The East Carolinian, January 16, 1986






�ltt
(Earoltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No.aO Thursday, January 16, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
ECU Buys Warehouse,
Expanding Land Area
Sow It's ECU'S
JIWLEUTGENS- The E�s' C�rolmin
Over thehrisimas break K I purchased the New Carolina Warehouse on Charles Street behind
Minges. I he purchase completes the tract of land in that area. See related story on page 1 for further
details.
ECU Profess
On Library b
(
Outspoken
Censorship
B HAROI DJOYNER
N4.ff Wrllrf
In an effort to expand campus
grounds, ECU officials recently
announced that the purchase of a
tabacco warehouse that was
made over Christmas break and a
proposal to make an official en-
trance to the campus are still in
the planning Mages.
More than two a. res were
recently added to EC I 's existing
411-acre campus through the
estimated $250,000 purchase of
the New Carolina w arehouse and
property located on Charles
Boulevard.
Nevertheless, no official plans
have been made tor the 79,680
square-foot warehouse, said
CO- Moore, vice chancellor tor
business affair. m e
possibilities, such a- housing
equipment or h itl letic
events. have been suggested for
uses oi the building.
The University owns land on
three sides oi the building, and
Howell said in a recent interview
that "The University needs to be
interested in acquiring any pro-
perty that becomes available
when it borders on University
property.
ECU was offered the property
where Ringgold Towers now
stands but turned down the otter
because of lack of funds. Howell
said.
tI VfHv Bureau
� the nation's i
tivc . . ai d outspoken
' � I aniet cl til a:
lumei . ban les on
1 � mendn n
I aniet. pn c i ol library
and information studies a; I (. I .
neads the North Carolina I ibrary
Association's Intellectual
i reedom n n ittee and the
V Vssociation's
Intellectual Freed n Round
I it He ften summoned to
expei' -� tness, the voice
for First Ami em rights, the
ntidani I a panicky
rai in beei ordered to
pull a c ��-�� al book off the
she
He's also beeti the target ol
se whom he describes as
"radical right-wingers" who at-
1 anier
tempt to censor library and
school textbooks, the "self-styled
arbiters of public morals
"I'm a First Amendment
purist I.anier says with pride.
"I am a fool for these words, for
the concept. To me. the words of
the First Amendment are ab-
solute . . .no law. . .abridging
the freedom of speech, or of the
press.
"It doesn't say that there will
be freedom of expression provid-
ed said expressions do not run
contrary to popular thought, or
that said expressions have no
tendency to subvert standing in-
stitutions
A First Amendment champion
because of his interest in
��� Ml �����
The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds12
Editorials4
Features8
Sports� 1
In all things, success
depends on previous prepara-
tion, and without such
preparation there is sure to be
failure.
-Confucius
libraries. Lamer has often found
himself allied with elements some
might consider unsavory. "I am
not comfortable with many of the
excesses that take place in the
ne of the Firs; Amendment
he admits.
The anti-censorship fight docs
ike for some strange
bedfellows � librarians find
themselves lined up with blatant
pornographers in lobbying
against such anti-obscentity
measures as the law passed b the
North Carolina General
Assembly last fall. This legisla-
tion was passed in disregard ol
the report of the assembly's own
study Commission on Obscenity
Laws, according to Lamer, who
served on the commission.
"Now the censors are primari-
ly after the video dealers, the
adult bookstores, the motion pic-
ture theaters said Lanier. "But
when they've finished with them,
they may turn they threats to the
libraries and the classrooms.
Where will they draw the line?"
It is this singleminded devotion
to the public's "right to read"
that has sent Lanier on more than
100 speaking engagements, to
legislative hearings on proposed
laws on obscenity and library
user privacy. Hardly a week goes
by that he doesn't get a call from
a librarian needing advice on
dealing with censorship threats.
During 1985, these calls came
from all over the state and
elsewhere, from as far away as
New York, California, Min-
nesota and Florida.
Lanier displays a framed copy
of the American Library Associa-
tion's Library Bill of Rights over
his desk in ECU's Joyner
Library. On another wall hangs
some of the awards he's been
given in recognition of his strug-
gle against library censorship,
among them the American
Library Association's 1984 John
Immroth Memorial Award for
Intellectual Freedom. Receiving
the Playboy Foundation's 1982
Hugh M. Hefner First Amend-
ment Award in Education
brought Lanier widespread
recognition � and a charge by a
former state legislator that
Lanier's views of obscenity
should be discounted since he had
accepted the honor from a
"known pornographer
Lanier's postwar experience as
a counterintelligence special
agent in Western Europe brought
him into contact with Germans
who had lived through the "book
burnings" of the Nazi regime. "I
began to realize how easy it is for
our basic right to be taken
away he recalled. "This is par-
ticularly true in a place where
freedom is taken for granted.
"Some of our basic freedoms
are being eroded now by persons
who are screaming louder than
we are and who are dictating the
reading, viewing and listening
habits of our ctiens
Censorship attempts in schools
and libraries are increasing rapid-
Lamier said. Nationwide, there
were one-third more documented
vases in 1985 than the number
reported in 1984. Targets of
book-ban cases are numerous
and varied � new fiction by
novelists Judy Blume and
Howard Fast and literary classics
Romeo and Juliet, Huckleberry
Finn and Brave iew World, even
such popular children's stones as
"Little Red Riding Hood" and
"The Emperor's New Clothes
J. D. Salinger's Catcher in the
Rye is a perennial target for
school library purges. Reference
works are not exempt either;
Lanier knows of cases involving
two current dictionaries and the
See PROFESSOR Page 3.
Howell
The monev used to buy the
warehouse was approved bv the
ECL Board o! Governors
ECU has asked the citj ol
'he recent purchase completes the Greenville to sell the old "swim-
tract of land. Chancellor John ming pool" parking lot, located
at East Fifth Street and Readc
Circle. Drawings and plans of the
area were presented to Greenville
City Council members at a recent
meeting. In a letter by Howell
stated that ECU wanted to buv
the property at a "fair market
value "
EC U plans to make the � tu-
rning pool" lot an "official
trance" to ECU through the use
of landscaping and a sigr.
The property was thev fthe
old municipal swimming ;
and is now being used as a leased
city parking lot. Even thougl
of the 26 parking spa.es arc leas-
ed by the city. Council members
were hesitant in selling the
few remaining parking ts in
Greenville
ccord ' b ' 1984 figure
campus is valued at i
S2.9 million, with the replace-
ment value of the buildings set at
more than $196.36 milli n
Ot the 246 77 acres f land tl at
make up the van.pas. 2; 23 acre
are covered by. b i Id ngs and i
acres are covered by rr' 5
There are 5.2. miles � : streets and
12 miles I lew ill rding
the renort.
Hearing Program Unique
B C ROl SS DKIsWOI I
Viff Wntr�
"The Program tor Heai i a
Impaired Students is here to pro-
vide support services, not
academic services to students at
ECU explains Tony Schreiber,
director of the program.
Those who benefit from these
services have disabilities ranging
from a need for greater volume to
complete deafness
The program began nine years
ago when James M. Dickson, a
trustee for the university, wanted
his hearing-impaired daughter to
attend ECU. However, in 1977
there were no services to support
students with these conditions.
At Dickson's suggestion, the pro-
gram came into existence and has
since expanded
Its services are listed in several
rials for prospective students
looking for colleges with pro-
grams for the hearing impaired.
ECU's program offers five
academic support services: inter-
preting (in sign language and
orally), tutoring, notetaking in
class and counseling and ad-
vocacy. "Educational support
for the faculty says Schreiber,
"is for those teachers with
hearing-impaired students in
their classes. . .to help them fit
the student in
Sign language training and
amplification systems are the two
technical services students may
take advantage at ECU. For
�hose who are "more hard
hearing than deaf accord g I
Schreiber, the program provides
teacher-student a m p f
devices in which the teachei
wears a small microphone
lapel.
As far as social activities, .ap-
tioned movies are frequei
shown for students. Re.e:
students took in Superman,
Absence of Malice, Stripes and
Airplane.
In addition to those provided
by the programs, the university
offers a decoder on a television in
Mendenhall for closed-captioned
programs, amplifiers foi dorm-
See HEARING Pane 3.
Health Services Gets New X-Ray Unit
BETH WHICKER
stiff Wnitf
The Student Health Services'
purchase of a new X-ray unit has
substantially decreased the cost
of getting X-rays for students.
"Before the X-ray unit was
purchased, students were referred
to private physicians, and that is
very expensive said James Mc-
Callum, director of ECU's Stu-
dent Health Services.
"Students have come in for ex-
aminations and have been told
that they needed X-rays. Some of
these same students didn't have
the money or the insurance to
cover the cost of the X-ray at a
doctor's office or the hospital
said Kay Van Nortwick, ad-
ministrative manager of ECU's
Student Health Services.
"The new machine will supply
a need to the students where in
the past there has been no
availabilitymainly because of
the service's costliness, said Mc-
Callum.
According to Van Nortwick,
the cost of an X-ray at the Stu-
dent Health Services will be
about one-third the cost of get-
ting an X-ray at a private physi-
cian's office.
"Insurance through the Stu-
dent Health Services pays for the
entire cost of the X-rays perform-
ed at the Student Health
Services said Van Nortwick.
The Student Health Services
has been in the process of pur-
chasing the new X-ray unit since
April, 1985. The process was
lengthy because the health center
had to deal with state agencies
and, moreover, adhere to their
regulations.
The Student Health Services
purchased the unit with Student
Health fees, which are the sole
source of funding for the Student
Health Services.
"We have studied getting the
X-ray unit for 10 years. It was a
slow process because the Student
Health Services spends money on
services that are demanded
most Van Nortwick said.
"We see approximatly 300
students a day. yet only about 25
patients a week need X-rays
she added.
The new unit, able to X-ray the
extremities and chest areas, will
become most helpful during the
flu season, noted Student Health
Services administrators.
However, the new machine is not
equipped to perform internal
X-rays such as gastrointestinals.
Once an X-ray is taken, it will
be sent to a radiologist who will
read and interpret the X-ray The
fee charged for this service will
pay for the supplies used during
the procedure and will also pay
the radiologist's expenses
New X-Ray Unit
JIMLEUTGENS ThtElslCtrolmim
The Student Health Services recently purchased an x-ray machine. By purchasing the new unit, the
Student Health Services was able to cut the students' cost of x-rays by one-third. See related story on
page 1 for more information.
� �- - � �-
� � - � �.
�-





I HI t s
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Announcements
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NEW POLICY
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CIRCLE K
ECU SURF CLUB
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
EC!
!ATE CLUB
PS! CHI
NEWMAN CENTER
SCRIPTURE STUDY
GRADUATE STUDENTS
MARTIN LUTHER KING
AWARDS CELEBRATION
� v-i � ng Awards
.ene on Monday Jan
' " � '� Vlendenhan Student Center
Special piattorrr, gues' will include D'
rtspe' Bpj si� Mayoi Ead.e Carter
Aus i . , oert �� e award
� East Carolina Gospel Cnoir The
� � : �' ' ��- IS i- " c m Ana a rei ention
�� neid n the Multipurpose BuiiO'g FT
� �� Nvirtc the ere nonv
PPHA
' � lessional Meant- ah,ante �v-n have
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We lenha All membi i v ested
. -v rj raged 1 �"�
MARTIN L. KING SPEAKS
� I I trie world's qreates'
arid v ' grits � a �� i .e via
� ' � � A' J � Itura

� � � rd to

HONORS PROGRAM
its Program fa
� � � sal lo the
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Progran . � . � �
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GRADUATE MANAGEMENT
ADMISSION TEST (GMAT)
Itl V � ,� � - �� vs t'S
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LAW SCHOOL
ADMISSION TEST (LSAT)
rest be ol
it. F el � �
ire to Oi pieted med
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NATIONAL TEACHER
EXAMINATIONS
CORE BATTERY EXAMS
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tea a ���
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SKI SNOW SHOE SPRING
BREAK
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A SI - V - - �'�.���� � � .
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Now is the time to start getting your body
ready for bathing suit weather.
Bring this coupon in for $5.00 off a
month's membership.
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417 Evans St. Mall
. Downtown
Coupon Expires 1-31-86
757-1608
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Come feel �
� THE .
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Either way, you'll come to
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For lunch, dinner
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Visit us soon in The Plaza
die's �
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from 11 30 a m
� RANT & I
The Plaza
Greenville Blvd �
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PSI CH!
Don I tot gi" la i ome I �� i
Jan 21st' Come nelp suppor
Tues
lUI s�Jl -�
NEEDCASH
The Deparrren' ol I n 1 I n
Recreat.ona Serv es s iO�t I . '
anyone ;nterestea in j i
positions For more information t ontact j R
a1 S t 6387 fclthou )l � I � . "
�I r enl worn .j desired A . � . � j.
m- invest gated and a in eo ime n�
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plication BasKetbaii officials w a
hired for this years leaooe Conta I . etl
Gmn 171.? is5n i The first be rie
Jan 20 h' 9 00 p m m Rm 102 Me"
Gym
LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS
OFGREENVILLE
� � i : � ivited 1 nity
'orun- ed by the � ee � � I l
County League of Women Voters on tl
oosec ma � � i jes n the � � � �
Cooe � � itiwi � the '�pe of �.
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at large' systi
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Pati a Duni � � �
ECU POETRY FORUM
ECU foe1 Forum w meet �
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ALL Y
FRE
A





THE EAST CAROUNAN
JANUARY 16, 1986
AVUNWWXXW
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n A Bun'
p. St.
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inville Blvd � Greenville
Fossilized Neck Bones Of Whale Found
MOREHEAD CITY (UPI) -
Scientists say a fossilized neck
bone found recently near
Morehead City belonged to a
50-foot whale that roamed the
ocean more than 10,000 years ago
when the shoreline ran near what
is now Goldsboro.
"You find whale parts all the
time - ribs and jawbones said
Frank Schwartz, a professor at
the University of North
Carolina's Institute of Marine
Science in Morehead City. "But
you very seldom find neck
bones, especially this near the
skull. This was the first bone
behind the skull
The V-shaped, slate-gray bone
is more than 2 feet long, 10 inches
across and 18 inches tall. It was
found around Christmas by
Ernest Willis in a creek bed near
Newport, Schwartz said.
The bone belonged either to a
sperm whale, a humpback whale,
a sea whale or a right whale that
lived in the Atlantic Ocean bet-
ween 10,000 and 20,000 years
ago, during the Miocene era.
The ocean then was 200 feet
higher because the Earth's ice
caps had melted during an in-
terglacial period, and the ocean
extended as far inland as the fall
line near Goldsboro, he said.
Humans lived onshore nearby
during the same period.
Similar whales are found in the
ocean off the North Carolina
coast today, said Schwartz.
"If we knew what kind of
whale it was, we could make a
better stab at saying whether this
type of whale was found further
inland he said. "It adds
another piece (of evidence) that
whales and porpoises were being
found in various places in the
coastal area
A large set of whale jaws was
found near Nags Head in 1982,
and quarries in the eastern part of
the state occasionally turn up
various bits and pieces of whale
skeleton, he said. This one ap-
parently was washed out of the
earth by rains associated with last
year's hurricanes.
Schwartz said the 30-pound
fossil is only half of the neck
bone. It has cup-shaped depres-
sions on the ends of the V-shaped
protrusions that fit onto the skull
and a groove on the other end
that accepts the prong of the next
vertebra. Its shape made it easy
to identify as the first vertebra.
The man who found the bone
plans to keep it for a while, then
perhaps donate it to a state
museum, said Schwartz, who is
an ichthyologist - fish scientist -
who also studies whales, sea
turtles and porpoises.
New Bus Route To Hospital Opens
B JENNIFER MYERS
s��ff nier
Starting Monday, ECU
students can ride the Greenville
city bus from main campus to the
medical school, free of charge,
made possible by an agreement
between the SGA Transit Divi-
sion and the Greenville City
Transit Division.
The GREAT city buses will
pick up students waiting at
designated areas along Route 2.
which runs on 5th Street between
Elm and Jarvis streets.
According to David Morris,
transit supervisor for the city of
Greenville, the idea of having
such a route was a joint effort
between he and former SGA
Transit Manager Marshal
Tucker. The city was asked to
assist the SGA with bus repair
and maintenance, and the idea of
a new route to the medical school
developed.
Scott Alford, assistant SGA
Transit manager, said the majori-
ty of students using this route
would be nursing majors and
students needing research infor-
mation at the hospital.
Therefore, the passengers would
be limited and would have no
regular riding schedule.
SGA Transit has always
wanted to provide a route to the
medical school but could not af-
ford it. Now the school and city
have developed a system in which
ECU pays the city 50 cents per
rider. The student merely shows
the driver a pass and student ID
Professor Fights Censorship
with relieion � their kind of potentially "offensive" items will
Continued From Page l.
"R" volume of the "World Book
Encyclopedia" (for its article on
reproduction).
"The conservative cause had
the program, but not the
�soldiers' for their censorship ef-
forts, not until recently when
thev becan combining politics
Hearing
Impared
Program
Continued From Page 1.
room telephones, a sign language
club and job placement services.
The Program for the Hearing
Impaired employs four staff
members for the 30 students it
supports.
Schreiber says, "We are always
looking for student notetakers
Anyone who is interested in this
or any other aspect of the pro-
gram can contact Schreiber at
757-6729 or in A-114 Brewster
Building.
religion Lamer said. Since he
debated the Moral Majority's na-
tion field director a couple of
years ago, Lanier's name was ad-
ded to their mailing list; he
receives mailings "almost week-
ly he sas.
In his role as advisor to and
defender of librarians. Lanier
argues that since librarians
generally follow written, approv-
ed book selection policies, most
never reach library shelves.
"Of course, there's a lot of
garbage published, but it's not in
the libraries he said.
"However, what is considered
objectionable varies from person
to person, just as taste in art, ar-
chitecture and music varies with
the individual. What may be
trash or trivia or indecency or
obscenity to me � the most of-
fensive material � may be quite
another matter to you.
Clive Cussler's
CYCLOPS
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WEDNESDAY:
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TEQUILA SUNRISES � BLOODY MARYS
MIMOSA � CHAMPAGNE � SCREWDRIVERS
Darryls Delivers � Call 757-1973
to ride. The 50-cent fee comes
from student fees paid every
semester. This free ride can only
be used on Route 2 to the medical
school and back.
The GREAT bus runs from
7:20 a.m. to 6:20 p.m. The most
accessible stops are across from
Speight Building at 5th and Lewis
streets, and the corner of Jarvis
and 5th. by the ECU Personnel
Office, or the student can get the
driver to stop anywhere between
Elm and Jarvis streets along 5th
Street.
Passes can be obtained in
Mendenhall Room 228 Monday
hrough Friday from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. by showing a student ID
and activity card.
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(Wje Eaat (ttarnliniati
Serving t'tc East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender, �Tivupr
Jay Stone, Managingtumi,
Mike Ludwick. n,5 g Greg Winchester. d,Wo,o�,�,
Scott Cooper. �m ��.� Anthony Martin, &,�, Manattr
John Shannon, rmmUM. John Peterson, jwn
Lorin Pasqual, cw td,�. Shannon Short, prt� .�,�,�,�
DeChanile Johnson. �� km Debbie Stevens. &����
CAMtt,KfflT,K0Ol.WINSTON
Januarv 16, 1986
OPINION
Page 4
Education Today
According to The National
Center for Education 163,000 more
teachers will be needed next year �
and that goal will probably not be
met. In addition, The National
Education Association (NEA), the
country's most prominent teacher's
union, has estimated that by 1990
the nation could be short by as
many as 1.6 million teachers.
Between 1972 and 1982, accor-
ding to the NEA, the number of
college graduates entering the
teaching profession nose dived by
more than 50 percent. Moreover,
education majors are, on average,
among the lowest scorers on stan-
dardized college admission tests.
Meanwhile, of course, demand for
teachers continues to rise.
These are sobering statistics in a
nation facing a dropout problem of
staggering proportions. On the
average, 27 percent of America's
teenagaers are not graduating from
high school. In large cities the
dropout rate has climbed above 40
percent, in New York City it's over
50 percent. The fact that more than
half of the nation's prison inmates
are dropouts makes the problem
even more urgent.
Of equal importance is the fact
that minority children (particularly
black children) and children from
poor families lag behind white and
affluent children in their academic
performance. Since Brown vs. The
Board of Education our public
schools have ostensibly been an
equalizing force. Yet as NEA
president Mary Hatwood Futrell
argued in a recent issue of the San
Francisco Examiner, if present
trends continue public education
will merely perpetuate the polarities
and inequalities that already exist in
society at large. This is particularly
true, Futrell maintains, if public
school programs which promote
equity have their funding cut and
Troubles Brewing
teachers are forced to teach ever-
larger classes with less emphasis
upon individual attention.
The solution to these problems
aside from fighting more cuts in
education? According to the NEA,
it would consist of having the
government offer future teachers a
federally funded free ride to college
in exchange for their being required
to teach for four years after they
graduate. By doin so the govern-
ment would be offering an attrac-
tive incentive to students who might
otherwise avoid a low-paying
teaching job.
By offering teachers a free educa-
tion the NEA hopes that money
that would have been used by
education students for college will
help compensate for the low wages
that the teaching profession offers
generally. NEA also hopes that by
offering educational benefits more
qualified personell will be attracted
into teaching and thus more in-
dividual attention can be given to
students and the quality of educa-
tion will improve. It is hoped that
this will help solve the dropout pro-
blem and problems of inequality.
Of course, offering teachers four
years of free education in exchange
for four years of teaching is a fine
idea. It is doubtful, however, that
such a measure will solve the crisis
in education. In oHer for that to
happen teachers' salaries1-rmist"m
crease as well and the educational
system must offer disadvantaged
students more intensive assistance
and a much more relevant academic
experience. More to the point,
society itself must do something to
overcome the alienation which the
dispossessed feel, it must offer
them real opportunities and it must
endeavor to overcome the profound
inequality which still excludes many
from savoring the fruits which this
land has to offer.
WARD
COUNTRY
Campus Forum
Republican Lambasts Democrats
Many people in American today
do not realize the basic differences
between Republicans and
Democrats. When asked about their
political preference, they'll say one
party or the other, often making this
choice for all the wrong reasons.
Maybe mom and dad are
Republicans, so that must be right,
or all their friends say they're
Democrats, so that must be right,
and so on. But politics affect even
aspect of life, so shouldn't people
know the facts before you go endors-
ing one party over the other
Republicans, commonly, known as
conservatives, believe that man is in-
nately free and that he has a spiritual
side that separates him from other
animals. Conservatives believe :1ns
spiritual side is man's superior
aspect, and thus, their goal is to offer
man the most possible freedom to
develop his spiritual side, or in-
dividuality. Democrats, or liberals,
�JJAJte Ser. hand, claim to be in
favor of the "common man Thev
favor a society in which everyone
works for the good of the whole.
Theirs is a system which rewards
substandard performance and
punishes achievement. Thus, they sti-
fle man's individuality, and constrict
his freedom, all in the name of the
"common man A liberal society.
with its "all for one and on for all"
policy, does not bear much
resemblance to the society our
forefathers had in mind when thev
created the United States of America.
the land of the free. Indeed, a liberal
society more resembles what Lenin
had in mind when he drafted the
socialist ideals that are the guidelines
of the Soviet Union.
Let us consider an example. Presi-
deni Reagan is currently, striving to
reduce the amount of taxes all of us
are forced to pay to the government.
In doing so. he is supporting that
basic conservative policy, the
freedom of the individual. In his at-
tempts to lower taxes, however, he
has run into opposition from the
liberals. The liberals in Washington
seem to think the government has an
unlimited claim on all the money you
earn. Apparent!), their only task is to
decide how much of your income
the) are going to take this year. Is
this freedom? ' "How can a man be
free it the fruits of his labor are not
his to dispose of, but are treated, in-
stead, as part o a common pool of
public wealth'1" says Barry
Goldwater.Thus, isn't the reduction
of taxes an obviously desirable objec-
tive' Why, then, does President
Reagan run into opposition from
liberals as he attempts to reduce
taxes'1 The liberals must think that
we, the American public, have en-
joyed 40 years of ever-increasing tax
rates.
This is but one issue. Besides taxes,
there are countless other political
controversies going on now for which
the conservatives have logical,
morally-enhancing solutions that do
noi infringe on man's freedom. Do
you believe all men should - fret
Do you support freedom move
the world over? Do you view ;
munism as one of the great
blems of our world1 It so. .
the College Republicans p.
Tuesday nights in Mendenhall. v
that you, for one, do n
granted the freedoms you are
enough to enjoy. You ow
to yourself, but to your ;
to the children you will leave bel
The College Republicans; .
keep you free. God Bless V
Lance Hard in
Sophomore, Business
Forum Rules
The Las; C arolinian weU
expressing all point' �� .
drop them by our f)
lions ttuttdtnu across from rhe en-
trance of Joynt r 1 brai
For purpose ��� . � � �
ters must include :u
classification, addn
and signature of tht authorts
are limited to tw
double-spaced or nee
letters are subject to edit 1 !
ty, obscenity and libel, w . �
attacks will be permute v.
faculty and siat! writing leth r- ' �
page are reminded that they are tin
to one every five issues.
King Seen As Democratic Populist Patriot
By TAYLOR BRANCH
The New Republic
There was always a special patriotism
to the speeches of Martin Luther King.
No other American orator could bring
audiences to their feet by reciting three
full stanzas of "My Country, 'Tis of
Thee From there, he often soared
across the American landscape in
perorations calling on freedom to ring
"from the granite peaks of New Hamp-
shire from the mighty Alleghenies of
Pennsylvania from the snow-capped
Rockies of Colorado from Lookout
Mountain in Tennessee! Let it ring
from Stone Mountain in Georgia
On Jan. 20, King's own name will be
tolled from those hilltops. Children will
let fly balloons in Maryland and
Arizona, and pilgrims will retrace the
steps of his marches. By act of Con-
gress, duly signed by the president, his
birthday will be celebrated as our 10th
federal holiday on the third Monday of
this and every succeeding January. Of-
ficially, King's Birthday joins New
Year's Day, Christmas, Labor Day, In-
dependence Day and the other five
working days on which the government
closes its doors.
The enshrinement is a remarkable
phenomenon. It was accomplished less
than 18 years after King's murder, in
the month when he would have turned
but 57 years of age.
By contrast, George Washington's
Birthday was not made a federal holi-
day until 1879, 80 years after his death.
Lincoln, whose birthday is celebrated in
32 states, came closest to federal
recognition in 1920, but Southerners
killed the House bill in the Senate.
Ironically, the creation of the holiday
owes something to a negative trend in
contemporary race relations. In 1983,
with the Reagan administration propos-
ing tax exemptions for segregated
schools and delaying an extension of the
Voting Rights Act, some Republican
leaders decided to appease black voters
with a holiday. The leaders of the King
Holiday Commission know they are not
riding an unmixed tide of national senti-
ment, and that many regard his new day
as a political gesture, a throwaway holi-
day for blacks.
The King Holiday bill reached the
House floor with scarcely a flicker of
outside notice and passed 338-90.
Republican leaders bypassed the com-
mittee process and placed the House bill
directly on the Senate voting calendar,
in a procedure normally reserved for
minor business. There it passed 78-22.
Every Southern Democrat except Sten-
nis of Mississippi voted for it. So did
Strom Thurmond, Jeremiah Demon
and Paul Laxalt, three of the four con-
servative Republicans who had issued a
report opposing the holiday as
premature and too costly.
In Senate debate, Jesse Helms of
North Carolina attacked King as a com-
munist sympathizer, or worse, and
sought to open sealed FBI files to prove
it. He relished the point that it was a
liberal attrney general, Robert Ken-
nedy, who had authorized the original
wiretaps on King. When a reporter ask-
ed President Reagan later that day
whether he thought King had been a
communist sympathizer, Reagan
replied, "Well, we'll know in about 35
years, won't we?" He meant that the
answer had to await the court-ordered
date for the unsealing of the FBI bugg-
ing material. So Reagan, while announ-
cing that he would sign legislation
honoring King above nearly all the
Founding Fathers, reserved judgement
about King's basic loyalty to the coun-
try.
Reagan's remark was fatuous as well
as stunning. The sealed records from
King's FBI file do not address the ques-
tion of King's political allegiance.
Those records, by the tens of thousands
of pages, are available for public inspec-
tion in the FBI Reading Room. The
sealed ones are about King's personal
life, especially his extramarital sex life,
as intercepted by FBI bugs and
wiretaps.
Even Sen. Helms did not dare to ad-
dress this subject directly, and this was
perhaps his only area of agreement with
King's most ardent supporters. Skit-
tishness about speaking personally of
King is almost universal. His enemies
seem to fear that to do so would
backfire, or expose their utter lack of
knowledge about him as a human being,
while his admirers seem to fear that
anything less than perfection will slide
or be twisted into degradation.
Questions of identity dissolve in the
insecurities of race. King lived nearly his
entire life calling himself a Negro in-
stead of a black man. The very name of
his race was in flux, and for most of his
years the personal attributes of Negroes
were nearly invisible within the white
world.
The young King is generally por-
trayed as a well-educated but conven-
tional Southern Baptist minister, whose
transformation into a man of stature
began suddenly when the Montgomery
bus boycott made him a celebrity in na-
tional race politics. In fact, by in-
heritance and oratorical gifts, King was
a prince within his national church long
before the 1955 boycott. While still a
student, he established a reputation that
brought him invitations to preach in the
largest black churches. When he left
college to attend a Pennsylvania
seminary in 1948, he was the only
member of his integrated class wealthy-
enough to support himself without at
least part-time work.
While other aspiring leaders of both
races kept clamoring for their moments
in the White House, King chose to stay
away. "He's cancelled two engagements
with me, and I don't understand it
President Johnson complained in a
private memo. At the end. King was not
in the company of white presidents or
black elites, but marching with the gar-
bage men of Memphis.
This downward thrust makes him a
transcendent figure rather than merely a
romantic one.
Inescapably, the meaning of King's
life springs from religion as much as
politics. His religious beliefs never were
orthodox. He studied at a seminary
teeming with free-thinking professors
who doubted, for instance, the existence
of the historical Moses. King adapted to
such skepticism more readily than most
of his classmates because he was sear-
ching for an honest way to recover from
a prolonged spell of blanket disbelief.
In particular, he was troubled by
liberal theology's answer to the age-old
problem of reconciling the idea of God
with the presence of evil in the world.
King rejected the progressive notion
that intellectual and scientific progress
could steadily reduce evil, and thereby
the need to explain it. He stubbornly
refused to believe that education or
comfort made people less sinful. On the
contrary, he thought these attainments
fed the central moral sin of pride.
Not until late in his studies did King
find a way to join his yearning for
justice in the world to an idea of God in
the universe. He fixed upon the theory
that from human self-centeredness
comes an ingrained capacity for
"enemy thinking or self-justifv
moral codes. These accommodate
removal or blotting out of ?eopk as in
racial segregation In extreme form
can invert morality altogether, as w
the most heinous sins of ordinal
become the sacred dutv or n
Klansmen, or terrorists
King merely resolved that it was
possible, by supreme acts of faith .
human will, to combat enemy thinli
without falling prey to it. to affirm that
"the arm of the moral universe is long,
but it bends toward justice Bv s
efforts, he sought to uphold the ex-
istence of God. Far from being a com
fortable or conventional theology,
was nearly a desperate one, linking
King's personal religious doubts not on-
ly to the plight of his race but also to the
fate of the bomb-threatened globe.
King's version of the American
Dream had nothing to do with the tinsel
ot prestige or windfall riches. Indeed,
he sought to reclaim the sacredness ol
free human character in a country he
saw as glutted with wealth and power.
His deity was a personal God whose
benevolence could be believed com
municated - even demonstrated - a
when his crowds responded to the words
of his favorite prophet, Amos, that
"justice shall run down like waters and
righteousness like a mightv stream "
This was the spirit of the civil rights
movement, which lived in the bot-
tomless passion of his speeches.
Among American holidavs, King's
Birthday alone stands in honor of a
preacher, a Ph.D a black man, and a
martyr who was wiretapped and reviled
by officials of the same government that
elevated him. He never held or sought
public office, but he shaped more
sweeping political change than any
politician or private citizen of his era.
Ca,
Vi
How do you think the
to terrorit ad
hris MiPhatter

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Donna Mulik
Food and N
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THE EAST C AROI IN1AN
JANUARY 16, 1986
0R0,
T0N
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Campus
Voice
How do you think the I nited Stales should respond
to terrorist acts on U.S. eitizens?
democrats
rum Rules
Ma
the
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Patriot
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believed, com-
i " ited as Vmos, (hat
all run diters, and
ess ikea rr
le :ivil rights
rnen which lived in the hot-
tssion of his speeches
oong American holidays. King's
Ja alone stands in honor of a
Icier, a Ph.D a black man, and a
1 who was wiretapped and reviled
tticials of the same government that
kted him. He never held or sought
Ik office, but he shaped more
Ipmg political change than any
Brian or private citizen of his era.

C hris McPhatter
Criminal Justice sophomore
"I feel that President Reagan is
doing the right thing by cutting
off connections between the U.S
and Libya
Dwanna MeNeely
Business Management junior
"What President Reagan is do-
ing now is right. 1 just don't want
a war
v
Scot Hagerthev
Physical Therapy freshman
"We definitely should take a
stand. We should place boycotts,
embargos and sanctions (on ter-
rorist countries.) If terrorism
continue, we should take
militarv action
Annette Benthall
Early Childhood Education
junior
"1 don't think military action
would do any good because that's
just what they are doing to us
Donna Mulik
Food and Nutrition Junior
"I guess the U.S. is handling it
okay for the time being. We will
need to take action some time
soon to stop them from taking
advantage of Americans
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Jimmy Hardwick
Education sophomore
"Many times the U.S. has been
caught up in the political arena,
putting the bodies, minds and
lives of young men on the line
when the leaders of the countries
could have been dealt with in-
stead. 1 am not against taking
military action against the highest
powers of a country in the form
of a coup, especially in a situa-
tion that could become another
Vietnam
The
Information Age Brings Hope
(CPS) � While they may not
be able to tell it while they're
beating the pavement looking for
work in what recent reports
predict will be a tight job market
this spring, students will be sit-
ting pretty when the Information
Age finally dawns, social
forecaster and author John
Naisbett says.
Job applicants are going to
find the employment market shif-
ting more and more in their favor
as firms will compete to hire
declining numbers of college
graduates, he predicts.
And in a seller's market,
Naisbett � author of
Megatrends, the successful book
about emerging social, economic
and political trends � says
students are entitled to ask ques-
tions like: What is the company's
vision? Can employees par-
ticipate in it and reap benefits,
perhaps through employee stock
ownership plans? Is there profit-
sharing for all, and are women
paid fairly?
The questions are far from im-
pudent, Naisbett says. And
what's more, a quickly-growing
number of young, generally high-
tech companies actually expect
them.
The companies, which tend to
be less hierarchical than Fortune
500 firms and to concentrate
more on "nurturing" employees,
are leading the way toward re-
inventing the corporation,
Naisbett asserted in a recent in-
terview.
Not coincidentally, Naisbett
discusses these new-age firms at
length in his new book, "Re-
Inventing the Corporation
He also notes collegians are in
a good position to take advantage
of them in the job market.
New companies are springing
up at a rate unequalled since the
1950s, but the fine balance of
labor and capital has shifted
significantly since then, he says.
Labor used to be cheap, and
money dear. Now, he explains,
labor is the most valued resource.
"It's because companies know
they need creative minds that can
apply technical knowledge
Naisbett says. "A knowledge of
software isn't as valuable as be-
ing able to design software pro-
grams that revolutionize in-
dustry
To get jobs in the Information
Age, Naisbett recommends
students "not concentrate on
specific information skills, but
learn how to learn and how to
think
"As we become more high-
tech, we are also becoming more
high-touch he says, citing a
renaissance of interest in the arts
and literature.
Naisbett attributes the rise of
the "nurturing company" to the
rise of corporate women who see
a manager as a nourisher, not an
order-giver. Women are also
brining intuition � another
characteristic of entrepreneurial
times � to the Information Age.
But many campus placement
officials warn students had best
think twice before grilling pro-
iClass if ieds
5
r,iiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiHiiiiimiiiiiiiiif5
ANNUAL WINTER SALE
�All Fall and Winter Clothing
�Selected Jewerly & Accessories
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25 OFF (Begins Sat. Jan. 18)
Specializing in Natural Fiber
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116 E. 5th St. Mon-Sat 10:00-5:30
Next Poor to Book By 757-3944
spective employers about world
visions during interviews.
"Companies are marketing
themselves differently because
they see what's on the horizon,
and that's a lot less graduates
agrees John Shingleton, place-
ment director at Michigan State.
But it's still not a seller's
market for the non-technical stu-
dent, he says, and the role rever-
sal Naisbett envisions during job
interviews is "a ways off
Naisbett predicts liberal arts
students will be increasingly
valuable in a "high-touch" socie-
ty because of their ability to app-
ly knowledge and create.
While Shingleton agrees those
abilities can be invaluable,
businesses have yet to seek them
out.
Major companies like General
Motors have announced they like
liberal arts students, but I don't
see them recruiting these people.
Instead, they take people with the
technical training to do the job
now, and that's who they
recruit
At best, a liberal arts degree is
considered "an added skill
because it suggests an ability to
synthesize information says
Richard Hill, executive vice presi-
dent of the National Association
of Personnel Consultants.
For the young, bright and well-
educated, "we already have
something of a seller's market
Hill adds, but that doesn't mean
corporations are changing as
quickly as Naisbett suggests.
"I don't see companies becom-
ing less hierarchical, or, for that
matter, changing their marketing
strategies that much in the next
three years he explains. "They
don't want to make a guess about
which way things will go
Hill agrees with Naisbett's
observation that diverse educa
tions have great appeal to many
employers.
"They like the balance or
diversity: a technician with liberal
arts courses, a journalist with a
technical minor, an attorney with
a chemistry or biology degree
he adds.
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T HI hAST CAROL IN1AN
JANLARV 16. 1986
Black Enrollment In College May Drop
(CPS) � There will be fewer
black students in college in 1990
than today if present trends con-
tinue, says a new study by the
Southern Regional Education
Board (SREB).
Since 1976, while a greater
percentage of college-aged
students have been registering tor
classes, black students' rate of in-
crease for college attendance has
trailed the total enrollment
growth by a larger and larger
margin.
And since 1982, growth "has
been at a standstill says Joseph
Marks, author of the SREB
study, "The Enrollment oi Black
Students in Higher Education:
Can Declines Be Prevented?"
Marks found that while more
black students are going to col-
lege each year, their enrollment
growth rate actually declined by
over 8 percent from 1976 to 1982.
At the same time, white
students' college-going rates in-
creased, even though whites' high
school enrollment and gradua-
tion rates suffered a greater
decline than blacks
Moreover, the number of black
students completing college in-
creased onlv 3 percent from 1976
to 1982.
But from the mid-1960s
through 1970, black students'
graduation rates grew a whopp-
ing 60 percent, thanks to "suc-
cessful integration" and "people
realizing the door to education
was open
Marks blames black students'
inability to obtain financial aid
and better job prospects for mak-
ing "the college-going rate plum-
met
Financial aid also played a ma-
jor role in black students'
droupout rates, the SREB found.
It also said a scarcity of minority
professors and administrators
made black students feel more
isolated and less comfortable
staying in school.
The SREB's report said it
hoped to improve high school
retention levels and to "give
students a better college prep
education while in high school
Secondary schools should also
provide better college advice
earlier in high school, Marks
recommends.
The SREB's concern, Marks
says, is "educating students well
enough so they can handle college
academics once they've been
recruited
The SREB feared the school
reform movement, begun in the
mid-70s, slowed the growth of
black enrollment. Marks found
higher admissions standards did
indeed keep some black students
out of college.
In a paper published separately
last week, Stanford professor
Henry Levin found many of the
school reform measures adopted
in recent years ignore the needs of
as many as 30 percent of the na-
tion's students.
Marks, for one, is confident
"quality improvement" and in-
creased minority enrollment can
co-exist.
"Good preparation - the high
school level is the key to this pro-
blem he says. "We're telling
the states that by improving high
school educations and improving
college preparation, we can raise
the academic level of minorities
so they can still make the higher
admissions requirements
But "even a well-prepared stu-
dent can't go anywhere if he can't
afford it he adds, citing lack of
financial aid as the main culprit
in keeping black students oul oi
college.
As legislators worked to extend
financial aid to the middle class
lr the late 1970s, they inadver-
tantly hurt the lowei income
students - then the primarv n
pients ol finan ial aid bv
redistributing same amount
of funds to more people. Ma
explains.
"By the earl) 1980s, w became
apparent that while
amount of money given in �
Grants was growing, each studei I
was getting less
I he maximum Pell Grant wa
$1,600 in 1974 lo keep up .
inflation and increased cents,
im grant should I
t0 $3,000 b 1982. bul
� d n was onl Si ,800
While Marks savs "a huge
federal increase" in financial
could solve the pi
declining black enrollment, he
pec' ' . - s will continue
slash aid - and blacks' chan
llege
HOKII()S UP
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917 West Morgon St. Raleigh, N.C
ECU'S Student Union Will
ExpierenceCornplete Turnover
r'rom Slaff Reports
The ECU Student Union will
be experiencing a complete tur-
nover in staff within the next
month. Kay Jones, Student
Union secretary, will be accepting
aplications for Student Union
president and vice president until
Friday, Jan. 24, and for chairper-
sons until Wednesday, Feb. 5.
The Student Union is the prin-
cipal programming organization
of the University. It organizes,
sponsors and promotes events
ranging from major concerts in
Minges Coliseum to fine arts and
cultural-entertainment programs,
including weekly free films, guest
speakers and entertainers and
special events such as "Barefoot
on the Mall
The new staff, which will be
chosen bv the Union's Board oi
Directors, will be responsible for
selecting, planning and im-
plementing projects such as those
described above.
The Student Union president
administers the operations of the
organization, recommends policy
changes and appoints committee
chairpersons. To applv for the
position oi president, a student
must have a minimum grade
point average of 2.5.
The Student Union vice presi
dent aids the president in carrying
out his or her responsibilities and
takes over the presidents job in
the event oi the president's
absence. The vice president sue
ceeds the president if the latter
position becomes vacant and
must meet the same qualifica-
tions as those established for the
president. Both the president and
the vice president are chosen bv
the Union's Board of Direci
Since committees handle all
Student Union programming,
their number and areas ol
responsibility are determined bv
the president, subject to approval
by the Union's Board oi Direc-
tors.
A committee chairperson must
State SupremeCourt
Refuses To Review
(CPS) � In what may be the
last of the anti-war era college
trials, the California Supreme
Court last week effectively told a
professor fired for his anti-war
activities in 1972 that he could
have his job back.
The case, one lawyer claims,
means college professors have a
more limited freedom of speech
than other people do.
Specifically, the court refused
to review the case of former Stan-
ford professor H. Bruce
Franklin, whom Stanford fired in
1972 for making anti-war
speeches the previous year, and,
Stanford officials said, inciting
students to riot.
Franklin was suing to force
Stanford to reinstate him.
It was the only time Stanford
ever has fired a tenured pro-
fessor .
"We are certainly gratified
says David Heilbron, attorney
for Stanford, which at the time
was widely-criticized by some
faculty groups for allegedly try-
ing to dampen the campus anti-
war movement by punishing
Franklin.
"The university's position has
been vindicated Heilbron
asserts.
Franklin, now a professor at
Rutgers University, disagrees. "I
am not the main victim he says.
"The main victim is the people
who would hear the (anti-war)
view, the American people
Stanford fired Franklin for
disrupting a January, 1971 cam-
pus speech by former U.N. Am-
bassador Henry Cabot Lodge. It
also disciplined Franklin for
allegedly encouraging students to
break into Stanford's computa-
tion center � where the school
conducted research for the Pen-
tagon � and damage computers
in February of the same year.
Stanford, Franklin says, was
"one of the universities central to
the war in Southeast Asia
Some computation center
clerks, he remembers, noted the
school was devising a plan, called
GAMUT-H, to invade North
Vietnam by land, sea and air.
The court is saying that even
advocating civil disobedience
may justify the firing of a pro-
fessor, says Margaret Crosby, the
attorney for the American Civil
Liberties Union (ACLU) who
represented Franklin.
See SUPREME Page 7.
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be a full-time student and have a
minimum GPA oi 2.25. The
chairperson selects committee
members and in doing so,
endeavors to have represented on
the committee all segments oi the
membership oi the Student
Union, which consists oi all
students who pay activity fees.
According to outgoing Student
Union President Michael Smith,
the new president and vice presi-
dent will actually be in training
until April when they take over.
Smith adds. "Working in Stu-
dent Union is a great opportunity
to meet other students and facul-
ty members, and it's a lot oi fun
to work on things like the
HEART concert and guest lec-
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The deadline is fast approaching for students interested in
applying for a 2- or 3-year Army ROTC scholarship. Army
scholarships pay for tuition, all fees and textbooks. In addition,
recipients are provided $1,000 (tax free) per year as a subsistence
allowance. The scholarships are awarded on merit and, generallly,
if you have at least a 2.5 cumulative grade point average (GPA),
2.0 in nursing, you will be competitive for a scholarship. It is
important to note that one does not have to be currently enrolled in
the Army ROTC program to apply. For more information, contact
Captain Alvin Mitchell at 757-6967 or stop by room 319 Erwin
Hall.

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THEEASl (� Akoi INIAN
JANUARY 16. 1986
New'Pill'Subject Of Research
V ASHINGTON (UPI) - As the
millions of women who use them
know, birth control pills have
disadvantages, not the least of
which is the need to remember to
take one every day.
But researchers at Rutgers
t niversity are testing an adhesive
skin patch to deliver contracep-
tive drugs that would only have
to be changed once a week, pro-
siding the correct dosage directly
the bloodstream.
"It we do it this va. we are
able to optimize the therapeutic
efficacy, and also we are able to
prolong the duration o' the treat-
ment said Yie W. Chien, chair-
nan of the Rutgers College of
Pharmacy Department of Phar-
maceutics.
"Instead of a woman taking
one pill a day. she would need on-
U to use one (a patch) once every
week. It would also minimize the
side effects because the concen-
tration of drug in the body is
maintained at a constant level
(with) no fluctuation
Chien, a professor of industrial
pharmacy, also heads Rutgers'
Controlled Drug Delivery Resear-
cher Center, which he establish-
ed. He and colleagues are work-
ing on novel drug delivery
systems.
Research on transdermal
delivery of other drugs led them
to investigeate the possibility of
using a skin patch for contracep-
tion. They are also testing pat-
ches for liver and heart disease
and cancer.
"This is very, very new he
said.
Patches containing an antimo-
tion sickness drug and patches
with nitroglycerin, used to treat
angina pectoris or chest pain, are
already on the market.
A patch delivers controlled
doses of drugs � in the case of
contraception, estrogen and pro-
gestin, varying according to
which week of the cycle the
woman is on. However, much
lower doses would be required.
This, theoretically, would reduce
side effects.
"If you take a drug orally, bas-
ed on biomedical knowledge,
about 90 percent or more will be
metabolized by enzymes in the
liver. So actually only 5 to 10 per-
cent is effective Chien said, "if
you deliver through skin, you can
reduce the dose by tenfold
Pills provide a surge of medica-
tion that drops off later, while a
skin patch would deliver constant
doses. Differences in skin
permeability would probably
change the absorption rate only
10 percent in either direction,
Chien said.
The patch is being tested on
animals now so the researchers
can calculate dosages and rates of
absorption. Human testing using
large groups of volunteers may
begin in early 1987. If everything
goes right, the product could be
on the market in late 1989.
Although Chien's team is
determined to develop a con-
traceptive patch, the researcher,
who previously worked in private
industry researching drug
delivery, said there is no intention
of rushing things.
"We want to make sure the
type of drug we develop if safe
and efficacious Chien caution-
ed.
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Duke Will Grant Nixon Honorary Degree
Dl RHAM, NC (CPS) �
Somewhat motivated by the
specter of Richard Nixon, Duke
I niversity says it will grant
Chrysler chairman and business
superstar lee Iacocca a honorary-
degree rext spring after all.
Officials say there was never a
question about giving Iacocca a
degree, despite a nationally-
indicated column that claimed
they were going to refuse to grant
one.
The school's Academic Coun-
cil recently approved giving a
degree to Iacocca, with "only a
few negative votes
In November, nationally-
syndicated columnist Robert
Novak claimed some members of
Duke's Academic Council
wanted to prevent Iacocca from
getting a degree when he delivers
he commencement address next
spring.
ovak likened the alleged
satisfaction with Iacocca to
ke's 1983 decision not to host
Richard Nixon Presidential
I ibrarv.
Ihc columnist blasted coin,
opponents to lacocca's degree a-
"a bunch ot hoity-toitics who
wouldn't even commit to the Nix
on I ibrary
Nixon himself dropped Duke
list of locales when
Duke wanted to insure public ac-
cess to the Nixon records and to
scale down the size of the
museum attached to the library.
I he Ubrarv is now being built in
San Clemente, Cal with help
from a foundation associated
with Chapman College.
Duke's trustees, moreover, had
approved giving Iacocca a
honorary degree in September.
"We have been wondering
where Mr. Novak got this from
Duke official William Green
says.
"To my knowledge, the
Academic Council had not
discussed the degree when the
Novak column appeared Green
explains. "He (Novak) was fac-
tually wrong
Novak declined to tell a Col-
lege Press Service reporter how
he got the story of the supposed
anti-Iacocca sentir. ent.
About 20 council members did
receive a letter from Slavic
Languages Prof. Magnus Kryn-
ski, who protested Iacocca was a
"faddish" choice for commence-
ment speaker. Krynski, who does
not sit on the council, called
Iacocca a "demagogue and a rab-
ble rouser who is intellectually
lacking in depth
"Mr. lacocca's ac-
complishments certainly tit the
criteria for honorary degrees a;
Duke. His accomplishments are
quite remarkable Green main-
tains. "There is nothing that says
businessmen can't receive
honorary degrees
Iacocca has received nine
honorary degrees, including ones
proffered at commencement ad-
dresses at Massachusetts Institute
of Technology in 1985, l.ehigh in
1984 and Michigan in 1983. Alysia Hilton, lacocca's cor-
Iacocca has gotten more than respondence coordinator.
250 requests to speak at com- "We're getting at least five a
mencements this spring, adds week

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Supreme Court
Continued From Page 6.
Bui the American Association
ot Universit) Professors
Vl P), which undertakes to
publicize and stop instances in
which administrators diminish
campus tree speech, tends to
agree with Stanford.
"We vsere asked to review the
ase. Nothing seemed sufficient!)
out of line to call for a full
A AI I' investigation the
VAUP's Jordon Kurland recalls
The ruling "does not broaden or
narrow the law (protecting free
speech)
Crosby contends various alum-
ni groups pressured Stanford to
get rid of Franklin because they
were upset by his "radical"
views.
"The school docs not respond
to alumni pressure replies Stan-
ford spokeswoman Karen Bar-
tholomew.
Few professors actually were
fired for protesting against the
Vietnam war. Kurland reports.
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nil FAST AROi INIAN
Entertainment
IAN1 -H ' '
Though Knave At Heart,
The King Was Cool
B DOUG ROBKKsON
stiff Wmrr
In oui society, rock performers
are often viewed as god-like
figures who have miraculously
risen above the common masses
into a pseudo-heaven tilled with
tame and fortune. But with the
possible exception of the Beatles.
celebrity has ever receiv
ed � monumental acclaim
and fanatical devotion as the late
Elvis Presle
lived, Elvis would
i his 51st birthdav
v x lor the youth ol
1 Ivis may seem to be
chaic relit ol a more
simple pas' Bui it was Elvis who,
grinding and gyrating behind his
the never-ending
string ck performers. And in
comparison to the scantily-clad,
txp outing performers of
" �' Ot's
almost
ha e elel
on Januai
l)Sl k
quam
Yei
mei;
evil
iv. Elvis vvas one
figures in
and arguably,
st significant in-
preseni culture,
luring the
f the 1950s,
ts a base
I ite, sanitai
era His slurred
dirty and wild
smooth, vai
� e � vals
candalous asD(
a renc
resonated with their delivery.
Elvis' hip-sw inging, pumping and
grinding style forced l:d Sullivan
to censor the singer from the
waist down on national televi-
sion, much to the dismay of
America's teenagers.
Despite the sexual undertones
ot his bump and grind, Elvis ap-
peared almost unsuspectingly in-
nocent He can ied his fame,
glamour, and sexuality with the
down home simplicity ot a back
country Southern bo. It was a
combination that set ablae the
frozen spirits of the 50s' youth.
Although his popularity leapt
to stratospheric heights, Elvis re-
mained a country boy. Without a
doubt, he had a unique talent in
his endearingly imperfect voice.
his rough-hewn playfulness, his
smoldering, curled-lip smile that
conveyed unspoken messages to
women everywhere. But. Elvis
never owned the wil and wisdom
ol a latter generation's John I en
non, for instance, nor did Elvis
ever solely compose even one of
his hit songs
This dispantv between Elvis'
personal simplicity and the
monumental dimensions of his
legend prohabh accounts for his
undying popularity. Hvis was a
king to the masses of common
people. He was the common
denominator through which
every truck driver, store clerk,
waitress, and gas station youth
co ii i j pr n ex-
travagani fantasies the lavish
weali pink Cadillacs, and
' f adi �i ine fans.
- i ' Elvis was
that his simplicity lent itself to
supporting such fantasy lives.
That is why his fans so reverently
adored him, so grievously
mourned his passing, and refuse,
even now, to release the memory
of the promise he held.
Perhaps it was his own enor-
mous popularity that destroyed
Elvis. His "Aloha From Hawaii"
concert in 1973 was beamed via
satellite to more than half the
population of our planet. By the
time of his death in 1977, Eh is'
image had become the most wide-
lv reproduced on Earth.
Yet, at the center of this
monumental legend stood a man,
who despite his magnified image,
remained a banal, country boy A
boy who was isolated from the
world by his own popularity A
boy who lived in a topsy-turvey
world govened only by his moods
and appetites. A boy who,
ultimately, was destroyed bv a
myth he could never live up to,
yet one he could never betrao
Elvis will not be remembered
as the bloated effigy of his
former self that died in Memphis
more than eight vears ago. Elvis
Presley, the man, has passed
away. But Elvis, the legend, has
been wholly transformed into
another dimension composed ot
magnetic tape, films, and televi-
sion. It is m this electronic alter-
universe that Elvis seems super-
naturally and eternallv to dwell
among us. The King is dead
1 ong live the King
Thinking Solid This Week
Hv V R K)M)
involves
tie con-

simp
(vertices), how
Igesl are required to
each vertex to every
te I � � example case
aitl ' n vertices, re-
quires mx edges. Whai about the
general tase of n dots?
rhe solution exemplifies the
elegance dd power of a simple
counting argument. Begin with n
isolated vertices (fig. 2a). Con-
nect one vertex to every other
vertex I here are n- edges. Pick
a second vertex. Because one
vertex has been used, n-2 verti.es
remain to be connected. Thus,
the number of edges added at this
stage is n-2 (fig. 2b). Continue us-
ing this method until, finally, one
I his t
remaining edge - added 1
tially, 'he tota
needed u � fully co
is the sum of the edges added at
each stage fiat is the un 1 i �
four vertices the answei is (3 plus
2 plus h sn Whai I general
case of n vertices?
A technique deriv : by ai I
Friederich Gauss in 1786 (as a
boy of nine) solves the problem
J. G. Buttner, Gauss'
teacher assigned class a
please ee FRY Ol I . pane M
Elvis Presley
�ce ma be the most popular icon in ihe world.
A Long-Time Partier
Revisits Downtown
B PA I MOI i)
�f �rilti
"Faculty 86" Holds Reception Friday
tI evs Bureau
"Faculty '86: I eaching Artists
ai 1 (I an exhibition of art by
East Carolina University School
ol Art faculty members, opened
in Gray Gallery Monday and will
remain on view through Feb. 1.
According to Perry Nesbitt,
director of Gray Gallery, the
showing consists oi a full range
� media, including drawings.
paintings, sculptures, water-
colors, printmaking,
photography, textiles, art metal,
wood and ceramics
"Members of the commercial
art and environmental design
faculty will be exhibiting draw-
ings and finished pieces as well
Nesbitt said.
A faculty reception, which is
free and open to the public, will
be held Friday from 7:30 to 9:30
p.m.
Exhibitors are: oe Buske.
Charles Chamberlain, Robert
Edmiston, Sara Edmiston,
Michael Ehlbeck, Ray Elmore,
Janet Fischer, Marilyn Gordlev,
Tran Gordlev. Paul Hartley,
William Holley, Norman Keller,
Richard Laing, Edward Levine,
Mind- Machanic, Craig
Malmrose, Clarence Morgan.
Sergio Ortiz, Betty Petteway,
Robert Rasch, Roxanne Keep.
Betsy Ross. Dorothy Satterfield,
John Satterfield, Donald Sex-
auer. Terry Smith, Melvin Stan-
forth, Henry Stindt. and Michael
Voors.
Gray Gallery hours are Mon-
day through Saturday from 10
a.m. until 5 p.m. and until 8 p.m.
on Wednesdavs
A Show Hung Well
B TON Rl MPI I III Sr� ima
m?hhk? i s!0(arohna Umy. Gray Gallery, and Ludwig Bradly, gallery assistant, put the finishing
touches on the exhibition Faculty '86: Teaching Artists at ECU" which began Monday. Paintings, watercolors, sculptures,
photographs and textiles are among the many different types of media displayed in the show. The pieces will be on view through
1 he old dinosaur is dead � or
quickly dying. Nope. Downtown
ain't what it used to be. The crazy
days ot w ild (I do mean wild) par-
ty ing and cheap beer are now '
be placed in the archives of "Par-
ties Past. ' Fear not fellow fry
brains, that era is being ushered
out by a new, more radical one:
the era ofPeople who can af-
ford to take a mortgage out on
their car for a night on the
town
Does anybody remember what
Downtown used to be like'1 The
scene Downtown was different
two or three years ago. A dude
could go out, catch a bu (which
so often needs to be done on
weekends) "get up" with a
member of the fairer gender, and
still wake up with enough change
to buy that all-important first
Pepsi of the day. Seems folks
would've had the sense not to
disrupt a system that had been
working so well for so long. But
Nooooo, the "powers that be"
had to start screw in' around with
everything.
First it was that narrow little
bat to which future yuppies seem
to be drawn. You know what I'm
talking about � the bar with the
simply "huge" pool tables. The
bar that plays music virtually in-
distinguishable from that of any
Hare Krishna commune. That's
the one. This bar has always been
expensive � why they went
private two years ago I'll never
know. Even when they were
public I couldn't afford � nor
did I want � to drink there.
Next is the acid rock bar.
C'mon guyswhat the hell hap-
pened to ya? Two years ago, you
people were kickin' ass. You used
to play jammin' rock and roll �
not that Twisted Sister. Dokken
crud � 1 mean good tune. like
the Who. early Journey, and the
Stones. Now I have to listen to
some maniacal psycho freak tell
me how he's come to having his
"bails to ihe wa . Wl
worse, 1 have i
foil
. isa
ds � oi arc vol: a
S ape up � ai ider why
. can only d
weekends
Now we con i - a vhere
the people who di I and
fix thangs" dwell � :he
Industrial Tech majors. Even the
name of this bar typifies the per-
sonality of its clientele Simply to
enter this bar sou must wear a
shirt with a collar. I'm a poor
'py - I win a
shirt with a collar. Besides, who
wants to drink in a bar where all
people drink Michelob 1 s
d talk about government
misrepresentation in Boi
Spare me.
Well, we're down l as-
respectable drinking pond
they actually serve beer at
reasonable prices � this bat
sin Dly has other problems Firs
it's small. incredibly
smallminiscule. Second is their
choice oi television programm-
ing. One can't sit down for a
burger and a beer without being
forced to view the starving m
Ethiopia. 1 truly, sympathize with
these people, but I. too, must eat
I astiv is this establishment's
clientele. 1 don't consider mysell
a snob - those of you who know
me. both of you, realize this But
1 just can't force myself to drink
in a bar where all the guvs are
named either Skip. Chip, oi Jeff
1 refuse.
Soooo, 1 guess I've prettJ
much chopped everybody up
Hell, now even if I wanted t0
drink in a bar, nobody would let
me That's all right, though I
still have all of my Jimim Buffett
albums, and Overton's sells brew
at a pretty good price. Now all I
have to do is think of a wav to get
all the women to mv house
1 ve got it. Ladies, there is ab-
solutely no cover charge - but
there is tipping.
Try Out
1 '�tinu-d f







WSB'
i
S
Tone
Take A
JOIN NO

-
o
CALI
FRE
THE
SouthPa





I HI JASfAkOI ISIAN
JAM.AkY 16, Ml
Try Out Some Mathematics In Your Valuable Spare Time
continued from page 8
tiresome problem gt iranteed to
wile away the alien in (and to
give Buttner a bre. - tiom in-
tellectual strain) Th problem �
add all the numbc 1 through
100. Gauss had an insight involv-
ing a re-arrangement and
simplification of the problem.
The answer, armed at without
pause � 5050. following a
similiar tack, we will arrive at the
sum oi all numbers n- through 1
(Fig. 3).
Aha! Momentary insight
resolves insurmountable situa-
tion.
A simplifying viewpoint may
take a thousand years to evolve.
The Pvthagoreans recognized
that there are five (Platonic)
solids with regular faces. The
cube is one. Lach face of the cube
is congruent with every other
face. Why these five? There is no
solid with congruent pentagram
for faces.
l.eohnard Euler counted the
number of corners (vertices),
edges and faces ot each Platonic-
solid. Luler numbers are derived
from the relationship between
vertices, edges and faces (fig. 4).
Each Platonic solid has Euler
number 2. Here, counting of dif-
ferent qualities shows a relation-
ship not realized before. What
tvpe of figure has Luler numbers
1 and -1? H. B. Griffith's Sur-
faces is an excellent introduction
to numerical relationships bet-
ween geometrical objects.
Finally, what kind of problems
exist where counting creates
boundary conditions for a solu-
tion but yields no specific infor-
mation about the solution? The
science of numbers, or com-
binatorics, according to Claude
Berge, "obtains exact formulas
for the number of configurations
satisfying certain specified pro-
perties
There is a class of problems,
finite in nature, whose solution
would require the fastest com-
puter billions of years.
An example involves a typing
monkey. The monkey is con-
strained to type no more than
1000 symbols per sequence.
Fig. 1
Fig. 2a
Fig. 2b I
Figures Vertices Edges Faces
Tetrahedron
Cube
Octahedron
Dodecahedron
Icosahedron
4
8
0
6
12
9
4
6
8
12
20
Fig. 4
Gauss's Method:
1 ?23 �� 98 -99100
1 ?100�299398�50 51
N�5
Stage 1 N-U4
Stage II N-23
? l ?
3N-2 N-l
101 101 101
50 Pairs 50(10115050
101
1 � N-l2 � N-2N-3 � .?
N
N
N
N-l Pairs (N-l)N
Fig. 3
1000
34
Each Svmbol has a 1 in 34
Chance of Being Selected
Fig. 5
A Box Of Mathematical Fig.s
WSB's Voice
SPRING BREAK
EXTRAVAGANZA
(L'PI) � From the simple
hillbilly days of Dixie to the cur-
rent boom times of the Sun Belt,
the South and radio station WSB
grew up together.
The history oi the relationship
between the self-proclaimed
"Voice of the South" � indeed,
its call letters stand for
"Welcome South, Brother" �
and the region it helped raise is
being preserved in an immense
archival collection that includes
thousands of phonograph
records and other memorabilia.
There was no more room for
the records, tapes, log books, let-
ters, scripts, photographs,
microphones and turntables that
had been accumulating since
WSB first went on the air in 1922
with a meager 100 watts of
power. It was the first radio sta-
tion in the Southeast, hitting the
airwaves just two years after Pitt-
please see VOICE, pa;e 10
Cancun, Mexico March 8, 1986
Air Travel From Miami
7 Nights Hotel Including Taxes
T�-ansfers From Airport
Bahamas Cruise March 9, 1986
4 Days of Cruising m the Bahamas
All Meals and Entertainment on Ship
Port Taxes and Gratuities
$387 pt person
$356 pt person
Vy
Space Limited
Make Your Deposits Now
Coe in for brochure
QUIXOTE TRAVELS, INC
19CotancheStreet Greenville NC
P�-one 757 0234
Assuming there are 34 symbols
(26 letters, seven punctuation
marks and a blank) to cl
from, how long would il take- the
monkev to reproduce the Gel
tysburg Address
The Address represents a uni-
que sequence of symbols The
number ot combinations ot sym-
bols is shown in tig. 5. The
monkev could produce rhe Ad-
dress perfectly the first time, but
this is unlikely.
Students probably should
avoid this method ol producing
"that perfeci theme paper A
computer cnuld run through
every combination oi symbols. It
would take a very, long time, but,
at some point, it would recreate
every piece ol literature extant
f untorlunatelv, this column
i, and create new literature b
old authors, and even (.omplete
unknown works.
Unfortunately, a humar,
presence is required to filter the
information and extract penmen'
pieces.
Professionally
Prepared
Resumes
CALL 355-6810
Tar Landing Seafood
January Specials
All You Can Eat
Any One Or Any Combination
Shrimp, Oysters, Trout,
Clam Strips, Deviled
Crabs,Flounder
'Up To 4 he
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6
Alaskan Crab Legs Or
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Served With Fried Or Baked Potato, Cole Slaw,
Hushpuppies.
9
jGE��.viu.
.V" v
Family Restaurants
� , . � i
. a lable
It he world.
ne Partier
)ovvntown
vs hai

�he
per-
;r a
poor
rd a
� Besides, ��
e all
b Light
I! vernment
B �1
the last
� . -nd
beer at
First,
i
I is their
elevision programm-
: am for a
beer -�� th n being
mg in
ve with
e, but ! must eat.
ment's
e 1 dor - myself
o know
realize this. But
myself to drink
ill the guys are
ither Skip, Chip, or Jeff.
1 guess I've pretty
much chopped everybody up.
Hell, now even if I wanted to
drink in a bar, nobody would let
me. That's all rightthough. I
still have all of my Jimmy Buffett
albums, and Overton's sells brew
at a pretty good price. Now all I
have to do is think of a way to get
all the women to my house
I've got it. Ladies, there is ab-
solutely no cover charge � but
there is tipping.
STILL NOT OVER
THE HOLIDAYS
Tone Your Body Back In Shape At
THE
x
Take Advantage of Our Special Student Rates
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OOw
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THE
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Includes:
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Aerobics 52 times a week
New Wolff System
Tanning Bed
$4.00 per visit
10 visits $30.00
�� . �





10
HI I AS I c AK( 1 iM N
I AM tO lf. !S86
Dooneshurv
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
(f
,�J
c55
a � -
0
-4
? �� , �.���� ��
9�w v ' net �?'��� �
.�:� v ���- KAl 4TCU0
i m ?

RL4M6R

! � v

�AtV
'
Q � � ���: v 50
�� . �

lw
.��

� � - K � '
AHBAl -�
'� - M
J �'
- flf
d &r'l
-J.�
Foce 0 The South Lives
continued from paj� 9
kOk
A SI
40-
(apanes( irrender ending Wi d
w at 11 ai e pi esei v ed on lai ge
discs, the forerunners oi
gnetic recording tape
UsH started small, so small in
fact it was mereh an offshoot oi
i � Journal and had its
. bi adcasting studio in an
?mpt room at the newspaper.
� station as physical-
ly small, it was di enormous
breakthrough tor the South. It
introduced listener- to the strange
new world of immediate news
I
WSB
eel in
:
WSB
see
WsH ai 1. � tl
�. eai 1 ' ��.ink;
mplei
Mike
aaei � 1 Vsi
much
.hill, plus
' Itsu 1, foi a time, provided educa-
1939 �����.te nal programs � spelling bee
M C pun hasectui es and story-telling to the
ai urnal atlanta school system. WSB also was viewed as
gi a and becamesomething ol a new toy for the
� � rated, so toomasses.
I1 stationHenry Ford, the car magnate.
50 " H ' '�� :Hjvas so impressed after visiting
d 11sWSB in its early days that he
ti ind icrosswent home to Michigan and ap-
aftei dark,plied for a broadcasting license.
playlisi towardFord later installed a transmitter
pular music.in his Highland Park plant to
history. toosupply entertainment for his
Rooei' dw Chur-employees.
theceremon ot the
' � �
w here i Id be preserved
future ions tor t;
joyn : study
1 he coll of arly 55,000
graphs runs
ol musical taste I rom
Joe Stafford and Pie I Pipei
Herb pei i ind the '
Brass, fi n M
Boy George, from the Ragi
kascaK to "Christmas in the
Stars rlic Star Wars yuletide
album featuring the single,
"What Can You Get a Wookiee
for Christmas (When He Already
Owns a Comb ?)
Said Paton, "It appears that
one hadn't been played too
often
There is evidence ol a heavy in-
fluence of religious and hillbilly
music, particularly from the early
davs, as WSB mirrored the tastes
fippfa cofidg
204 East Fifth St
758-1427
OpenMon-Sat 10 am 9pm
Albums and Cassettes on SALE This Week!
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830-1040
Jazz Jive On Paper
For more than three decades.
New York photographer Chuck
Stewart has been part of the veil-
ed world of jazz musicians, en-
joying an uncommon intimacy
with many oi' the most for-
midable creators of the music.
Chuck Stewart's Jazz Files,
photographs by Charles Stewart
and text by Paul Carter Harrison
(published by New York Graphic
Society Books Little, Brown,
October 18, 1985) is a lively in-
troduction to these musicians,
centered on Stewart's portraits.
The emphasis oi Chuck
Stewart Jazz Files is on current-
ly active performers � here are
David Murray, Wynton Marsalis,
and Lester Bowie � but also in-
cluded, mostly in performance,
are their great seniors � Duke
Ellington, Count Basic. Billie
Holliday, and on to Dizzy
Gillespie, Charlie Mingus and
Miles Dais. Sections based on
instrumental groups include
anecdotal passages from the per-
formers themselves, and each is
introduced by Obie Award-
winning playwright Paul Carter
Harrison, who conveys informal-
ly the evolution ol a particular
sound or musical attitude. Har-
rison's interviews with Chuck
Stewart evoke this fascinating
world with vivid sketches oi in-
dividual performers and tales tiotl and brilliant artistry Jazz
suggesting something of the dit- great Billy Taylor contributes a
ficulties they face, their dedica- foreword.
�fW��WWfWWP"�W�l�WW
0NS0LI DATED
"HEATRES
- � � � '
BUCCANEER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
Now Playing � c
jeff GOLDBLu; TRANSYLVANIA
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Professionally
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RESUME'S
Spei ui Student Rau s
355-6810
JAZZ
BAND
ThE AUDIENCE ISDEVASTATING
RECORDS
We Buy
Used Albums &
Tapes
"Best Prices Paid"
112 E. 5th St. 758 4298
Monday, February 3, 1986
Hendnx Theatre, Mendenhall Student Center
Admission: ECU Students S3.00
ECU Faculty anu Staff :7 50
Public and a1 door, $9.00
Tickets at Centrol Ticket Ottice
757-6611 exl 266
I fudcni I nion Specialoncert
ft i �, t ntation
ECU S
Medical Center Shuttle
ECU Students can now ride to and from the ECU School of
Medicine on the Greenville Area Transit Route 2 free o charge.
Tickets may be picked up at Student Government Transit Office (2nd
Floor Mendenhall) between 9-5, MonFri. ECU l.D. required.
GREENVILLE AREA TRANSIT (GREAT) ROUTE 2
location IK-
Downtown Mall (4th and I vans Si ((Headed v. : after
ECU School of Medicine (Brodj Buildii . 20 I
Pitt Memorial Hospital
Doctor's Park 16 till
Downtown Mall (Headed East
Rose High School (Near College Hill)(l - reet) -i a
10th Street (Village Green) 6 alte
University Cond. 10 a
Greenville Blvd. (Ca irt, Eastbi ��� � 12 attei
10th Street (Kings R 14
Village Green (5th Street) 15 a
1st Street (Wilson cres, Tar River Estates) x aftei
5th Street (Speight Bmidmgi 20 aftei
5th Street Jarvis Street (Personnel Office) 20 after
Overton's Supermarket 22 after
parts
hour
hour
hour
hour
hour
hour
hour
hour
TAB RIVER ESTATt S
Tracksters
Hilton Inv
� IMP"
1 n McNeil
-

I
had
on the r well
h;s �

i
1





Paper
I Ml S K(M INIAN
Sports
JANUARY 16. lSf
Page 1 1
t nn 1 � DRENr V
l Ul ANYTIME J
Mr� Shopping Contor
vania
5000
me is over
�v. V �

li � mi ir "
s i
Lasf Second Tap-In
Bucs Defeat Indians
!ln� tini defeated W illiam X 1ar on Monday niht. He'll need to be in this position
travels in Wilmington lo battle the Seahawks and center Brian Rovwon (25�.
B SCOTT COOPER
SporU Kdilor
WILL1AMSBURG, Va.
Thanks to a Curt Vanderhorst
tap-in in the final seconds of
regulation play, the ECU Pirates
picked up their second con-
ference victory by defeating
William & Mary 54-52 Monday
evening.
The win marked the first con-
ference road victory for the Bucs
since the 1982-83 season (Har-
rison's first) when ECU topped
George Mason 68-65 in the open-
ing round o' the ECAC-South
Tournament.
Junior forward Marchell
Henry paced the Pirates with 18
points. Vanderhorst was the only
other Buc in double figures with
11.
Although the Indians outre-
bounded the Pirates 29-22, ECU
forced William & Mary into 10
turnovers. Pirate coach Charlie
Harrison was pleased with win
but did see some areas to be im-
proved upon.
"Winning a close one on the
ioad can't help but create
positive things Harrison said.
"I was disappointed to let them
dictate the tempo of the game.
"We must continue to improve
and stick to what we do in prac-
tice, we've been having the
tendency to go away from what
we've been practicing Harrison
added.
The game was close from the
onset. Both teams swapped
baskets until the Pirates went on
an eight-point scoring surge.
Jumpers by William Grady and
V anderhoi t gave ECU a 15-7 ad-
vantage with 12:24 to play in the
opening period.
William & Mary retaliated by
scoring the next five points,
chopping the Buc lead to three
(15-12) with 10:03 left to play
Four of those points came from
guard Scott Coval.
The second 10 minutes of the
opening period remained close as
the lead changed hands on six dif-
ferent occassions. A Scott Hardy
layup gave the Bucs a 25-24 lead,
and after a Mark Batel free
throw. Hardy canned a 17-foot
jumper to give the Pirates a 27-25
lead at the intermission.
Hardy supplied a needed sein-
ing punch and ECU coach
Charlie Harrison praised his
senior guard's all-around play.
"Scotty's played extremely
well in the last five games Har-
rison said. "His assist turnover
ratio has been three-and-a-half to
one � and that's very positive
The second half saw the Pirates
come out of the box quickly. The
Bucs, in fact, shot a red-hot 57.9
percent from the floor in the se-
cond haK. ECU opened its big-
gest lead (39-29) on a nine-fool
jumper by Henry, with 15:13
play.
Once again the Indians came
roaring back as they went on a
12-2 scoring surge, knotting the
game at 41-41 with 9:19 left to
play. Forward ken Lambiotte
(yes, the brother of N.C. State's
freshman Walker Lambiotte) led
the way for William & Mary
I ambiotte scored 10 o the 12 In-
dian points in that run.
A Keith Sledge 17 footei then
broke the droughl foi the Bucs,
regaining the lead tor II 43-41
with 9:02 lett to play
With 4:28 remaining, a pair
laik Batzell tree throws gave
William Ai Mar) their larf
lead, a 52-49 advantage A
turned out, these weo final
points by the Indian- a th Buc
defense took control.
A Vanderhorst jumper fi
the left corner and a tree throw
set up the game's final play.
When Hardy's long jumper
bounced ofl the right side I
rim, Vanderhorst was there �
the follow, just before tl
buzzer.
The 54-52 vici es EC1 a
2-2 conference mark and an
overall mark oi 7-7. "he seve
wm tor the Bucs matches tl
season total o a year at .
junior forward Henrv is happ;
heat W & M arid is satisfied to He-
at .500
"It (the win) give- us a lot
confidence Henrv said. "It"
Curt's first win over William &.
Marv and we're lool
on il
"I'm Happv to be 7-7 �
time. We could be
we're content righi i Henry
added. "We thought we'd be I
tei this yeai md �
that"
The loss V a. Ml 0 ; :
the C AA .1- i : 8
The Pit
this Saturd :n they "
Wilmingti I i
foe I-W
ECU Swimmers Face Wilmington Saturday
iiv )i)Mi,(,Shs
)
uttle
i M t k
ave had in a
a � tl a ie i hem,
ac K be He expects
: the
men than the women, who heex-
a � pects to win without much trou-
� �. ble.
"We � eased as we can be
a ' iur teams' p.
� Kobe said I iates
ti e now 1 3-3 overall. " '
� e best � � ve've
had
s fat as I ike f i he
.
. � aiac tei tzed by a strong i re �:
. � e sw immers, w hile
the
depi
I he :nen squa ai i N W is
easily the stronger ol Ip e two,
u d is lead by tw
lividua D i Hoosier was the
85 1 astern Intercol t giate
Petei v kes was a freestyle
in the same meet
One advantage the Pirates will
, trom swimming against the
Seahawks in Wilmington will be
that thev will have the experience
ol swimming in tl . p �1 thai is to
be used in the ference cham-
ship. Their biggest challenge will
probably come from James
Madison University, whieh is
slightly favored in both the men's
and women's divisions.
following the conference tour-
nament, the men will go on to
compete in the Independent Na-
"We are pleased as we can be with our
teams' performance this year This is
the best bunch of kids we've ever had. "
�Rick Kobe
pionships Getting familiar with
thai pool cannot but help the
Bucs when the CAA conference
tounament rolls around.
Indeed, that competition is jus;
around the : rner tor the Pirates,
who have an excellent chance to
tionals, one of the most
prestigious invitational tour-
naments in the country. Among
the Pirates' foes in that competi-
tion will be Miami, Southern Il-
linois, Tulane and Florida State.
I his meet will be a step up for
ual medley, and take the conference champion- ECU which competed in the
Eastern Regionals until this year.
The Eastern Regionals is tradi-
tionally a prestigious meet, bui
has recently been losing some I
its top competitors. It used
field 16 collegiate teams, but that
number has now dropped to 10,
and with the withdrawal of ECU,
nine.
"The Eastern Regionals is a
meet we (ECU) have grown out
oi said Kobe. "It's a dying
meet, losing participants almost
every year recently, and it's also
very expensive since it's usually
held in Cleveland or Pittsburgh
and our kids have to pay their
own way
While the intensity of this
year's competition begins to
build, coach Kobe has been look-
ing to next year's potential swim-
ming talent since last August.
At this point Kobe has a 'pool'
of about 50 potential Pirate
swimmers, which he will pare
down to the f to 21
women he will need il "86 'We
recruit a lot of kid
the process ol elimii ai Soi
oi them go else and
don't eventually make the cuts
What the c - .ng
stafl want- is student-ai
This means kids w h � II l
have trouble wi u idemics,
ting the coaches concei
attention on swimming.
Among the areas thai E( I
recruits many ol its athletes :
are the Virginia-Mary land
Washington DC. area. Florida
and New Jersey, is well as here in
North Carolina.
The ECU swimming pi -
performance has beer: ris -
steadily during the past few
years. With the continued dedica-
tion and persistence of its
veterans plus the flow oi new
freshmen talent it should keep
going nowhere but up
Tracksters Shine In
Hilton Invitational
SI I sIMPsON
r in-
-
I ee Mi Neil
ams had excellentshow-
I ich Bill Car-
either won or placed
every event, while
i Wayne Miller's ladies also
i arson was pleased
� un's performance.
- is the best start we've ever
hadarson said. "Everybody
.n the team did weli
sels good about how
his team will perform this season.
"It's early, but we could be as
.1 as we've ever been he
uated.
I ee Ms Neil, who had a
fabulous freshman season, con-
tinued on his winning ways by
ishing first in the 60 yd. dash.
McNeil's winning time of 6.22
second- set a new meet record.
"1 ee had an outstanding per-
formance added Coach Car-
son.
Craig White and W alter
Southerland picked up where
teammate McNeil left oi. White
and Southerland placed first and
second respectively in the 60 yd.
high hurdles. White's winning
time was 7.53 seconds, while only
.01 second behind him came
Southerland at 7.54. David
Parker was fifth in the race with a
time of 7.80 seconds.
The 3(X) yd. dash ended in a tie
with Nathan McCorkle taking a
share of first place honors. His
tying time was 32.9 seconds.
Third belonged to John I ee, who
ran a 33.1.
The men's mile relay came
down to a photo finish between
North Carolina State University
and ECU. The judges decided
N.C. State was first. The Pirate
relay team consisted of Julian
Anderson first, followed by
Rueben Pierce, Ken Daughtery,
and anchoi Phil Estes. The mile
time was 3:25.
See Women, Page 14
Emory Investigated
For Paying Players
BT1MCHAM)I.KR
sports U nter
A �irr rrpnrt
I ast Carolina University is in
the process of investigating
evidence that football players
who played under former coach
Id Emory received cash
payments.
The report of these allegations
surtaced Tuesday in the
Greensboro News & Record:
University officials found out
about the incidents in the state at-
torney general's office as they
were waiting to defend the
University in a lawsuit filed by
Emory last March.
Don Powers, defensive coor-
dinator, said Tuesday that the
Pirates coaching staff knew
nothing of an investigation by the
school. "This is all news to us
Powers told wire service
reporters. "Gosh, our staff is
completely unaware of all of
this
Head Coach Art Baker and
Athletic Director Ken Karr were
unable to be reached for com-
ment. Pirate quarterback Ron
Jones said he was "shocked"
when told of what had happened.
"I've never heard of anything
like that in this program, " said
Jones.
Emory was contacted Tuesday
by phone and he stated that he
ran the football team according
to the rules, denving entirely the
report. "The only thing I can say
is that I've got 26 years of
coaching philosophy and reputa-
tion stated Emory, "I ain't
never paid an athlete anything.
The five years I was at ECU, we
had the cleanest program in
America
' 7 ain 7 never paid an
athlete anything. M
�Ed Emory
Emory said he has never been
questioned by the NCAA about
anything, and would be willing to
answer any questions put to him.
"When I got fired, I asked
whether I had any NCAA
violaions, or any reported viola-
tions he said, "I was given a
firm 'No' by school officials
Emory said that the news was
"devastating "I want to finish
my career in college coaching
he said. "When you get tarnish-
ed, it's tough
No details concerning the cash
payments were made available.
"We did make a report to the
NCAA concerning some problem
we had discovered said David
Stevens, attorney for the Univer-
sity. "We're in the process of
putting together a report for the
NCAA
This Just Ain't My Day'
Ed Emory may have seen happier days during his 8-3 season, but
dosen't show it here in this '83 photo.
HL i
I





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$9.00 pre-registrotion
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JAN. 18
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2000 Cedar Lane
��:��� i:
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 16, 1986
13
, Si LI ' Cerwin Vega
ipeakers Reg S200
j 50 Never used Call
EN1 e 2 bedroom
a ,�. � & sewer in
rn Can Keith
SELL Lovesea
Sv offee Table
S2 3875
aot v .
. je Kitchen
� Near Pitl
! snjHH�. pa�f 13
G A JOB?
iterviewing
ur iob
$12.00 at door
2000 Cedar Lane
ftm
m
��. �jp

� -�
?� Spring A ctivities
B JEANETTE ROTH
M�ff Wnlrr
fter a long, leisurely holiday
break, Ihe Department of
imural Recreational Services
read) to get back into the swing
: things with a whole calendar
: activities and events for spr-
1 he courts will be alive this
estei as intramural basketball
cads up the calendar. Other ac-
vities on January's agenda in-
clude the annual swim meet and
acquetball doubles.
Before moving ahead, con-
gratulations are in order for
.everal teams taking the number
spots in last fall's events. In
n volleyball, the men's
easonal power, The Lucky
even, proved true to their names
as they defeated second-ranked
07 Spikes and fifth-ranked Phi
kappa tau to take the men's all
pus championship. In ladies
ei action, The Good, Bad and
gh won then second straight
campus volleyball champion-
ship bv downing residence hall
tders, 1 he Gumby's.
Seventeen males and two
females headed up the free throw
contest competition. I ast year's
male champion, Garv Bishop
failed to enter this year's event so
e poll was wide open and
awaiting a new champion. Tak-
i the number one spot into the
semi-finals was Kenny Murphv,
followed by Darryl Bess and
Michael Little each with 23 of 25.
However, in final play, the top
eight shooters played musical
baskets, drastically changing
their ranking in the final poll. As
the last roundball sailed through
the hoop, Michael Little out-
finessed his competitors, captur-
ing top honors. Billy Hamilton,
ranked fourth in the semi-finals,
pulled up to the second position
with excellent shooting down the
wire.
The ladies competition includ-
ed only two hoopsters, Lynette
Ginn and Karen Vlahos. Ginn
captured the championship with
a two-shot lead over Vlahos.
Aerobicizers beware! Drop-in
classes will be available January
13-23 in Room 108 Memorial
Gym. Classes will be held
Monday-Thursday at 5:15 p.m.
Monday and Wednesday classes
will also meet at 4:00 p.m. First-
session registration will be held
January 20-24. All faculty, staff
and students are encouraged to
register. The cost is minimal and
great benefits can be gained
through this invigorating exercise
program.
Do vi i need to earn a few ex-
tra backs for rainy day weather,
or would you just like to earn
nonev Joing your favorite hob-
bV ell. the Department of
lni.am.iral-Recreational Services
a variety of job opportunities
available. Photographers are
needed to help capture the sights
of intramural sports. If you are
interested, call 757-6387 and ask
for J.R. An appointment will be
made promptly. Experience in
developing and, of course,
action-shot picture taking is
desired. The Publicity Depart-
ment also has an excellent oppor-
tunity available for East Carolina
art majors, or anyone talented
with pen-in-hand. Artists will be
hired this semester for work
displayed all around campus to
help promote the IRS. Call
757-6387 and ask for J.R.
Although a portfolio is desired
upon interview, it is not required.
If you want to get in on all the
basketball action this semester,
officials will be hired for this
most challenging event on Mon-
day, January 20 at 9 p.m. in
Memorial Gym Room 102. The
first officials clinic will be held to
inform all interested parties
about the program. No ex-
perience is necessary.
Be sure to sign up for
January's first special event, the
video games tournament that will
be held January 22.
For more information on any
or all activities and services
within the Department of
Intramural-Recreational Ser-
vices, call 757-6387.
Lady Pirates Crush fclassified
Conference Rival
Bv IIMCIHMH.KR
sports W nler
rhe I ad Pirates successfully
ecord to 12-5 with an
ressive 89-54 victory �xcr
� ference rival William & Marv
' � . . ehi in Minges Col-
iseum.
Loraine Foster
rhe Pirates who held a 42-2
ftime lead, quickly jumped to
a 22 point lead. 52-30. with 16:35
left in trie game and never looked
back alter that. The quick spurt
in the second half was helped
greatly bv Delphine Mabry, who
scored eight of her 13 points in a
six-minute span of the second
half.
The first half was close only
for a short time. William &
Mary only led once during the en-
tire game at 4-2. The key spurt
for the first half was a 12-point
run by ECU. With 16:23 to go in
tl e half, Karen Jordan sank two
tree throws to tie the game at six
all. With 12:12 left in the half,
the Pirates had gone ahead 18-6.
I oraine Foster had six points
during that run.
Head Coach Emily Marwaring
said that she felt that the intensity
level oi the Pirates was excellent.
"The defense played great man
to man" added Marwaring.
Sylvia Bragg was once again
one of the leading scorers for the
game. She contributed 14 points
to the Pirates total.
Assistant Coach l.ilion Barnes
commented on Bragg's outstan-
ding play of late. "I feel that she
could start on any Division I
team stated Barnes.
Also in double figures for the
Pirates was Loraine Foster, who
chipped in a team-high 16 points,
followed by Mabry with 13. Two
other Pirates finished in double
tigures. Lisa Squirewell and
Alma Bethea each had 10. Bethea
also led the team in rebounds,
pulling down 10.
Other scorers for ECU were
Rose Miller with 6 Crystal Grier
with 5, Cathy Ellis and Gretta
O'Neil with four apiece. Roun-
ding out the Pirate scorering were
therese Dorkin with 3, and
Monique Pompili and Chris
O'Connor each with two.
For the game ECU shot 51.9
percent from the floor compared
to 35.7 percent for William and
Mary.
The next contest for the Lady
Pirates will be this Saturday at
7:30 p.m. in Minges Coliseum.
UNC-Wilmington will be their
opponent. Both teams will enter
the game with unbeaten con-
ference marks of 2-0.
Continued from page 12
SENIORS! SENIORS! SENIORS
En,oy the last phase of our college
career employment S8.F Com
puters is offering a package price to
help vou send out your resumes in-
cluding all of the following Letter
quality typed resumes. Mail mergeu
cover letters (name and address of
each company as insiae mailing ad
dress on letter), Letter quality typed
envelopes with company aadress
and your return address on
envelope. Everyming folded, stuffed
and even stamped. A listing of com
panies sent to for your follow ups).
Just bring us your hand written
resume and cover letter and the
businesses you with to apply to and
we'll do the rest Per resume for
your namesaodr (we stuff) $2.30
(min 10 resumes) (we stuff and
stamp) $1.90 (2 page resume prices
slightly higher). This offer absolute
ly expires March 15 1986 S&F Com
puter Company, 115 East Fifth St
Greenville, NC 27834 757 0472
Study
$-
NEED CASH?
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Gun & Pawn
752-2464
500 N. Greene
r$
i
Pirate
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BAGLEY'S
EQUIPMENT COMPANY
U.S. 13-17 By-Pass PHONE 792-5041 Williamston, NC
PRE-RUSH SALE AT
Peeler's Sports and Trophies
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FRATERNITY Golf
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Sale Expires 1-25-86 Greenville NC 758-3996
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Located on the Evans Street Mail
(across the street from the Elbo)
THE LARGEST FREE WEIGHT
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(Over 7,000 sq. ft.)
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�� Ufa J1 ifhMUfc'






14
HI EAST CAROLINIAN
IANI ARV 16,1986
Ray Martinez: A Man Of Many Talents
B (.KORC.K I HRKKWITTS
HI Sr� Rutt�u
GREENVH LE "I've never
really been impressed with sports
except as a test of what you have
done m youi training says Dr.
Ra Martinez, a one-time
engineering student whose
coaching brought a trophy ease
lull of glittering championships
to ECU in the 1950s and 1960s.
"To me the most important
thing (about sports) is practice
says Martinez, who was ECU's
tii st collegiate su imming and div -
ing coach.
" lo tell you the truth, 1 think
hat an age group swim meet
where you have all these kids
Mining together is about as e-
tig as watching the grass grow .
I de imperial i thing is how well
the chiH �id LMd he learn
anythin
Martinez, professoi and chair-
an of the Department of
Health, Physical Education,
Recreation and Safety for the
past six years, plans to retire at
the end of this academic year
after 32 years at ECU. He was a
pioneer in developing and using
scientific techniques in coaching,
and his swimmers and divers
brought ECU two NAIA national
championships. He produced 20
national championship swimmers
and 45 All Americans.
By studying swim strokes and
dives with motion pictures and
computers and applying the prin-
ciples of mechanics and motion,
he was able to convert wildly
thrashing arms and legs into fine-
tuned swimming machines. By
today's standards, this use of
technology in athletics is called
biomechanics. Martinez was
years ahead o his time.
"A favorite uncle used to tell
me that 1 would make a good
engineer because o' my interest m
model airplanes, Martinez
recalls. He fashioned his models
from strips of balsa, paper and
thick rubber bands and studied
their flight, then entered them in
take-off and flight competition in
his hometown, New Orleans, La.
He completed two years of
engineering studies at Louisiana
State University. But while in the
Army Air Corps in World War
II, he developed an interest in
swimming. When he returned to
LSU it was to pursue a double
major in math and physical
education. With a master's
degree earned in 1950, he became
a special field representative in
first aid and water safety for the
American Red Cross and was a
Red Cross researcher at the
Helsinki Olympics in 1952.
He also worked as an instruc-
tor at the Red Cross Aquatic
school in Brevard, N.C and
there came in contact with East
Carolina officials. In 1953, he
was hired by ECC President John
D. Messick to become swimming
coach.
Pretty soon, Martinez also was
teaching first aid classes for
Greenville's first rescue squad-a
squad that was to win national
championships and international
recognition.
He completed doctoral degree
work at the University of Iowa in
1960 and also opened a swim
training facility in Greenville
which attracted swimmers from
all over the United States,
Canada and foreign countries.
Part of his success as a swim
coach was due to "doing things
differently in training he says.
"We had weight training when
few coaches were pushing it for
swimmers. Also, isometric exer-
cises were used. We took chances
and experimented with different
regimens of exercise
"But it all paid off. It made
more of a thinking man's type of
workout he recalls.
In addition to coaching swim-
mers, Martinez also taught health
and physical education classes.
directed the intramurals program
and for four years coached the
tennis team.
The highlight of his career as a
coach came in 1968, his last year
of coaching. ECU hosted the
AAU Indoor National Cham-
pionships, a qualifying meet for
the Olympics in Mexico City. The
event was held in the new Minges
Coliseum natatorium.
"By every standard, we put on
the best meet that has ever been
held he says.
Now, Martinez says, "we need
a biomechanist to work with the
medical school, physical theapy,
physics, biology and the perform-
ing arts
"If we had a biomechanist in
association with what we already
have-the medical school, the
human performance lab, the
special education lab and sports
medicine-we could become a
satellite to the Olympic Training
Village in Colorado Martinez
says.
In addition to chairing the
health, physical education,
recreation and safety depart-
ment, Martinez continues his
research in cinemagraphic studies
of swimming. He stresses the
value of sports as a worthwhile
pursuit and the need for more
academic and scientific ap-
proaches to sports studies.
Baker, Heath Conclude College Careers
Great
B BOBGEWAREl II
t 1 sports Infnrmalhtn
Senior tailback loin Baker tell
onlv yards shorl ol" becoming
FC1 's all-time leading rusher.
Rie High Point, native needed
I on) Baker
ard- m the Pirate's
?ason-ending game at I SI to
lace Carlester Crumple! as the
ool's all-time leading rusher.
Baker suttered a fractured
.i in the first quarter and was
held to just 12 yards. That left
Baker with 2,285 career rushing
Us,
kiood tor No.
on the
hing list behind Crurnpler's
,889. Baker's final 1985 total o
951 yards also left him 49 ards
ol becoming onlv the fifth
k in ECl history to rush for
00 in a season. Those 951
Is rank as the sixth best
.ingle-season effort b an 1-CL'
tnningback.
Bakei ended his career at 1 C I
the No. 9 spot on the all-time
Women
Runners
Perform
Continued from page 11
Coach Wayne Miller and assis-
tant coach Rodney Blacknall
took four members of the lady's
�quad to the meet. They were
l.inda Gillis, Lisa Poteat,
Carolyn Martin and Sonya
Baldwin.
"The ladies put forth a tremen-
dous effort stated Rodney
Blacknall. "They reallv did
well
Blacknall also feels the team
will have a good season. "I think
we'll do reallv well this season
he said. "Barring injuries, we
should be fine
Linda Chilis placed second for
the Ladv Pirates in the 60 yd.
dash. She ran a time of 7.21
seconds.
The Lady Bucs took two of top
three spots in the 300 yd. dash.
Lisa Poteat came in second with a
38.8 and Sonya Baldwin got third
with a mark of 39.6.
A fourth-place finish in the tri-
ple jump belonged to Carolyn
Martin. Her jump covered a
distance of 35 feet 10 inches.
T he ladies had a time of 4:18 in
the mile relay, good enough for
third place. Gillis ran the first leg
of the relay, followed by Poteat
and Martin, with Baldin running
the anchor leg.
Lee McNeil was named the
men's meet's most valuable run-
ner.
The ne t meet is the Eastman
Kodak Invitational on Jan. 17-18
in Johnson City, Tenn.
offense list with his 2,285 vards.
His 1985 efforts earned Baker
first-team All Southern Indepen-
dent honors along with
Associated Press honorable men-
tion All-America distinction.
record career point total to 251.
Heath ended his career as
ECU's all-time leading scorer
with those 251 points as he sur-
passed Carlester Crurnpler's
previous record of 222 Oct. 5 in
Ficklen Stadium against Miami-
Florida.
Heath ended his career as a
Pirate with the following school
records-
Field Goals Season: 16
Field Goals Career: 53
Extra Points 92
Total Points - Career: 251
Longest Field Goal 58
Texas-Arlington
vs.
Heath owns the tour longest
field goals in ECU history (58,
53, 52, 51 and 50) and is the only
kicker in school history to be suc-
cessful on a field goal of 50 or
more yards. His 59 points led the
Pirates in scoring for 1985 and
marks the fourth time in four
seasons Heath was ECU's leading
scorer.
Jr. Sirloin
& Salad Bar
$3.99
Mon-Fri.
No Take Outs
Please
V
4 yieat place fa eat!
STEAK HOUSE
Jeff Heath
Baker finished his career with
nine 100-yard single-game ef-
forts, including three in 1985
164 vards vs. Southwest Texas
State. 14" yards vs. Southwestern
1 ouisiana and 130 vs. Tulsa.
CAREER RUSHING I 1ST
1. Carlester Crumpler2,889
2. TONY BAKER2.285
3. Theodore Sutton2,730
4. Butch C olson2.5 12
5. Anthony Collins2.20"
Senior placekicker Jeff Heath
closed with a bang in ECU's
season-ending loss to LSL The
Virginia Beach, Va native kick-
ed three field goals and ac-
counted for nine o the Pirates'
15 points, pushing his school
Norton Wins Picks
FINALFINALOVERALL
STANDINGSWEEK
TOM NORTON7-5104-47
SHEWS MEWS6-6103-48
JOHN PETERSON6-6102-49
SCOTT COOPER6-6101-50
"D.J. WATTS"7-5101-50
RICK McCORMAC7-5101-50
BILL DAWSON7-5100-51
TODD PATTON5-792-58
Hooker Memorial Christum Church
(Dlectplee of Christ)
1111 Grernvtllc Blvd 756 2275
cs
3
"
i

?
"In fssentiais. 'llmt
In non-t!ss?ntials. ttdom
In aU things J.oa





i!




R�v H Vann Koighl
Special Classes For College Students
9:45 a.m. Christian Education (aU ages)
11:00 a.m. Worship- Open Communion
East Carolina University's
Student Union
is taking applications for
Student Union President
Student Union Vice President
Deadline: Januan 24. 1986
&
Student Union
Committee Chairpersons
Deadline: February 5, 1986
for the 1986-87 Term
Any full time student can apply
Applications available at Mendenhall
Student Center's Information Desk
Due to the Fire at
FOR HEADS ONLY
Melody Furci and Beth Long
Will Be Working with the Fine Staff of
SHEAR HAIR DESIGN
Located on 14th St. next to Sammy's Country Cooking.
752-9706
(Tina Furci's clients may contact Melody or Beth for more information)
HOME C
� :�
Large Plate � All You Can Eat Vegetables,
1 Meat, Bread & Tea $4.07 plus Tax
MEAL PLANS AVAILABLE � $2.50Plate
512 E. 14th St. Near Dorms
Call for Take-Outs 752-0476
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 11 a.m8 p.m.
, � , .��
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Customer must pay any sales tax
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Expires Feb. 6,1986.
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 16, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 16, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.448
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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