three Pirates reached double
figures as Henry led all scorers
with 16, while Hardy had a
career-high 15. Keith Sledge
knocked in some long-range
jumpers to finish with 10.
The Pirates came out very
cold, just connecting on 39.1 per-
cent of their field-goal attempts
through one period of play. The
Dukes were a bit hotter at 52.4
percent. However, the name of
the game was defense � at least
for the Pirates.
"It wasn't very pretty. The
defense did what had to be
done coach Charlie Harrison
said. "We're 4-3 and I'm pleased
to be where we are. I hope thev're
(the team) pleased with
themselves
The 2,600 fans saw James
Madison take an early lead they
would hold until 14:25 of the se-
cond half.
In the first half, however, the
Dukes led by as manv as eight
(16-8) with 9:48 left in'the open-
ing period. Two quick buckets bv
Henry and a Hardy steal for an
easy layup cut the Dukes' lead to
16-14 with 8:30 remaining in the
first half.
As the two team's traded
baskets over the last minutes of
the half, JMU went into the
lockcrroom with a 22-18 advan-
tage.
In the second half, the Pirates
trailed by seven early as a Todd
Banks three-point play gave the
Dukes a 25-18 lead with 17:46 re-
maining in the game.
However, the Bucs retaliated.
When a Curt Vanderhorst steal
resulted in a Hardy layup with
16:13 left, ECU trailed 25-22 as
the crowd showed its vocal sup-
port.
The Pirates finally broke the
ice when Sledge nailed a 14-foot
jumper with 13:21 remaining,
giving the Bucs their first lead
(28-27). It was a lead they would
never relinquish.
The Pirates' late surge was
spearheaded by the fine defensive
play. In fact, ECU forced the
Dukes into nine second-half tur-
novers.
ECU built as much as an eight-
point advantage, 42-34 with 7:30
remaining to play. However, the
Dukes' no-quit attitude was ap-
parent as they came back to
within two points, on two dif-
ferent occassions late in the con-
test.
The Bucs' ability to sink the
late free throw once again spelled
doom for a conference foe. Har-
dy sank five of his six line at-
tempts during the final minute of
Play, giving ECU a 51-48 victory.
The win was a big one for the
Pirates and senior guard Hardy
was happy with the victory. "It
was a great team effort Hardy-
said. "I gambled a lot tonight (on
defense), and those guys covered
up when I did so. We're thrilled
to death to be in third place
A balanced Pirate scoring at-
tack gave ECU a 75-67 victory
over George Mason, snapping a
two-game losing streak.
Senior guard Curt Vanderhorst
paced the Bucs with 17 points and
an all-around effort, including
eight assists, five rebounds and
three steals. Marchell Henry add-
ed 15 points and a game-high 10
rebounds while Leon Bass had 14
and Keith Sledge chipped in a
dozen. Scott Hardy finished with
eight while Manuel Jones had
seven.
For such an important con-
ference game. ECU showed no
signs of nervousness as they con-
nected on 63 percent of their
field-goal attempts and had an
85-percent evening from the foul
line.
"We got more balanced scor-
ing than we got in a long time
coach Charlie Harrison said.
"We had very high-percentage
shots � we got the ball inside.
"We got very good shots
Harrison added. "We executed
well at times, though at times we
got lazy and tired (in last five
minutes of first half) � we we're
fortunate that the ball bounced
our way at those times
Early in the contest, both
teams matched baskets as a Bass
layup knotted the game (8-8) with
15:15 left in the first period.
With George Mason in their
full-court man-to-man defense,
ECU suddenly exploded as they
outscored the visiting Patriots
11-0 over the next four minutes.
After two inside scores from
E ss, and a Sledge jumper, Har-
dy hit a streaking Vanderhorst
for a layup and an eventual three-
point play. The two then switch-
ed roles as Vanderhorst assisted
Hardy for a layup off the break.
This gave the Pirates a comman-
ding 19-8 lead with 11:28 left.
J B HUM6EKT
e Eas' Car
McNeill, White Win
In Bud Invitational
D. Ill"f �
By RICK McCORMAC
K i Sportj lnfortrnnr
The Patriots whittled at the
Pirate adavntage, cutting it to six
(25-19) on a Rob Rose layup with
2:41 to go in the half. However,
the Bucs responded on two quick
baskets by Henry and took their
biggest lead of the period (33-21)
when Vanderhorst's tip-in beat
the halftime buzzer.
See Bucs, page 11
The ECU men's track team
captured two first-place finishes
this weekend at the Marriot-Bud
Light Invitational in Blacksbura
Va.
Sophomore sprinter Lee
McNeill and senior hurdler Craig
White each won their respective
events.
McNeill won the 60-meter dash
with a time of 6.23 seconds in the
finals. He also ran a 6.18 in the
semi-finals, giving McNeill the
two fastest times posted in the
two-day meet.
White captured the 55-meter
high hurdles with a winning mark
of 7.55 seconds.
ECU was the only team in the
25-team field to capture first-
place finishes in two events,
however no team standings were
kept.
Also placing for the Pirate
tracksters was the mile-relav
team, which finished in third
place with a time of 3.17.7.
Julian Anderson led off the
relay with a time of 49.8 seconds
and Phil Estes ran the second leg
in 49.3 seconds. Ken Daughtry
ran the third leg in 50.4 seconds,
with Chris Brooks anchoring the
relay with a time f 48.2
Brooks' 48.2 was the second
fastest time of the meet.
Other Pirate runner- a per-
formed well, but narrowly missed
the finals due to the strei -
the field.
In the 60-meter das :ne
McNeill (younger brother of Lee)
ran a 6.4 in the semi-finals,
finishing third in a photo finisl
However, on! the top I v
each heat made it to the finals.
Nathan McCorklealso ran well in
the 60-meter dash, posting a time
of 6.42 seconds.
Brooks narrowly missed the
finals of the 400-meters. finishing
in ninth place despite getting
knocked off the track in the earlv
part of the race.
ECU coach Bill Carson was
pleased with his team's perl
mance, especially considering the
tough opposition.
"We sprinted well in a tough
field Carson said. "There were
15 heats in each event, with six
kids per heat.
"Our kids ran well, it was a
really good performance Car-
son added.
The next meet for ECU will be
Saturday in Fairfax, Va when
the Pirates compete in the George
Mason Invitational.
B DAVIDMcGINNESS
aiMMI Spun, rdlior
The ECU Pirate swimmers e
ended their streak of consecutive
dual-meet victories this weekend
th a win over CAA conference
rival Old Dominion University.
I he women have taken nine
aighl wms and their record
now stands at 10-1. The men are
not far behind, with five in a row
and a season record of 7-2.
"Things could hardlv look any-
bet ter said ECU swim coach
Rick Kobe. "This is our best
season ever in terms of the
number of wins
Sophomore Bruce
Brockschmidt lead the way for
the men, winning the 200-yard
freestyle and backstroke, and set-
ting a school record in the latter.
Brockschmidt has been excelling
all season, and according to Kobe
he just continues getting better.
"Bruce was outstanding at this
meet Kobe said. "His times are
just awesome for this time of
year. He actually broke the
record in the backstroke unshav-
ed and unrested
Senior Keith Kaut also
displayed his lightning speed,
winning the 50 and 100-yard
freestyle events, and turning in
his best times of the season in the
process.
For the women, junior Scotia
�1 � ' ee BUC' Pae ll w"h Chris Brooks anchoring the Mason Invhational
swimmers Extend Streak; Defeat ODTT
"SKSS iST.SL ,�?!? �he me� and really d,d a good swim a full work�, Th��H,� �� JL TzL . T
Miller was a force to be reckoned
with, taking wins in the 500 and
00-yard freestyles.
try Campbell dominated
the diving boards, winning both
"tie one and three-meter diving.
week will be the beginning
he "taper period" for the Buc
swimmers, as they wind down
vards their conference tourna-
ment in Wilmington. The Pirates
have reduced their strenuous
training schedule, practicing only
in the afternoon and suspending
weight training.
oach Kobe is excited about
his team's progress so far.
'Things couldn't look any bet-
ter Kobe said. "It's kind of
scary, doing this well at this
point. The kids have been train-
ing really hard, and they still keep
getting faster. In my four years as
head coach, we've always gotten
faster as the season progressed,
which is what you want to do. We
should peak at the end of the
season, which is ideally what you
want to do
Kobe, who has been ill during
the past week, was unable to at-
tend the meet. Assistant coach
Scott Hernon and diving coach
Jon Rose travelled with the team
and served as coaches during the
meet.
"Jon and Scott took the kids
to the meet and really did a good
job said Kobe. "They took
charge and really got the kids go-
ing. It's nice to know you've got
good people to help out, but this
was still the most nervous meet
I've ever 'been to
Although the Bucs are osten-
sibly entering their "rest" period
this week, they will actually have
to face two of their strongest op-
ponents, and with less time bet-
ween the two meets (one day),
than any others this season. In
swim a full workout Thursday
Kobe believes that even though
they are in their taper period, and
swimming two meets this week, it
is important for his Pirates to
practice daily.
"It's important when you're
resting to get into the water every
day Kobe said. "You want to
strike a balance between working
too hard, and getting out of
shape. Since we've stopped lifting
and morning workouts, it's im-
portant to maintain the fitness
We'll go through these meets and
just let the chips fall. We're just
concerned with the conference
championships at this point
According to Kobe, the out-
come of the meet with Duke will
be tossup. Both teams are of
similar ability, so the location of
the contest may be a crucial fac-
tor.
"If we were swimming in our
pool we'd be favored said
Kobe, "but since we're swimm-
ing at Duke, either team could
win
The Pirates will face Carolina
at home in Minges Natatorium
"TI��n I. , , ai uc ,n Minges Natatorium
things could hardly look any better This is our on Wednsday at 600 p.m. Thev
best season ever in terms of the number of wins. �take �n �uke �" Fr,day at
Rick Kobe
addition, the Bucs will not inter-
rupt their training regimen
(although it is a reduced
schedule) before or between the
meets. They are doing this
because Kobe feels that the Bucs'
performance in these meets is
secpndary in importance to their
preparation for the CAA tourna-
ment.
"Before we swim UNC
Wednesday, we'll work out a full
two hours Kobe said, "and
you've worked so hard to achieve
all year
Carolina, whom the Pirates
will face Wednesday will un-
doubtedly be their strongest op-
ponent of the year. The Bucs will
be definite underdogs in this con-
test, but Kobe is merely intent on
having his athletes perform to
their capabilities.
"The outcome of this meet
doesn't make a difference
Kobe said. "When you're swim-
6:00 also
The following are the winning
results from Saturday's meet with
Old Dominion.
Men's Winners
400 medley relay: East
Carolina (Brockschmidt, Flem-
ing, Hidalgo, Brown) 3:37.29.
1000 free: Brown (ODU)
9:39.35.
200 free: Brockschmidt (ECU)
1:43.78.
50 free: Kaut (ECU)21.96.
1-Meter diving: Lydecker
(ODU).
200 IM: Hidalgo (ECU)
2:01.54.
100 free: Kaut (ECU) 4
200 back: Brockschmidt (ECU)
1:56.50 (School record)
500 free: Brown (ODU)
4:41.66.
3-Meter diving: Durkm (ECU)
200 breast: Hicks (ECU)
2:14.81.
400 free relay: ODU (Kirkhom
Arguelles, Brown Horton)
3:12.49.
Women's Winners
400 medley relay: East
Carolina (Poust, Wentink
Augustus, Pterson) 4:11.66.
1000 free: Miller (ECU)
10:52.80.
200 free: Cholish
1:57.56.
50 free: Winters (ODU) 25 02
200 IM: Cholish(ODU)
��-� 13.63.
,pmCter dlving: Campbell
(ECU).
2125�20 fly' AugUStus (ECL)
100 free: Winters
54.68.
200 back: Poust(ECU) 2:15.68.
500 free: Miller (ECU) 521 79
(ECU)Cter d'Ving: CamPbe11
200 breast: Cholish
2:25.01.
(ODU)
(ODU)
(ODU)
before Duke (on Friday), we'll ming fast, you're swimming fast
200 fly: Polonsky (ODU) (WWrT �'d Domini�n
1:58.26. �rTV' Brennan. Wald
Serouele) 3:43.26.
NCA
Continued from pa�t i
Jaimed that the mone a
( arnestoget a
a knee injury and-hat hi:
reinbursed the school. How
no record of reinbursemei
be found.
OnJu!
a check foi Si2 to N
Vann to pj
claimed
grant at tl
written jr
am to ' � icaden
ble. Emory
reimbursed the
University
bursment
On Ma.
wrote a
Telephone
phone -
Bunn wa
time, and tl
was 1
him.
Bunn .�
spring seme
4. and �- j �
Bucs Be
( ontinued trom page fj
"They (
pressure
tonigh'

bother
"Scot.
their pi
:
- '
The
down
�"
Witl ; -
ed to be in 1
game. A Hat I
a Vanderhorst dunl
43-30. Hen
with 10:19 e?
urgi)
However tl
c up. chew .
the Pirate lea-
eight minutes, v
ECL 22-9. A K
Classifieds
Continued from pat 8
WANTED: Stuoen' or -
oo paperwork 95 c - ��
Peb. 3 13 Will De pa d
NATIONAL COLLEGE
MARKETING COMPANY
dividual or campus orfl
work Part timeassf ng si
applying for credit cards - .
fours, excellent fu
Meet students ana have .
Snaron Granc a I 800 592 .
ROOMMATE NEEDED Va �
share new conac replace washer
3ryer. dish washer, own pearoo-
ana Path, micro oven. S25C fiat ra�e
Call Britt 355 4349
CABIN COUNSELOR INSTRUC
TORS: Mate and Femae �
western N C 9 week chiioren s ,
er camp Over 30 activities n
eluding Aacr s� TennlS Hea'ez
swimmmg doc Go Kas Hiking
Art room -s-ea s salary ac
travel Expe ece not necess-
Non-smok "c students wr v
P'tcation t3ocfure Ca
Pewooc. '�006 BodO d-
Miami. Flor aa 33015
also cmung February 3i
Watch For
BUTTERMI
BISCUITS
Sausage
$1.09
er,
1
Steak
$1.09
Cheese
.65
j
Plain
.45
� t I - ' -3.
' - ' fe' � ��
Mm
1





THfc LAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 28, 1986
11
NCAA Investigates Emory
11


( nntinued from pat 1
laimed that the money was for
ai nes to get a second opinion on
ee injury and that his parents
used the school. However
record of reinbursement could
. found.
On !u! 28, 1982, Emory wrote
leek for SI2 to Norwood
to pa an exam fee. Emorj
;cd that Vann was not on
at the time the check was
ten Md that he needed the ex
lo become academically ehgi-
i mory also stated that Vann
nbursed the school. The
versity has no record of rein-
ment.
May 16. 1983, Emory
a check to Carolina
one to pay Buhba Bunn's
le bill Emory claimed that
a as not in school at the
md that payment of the bill
work Bunn had done for
was on grant during the
�tei which ended Ma
was n summer school.
which began May 16. The
University has been unable to
reach Bunn to find out if indeed
the payment was for work done
between the two dates.
Emory said that the accounts
had been authorized by Bill Cain,
former ECU athletic director, to
handle money from vending
machines.
Cain said he went with Emory
to Eirst State Bank to open per-
sonal accounts without the
University's name on the ac-
counts. Cain said he never told
Emory that he could open any ac-
counts in ECU's name and was
unaware that he had done so.
Also dealing with financial
assistance Emory gave, in the fall
of 1982, a check to prospective
athlete John Cal Williams to pay
part of his tuition. Williams was
a transfer from North Greenville
Junior College.
Williams, in a sworn state-
ment, claimed that he owed the
University additional money over
his Basic Equal Opportunity
Bucs Beat Mason
vVhite Win
vitational
atODU
�n s W inners
�i D U)
�bell
� tL .(E U)
-W(ODU) I 2 15.68. 5:21.79
eterdivingnpbel!
(E( 1
� breast C holish (ODU)
2 25 01
400 free relav: OldDominion
1W i n t e'Brennan.Walder,
Serouek; 34 26
( ontinued from page 10
. (GMU) put a lot oi
. e on your guards, but
thai pressure didn't
us Harrison said.
did a nice job against
ire.
ge
1 he guards did a
the ball in to the
rlir!
th
gei me ball
;e broke full-
flit Bass inside
1 CU a 39-28
remaining to
the Bu.s seem-
command of the
steal turned into
lunk as ECU led
three-point pla
rd the Bik
gest, 52 38
Patriots did not
teadil) awa at
()er the next
(.All outscored
Kenm Sanders
layup with 1:58 left to play cut
the Buc lead to just one (61-60).
GMU had a chance to take the
lead, but as the Mmges Coliseum
crowd roared. Hardy nabbed his
fourth steal of the game. And
atter a pair of clutch free throws
from Henry and Hardy, EC I
took a 65-60 lead. However, a
Sanders three-point play chopped
the advantage to 65-63 with '58
seconds left.
The Pirates responded when
the) needed to. After being trap-
ped in the corner. Sledge found
Jones for a two-handed slam,
giving ECl a 67-63 lead. After
two Sledge free throws gave the
Pirates a "1-63 advantage.
Vanderhorst split the defense and
once again fed Jones for a crowd-
roaring slam.
A pair oi free throws from
Henry and Vanderhorst iced the
zame as let won easily, "5-6
Grant, and that Emory issued
him a check from his TV show's
account. Williams said Emory
told him to cash the check at a
bank and then pay off the rest of
his tuition.
Emory denied this and the
University has no? been able to
obtain all of his bank records.
As for as Emory's recruiting
violations, the investigation turn-
ed up evidence that Emory sent
graduate assistants off campus to
recruit, which is against NCAA
rules. According to the rules of
the NCAA, the head coach and
his nine full-time assistants are
the only one's that can recruit
off-campus. If less than nine are
on the staff, then graduate
assistants can be used to fill those
vacancies.
Emory claims that the graduate
assistants were only used when
there was less than nine full-time
coaches.
ECU said that on occassions,
there had been some vacancies on
the staff, but there were none
during the football season when
the recruiting violations took
place.
Robert Barrow, a former
graduate assistant from spring
83 to Jan. 1985, said in a sworn
statement, that Emory had in-
structed him to attend high
school football games to scout
prospective athletes.
"Coach Emory encouraged me
to make actual contact if possi-
ble stated Barrow. "1 perform-
ed the off-campus recruiting
nearly every Enday night during
the fall seasons of 1983 and
1984
The report also showed
evidence that Emory had two of
his players to play with assumed
names in junior-varsity games.
This was done so the players
would not lose a year of eligibili-
ty .
Jerod Jackson played for the
junior varsity team twice in 1984,
on Sept. 15 and Nov. 8. Jackson
said that he was told by Emory
that if he played under an assunv
ed name, that he would not lose a
year of eligibility. Jackson did
play in both games, but his name
is not on either roster.
Emory said that although he
did sign the participation lists, he
relied on Rhett Raynor, the
junior varsity coach at the time,
to see that the lists were accurate.
Raynor was contacted by ECU
and he commented that he did
not prepare the lists; and that
Emory had never discussed the
possibility of a player playing
under an assumed name with
him. He also said that he did not
remember whether Jackson
played in either of the two games.
Dr. Howell commented that
the investigation showed that
staff knew of the incidents when
they happened. He also com-
mented that the proper steps have
been taken to see that something
of this nature doesn't happen
again.
Howell stated in the report that
he felt that the investigation was
thorough. "The report is submit-
ted so that the NCAA may assess
the facts and circumstances in
order to determine whether rules
of the NCAA have been violated.
ECU has already taken actions to
further assure that its athletic
programs are conducted in accor-
dance with NCAA
requirements
Classifieds
mtinued from page 8
n student to
Mon Fri
DNAL COLLEGE
� ' NG COMPANY: Seeks
impos organization to
' � � -s st ng students in
� � redit earns Flexible
� � enl S U:i training
� i ftave fun. Call
� : al 1 800 592 2121
'ATE NEEDED: Male, to
,nac. fireplace, washer
washer, own bedroom
icro oven, $250 flat rate
M 355 6349
BIN COUNSELOR INSTRUC
R S: Male and Female for
NC 8 week children's sum
"amp. Over 30 activities in
. Water Ski, Tennis, Heated
� ming pool. Go Karts, Hiking,
oom, meals, salary and
Experience not necessary.
' smoking students write for ap
� on brochure: Camp
ewood, 19006 Bob O Link Dr.
im Fior.da 33015.
NO
THE EFFECT UPON
THE AUDIENCE IS DEVASTATING
Monday, February 3, 1986
Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall Student Center
Admission: ECU Students, $3.50
ECU Faculty and Staff, $7.50
Public and at door, $9.00
Tickets at Central Ticket Office
757-6611, ext. 266
A Student L nion
Special Concerts Committee Presentation
J&
What 's new in Good Eatin'
at the Student Store in Wright
Building and at the Croatan?
SUBS
now fresh daily
also coming February 3rd
Watch For
BUTTERMILK
BISCUITS
Sausage
$1.09
The "Country
5 5
ham, turkey, roast beef and bacon
with two k inds of cheese
$1.90
9)
Steak
$1.09
Cheese
.65
Plain
.45
Bacon
$1.09
Ham
$1.09
The "Tree Top
ham, turkey and roast beef
with two k inds of cheese
$1.90
Daily" Special
$1.65
v?
Pilot makes
writing so exciting.
The
Pilot Precise
rolling ball pen -
the smooth,
sleek way
to get it on paper.
It's the pen thai w rites as fine as it looks A
unvhall held by a needle-like collar is the
secret to the comfort and smoothness you
experience And because of p-
itshall the Pre ise w ill write
(nsph through carbons
In either the fine or extra
fine point ()nh Si 19each
PILOT
orecise"
ARE YOU INTERESTED IN
Leadership
Scholarship
Social
Involvement
It So. HeId Sigma I'hi
Could Be. lor You!
STOP BY
AND TCiN
THE PARTY
J
Tuesday Night the 28th �
Munchies
Monday Night the 3rd �
Tuesday Night the 4th �
6 ft. Sub Night
Parties from
7 till n
OUT A O .
Sigma �J S?;
Phi c
.�.
i
-�
V
Va lb. Single Only
Unlimited
Cheese .20
Tomato No Charge
Valid at al' Greenville, Wilmington, Havdock & Jacksonville Locations
v - Ml K.I,

I
ALL YOU CAN EAT
SALAD BAR 99c
t. Good at participating Woody Not valid
3 with any othoroffor or KIDS'MEAL.
Please present coupon when ordering.
I Ono coupon por customer.
I Cheese, bacon entra and tax eitra
� where applicable.
m OFFER EXPIRES: 2 I ��
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
ONLY
Good at participating Wendy's. Not valid
with any other offer or KIDS MEAL.
Please present coupon when ordering.
One coupon per customer.
Cheese, bacon �trm and tea where ap-
plicable.
OFFER EXPIRES: 2-R-M
sHt r





12
I HI I s i K('l IM W
l K
IRS Basketball Soon
B MI-PHAMi- lrN
Sl.ff M nirc
No that Wintei has ai i ived
full force, it's the perfect time to
arm up cold hands and feet
a little exercise 1 ho Department
of Intramural Recreational Set
vices offers a variety ol programs
designed to do nisi thai
Watch out Carolina! In
tramural basketball begins this
eek and the stars are hooping it
up to be a pan ol the all-campus
final foui Games will be played
in Memorial Gymnasium and
Minges Coliseum from 4:00 pm
to 11:00 pm nightl)
Today is the las da to registei
foi co-rec bowling to be hold in
Mendenhall Student Center.
Frank Lee and the Powerhouse
will be back on the a 11 c warp
in the hopes ol crushing oppo
nent for another all-campus
championship 1 o sign up come
b room 204 Memorial Gym and
pick up youi team's registrai
packet.
Ever played basketball in
water You can this yeai with the
newest intramural point sys
event. Watei Basketball s �
paddle across com trust)
ner tubes to score a qu �
points, youi opp be
defending you
attempting defle
steal the rou
filled with hilai
and participa
Registration ends eb 6 R
robin action s :
Drop bv I 204 M
Gyn
packet
w

sw mn
Min
i i n
take place i
seen whetl
met
Wago
AI
iboui the la;vis Wandei
ladies title
Be sun � youi team up
- in ro m 204 Memoi ial
Vnd be sure to tune in to
1 amis Show I alkshow each
� and I hursday at 2:30
he latest highlights,
! md information concern
Department ol
ai al Reci eai ional Set
Stephanie 1 uke is youi
91 I 1 WZMB. fune
ECU Golfers' New Coach
B MM IHMH KK
SpBflj rllrf
1 he Il men's goll lean
a familial face back at practice
each day, but with a differeni
role now
Formei Pirate golfei hris
( zaja has been named assist
coach ol the goll team, aftei
playing foi E I from 1981
Head coach Don Sweeting
stated that C zaja will ha �
various duties as assistant coach.
He will be supervising practice,
directing ai
tions, an I ���
l t ; : �
added lhai I
mat hes
( l �

taininj tl
"1 A.I
fered the positi
"It's a k
to know th( .
with them and
Watch for the Pirate
Pigskin Preiev
Can't wait 'til April
�3
806
Memorial Drive
SUN
N
NY
rEM! N
v
WALL TO WALL PRICE
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN ELIZABETHTON.
Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality.
xXx
J
M � I � - I
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRESH
MARKET FRESH
Qtrs. Ground Beef
10 LBS. OR
(5 lbs. or more)
I
DIET PEPS! � PEPSI FREE � MTN DEW
Pepsi Cola
S&M

2 Itr.
btl.
99
0
Purex Bleach
DIXIE CRYSTALS
Pure r J L
RED RIPE
Sugar
88
LIMI1 � �� E � rH A . ' .
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY IW PRICE
DIAMOND
Grape Jelly
2 lb.
jar
79c
DOUBLE "Q" � IN OIL � OR WATER
Chunk Light Tuna
6.5 oz. ��
can
LIMIT TWO WITH ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE.
PLAIN OR SELF RISING
Red Band Flour
fe 48c
Tomatoes
IK
68
0
Paper Towels
SAVE
25'
UMTT TWO WITH ADDITIONAL
� .it.
SAVE
- 31c -
Round Top Bread
LIMIT ONE WITH ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
R�REGULAR
Crisco Shortening
3, 168
ASS PAt
81
can
Shortening
3 128
�if
loaves
LNMT FOUR WITH ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
i
SUNSHINE REGULAR � UNSALTED
Krispy Saltines
1 lb.
box
DUKE'S
Mayonnaise
703 Greenville Blvd. Greenville, N.C. OPEN 24 HOURS SSS&VI OPEN SUNDAYS 7
AMm,11PM
-





Title
The East Carolinian, January 28, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 28, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.451
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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