The East Carolinian, January 21, 1986






She Saat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Nol.60NoJ4-3(
Tuesday, January 21, 1986
Greenville, N.C .
12 Pages
C in illation 12,(MR)
Tutu Speaks At Duke
Praises Students Role
Tutu Speaks In Durham
JOMIIKDN HI Pbulo I �b
Bishop Desmond 1 utu spoke at the Duke Chapel this past Sunday. Besides trying to raise money in
North Carolina. Tutu tried to raise the awareness of North Carolina's citizens to the plight of black
South Africans. See related story on page 1.
King Remembered At ECU
B( VROI YN DKlsCOI.I. SUfl Wnler
l! d gathered Monday
i 'Hendrix Theater to
ate the 1 � of the Re.
Manithet King Jr
� leCity Councilman I d
( arm e at the Alpha
' � a ernity pres
! .i A Holiday said
"1 ki� . : tance l tinner, �e
haverstand the necessit
fluence on my life In his tribute
to King. Register explained, "we
ca nnot live on past
successeswhere we are uoin�� is
- � AflMft ,
ol struggle
The IO-mi i peech, "Keep-
ing the Dream Alive spoke out
against prejudice and discrimina-
igainsi minorities.
C at tei met King during the
'60s while attending Virginia
State dlege.
speaking at the program
Jasper Register.at: 1 : I
faculty memb
Register was a treshman at
Moorehouse College in Atlanta
when he heard King preach
"History and Destiny a sermon
vvhuh he saidhad a great in-
itial
more important than where we
have been
Angelo Volpe, vice chancellor
� cademic Affairs was also on
hand to give his remarks on
King's importance in the fight for
equality. He said, "He carried
the torch and now he is passing it
to you
Certificates oi merit were
received by leaders of several
minority students organizations.
Ken Hammond, program direc-
tor for University Unions, won
the Martin l.uther King Jr. Com-
munity Service A ward. The
Outstanding Greek Award went
to Eddie Bradley oi Kappa Alpha
Psi, and an Outstanding Leader-
ship Award was given to Brenda
Reid oi Delta Sigma Theta.
Monday was the first time
King's birthday was celebrated as
a national holiday. It's
significance was noted by An-
thony Bunch, president of Alpha
Phi Alpha when he saidThe
United States of America, black,
white, brown, north, and south
has stopped for 24 hours to
remember the life oi a black
AmericanRev. Martin Luther
King
B JAY STONE
Mini�lH Mitur
Bishop Desmond Tutu, Nobel
Laureate and critic of the apar-
theid policies of the South
African government, was the
featured speaker at Duke Univer-
sity Chapel Sunday. Tutu
delivered a 45 minute sermon to a
crowd oi' more than 1 .(MX) people
who packed the chapel on the
campus of Duke University.
After the service, Bishop Tutu
answered questions from
reporters in a short press con-
ference which took place in the
Divinity School adjacent to the
University's Chapel.
Tutu's appearance at Duke was
designed primarily to raise money
for the South African Council ot
Churches. Yet, he also hoped to
raise the awareness of North
Carolinians regarding South
African politics. Among the
Council ofChurches' projects are:
care for the dependents ol
political prisoners, a scholarship
program, a ministry to migratory
labor and acting as an opposition
voice for the movement against
apartheid.
In his sermon, Tutu spoke of
the power of Christian love. He
mentioned a minister in Alaska
who wrote Tutu saying that his
entire congregation prayed for
Tutu and the members of the
Council of Churches by name.
"What chance does the govern-
ment of South Africa have.
Tutu asked. "When it is fighting
against God?"
Tutu continued his sermon by
saying 'hat the evil of the system
in South Africa is not the pain
and anquish that it causes. The
evil is that, "It makes a person
doubt that they are a child of
God Tutu added that God
always creates a scandal because
he chooses to be on the side of the
hungry and the oppressed. The
test o God's people, he said, is
whether or not they have fed the
hungry or clothed the naked.
"There cannot be any true
freedom for anyone until all are
free Tutu said.
Though Tutu's sermon barely
touched on the specifics ot South
African politics, the press con-
ference which took place after-
ward locused more on specifi
Early in the press conferens-
white South African asked I utu
whether Christians should pray
for the overthrow oi the white
government. Tutu replied that he
would leave such a dec.
God
Tutu praised the i
American students in cl
the moral climate in the ' nited
States. A Duke University stu-
dent asked Tutu what he
thought of divestment. "As tar
as peaceful strategic g
ment is an effective measure I
all people
support
In response to the assertion
that blacks will be the ones
fer if divestment is intiated Tutu
said, "The United States has
already initiated -a :ti
against Poland, Nicaragua
Libya. It is only I I
South Africa thai
same people who have supp I
these other sanctions bet
altruistic
Students Vital To Success
ECU's National Teiefund ex-
pects its donations to exceed
S200,000 due to the participation
and enthusiasm oi the ECU stu-
dent bodv.
"It's the best response we've
ever had on campus. We've had
fabulous support. Many student
organizations sent student
volunteers. Sororities, frater-
nities, honor fraternities and
dorms were also well
represented said Annual Giv-
ing Director, Cindy Kittrell.
"The students who particpated
love ECU and enjoy contributing
to the success of the university.
Their enthusiasm made the tele-
fund a major campus event
said Kittrell.
Blood Supply Low, Club Sponsors Drive
By CAROLYN DRISCOLL
siiff Wntrr
Giving blood has nothing to do
with AIDS. There is no way that
a donor can contract AIDS or
any other disease by giving a pint
of blood, according to a report
published by the US Surgeon
General.
However, despite these
published statements from the
US Surgeon General, many peo-
ple still have a fear oi donating
blood. In fact, although a patient
somewhere needs blood every 12
seconds, only four percent oi the
population actually donates.
Students will be given the
chance to save a life next
Wednesday and Thursday,
January 29 and 30, when the
ECU Biology Club sponsors a
blood drive.
In order to achieve a goal of
record high student participation,
the club is holding a contest
"designed to get students involv-
SGA Plans Tough Crackdown
Defaulters Face Penalties
ed in recruiting blood donors
explains Sammy Wynne, presi-
dent of the Biology Club.
To enter the competition.
recruiters can have donors sign
up to give blood on Wednesday
or Thursday. For every ten
donors who sign up and show up
to donate, the recruiter's name is
entered once in a random draw-
ing. The person choose after the
blood drive will receive dinner for
two at the Beef Barn in Greenville
See BLOOD Page 3.
According to students who
participated, the teiefund was ex-
citing and created a sense o! ac-
complishment, awareness, and
aUo gave them the opportunity to
gain telemarketing experience.
The National Teiefund lasted
for eight weeks and was organiz-
ed by the ECU Ambassadors and
coordinated by Roseann Blum.
student teiefund coordinator.
"The Ambassadors were in-
strumental in our success.
Without the coordination of the
Ambassadors and the help of the
students, we could not have
reached our goal Kittrell said.
The national telefund's total is
over SP4.000. Kittrell expect it
to reach S200.000 by the end ot
May after the two regional fun-
draisers close the giving cam-
paign.
"Public universities are
latecomers to raising money and
we feel we have reached a
milestone in fund raising said
Kittrell.
"In order to be the best we
have to have money to become
the best. By giving, alumni feel
they are improving the quality oi
their degrees she added.
Much of the success of the tele-
fund can be attributed to the
$100,000 Dowdy Challenge
which is designed to encourage
alumni and friends of the univer-
sity to increase their gifts to
ECU. All new and increased gifts
received in the telefunj unt M-
3 Isi will be matched up I
$100,000.
"ECU I a
since the 60's It's a �ch
has worked hard I � ca
respect it command
cording to Ronald E Dow
1966 ECU graduate and
stitutor of the Dowdy Challenge
"After the university re
Purple Weeks
(Irganizations
1st Place � Cotton Dorm
2nd Place � Green Dorm
3rd Place � American Marketing
Association
Student W inners
1st Place � kathy Viglianco
2nd Place � haron Krol
3rd Place � Deborah Overton
Gold Weeks
( � ijanizations
1st Place sigma Phi Epsilon
2nd Place � Delta eta
3rd Place � I heta Chi
St dent w inners
1st Place � Bryan Lassiter
2nd Place � Michael I iddy
3rd Plait � lerri Trotman
gift like the Dowdy money, the
recognition begins said Kittrell.
According to Jim Lanier, Vice
Chancellor of Institutional Ad-
vancement, "The success oi the
teiefund can be attributed to
three factors: improved organia-
See TELEFLND Page 3.
By D()l(, ROBERSON
Senior staff Wrlltf
Students who have overdue
emergency or medical loans
should repay them immediately
or face penalties including fines,
tagged records and mandatory
community service.
Within the next few weeks, the
Student Government Association
will begin prosecuting students
who have outstanding $25
emergency and $150 medical
loans, said Student Welfare
Committee Chairman John
Eagan.
"We don't want to do this, but
we have to have the money so we
can loan it to students who need
it he added.
According to SGA Treasurer
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds8
Editorials4
Features7
Sports10
Love sought is good, but
given unsought is better.
�Shakespeare
Tony Braswell, more than $5,300
in emergency and medical loans
are owed to the University.
"Most of the overdue loans are
$25 emergency loans. Of the
$5,300, more than $2,000 is owed
from last year Braswell said.
The penalties for students with
outstanding loans will include
fines, tagged records and man-
datory community service.
"If students don't pay, the
Registrar's Office will freeze their
records. Then the student can't
dropadd, pre-register, or receive
their transcripts Eagan said.
In addition to having their
records tagged, students with
overdue loans will be fined,
"Now, they pay back $28.50 on
an overdue emergency loan. With
the changes, they'll have to repay
$38.50 Braswell added.
Mandatory community service
is another penalty students with
outstanding loans will face.
"The student will have to work
10 hours of community service
for the $25 loan and 50 hours for
an overdue $150 loan Eagan
said.
Both Eagan and Braswell said
the penalties are harsh, but
necessary changes.
"We're doing it so students
will be able to get emergency and
medical loans. If we don't take
these steps, next year there may
not be any money to loan out
Braswell said.
In the past, the SGA has not
prosecuted students with overdue
loans, but Eagan said, "there has
been a problem for a number of
years.
"Students come to the SGA
and think we're not doing our job
because there is no money
because of the overdue loans
Eagan added.
The North Carolina
Legislature could audit the SGA
and determine the outstanding
loans constitute a "gross misuse
of funds he added.
Until prosecutions begin,
students can repay their loans
with only the usual late penalty,
but after prosecutions begin,
there will be no exceptions,
Eagan said.
Braswell added, "The SGA is a
service to students. If the loans
don't work, they may be done
away with. So students should
beware, in the next few weeks, if
they have overdue loans, we're
going to come after them
Stalled Students
J S HUMBERT - Th. Et C.rdin.an
The sidewalk in front of the Student Supply Store may be a little more crowded than usual this
semester thanks to a record enrollment of 13,291. This total includes 5,681 men and 7,610 women �
go for it guys.
H ?



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�i





I HthAST CAROL 1NIAN
JANUARY 21, 1986
Announcements
ARMY ROTC SCHOLARSHIPS
AVAILABLE
The deadline is tast approaching or
students interested m applying tor a 2 or
3 year Army ROTC scholarship Army
scholarships pay tor tuition, all fees aria tex
tbooks in addition recipients are provided
I).000 vtan tree per year as a subsistence
allowance The scholarships are awarded on
�nent and generally if you have at least a
2 5 cumulative grade point average (GPA)
2 0 m nursmg. you will be competitive for a
scholarship it ft important to note that one
does not have to be curentiy enrolled m the
Arm, ROTC program to apply For more in
formation contact Captain Aivm Mitchell at
757 6967 or stop by room 319, Eryvin Mall
SUMMER JOBS
For all hara worKmg ambit,ous students
who need a challenge An internship pro
gram is on campus interviewing students to
oe independent business people No par
' uiar maior is necessary but all are invited
earn about the program interviews are
(W Vondav nights at 7 00 Tuesday and
dav a' 30 and 7 00 m BB 303
THE NAVIGATORS
Check us out' Beginning Tuesday
aua-y 14 Tne Navigators ntensve bible
�. anu fellowship Eve Tuesday 7 30
cm 9 00 pm Brewster ?02D A real lovmg
family atmospgere with concentrated m
sights into the bible
ALL NURSING STUDENTS
GRADUATING SPRING
SEMESTER
in order to receive your Nursing Pin by
Apl 198� orders ius'be placed m the Stu
3ent Stores Aright Bu.idmg no ater than
February 3 1996 Orders should oe placed at
th� Jeweiry Counter Orders mus' be paid In
when the order is placed
GRADUATE MANAGEMENT
ADMISSION TEST (GMAT)
"he 'aaai? Management Admission
Test gvat win be offered at East
Carolina university on Saturday March 15.
1986 Appi.cation blanks are to be completed
and mailed to Gmat Educational Testing
Service Box 966 R Princeton N J 08540
Applications mu 5 oe postmamed no later
an February 10. 1986 Applications ma, be
obtained from the ECU Testing Center
Room 105. Speight Budding Greenville
N C 2783
QUALITY CONTROL
-oca �-rt-oac'urer needs students for
' � 3ua � . study Background r
stat s" rs a"C .c"r0' ;rar' 'rorY -ea rec
E 1 e pi ' opportunity tor students
Bs "ess or iNDT Salary 17 00- For more
"formation contact Cooperative Education
313 Raw
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE
S't ' ' '�"�sec n 'OOP opoorfun tes
� . v 1 Atiat'f, or of Nat onai Pa'ks
- net �tac' the co oc office
as soon as possoie Positions available for
recrea' or - ��� biology jcs For
more n1cr rr a1� on contact Coope'a' .e
Eauca'on 313 R�
HONORS PROGRAM
Any faculty member wanting to offer an
Honors Seminar in the Monore Program fall
semester 19S6 needs to get the proposal to the
committee, co David Sanders, Director of
the Honors Program. Ragsdale 212 (ext
6373). by Tuesday, Jan 21, 1986, at the latest
POETRY FORUM
ECU poetry Forum will meet on Tuesday
8 OOpm in Mendenhall 248 Open to anyone
who wants to read or listen to poetry Those
wanting feedback on their work are asked to
bring 6 or 8 copies of each poem
ECU KARATE CLUB
The ECU Karate Club will have its first
meeting on Thursday Jan 16 at 7 30pm m
room 108 Memorial Gym This meeting s
open to anyone who has experience in any
style of the martial arts Advanced classes
will be held thereafter every Thursday
same time and place A demonstration and
registration for beginning classes will be
held Thursday January 30 at 8 OOpm in
room 108, Memorial Gym For any mtorma
t'on call Chuck or Anne at 758 0370
NEWMAN PERSONNAL
DEVELOPMENT SERIES
"WHY AM 1 AFRAID TO TELL YOU
WHO I AW" by John Powell A program
designed to help us grow in self awareness
self esteem enabling us to reaiiie that, with
God's grace life can be an exciting adven
ture Offered on Tuesday evenings at
1 30pm
NEWMAN CATHOLIC
EDUCATION SERIES
Wednesdays at 8 30pm BEING
CATmOliC A course for those interested
In iearn;ng about the Cathouc faith and
ff) ngs uniquely Catholic Open to everyone
nteresteo
MODELS NEEDED
it interested see Tran Gordiey Of ce 1307
Jenkins Art Bidg Phone 757 625v
APPLICATION DEADLINE
FOR
SOCIAL WORKCRIMINAL
JUSTICE
Deadline for application to the Division of
Social Work. Criminal Justice tor Spr ng
Semester Is January 24 1986 AM appi ca
tions for admission Spring Semester most be
turned in by tha' date
PHI ETA SIGMA HONOR
SOCIETY
Pn Eta Sigma Honor Society will ave ts
first meeting of the semester n 221
Mendenhall on Thursday. January 23 at
J '30pm We win set our meeting limes a' Hi t
meet ng so please attend
VETERAN'SCLUB
There will be a meet ng of 'he Eas
Carolina Vetemas Club Wednesaa,
January 22. at 7 30 in room 231 Ot
Mendenhall Student Center We w ��
discussing our pians �or this semester sc
don't miss out' An,one "terespd s en
couraged to attend
NATIONAL TEACHER
EXAMINATIONS -CORE
BATTERY EXAMS
The National Teacher Examinations Core
Battery Exams will be offered at East
Carolina SUmversity on Saturday April 5,
1986 Application blanks are to be completed
and mailed to the Educational Testing Ser
vice. Box 911 R, Princeton. NJ 08541 to ar
rive by March 3, 1986 Applications may be
obtained from the Testing Center Room 105,
Speight Building East Carolina University
NEEDCASHII
The Department of Intramural
Recreational Services is now hiring for
anyone interested m artist or photography
positions For more information contact j R
at 757 6387 Although not required, a portfolio
of recent work is desired All phone calls will
be investigated and welcome Come by room
204 Memorial Gym and fill Out an applica
tion Basketball officials will also be hired
tor this years league Contact Lynette Gmn
(757 6387) The first clinic will be held
January 20 at 9 OOpm in room 102 Memorial
Gym
MANAGEMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
Students are needed to work sprmg and
summer In th� areas of aquatics food ser
vice and revenuemanagement at a recrea
t.onai facility in Fayettev.lle For more In
formation contact Coooperat.ve Education
313 Raw
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Excellent opportunity for ;umor level com
puter science student with strong program
m.ng skills Programming position w.th
computer services department of maior
local manufacturer Contact Cooperative
Education 313 Rawi Bino
�. o � ' n j r r lOi
Education 313 Rawi Bldg
STOPSMOKING!
H your New Years resolution was to stop
smokmg join the Smoking CEssat.on Group
Tn,s . week class begins 1 27 86 Classes will
be Mondays at 4 OOpm at the Student Heaitn
Center Room 107 Call Mary E.esha Adams
at 757 6841 for more information
EARN EXTRA MONEY WHILE
ATTENDINGCLASSES
Students wanted to provide nofetak
ng tutor,ng serv.ces during spr.ng
semester 86 for disabled students on cam
pus For an application contact program for
hearing impaired students. Brewster A 114
or can 757 6729
AMBASSADORS
welcome Back Ambassador's! We can't
wait to see you at our 1st general meeting of
this year We will meet Wed Jan 22 at
5 15pm in the multipurpose room in
Mendenhall Also, don't forget that our In
ductlons will be held Sun , Jan 24 at 2 OOpm
in room 244 MSC
CAREER PLANNING AND
PLACEMENT SERVICE
If you wuld consider a summer 10b In a
camp like the YMCA Blue Ridge Assembly
or a Yellowstone Park Service 10b. or a
Musicians job at various Theme Parks, then
you might want to look at the Summer Joes
Notebook. Bulletin Board, and shelves of
summer 10b announcements at the Career
Planning and Placement Service m the Blox
ton House Also watch for Announcements
about Camp Day coordinated by CO OP In
February
BIOLOGY CLUB BLOOD
DRIVE
The ECU biology CIlhD 15 sponsor,ng a
community wide Bioodmobiie a'
Mendengeli Student Center room 244 The
Bioodmobiie will take place on Wednesday,
Jan 29 and Thursday. Jan 30 from 12 rtoon to
6pm Competitions between organizations
and challenges from Presidents Is highly en
couraged Competitions will be held between
dorms, fraternities (honor � sociaii.
sororities, honor societies, departments, and
anyone else who will make a challenge If
you cannot give blood, recruit blood donors
to give blooo For every 10 people you
recruit, your name will go in the drawing
once fir a dinner for two at the Beet Barn
one of Greenville's finest restaurantsi and
a chauffered hmosme ride to and from the
Beef Barn Total value $130 00 Wm the
B.ology Club's night on the town for one of
our top blood donor recruiters Donor
sheets can be picked up at the Student Supp
ly Store Soda Shop, o the Crotan from ar.f
cashier
WOMEN'S FRISBEE CLUB
The Women s Fsbee Club is looking for
peopie who like piaymg fnsbee ano getting
HORiZ1 We want to get the team, together
and start practice soon so we can go to
Fior.da over Spring oread II you re in
terested can Sandy at 752 0856 (evenings
PHI BETA LAMBDA
There will be a meeting on Wee Jan 22
'986 at 3 00 in Raw! 342 Old memoes bring
a friend who might be interested - oining
AH business maiors we come to lO.n
EDUCATION MAJORS
The Department of Speech Language �
Auditory Pathology iSLAPi will be pro
viding the speech and hearing screening for
all students eligible for admission to the up
per division of teacher education on Monday
Jan 27. Tuesday. Jan 28. and Wednesda,
Jan 79 The department will be testing from
5 7 on an these days NO APPOINTMENT iS
NEEDED (first come basis; The SLAP
Department is located m Beik Annex on
Charles Street
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
WORKSHOP
A three part workshop offered to students
at NO COST by the University Counseling
Center Thursday. January 30, February 6 �
13 All three sessions will be conducted from
3 4pm. in 306 Wright Annex Assertiveness
Training can sharpen your interpersonal
ski'is and help you target personal goals
The workshop will focus on helping members
distinguish between ther assertive ag
gressive, and nonassert.ve behavcrs Par
fiopants can learn how to express
themselves directly and openly, and respond
to interpersonal setuations in manner which
neither compromeses individual beliefs nor
offends others PLEASE CALL COUNSE-
ING CENTER FOR REGISTRATION
1757 666 i)
PRE MED
Alpha Epsiion Delta will hold it's nex'
meeting on Tuesday Jan. 21 at 7 OOpm n
room 307 Flanagan Dr McLean from the
ECU Student HeaLTH Services will be
speaking on alcohol and drug abuse c-
terested students art welcome '0 attend
There wiii also be an important meeting for
an pledges at 6 30pm
FEDERALSUMMER JOBS
Opportunities for students r, a var,et
-aior, are avaao.t to. lumme l,�
fed-raiagenc.es Students should contact
Coop office, 313 Raw t0r information ana
appiicatns �
ECU LAW SOCIETY
The Law Society win be meeting Tuesdar
night jan 28 from 7 30 9 00 m room 31J
Menoehan Our guest speaker win oe Judge
Aycock Please m�ke pians to attend tr �
meeting We will also discuss our p,an� to-
the up coming semester it you need more r
formatm please contact Richard P-xid ��
758 3!5
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
The College Republicans �rtll mee' Tu.
la, ;an 21 In room 221. Menoenr.a '�-
meeting win oeg.n a' � 30pm but ai
ecutive board memoers ere reminde
there at 6 00 Anyone interested If
should af'end EVeryone s reminded '0 c
mg their birthday cards tor Pres o
Reagan
DO YOU GO DOWN
Attnetion scuba entrtutiatlt prapar!
yourseif tor 'he utmost m underwater ad�e-
ture Coming to the university nee'es' 1
the Cora! Reef Dive Club
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
�r.e-f w oe mandatory meetngs lot a
nterna'ionai students on wed ,r 22 �ic
Sat the 25 n room 201 Flanagan b,dg a' I V.
Refreshments win be served
PHI BETASIGMA
FRATERNITY, INC
We the brothers of X N J � hafe-
�oj'fl ,xe to my.te an those �?erejtKj yrxm
men to our spr ,ng smo�er on anuary 23 86
at a OOpm in the Cu'turai Center vv s mar
noose P- Bt'a Sigma " G O M A B
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
S19S Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks ai
additional cost. Pregnanc lest. Birth Control.
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling For
Further information, call 832-0535 (toll tree
number- 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5
p m weekdays General anesthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
r West Morgan St. Raleigh, N.C.
VETERANS
CLUB
MEETING
Come Out and Meet Us
Room 221 Mendenhall
7:30 p.m. Jan. 22
OVEDTCN&
Charmin
AH Varieties
11 oz bag
1.79
TOILET TISSUE
4 roll pkg
99
Lima 2 Pleas
Super Savings From Overton 9s
Prices Effective Tuesday, Jan. 21
Through Tuesday Jan. 28
oocococco
Regular or Diet
7-Up or RC Cola
2 Liter Bottle each
69
Limit 2 Please
Additional Drinks each 89C
PLAY & WIN
in Overtoil's Wheel of Fortune Game!
Three Names Are Drawn Each Week.
You Can Qualify to Spin The Wheel and
Win Cash or Grocery Prizes!
Complete Details in Store!
Richfood 2 Lowfat
MILK
1 2 gallon
89
Bianco or Lambrusco
Riunite Wine
$2.99 Value
750 ml bottle
1.99
Grade "A" Fresh White
Jumbo EGGS
Dozen
Star-Kist Oil or Water Packed
Chunk Light
TUNA
6Y2 oz can
79
Miller Lite
69
Donald Duck
Fresh
ORANGE JUICE
112 gallon carton each
99
6 pack
12 oz cans
2.39
Open 8 am - 8 pm
Monday through Saturday
Sundays 1 pm - 6 pm
Deli Specials
Baked Ham lb $2.79
Roast Beef lb $3.99
COPi
V
V
N
1 B
1 v
it
We Do Chic:
Coupon Redeem
Gree
Expr �
11





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Jan.22
LET TISSUE
99
2 Please
89
Donald Duck
Fresh
ORANGE JUICE
! 2 gallon carton each
99
lb $2.79
lb $3.99
I HI I ASIC AROl 1MAN
JANUARY 21, 1V86
Special Studies Program Helps Students
By BETH WHICKER
Auburn Nr�i Kdhor
The ECU Special Studies Pro-
gram prepares over 200 marginal
students each year to face the
academic challenges of higher
education.
The Program began in 1974
due to the need for remedial
development in liberal arts areas
for students who were only
According to William H.
Cobb, Associate Dean and direc-
tor of the Special Studies Pro-
gram, "The connection between
skills instruction and content area
is vital because the students
motivation to overcome their
disadvantage is dependent on the
reward of college level instruction
and credit toward graduation
The need to design a Special
by several ECU instructors who
were concerned that many
talented high school students
were by-passing post secondary
education and entering the job
market.
According to Cobb, the pro-
blem is especially acute in Etastern
North Carolina, an overwhelm-
ingly rural area of low average in-
come families.
Him K,iiian livj'iiu'ii. i w i v i. Muua i t ujiawi vti-
Health Column
enrolled in designated sections oi
the basic curriculum that have a
remedial development core.
These sections are smaller and
designed to fit in more individual
instruction.
Students in the program are en-
couraged to participate in all
campus activities ex.ept ity
athletics. At the end oi the
freshman year students are plac-
ed into the normal curriculum
marginally acceptable to ECU. Studies Program was recognized Special Studies students are
r�i"11wMMmmmmWith Mary Elesha-Adams
j B HUMBERT The East Carolinian
1 .In! �e�
( i Howu
h
ge In Command
had a transfer in command, it.
�nand from 1 (. Col. I'm Williams.
Each time I attend a loud con-
cert my ears ring for a couple of
days and my head feels stopped
up; what does this mean?
Too much noise for long
periods of time, or certain types
of noise for even short periods of
time, can lead to a hearing loss. If
your ears ring for several days
this could mean that you have an
irreversible hearing loss. Ex-
cessive noise is a leading cause of
hearing loss; disease, injury and
ace are other causes of hearing
loss.
Your hearing is important for
three reasons: learning, com-
munication, and safety. Much of
our information is gained from
listening. One of the most impor-
tant ways of getting along with
others is by spoken words, and
our personal safety is dependent
upon our ability to hear.
Moreover we get pleasure from
music, hobbies and sports that
depend on our ability to hear.
Some people are more sensitive
to noise than others; however,
everyone is affected by excessive
noise to some degree. Factors
that may increase the likelihood
of losing your hearing include
loudness, pitch, length of ex-
posure to noise, age, previous ear
trouble, distance from the source
of the noise, and the position of
the source (are you standing
directly in front of an amplifier
or to its side?)
How can I decrease my chance
of developing a hearing loss?
Have regular professional care
and hearing examinations. Wear
protective equipment such as ear
plugs or earmuffs when working
around machinery or if you plan
to go to a loud concert; more im-
portant, make sure the equip-
ment is in good shape. In case of
an accident or injury involving
the ear seek medical attention.
Take care of your hearing � it
can't be replaced.
Look What Surfaced
Blood Donors Needed Now
( ontinued From Page 1.
ours v1! servcie from
. e i imousine.
' 1 a.i: ; 1I to be known as a
lat no; only pro ides
exct . lemics bui good,
i feel the tur-
e ill prove
:on ect explains
When asl i u! the tear ol
IDS" impact u ticipation in
W n ne st ates.
feat ot MDS will
lower the amount of blood col-
lected, but I hope that ECU
students are smart enough to
know that you cannot get AIDS
from donating blood, and that a
pint of blood goes through
rigorous testing before it is given
to a patient
'Hopefully continues
Wynne, "the media has done a
good job enlightening students
about the shortage of blood.
Students are realizing that when
they need blood in an emergency.
it mav not be there
Tele fund Big Success
Continued from Page 1.
u d leadership, greatei en-
pat ion and
ihe 1) llenge
i allenge cap-
1 n and gave
pportunity to
.eness ol their
�aid i anier.
According to Lanier, "ECU is
one of the great universities of
the South. We think the success
of this year's telefund. our entire
advancement programs, and the
general feeling of involvement
and ownership being adopted by
students and alumni has created
this new sense of pride
The contest is open to in-
dividuals as well as student
organizations. Donor sign-up
sheets are available at all cashiers
in the Student Supply Store,
Wright Soda Shop and the
Croatan. All sheets must be turn-
ed in to the Biology Department
Office bv Monday, January 2
The blood drive will be held in
Mendenhail Student Center from
12:00 to 6:00 both days
CORRECTION
in Jan. 14 and U issue of
The East Carolinian, the
Quixote Travels
advertisement should have
read:
Bahamas Cruise March 9, 19S6
4 Days off Cruising in Bahamas
All Metis and Entertainment
on Ship
�PortUx
$356 per person
Free Delivery For $5.00 & Over Purchases
Tuesday
is
College Night
7 p.m11 p.m.
99C SUBS
Your Choice Of
Ham A: Cheese
Bologna A: Cheese
Ham. Salami, & Cheese
Pepperoni, Salami, cV C heese
Turkey & Cheese
Ham, Turkey, & Cheese
60 oz Draft $1.99
11 a.ml 1 p.m.
752-2183
215 E. 4th St.
INTRAMURAL DEADLINES
ECU ICE HOCKE
COPING WITH STRESS

SPRING 13 I? IE A K
'86
i
Bake m the sunshine aw stole in the noonngm at America's
hottest Deach There ill te concerts, games, parties, exhibitions,
sporting competitions ioads ot freeDies. golf tennis Ja AlaJ.
greyhound racing and great nightlife And weve got the Pest beadws
if Florida.
So pack your car. hop on a tour bus or catch a flight on Eastern.
, Delta or Piedmont AwSnes. And
JjJT travel agents ofter tree reservation
service So come to Spring ���
in Daytona Be, just tor
the tun ot tfi
fih
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issssss
� m
OFFICIAL POSTER OFFER For a 17" � 21 Daytona Beach poster
send Si 00 with your name and address to Daytona Beach Poster
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Coupon Redeemable at
Greenville locations only
Expiration Date 3 3 86
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ICOUPON-
Only $10.00
Deposit
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Wed Jan. 22 & Thurs Jan. 23
TIME: 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.
Low, Low Prices
MMHtUff tOMtS
� � Of ton ot C �matron Comment
0 � 40 0






'�

&t laat (HatvlMun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Li vender ��r
Jav Stone, ihn catum
Mike Ludwick, ��aw
Scott Cooper. v.� ek�
John Shannon, amm, caw
LORIN PASQUAL, Copt&tet
DeChanilf Johnson. v dww
Greg Winchester, a� Adrtnt
Anthony Martin, ��.��
John Peterson, oum.
Shannon Short, produce �
Debbie Stevens. c�
Januar 21. 1986
Opinion
Page 4
Black Americans
The Politics Of Protest
The appearance of Bishop Des-
mond Tutu at Duke University this
past Sunday was highly significant.
First, it was significant because
Bishop Tutu delivered his sermon
on the eve of the first celebration of
the new holiday honoring Martin
Luther King Jr Second, it was
significant because he delivered it at
a school that has, up until now,
refused to divest itself of the more
than $8 million worth of holdings
that it has in South Africa.
On the first point, it is important
to recognize the extent to which the
anti-apartheid protest that has
swept the nation is linked to the
politics of American blacks. Jesse
Jackson's campaign for the
presidency mobilized many
Americans, mostly black, who had
previously been reluctant to become
involved in politics. Jackson's
Rainbow Coalition added more
than two million new voters to the
registration roles in 1984 alone. The
Jackson campaign also mobilized a
strong black political leadership
that continues to work on a variety
of issues under the auspices of the
Rainbow Coalition and other
organizations.
Though the 1984 elections
frustrated Jackson's efforts by and
large, the black community was
politicized more intensely than it
had been in over twenty years.
Jackson won 61 Congressional
districts, finished either first or se-
cond in ten races and carried at
least 20 percent of the vote in six
others. Thus, it was in the face of
mounting black political involve-
ment that national policy makers
declared the new national holiday
honoring Dr. King. Just as impor-
tant, the Jackson campaign marked
the first time that foreign-policy
issues concerning the Third-World
and South Africa were given a real
hearing in a major election.
In large measure, therefore, it
was the electoral efforts of 1984
which gave rise to the anti-
apartheid protests of 1985. And
students have been in the vanguard
of these protests, primarily because
of the direct investments of univer-
sity funds in corporations operating
in South Africa.
The evolution of a new student
protest movement and a rein-
vigorated civil rights movement
raises the spector of a reawakening
of the passion and moral fervor of
the 1960's. Beyond that it could
sow the seeds that would resurrect a
genuine democratic populist move-
ment in the United States. Thus, it
should come as no surprise that
campus administrators have acted
to stifle campus protest.
At the University of California at
Berkeley, student protests have
been videotaped by campus police
(so that leaders can be singled out
for disciplinary action, it has been
alleged). At the University of
Miami campus police have required
students to "register" their names
before protests. Special disciplinary
codes to deal with "disruption" �
written in the late '60s and long
since abandoned � are being dug
out of mothballs. Even more
ominous, according to In These
Times, a Chicago newspaper, on
September 5 a State Department of-
ficial and representatives of the
South African Embassy and Mobil
Oil met with university lawyers over
the issue of "Divestment and Cam-
pus Disruption" and how to stop it.
When word of this meeting reached
students, it confirmed many suspi-
cions about corporate manipulation
of the universities.
But the administrative
crackdown seems to be backfiring.
For all of the jackboot stomping
and chain rattling, repression is on-
ly strengthening students' resolve.
And � as it did during the "60s � it
is raising the issue of democracy
within the university. Protests have
broken out on many campuses
across the nation, not directly in
relation to apartheid, but in
response to the university ad-
ministration's reaction to anti-
apartheid protests.
In the long run, administrative
repression may do almost as much
to reinvigorate the campus protest
movement as the victories of the
movement have done. Certainly
this proved to be true in the '60s as
the Berkeley Free Speech Move-
ment illustrates.
In a larger sense, perhaps black
Americans see the assualt on
students' rights as being not
unrelated to the Reagan Ad-
ministration's attack on civil rights
generally and particularly on those
of black citizens. That the Voting
Rights Act, Affirmative Action and
the ami- aparthied movement have
all come under seige is a testament
on the nature of our times.
Vet, protest and political
organizing have yielded significant
results even at a time when protest
and organizing are not in vogue.
Thus it is possible that by working
together more closely the student
protest movement and the civil
rights movement may help to bring
in a new era in American politics.
That is just as true now as it was in
the 1960s.
jjwgggggjggagijwMt1
j
Campus Forum
Letter From Republican Gets Heat
Mr. Hardin's letter to the East
Carolinian Campus Forum was an
insult to thinking Americans,
Republican and Democratic alike.
His pompous rhetoric served only to
broadcast the fact that he (a
freedom-striving individualist) lacks
any personal original thought.
Mr. Hardin began his letter with
the assertion that people should
know the facts before endorsing a
political party, and that was the las;
logical point he made.
The genus of Republican has a
variety of species, not all of which
necessarily conform to the standards
listed in the letter. Republicanism is a
political affiliation, not a religious or
moral philosophy. What is more.
Mr. Hardin's omniscience regarding
the personal vallies of every member
of both parties is remarkable il
somewhat inexplicable, as is his in-
timate knowledge of the minds' oi
America's founding fathers.
Some people might even question
the correlation between individualitv
and man's 'spiritual side but ve will
have to let that pass, as the members
of the College Republicans, with
their polo shirts, pennie loafers and
S20 raor-cut hairstyles doubtless are
the foremost authorities on that sub-
ject.
However, when he makes the state-
. ment that Reagan is doing all he can
to cut taxes, Mr. Hardin goes a bit
too far. In 1984 alone. President
Reagan voted for tax increases of
over S144 billion, much of them in
the area of income tax hikes. At the
same time, he voted to cut Medicare
by S13 billion through fiscal vear
1987.
Perhaps the President is merely af-
flicted by bouts of 'liberal' insanitv.
But let it not be said that the Presi-
dent would have the American peo-
ple's hard-earned dollars spent un-
wisely. He made sure to support
military aid to El Salvador and
Nicaragua, and opposed heartily a
bill that would have required prior
Congressional authorization to put
combat troops in those countries and
Honduras.
Mr. Reagan has demonstrated his
sagely wisdom time and again in the
area of environmental protection as
well. The man who as governor of
California once said, "If you've seen
one redwood (tree), you've seen them
all stayed true :o form as Presi-
dent.
While vetoing a bill for a program
of water resources research and
management, Mr. Reagan wisely
signed into law a bill declaring 1984
the "Golden anniversary year of the
duck stamp
This is the same president who ap-
pointed Anne Burford as head of the
Environmental Protection Agency, a
woman whose staff member Rita
Lavelle was tried for commuting per-
jury betore a Congressional hearing.
Mr. Reagan later appointed Mrs.
Burford as executive to the National
Advisory Committee on Oceans and
tmoshere, a group she eloquently
referred to as a "nothing burger
Mrs. Burford is no longer with that
body either.
Mr. Hardin goes on to remind
"substandard Leninist" liberals
that. "Besides taxes, there are
countless other controversies going
on now tor which the conservatives
have logical, morally-enhancing solu-
thai do not infringe on man's
freedom Well, thanks anyway, but
1 for one have no need to have my
moral solutions dictated to me by
conservatives or any other group.
Finally, Mr. Hardin asks the ques-
tions, "Do you believe all men
should be free1 Do you support
freedom movements the world over!
Do you view communism as one of
the greatest problems of our world?"
In answer to those questions, I do
believe all men should be free. But I
do not think "freedom movements"
such as the senseless slaughter by
professional mercenaries in
Nicaragua deserves anyone's sup-
port. Furthermore, I view worldwide
military aggression (and the expen-
diture of trillions upon trillions of
dollars worldwide for military hard-
ware) in a world where millions are
dying each year of starvation as one
of the greatest problems of our
world.
God Bless the world, and let there
be an end to war, ignorant prejudice
and hunger.
Richard Chenery
Sophomore, Philosophy
Conservative Criticized
Lance Hardin's Jan. 16 letter was
an embarrasment to Republicans and
it is fortunate that there are manv
conservatives who do not hold such
radical views. Hardin claims that
liberal Democrats infringe on an in-
dividual's rights, and support the
doctrine of Lenin. An adequate
knowledge of Leninism would show
that Lenin endorsed a total, complete
socialization of production. whi
true liberal would never do. The land
of the free offers people the op
tunny to pursue their own edu
career, etc vet some conservai
wish to prevent less privileged
students from having the chance to
gei a decent education by cutting stu-
dent loans. Of course, not all
Republicans would agree; the student
loan program began under the
Eisenhower administration. If
liberals stifle man's individualitv,
then whv is it that some conser-
vatives, such as Ronald Reagan and
Jesse Helms, wish to outlaw abor-
tion, an individual choice, and to in-
fringe on an individual freedom of
religion1 Once again, no: all conser-
vatives agree. Barry Goldwater has
sharply criticized the Reagan ad-
ministration's stand on abortion and
19 Republican Senators voted against
the completely ridiculous set
prayer amendment. Goldwater called
Jesse Helms' latest school prayer
proposal an embarrasment.
Next, there is the ta.x issue. Why do
liberals attempt to stop Reagan's tax
proposals? Simply because they
know that the ever increasing hideous
deficit is hanging over the
individual's head, threatening
wreck havoc on the economy. If Mr
Hardin would care to pay off the
deficit himself, fine, but there are
many people who realize that a tax
increase now would not even com-
pare to the problems ahead if the
deficit continues to grow. Two well
known conservatives, William F.
Buckley and David Stockman, have
admitted that taxes need to be raised.
Thus, it would seem that conser-
vatives are the ones who infringe on
individual rights.
Bern McCrady
Junior, Political Science
War Waged On Many Fronts
Students Fight Hunger
Bv DARRYL BROWN
WASHINGTON � When Bill
Hoogterp finally returned my call, he
was phoning from Philadelphia. I had
left a message at the student center of
Aquinas College in Grand Rapids,
Michigan. He checks in there most
days, now that he's always on the road.
He said he had just come from Boston,
Cleveland and Pittsburg, and still had
to make a stop in Buffalo before a sw-
ing down to Houston. And Hoogterp
has a lot more stops on his "U.S. tour"
before he graduates in May. Actually,
before April 19, the day of the Hunger
Clean-Up.
This gung-ho senior finished his
coursework for a degree in international
studies last semester and is now driving
around the country spreading the word
about a good idea for a good cause. It's
called the Hunger Clean-Up, begun last
year by Grand Rapids students who had
the novel thought of raising money for
hunger relief by a work-a-thon instead
of a walk-a-thon. Last April students
from all nine colleges in the city drumm-
ed up sponsors � corporate as well as
individual, which increased their earn-
ings substantially � for their work in
such chores as cleaning city parks, pain-
ting buildings and repairing houses.
About 350 students volunteered, and
they raised $10,000 in three hours. Half
the money stayed in Grand Rapids to
alleviate local hunger, but the rest went
for overseas famine relief via USA for
Africa, because "we were very impress-
ed with how they used the money In
addition to the fundraising, the clean-
up improved the town with free labor,
instilled a bit more pride in the com-
munity, and smoothed town-gown rela-
tions.
The Kellogg Co. was impressed
enough to give the students a sizeable
grant, which they've used to print how-
to information and spread the word to
other campuses. That's what
Hoogterp's road trip is for � to con-
vince other schools to take up the idea,
with local variations. So far more than
200 colleges in at least 25 states are plan-
ning a Hunger Clean-Up for April 19.
Response, Hoogterp says, "has been
terrific Those interested can contact:
The Hunger Clean-Up, Aquinas Col-
lege, Grand Rapids, MI 49506.
Hoogterp's project, though, is not
the only one organizing students on
hunger relief, or even the largest. That
honor goes to the National Student
Campaign Against Hunger, an effort of
those inimitable campus organizers, the
Public Interest Research Groups. The
student-run PIRGs have the closest
thing to the official project, too, in
cooperation with USA for Africa. With
the endorsement of Lionel Richie, the
campaign is called So Let's Start Giv-
ing. And students are.
The campaign (which works closely
with Hoogterp) has reached colleges in
all 50 states, at roughly one college out
of three. The emphasis is on education
as much as fundraising, on long-term
relief as well as short-term. Grant
money from USA for Africa will help
students who establish long-term pro-
jects to solve local hunger, not only
alleviate it. Some impressive efforts are
bringing in considerable sums. In New
Jersey, for instance, one Rutgers cam-
pus raised $17,000 through a rock con-
cert, a miss-a-meal day at which
thousands skipped lunch and gave the
money to famine relief, a Thanksgiving
student drive at grocery stores for food
contributions, and a student-staff food
warehouse.
Rob Stewart of the PIRG at New
Brunswick Rutgers campus says
students are working on projects that
will have enduring value. "We've pretty
much dedicated ourselves to the com-
munity and some things that are going
to have an effect long-term he says.
"People really got more excited about
working at home than for hunger in
Africa To that end they "use the
community's resources" to set up, for
instance, gardens in vacant lots with
donated seeds. Local groups give
whatever portion they choose to the na-
tional campaign that goes to USA for
Africa, which has a similar policy of
funding fanning and other long-term
development projects.
Enro
WASHINGTON, D
� The great enrollment
the '80s stalled some
year, new head count-
American student bo
Despite continued
the numbt - 24-year-
" who, i � irse, trac
have made up the bu.f
err illment! enrollmer
�� ; .
.
public sc
I dsi Aeek, an a
college registrai
- .
of the nation'
P- pula : �
-
contradict
ome regio-
plan dran a
� -
In November
Center f
predicted enrc
tively -
ear
And in De ce i
American Counc
reported the
iecreased
But the
be
number of
helped offset a a i
Prospec
EVANSTON, El
ing grads' jot
be quite as posil
reports p ;
testing of ��
ing plans indicates
The pre
moreover.
better job pre- :
had last yea:
market �
"I expeo
plus or minus one pc
pared to las: year observes j
tor Lindquist, supervisor I (
thwestern University's I
Report, the most rec I
three major survey
spects for gradu
And p r e v i o u s 1
engineering, cc p
chemistry grads are
a much harde-
than their counter? .
few years.
"Students are g
commit to a longer
and be satisfied u
choices Line . i-
In late Noveir j
Placement Council (CPC
jected firms will make tw
cent more job i
did last spring.
December Michigan State's nj
tional survey .
plan :ted a I 4 perc
in job offer- 8 .
The three surveys ask
panies throug
how many first eekel
they plan to hire fi
graduating clav-
Lindquisi says
less optimistic be a
firms three months afta the CPJ
did, and because it doe
pie government agen
like the CPC does.
"Our report is pretty
(John) Shingleton at W
(State) he notes.
Wednesvia
10C
i
�-





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 21. 1986
,
rets Heat
ratie C riticized
was
cans and
. are man
old such
. aims that
ring n an in-
the
luate
-
plete
n. which a
dc The land
e oppor-
tucation.
C(
K1
an
dent
duality,
; : ser-
d Reagan and
to outlaw abor-
?ice, and to
i dual's freeJ i
tai ser-
�c Barr Goldwatei nab
red the Reagan ad
rtion and
IOOI
Idwater called

use
2 10
� If Mr
are
a tax
�. e
h�er-
e�
unger
Aorks closely
�,ed colleges in
aghly one college out
e. The emphasis is on education
fundraising, on long-term
: well as short-term. Grant
m USA for Africa will help
ho establish long-term pro-
tl hunger, not only
ne impressive efforts are
lerable sums. In New
- instance, one Rutgers cam-
ed Si000 through a rock con-
i meal day at which
pped lunch and gave the
tamine relief, a Thanksgiving
e drive at grocery stores for food
lnbutions, and a student-staff food
jhouse.
Stewart of the P1RG at New
iswick Rutgers campus says
:nts are working on projects that
iave enduring value. "We've pretty
Ih dedicated ourselves to the com-
Litv and some thi ;js that are going
ave an effect long-term he says.
ple really got more excited about
nng at home than for hunger in
lea To that end they "use the
munity's resources" to set up, for
ice, gardens in vacant lots with
ited seeds. Local groups give
lever portion they choose to the na-
campaign that goes to USA for
ca, which has a similar policy of
ing farming and other long-term
klopment projects.
Enrollment Decline Stalled For College
WASHINGTON, DC (CPS)
� The great enrollment drop of
the '80s stalled somewhat this
year, new head counts of the
American student body indicate.
Despite continued shrinkage in
the number of 18-to-24-year-olds
� who, of course, traditionally
have made up the bulk of college
enrollments � enrollment on the
nation's campuses managed to
hold fairly steady last fall,
though not without significant
shifts of students from two-year
and private colleges to four-year
public schools.
Last week, an association of
college registrars released a
survey showing more than a third
of the nation's campuses suffered
population declines this year.
It was the latest in a series of
contradictory overviews of a
tumultuous year that has schools
in some regions prospering, while
other colleges close dorms and
plan dramatic tuition hikes to
cope with big enrollment drops.
In November, the National
Center for Education Statistics
predicted enrollment this year ef-
fectively would be the same as
last year's.
And in December, the
American Council on Education
reported the student population
decreased one percent this year.
But the drop was minimal only
because of small increases in the
number of freshmen, which
helped offset a worrisome 4.2
percent enrollment drop at junior
and community colleges, the
ACE found.
Administrators, moreover,
speculate the small nationwide
drop is just a temporary reprieve
from a long-term enrollment
decline extending into the next
decade.
It began with a 3.3 percent
decrease in 1980s and a 2.5 per-
cent drop a year later, they say.
Overall, 36 percent of the na-
tion's colleges lost at least five
percent of their full-time
freshmen, reports the American
Association of Collegiate
Registrars and Admissions Of-
ficers (AACRAO).
But thanks to five percent or
more increases in freshman
classes at 28 percent of all col-
leges, enrollment nationwide has
managed to remain steady, the
AACRAO's Bert Ackerman ex-
plains.
As the numbers suggest,
previously-insignificant
demographic shifts can make
campus populations bump up
and down wildly these days.
An unforeseen influx of part-
time students at public, two-year
institutions last year helped push
enrollment nationwide up one
percent, the College Board
found, but the influx hasn't hap-
pened this year.
In Tennessee, for example, a
whopping 34 percent drop in
freshmen at the state's communi-
ty colleges contributed to a 16
percent overall decrease in
freshmen enrollment at state col-
leges and universities for 1985-86.
Mississippi's Division of
Junior Colleges reports full-time
equivalent students dropped four
percent last fall, says spokesman
Bill Bunch.
Junior and community college
enrollment nationwide is, indeed,
"at a screeching halt Acker-
man observes.
Economic prosperity, ironical-
ly enough, seems to be the
culprit.
"We went through a period
when a lot of students said there
was no point in four years of
school, especially if they just
wanted to get a technical degree
and then work he says.
In Tennessee, officials also
blame an exodus from communi-
ty colleges on boom times.
"The increased availability of
jobs is playing a big role here
says Matte Campbell of the
state's Higher Education Com-
mission. "It's easier to get a job
now, so a lot of people are choos-
ing immediate work over
technical schooling
Freshman enrollment at Ten-
nessee's four technical colleges
dropped 25 percent last fall, but
Campbell hopes a slow increase
at four-year schools will make up
for the decrease.
California's new tuition
charges at community colleges
deter some prospective students
there, state officials say.
University of Montana of-
ficials also blame tuition for
pushing students away.
the school closed two of its 11
dorms this fall, when 2.4 percent
fewer students enrolled after out-
of-state tuition went up to $2,913
from $2,715.
West Georgia College also
soon may close near-empty
dorms as enrollment continues to
decline.
At Southern California, a tui-
tion increase spurred an enroll-
ment drop that, in turn, unex-
pectedly created a large deficit.
"The revenues were underrun
substantially, and the expenses
were not cut back fast enough
says Ross Clayton, dean of the
School of Public Administration.
The dean will solve it with
"recruiting and fundraising
Some schools, however, figure
the only way to make up for los-
ing students because of tuition
hikes is to raise tuition once
again.
Nebraska, Tennessee and Cal
State regents are among those
who have announced plans that
may include raising tuition rates
to recoup money lost because of
enrollment drops.
West Virginia University
regents recently warned state and
tuition revenue shortages may
provoke across-the-board pro-
gram slashes.
But as enrollment declines
drastically in various parts of the
country, other institutions are
still doing well.
Sunbelt states, including New
Mexico and Arizona, report ris-
ing enrollments, while the
University of Nevada System says
its head count has increased 9.9
percent in the last nine years.
The West's good fortune may
continue with its population
growth. The Census Bureau
reports California's population
grew another 11.4 percent last
year, while Arizona's 17.2 per-
cent growth is helping feed its
school systems.
But in shrinking Middle Atlan-
tic, Northeast, and some Midwest
states, administrators agree they
need to recruit "nontraditional"
� or older � students ag-
gressively-
Prospects Down For Spring Graduates
EVANSTON. IL (CPS) - Spr-
ing grads' job prospects may not
be quite as positive as previous
reports predicted, the latest
testing of American business' hir-
ing plans indicates
The previous reports,
moreover, suggested only slightly
better job prospects than students
had last year, when the job
market was at a nadir.
"I expect it to be flat, maybe
plus or minus one percent com-
pared to last year observes Vic-
tor Lindquist, supervisor of Nor-
thwestern University's Endicott
Report, the most recent of the
three major surveys on job pro-
spects for graduating seniors.
And previously "hot"
engineering, computer and
chemistry grads are going to have
a much harder time finding jobs
than their counterparts of the last
few years.
"Students are going to have to
commit to a longer job search
and be satisfied with fewer
choices Lindquist says.
In late November, the College
Placement Council (CPC) pro-
jected firms will make two per-
cent more job offers than they
did last spring, while in
December Michigan State's na-
tional survey of business hiring
plans predicted a 1.4 percent rise
in job offers for '86 grads.
The three surveys ask com-
panies throughout the country
how many first-time job seekers
they plan to hire from the next
graduating class.
Lindquist says his report was
less optimistic because it polled
firms three months after the CPC
did, and because it does not sam-
ple government agencies' plans
like the CPC does.
"Our report is pretty close to
(John) Shingleton's at Michigan
(State) he notes.
"All three surveys sample dif-
ferent populations explains
Rhea Nagle of the CPC.
For only the third time in 20
years, Lindquist's "population"
had a declining interest in hiring
engineering majors. There will be
six percent fewer job offers for
them this year, the report said.
The Endicott Report also
preducts a nine percent decrease
in offers 10 chemistry majors.
The other reports anticipated a
"slight" increase.
The Northwestern survey does
agree that computer majors will
suffer a five percent decrease in
employment opportunities.
Not all the new is gloomy,
however.
There is, Lindquist found, a
continuing employer interest in
business and marketing degrees.
And liberal arts grads have bet-
ter job prospects this year, the
Endicott Report found.
Firms planned to make 12 per-
cent more job offers to liberal
arts grads than they did last year,
Lindquist says.
Companies think liberal arts
majors are "more able to deal
with disparate thoughts and
ideas. Their thinking is more
holistic Lindquist says.
"We need people who can
translate computers into usable
terms explains Steve Bennett,
author of "Playing Hardball
with Soft Skills a soon-to-be-
realeased book about how liberal
arts majors can break into the job
market.
Lindquist says American
Telephone and Telegraph (AT'T)
recruits liberal arts majors as
managers because they perform
better than any other degree.
Lindquist also credits the move
by many liberal arts majors to
llll
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University Optometric Eye Clinic
DR. DENNIS O'NEAL
Comprehensive Eye Examinations
Contact Lenses
Soft, Hard, Gas Permeable Timed
Extended Wear, Contacts for Astigmatism
Glasses (One Day Service in Most CasesJ
Student & Faculty Discounts on Contacts &
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Convenient to Campus
Evening & Sat Appointments Available
!
612 E. 10th Street
(Across from campus security)
758-6600
& Psi Chi
Present
DRAFT NITE
Tuesday, January 21, 1986 9:00-1:00 a.m. $1.50 Guys
$1.00 Ladies
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Present
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Wednesday, January 22, 1986 9:00-1:00 a.m. $1.50 Guys
$1.00 Ladies
10 Draft All Nite
take a more diversified cur-
riculum, which often includes
computer, math and business
courses. "Kids are getting better
prepared for jobs
In preparing for the job
market, Lindquist recommends
seniors had "better hit the
ground running now, get a
resume together, know the
market. You are going to be com-
peting with all your classmates.
$ 1 .00 Off With Coupon
Wednesday, January 22
Upcoming Events
For The Week
Travel Committee presents
Pageant of Britain
Need A Student ID?
Making of Student IDs
Mendenhall Multi-Purpose Room
At The Underground:
Still and Max (Ventriloquist Act)
Thursday, Jan. 23 at 8:00 p.m.
Movie of The Week Thurs. Fri. & Sat.
COCOON 7:00 & 9:30p.m.
� � �
Wed Jan. 22
8:00p.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 22
2:30 p.m.
v
Next Week
CASINO NIGHT
Compliments of the Recreation Committee
Blackjack, craps, poker, bingo and lots more!
Mocktails and refreshments served
It all happens on Thurs. Jan. 28
In February
Special Concerts Committee
Preservation Hall Jazz Band
Appearing, Mon. Feb. 3
Tickets: Central Ticket Office
Mendenhall from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Don't Miss It � A must for Music Lovers
gathering place
REACHING OUT TO SERVE YOU
-� ' r
- .
-���-����;
'�'4MA





THE t MAROI INIAN
JANUARY 21, 1986
Educated Women Not Keeping Up With Jobs
(CPS) � Male students tend to
dominate classroom conversa-
tions even when the instructor is
female, a new Harvard study
says.
Previously, much education
research blamed women's
classroom reticence on discom-
fort with having male professors.
The report is the second in as
many weeks indicating colleges
aren't alwavs as hospitable to
women as they are to men.
Two weeks ago. Congress' Of-
fice of Technology Assessment
found college teachers often steer
women away from high-paying
science and engineering careers
with subtly-discouraging
classroom behavior.
In Search Of
In the new Harvard study,
Education professor Catherine
Krupnick videotaped Harvard
courses taught by 24 different in-
structors, and then calculated
how often � and how long �
male and female students par-
ticipated in classroom discus-
sions.
Krupnick, who conducts
workshops on other campuses,
says men dominate classroom
discussions at colleges around the
country.
While Krupnick notes men's
and women's grades and aptitude
test scores are about the same,
she says male dominance in the
classroom is important because
"liberal arts schools are set up to
imply participation
important
She adds the same problems
show up later in the workplace.
Krupnick began studying
classroom speaking habits to help
her figure out why women who
do as well as men in college don't
seem to be keeping up in their
careers 10 years after graduation.
Studies show that marriage and
childbearing are not the main
obstacles to career success, she
adds.
W'omen's career problems,
Krupnick now believes, are at
least partially related to both
their restraint in participating in
the classroom and instructors' ac-
ceptance of what they have to
is say.
"In the real world, the ability
to express ideas forcefully is im-
portant. It's highly correlated
with how well you do in your
career Krupnick asserts.
"It confirms our findings
says Bernice Sandier of the Pro-
ject on the Education and Status
of Women.
Sandier and colleague Roberta
Hall have released numerous
summary studies documenting
differences in the way men and
women go to � and are treated in
� college.
Female instructors themselves
often were raised in homes that
considered men's views as more
valuable, Sandier observes.
Their upbringing, she says,
may explain why women teachers
might allow men to dominate
class discussions.
"Many of the different expec-
tations for men and women are
carried over from the larger
social rituation into the college
classroom Hall says.
In another study, University of
California researchers Candice
West and Donald Zimmerman
found men interrupt classroom
conversations three times more
often than women. Also, women
wait twice as long to interrupt
However, they also found that
women are just as likely as men
to gain the floor when they do in
terrupt.
Previous research also in-
dicates women's classroom
language is not as "assertive" as
men's. But Krupnick's study dif-
fered.
Krupnick compares female
students' classroom problems to
the plight of immigrants being in-
troduced into the public school
system in New York City around
the turn of the century. "They
did not speak up as much in class
because of language barriers
' ilege experience can rein-
force old expectations, or can
help women to overcome them
Hall says.
Organization Looks For Students
B PATTI KEMMIS
suff W rtl�
Looking for a new wav to
become involved in campus ac-
tivities? If so, the ECU Student
Union is looking for you. Ap-
plications are now being accepted
for Student Union president,
vice-president and various
chairpersons.
The Student Union is the prin-
cipal programming organization
the University It organizes,
sponsors and promotes events
ranging from major concerts
(such as the Heart concert) to fine
arts and cultural-entertainment
programs, including weekly free
films, guest speakers and enter-
tainers and special events such as
"Barefoot on the Mall
The Union's Board of Dirtv
tors will be responsible tor selec-
ting the new staff. The voting
Board members consists of eight
students, two faculty members.
the director of the Department of
University Unions and the Vice
Chancellor for Student Lite.
To apply for the position of
president or vice president, a stu-
dent must have a minimum grade
point average of 2.5. Although it
is not required to have been in-
volved in the Student Union
previously, the Board of Direc-
tors is hoping to find a staff with
some experience in similar
organizations.
"What we're looking for is so-
meone with good organizational
and leadership skills remarked
Program Board Advisor Ken
Hammond, "also a strong
motivation to get a group mov-
ing
The Student Union is broken
down into 12 committees whose
number and responsibilities are
determined by the president.
lo become a chairperson of a
committee a canidate must be a
full-time student with a minimum
GPA of 2.25. The chairperson
then has the responsibility of
choosing committee members
who will fully represent the stu-
dent body.
Anyone interested in becoming
a member of the Student Union is
urged to stop by the office in
Mendenhall to fill out an applica-
tion. The Student Union
secretary, Kay Jones, will be ac-

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cepting applications tor president January 24 and for chairpersons
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Optn MonFri, 9 o.m. til 5:30 pi
East Carolina University's
Student Union
is taking applications for
Student Union President
Student Union Vice President
Deadline: January 24, 1986
&
Student Union
Committee Chairpersons
Deadline: rebruarv 5, 1986
for the 1986-87 Term
Any full time student can apply
Applications available al Mendenhall
Student Center's Information Desk
COPV'gnt '986
foqt' 5iv On
Ouanr.rv Bignrs �rse-�c
SO"e SO!C r� tn r
items and Prices
Effective thru Sat
Jan 25 1986
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Staff nir'

Well, it's aim
armchair quarterba �
living for sin �
preseason bey
XX
This year's pr
ment seems to be H
high. Will the awesorm
ly invulnerable '85r
make short work i I
Cinderella team the New
Patriots'1 1 �
answered this Sun:
NBC presenl
what will probab �
watched television ev
year
Here
bowl means one
PARTY riME!
Greenville is n I
dinars par I i
folK ��
Emerald C
a rare
amateur
har:
whei
par
C
area
spe.
bowi �
S
left
pub!
pen. .
Gree
PI Kaj
Playwr
The first P
North Carolina produ.
1986 will feature I a
Wood ' - V Mark
Memories.
explores the r
teries
boundaries
K
lives -
mother in a M
town, and I
a mysu
through tin
Lawrence Wood
Harlem and a
College and Me
College in Nasrn
Navs flight
Balboa H.
"1 wen:
because I " .
better docl
known. It wa
though V
was in
discovered h
create. "I :
Wood su :
the issue
Wrii � ays is
She Saw
Comet B
(UPI) � Ga; i
et ma be a once-in-a
thrill for mos b
81-year old N
woman who firsl
heavenly body in 1910,
was six.
"There are things tha
to you in your lifetime tl
never forget
Johnson of Winsl v em T
didn't know whether 1 would
get to see it again, but wh
realized that 1 was livii �
enough to lay mv eyes on it again.
1 was realh excited "
Johnson first saw the comet
from the wooden balconv oi her
brother-in-law's sign shop in
downtown Wmston-Salern
Johnson said she and her
sister, Pauline Styrow, were
taken by an older s'ster to see the
fiery comet.
"It was exciting in a was
so young I didn't reallv ki -
what it was all about, but .here
was lots of talk from my par.
and family � more talk
there is now Johnsor s c v






th Jobs
THfc EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
JANUARY 21, 1986
Page
esearch also in-
en's classroom
as assertive" as
Crupnick's study dif-
compares f male
assroom problems to
migrants being in-
le public school
01 k City around
e centur) "They
nuch in class
guage barriers "
c :an rein-
oi can
. me them
I nion
m President
ice President
t nion
k hairpersons
m
n apply
Mendenhall
Desk
Y FIXINS
DELI!
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thin CRUST
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ICHosaveV
A HOURS EVERYDAY
iviiie Blvd - Greenville
Where Will You Party Sunday?
Bv DAVID McGINNESS
Staff Writer
Well, it's almost here � what
armchair quarterbacks have been
living for since the NFL
preseason began � Super Bowl
XX
This year's pre-contest excite-
ment seems to be at an all-time
high. Will the awesome and near-
ly invulnerable '85 Chicago Bears
make short work of the wild-card
Cinderella team the New England
Patriots? That question will be
answered this Sunday, when
NBC presents its coverage of
what will probably be the most-
watched television event of the
year.
Here in Greenville, the Super-
bowl means one thing: IT'S
PARTY TIME' Now since
Greenville is not just your or-
dinary party tovn, it naturally
follows that residents of the
Emerald City wouldn't leae such
a rare and important eent to
amateurs. No, sir, the real die-
hard football fans here know that
when the party gets serious, the
party turns pro.
Consequently, many G'ville
area hot spots will be having
special parties to make Super-
bowl XX one to be remembered.
So that ECU students won't be
left out, the East Carolinian is
publishing a list of what's hap-
pening on Superbowl Sunday in
Greenville.
Phi Kappa Tau will sponsor a
party at the Attic starting at 4
p.m. It will cost one dollar at the
door, and will feature special
"Here in Green-
ville, the Super-
bowl means one
thing: IT'S PAR-
TY TIME
David
McGinness
prices on canned beer, a hot dog
happy hour for each score, free
popcorn, a kitty for predicting
the final score, and a halftime
raffle. Prizes for the raffle will
include an all-expense-paid trip
for two to Busch Gardens, with a
case of beer, gas money and
motel accomodations for two. In
addition, the Attic sports the
largest big-screen in eastern
North Carolina.
The Greenville Sheraton will
start its party at 4 p.m It will
cost one dollar at the door, where
party-goers' hands will be
stamped with the team of their
choice. Whenever a team scores
or sacks the opposing quarter-
back, people with that team's
stamp will be eligible to bus
50-cent shooters. Prices tor
drinks will be one dollar for beer
and Si .75 for high balls.
Munchies at the Sheraton will
be provided by a dinner buffet.
B� JON JOKICiS K! Phololib
k When the par-
ty gets serious, the
party turns pro
David
McGinness
The halftime activities will in-
clude a raffle with the following
prizes: a small Hot Point
refrigerator, dinner for two at
Leo's and Superbowl XX
T-shirts. Also, a pony keg will be
awarded to the group doing the
best "Super Bowl Shuffle and
there will be contests for the best
Jim McMahon iook-alike and the
best "refrigerette" look-alike.
Hooter's will hold a "Super-
bash starting at 3 p.m. Ad-
vance tickets are still available for
$10, but supplies are limited, so
hurry. For their S10, all par-
tygoers will receive a T-shirt. In
addition, Hooter's will feature a
big-league buffet, special happy-
hour drink prices and four
25-inch televisions.
At the Holiday Inn, festivities
begin at 1 p.m. A buffet will be in
progress while the game shows on
the big screen TV. and drink
prices will be discounted.
Darryl's will have two televi-
sions, beer specials and free pop-
corn.
Corrigan's will hold a party for
members and guests including
free sandwiches and chips plus
four televisions. The party will
begin around 3:00 p.m. and there
will be no cover charge.
The Sports Pad will present the
game on a wide-screen television
in stereo. They will be serving the
"world's best hot dog" (2 for
SI.25) and will give one week of
free pool to the person who most
accurately predicts the final
score. Doors open at 1 p.m. and
there will be no cover charge.
Playwright To Read One-Act Wednesday
The first Playwrights' Fund of
North Carolina production of
1986 will feature Lawrence A.
Wood's No Marks, Just
Memories, a one-act play which
explores the powers of love, the
mysteries of the mind, and the
boundaries of time. It is the story
of Kathryn Baker, a teacher who
lives with and cares for her ailing
mother in a 1940s rural, Southern
town, and falls in love with Jake,
a mysterious stranger, a traveler
through time from the 1980s.
Lawrence Wood, a native of
Harlem and a graduate of Hunter
College and Meharry Medical
College in Nashville, is a U.S.
Navy flight surgeon stationed at
Balboa Hopsital in San Diego.
"I went to medical schools
because I thought I could be a
better doctor than those I had
known. It wasn't as easy as I
thought Wood says. While he
was in medical school, Wood
discovered he also wanted to
create. "Doctors don't create
Wood submits. "They confuse
the issue with medication
Writing plays is not as easy as he
thought, either. Wood admits,
"but the joy of creating a
character is worth the effort
No Marks, Just Memories is
directed by Tracy Donohue, a
member ol the ECL Theater Arts
faculty. Tracy Mills, a freshman
in the ECL Theater Arts depart-
ment, plays Kathryn Baker, the
teacher who falls in love with
Jake, a mysterious stranger who
works on a nearby farm. Mrs.
Baker, Kathryn's mother and ad-
viser in matters of the heart, is
played by Teresa Brooks, a
B.F.A. student in the ECU pro-
fessional acting program. Jake,
the traveler in time from the
1980s, is played by Sidney Hor-
ton, a B.S. student in the Theater
Arts Department. There will be
two performances of No Marks,
Just Memories on Wednesday.
Both programs are free and open
to the public.
The Best Lunch Theater Ever
reading will be at noon at the
Greenville Museum of Art, 8th
and Evans Sts. The public is in-
vited to bring lunch, see the play
and talk with the playwright after
the performance. The Bes; Lunct
Theater Ever is co-sponsored b
The Playwright's Fund. Inc. and
the Greenville Museum of Art.
At 8 p.m at the Humber
House, 5th and Washington Sts
will be the Downtown,
Downstairs performance follow-
ed by an informal discussion with
the playwright and the audience
led bv Gay Wilentz. a specialist in
Afro-American literature and
Visiting Assistant Professor in
the ECU English Department.
The evening post-performance
discussion is sponsored by the
North c ai lina Human-
Committee.
The Playwright's Fund ol
North C aroiina. In, is in its fifth
season of producing : rfor-
mances of original one-act plays
from national submissions by
new and established writers.
PFNC is a non-profit organiza-
tion, partially funded by the
North Carolina Arts Council,
and the NEA membership is open
to all persons interested in new
works for the theater. For further
information, call the PFNC of-
fices at 758-3628.
British Isles Subject of Travel Film
The Kntertainer
The East Carolina University
Student Union Travel Committee
will present Ken Richter and one
of his ever-popular films,
Pageant of Britain, in Hendrix
Theatre as part of the 1985-1986
Travel-Adventure Film Series.
The film will be presented
She Saw Halley's
Comet Both Times
(UPI) � Gazing at Halley's com-
et may be a once-in-a-lifetime
thrill for most, but not for an
81-year old North Carolina
woman who First saw the fiery
heavenly body in 1910, when she
was six.
"There are things that happen
to you in your lifetime that you
never forget said Edna
Johnson of Winston-Salem. "I
didn't know whether I would ever
get to see it again, but when I
realized that I was living long
enough to lay my eyes on it again,
I was really excited
Johnson First saw the comet
from the wooden balcony of her
brother-in-law's sign shop in
downtown Winston-Salem.
Johnson said she and her twin
sister, Pauline Styrow, were
taken by an older sister to see the
fiery comet.
"It was exciting in a way. I was
so young I didn't really know
what it was all about, but there
was lots of talk from my parents
and family � more talk than
there is now Johnson said Sun-
day.
"Of course Winston was just a
small town then, and there were
fewer downtown lights. It was
real easy to pick out the comet
then, but now downtown
Winston is a difficult place to
watch anything in the sky she
said.
Last week, Johnson watched
the comet � "A bright star with
a streak of a little tail" � pierce
the sky again. She chose a clear
night and used binoculars to gaze
at the comet from her home in a
less populated area of the city.
"The tail didn't seem to be as
bright this time around. But I
could be wrong � it was so long
ago she said.
Johnson said she was "thrilled
to see" the fiery ball and was pro-
ud to be among the "very, very
few" who saw the comet twice.
But she said she has no desire to
see it a third time.
"I know I won't be around for
the next one in 2062. I don't want
to be that old she said.
Wednesday night at 8 p.m.
Ken Richter's film begins at the
white cliffs of Dover and tours
through all of England, Wales
and Scotland. The British Isles
bring to mind the land of our
forefathers, and Richter's film
explores almost every nook and
jranriviribreathJakirigfx
and captivating narration. From
the beautiful Dover coastline and
the bustle of London to the
quaint country towns of Wales
and the inspirational beauty of
the moors of Scotland, Ken
Richter introduces his audience
to more than the local scenery.
There's afternoon tea with a
young family in their country
garden, the pageantry of the
Royal Family at the Highland
games and the Queen's Proces-
sion to Parliament. Pageant of
Britain is at once spectacular and
interesting; it is a credit to the
film-making genius of Ken
Richter.
A Scene From The High Country
Scenes likes this one, in addition to Stonehenge, the Cliffs of Dover, London and many more British landmarks, await those
who take advantage of Wednesday's Travel Adventure Film, Pageant of Britain, by Ken Richter. Admission is free to ECU
students with activity cards.
U . C � i. -

�k.ffc.�fc 4 .
I





8
I HI l AM (. AROl 1NIAN
PERSONALS
KAPPA SIGMA: Welcome Back!1
There will be a Little Sister meeting
�oday at 5 30 Please try to be there
PHI SIGMA PI: Congratulations Psi
Pledge Class! We welcome our
newest brothers Steve Brock, Paul
Duncan, Belinda Foster Rene' Lee,
Karen Millar, Lois Petzold. Danielle
Prescott. Frank Rabey, Bert Smith,
Alana Tinkham, Mike Thurber,
Lewis Wamngton, and Belinda Jo
Williams.
PIKA SOCIAL HOUR: Will be held
at 'The Alley" from 9 to 1 pm Tues
day, Jan 21 Come on down and get
happy!
DEAR ALPHA DELTA PI'S: Ya'll
partied like Champs! Thanks a lot
and let's do it again soon The Kap
pa Sigs
BETA PSI: Welcome to the club
you have made it through and now it
is time to work for everyone Con
gratulations Sku
PHI KAPPA TAU LIL SISTERS
Thurs night 9 Box & Ox Be there,
9 00 There will be a surprise
waiting for you at the house
HAPPY HOUR: Relive Friday
afternoon Happy Hours this Friday
afternoon Jan 24th at the Phi Kappa
Tau house There will be entertain
ment and lots of fun for all who a
tend 36
PHI TAU LIL SISTERS: It you wish
to remain active this semester, dues
must be paid by the meeting Wed. at
5
STEPHKRISSY, DOE, JO,
THERESA ANG AND LORI: Had
so much fun this weekend, we were
whistling zippity do da out our
a holes
PANTANA BOB'S PRESENTS
"PITCHER NIGHT Wed Jan 22
Pantana s will have $2 Bud and
Busch pitchers all night long "Br
mgmg you Defter crew a1 reasonable
prices
DELTA ZETA. Congratulations to
our new officers President Dana
Koutras V P 's Anne Schrmtz and
Pam Bundy, Recording Sec Trisha
Gr'ften Corresponding Sec Liz
wooten, and Treasurer Kathy Wells.
HERB: You may be eligible to be a
memoer of the Veterans Ciub ana
not know it Meet us at Mendenhall,
Wed , Jan 22 at 7 30 p m in room
221
DO YOU GO DOWN?: Keep your
eyes on the personals for news on the
upcoming Scuba Club at East
Carolina
FACULTY, SENIORS, AND
GRADUATES: Portraits will be
taken Feb 3 13 Appointments can
be made beginning Jan 22 by com
ing by the Buccaneer Office and
signing up No appointments by
phone Undergraduate portraits will
be taken March 17 27.
AOTT'S
thanks
Thanks but no
AMANDA: Inspiration week is here!
Get psyched for the big "I Just
wanted to tell you what 6 great little
sis you are I love ya! iove. Your
Big Sis.
ALPHA DELTA PI: Let's bring in
the new year right. The Batch is
Brewing, the beer is flowing and at
midnight the corks will fly. See Ya
Soon. TKE's
MH�
OFF
Process & Print
with this coupon
From 110, 126, 35mm or
Disc Color Print Film.
19!3C per print
(reg. 29C)& 51.98 dcv.chg. (reg.J2.98)
Example: 24exp. film reg $9.94
NOW $4.73
Carolina East Mall
(North Entrance�Near Belk's)
756-6078
OPEN MONSAT.
8 AM lo 9 PM
I
Limn on� roll per coupon
Not valid wiih other offers
Expires 23M
I AM KY 21, lVHf,
WANTED
WANTED: Looking for one or two
persons, M or F, to share a house 2
blocks from campus Rent $130 a
month ' j or ' 4 utility. Remainder
of January's rent free Call David or
Jeff anytime at 752 9788
NEED FINANCIAL AID?: Scholar
ship Research Foundation can help!
We have over 4 billion dollars worth
of financial aid in our computer
banks $135 million dollars worth
went unused last year We have
financial aid sources for freshmen,
sophomores, athletes and also for
the student wishing to attend
graduate school. Our applicants
receive an average of from 15 to 20
sources for which they qualify. We
guarentee results! For free informa
tion write to us and please include
year in school Scholarship
Research Foundation, 829 Lyn
nhaven Parkway, Suite 114 118,
Virginia Beach, Va 23452.
LOST: Checkbook with blue cover.
if found call 758 8520 Reward of
fered
FREE BELGIUM SHEEPDOG:
Spaved, house broken, all shots, 9
months old, long, black hair
758 6147
SALE
MODELS NEEDED: For tennis
wear Must be size 8 10 If interested
call 752 3980 or come by Dean's
Photograhy downtown Located
across from the Courthouse
PART TIME PRODUCTION ASST
WANTED: For full service Adver
tismg Agency Sophomore in Broad
casting or related field. Transporta
tion necessary Send resume to Pro
duction Asst P.O Box 210, Green
ville, N C 27834
PERSON WANTED: For full or part
time sales work in men's store Must
be fashion conscious of men's wear
and enjoy working with the public
Experience preferred Good hourly
salary and ability to earn commis
sion. Apply at Brody's for Men The
Plaza, Mon Fri ,25pm
ROOMMATE WANTED
$88 month, share room across from
campus, prefer female, call 758 3369
Ask for Pam or Elizabeth
SAMOYED FOR STUD: With any
'arge Husky mix. I need a puppy or
nvo 830 1877
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female to
share apartment $118 per month
utilities Phone 757 0344
WANTED: Exotic dancer One night
only, pnce negotiable Call 758 7640.
Ask for Gene or Dave
WANTED: Girl to work, the door at
Grogs Accepting applications Wed
Jan 22 from 1 2
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
To share a 3 bedroom duplex $100 a
month ano '3 utilities. Corner 1st
and Meade St Call 752 0873
WORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
perience m typing resumes, theses,
technical documents, an term
papers We manage ano merge your
names and addresses nto merged
letters, labels, envelopes or roiodex
cards Our prices are extremely
reasonable and we always offer a 15
percent discount to ECU students S
& F Professional Computer Co
(back of Franklin's) 115 E. 5th St.
757 0472
MOBILE HOME FOR SALE:
Emerald Isle NC View of both ocean
and sound Across the street from
the Emerald isle Fishing Pier.
Water, ac, partial furnishing $750
or best offer and assume land lease
HOUSE FOR RENT: Near universi
ty. 305 E. 14th St 5 bedrooms, large
living room, dining room, den $460,
758 5299
MEDICAL DICTATION SERVICES
AVAILABLE: ,7� per line Call
746 3513 after 6 p.m. for pick ups.
SENIORS! SENIORS) SENIORS
Enjoy the last phase of your college
career employmentS8.F Com
puters is offering a package price to
help you send out your resumes in
eluding all of the following Letter
quality typed resumes, Mail merged
cover letters (name and address of
each company as inside mailing ad
dress on letter), Letter quality typed
envelopes with company address
and your return address on
envelope, Everything folded, stuffed
and even stamped, A listing of com
panies sent to (for your follow ups)
Just bring us your hand written
resume and cover letter and the
businesses you with to apply to and
we'll do the rest. Per resume for
your namesaddr. (we stuff) $2 30
(min 10 resumes) (we stuff and
stamp) $1 90 (2 page resume prices
slightly higher) This offer absolute
ly expires March 15, 1986 SiF Com
puter Company, 115 East Fifth St
Greenville, NC 27834 757 0472.
FOR SALE: Couch and 2 chairs
Good condition Light Brown. $90
Call 758 2477
FOR SALE: Montgomery Ward
Stereo with cassette, AM FM,
8 track and turntable. $50 Call
758 6196 after 6
FOR SALE: Ball Python, 20 high
aquarium and heatlamp. $110. Call
Riley 752 5543
APT. FOR RENT: Near campus 1
br . bath, kitchen $140 and $100
deposit Lease to August 752 2615
days
TYPING SERVICES: Resumes,
term papers, theses Low rates
Spelling and grammatical correc
tions included Cindy 757 0398 after
5 30 p m
Help Find Children
(UPI) � Television on a day-to-
day basis allows its audience to
escape into a never-never land of
devilish daytime and nighttime
soap operas, light-hearted adven-
tures and fairy-tale sunny subur-
ban families.
The medium gets down to the
despair and terror that can be real
life in a program such as NBC's
second edition of Missing: Have
You Seen This Person? to be
telecast Wednesday, 8-9 p.m.
Meredith Baxter Birney and
her husband, David Birney, host
the second show that NBC has
done on missing persons.
The emphasis is on missing
children � some runaways, some
abducted by their non-custodial
parents and some abducted by
strangers.
There also are missing adults,
although they do not strike the
same chord in all of us that
reverberates with pity.
Perhaps the most touching
story was the first one revealed,
because it has a happy ending.
Pascale Newbegin, 15, ran away
from her Oregon home, leaving
behind a note that made her
parents wonder where their com-
munications with their daughter
had gone wrong and where they
had failed to show her their love
The chapter ends with the tear
ful, huggy reunion of parents and
child. Pascale does not return to
live at home � the time for that
has passed � but she does visit
her parents now, and parents and
child appear to have established
please see MISSlNd, page 9
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc Call
758 6011 and leave a message
FOR RENT: 2 room apt for rent
Call 752 7212 or 756 0174.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom apt. 1'2
bath, living room and large kitchen
Cable and central air Near Pitt
Plaza Call 830 1769
FOR SALE: Pair of Cerwin Vega
Digital Series speakers Reg $200
will sell for $150 Never used Call
752 4480 Ask for Joey
FOR RENT: Extra nice 2 bedroom
apt near campus Water 8. sewer in
eluded $270 per month Call Keith
Warren 752 3850
MOVING MUST SELL: Loveseat
$75, leather chair $50, coffee table
$10 Call after 5 p.m 752 3875
SUMMER JOBS: Trinity Center,
new Episcopal Camp and Con
ference Center at Salter Path. N C
accepting applications for summer
jobs, lifeguards (WSi'Si. sailing .n
structor (WSI also), counselors. RN
and Arts & Crafts Director Apply
to Edward M Hodges, Jr Trinity
Summer Camp Director, 101 E 10th
St . Washington, N C 27889
Tar Landing Seafood
January Specials
All You Can Eat
$6
99
Any One Or Any Combination 1
Shrimp, ()slers, Troul.
Clam Strips. Deviled
Crabs, Flounder
Alaskan Crab Legs Or
Steamed Shrimp
Served With Fried Or Baked Potato, Cole Slaw,
Hushpuppies.
v
-f$
?
f
. v,i
c
105 Airport Road
Greenville, NC
Hj I M . r- -t iblC
Open Duly Sunday ihn rhunday 1 M 9PM
I rijji jnJ S�!urdv II A.M PM
Comedy
S(. Y

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gathering pace
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Hooker Memorial Christian Church
(DUciplea of Christ)
1111 Greenville Blvd 756-2275
000000000000004
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"In essentials. limit
In non-essentials. 'Oxi.tA
iitdotn
In all things. Jloon.
Special Classes For College udents
9:45 a.m. Christian Education (a jges)
11:00 a.m. Worship- Open Communion
Rv H Vann Knight
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Just Received From
New England
Shipment of
100 Wool
Overcoats
Also Very Good Selection
Of Trench Coats
El
COIN AND RING MAN
Corner of 4th and Evans Street Mall
Quality Name Brand Estate Coats
Doonesburv
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Missing ChiU
continued from pae 8
an endu
As ' em pi
not a news
documentarj 1
event prepared witl
families ai .
ficials.
The seco d
filed is Equilla H.v
8 years old wh I
from her home in the B N
York, last ug
Equilla ran do
and around the I
an ice arc m ti uck s t neva
returned and no one
happened to h
Watching the re :
like entering
Zone" � the girl round
ner, a truck dnes down
street, and when it is gone -
the little girl
Again like a scene !r 77u
Twilight Zone, Equilla's mo I
sits on her porch, watching thej
corner, waiting for her daug
'to reappear
Another case on Missing in-1
volves an adult. David Grangei f
35. of Holden. Mass . d eer.
on September 17, 1914. Granger
4s a Vietnam veteran who ma be
�uffering from post traumatic!
�tress disorder, and may be
reenacting a Vietnam experience.
While some of the Missing
Children probably were abducted
strangers, others were taken
a parent.
One such case involved a I
Florida man and his Mexican





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BY GARRY TRUDEAU
h SAB PQC XAAuERS
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were the secret rites of
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A SOUL-SEARING SCREAM
PIERCING THE STILL OF THE HKHT
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NASTYMOuTH
EVJERY ThursdaY!
Missing Children Subject Of Re-enactment
continued from page 8
an enduring relationship.
-s the show emphasizes, this is
a news program nor a
documentary. It is a recreation of
events, prepared with the help of
families and law enforcement of-
icials.
The second missing child pro-
riled is Equilla Hodrick, who was
- years old when she disappeared
!rom her home in the Bronx, New
York, last August. At 7 p.m
hquilla ran down her busy street
and around the corner, following
an ice cream truck. She never
returned and no one saw what
nappened to her.
Watching the re-enactment is
iike entering "The Twilight
Zone" � the girl rounds the cor-
ner, a truck drives down the
street, and when it is gone so is
the little girl.
Again like a scene from The
Twilight Zone, Equilla's mother
sits on her porch, watching the
corner, waiting for her daughter
to reappear.
Another case on Missing in-
volves an adult, David Granger,
35, of Holden, Mass last seen
on September 17, 1984. Granger
is a Vietnam veteran who may be
suffering from post traumatic i
stress disorder, and may be
reenacting a Vietnam experience.
While some of the Missing
children probably were abducted
by strangers, others were taken
by a parent.
One such case involved a'
Florida man and his Mexican
wife. The man, accompanied by
his stepfather, took the infant
daughter from the home while
imprisoning the mother in the
bathroom. Then the stepfather
evicted the mother from her
home, which he owned.
They did not count on the sup-
port she was able to muster from
her Anglo neighbors, who have
taken her in, found her jobs and
tried to help her find her child.
The program ends with a
rollcall of 20 missing youngsters,
some of whose baby picture?
have been "matured" by com-
puter to approximate what they
might look like today. Viewers
are asked to respond if they
recognize the children.
ors
Experience the field of commercial art
and GET PAID for it The East Carolinian
has one opening for an advertising
layoutpasteup artist.
Experience preferred but not necessary.
Caring essential. If interested, stop by 2nd
floor Publications Bldg. Mon-Fri 8-5.
The East Carolinian is an equal opportunity employer
MFVH.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 21, 1986
Folk Art Examined
A group of Pitt and Lenoir
County citizens met at the Grif-
ton Civic Center Wednesday
evening, January 15, with Dr.
Karen Baldwin of East Carolina
University in the first of a series
of workshops designed to teach
local citizens how to identify area
Folk Artists and how to record
information so others can learn
some of the traditional arts and
crafts.
The project is being funded by
a grant to the Town of Grifton by
the North Carolina Arts Council,
a State agency, with local support
from the Town and much
volunteer help. Any interested
person is welcome to participate,
not just Grifton residents, and
the hope is that the Folk Arts
Project will identify traditional
craftspersons from the entire
area. Others who would like to
participate may contact Grifton
liaison Mrs. Charlotte Betts at
524-5356.
As defined by Dr. Baldwin in
this first workshop, traditional or
folk artists and craftspersons are
those whose creative skills have
been learned from and passed on
to family and friends, rather than
through formal class training.
Dr. Baldwin discussed basic
techniques for locating, identify-
ing and recording the traditional
work of these folk artists, and
showed slides of typical Eastern
North Carolina folk skills. Ex-
amples are quilting, crocheting
with twine, basketmaking with
pine needles, wood carving and
turning, soapmaking and tradi-
tional cooking. Other types of
folk crafts might include making
nets, hunting knives and other
tools for farm and rural living.
Workshop participants shared
information about their own
traditions and those of family
members, neighbors and friends.
They will use these leads to seek
out and talk to resou.ee persons
in the area, perhaps tape-record
interviews and photograph in-
dividual works.
The aim is to collect informa-
tion about the folk cultural
heritage of the Pitt-Lenoir Coun-
ty area and to bring a wider ap-
preciation of folk culture to more
people. The recordings,
photographs and written descrip-
tions of local traditions will
become part of the collection of
the Grifton Historical Museum.
Some of the local folk tradi-
tionalists will be featured
demonstrators at the annual Grif-
ton Shad Festival on the April
12-13 weekend.
Another workshop is schedul-
ed at the Grifton Civic Center on
Wednesday, Jan. 29, at 7:30 p.m.
Dr. Baldwin is Associate Pro-
fessor of English and Director of
the East Carolina University
Folklore Archive. She has been
on the faculty at ECU for nine
years, teaching courses in
American folklore. She also
taught at Wayne University in
Detroit and at the University of
Massachusetts � Amherst. Dr.
Baldwin is a professional
folklorist with an M.A. in
Folklore and a Ph.D. in Folklore-
Folklife from the University of
Pennsylvania. As a George C.
Marshall Fellow, she also studied
northern European folklife at the
University of Copenhagen, Den-
mark, and did research at Den-
mark's National Folklife
Museum.
Dr. Baldwin's particular areo ,
of interest are in family folklore,
women's traditions, folklore and
education, folk narrative, folk
art and folk medicine. She has
read many professional papers
and published several articles in
these areas. She is a past presi-
dent of the North Carolina
Folklore Society and currently is
vice president.
Dr. Baldwin has given talks
and workshops dealing with
folklore in North Carolina for a
number of community based pro-
grams and organizations, in-
cluding the Appalachian
Women's Council, the Statesville
city schools, Wilkes County
schools, Lenoir County Arts
Council, the Hiddenite Arts
Center in Alexander County, the
Davidson County Historical
Museum, the N.C. Sea Grant
Marine Resources Center in
Manteo, and the Greenville city
schools. For the past five vears
she has worked with curriculum
development for folk arts as a
consultant to the N.C. State
Department of Public Instruc-
tion, Arts Education Division.
Dr. Baldwin will appear on
Carolina Today Friday, at 25
a.m. on WNCT-TV (Channel 9).
At The Underground
Ventriloquist Act
The off-beat ventriloquist act
of Still and Max is coming to the
campus of East Carolina Univer-
sity. Nominated Campus Enter-
tainers of the Year, Still and Max
have opened for comedy king
pins Bill Cosby and Bob Hope,
and they will have you rolling
with laughter in an act loaded
with uncontrollable wisecracks
and unexpected adlibs.
Still and Max will leisurely
stroll about the campus of East
Carolina University Thursday,
January 23, to give students a
taste of their unique style and
comedy before their live show at
Mendenhall's Underground at 8
p.m under the sponsorship of
the ECU Student Union Cof-
feehouse Committee. Admission
to this outrageous comedy act is a
paltry one dollar, and free
refreshments will be served. So.
come Underground for some
good laughs.
Own Your Own ECU Quilt
r U r V
-rriT r" r '
f w r r r
The students of Beaufort County Developmental Center are proud to
present their new "ECU" quilt for students and alumni. The quilt can be
viewed at University Book Exchange on Cotanche Street in Greenville.
The handmade quilt sells for $100.
Orders can be placed by filling out coupon below and mailing it to the
Beaufort County Developmental Center, 1534 W. 5th St Washington,
NC 27889. BCDC is a workshop for handicapped adults.
NAME
DATE:
Please make for me
ECU quilt(s) at $100 each plus 4 sales tax
MAILING ADDRESS
PHONE NUMBER
?Please enclose a $10.00 deposit on each quilt ordered.
Allow 4 weeks for delivery.
K JIJSLxjL
It's here, it's now. It's what East
Carolina is. The brothers of Pi Kappa Alpha
Fraternity are having their very first Little
Sister Rush. We cordially invite all East
Carolina University women to attend and
become members of the Alpha Class. Our
first class must be the best. Be at Grogs
tonight from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. and meet the
guys. Go Alpha and be first class.

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THE EAST CAROI INI AN
Sports
IANI AKV2I. IVW
Cage Id
Bucs Vs. UNC-W
Swimmers Dominate
By DAVID McGINNESS
The ECU Pirate swimmers
traveled to UNC-Wilmington last
Saturday and defeated their con-
ference rival Seahawks in style.
The final score for the men's
meet was 71-42, as ECU netted a
dominant six firsts in individual
events plus wins in both relays.
This included two wins by Pirate
veteran Bruce Brockschmidt.
"I was very pleased (with my
performance) Brockschmidt
said, "my times were good, and
as a team we swam well
The Bucs have been training in-
tensively in preparation for their
conference meet in Februarv, not
even taking the da off before
competition. In fact, they swam
both a morning and an afternoon
practice last Friday prior to going
to Wilmington.
"I was a little nerous going in-
to the meet (with UNC-W)
because we've been swimming
right through our meets and I've
been really tired in practice
Brockschmidt added. "But it
didn't seem to hurt me in the
meet, and it gies us confidence
when we can work this hard and
still compete well
The entire Pirate team was
confident apparently, as they
swam what coach Rick Kobe call-
ed. "The finest dual meet in
terms o total team performance
I've had in six vears ot
coaching
Kobe went on to say that if he-
had to pick a most valuable
swimmer for the Wilmington
meet, "it would have to be the
whole team
We're working the kids really
hard said Kobe. "We haven't
rested at all since C hristmas. We
even worked out twice iast Friday
and still won
The ECU womens' 34
domination of their
Seahawk opponents was �
more complete man thai
men. The took home wins in 10
ol II events, scoring han
twi.e as many points as the I (
W women.
Among the many excel It
formances put in bv the
Pirates, veteran Scotia M
nailed firsts in the 100 ant:
freestvle in addition to sway-
on the winning 400 fr
medley relav teams
Pousl grabbed two in :
wins in the 200 freestyle
backstroke, while also swii
on those same winning
teams
See I ANKERS, Paye 11
Rowsom Leads Seahawks
Over Short-Handed Bucs
VMfffn ctfrcH n
By SCOTT COOPER
Sport! Mum
A 25-point effort from Brian
Rowsom paced the UN
Wilmington Seahawks to their se-
cond conference victory and a
10-6 overall mark as they
defeated ECU 68-54 Saturday
night in Wilmington.
Rowsom, who connected on
seven of 14 field goals, scored 1 1
points from the charity stripe and
grabbed a game-high 1 1 re-
bounds. Bobby Jo Springer add-
ed 14 and Greg Bender chipped in
1.
The Seahawks came out of the
box quickly as they opened a 14-5
lead just five minutes into play.
UNC-W road on the shoulders ol
Rowsom (who had 11 first-half
points), who paced the Seahawks
to a 31-23 advantage at the inter-
mission.
In the second half, UNC-W
was once again ho: as they scored
the first four points to take a
commanding 35-23 advantage
they would never relinquish.
Despite the Pirates' 4.2 (second
half) field-goal 'hooting. ECU
could get no closer than 10 points
in the second half
Although the Seahawks only
connected on 39 per.en; of their
field goals, it was th� i 24 ol 30
Manuel Jones
successful free-throw attempts
that did the Bucs in, accoi
Pirate coach Charlie Harrison.
"1 felt iike we played well
defensively, we did what we had
Han But
free-throw sh
for the Pii
Ma
� I
S nioi
Van
Pirate i : . 4
were p
Ige d;d not
tn illness and Bass
�pcd jv he saw
H
ten Harrison was please
his freshm i
mance.
"1 thought Mai lei I
played well considering he had to
play 40 minutes Harrison -aid.
"I eon couldn't rui . we
: small
rid.
"We've goi to pick it up and
in from ere Hal I
tinued. "We're one game over
the midpoint ol the seasoi
we're tied with W ilmingtoi "
Howell Comments On
University Investigation
By TEM CHANDLER
Sporlj Wnirr
East Carolina University is
continuing its investigation of
former Pirate football coach Ed
Emory.
ECU Chancellor John Howell
commented that the NCAA had
requested that the university con-
duct an investigation. This
followed discovery by members
of the ECU athletic department
and lawyers from the attorney-
generals office, that possible ir-
regularities in the school's com-
pliance with NCAA regulations
had occurred.
Howell's statements were in a
written release from the universi-
ty on Thurs. Jan. 16.
Emory was fired for unknown
reasons on Dec. 10, 1984. He has
denied every charge, and David
B. Stevens, the university's at-
torney, said that the investigation
is broader than just allegations
involving Emory's former
players.
The chancellor, commented in
his statement, that his decision to
terminate Emory was not based
upon any belief that Emory had
violated NCAA regulations. He
said the information was found
while a defense to Emory's
lawsuit against ECU was being
prepared.
"This information was promp-
tly reported to me, and in accor-
dance with ECU's obligations, I
reported this information to the
NCAA on April 23, 1985 com-
mented Howell. "NCAA of-
ficials requested ECU to conduct
an investigation and forward a
report thereof to the NCAA for
such possible action as it might
deem appropriate
Howell also said in his state-
ment that a final report to the
NCAA of the results of the
university's investigation is now
being prepared.
Emory, who is now a volunteer
coach for the Memphis
Showboats of the United States
Football League, had a five-year
record of 26-29 at ECU.
Lady Bucs Pull Out Victory
By TIM CHANDLER
Spurts Wmrr
The Lady Pirates withstood a
furious second-half comeback to
post their third Colonial Athletic-
Association (CAA) victory Satur-
day night over UNC-Wilmington
in Miges Coliseum. The final
score was 83-67.
The win put the Pirates at 13-5
overall and 3-0 in the CAA. They
are tied with James Madison for
the lead in the conference.
The final margin was quite
deceiving in this contest.
Although the Lady Pirates edged
out their Lady Seahawk op-
ponents by 16 points, the loss of
one UNC-W player may have
spelled their victory.
It wasn't until UNC-
Wilmington's standout guard
Sissy Morse, who led UNC-W in
scoring with 21, fouled out with
4:23 left in the game that the
Pirates began to pull away. At
that time the score was 68-61, and
UNC-W was on a roll. They had
trimmed what had been the
Pirates' biggest lead of 62-42,
down to what it was when Morse
fouled out. With Morse out of
the game, ECU went on a 13-to-
four run that put the game out of
reach for Wilmington
UNC-Wilmington head coach
Marilyn Christoph commented
on the turning point in the game.
It was a tremendously big fac-
t r when Sissy fouled out
stated Christoph, "after that we
just seemed to lose our momen-
tum
In the first half of play, it look-
ed as if ECU would run away
with the game. The Pirates ran
off the first 10 points of the
game, that was enough for
Christoph, who signaled for a
timout at the 17:02 mark.
After the timeout, the Wilm-
ington offense settled down and
when Worda Carol scored to pull
UNC-W within five, 21-16, ECU
head coach Emily ManwariWg
called for a timeout.
The Pirates then went on an
11-2 run that helped pave the way
for their halftime lead of 44-30.
Alma Bethea, who started at
center for ECU, had a sensa-
tional first half scoring 14 of her
18 points, including a last-second
layup to end the half.
Coach Manwaring had plenty
of praise for Bethea's play. " If
anybody did the job tonight,
Alma did stated Manwaring, "
she did an excellent job defending
Elizabeth Bell
Bell came into the game
averaging over 13 points per
game, but she could only chip in
six Saturday night.
The Pirates shot 53.8 percent
from the floor for the game com-
pared to 50.9 percent to. UNC-
W. The Pirates also out rebound-
ed Wilmington 29-26 with Bethea
and Lisa Squirewell leading ECU
with seven rebounds apiece
Squirewell also led the Bucs in
scoring with 22 points. Sylvia
Bragg and Bethea were the only
other Pirates in double figures
with 19 and 18 respectively. Also
helping in scoring was Delphine
Mabry with seven, while dishing
out a team high six assists. R
ding out the Pirates' scorer- were
Loraine Foster with six, Monique
Pompili and Gretta O'V
four each, and Chris O'Connor.
who chipped in three
The Pirates now face tl -
� ght road games, all of which
are CAA contests. The January
contest against James
Madison will be for first place in
the conference.
The next home game for the
I ady Pirates will be Sat Feb. 1
at 7:30p.m. when the Pirates will
be playing host to American
University.
Colonial Athletic Association Standings
Men's Conf- �veral1 . Conf.
Men's
Navy
Richmond
George Mason
James Madison
East Carolina
UNC-Wilmington
American
William & Mary
W
5
4
2
2
2
2
1
0
L
0
0
2
2
3
3
4
4
W
13
13
8
4
7
10
7
3
L
3
1
8
14
8
6
8
10
Women's �ni' �veral1
s W L W L
James Madison 4 0 13 2
East Carolina 3 0 13 5
UNC-Wilmington 2 2 5 6
American 1 2 10 4
Richmond 1 2 3 10
George Mason 0 15 9
William & Mary 0 3 3 10
� results as of Thurs. Jan 16
J'MLeuTOeNS-Th.E.UC.r
Halt! Who Goes There?
Lady Pirate head coach EmiU Msnwarin. -i.
players during ECL's 83-67 4 JlSJc-W mstnictlons �� h�
- . � .
- -


Men
By RICK McCORMAt
The ECU men's track tearr
competed in the Eastman-K
Invitational in Johnson Cits I
over the weekend, w I
sophomore sprinter Lee McN
the only Pirate runner to mak
the finals.
McNeill, a sophomore from St
IRS Bal
By JEANNE I IK KOIH
Sl�" �1U'
Memorial Gym ba I I
beginning to tremble v.
ticipation as tl o
tramural basketball x i
the opening buzzer It ren
be seen whether or not la
all-campus met
Unknowns II will n i
final four. Fraternii �
Omega Psi Phi ai
strong squad and shou
again be in the running
residence hall champ
Warriors, blasted la
ponents enroute I
all-campus finish
Last year's top-lady
and all around
Umstead. who have
Tankers
Continued from pae 10
Freshman Susie V ei
had an outstanding
in the 200 brei
a new ECU varsil
2:31.2 in the process I
nothing new for this out
rookie though, the
broke was her ov
this season.
The other
at UNC-W were: Brenda H
(1000 freestyle). Ang
(50 freestyle), Par
(200 individual medlevi at
McPherson (200 butter'
"This was a good
me said Poust. who ha :
sistently been one of the
swimmers on the women's team
"I swam really fast, and LTN
is a very fast pool. This win is one
more step towards the coi
tournament, which is what we'i
really aiming for
The Pirates hit the water next
on Jan. 29 in Mil
Natatonum, when thev .
what is undoubtedlv their
strongest opponent. I l
Chapel Hill. Two days later EC I
will travel to Durham
against Duke University.
These two meets will occti
time when ECU will be tapering
(resting) in preparation for the
CAA conference meet, and c
Kobe feels that the timing c
have been better.
"We would rather not swim in
competition during the two weeks
of taper but the schedule was
made out last year, before we
knew we would be having a con-
ference tournament, so there's
nothing we can do about it. "
Kobe said. "Carolina is a ver
strong team and we just want to
swim well against them. Duke is
also a good team, but they are
well within our ability to defeat
As the season winds down to
its conslusion, the Pirate sw.m-
mers are looking ahead right now
to the conference meet in Wilm-
ington. Right now. the men see
their greatest potential threat as
James Madison University, while
the women expect to find the big-
gest challenge in Wiihan & Marv
"We've been looking at the
stats sheets from JMU and
William & Mary Kobe stated.
"They are both swimming very
well, and we'll need to be very
Du
FOI
Melody
Will Be Wi
SHEAI
Located on 14l
(Tina Furci' clieni





THE LAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 21, 1986
11

minate
N(
ks
ucs
.tU lo
Victory
JIMLEUTGENS Th),E,�Caro(n,ao
) Goes There?
Manwaring skoals instructions to her
nn mer UNC-W.
Men Run In Eastman- Kodak Invitational
By RICK McCORMAC
HI Sp.rn Isf onaatioa
The ECU men's track team
competed in the Eastman-Kodak
Invitational in Johnson City, TN,
,er the weekend, with
sophomore sprinter Lee McNeill
the only Pirate runner to make
he finals
5.
McNeill, a sophomore from St.
Pauls, finished in sixth place in
the 60-yard dash with a time of
6.28 seconds in the finals on
Saturday.
However in Friday's qualifying
heat, McNeill set a new school
record in the event with a time of
6.14 seconds.
While no other Pirate runners
were able to make the finals,
many were close. There were 53
teams competing in the meet, and
many of the ECU runners times
placed them in the top 10.
However, only the six fastest
qualified for the finals.
A good example of this is was
in the 60-yard high hurdles.
Pirate hurdler Craig White's time
of 7.33 seconds in the qualifying
heat was the fourth fastest, but
White had the misfortune of be-
ing in the same heal as the first
and third place finishers in the
event.
Walter Southerland also ran
well in the 60-yard high hurdles,
finishing 14th with a time of 7.48
seconds.
ECU also had three of the top
IRS Basketball Season Is Coming
B JKANNETTK ROTH
Memorial Gym backboards are
beginning to tremble with an-
ticipation as this year's in-
tramural basketball season awaits
the opening buzzer. It remains to
be seen whether or not last year's
all-campus men's champion
Unknowns 11 will make it into the
final four. Fraternity champions
Omega Psi Phi always post a
strong squad and should once
again be in the running. First year
residence hall champs, The Road
Warriors, blasted last year's op-
ponents enroute to a second place
all-campus finish.
Last year's top-lady netters
and all around 'jockettes' from
Umstead, who have captured
more than a netful of champion-
ships took last year's honors
followed by Thriller. Alpha Delta
Pi captured the sorority division
title and third place in the all-
campus finals.
This year's season begins Mon-
day, Jan. 27. Registration closes
today at 5:00 p.m. in room 204
Memorial Gym. Pick up your in-
formation packet and prepare
yourself for a season of exciting
court action.
Next on the Department o
Intramural-Recreational Services
action update is co-rec bowling
competition. No doubt. Frank
Lee will get his top pin topplers
together again this year to go for
their fourth-straight regular-
season bowling championship.
Powerhouse has become a dynas-
ty of sorts on the Mendenhall
bowling lanes. The deadline for
registration is Jan. 28 in room
204 Memorial Gym with play-
beginning February 3.
Racquetball doubles is also
tops in the line up with registra-
tion ending Thursday, January
23. Raymond Song (and partner)
will head up the rankings with
openings in both the second and
third poll positions.
Don't forget the Department
of Intramural-Recreational Ser-
vices drop-in aerobic fitness
classes. The last day for this ses-
sion of drop-in exercise is
January 23. The cost is .75 cents.
Meet your muscles in room 108
Memorial Gym at 4:00 and 5:15
for an hour of fitness. Registra-
tion for first session fitness
classes, including aquarobics is
January 20-24. All faculty, staff
and students are welcome.
Check into the Department of
Intramural-Recreational Services
informal recreation hours.
Memorial gymnasium, pool,
weight rooms, swimming pools
and equipment rooms are open
for your utilization throughout
the week (Free of charge) For
more information, call 757-6387
or drop by room 204 Memorial
Gym for details. They will assist
you with a variety of recreational
endeavors.
16 sprinters in the 60-yard dash,
with McNeill finishing sixth,
Henry Williams placing 15th, and
teammate Eugene McNeill 16th.
"This is the first time we've
ever competed in this meet and
come home without winning
something ECU track coach
Bill Carson said. "We just are
not in good shape yet. We were
running and winning � but our
times were just not good enough
to make the finals
This does not worry Carson
too much because schools with
indoor track facilities and schools
from warmer areas usually start
the year with faster times, but as
the weather gets better, the other
teams catch up.
"Our performance was
nothing to get upset about Car-
son said. "We ran well and we
ran hard but we just have't been
able to train due to the weather.
"All signs are positive he
continued. "All we need is some
good weather and about a month
to get in shape with both training
and racing. Our times were ac-
tually a little better this year than
they were at the same time last
year
Carson praised a number ot
runners for their work, including:
Lee and Eugene McNeill, Craig
White, Henry Williams, Walter
Southerland, Julian Anderson,
Ruben Pierce and Phil Estes.
The Pirates next meet will be
Jan. 24-25 at Blacksburg, VA in
the Bud Light Invitational.
Tankers Have Great Day Vs. UNC- W
Continued from page 10
Freshman Susie Wentink also
had an outstanding day, winning
n the 200 breastroke and setting
. new ECl varsity record of
2:31.2 in the process. That's
mg new for this outstanding
kie though, the record she
ke was her own. set earlier
� (.a son.
The other first-place finishers
N( W were: Brenda Horton
yle), Angela Winstead
le), Patricia Grand
. I medley) and Ellen
Mel butterfly).
was a good meet for
who has con-
ently bee I he strongest
swimmers on the women's team.
"1 sam reall) fast, and UNC-W
This win is one
trds the conference
. which is what we're
g for
es hit the water next
Jan. 29 in Minges
am. when they will face
undoubtedly their
gest opponent, UNC-
Hill. Two days later ECU
i travel to Durham to swim
tinst Duke University.
These two meets will occur at a
lie when ECU will be tapering
resting) in preparation for the
CAA conference meet, and coach
Kobe feels that the timing could
have been better.
"We would rather not swim in
competition during the two weeks
of taper, but the schedule was
made out last year, before we
knew we would be having a con-
ference tournament, so there's
nothing we can do about it,
Kobe said. "Carolina is a very-
strong team and we just want to
swim well against them. Duke is
also a good team, but they are
well within our ability to defeat
As the season winds down to
its conslusion, the Pirate swim-
mers are looking ahead right now
to the conference meet in Wilm-
ington. Right now, the men see
their greatest potential threat as
James Madison University, while
the women expect to find the big-
gest challenge in Willian & Mary.
"We've been looking at the
stats sheets from JMU and
William & Mary Kobe stated.
"They are both swimming very-
well, and we'll need to be very
fast to beat them, but we can do
it
The following are the men's
and women's results from the
UNC-Wilmington meet.
Men's
400 Medley Relay: ECl
3:39.5 (Brockschmidt, Hicks.
Hidalgo, Kaut)
1000 Free: Hosier (W) 9:49.4;
Brennan (EC) 9:54.6; Smith (EC)
9:56.0
200 free: Brockschmidt (EC)
1:45.1; Killeen (EC) 1:45.8; Roth
(W) 1:49.6
50 Free: Fleming (EC) 22.7;
Brown (EC) 22.8; Finlay (W)
24.1
200 IM: Hidalgo (EC) 2:01.07;
Schulz (W) 2:05.0; Robaczewski
(EC) 2:06.2
3-Meter Diving: Candler (W);
Pundock (W); Stevens (EC)
200 Fly: Hosier (W) 1:57.0;
Nells (EC) 2:07.2; Hawkins (EC)
2:09.4
100 Free: Kaut (EC) 48.1;
Brown (EC) 49.7; Roth (W) 50.9
200 Back: Brockschmidt (EC)
158.8; Hall (W) 2:02.8; Hawley
(W) 2:05.9
500 Free: Hosier (W) 4:45.5;
Killeen (EC) 4:45.7; Brennan
(EC) 4:49.1
1 Meter Diving: Pundock (W);
Candler (W); Durkin (EC)
200 Breast: Hicks (EC) 2:14.6;
Smith (EC) 2:17.3; Fleming (EC)
2:20.4
400 Free Relay: ECU 3:16.2
(Hidalgo, Killeen, Brown, Kaut)
Overall scores: ECU 71; UNC-
W 42
Women's
400 Medley Relay: ECU 4:15.1
(Poust, Ennis, Pierson, Miller)
1000 Free: Horton (EC)
10:54.3; Flaharty (W) 11:19.3;
Gorenfio (EC) 11:34.5
200 Free: Miller (EC) 1:59.9;
Ludwig (EC) 2:04.6; Halstead
(EC) 2:05.2
50 Free: Winstead (EC) 25.6;
Pierson (EC) 2fr.2; Kramer (W)
26.7
200 IM: Grand (EC) 2:21.7;
Brown (W) 2:22.4; Augustus
(EC) time unavailable.
1 Meter: Campbell (EC); 2nd '
M
JAZZ
THE AUDIENCE IS DEVASTATING
Monday, February 3, 1986
Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall Student Center
Admission: ECU Students, $3.50
ECU Faculty and Staff, $7.50
Public and at door, $9.00
Tickets at Central Ticket Office
757-6611, ext. 266
.4 Student Lnion
Special Concerts Committee Presentation
Due to the Fire at
FOR HEADS ONLY
Melody Furci and Beth Long
Will Be Working with the Fine Staff of
SHEAR HAIR DESIGN
Located on 14th St. next to Sammy's Country Cooking.
752-9706
(Tina furci's clients may contact � � Beth for more information)
3rd unavailable.
200 Fly: McPherson (EC)
2:21.0; Wilson (EC) 2:21.2; Bur-
ton (EC) 2:20.5
100 Free: Miller (EC) 56.9;
Augustus (EC) 57.3; Gorenfio
(EC) 58.9
100 Back: Poust (EC) 2:12.6;
Brown (W) 2:22.1; 3rd
unavailable.
800 Free: Flaharty (W) 5:30.3:
Ludwig (EC) 5:31.2; Halstead
(EC) time unavailable.
3 Meter Diving: Campbell
(EC); others unavailable.
200 Breast: Wentink (EC)
2:31.1.
IpojililijillJO
m
I
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p
1
I
I
1
m
I
m
m
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 21, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 21, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.449
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
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