The East Carolinian, January 23, 1986






�he
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 NoW-3 3.
Thursday, January 23, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Candlelight Vigil Held In
Honor Of Abortion Case
Bv JENNIFER MYERS
sj.ff Wrllrr
� candlelight vigil was held in
ii ol the Pitt County Cour-
thouse Wednesday night by the
National Organization For
Won immemorate the an-
nivei � the Roe vs. Wade
ing abortion.
rh( on was passed by the
Supreme Court on January 22,
1973, allowing women to have
the choice ol terminating
pi egnanc).
1 he vigil began at 5:45 with a
few moments of silence for
iei who died due to illegal
ms.
Na ()i ganization For
I Wchapters all over
the United States, at the state and
local level, held similar vigils. On
March 9, a national vigil will be
held in Washington, D.C. for
chapters on the east coast, and
one week later in Los Angeles for
chapters on the west coast. One
of the reasons for these vigils is
the re-evaluation of the Human
Life Amendment by the
legislature. A possibility exists
that the amendment may be
changed.
According to Fran Parrott of
the Greenville Chapter of NOW,
"This could be a backward step.
NOW believes in pro-choice.
Right-to-life groups falsely say
we're pro-abortion. We are not
opting for abortion but believe
that women should have the right
to make their own decision
without government
interference
"NOW believes that a
pregnancy is a private matter,
and we advocate responsible
choice, one not to be made flip-
pantly. It is a personal decision,
and a woman should be allowed
to make her own decision. Ap-
proximately 70 percent of the
country's population believes in
having the choice to make this
type of decision
Opposing NOW in the Green-
ville are the pro-lifers, the conser-
vative churches, and the National
Right to Life group. Two prayer
vigils were scheduled Tuesday
and Thursday for downtown, by
opposing organizations. Also,
this past Sunday, Sanctity of Life
ceremonies were held in some
Baptist churches. These are pro-
life movements which coincided
with the anniversary of the Roe
vs. Wade decision.
The purpose of NOW is "to
bring women into full participa-
tion in American society to have
an equal relationship with men,
and to be accepted as equals,
"according to Parrott. In the
Greenville chapter, both men and
women, young and old, par-
ticipate.
ror more intormation on
NOW,write:
GreenvilleNOW
P.O. Box1307
Greenville, NC 27834
Placement Center Prepares Students
Bx MIKE l.l'DWK'K
Sr�. I- �3irnr
v areei Planning and
' '�� ce conducted a
foi mation meeting
lav in Mendenhall. The
e was designed to aquaint
vith the services provid-
I b ; acemenl Office.
Planning and
ice serves the
Furney James,
e Placement Office
jw. "We're here to
people in making a trans-
education to the world
f work he added.
The Career Planning and
nl Office prepares
udent ' i e w i I work by
� ' resumes, inter-
g skills, company informa-
job openings,
he office can
. sou have to register
with the office. "You register
with us by picking up a packet of
registration materials, which in-
cludes a resume format, data
sheet, reference forms and ad-
Furney
ministrative cards Furney said.
After a student has completed the
information packet he she
returns it to the Placement Of-
fice, then they are registered
Furney added.
One of the more valuable ser-
vices the Placement Office pro-
vides is coordinating on-campus
interviews. Companies from ae-
cross the U.S. come to ECU to
interview graduating seniors for
possible positions with their com-
panies. Some of the more promi-
nant companies that will be here
in January are Burlington In-
dustries, Peoples Bank, Roadway
Express and Planters National
Bank.
Anyone can use the services
and resources at the Career Plan-
ning and Placement Office;
however, said Furney, a student
must be a senior before they can
register with the office and be
eligible for on-campus inter-
views. Furney added that
students should register with the
office as soon as they become
seniors in order to take full ad-
vantage of the office's services
Besides receiving The Job
Guide which lists job openings
that a student can apply for
directly, added Furney. seniors
are abie to research company
backgrounds. He added knowing
about the company is vital in an
interview.
Furney said that the Career
Planning and Placement Office
regularly conducts resume
writing and interviewing skills
workshops. Resume workshops
will be held Jan. 24 and 30 at 3
p.m. and interviewing skills
workshops on Jan. 20 and 28 at 3
p.m. All the sessions are held in
the Bloxton House. Furney urged
all seniors to come by and register
with the Placement Office as
soon as possible.
Most Americans Diet, Weight Conscious
By CAROLYN DRISCOLL
sinff Writer
According to a report recently-
published in Time, almost 90 per-
of all Americans think they
are overweight. The same reports
fial four-fifths of all girls
in the fourth grade are dieting.
These tacts may explain why
dieting and fitness have become
two or America's favorite
pa es However, despite the
S billion we spent last year try-
slim down, the U.S.
illation has been called the
world's fattest.
"We are a population of
rabundance explains Susie
Bredderman, MSRD, a nutri-
tionist with the Department of
Family Medicine at the ECU
School of Medicine. She con-
cludes that the weight problem in
our country is a result of both
hereditary and environmental
factors. This opinion is shared by
Mary Elesha-Adams, Health
Educator with the Student Health
Services at ECU.
States Elesha-Adams, "When
parents have poor eating habits,
they are passed on to the
children In addition, they have
a 40 percent chance of being
obese as well. This risk doubles
when both parents are obese.
Heredity aside, according to
Bredduman, people may overeat
for several reasons, including the
influence of commercials on TV
and radio, stress at home and on
the job, and boredom.
It has long been noted that the
emphasis Americans place on be-
ing thin, especially through the
media, has a great influence on
how we see ourselves,
"Americans are brainwashed
says Bredduman, "into thinking
we all need to look like the media
tells us we should
Continual dissatisfaction with
ourselves leads to the frequent
"discoveries" of new dieting
gimmicks, such as eating kelp or
grapefruit to burn fat, and diets
which recommend eating one
thing all day, such as ice cream or
cookies.
"People want a quick way to
lose weight rather than take
weight off the right way and stay
happy with themselves says
Bredduman. However, the most
effective way to lose weight and
keep it off is not to do it quickly.
Experts recommend a goal of 1-2
pounds per week. To lose more
than that may result in water loss
in which case the weight will be
See AMERICANS Page 3.
JIMIHH.rNx Inrli-M �rHimm
Candlelight Vigil
N.O.W. (National Organization of Womeni conduced a
candlelight vigil last night in front of the Pitt County Courthouse.
N.O.W. held the vigil to commerate the Roe vs. Wade decision
that legalized abortion in the U.S. For further details see the related
story on page 1.
SGA Recommends
Fall Break Change
Bv LANCE SEARL
NUff Writer
Due to differing faculty and
student interests, the ECU Stu-
dent Legislature recommended a
change in the 1986 Fall Break
date from October 13-14 to Oc-
tober 23-24 or 27-28.
The original date set for Fall
Break would apparently fall in
conflict with Homecoming
weekend which is scheduled for
October 18-19.
SGA President David Brown
said the calendar change would
enable the Homecoming Steering
Committee to prepare more ade-
quately and would give ECU
students a better opportunity to
get into the Homcoming spirit.
Otherwise, said Brown, "the
students would be coming off a
long, fun-filled weekend at the
beach
Attendance, especially of the
parents would also most likely
benefit from the date change.
There would be a larger crowd at
the Homecoming game, ten-
tatively scheduled against
Georgia Southern.
In other business, the
Legislature appropriated S200 for
a Bell Tower Design Contest. The
contest would award Si25 for the
best design and $50 and S25 to
the runner-ups. The contest is an
attempt to find the top student
ideas for a campus tower to be
built in the future.
Also. $412 was granted to Nur-
sing Student Organization
enabline nine of theii represen-
tatives to attend state and na-
tional conventions later in the
vear.
Candidates For Shuttle Ride
s a - lTitS-t ft, w � t
SatisfactionJIM LEUTGENS - The tml
King also known as Alcoa has the look of satisfaction. King is the campus dog who likes to eat
aluminum cans. He has also been know to enjoy a good scratch behind the ears, so when you see him
around campus say hello.
By BETH W H1CKER
AMtetaal Nt�i hdllor
A dream may come true soon
for two people at ECU's school
of Medicine. Janice Shipley and
Lee Williams will find out today
if they will be aboard the space
shuttle in 1987.
Shipley, a physician in the
Family Medicine Program and
Williams a research associate in
microbiology and immunology,
were nominated to fill two
technical positions aboard the
shuttle in the may 1987 mission.
Both were chosen by ECU
Assistant Professor Carlo V.
Bruschi, whose research project
will be aboard the 1987 shuttle
night.
. Bruschi, upon learning of his
projects place on the shuttle plac-
ed an ad in the Daily Reflector
asking for applicants who were
qualified to conduct the experi-
ment in space.
Bruschi interviewed 20 ap-
plicants for the job. "All of the
applicants seemed to be highly
motivated and dedicated in-
dividuals, not simply curiosity
seekers
For Shipley and Williams the
competetion has just begun. To-
day, the group will be cut from 20
semi-finalists to eight. The final
cut will determine the two who
will be aboard the shuttle will be
made later in March.
The position involves
dedicating two years o the shut-
tle program. The first year will
involve training at NASA labs
around the country and a few
labs in Europe. Both Shipley and
Williams describe the shuttle
flight as "the dream of a
lifetime
"I quess all of those childhood
fantasies were brought back up
when 1 saw the article said
Shipley. "I thought, what a neat
thing to do - the excitement of
combining something scientific
with the excitement of going
Bruschi said both of the can-
didates are well qualified on
scientific grounds. Williams, who
holds a Ph.D. in medicinal
chemistry from the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
has the skills required for the
shuttle mission.
Shipley holds a medical degree
and undergraduate degrees in
biology, languages, and a
graduate degree in microbiology.
She serves as co-chief of the
medical school's largest residence
program.
Williams claims to have no fear
of the shuttle missionThey've
been sending up astronauts for I
don't know how long and they've
never had anybody go up that has
not come down
Shipley, who is taking flying
lessons admits being selected for
the space duty made her realize
the involvement of the job
When it finally came down to it
and Bruschi said "Do you really
want to go0 I did have to sit
and think about it because that is
scary. But all I could think is that
it would be great
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds9
Editorials4
Features8
Sports11
Tyranny over the mind is
the most complete and most
brutal type of tyranny: every
other tyranny begins and ends
with it.
�Milovan Djilas

� � -
mm� � r-
na .� ��� v. m





Announcements
�BAKPaii Hl CLUBBIOOO FEDERAL SUMMER JOBS PING WlRl
- - T ICOLLEGEDI RVEY Tl HNICIAN CONF F Uf , COORDINATOR NAL DE VE LOI HONO-
CAMP 1
MAN. OPPO ENI PRESIDE.Cm?
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
rOR
AN!
���-�
NAL
ASSOC
A;

ALL
7f "J
-
� -
-
NG SPRING
SE
The
OPTICAL
sc
-AREER PLANNING AND
PLACEMENTSERVICE
PALACE
� il
i i r
$15.00 OFF
Any Complete
Pair of
Eyeglasses
ft i: (uding sale items
Ray-Ban
and all other
non -prescription
SUNGLASSES
20 OFF
J
ASK ABOl I Ol 1200
SENIOR CITIZENS
HlSf CM Nf
OPENSAIlRDAYSBY
APPOINTMINTSOM Y
Wf t an Arraar
Aa. ; F xam
Fof ou On
Ih� samr fa�
Sof Contacts
$59.00 pair
Phone
756-4204
�� � , �
l pin
7fl3 CrtravlU Bivd (Arrow Fro� Pill Plaxa Nnl T� F.RA Really)
.ar M Harrfe. I Jca�d Opttriaa Opca � M � a Io A p m Mm -Fri
T-6.?66
rvzer q - rlington
A Greenville Blvd.
GREAT EOOD-EESS EAT
We've Cut the Calories So You Don't Have To
(
ompare the Calories in a Typical Fast rood Meal to Jack Spt a
ist food Meal Contains l()i is See Mow M,
tts
Jac Ks Jumbo
Will)
Baked Potato
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520
c alories
Salad Platter
Sou)
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v
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872
c alories
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Baked Pototo
mi-
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769
( alories
t5a on.I ettne c
& ion Tito
Soup
5�
a ?
Save
665
C alories
�mencar
HaDD
avs





IHl I M c KOI INUs
IANI MO 23, 1986
CATHOLIC WORSHIP
SERVICES
Saturday S 30 f V a' "ie Sp-nan Center
'� WAV n the Biology Bu.lamg
s " 10 3
it - � P v si rne np"�� Center
" �(� r� - Cent v o, ec! a. 9i3 g
,� t pi.v Music Building
ZETAPHI BETA SORORITY
� leta rne l amba �. hapte ot Zeia
�h Be'a Soront i like re n �e ail
iterested adies to oui 3rd annual
�a s" This event 'ae
tci the ifteet v H Wendenha
rne rush eg prompt . a'
� a" even.ng ot
� i e eoe e with rne soi at s'resses
- s stei v s � . s- p ana finer
PHI BETA SIGMA
FRATERNITY INC
� �
v - �� "p'ps'pvi young men
a ai . 8e a'
a sc men
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
hers Al � � nega (CO�ed
� :e Fraternity are pieasec to ann Dunce
p, rne beg �, ng ot our -
� Diedge p - l � .� � nal rush mil
� � � iry 28.1 7 von- n the
� � v be. n the basement o VfnofrT-j
, �� and IrVed a"�arv 29 rum
�pn room; 5 v- lenha he -� 'a
vx a a be held Ti ursday
' Bry 30 ' �e a c a.e to De
(OunceO We �� a 'e'es'ec
lents Fo � re if - �� at " a A-geia
GAMMA BETA PHI
�� re a - ee' -g Thursday jr' �'
101 n January 23 Ai:errt)ri Ti' a
The meet ng � be held n the
Mendenha Vi � purpose roorr
CASINO NIGHT
COME ONE COME ALL
le ' - �e. ��a on Comm "ee
3 a Casin s � on Thurs a-
� - � - Mendenha s v � expose
ft EC students ta utty s-a" and
lependents a-e welcome Adm ss
I
VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE
his s ust a rem nae- " a ar" students
-��� . i �. � 1 A rt Show
ning up in ate February Sc dp
VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE
(' - S
am h m e that .� � � .
-� J
� . - �
LOUIS FARRAKAN SPEAKS FOR MSO
" iDU s Farraka
Beat �� . a . oe record ng a' �"� v
� ' mee nS of. V:c.a,
� � V 'S6 T"e -ee' ng w convene
.a Wendenha Student ;enter it
Farraka speal
rt Afi a � . a rj
� � - speak�
ANGEL FLIGHT
����� ai educat
� � soc a serv e rganiiatit
rhegi p is resp
� . . � b and �
an- pus as e as
a support the Arnold a '
� -�'� the Air Force Besee Officer
r a rr and pr o v i oe ECu
'udentj ft �he jpporti � test the r
f-ade nanageriai ac � e$
terested students shou : ntact -a
a 65y an ny Pollard at
SUMMER JOBS
For a hard � m , ami us students
" l need a cfta enge Ar �ei,f c pro
'8 � on campus fl�pr, vy ng students to
� loependeot business peope s par
uiar major is necessary but ai: ae nv ted
�earn about the prog'a nterviews ae
- Monday nights at 7 00 Tuesrjy anc
�-sday at 3 JO and 7 DC -n BB ffl
ALL NURSING STUDENTS
GRADUATING SPRING
SEMESTER
rder 1 rece ��- rour Nus-ng e r- ?
� ie I - .s' De o'aceo n rne Stu
res A-g- Bt ic ig no iater than
� iary vH4 Oi-oe'S snouio be piaced a'
ewelry C aunfer Orders rr ust be pad in
�nen ne orde' s placed
Announcements
BAKE SALE
The women interested in Zeta .yViZ Club)
viii be holding a Dane sale in (romt of the
itudent Supply Store on Tuesday Januar 78
98 The Mr iZ Club is the little sister
irgan.iation tor Zeta Phi Beta Sorority mc
ECU COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
Jom the best party m town1 ECU College
Democrats meet tonight in cvom J12
MendenhaH at 7 00
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
Piano tor Adults Won Feb 10 April 28
6 3 0 7 3 0pm
intermediate Piano �on Fee 10 Apr.i?8
3 0 -8 3 0pm
Begmn.ng Bane' Tues Pet II Apr
5 30 -6 30pm
Beg.nnmg Conversa' onj Germa"
Tu�s iThurj Feb l' March 18
6 30 8 00p-n
Beginning Drawing Wed Feb 12 April 9
9pm
Ciontmumg Education Emy" SHall or tail
'57 613
BE THE BOSS
you can be a leader in 'he Student union
Organize meetings Plan activities mee'
ne people Be a par' of the Student Union
Pick up your aplication for committee
' a persons soon (rm 234 Menoena
T"e dead'ine is Mon Feb 3
WOULD YOU LIKE TO RF
PRESIDENT?
d be the next pes dent or
yic president for the Student Union If you
ke -a engmg dec sons nteraction a ��
'OTs of people az anagera ra n ng �nPn
pick up yo. - arc , ation today Theoead'ine
�or appi.cations s Fr jSn ;4 Dy 5 ooprr
p vk them uc Venden"aii 'ocn- 134
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
MOTOR
AND PHYSICAL FITNESS
COMPETENCY TEST
'2 00 noon F'B� .aa 31 1986
a cass.ng score on this 'es' s required of a;i
students pr.or to deciarng physical educa
�on as a ma or Pass ng 'he 'es' ;ons s's H
oof va ntaining ar average T score
of 45 on the s fern 'es- batfet .
1 hjv ng a score of 45 o" set x? cs
' u n
A"y student a a med ca cono � on that
A S contra I ate part ca or n ne
vs" - so.c: lon'ac' D' s-ae - v ke VI
Cammon at 757 649- To be exempted fr �
ar v port � if the test � mi st '�ave a
physic ans e�cusf A oe'a eC !u"Trar, ot
the 'es' components s a.a able '��
H man Performance Laboratory room
v nges C - srn m your phy . s
rr ust spe � . a � state �v � ten 5 yen � �
t � seo �
NEEDCASH
epa rt men t � . -
Set yiees s now hiring to'
�"�erese n artist r phot
. ' S (v � � '
" . ' �
if recent yyor sa
ce �es gated a � - me e I -
20 Men � a G . a -
- tsa � �� a �� �
����, ,ea'S eage 1 - 1 . . �- .
'?" 638 e ' -s- mc be � �
January 20 at 9 00pm in room '02 Memona.
Gym
ECU KARATE CLUB
� arate Club have '� � �'
mee' ng or Ti-Ursaa� .1- '� a- ' lOf n
'08 viemor a jc This �� pp- ng �
-pen te anyone -c "as �pe' puce - a"�
� rf the martia ?r's Advanced asses
be held fpa'?' every Thursday
same time and place a ct- nstrat � ano
registratior �or beg nn ng classes � be
he - Thursday :aar. 3C a' 8 Xp� -
'oon 108 Memor a Gym F a forma
' on ca Chuc or Anne a' 'S8 537C
PHI ETA SIGMA HONOR
SOCIETY
p- E'a Sigma Honor Sex e yy -aye ts
I 's meet g 0 the semes'e'
Menoer-a on Thursday January 23 a'
Xpm Ae yy ' se' mee ng � mes a' rt r
ee -g so piease attend
CAREER PLANNINGAND
PLACEMENTSERVICE
' you vouidcons aer a summer oc � a
az- �e 'he vvCA B ue R.dge Assembly
-r a tp ovystone Park Sery.ce 1 ob or a
Musicians 10b at various Theme Pams then
you might ant to look a' f-e Summer jobs
Notebook Buiie' ' B-arc ano shelves ot
summer ob announcemen'j a' 'he Career
Pann ng ar,0 P i;p'i-p Sfvce r 'he Blox
'on House A s Aa ' or Announcemen's
aoou' Camp Oar coordinated by CO OP in
c ebrjar.
Xw
PALACE
! $15.00 OFF
Any Complete
Pair of
Eyeglasses
fexcluding sale items)
1 r
1
1
1
1
Ray-Ban
and all other
non -prescription
! SUNGLASSES
20 OFF
J
ASK ABOUT OUR 20�7o
SENIOR CITIZENS
DISCOUNT
OPEN SATURDAYS BY
APPOINTMENTS ONLY
We Caa Arraigt
AftEyeEufli
For Yob On
Tic Sum Day
Soft Contacts
$59.00 pair
Phone
756-4204
Offer Expires Jan. 31
7t3 GrccavlM �d (Aero Fro Pitt tfua, Next Tm ERA Realty)
Gary M. MMhMri OMktea Om t:3t im ta I p.ai. MoaFrt.
BIOLOGY CLUB BLOOD
DRIVE
The ECU biology Ciuib is sponsor ng a
community wide B'oodmobiie at
Mendenoaii Student Center room 244 The
Bioodmooile will take place on Wednesday
Jan 2v and Thursday Jan 30 from 12 noon to
6pm Cnmpetitions between or ganuations
and challenges trom Presidents is highly en
couraged Competitions win be held between
dorms tratern,t,es (honor � social)
sororities, honor soc eties departments and
anyone e'se who wm make a challenge It
you cannot give blood 'ecru't blood donors
to give blood Por tve't to people you
recruit your name will go In the drawing
once tor a dinner tor twe a' the Beet Ba'n
one oi Greenville s nes' 'estaurants and
a chauttered mosme roe to and trom the
Beet Barn Total value S130 00 Win 'he
Biology Club s night on the town for one ot
lop blood donor recru'ers'11 Donor
sheets can be picked up at the Student Supp
y Store Soda Shop or the Crotan from any
as' i
EDUCATION MAJORS
The Depar'men' ot Soeec n Language '
Auditory Pa'hoiogy SLAP will be pro
viding 'he speech and hearing screening fc
ai1 s'uden's eligible for admission to tne ;jD
per division of teacher educat.on on Monday
. ' esda� Jan 28 and Wednesday
Jan 2v rhe department will be testing from
� ' these days no appoint men " s
NEEDED first -e bass Tp SLAP
Opcip' ' s n a'ea in Be'� Annen
- ai et Street
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
WORKSHOP
A three part w i � � .� i ������� students
81 N ��. .�'S. Counsel ng
' " � i v ary 6 '
�� � ee sess i ns be a . 'ed from
. ' Kt A- ght Annen "Sse" �eness
T,ang can sna'pe' . nterpei
S a� . . - 'a'e- pe'sonai goals
the workshop I v 11 . gn empers
1 st ng, s oe'ween the r asse" . ��
)ressiv a massertive behavors Par
ea 'a ex p r es
�ne �se .psc -ec'r anc ODer, , and -esponc
11 setuat � � � i i
- be ets r -
�� 'hi EASE Cl COUNSEL
NG CEN'ER ccr fn -
� 644'
QUALITY CONTROL
. . needs s'jee' � I
maior quality �- s- E'a �ground n
a' st s and irt the � -�q. �� :
I . � , � ly for student;
Bus i ness N � � �
� i � operative Ed it
- a
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE
� ���
the W Atlant reg � � ' p a� �s
summer she 'act trve . �'
IS SO as doss eie pjssa lbl
Ittoi history : ig �
ore ntormatior confa oerative
Educa 3 Haw
FEDERAL SUMMER JOBS
Opportunities tor students in a ��fp il
maiors are available tor summe "
'ederai agem es Students should
Coop office, 313 Pawl for information and
apph a'ions
SURVEY TECHNICIAN
CONFERENCE
COORDINATOR
Postions available tor students 'n'erested
in survey methodology and u'ban develop
ment Barkground in statistics or sociology
for one position accounting managemer'
background desired for c oordmator per I
Women and minority applicants eni uraged
for these local positions f-or more n
tion contact Cooper j' vp Educat
Raw
CAMP DAY
Camp Da. ! i ig I you an '� � rs'p'i
in working .n a summer amp you SI
contact the Cooperative Educa- e
313 Pawl to learn more about op
amps and resorts
MANAGEMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
S'uden's are needed 'o wo'X sp' "g and
summer in 'ne areas of aqua' � -
. e and revenuemanagemen a a ��
Onai facility in Fave'V.
'orma' - ntact Cooooera' .� i I at
313 Paw
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Excellent opportunity foi leve
ter science student witt igran
w V" s Prqra-rr ng qq � pn
computer services department
oca1 manufacturer r ,nta � Cooperat ���
Education 3)3 Paw Bidg
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
riere be �a-ca ry rneei :gs f i
�'a s'Ldes m A: the I
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Br�-e4r .Pr A rjesee:
RUGBY CLUb
The ECU rugb� :lub w
meet � �. jnt at 406 Rotary Avi
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Brea 'our 1 the Ba'aas w .� - s jsse:
A rpires'ec oe'ons arc ��- jraged 1
ne s experience "eressa - .
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"�sja. T"s s you' as" chance Trwt
w :� a re.e'age SO a af "e n � I .
me or out ana oe a pa" �� �
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A tree mini lass j�'r�
Counseling Center tor students i xj
identify Sources of Stress Va�e Pos ' ��
Changes Vanage rojr Resp"se 'o S'ess' ,
Situations Learn to Rea� Improve SeK
denre Pian to at'end an foul n M �
Wednesday jsrijfl'i
Monday Pebruary
Wednesday February
Monday February
No advance 'eg s" a ' a
s'op by the Counseling Cne'e' for
formation JO; Wr.g Ai hen ' '�"
ECU COUNCILOF
HONOR SOCIETIES
Ecu Cou' cieties w �� '
on Thurs Jan 23 a'
BD 204 (Notice time and roon hang
STATE EMPLOYEES
ASSOCIATION
- ECU C a;
' j-s Feb 4 at 5 30 pn enkms Fma
Arts Center Auditorium on the I
Cnap'er members a-e trgtC ' 11
HONOR BOARD
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p ease phone �3 '
COMPUTER CLASSES
nputer a Bas '
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ng � - ifton. Erw � - � '
CADP FIRST MEETING
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ECU LAW SOCIETY
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IS
Corner of Arlington
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.i lot like lack. And tli.it s uh there sJa kSpratl s ou set
unlike the mam fast tood testaurants around tcx1a lack
nutritious stuffed spuds along uith oui light and lusi ions
yogurt desserts vou'll taste ttesh uholesi
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using less lats. That means less calories and better all around just what we've done andsodelii
eating toi you! t romoui extra-lean meats to om los calorie
high libei buns our fresh fruit and vegetable selection to oui
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Ja K Spratl s
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A Typical t'ist Food Meal Contains 1066 Calories' See How Many You Save With Ja k Spratt s
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in sand vlt
Jacks Jumbo
With
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Students Earn Credit In Italy
B JtNMKKKMM Ks
M�ff Wrtlrr
e oil g � Vrts and
. as u has in the past two
planning a summei
sion in 1 erara, Italy.
'� .s and Sciences
;e credit
university, which will allow them
interact with the Italian
students.
Along with class instrtuction,
field trips are scheduled to Milan,
Florence, Venice, Ravenna, and
Bologna. Studies aie planned to
fine arts tie in with the beautiful surroun
session dings the students will experience
-ion,
Ma 14 to J
. a �:
by EO ;
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Italian.
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i lean I
- .v Sc i e n ce s,
program two years
He w as the chief organizei.
.
Ryan,
ist beautiful ci-
a rhe students I
is an excellent program " once selected, the student is re-
Anyone who is eligible to at- quired to pay the balance oi
lend summer school may applj $700, due in late April lhetdt.il
for the classes in Italy. Fifteen cost oi $800 includes lodging,
students attended last year, and transportation in Italy and
eight the year before. Applica fieldtrips. Additional costs in
tions are available in Brewster elude ECU summei school tui-
Building, Office of the Dean. tion, and roundtrip airfare bet-
( ollege oi Arts and Sciences. A ween New York and Milan.
$100 deposit is due with the com-
pleted application by February
14. Interviews will be held, and
-

ATTIC
THUR.
gajjggin
FRI. &
SAT.
Vs.
PI KAPPA PHI
presents
Superbowl XX
Giai ft 1
Re-Districting Plan For City
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dep I e!U are
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are s
� ielp but think that
beca the level pornography
�ciety, they just
felt like it's an area government
uldn'l be messing with
Spivey �aid "That's certainly noi
my position.
�'I do think maybe there is a
feeling that as long as people
don't force it on me or force my
kids to see it, if someone wants to
show it in the privacy of his own
home, they are going to be more
tolerant
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Kentuckv Nugget Snack
6 Kentucky Nuggets
Kentucky Fries
1 Large Drink
HAPPY HOURS DIDN'T DIE
t
They just moved to the PHI TA U house!
Friday, Jan. 24 from 4 to 7 p.m. � 409 Elizabeth St.
WILD WOMEN GREAT MUSIC BYOft
Next Tues Phi Kappa Tau presents "What is a Fraternity?" 8:00 p.m. in Jones Cafeteria.





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Stye iEaat (ttarnlittiati
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender. ofM.
JAY STONE, Managing Editor
Mike Ludwick, , Greg Winchester, ���,
Scott Cooper, ��, w��, Anthony Martin, �,�� �,�,�
Dan Maurer. tnr,fl,nm�, ����,� jOHN pETERSOn, o� ,��
Lorin Pasqual. c-oP, tduor Shannon Short, Manage
DeChanile Johnson, , a Debbie Stevens. &���,
January 23, 1986
OPLNION
Page 4
Roe Vs. Wade
Biology Is Not Destiny
When 1 was home over Christmas
my sister, her husband and I got in-
to a lengthy discussion that
centered primarily on the topics of
politics and religion. My sister calls
herself a Christian of the "Born-
Again" variety and she votes a
straight Republican ticket as does
her husband.
Since I have known this for some
time it did not surprise me to find
myself in disagreement with the two
of them, though I have the utmost
respect for both of them as human
beings, quite apart from their
philosophical and ideological con-
victions. What did surprise me,
however, was to discover that my
sister, who has never been in a
demonstration in her life, had
become an avid "pro-lifer" and is
planning to march in a pro-life rally
in Washington this spring.
In talking with her I conceded
that I was on the opposite side of
the abortion issue from her, but
that I could understand her concern
for human life. Then I asked her if
she spent any time working to end
world hunger or if she would be
willing to do so. She replied that she
would not because, according to the
Bible, it is more important to save
the immortal soul of a woman who
is considering abortion than it is to
save the mortal body of a child who
is dying of hunger.
Now, my sister is not a bad per-
son. In fact, I think that she is one
of God's finer accomplishments.
But, in this matter and in other
political matters, she has been
swept up in forces that are larger
than the spiritual pieies to which
she owes her primary allegiance.
Hence, her reply.
The abortion debate hinges on
two fundamental arguments: 1) The
fetus is a human life and abortion is
murder. 2) A woman has the right
to choose whether or not she wants
to have a child since she will have to
carry the fetus for nine months,
give birth to the baby and possibly
raise it. Most of the time the people
who advance these two points of
view spend their time arguing past
one another.
The primary problem with the so-
called "pro-choice" argument is
that nobody in that camp really
seems to be addressing the fun-
damental premise of the "anti-
choice" camp. In other words,
nobody has put forth an argument
to explain why a fetus is not a
human life and thus why abortion is
not murder. It seems to me that that
is an unavoidable issue that must be
addressed by anybody who sanc-
tions legalized abortion.
Since yesterday was the 13th an-
niversary of Roe Vs. Wade and I do
not want to see the Supreme Court
reverse itself I will attempt to do so
myself, though I do not relish the
prospect. At this time the conven-
tional wisdom is that human con-
sciousness is a developmental
phenomenon. There is, in fact, a
whole school of developmental
psychology founded by such
thinkers as Jean Piaget. The
developmental school advances the
notion, generally speaking, that
human consciousness and the in-
dividual's conception of his en-
vironment, time and himself is not
fixed and set for all time but that it
evolves and develops.
With this understanding it is
possible to see that human life is



not something which is from the
moment of conception, but rather it
is something which comes to be.
This is true because when people
speak of human life they are really
talking about that which
distinguishes human life from other
forms of life � human con-
sciousness.
While there is no evidence that
God has ordained, as the Supreme
Court did, that human life begins at
the point of viability, (or when a
fetus becomes capable of sustaining
its own life) there is no real evidence
to refute that. Of course, as "pro-
lifers" or "anti-choicers" are quick
to point out, where human life is
concerned the burden of proof is on
those who argue in favor of legal
abortions.
Yet, evidence from the medical
community which suggests that
higher brain activity (The activity
of the neocortex and the conscious
centers of the brain) begins
sometime during the second
trimester adds considerable weight
to the pro-choice point of view.
For, since the brain activities that
are operating before this point only
control reflex and involuntary func-
tions rather than conscious ac-
tivities, it cannot be said in any
meaningful sense that human con-
sciousness is present.
To me what that means, at the
risk of sounding disingenuous or
even glib, is that those who are ex-
pending their moral fervor in the
"pro-life" movement would do
better to become vegetarians and
join the animal rights movement. It
is clear, after all, that cows and
chimpanzees have more highly
evolved brains and consciousnesses
than a two-month old fetus. Of
course I realize that this is never go-
ing to happen. Christians believe
that the fetus has a soul, a concept
which is more ambiguous and dif-
ficult to define than consciousness,
if that is possible.
While it is not prudent to get into
metaphysics because of limits on
space, suffice it to say that it is not
untenable to suppose that there is
an element in human beings which
survives death and precedes birth.
But the burden of proof for such
things is on those of us who believe
in them and then we must argue the
laws, mechanisms or processes by
which they operate. Unitarians and
Quakers, for example, do not share
the same metaphysical outlook as
Mormons or as Baptists.
What we can empirically verify
here and now is that the fetus is not
a human life and cannot be proven
to be a human life by virtue of any
known measurement. Yet, the
mother is clearly a human life and
to rob her of control over her own
body would be to create an error
and to perpetrate a grave injustice.
It would be the supreme act of ar-
rogance. Perhaps when we have fed
the hungry, healed the sick and
sheltered the homeless we can in-
deed begin to seriously discuss an
alternative to abortion. But, in a
world where social programs,
which have children as their
beneficiaries, are raped by the same
folks who clamor for an end to
legal abortion, adding more
unplanned-for children to the
population seems like a less than in-
spired idea.
SOW MAM.X00KS M WR HUSBANP PAS$St
AWAr SOMETMe MRMG 7W� REGULAR SEA50M
Republicans LaunchCounterattack
-Campus Forum
Having carefully analyzed the
thoughts expressed in the Tuesdav
edition of CAMPUS FORUM, I
cnce again concluded that liberals set
their agenda around criticizing Con-
servatives. Maybe they have just read
the East Carolinian for too long? I
have yet to here one single com-
prehensive proposal from the leftside
of the ECU community. It only
seems that they can continuely blame
conservatives for this or blame con-
servatives that.
If they intend to become critics by
trade they probably should get their
facts straight! First of all, Mr.
Chenery, Ronald Reagan has never
voted on a tax proposal in his life.
Unlike Tip O'Neal and Dan
Rostenkowski, President Reagan has
never run for, nor been elected to
Congress. If you will refer backo
your Pols 1010 text you will see that'
all taxing originates in the US House
which remains in the control of Tip
O'Neal and the liberal Democrats,
not conservatives (Be they
Republicans or Democrats). More
specifically taxing power is channeled
through the House Ways and Means
Committee, that is Tip's House NOT
the White House. Secondly, Mr. Mc-
Cardy, while you make the statement
that Ronald Reagan and Senator
Helms are stripping individuals of
their rights by seeking to ban Abor-
tion, what they are in fact doing is
trying to protect the life of innocent
victims that do not yet have the
capacity to speak for themselves. If
you will refer to the US Constitution,
you will find that one of the explicit
duties of our federal government is to
protect the lives of all Americans.
The Constitution, unlike modern
man, makes no attempt at plaving
God. It makes no distinction between
the born and the unborn.
Personally, I enjoy hearing the
rhetoric which flows from liberal
ideologs. Their continuous efforts to
down grade the conservative youth
movement only seems to give our
numbers added strength. Having
been a College Republican for three
years I am proud to say that our
movement is gaining momentum and
one sweet day will run all pacifists,
lazy liberals, and moral outcasts back
into the closet:
A) Pacifists � People who would
tell you that contrary to Soviet ex-
pansionism and the very edicts of
THE COMMUNIST MANIFESTO,
the thret of the end of free speech,
freedom to travel, freedom to set
your own career goals, and to wor-
ship the God of your choice will
never come to American soil. They
say that we really do not need a
strong national defense because no
communist movement is really in-
terested in the vast amount of natural
and human resources which the USA
has been so richly blessed with.
B) Lazy Liberals � These are the
people who do not believe in the
"American Dream They do not
think that a man should be able to
achieve anything he desires. Instead
they would say that government best
knows your needs as an individual,
so just let them tax away your income
and let the bureaucrats provide for
our social needs.
C) Moral Outcasts � You guessed
it Homosexuals, secular humanists,
and baby-killers. These are the types
who have no respect for their fellow
man. While people should have the
freedom to do as they choose, should
that freedom infringe on the rights of
others? These people reply by saying,
"Me first
If you share my distaste for these
types of attitudes, then you too
belong in the ranks of the College
Republicans. To express the urgency
of conservatives staking their claim
in the political process, consider our
opposition the "Three Little
(Liberal) Pigs" described above. One
more thing, you don't have to have a
$20.00 haircut to join. 1 never pay-
more than $5.00. College
Republicans The New Republican
Generation!
Gordon Walker
Senior, Economics
Republicans Defended
Mr. Chenery's letter scurrilouslv
attacking our (The College
Republicans) membership chairman.
Lance Hardin, was unfortunate.
After reading Mr. Hardin's letter
over again, I can't see how it is an
"insult to thinking Americans
"pompous rhetoric or how it
"broadcasts the fact that he lacks
any personal original thought Anv
intelligent man can read Mr
Hardin's letter and discount those
ludicrous assertions.
Next, Mr. Chenery, vou should
look in a biologv book and read what
"genus" and Species" are. Your
knowledge of Republican philosophv
is highly sophomoric. Government is
supposed to dictate some morals; the
debate is which morals. Mr. Hardin's
letter states his personal thoughts on
the "basic differences" between the
two parties. It was not meant to be
read with the impact of a doctoral
dissertation.
Also, 1 have a razor-cut hairstyle
which cost me $4.00. I bought mv
five Polo shirts from Hyman Brody
on sale at $17.50 apiece. My penny
loafers cost $23.00 in 1976. I have
had them resoled twice and I keep
them shined.
Mr. Chenery must be embarrassed
that he ignorantly said the President
votes on bills. He doesn't; he signs
them into law or vetos them. As for
Mrs. Burford, her E.P.A. ad-
ministration made former Governor
Hunt promise before construction to
bridge 400 acres of wetlands in the F7
corridor of 1-40 to receive federal
funds for the project. He promised to
do it and received the funds. His
Deparment of Transportation
destroyed the wetlands and paved it
over anyway. No politician or party
holds a monopoly on environmental
issues.
As for Mr. Chenery's ideas on
foreign policy, some of us believe in
helping people fight communism to
be or remain free so that American
will set the standards for freedom in
the world instead of being the refugee
camp of the world. Mr. Chenery, you
have no right to impose your im-
morality or lack of character on me I
could say, but you do. You never
answeied the question, "Do you con-
sider communism as one of the
greatest problems of our world?"
Mr. Chenery the most hypocritical
thing you said in your letter was "let
there be an endto ignorant pre-
judice
As for Mr. McCrady's letter, I
want you to know that Mr. Hardin's
letter was endorsed Tuesday night by
the ECU College Republicans and
our state and national organizations
plan to use his letter as an example of
a good recruitment letter, so it is not
an embarrassment to Republicans.
Also most conservatives hold the
views stated in his letter. If they do
not we consider them liberal or
moderate. Moderate being what
liberals are currently calling
themselves to the detriment of true
moderates. Mr. Hardin stated that
"a liberal society more resembles
what Lenin had in mind he did not
say Democrats support the doctrine
of Lenin as you claimed.
Mr. McCrady saying that conser-
vatives want to deny education by
making student loans more difficult
Editor's Note: We wish to apologize
for an oversight in a front page storx
entitled ECL Professor Outspoken
On Library Book Censorship that ap-
peared in the January 16 issue of The
East Carolinian. The story featured a
picture of Jim Lanier though the pro-
fessor featured in the story was Gene
Lanier.
Editor's Note: We regret an error
that appeared in an article entitled
Where Will You Party Sunday? on
page 7 of the January 21 issue of The
East Carolinian. The author referred
to a Super Bowl party that he
understood would be sponsored by
the Phi Kappa Tau fraternity. Misin-
formation was erroneous, however,
and the fraternity that is actually
sponsoring the party at The Attic this
Sunday is the Pi Kappa Phi fraterni-
ty.
is wrong. Conservatives have bee
strumental in making Un-
available to poor and truly
students instead of those whi
send their children to expei
private out-of-state instituti
maintain their current income I
who are able should pa even
difficult for a few years
1 challenge you, Mr. Mc rady,
back up your allegai
Barry Goldwater and Wi
Buckley completed said i d
a complete text
men have said: howev.
unlikelv they said wl ai ,
They mav have and I
when I see it.
If you raise taxes tl
grow because the Democrat House oi
Representatives in
responsibility will continue I
more and more. A pr
set bv halting taxation. (Mr Mc-
Crady, with your views l pred
will be ottered a scholarship from j
ECU's political science dc?
to be a graduate student, rhai
where you will be armful I
with your views i
E. Sandv Hardv.
Chairman, ECU College Republic
Swimming
In the Jan. 16 issue of the La
Carolinian we were informed that ex-
swim coach Dr. Martinez was preri'
ing to retire from the university
What caught my attention was his
comments about sports in general
and particularly those addressed,
towards swimming. Mr. Martinez
says that he has never really been im-
pressed with sports and that to watch
the young kids competing at age
group swim meets is about as exciting
as watching the grass grow. As a
former scholarship swimmer for
ECU I have to find myself more than
slightly perturbed at his attitude. In
my 13 years as a swimmer this is mv
first encounter with such a negative
attitude in a person so well respected
in the sport of swimming. What a
facade his 32 years of involvement in
the sport must have been. How can
ECU recruit top notch athletes when
the chairman of the department of
health and physical education finds
sports unimpressive. Imagine how
much he must have hated his job all
that time. It is sad to see a man who
has built his entire life and career
upon the sport, express his views oi
swimming in such negative terms
Maybe he finds grass growing more
exciting than watching the develop-
ment of fine young athletes, aspiring
Olympians, in action.
Stan Williams
Communication
Corrections
Ca,
Vi
Who will win t
Sunda the.
Patriots of the
Wendy Ceore
rr

Rickv C.ratt
I
Sophomore
"Chicago Bears because I
been an underdog if.
They have a loi
Bill Baiiev
Broadcast .
fresk-
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the Bears don't have
fense. I prec ;
game
LA
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JAN.
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( orrections
We h h to apologize
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� tf Professor Outspoken
1 ibrary Rookensorship that ap-
r n the Januar 16 issue of The
Varoiinian. The story featured a
lure of Jim Lamer though the pro-
tor featured ,n the story was Gene
tier
Vote. We regret an error
appeared tn an article entitled
here Hill You Party Sunday? on
h 7 of the January 21 issue of The
h Carolinian. The author referred
u Super Bowl party that he
Merstood would be sponsored by
Phi Kappa Tau fraternity. His in-
flation was erroneous, however,
the fraternity that is actually
isonng the party at The Attic this
iday is the Pi Kappa Phi fraterni-
JANUARY 23, 1986
Campus
Voice
Who will win the Super Bowl this
Sunday, the New England
Patriots of the Chicago Bears?
First Porn
Case Fails
Wendv George
Corrections
Freshman
"It's gotta be the Bears. They've
won so far
Tracy Price
Therapeutic Recreation
Senior
"I'm pulling for the Patriots, but
I think the Bears will win
Ricky Cratt
Computer Science
Sophomore
"Chicago Bears because they've
been an underdog in the past.
They hae a lot of talent
Rick White
Commercial Art
Junior
"Chicago Bears because they
have the Fridge, Walter Payton,
and Jim McMahon. 1 predict the
WILMINGTON, N.C. (UPI) �
The state's new anti-pornography
law has failed its first criminal
court test but the district attorney
on the losing side said Wednes-
day prosecutors won't give up the
battle against smut peddlers.
"I don't think after one trial
and one jury verdict we can
throw in the towel and say this is
a bad blow daid New Hanover
District Attorney Jerry Spivey.
"As other cases are developed
� and I'm sure other charges will
be filed � we have to keep
presenting them (court cases) to
the jury and determine what our
community standareds are in the
state of North Carolina Spivey
said.
But Spivey said he thought if
ever there was a business the por-
nography law was intended to
regulate, your 421 Video News
Center was it. The building had
boarded up windows and a sign
that read, "if nudity offends you,
do not enter
Inside, law enforcement of-
ficers found video viewing booths
where they could insert a token
and push a button for viewing a
pornographic movie.
William Jackson, a clerk at the
Video Center, was found inno-
cent Tuesday of a felony charge
of disseminating pornography
after selling an undercover agent
a videotape of a movie titled,
"Battle of the Stars, Round Two:
East versus West
Spivey said the videotape
depicted a broad range of sexual
activity � including group sex,
bears bv eight points

Bill Bailf
Broadcasting
Freshman
"New England Patriots because
the Bears don't have a great of-
fense. I predict a low scoring
game




House of Hats
Hats
Accessories �jewelry, evening �
gloves, pocketbooks, gloves, 4
scarves, umbrellas
New Spring hats arriving daily
Winter hats reduced 12
403 Evans Street Mall
758-3025

LAMBDA- CHI � ALPHA
(�l:oo
3HT.
male and female homosexual love
scenes and closeups of sexual
organs. "It covered the whole
waterfront said Spivey.
But jurors spent the afternoon
watching the film and heard two
sex therapists testify for the
defense about its positive benefits
before returning the not guilty
verdict.
Tim Britton of Lenoir Com-
munity College said the film
could help couples learn "a
healthy interest in new sexual
alternatives
David Knox of ECU said the
videotape would have some
political value because it showed
"equality of gender role" in the
sexual acts depicted.
Both therapists said the movie
avoided sexual acts with prurient
appeal such as violent subjuga-
tion, beastiality or sex with
children.
Jackson's lawyers also argued
he was only a clerk and did not
know the exact content of the
videotape.
The fact that Jackson was
merely an employee may have
played a role in the jury's verdict,
Spivey said. But the laws also
judges what is pornographic ac-
cording to community standards,
and Spivey said those standards
may have been eroded bay a
deluge of pornography, par-
ticularly in urban areas.
FRI.&SAT.
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j4 yiext fttxce to ent!
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Ride To Class
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HONDA Scooter.
BAGLEY'S
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U.S. 13-17 By-Pass PHONE 792-5041 Williomston, NC
presents
Super bowl Sunday
? 6 ft. Sony TV Screen in Stereo
$1.00 High Balls
$2.50 Pitchers
C Free Hor D'Oeuvres
? Party lasts till 1 a.m.
m
Only $10.00
Deposit
Specia
ECU Student Store
Wed Jon. 22 & Thura Jan. 23
TIME: 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.
Low, Low Prices umhons
0�-ow ot Cemeften Comptny
�� r �� m � ��

I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 23, 1986
Mysterious Fighting Continues
CAIRO.Egypt (UPI) - Rival
Marxist factions fought in South
Yemen's capital Tuesday and
both sides claimed victory, but
diplomats in the Red Sea area
said it was impossible to tell who
was winning the power struggle
that began more than a week ago.
Diplomats in San'a, capital of
neighboring Yemen, said his
country and the Soviet Union
were trying to arrange a cease-
fire. South Yemen, a small Arab
nation on the Arabian
Peninsula's south-western tip, is
allied with the Soviet Union and
provides it with two strategic
military bases.
The diplomats said many
fighters supporting President Ali
Nasser Mohammed were believed
holed-up in the outskirts of
Aden, a position easy to defend
because of difficult access.
Civilians evacuated from Aden
described the seaside capital as a
"city of death its streets full of
bloated bodies and burned-out
tanks.
Rebels led by Abdul-Fattah
Ismail and Ali Antar appeared to
be gaining ground both in Aden
and the provinces, the diplomats
said. Ismail is a hard-line former
president who opposed Moham-
med's recent overtures to the
West, and Antar is vice chairman
of the ruling presidium.
The battle began with an at-
tempt to assassinate President
Mohammed on Jan. 13. The
diplomats said he was operating
from his hometown in Abyan
Province east of Aden.
Mohammed made a brief visit
to Ethiopia, another Marxist ally
of the Kremlin, last weekend, and
the official radio there claimed
his side was winning.
On Monday night the Ethio-
pian radio read a statement at-
tributed to Mohammed saying
that, except for Aden, the coun-
try was under the "legitimate
control of the Yemen Socialist
Party and government
Rebels began broadcasting
Sunday night on the frequencies
used by South Yemen's govern-
ment radio. They said a "new
collective leadership" had emerg-
ed. The radio is said to operate
from a rebel stronghold in Lahaj,
32 miles north of Aden.
Arab and Western diplomats in
Yemen, who said they were in
close touch with developments
across the border, described the
picture as too confused to assess
with certainity.
"The situation in South Yemen
is a mysterv to manv of here, and
there is no way of knowing who is
winning or who is losing an
Arab ambassador said. "Army
units with tribal
Rear Adm. John Gamier, cap-
tain of the British royal yacht
Britannia, which has been
evacuating foreigners, said Tues-
day that he had seen fighting ar-
round the Soviet Embassy near
the beach at Khormadsar, Aden's
embassy row.
"The Soviet Embassy was ac-
tually pinned down by rifle fire
while we were talking to (the em-
bassy personnel)he told the
British Broadcasting Corp. in a
ship-to-shore radio interview.
The Britannia, on its third
rescue trip, was forced to stand
off the port, waiting for the
fighting the abate.
�ww0w4����� �� � 1 � XX
Kfer mxd Chri�i� Owrrt
(Ptoctpl� of Chttmt)
1111 Gr�mvtil� Blvd 75-127S
T
"In essentials. (llnily
In non essentials. Ju.doi
F A. In all things. Jlovi
J Special Classes For College Students
9:45 am Christian Education (all afn)
R�v h v.nn Koi�h. 11 00 am Worship- Open Cooununioa
Public Opposed to Radioactive Site
RALEIGH, N.C. (UPI) � Op-
ponents of a Bladen County low-
level radioactive waste in-
cinerator hve mobilized
thousands of critics at public
hearings, but state officials said
Wednesday they are caught in the
middle on the issue.
"Opponents have said if we
issue the permit they'll take us to
court, and if we don't issue the
permit U.S. Ecology might take
us to court Human Resources
Secretary Phil Kirk said Wednes-
day.
"I'm in a challenging position
on this issue and, yes, it gets
frustrating at times
Some 1,000 people jammed a
Bladen County gymnasium Tues-
day in a boisterous show of force
against U.S. Ecology's plans to
build a low-level radioactive
waste incinerator 20 miles
southwest of Fayetteville.
"I did not appreciate political
threats of voter retaliation or be-
ing called a fool or implications
rhat 1 was not religious for trying
to listen to both sides of this
Kirk said. "1 tried very hard not
to take those things personally by
:t's difficult, particularly after
seven hours
A hearing last week in Fayet-
:eille drew 4,000 vocal critics.
But Kirk said even though op-
ponents had succeeded in
creating a political issue in
southeastern North Carolina, the
decision would not be based on
politics.
"Many people last night said
they voted for Governor Martin
but wouldn't again if he didn't
Hjiiiiiiiii!iiiiimimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiimiiiii�
put a stop to this Kirk said.
"We're trying to keep politics out
of the process
The Human Resources Depar
ment is the lead permitting agen-
cy for the incenerator proposed
for the nothwest corner oi Bladen
County. But Kirk said the
Department oi Natural
Resources and Community
Development and the Federal En-
vironmental Protection Agency
also have permitting respon-
sibilites.
"There are so many different
agencies involved in the permit-
ting process. I don't even knou
when we're going to be ready,
much less the other two Kirk
said.
The proposed incinerator
would take low-level readioactio
waste from nuclear power plants,
hospitals and research institiu-
tions. Non-radioactive garbage
would be burned away and
radioactive ash buried in a land-
fill.
But opponents fear the in-
cinerator would threaten the en-
vironment and public health b
spewing wind-borne radioactive
waste from its smokestack.
They also assail U.S. Ecology's
safety record at other disposal
sites.
"There is notheing in the laws
that were written by the General
Assembly that allows public op-
position as such to be a factor in
the decision making process
Kirk said. "However, the value is
the number oi issues and ques-
tions which are raised, which the
staff then follows up on
East Carolina University's
Student Union
is taking applications for
Student Union President
Student Union Vice President
Deadline: January 24. 1986
&
Student Union
Committee Chairpersons
Deadline: February 5, 1986
for the 1986-87 Term
Any full time student can apply
Applications available at Mendenhall
Student Center's Information Desk
maty TuescL Wedtesdaif, 7Juuqchi fhiLw aafofofyt
TheyERANDA ig HAPPY DAYS!Join us for HAPPY DAYS, Vton Fn ser.mg Ho! and Heay Hors d'ouenres, 5-7 p.m. Hand hours are 9 p m -la m Daily drink specials are available all da long Dres c ode rtfon ed. Open t Ramada Inn � 301 Greenville Blvd. � 756-2792
Featurii
DOG GONE IT DAY No Cover Build the 'perfect Hct Dog House High Bails $1 75WING IT DAY Chicken Wings With All The Condiments Draft50 Pitcher $2.00SOUTH OF THE BORDER FIESTA Build Your Own Taco with all the ingredients' Margaritas $1 75 Tequila Sunnse $1 75 Dos Equis XX $1 50PIRATE PARTY Featuring our Fabulous Pizza Spread Draft $50 Pitcher $2 X Schnapps $2 00FESTIVE FRIDAY Chef's Choice o? ho: & Hea Hors d'ouevres - Coffee $2 00 Cider $2 0CBANDS Jan. 13-18 Atlantic Ave Jan. 20-25 Straight A's Jan. 27-31 Prowler
The ArborShrimp & Chablis $9.95Crab legs & Shrimp with Chablis $9.95Choice of our 3 all you can
Chef SpecialChef Specialeat specials $10.95
TKE
Read
The
5
iClass if ieds!
St
"iiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiimmiiiiiiiimmiiiiimiiR
THE ORIGINAL
"Burning Down The House"
SATURDAY JAN. 25th
Post Superbowl
"RASTAFEST"86
SUNDAY JAN. 26th

;�'
ECU I.D. REQUIRED
BEVERAGES PROVIDED
BOTH NIGHTS
Festivities Begin 9:00 p.m. til?
Fraternity Orientation Mon. Jan. 27th
IN JONES CAF. 8 PM-11 PM
WASHINGTON
Problems with the I
Revenue Sei
systen I a
more
original $280 mill
was reported Wednei
"Knowing eve- -
today, I'd
lot to leai
procure
quoted ! I
k Egj
Problen
puter sup;
Corp be
MIA Rent
BANGK
� Some
miss; .
Vietnan I
beer.
govern!
congres
earlier tl
I - �. '
the
coun
an
o
doc
.
deic
I �
"M
hav
Off Highway 11
Wednes
THE LAD
AW -ady Memt
Unti
Guys
25C Draft
Frida
COLLEG
All Members Ir
50� Draft �
$2.50
SUPERBO
BIG SCI
$2.751
Bob "Daddy Cool" Hayw
in Contemporary Dance t
Beau's.
Located in the Card
Phone 7S4-
'������ it4 "����.�'
ffl si
v
hi -
"A Complete
i SUPERBO
$1.
SUPER
FREE D
ALI
Super Bowl Sunday
7 52-2183
"V"





IHf I AS I kOl IMAN

� '
ifnwiii Chnsri Ctarrti
lpl� � twt�i
?2274
allege Students
I'hnsttan tduvatioo all agm)
�n CoramunkM
H
mion

ident
p President
uQ&tMaii
BANDS
Atla
Strata'
OV
f TUT 'TtiT' If If -f if If fcfi Mi fl
-y
J
D
IRS Computer Delays Tax Refunds
ASHING ION a PI)
Problems with the Internal
Revenue Service's compute!
system has cost the government
more than SlW million above the
ginal $280 million estimate, ii
was reported Wednesday
"Knowing everything I know
t. I'd n.i we cei tairtly have a
learn about (equipment)
i ui erne L'SA 1
oted 1 K S . ommi ssionei
oe I ggei s
Problems with the IKs com
ei supplied b the Sperr
p bet ame well kn iw � n 1985
ause ol serious delays in
refunds 25,000 taxpayers were
-till waiting foi theii money last
month and f �i sending out in
v ot i eel deliquent notii e
26 1100 businesses in !lJS I
I !u- newspapet said problems
m 1985 meant the IKS bought $33
million in extra computei equip
ment; : - ! I million mon
alities than in 1984 on late
refunds; spent $10 million n
lot employee overtime; and lost
6 million in producth its foi
; if $102.6
1 he nev spapi
mation from current and former
IKS officials and government
audits, some obtained under the
Freedom ol Information suits,
said an IKS audit urged theagen-
to void its contract with Sperry
m NKl unless the firm supplied
at no cost $54 million in addi-
tional equipment Sperry
responded with $12 million in
equipment.
Ihe treasury Department is in
vestigating I rmet top IKS
computei Joseph
Bishop, fot possible impropei
lealings with Spei ry, I S I oday
reported.
It said IRS officials the follow
ing year urged the Sperry con
tract be dropped and a more ex-
pensive but superior system be
ordered from the Japanese firm
ol Hitachi.
The contract was weighted up
to 80 points for low price and on-
ly 20 points for technical quality,
IKS officials said, and the Sperrv
bid was so low, the Hitachi quali-
tv was not enough to win.
The newspaper reported that
Sperry should not get all the
blame.
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGSASCY
SI95 Abortion from 13 to 18 etki �'
additional cost Pregnancy Test, Birthontroi,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling For
Further information, call 832-0535 (toll tree
number .�00 M2 MM) between 9 a m and
pm weekdays General anesthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917 West Morgan St. Roleigh, N.C.
MIA Remains Stockpiled By Vietnamese
NGKOK, rhailand U PI)
.tins ot Americans
on in the wai
�w e id(
stockpiled" I : �:
embers ol a I s
delegation
a eek

MIA
Vie
rep
. ted app i a e

Bui I don't he
� ��
I
the
M I
� .
MIA rei
� . ' a
V ie t n a
i o vernmen t
i
- De, I . sa .
M
Night Club
Carolina East Centre
Off Highway 11
Near Plitt Theatre
Phone 756-6401
Wednesday Night
THE LADIES ZOO
All Lady Members Get In For $1.00
Until 10 p.m.
Guys In At 10
ISC Draft 75cl6oz.Dra
Friday Night
COLLEGE NIGHT
All Members In FREE Until 9 pm
50 Draft 50 Wine Coolers
$2.50 Pitchers
SUPERBOWL PARTY
BIG SCREEN TV!
$2.75 pitchers
Bob "Daddy Cool" Hayworth is back playing the best
in Contemporary Dance Music both fun-filled nights.
Beau's, a private club
Located in the Carolina East Centre, Greenville.
Phone 756-6401 lor more info.
Sspi l
"A Complete Meal On A Bun"
COUPON
SUPER BOWL SPECIAL
$l.ooOFF
Our
SUPER SPECIAL
( ()L f()
FREE Deliveries
ALL DAY
Super Bowl Sunday � Noon to Midnight
752-2183 215 E. 4th St.
ot weathei
' 'I raw youi ow n conclusions,
i gi oup of identifica-
. i ards thai looked like they
pi em darn good shape
s said.
ietnam epeatedl) re
tockpiled
trgaining
n negoi It insists
d to the
States as s possible
d .
V'iei namese relai i
ifter a Viei -
appeal ed
; committee
400 sets
beer, stored
Hai ling.
Press In
. been
ask. k i ,
nt IS ol
l) al
Deconcini said that both 1 av
and Vietnamese leaders rejected
suggestion that reports ol
Americans still alive in Indochina
be investigated b an independent
international organization such
as the Red Cross.
SPRING BREAK
EXTRAVAGANZA
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A Travel From Miami
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3





TMF EAST C'AROl INIAN
Entertainment
JANUARY 23. 198o Page 8
Rob Lowe:
A Look At 'Youngblood'
nho stmes to make the pros in I nited Artists' ImU'ki film, 'Youngblood.
"Over the years, I've learned
that pursuing a goal is never easy.
Talent isn't enough � and the
love of your craft will not take
you the distance. There are prices
to be paid along the way, and
those prices arc sacrifices, com-
promise, and hard, hard work
explains actor Rob Lowe, who
stars in the title role of the New
United Artists' colorful and
actoin-packed drama,
"Youngblood
To portray a talented amateur
ice hockey player who is striving
to prepare himself for the
challenges of professional com-
petition, Lowe worked closely
with writer'director Peter Markle
during the initial stages of the
production period. In order to
satisfy Markle's vision of authen-
ticity for the film, Lowe quickly
discovered he would have to ac-
quire a significant level of profi-
ciency on the ice.
To meet this challenge, the ac-
tor undertook what would
become a grueling and obsessive
two-month training program in
I os Angeles. "At first, 1 only in-
tended to improve my skating
techniques, and to build up some
muscle-tone with weights. As I
started to see results, however, 1
became more demanding with
myself he explains.
"I never saw myself going as
far as I did for the film � I never
said I was going to gain fifteen
pounds, put two inches on m
arms, take two inches off mv
waist, or skate for three hundred
hours before traveling to our
Toronto location. I just seemed
to get more obsessive as I went
on
Acknowledging that "nothing
else really existed" in his life dur-
ing this period, Lowe's daily
regimen began at the Culver Clity
Rink each morning at 9:30, and
ended late in the day when he
staggered home to bed � only to
awaken early the next morning
and start all over again.
"I lived out of my car Lowe
recalls with a laugh, reflecting on
his weeks of self-imposed
purgatory. "I'd eat in the car on
the way to the rink each day,
skate all morning, grab a quick
bite on the way to the gym, work
out for two and a half hours, and
then go back to the rink for the
rest of the day. Occasionally I'd
take time to see a movie, but
usually I just went home and
straight to bed. At first, my body
ached so much that I didn't think
I could go on � but I didn't give
up. For eight weeks, this was my
life
Lowe's determination in
preparing for the role of Dean
Youngblood is an accurate reflec-
tion of his approach to his career
as a whole. "I've been involved
in this business for twelve years
now � I've never wanted to do
anything else, and I'm not train-
ed to be anything other than an
actor. It hasn't been easy, but I
made my choice a long time ago.
As an actor, 1 intend to go the
distance he explains.
Born in Chariot tesville,
Virginia, Lowe's family later
moved to Dayton, Ohio, where
he made his first stag" ap-
pearance with a summer stock
company at the age of nine. The
young performer added more
than thirty stage plays to his
credits over the next three years,
when he began his television
career with such well-received
programs as the Emmy Award-
winning "A Matter of Time" and
"Schoolboy Father both After-
School Specials for ABC.
Following his starring role op-
posite Eileen Brennan in ABC's
" New Kind of Family I owe
made his motion picture debut a
Sodapop Curtis in Francis Ford
See LOWE, Page 10
Redford, Streep Make Artistic Attempt In Africa'
B ja STONE
To read differenl 'c cw - ��
the recently released film Out 1
Africa is to be exposed : a
range of opposing and
mant opinions. Film critics s
as Stan lev Kauffman of The V,
Republic, Andrew Kopk d
The Nation and virtually every
critic writing in the New Year's
edition of 7"he Ullage Voice has
cither praised or panned the film.
It has been called everything
from a meritricious bourgeios
bore to the best cinema of 1986
Why the diversity of opinio
First, American cinema has beei
going through a long dry spell
le time now. For well o
vear. barring a few exceptii
the film industry has abandoned
even the pretense of making
serious films which cater to an
' ience,
Riskx
,
� �
sens;
. �
�' � trend in
� �ther
tastes
( a widely
I to have lost money,
ii is arguably one of the
Amei i( rns to
ade its debut in recent
Vs ' es it all mean? Is
Out oj Africa a film worth see-
i ' put u simph - ves. but
Reds Ragi
( ru it.

ie 's
w un reservations.
Out " Africa is. in essence, a
story sei in Kenya during
N w I. 1 deals with the
ttionships between the Danish
Baroness Karen Blixen (Meryl
Streep), hei Swedish husband
Blixen (Klaus Maria Bran-
r ), arid her presumably
Via an 'over Denys Finch Hat-
ton (Robert Redford).
In the film, Streeps Swedish
husband proves to be a disap-
pointment in running the large
plantation that her family has put
up the money to finance. She, in
turn, takes over the task oi
managing the farm and, falls in
love with the people, the animals,
and the natural environment o
Africa.
Later on. She contracts
svphillis from her husband and,
after tolerating a series oi in-
fidelities, leaves him for Robert
Redford. The rest of the movie
deals mostly with the romance
between Redford and Streep and
with the conflicts that arise bet-
ween them. It is in these conflicts
that the essence of the film
dwells.
Streep believes in teaching the
natives to read and write, practic-
ing Christian charity and in-
troducing the local inhabitants to
Crazy Games hows
Anything For A Buck
all the niceties of Furopean
civilization. Redford, on the
other hand, believes in leaving
the natives and their culture to
themselves. He is deeply am-
bivilent about civilization and
modern technology (though he is
not anti-technological), and he is
fearful about the impact that pro-
gess is having on Africa.
The conflict described above
spills over into Redford and
Streep's relationship with one
another and manifests itself as a
philosophical difference. Red-
ford seeks to avoid all structure
and commitment while Streep
seeks a more defined relation-
ship with more intimacy and
security. The decision as to who
is right and who is wrong is left
up to the audience, since the
characters are not two dimen-
sional and the philosophical dif-
ferences are legitimate.
In the end. Out of Africa
leaves one feeling that the tenor
of Streep and Red ford's rapport
was almost buddhist in its subtle-
ty and minimalism. Thus, it is as
much from the things suggested,
as from the things that are said,
that Out of Africa derives its
moral force
There is a respect for in-
dividual intuition and also simply
a quality of vacuousness that go
hand in hand to embellish the
vivid African landscape with a
quiet finess. but they do so
without conviction or power, and
therein lie both the film's
strengths and its weakness.
It is steeped in all of the con-
tradictions of the present age;
seeking to be both nonchalant
and passionate, both socially
concerned and generically
palatable. It's virtue is that it
doesn't entirely fail in the at-
tempt, grandiose as it is.
Bv PAT MOLLOV
M�ff Writer
Well, I've been lying rather low
as of late. As expected, certain
parties didn't take to my critique
of their, shall I say, "ill-desired"
drinking atmospheres. Tough
shit. That's old news � on to
different, more exciting spec-
trums of life. On to glamour and
riches. On to fame and immor-
tality. On to gameshows.
From The Not
So Right

Pal
and

Ahh, yes, gameshows - those
wonderful slices of Americana
that so many consider "quality
television I would imagine
gameshows (and Gene Rayburn)
existed long before television.
Hell, let's throw caution to the
wind and say they existed
beforewell, before Chancellor
Howell, okay. Gameshows are
based on a very simple premise,
being that we, you and I, will do
most anything for a buck � no
matter how silly or undignified it
may be.
Now I can't vouch for all of
you, but I'll be damned if I'd go
on stage for half an hour and pre-
tend to actually respect Pat Sa-
jack. And for what? All anybody
ever wins on "Wheel of Fortune"
is a trip to San Francisco or a
porcelain statue of a dalmation.
Those prizes simply couldn't
reimburse me for the emotional
trauma I'd sustain from being
ana W hi
nd did they find
thai � ainly
�. contest
he seen a fun as a
coma Hov ma White'
Cod help he ever ai
ticula in one syllable
a' a I ook ai w hat the
woman wears. 1 think we've
ovei ed w here Michael
Jackson's other glove went. And
I know for a fact that the wench
uses Day Glo on her teeth. 1 et's
all pitch in and give V'ana a
plastic Jog. and Pal a trip to San
I rancisco certainly they've
earned both prizes.
Evei thought about who goes
to gameshows-alifornians. It's
in their DNA, kind of like yogurt
and meditation. It's true. When
Californians wake up, they eat,
meditate, and then go to praise
Chuck Woolery like he's some
sort of friggin' demigod.
Puhleeease.
Speaking of Charles,who picks
his wardrobe? Now I'll be the
first to admit I lack a fashion
sense, but this guy dresses like he
went wild m K Mart's Junior's
section. And lord, why doesn't
he get a real job? The Love Con-
nection just doesn't seem respec-
table, know what I mean? I can't
imagine how he holds a straight
face while some babe tells him
how she got ?he herps from a guy
Chuck introduced her to. It's all
simply befuddling, isn't it?
How can I know all this
without watching the show, you
See IT'S, Page 10
Artists Series Presents
The Bach Aria Group
Devoted Bach fans take note: the Bach Aria
Group will perform at East Carolina University on
Jan. 27 at 8 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre. They are
sponsored b the - Department of University
Unions as part of the 1985-1986 Artists Series.
The ensemble was founded in 1946 bv William
Scheide, a devotee of Bach's little-known cantatas
and anas. Scheide united a nine-member group of
vocalists and instrumentalists capable of the
rigorous soloistic demands and the needed ensem-
ble skills.
The Bach Aria Group was reorganized in 1980
following Scheide's retirement. Thev have ex-
panded their repetoire to include other Bach
works as well as his anas. Plaving under the
mus.cal direction of flutist Samuel Baron are
violinist Daniel Phillips, cellist Timothy Eddv
oboist Ronald Roseman. keyboard plaver Yehudi
Wyner, soprano Sylvia McNair, contralto Janice
Taylor tenor John Humphrey, and bass Thomas
The Bach Ana Group attempts to cultivate ap-
prectation of the Bach anas. The artists feel that
through the reconciliation of the verbal and
mus.cal meaning of these complex textural works
musicians and audiences alike are brought to a
new understanding of his other compositions
Tickets to the Bach Aria Group are available
denTc ne,CenKral ?" �ff' ndenhat Stu
dent Center, beginning Jan. 6. The Ticket Office
is open Monday through Friday, 11 a.m 6pm
Ticket prices arcr $5 for ECU students and guesT
$5 for youth (high school and under), $8 for ECui
faculty and staff and $10 for the pubhc AH
tickets are $10 at the door For � J � r U
Please call 757-66111. e� 226 mformation'
The Bach Aria Group will perform in Hendrix Theatre on Jan. 27 at 8 p.m. Tickets are
availbale from the Central Ticket Office InMe ndenhall Student Center. Ticket prices are
$5 for ECU students and guest, $5 for youths. $8 for ECU faculty and staff and $10 for
the public, tor more information, call 75W611, ext. 266.
Doonesbury
Beginning on Feb. 4, the regular "Doonesbury"
tr! , .?laCWl by Berke Breath ed's
Bloom County At present, this is a permanent
arragnement Student feedback on thiVcditoriaJ
decision �s welcome, and all letters on the subject
should be addressed to the Editorial Page
Classifi
PERSONALS
A0TT sp 'a' or ee� n
spe a to uS we've naa
� Btlyal Tar River We.
arrj t0 oe� no
Cutout :S cios-
e, The Beta Ze'as
-ETSGO DOWN TOGETHER
j the fin
Club Fet
�r a Rm 221 �
Scuba Divine, ce
e Please sr j
TKE BOXING
rove roorse I
Box
VINCENT
rtis a ca,
' so be prep J
occur - � -
�VA BETA A-
a be -

ALL CAMPUS PARTY

� sewerage pr 4
Wes1
cOR SENIORS ONLY
I
M - Gradu 11
� i
ass Pc
terested sut
- � :ea

CONGRATULATIONS NEA TK
EXECS

5ch
Sec
� � it Ai
Star- ley H)
peag
Let's r a .e a gooc or-
WELCOME TO ALPHA P"i
SISTERHOOD' att er E
� Sty Bet
Margaret Ccac Tracey C
Dense - ara Q
anda Hoages j

D e - - a r y C a t h
� - 5 ac E
RUSH PHI KAPPA TAU
SS
es Jar
ANNE LEIGH
a' .
Palace.
Ae acor
Drie raos'
RUSH LAMBDA CHI ALPHA A
Fratern-r oacnec by "ac 1
OH NO! KIM CARPER nal
a you're rtoi fai
He � et therr � a
� rh "a' S sa sw-
Anc ree'ber fstougt ge
rougn � you can "r-a s a .
asK o ease don I make n
c-sas'e A-nen you find m 1
d ecge -as'er Reebe-
love arc on re ai�vas nii-oer
Love Always Tonr y D
LOST: Goia Aiigree ba- c - witf
aauaa' ne - ce-er Gi-eaT se"
nental valu Ca Bart
7520262
LOST Checkbox I
if found call 758 852C
fered
biue
Rewa
SPRING BREAK CRUISE
now � ruise to the Me es
$445 tips ' gratuities ncluded
"5i:a,sCali now for A GRE-
H NG BREAK � 7580074
752 :�
NEEDAD.J, A't- �ou having a par
eec a D -� For the bes-
4C Beac a.3 Dance Ca
Morga- a between 57.30
p m Reasonable raes refernces on
request
1
-





ingbloocT
on in
Dean
refl�
careei
ivolved
� years
do
iin-
an
at 1
ago.
the
ater
sion
e c eived
ward-
and

l( s
i) . e
it a
'Africa
�nor
port
- ubtle-
m-
simply
mess that go
rtisVi the
:nt age;
� chalant
tally
all
It
Series Presents
ich Aria Group
Bach Ana
l niversityon
: � are
ersity
Series.
1946 by William
:antatas
eml �' group of
: the
jnsem-
!980
fhes have ex-
it her Bach
i Playing under the
Baron are
� Eddy,
Vehudi
Janice
I homas
ate ap-
fecl that
the verbal and
iral works,
� ' ight to a
ns.
� available
Mendenhall Stu-
I he Ticket Office
II a.m. �6p.m.
r ECl ttudents and guest,
and under). MforECUl
the public. All
Tor more information,
226.
WA I
ext
oonesbury
n Feb. 4, the regular "Doonesbury"
v? replaced by Berke Breath ed's
ty At present, this is a permanent
Student feedback on this editorial
Icome, and all letters on the subject
tressed to the Fditorial Page.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 23. 1986 9
Classifieds
PERSONALS
AOTT: So far, Inspiration weeK has
been so special to us. We've had a
blast, especially at Tar River. We're
looking forward to being your
sisters Cutout is close than you
think Love, The Beta Zetas.
LET'S GO DOWN TOGETHER: An
nouncing the first offical meeting of
the Coral Reef Dive Club. February
3rd 3 5 Mendenhall Rm 221. Anyone
nterested in Scuba Diving, certified
or not is welcome Please show your
interest
TKE BOXING: Attention Tough
Guys and Loudmouths, not loud
man, prove yourself, register for
TKE Boxing tournment, call
757 3042
VINCENT: Happy Birthday, I hope
to make this a day you will never
forget so be prepared for anything
that will occur! Thinking of you,
Renee
GAMMA BETA: Welcome Back
There will be a meeting on Jan. 23 at
7 00 at the Mendenhall Multipurpose
Rm See ya there
ALL CAMPUS PARTY: Come by
the Alpha Sig House from 9:00-until.
Plenty of beverage provided! 422
West Fifth St 757 3516.
OR SENIORS ONLY: The Senior
Class Council is requesting input
from the Graduation Class of '86 for
deas regarding a Senior Class Gift
and Senior Class Party, if in-
terested, submit name, address,
phone no gift idea and party
criteria to SGA office in Mendenhall
Student Center.
CONGRATULATIONS NEW TKE
EXEC'S: Chris Holland, Prez
Mike Pender, V Prez ; Mark
Schechter, Tres Tino Ferrarra,
Sec, Tom O'Have, Histor Eric
Hopkins. Sgt. at Arms; Scott
Stamley Hypophetes, Scott Forbes,
Pledge Trainer Way to go guys.
e s nave a good one
WELCOME TO ALPHA PHI
SISTERHOOD): Heather Bachman.
Christy Bennett, Elizabeth Clayton,
Margaret Conrad, Tracey Creps,
Denise Cromer, Lara Glowacki,
Amanaa Hodges, Jennifer Hulsey,
Rhinda Knight, Michelle MaClay,
Julie McElligott, Melinda Miller,
Keisha Morrissey, Christin Roach,
Debbie Rohs, Mary Catherine
Spikes and Elizabeth Walma.
SENIORS, FACULTY, GRADUATE
PORTRAITS: will be taken Feb.
3-13. Appointments can be made
beginning Jan 22 by coming by the
Buccaneer office and signing up. No
appointments by phone.
Undergraduates will be taken
March 17-27.
SALE
RUSH PHI KAPPA TAU: Don't
n ss it! Tues Jan, 28
ANNE LEIGH: We appreciate all
that you've done! Thanks The
Palace.
RUSH LAMBDA CHI ALPHA: A
Fraternity backed by tradition.
OH NO! KIM CARPER: I hate to
mow ou're not far from
HeiP Just let them know you're a
buff with that Sigma stuff.
And remember when it's tough get
rough l know you can! That's why
ask Please don't make me a
Disaster when you find I'm the new
pledge master Remember lots of
ana you're always number one.
ove Always, Tommy D.
LOST: Gold Aligree bar pin with
aquamarine in center Great sen-
timental valuv? Call Barbara
752 0262
LOST Checkbookwith blue cover.
if found call 758 8520. Reward of-
fered
SPRING BREAK CRUISE Decide
now to cruise to the Mexican Isles.
$445 tipsgratuities included. 5
nights 6 days Call now for A GREAT
SPRING BREAK! 758 0074 or
752 3178.
NEED A D.J Are you having a par
ty and need a D.J For the best in
Top 40, Beach and Dance Call
Morgan at 758 7967 between 5 7:30
p m. Reasonable rates refernces on
request
WORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
perience in typing resumes, theses,
technical documents, and term
papers. We manage and merge your
names and addresses into merged
letters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards Our prices are extremely
reasonable and we always offer a 15
percent discount to ECU students. S
& F Professional Computer Co.
(back of Franklin's) 115 E. 5th St.
757 0472.
MOBILE HOME FOR SALE:
Emerald Isle NC. View of both ocean
and sound. Across the street from
the Emerald Isle Fishing Pier.
Water, ac, partial furnishing. $750
or best offer and assume land lease.
MEDICAL DICTATION SERVICES
AVAILABLE: 7� per line. Call
746 3513 after 6 p.m. for pick ups.
SENIORS! SENIORSI SENIORS):
Enjoy the last phase of your college
career employmentS&F Com
puters is offering a package price to
help you send out your resumes in-
cluding all of the following: Letter
quality typed resumes, Mail merged
cover letters (name and address of
each company as inside mailing ad
dress on letter), Letter quality typed
envelopes with company address
and your return address on
envelope, Everything folded, stuffed
and even stamped, A listing of com
panies sent to (for your follow ups).
Just bring us your hand-written
resume and cover letter and the
businesses you with to apply to and
we'll do the rest. Per resume for
your namesaddr. (we stuff) $2.30
(min 10 resumes) (we stuff and
stamp) $1.90 (2 page resume prices
slightly higher). This offer absolute
ly expires March 15, 1986. S&F Com-
puter Company, 115 East Fifth St
Greenville, NC. 27834 757 0472.
FOR SALE: Montgomery Ward
Stereo with cassette, AM-FM,
8 track and turntable $50. Call
758 6196 after 6
FOR SALE: Ball Python, 20 high
aquarium and heatlamp. $110. Call
Riley 752 5543.
TYPING SERVICES: Resumes,
term papers, theses Low rates.
Spelling and grammatical correc
tions included. Cindy 757 0398 after
5 30 p.m.
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc Call
758 6011 and leave a message.
FOR SALE: seima bundy Flute,
Good Condition, Price Negotiable,
If interested call 758-1665.
TYPING: All your typing needs
done by a professional secretary.
Call Doris at 355 2510 after 6 p.m.
FOR RENT: 2 room apt. for rent.
Call 752 7212 or 756-0174.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom apt. 1V2
bath, living room and large kitchen.
Cable and central air. Near Pitt
Plaza. Call 830 1769.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Elec
tronic typewriter. Reasonable rates.
Call Janice at 355 7233 after 5:30.
FOR RENT: Two bedroom house.
Carpeted with stove and refrig. $270
monthly, one year lease and one
months deposit. 752 5778 after 5 p.m.
TAXES: Will do your taxes for
reasonable rates. Ten years ex-
perience. Call Doris at 355-2510 after
6 p.m.
FAMILY MEDICAL CARE: An
nouncing new family physicians of
fice opening on 10th St. across from
campus police. Dr. George Klein
M.D. 355-5454.
FOR SALE: 3 ft. refridgerator. $100
negotiable. Call 758 8019.
SUMMER JOBS: Trinity Center,
new Episcopal Camp and Con
ference Center at Salter Path, N.C
accepting applications for summer
jobs, lifeguards (WSi's), sailing in
structor (WSI also), counselors, RN,
and Arts & Crafts Director. Apply
to: Edward M. Hodges, Jr Trinity
Summer Camp Director, 101 E. 10th
St Washington, NC. 27889.
WANTED
PLANE
for sale
752 3572
TICKET: To Atlanta GA.
Best offer. Call Jennifer
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female to
share apartment. $118 per month �
utilities. Phone 757 0344.
WANTED: Exotic dancer. One night
only, price negotiable. Call 758-7640.
Ask for Gene or Dave.
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY:
Female to keep 2 children in home 2
afternoons weekly Call 752 2040.
WANTED: Versatile guitar player
for rock n roll band with a horn sec
tion. Call 752 1538 or 752 1058.
CABIN COUNSELORSINSTRUC-
TORS: Male and Female for
western NC. 8 week children's sum
mer camp. Over 30 activities in-
cluding Water Ski, Tennis, Heated
swimming pool, Go Karts, Hiking,
Art. room, meals, salary and
travel. Experience not necessary.
Non smoking students write for ap
plicationbrochure: Camp
Pinewood, 19006 Bob O-Link Dr
Miami, Florida 33015.
CONSOLIDATED
HEATRES
� i- M
Adults $2oo
'TIL I CHILDREN
5:30 I ANYTIME
i
BUCCANEER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greenville Squere Shopping Center
Ending Today
Transylvania
6-5000
1-3-5-7-9
Starts Tomorrow
Twice in a Lifetime
1-3:05-5:10-7:15-9:20
Held Over Waiting time Is over.
PG 13
2-4:30
7-9:20
Ending Today
TROLL
I.3.5.7.9
Starts Tomorrow
My Chauffeur
1-3-5-7-9
"�i
-
& Pi Kappa Phi
Present
END OF THE
WEEK PARTY
Friday Jan. 24
3:30-7:30 A.M.
FREE ADMISSION FOR ALL
85 Cans ALL DAY
Every Sunday
is
LADIES NITE
9:00-1:00 A.M. Admission $1.50 Guys
$1.00 Ladies
$1.00 18 yr. olds
10 Draft FOR ALL
All Nite
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female,
non-smoker preferred, private
bedroom, furnished Eastbrook Apt
Rent $107.50 per month plus V3
utilities. If interested, please call
Gina or Lisa at 758 1665.
DEPENDABLE PERSON: Seeking
dependable person to answer phone,
hours8:30a.m. 1:30p.m. M F, send
resume to P.O. Box 8587, Greenville,
NC 27834.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
To share a 3 bedroom duplex. $100 a
month and Va utilities. Corner 1st
and Meade St. Call 752 0873.
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 2
bedroom house at 808 Mumford Rd.
male or female. Rent is $125 and Vj
cable and utilities. Must like cats.
Cll Melanie 757 1160.
HEALTH CLUB NEEDS
EMPLOYEES: Duties are sales,
weight training & bar-tending.
Previous Health Club experience is
required. Please call 752-1946 and
ask for manager, Lisa Whichard.
WANTED: Looking for one or two
persons, M or F, to share a house 2
blocks from campus. Rent $130 a
month � V3 or lA utility. Remainder
of January's rent free. Call David or
Jeff anytime at 752 9788.
NEED FINANCIAL AID?: Scholar
ship Research Foundation can help!
We have over 4 billion dollars worth
of financial aid in our computer
banks. $135 million dollars worth
went unused last year. We have
financial aid sources for freshmen,
sophomores, athletes and also for
the student wishing to attend
graduate school. Our applicants
receive an average of from 15 to 20
sources for which they qualify. We
guarentee results! For free informa-
tion write to us and please include
year in school. Scholarship
Research Foundation, 829 Lyn
nhaven Parkway, Suite 114-118,
Virginia Beach, Va. 23452.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
2 bedroom apt iv3 bath. Will have
private bedroom and pay Vt rent
$142.50, V2 deposit $142.50 and V2
utilities. Non smoker. Call 758 6618
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Own room, $130 per month, V�
utilities, Vi phone, call 758 2551
iCKSILVVr
Us�mI Albums cj
Tapes
Bt Pn: .�, P ml
6 Day Cruise To Mexico
Over Spring Break
Cost: $445.00 from Miami
Call: Greenville Travel Center
756-1521
Get the
word out
in the
Announcements
In The East Carolinian
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Alpha Sigma Phi
SPRING RUSH
1986
The brothers of Alpha Sigma Phi would like to invite all those who
are interested in the Greek life to the following:
Jan. 25, Sat. Night, 9:00-until
All campus bash at the house with plenty of golden beverages provid-
ed! (ID's are required)
Mon. Jan. 27, 7-11 p.m Drop by Jones Cafeteria at our information
desk to find out what the Alpha Sigs are all about.
Wed Jan. 29, 7-11 p.m Rush night, come by the house and meet the
best bunch of Brothers and Little Sisters at East Carolina
Need A ride? Call the house at 757-3516. Bus service will be provided
from the Hill on Wed. night.
Think Big, Go Alpha Sig
422 W. Fifth St.
Greenville
� MiM to M " ' ' "�� � � ��-





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BY JARRELL & JOHNSON
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BY A GUY
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Tempers
Lowe Prepares For Challanging New Role
Continued From Page 8
Coppola's 1983 drama, The Out-
siders, a film which also featured
his Youngblood co-star, Patrick
Swayze.
Within the next eight months,
Lowe completed The Outsiders,
earned a Golden Globe nomina-
tion as Best Supporting Actor for
his role in the CBS movie for
television, "Thursday's Child
and began work on his second
feature film.
Over the past few years,
Lowe's back-to-back perfoming
commitments have thoroughly
tested his stamina and resilience
as an actor. Yet when it came
time to begin filming
Youngblood in July, 1984, his
athletic abilities a well as hi!
ting talents were on the line
"For the physical side of my
performance, I had to at least feel
that 1 was a decent skater Lowe
explains. "My daily training had
given me a sense of confidence on
the ice, and I think this carries
over to the screen. Making the
mental stretch from being a non-
skater to playing a great hockey
player was hard enough, but by
becoming fairly good on the ice.
playing Dean Youngblood
became less of a jump in my im-
agination Lowe relates.
Through his training program
and his attention to the dynamics
of his role, Lowe a hed
the principle goal he sei
himself with each film � to
stretch as an actor. "It doesn't
matfr what you want to be in life
� a doctor, a teacher, a hockey
player or an actor �
challenge is to be the best . u .an
be. You have to learn to find a
balance between ideology and
reality, and you have to learn to
compromise.
nave to find a
way of conforming to situa
while maintaining your integrity.
This is what Youngblood is
about, and this is what 1 am
about Lowe concludes
(herkill
BY FRIEDRICH
It's Door Number Two
THE FAR SIDE
C "it ti.c
By GARY IARSON
lJ?g!r
( onlinued rrom Pane 8
Well, I'm not totally im-
mum le magnetic pull of the
1 even think about
gam vs in my sleep. Many's
the mght I've dreamed even I am
pped down in a bean-bav!
� ' with a bag of popcorn in
one arid and a brew in the other
� you know, to kind of make a
night of it. Well, I've often
awakened screaming, "door
number two, Jim. It's door
number two 1 swear, it's m
biggest nightmare � next to
cheerleaders with big teeth.
Author's Note:
I as! week, I wrote about an
' 'acid-rock bar. H hile most of
the remarks I made were true, I
must apologize to "Jammin'
Jeff Whenever this dude is
spmnm' the discs, go check him
out � he remembers how to rock
'n' roil.
Actually, my girlfriend made
me say this. I mean, she told me
11 I didn 't apologize she 'd hold
back on me. What's a guy to do?


R

Tarion contemplates anottw �rrtfy
Spring '86 Movie Schedule
DATE
Jan. 15
Jan. 16-18
Jan. 23-25
Jan. 29
Jan. 30-Feb. 1
Jan. 30-Feb: 1
Feb. 6-7
Feb. 8
Feb. 12
Feb. 13-15
Feb. 19
Feb. 20-22
Feb. 21-22
Feb. 2 7-March 1
March 5
March 20-22
March 23
March 26
March 27
March 28
April 3-5
April 9
April 10-12
April 16
April 17-19
April 18-19
April 23
April 24-26
April 30
May 1-3
TITLE
Paris, Texas
4 View to a Kill
Cocoon
Another Country
The Falcon and the Snunman
L�te Show:
Phantom of the Paradise
A Soldier's Story
Pitch a Boogie-woogie
A Soldier's Story
Double Feature:
Lilies of the Field
The Brother From Another Planet
The Karate Kid
The Stalker
St. Elmo's Fire
Late Show:
Monty Python's The Meaning of Life
Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome
Double Feature:
Pixote
Bye, Bye, Brazil
Rambo
Musical Festival:
Swing Time
The Wizard of Oz
An American in Paris
Sew York, ew York
Double Feature:
The Anderson Platoon
Birdy
The Emerald Forest
The Emerald Forest
Mask
Koyaanisquatsi
Fright Sight
Beyond the Wall
The Mean Season
Late Show:
Blood Simple
Double Feature:
A Filmmakers Journey
Giant
Silverado
Stranger Than Paradise
Print's Honor
timerating
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THF EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JANUARY 23, 1986
Page 11
pinu New Role
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Lions Maul Pirates
Bucs Face Mason Saturday
By SCOTT COOPER
SaofUMnor
A balanced Nittany Lion scor-
ing attack was good enough to
give Penn State an 85-57 victory
over the ECU Pirates Monday
night in University Park, Pa.
The Pirates only led once in the
contest, after a Bass jumper just
:22 seconds into the game. From
this point on, the Nittany Lions
built as much as a 19-point lead
in the first half. ECU battled
back somewhat, cutting the
halftime margin to 38-23.
"I'm upset with the way we've
played ECU coach Charlie
Harrison said. "It was the worst
we've played all year. Our of-
fense was very sloppy and we
were impatient.
"The first 12 minutes were
bad, and that carried over for the
rest of the game Harrison add-
ed, "but we can't look back,
we've got to look at what's in
front of us
The second half was no better
for the Pirates as they trailed by
as many as 30 points with 4:48
left to play. With the game easily
in the control of the home-team
Lions, Penn State defeated the
Bucs 85-57.
Junior forward Marchell
Henry was the only Pirate in dou-
ble digits with 14 points, in-
cluding a 10 of 10 performance at
the charity stripe. Senior Scott
Hardy chipped in eight as Keith
Sledge added seven. Senior guard
Curt Vanderhorst, the Pirates'
leading scorer (for two con-
secutive seasons), was held
scoreless in the contest � which
hasn't happened in the past two
years.
With the victory, the Nittany
Lions are an even 8-8, while the
Bucs slip to 7-9.
Although the loss was not a
conference one, ECU faces a
tough home CAA battle when
they host George Mason Satur-
day night in Minges Coliseum.
Coach Harrison and the
Pirates ended a five-game road
swing and are pleased to be at
home, but a large task still awaits
the Bucs.
"I'm glad that we are home. I
hope the kids can regroup and
play well Harrison said. "We
need to scrap and scrape � then
we can have no complaints.
"We need to get back to play-
ing basketball like we had before
the sickness and injury (to Sledge
and Bass) occured. We've got to
get more consistency Harrison
continued. "We need good stu-
dent and fan support as much as
anything
According to coach Harrison,
ECU will have their hands full
when they host the 9-8 (3-2 in
CAA play) Patriots. Harrison
feels that GMU may be one of the
most gifted teams around.
"They're the most talented
team one through five, and by far
the quickest Harrison said.
"They've got two all-conference
players that are seniors. They've
got good talent at all positions
In order for the Pirates to have
success against the powerful
Patriots, ECU must play smart
and to their ability, according to
Harrison.
"We can't get into an
unintelligent transition game with
them, that is their strength �
pressing, gambling and running
the floor Harrison remarked.
"We're going to have to play ex-
tremely well and extrem
hard
Fan Support
Perhaps part of the Pirates'
success Satruday night could be
in the hands of ECU tans
coach Harrison feels that
crowd would be extremely
helpful, so does ECU's Pirate
Club.
Along with the vocal supi
lended to the Pirate hoopstei
haftime show and a p
giveaway are scheduled
tions.
The Pure Gold Dancers �
making another encore pei I i
mance. The 12 young ladies
should provide a great deal of
entertainment with their pre
dance routines.
Pirate supporters should a
remember that they may hae a
chance to win a brand
Chrysler Fifth Avenue. 1
lucky fans need to sink tour
to win. So come on out and c
yourself while supporting
Pirates
JIMLEUTGENS TheEii'Ci'
Ladies Roll Over
American Monday
� i
Rejection!
Keith Sledge
in last ear's
(24) goes airborn to put back th is George Mason lay up
action as Herb Dixon and Wllia m Grady help.
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Lisa Squirewell
Lady Pirate senior forward
Lisa Squirewe" has been named
the CAA playc of the Week.
Squirewell, the Wake Forest
native, scored 38 points, had 13
rebounds, three steals, two assists
and two blocked shots in helping
the Lady Bucs defeat UNC-
Wilmington in Minges Coliseum
on Saturday and American
University on the road Monday
evening.
During the week, Squirewell
was quite impressive as she con-
nected on 14 of 22 shots from the
field and was a perfect 10 of 10
from the free-throw line.
Bv TIM CHANDLER
Seoru Writer
The Lady Pirates continued to
roll in the Colonial Athletic
Association (CAA) Monday
night, as they defeated American
University 77-73 on the road.
Their conference mark now
stands at 4�0, and their overall
record to 14�5.
The Pirates, who shot 53 per-
cent for the game, had to rely on
some key defensive plays to win.
ECU led by as many as 12, 62-50
with around eight minutes to
play, but saw that dwindle down
to two, 72-70, with under two
minutes to play. After a Pirate
basket that put the score at 74-70,
Delphine Mabry came up with
the clutch play of the game. She
stole the ball from American's
Beth Shearer with 1:26 to play,
and from there the Pirates were
able toice the game from the free
throw line.
Coach Emily Manwaring said
that the quickness of ECU made
the difference for the game. The
Pirates had 14 steals, six by
Mabry, compared to only five by
American.
The Pirates were paced by four
players in double figures with
Loraine Foster leading the way
with 18. Lisa Squirewell, who
was named CAA player of the
week, had 16, as did Sylvia
Bragg. Delphine Mabry was the
other Pirate in double digits with
15 points.
Rounding out the scoring for
the Pirates was Alma Bethea,
who led the team in rebounding
with eight, had five points,
followed by Chris O'Connor with
four, and Therese Durkin with
one.
ECU has two road games com-
ing up this weekend, both CAA
games. Saturday the Pirates
travel to George Mason, and
Monday they play at James
Madison.
James Madison just missed
getting into the top 20 this week.
The Associated Press ranked
them 21st on their latest poll.
Although the game at James
Madison will be for the con-
ference lead. Coach Marwaring
says that the Pirates can't look
past George Mason. "Last year
when we came up here, we had to
go into overtime to beat them
stated Manwaring.
The Lady Pirates will be back
home again for a Feb. 1 game
against American.
Freshman Gretta O'Neal gets a word of advice from Lady Pirate head
coach Emily Manwaring during a recent victory in Minges Coliseum.
9:00
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Brockschmidt Leads Talented ECU Team
B DAVID McGINNESS
Awi.iib! sports Milor
"He's the most talented all-
around swimmer ever to swim at
ECU said Pirate swim coach
Rick Kobe of sophomore sensa-
tion Bruce Brockschmidt. "He is
a natural probably one of the
best athletes on the ECU
campus
Kobe's estimation of the So.
Winchester Va native is well
n
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JIM LEUTOCNS � Tfct Cast Carolinian
JHead coach Rick Kobe and the Pirate swim team during an afternoon
Ipractice in MijigreNatetoriuin.
deserved. Brockschmidt's list of
accomplishments is indeed im-
pressive. One of which is the
ECU all-time varsity record in the
200 individual medley, which he
set last year at the Eastern
Regional Invitationals.
Along with his impressive
200-yard IM statistic,
Brockschmidt's freshman year
was undoubtedly one for the
record books. During the 1984-85
season, he tallied the Pirates' best
times in the 100 and 200-yard
butterfly as well as the 100-yard
backstroke.
This year the Pirate swimmer
has continued to lead the way in
what has been called by Kobe,
our best year ever and has a
goood chance at qualifying for
the NCAA Regionals in In-
dianapolis, IN.
"I think I've got a pretty good
shot Brockschmidt said. "I'm
only three seconds off the cutoff
time right now, and I'm getting
faster
The sophomore computer
science major will no doubt prove
extremely valuable to ECU when
it competes in the Colonial
Athletic Association Tournament
in mid-February. One reason is
his versatility.
"The thing that's nice about
Bruce is he can swim well in so
many events said Kobe. "He
could win three individual events
at the conference meet, plus the
three relays he is swimming in.
What Bruce means to our team is
potential points in every event he
enters
Should he qualify for the
NCAA's, Brockschmidt's main
goal will be, "Basically to go out
and swim well compared to my

the Olympics, where cutoff times
are different for each country's
team, of which America's are the
toughest.
Should Brockschmidt score in
Indianopolis, he will be the only
swimmer in ECU history to score
at an NCAA meet, according to
Kobe. Yet Kobe believes that if
he qualifies, he will have about a
70-pcrcent chance of doing just
that.
"Last year Bruce worked hard
and did very well, but not to his
potential Kobe said. "This
Brockschmidt could probably
have pretty much had his choice
of colleges. So why ECU?
"I liked the coach and the pro
gram, and the people at this
school are pretty nice,
Brockschmidt said.
The members of the team.
though competitive with other
schools, are close friends who try
to support each other, according
to Brockschmidt.
"We don't really compete
against each other, he said. "We
like for evervone to do well
Bruce Brockschmidt
other times. I'd like to swim my
best times in the NCAA's
Unfortunately, that is
something that is not easy to do.
A swimmer may reach peak per-
formance levels only once and for
a relatively short time during a
season. A problem for many
NCAA-qualifying swimmers is
that they are at their best when
they qualify, and are unable to
better or even duplicate their
qualifying time.
Another factor that makes
scoring in the NCAA meet is that
it is literally the fastest meet in
the world. The times there are
even better than those recorded in
"He's the most talented all-around
swimmer ever to swim at ECUpro-
bably one of the best athletes on the
ECU campus
�Rick Kobe
year he is
Brockschmidt's (and the
team's) workout schedule means
a lot of hard work almost every
day of the week. The team swims
for two-and-one-half hours every
weekday, plus 90 minutes in the
mornings on Mon Wed. and
Fri. They lift weights for one-half
hour on Tucs. and Fri. On Satur-
days when they aren't competing,
the team swims another two-and-
one-half hours. This schedule
often means that the Pirates will
swim 60,000 yards, or 34 miles,
per week.
An athelete as talented as
because we want to swim well a
a team together. We're prettv
close
The friendships that the
members of the team are an im
portant part of their college lives
"Having good friends is just
about the most rewarding part of
it Brockschmidt added. "If we
weren't as close, it wouldn't be
too mu:h fun
With the amount of time that
members of the team spend prac
ticing and competing, one might
think that their academic work
See SOPHOMORE, page 13
�Mfeift Y'
� T �






12
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Thursday
Jan. 30
Monday
Feb. 3




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i
1





THE LAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 23, 1986
13
I
I
Tuesday
Feb. 4

Wilson Sees Shutout In Super Bowl XX
NEW ORLEANS (UPI) �
Otis Wilson looked up from the
floor of the Supcrdome at the
banners with the scores of the
previous XIX Super Bowls.
"There's never been a shutout.
until now said the Chicago
Bears' left outside linebacker. "I
ee a big goose egg. It's never
been done, and we want to be a
history-making team
Wilson is known for his brash
talk, a la Joe Namath, who
guaranteed that his New York
Jets, an 18-point underdog,
would win the 1969 game.
The Bears are known for their
shutouts.
Having already set a National
Football League record by shut-
ting out the New York Giants and
Los Angeles Rams to get here,
they want to complete a hat trick
by blanking the New England
Patriots Sunday.
History isn't as much against
the Bears as it appears.
In Six Super Bowls, the losers
have been held to a touchdown or
less. In two, shutouts were spoil-
ed by Garo Yepremian, the
Miami Dolphins' place-kicker
who ruined one by the Dallas
Cowboys and another by his own
defense.
The first was in 1972, when
Yepremian's 31-yard field goal
provided Miami's only points in a
24-3 loss to Dallas.
The next year, when Miami
beat Washington 14-7, Yepre-
mian spoiled the shutout when he
tried to pass a blocked field-goal
attempt, only to have
Washington's Mike Bass in-
tercept and return it 49 yards for
a touchdown.
There was one other near-
blanking, the 16-6 victory by Pitt-
sburgh over Minnesota in 1975,
the first of the Steelers' four
Super Bowl wins. It was the most
dominating defensive effort ever
� the Steelers' "Steel Curtain"
allowed Minnesota only 119 total
yards from scrimmage, and the
Vikings got their six points when
Terry Brown recovered a blocked
Bobby Walden punt in the end
zone.
Which brings us to the Bears.
They shut out the New York
Giants 21-0 in their first playoff
game, then blanked the Los
Angeles Rams 24-0 for the NFC
championship. Excluding their
only loss, a 38-24 decision in
Miami, they allowed just 20
points in six games against teams
that made the playoffs.
One of those was a 20-7 win
against the Patriots the second
week of the season. New
England's only points came on a
90-yard fourth-quarter
touchdown pass from Tony
Eason to Craig James that
represented almost half of the
Patriots' 206 total yards.
Wilson figures that's a good in-
IRS Water Hoops Scheduled
By STEPHANIE DEW
S��ff �rttf
Sneaker Sam says, "Let's do it
in the water inviting you to
plunge into 1986 with the latest
Intramural-Recreational sport,
WATER BASKETBALL. There
will be round-robin action, Feb.
9-16, held in the Memorial Gym
Pool. Students interested should
register by Feb. 6, in Room 204
Memorial Gym.
As for the likes of Kim Swin-
son and Robbi Tweed, the 1985
dynamic racquetball duo, today
is the last day to register for rac-
quetball doubles competition.
Have you, Raymond Song and
partner Jim Hunt, signed up to
defend your open division title?
Next on the Department of
Intramural-Recreational Service
action update is arm wrestling.
The tournament-entry deadline is
Feb. sicth, with all matches
beginning on the 11th. Registra-
tion forms can be obtained in 204
Memorial Gym between 8:00
a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Here is how last year's wrist-
snapping action ended:
Men's Champions
150 lb. - under: Gary Bishop
151 lb. - 175: Robbie Rice
176 lb. - 199: Mark Williams
200 lb. - over: Don Payne
Women's Champions
135 lb. - under: Kim Bates
136 lb. - over: Lori Greene
A championship and runner-
up trophy will be given in each
weight class. All participants will
receive a free Intramural 1986
Arm Wrestling T-shirt.
ECU's Women's Soccer Club
may have given birth to the first
female Pele, Renee Flessate.
Sneaker Sam travelled with the
team of fantastic booters to their
first exhibition, held in Jackson-
ville. Nov. 20.
Flessate began scoring against
the Unidas with an 18-yard shot.
The Unidas returned the favor
only to be crushed again by
Sophomore Sensation
Heads Fine Buc Squad
Continued from page 11
would suffer, but for
Brockschmidt, the case is just the
opposite. "Actually I do better in
school during the season said
Brockschmidt. "It helps a lot just
being in a daily routine, and once
that routine stops I don't do quite
as well
With onlv two seasons com-
pleted (one of those only partially
so), Bruce Brockschmidt should
continue to be one of the top per-
formers for the ever-improving
Pirate swimmers. The dedication
and talent he has displayed so far
will hopefully only be a fraction
of his overall contribution to
ECU's swimming program.
DONNA EDWAitD
VILLAGE
Good Selection of Reptiles
and Saltwater and Fresh water Fish
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Master Card aa4 Visa art accepts as fteaadag is
511 EVANS ST.
GREENVILLE, NX. 27134
PHONE 754-W22
George KleinM.D.
Announces The Establishment of His Practice
Providing
Family Medical Care
602-C East 10th Street
Greenville, North Carolina 27834
Office Hours
Monday-Friday 12 Noon-8 P.M.
Saturday and Sunday By
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Flessate's finesse as she scored
two more goals for ECU. Lady
Pirates' Cheryl Higgins kicked
for a score on an assist by tc in-
mate Connie O'Brien, ending the
first half of play.
ECU refused to give the
Jacksonville squad a breather as
Dee Tropeano began the second
half with a quick score. The
Unidas, down by three, caught
the Lady Pirates off guard and
managed to add two goals to
their total. In the surge, however,
the Unidas fell to fatigue, enabl-
ing ECU's Connie O'Brien to add
the sixth and final goal of the
game.
Some outstanding perfor-
mances were put in by other Lady
Pirates, including: Kris Slacum,
Marion Bailey, Lisa
Grosshandler, Lilian Armour
and goalie, Donna Selman. With
this excellent show of talent, the
Women's Soccer Club is looking
forward to a very successful in-
door and spring season. Anyone
interested in becoming a member
of this year's team should contact
Pat Cos in Room 204 Memorial
Gym.
dicator of what will happen to
James Sunday against defensive
coordinator Buddy Ryan's com-
plex "46" defense that shut down
two other 1,000-yard rushers, Joe
Morris of the Giants and Eric
Dickerson of the Rams.
"Craig James got 27 yards the
last time said Wilson, a Pro
Bowler who often comes flying
into the backfield from odd
angles.
"He's no different a man now.
Just older and worn down
because the season wears you
down. Dickerson and Morris are
better. If we play consistently, I
see no problem
Bears coach Mike Ditka sees
no problem with Wilson's bragg-
ing � as long as he delivers, as
Namath did when he engineered
the 16-7 upset over the Colts that
brought the old American Foot-
ball League to parity with the
NFL.
"One thing about talking �
it's only good when you back it
up Ditka added. "You either
end up as a champ or a chump
when you say that
Most of Wilson's defensive
teammates would just as soon
avoid being put in that position,
although one offensive player
suggests it could happen.
"They've gotten most of their
points in the playoffs on tur-
novers, and we don't turn over
the ball said Walter Payton,
Chicago's all-time NFL rushing
leader.
But the defenders were more
cautious.
"I'm not feeling shutout now,
although I may be feeling it on
Sunday once we get started
said Richard Dent, the All-Pro
defensive end whose 17 regular-
season sacks led the NFL. "If a
shutout comes, fine. But I'll just
take the win
"A shutout? That's obviously
a formidable goal said Dan
Hampton, Chicago's other
defensive end. "The bottom line
is a win. If we win the game, we'll
be very, very happy. Defense is
the horse we rode into the
playoffs and the Super Bowl.
We'll build on that
And how do the Patriots feel
about this?
"People don't expect us to
come in here and score points
said James. "But in our heart
and mind we feel we deserve to be
here
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Gun & Pawn
752-2464
500 N. Green
830-1591
WBi
HOU.
Carolina East Mall
(North Entrance�Near Belk's)
756-6078
OPEN MONSAT.
8 AM to 9 PM
Limit one roll per coupon.
Not valid with other offeri
Process & Print
with this coupon
From 110, 126, 35mm or
Disc Color Print Film.
19V3C per print
(reg. 29�)& $1.98 dev. chg. (reg. $2.98)
Example: 24exp. film reg. $9 94
NOW $4.73
2586
LUNCHEON SPECIALS
Mon. STEAK N CHEESE � O A
& FRENCH FRIES 1 �Q7
Tues. CHICKEN � A A
& FRENCH FRIES ��II�
Wed. MIXED SNACK � O A
& FRENCH FRIES 1 �OT
Thurs. CHICKEN 'N GRAVY - Q A
& FRENCH FRIES 1 Q7
ElL STEAK & FRENCH Cm 0�
FRIES & REG. DRINK ItOY
Come By A Try The Best
Luncheons In Greenville!
Located Corner Of 10th & Cotanche Streets
Offering The Best Feed On The Corner!
SHOE OUTLET
NAME BRAND SHOES - . , D .
At Discount Prices
Quality Casual Shoes $15
Ladies Dress and Casual Shoes
at discount prices
I Large Selection of Name Brand
Tennis Shoes $12.88 to $29.88
752-2332 one block off Evans Street

�m W�t Ninth
I
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14
I Ml EAST CAROLINIAN
JANl'ARY 23,1986
Spring
pt�
Lambda Chi Alpha
2a Beta Tao
IFC will sponsor a Fraternity Orientation Program
(F.O.P.) on Monday, Jan. 27, 1986. (Time to be
announced). $
A) IFC will print posters and information cards for this
event.
B) A maximum of five members per fraternity can be
present at the F.O.P.
Each of 15 existing fraternities will be placed in one of
three groups:
-rao fcappa
epsion
GROUP 1
Delta Sigma Phi
Sigma Nu
Pi Kappa Phi
Pi Kappa Alpha
Phi Kappa Tau
GROUP 2
Sigma Tau Gamma
Lambda Chi Alpha
Alpha Sigma Phi
Beta Theta Pi
Theta Chi
GROUP 3
Kappa Sigma
Kappa Alpha
TayuKappa Epsilon
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Zeta Beta Tau
Schedule for first week of Rush is:
Group I Tuesday, January 28
Group 2 Wednesday, January 29
Group 3 Thursday, January 30
Rush hours for January 28, 29, 30 and February 3, 4 are
7:30-11
IFC will provide van transportation on January 28-30
Rl SH SCHEDULE FOR SPRING 1986
SAT.
SUN.
MON.
TUES.
WED.
Jan. 25 � Open Parties
Jan. 26 � Open Parties
Jan. 27 � Fraternity Orientation Program (F.O.P.)
Jan. 28 � Group 1 (first week Rush)
Jan. 29 � Group 2 (first week Rush)
THUR. Jan. 30 � Group 3 (first week Rush)
MON. Feb. 3 � All Fraternity Rush BIDS GIVEN
TUES. Feb. 4 � All Fraternity Rush BIDS GIVEN
Delta Sigma Phi
G.
RUSH LOCATIONS �
4.

Alpha Sigma Phi 6.Lambda Chi Alpha
422 W. 5th St.500 Elizabeth St.
Beta Theta Pi7.Phi Kappa Tau
757-0351409 Elizabeth St.
Delta Sigma Phi8.Pi Kappa Alpha
510 E. 10th St.The Attic
Kappa Alpha9.Pi Kappa Phi
500 E. 5th St.803 Hooker Road
Kappa Sigma10.Sigma Nu
700 E. 10th St.1301 CotancheSt.
11. Sigma Phi Epsilon
505 E. 5th St.
12. Sigma Tau Gamma
508 W. 5th St.
13. Theta Chi
752-6635, 752-0874
14. Tau Kappa Epsilon
951 E. 10th St.
15. Zeta Beta Tau
Mendenhall Student Cente:

mm -?-





Title
The East Carolinian, January 23, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 23, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.450
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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