The East Carolinian, January 14, 1986







�h� iaHt (Earnitman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No.Sfr aq
Tuesday, January 14, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
24 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Carillon Back On
ECU West Campus
As The Check Bounces
J B HUMBERT The East Carol.m�n
es, its thai time again when all ECU students make their pilgrimage to Mecca in order to offer
green paper as a sacrifice to the gods. Students make the pilgrimage hoping to influence the gods into
smiling upon themselves so that Ws mav some how appear in their professors' Krade hooks at the end
of the semester.
Halley's Comet Has Arrived
WASHINGTON (UPI) - I here
are almost as many wavs of pro-
nouncing Halley as there are oi
spelling Khadafy.
According to the Sational
Geographic Society, if you are
referring to Edmund Halley, the
English astronomer, you should
make the name rhyme with
"valley
(The Geographic must be
assuming that there is only one
way to pronounce "valley How
little it knows!)
s for Libya's leader. I PI
spells his name Moammar
Khadafy. But beyond those
guidelines, apparently, everyone
is on his own. No improvising,
please. And that goes for the
country as well.
Anyway, we are talking here
about comets, in particular the
one Halley discovered in P05.
which still bears his name. (The
comet, not the year.)
Halley's comet, now visible in
the United States away from cit)
lights, passes this way every 75 to
"6 years or so. It was last seen by
Americans in 1910.
I wasn't born et. but I have
heard my parents talk about it
and they agreed their oldest child,
then about 5, had the best chance
o seeing it twice.
My brother missed the current
visitation, but the Geographic
says much has been learned about
comets since 1910, and 1 believe
it.
See THE FACTS Page 3.
Bv BKTH WHICKER
Miff Wrllrf
Students may be wondering
from where the mysterious music
is coming on West Campus. The
ECU Carillon is back and is in
operation after more than a
decade of storage.
The Carillon is a music box
with bells that can be played from
a keyboard or some other
mechanism
Recently, the Carillon was
taken out o storage, repaired
and installed on the roof of
Mendenhall Student Center,
thanks to the Faculty Facilities
Committee, which recommended
the Carillon be put back into use
after its dormant past.
I he SGA purchased the
Carillon in 19fS9 for $4,000 and
dedicated to 1 eo Jenkins, who
was Chancellor at that time.
The Canilon was then installed
on the top of Austin Building,
where it chimed the hour and
played the ECl Alma Mater.
However, it created :h a noise
disturbance that it was put to
rest
Rudolph Alexander and stu-
dent leaders met in November to
decide when to play the newly in-
stalled Carillon and what should
be plaved. The group was in-
formed that the music box would
be installed on the side of the
penthouse of Mendenhall Stu-
dententer before the end of the
Fall semester. "With the
Economic Outlook Bright
By MIKF II DWICK
The employment outlook and
the economic prospects for the
Southeast, particularly North
Carolina and South Carolina, are
quite bright, according to two
economic reports published bv
the BellSouth Corp. and Man-
power Inc. and also James
Furney, director of the ECU
Career Planning and Placement
Office
The prospects for spring
graduates are "as good as or bet-
ter than last year said Furney.
However, Furney qualified his
statement, saying that the
economic climate could change,
but barring any economic varia-
tion, the outlook is good.
'The job maiket is com-
petitive; therefore, students
should start looking now for
those May and June jobs said
Furney.
Nevertheless, Furney said that
the job market is a fuction of an
individuals efforts. If an in-
dividual sits and waits for a job
to come to him or her, maintain-
ed Furney, then the job market
will be quite tough. On the other
hand, Furney said that those
students who have initative and
an aggressive outlook, then they
can make the job market more
hospitable.
Furney, in a phone interview,
cited math teachers as those who
are presently in the greatest de-
mand. Overall, education majors
are in high demand and have a
bright outlook for this May. He
also added that business ad-
ministration, computer science
and health professionals are cur-
rently in demand.
Liberal arts graduates will have
the toughest time again said
Furney. "They have a difficult
time finding a job mainly because
they are not trained for a specific
position such as accounting he
maintained.
However, the news is not all
bad. According to Fruney, the
retail industry is wide open and
an excellent opportunity for
those graduates with a beral arts
degree.
Furney's predictions are not
the only ones that paint a rosy
picture for the Southeast. Both
BellSouth Corp. and Manpower
Inc. predict that the Southeast,
particularly North Carolina and
South Carolina, will lead the na-
tion in economic growth.
BeliSouth's economic report
stated, "We expect the
Southeast's advantage to con-
tinue during the forecast period.
(Jan. 1, 1986 through Jan. 1,
1987) The expanding national
economy will continue to
stimulate the Southeast and that,
coupled with the region's long-
standing abiliiv ;o attract
newcomers, will produce solid
growth
The report stated that North
Carolina and South Carolina
have managed to grow faster
than the nation as a whole since
1982 despite substantial job
losses in textile and apparel
manufacturing. Those workers
are finding other jobs and "we
expect the Carohnas to grow
solidly in the forecast period by
continuing to rely on the service-
producing sectors for jobs rather
than manufacturing
Also. BellSouth predicted that
more than one million new jobs
will be created in the Southeast
by 1987 and real income will rise
by eight percent.
Manpower Inc. focused its
study on hir'ng trends across the
nation.
Nationally, Manpower said,
"The new year will begin amidst
a declining job outlook. Amongst
almost 12,500 employers
surveyed in nearly 400 cities, 19
percent expressed intentions to
add to their employment rolls
during the first quarter of 1986,
while 13 percent plan reductions
and 66 percent plan no change
The report pointed out that the
first quarter is seasonally a slow
period. However, finance, in-
surance and real estate firms will
provide the brightest spots for the
first quarter, while opportunities
will exist in education and public
administration.
Southern companies, accor-
ding to Manpower, will provide
the most favorable hiring
outlook. "While the wholesale
and retail outlook surpasses those
of other regions, it is still
seasonably weak.
On The Inside
Economic Outlook
According to various economic surveys, the Southeast is again supposed to lead the nation in
economic growth. More important, of the Southern states, North Carolina and South Carolina are
supposed to be the leaders. See related story on page 1.
Announcements2
Classifiedsg
Editorials4
Features11
Sports17
Courage is resistance to fear,
mastery of fear � not absence
of fear.
Mark Twain
Carillon's new location, it is less
likely to disturb students in class,
vet everyone will enjoy the
benefits of the music box ac-
:ording to David Brown, SGA
resident.
The Carillon will strike the
lour from 8 a.m. until 10 p.m.
.even days a week. The Alma
Vlater will be played at noon
Monday through Saturday.
On Memorial Day, July 4th,
md Veteran's Day, a patriotic
-ong will be played at noon after
he Alma Mater, a patriotic song
clayed at 3 p.m and a mini-
oncert of three to four songs at 6
).m. The ECU Veteran's Club
uggested that the songs be
Mayed on patriotic holidays.
On Commencement days,
nusic appropriate for com-
mencement will be played on the
same schedule as for patriotic
Holidays.
The Student Committee sub-
mitted the requests for the non-
religious Christmas music, which
will be played after the
Thanksgiving holidays. One song
will be played after the Alma
Mater, and a mini-concert con-
sisting of three to four songs will
be played at 6 p.m.
"I feel the Carillon will add
tradition and heritage to ECU
said Brown.
"Few students know the Alma
Mater; by hearing it played every
day, many more students will
recognize the song and heritage
of ECU added Brown.
Anyone wishing to offer
recommendations on the selec-
tion of songs played by the
Carillon should contact the
Department of University
Unions.
Economics Courses
Part Of The Basics
By BETH WHICKER
M�ff Wrtlrr
North Carolina educators
claim economics courses should
be taught as one of the basics.
According to a study done I)
the Hearst Corporation, only
half of 1,000 adults surveyed
knew what the prime rate is.
The H'inston-Salem Journal
claims that less than 25 percent of
high school students can
recognize a simple description of
capitalism.
However, North Carolina is
one of 27 states that requires a
course in economics for high
school graduation, according to
the Journal.
In 1980, the state provided
S200.000 to train North Carolina
educators in economics. This
year, the amount was $60,000,
said Larry Huzerford, director o;
the Center for Economic Educa-
tion at Winston-Salem State
University, where he teaches
teachers economics.
�ccording to Huer �'ord, few
teachers had an economics course
in college, and only a few con-
sidered it as important as the
three R's � reading, writing and
arithmetic.
"Teachers who feel that way
about economics really can't be
expected to communicate a lot of
enthusiasm to their students
said Huzerford.
"Too many professors teach
economics like everyone is going
to major in it. That's the curse of
college, too much
specialization he added.
See ECONOMICS Page 3.
J.S. HUMIERT - Tha East Carol.nian
New Year For The SGA
The SGA began the new year with a slow start Monday night. At-
tendence was low and the amount of business discussed was sparse
Elmer Meyer, vice-chancellor for Student Life, said that two floors
of Scott Dorm would be air-conditioned, which is spaces.
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I'Hfc hAST I'ARi H INI w
l k 14. lJSf
Announcements
JAZZ BAND
SPECIAL POP
PROGRAM
SENIORS
Sublimifi
FUN IN THE SUN
Di

I
r Daytami s
� �
� � � itions
a ula Burt a'
SUMMER JOBS

TEST WORKSHOP
VI Dl
taking 1
format! o
' '�- strafeO) a I
SRCLASSCOUNlIL
ECU B'OL OGY CLUB

STUDY SKILLS
. � ,
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FRISBEE CLUB
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS

A � a
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THE NAVIGATORS

i
circle k
vou have a friend who has not yet
'eyistered a' the Career Planning and Place
ment Service' Encovirage them to go by and
pick up a REGISTRATION PACKET ana to
attend eher ot two GENE RAl INFORMA
TiON MEETINGS On Wednesday Januar,
a, In Mendenhall 244 ana on Thursday
January ?3 in Rawl UO, brief iessors to e�
plain registration intervening on ampus
and how to bes; utilize the Career Planning
ana Placement Service will he ottered
GRADUATE STUDENTS
a �,iu graduate B . � Summer?
II so you are encouraged to register at me
Career Planning and Placemen' Se' t t
There will be GENERAL INFORMATION
MEETINGS on Wednesday January 72 at 5
pm in Mendenhall 244 �� 'Sday
-anuar, 23 at 3 p m .n Rawl 1 30 (or fOu to
learn more about how to best ue the Career
Plannmj and Placement Set .
RESUME WORKSHOPS
ireer Piai . . . � ,
" � B (ton h se i ��� ione hour
sessions t0 help you prepare four own
' -w graduates ge' oos without
parafion Many ernpl , �� s -eouest
� Showing your edui a'
oeence Sessions to help will be helo i the
Career Planning Room on January 24 at J
p m and lanuary 30 at 3 ano ' .
INTERVIEWING WORKSHOP
� � � Planning and Placer�
�� H se s ��� .����.
to aid � eloping
�� � . pa rig sii.ms tot Si .
a discussioi f how i
iew through this service w - - I � efl
� -i ' ses! a be held " � ireer l �
. Ra . � �
, �
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
la s � �
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6 30 6
Beg . �� �
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� .� Fei
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Sc uba Tues ' T hurs
' 10
Bas.c Sailing. Thurs
7 30 9 30 p m and Sat
1 30 4 30 p m
Sailing � Ousmg instru' tion Sat � Sun Mar
22 � 23, Sat 10 00 am Sun 4 00 pm
Continuing Education Erwm Man or call
7S7 4143
Vrti ' 18 Apr i 10
pm
April 17 Va,
Apr 19 26 May 2
p m
METHODISTPRESBYTER IAN
FELLOWSHIP
Our firsl Wednesday ntghl Supc s � ,� � ,
held this Wednesrtar January IS, at me
First Presbyter a �
I4tr, and Elm), at 5 30 p m tea'
L ASAGNA' Call !� 2030 for more miur �� a
tion Sponsored by Methodist and
Presbyterian Campus mm �
STOP SMOKIr,
� ,�. � reai
� . se1 y
� ��� a � .
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Wary E lesha
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
Greeting Fellow Student Leaders rhe
brotherhood of Alpha Ph. Alpha Frate
!nc Eta Nu Chapter would like to first and
for most wish you and your organization
seasons greetings, and cordially invite rou h
participate In our second annual Martm
Luther King jr Leade'Sh.p Award!
i. ffr.iony and Reception to be held on Mon
day January 20 1986 at Mendenhall Student
Center ' he purpose of this eve� s 'wofoirj
we would like to recognize both student and
community leaders and publicly gatttei
together t0 celebrate 'he f,rst official na
tonal observance of the birthday of Dr Va-
fin Luther King jr w arp asking fa'
organization to submit to . .
theif p'es.dent ana also mP name of any
person from your organization who you feel
"as displayed outstanding leaders- p
haacterist.es both in the organization and
'� �� ampus ommunity as a whole
person will compete for the Marl n uther
K ng jr eadersr p Awarr; ivfj I .
deadline for this informatioc s faai
ianuar, 17 1986 a' 5 OO p m in roon I
Jarv.s Dorm or give th,s informa' a I - .
member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraterr �.
LASAGNA
'art . � semester �� jreat ��
asagna � - eac
preparea by "errbp-c �
Wednesday
rst Presbytei at
� 4" jrvd I - Br ng 0ur friends
inly � 'SI 7240 few . � � � al ,
� A O
Nightclub
Carolina East Centre
Off Highway II
Near PHtt Theatre
Phone 756 A401
Wednesday Night
THE LADIES ZOO
All Lady Members In FREE Until 10 pm
Guys In At 10
25� Draft 75c 16 pz Draft
Friday Night
COLLEGE NIGHT
All Members In FREE Until 9 pm
50 Draft 50c Wine Coolers
$2.50 Pitchers
Bob "Daddy Cool" Hayworth is back playing the best
in Contemporary Dance Music both fun-filled nights.
Beau's, a private club
Located in the Carolina Cast Centre, Greenville.
c Phone 756 40i for more info.
The Fac
A TIN G This
SPRING SEMESTER
JOBS
SPRING BREAK IS COMING!
Now is the time to start getting your body
ready for bathing suit weather.
Bring this coupon in for S5.0Q off a
month's membership.
The Aerobic Workshop
417 Evans St. Mall
Downtown
Coupon Expires 1-31-86
757-1608
((UPON
2 Pieces of Chicken
(Original Recipe" or
Extra Cnspy-v)
1 small mashed potato
and gravy
1 Biscuit
I Medium Drink
$1.99
FOR ONE COMPLETE
2-PIFXK PACK
i i
We do Chicken Right"
Coupon Redeemable at
Greenville locations
Expiration Date 3 3-86
Gain
LAUNDRY
DETERGENT
Save 40
All Varieties
1 1 oz bag
�C'Ol PONM5
Charmin
79
TOILET TISSUE
4 roll pkg
99
42 oz box
$
1.49
Regular or Diet
7-Up or RC Cola
2 Liter Bottle each
79
Franklin Natural Grain
1 lb loaf
Regular 79c Value
Buy One at Regular Price,
Get One
JOOOCOOOOCCOCOOl
BREAD
FREE
PLAY & WIN
in Overtoil's Wheel of Fortune Game!
Three Names Are Drawn Each Week.
You Can Qualify to Spin The Wheel and
Win Cash or Grocery Prizes!
o Complete Details in Store!
Xsoooooo
Jif Creamy or Crunchy
PEANUT BUTTER
18 oz jar
1.39
Econom
Vital Part
Of School
CCOGO0O23OCCOO00GCO!
Lean Cuisine Frozen
Chicken Chow Mein
or Spaghetti
Ore-Ida Frazen Crinkle Cut Grade "A� Rresh White
French Fries Jumbo EGGS
Dozen 4 Jl c

1 1 oz pkg.
$
1.39
2 lb bag
19
99
Richfood
MILK
or Donald Duck
ORANGE JUICE
1 2 gallon carton each
99
Miller Lite
6 pack
2 oz cans
2.39
Sea I test $
ICE CREAM
12 gallon carton
All Varieties Except Cubic Scoops
1.99
1OVERTON'S COUPON
ECU STUDENTS & FACULTY ONLY
5 Discount
On $10.00 or more food order at
Overtoil's Supermarket. Present
this coupon to cashier with ECU I.D.
Open 8 am - 8 pm
Monday through Saturday
Sundays 1 pm - 6 pm
Name
Amount of Purchase
Discount Amount
Coupon Expires MM6
limit on discount oor ID. nwmoor
Thus Discount S'm val,d In Conjunction With ny OtherDbcxmni

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 14, 1986
STOP SMOKING!
a as �o stop
� �' or Group
M MM flSt$ for
Mondays �1 � 00
- room 10'
57 641 for
Club
Near Plitt Theatre
Phone 756 6401
day Night
IESZOO
In FREE Until 10 pm
In At 10
75� 16 oz Draft
y Night
ENIGHTH!
FREE Until 9pm
50t Wine Coolers
etchers
xrth is back playing the best
Ausic both fun-filled nights.
i private club
�a East Centre, Greenville.
01 far more info.
f
i
E. aUL&Ht
ILET TISSUE
kg
Chy
BUTTER
Richfood
MILK
or Donald Duck
ORANGE JUICE
1 2 gallon carton each
99
is coupon
& FACULTY ONLY
scount
lore food order of
rmorket. Present
ishter with ECU I.D.
1
Ml
ear I.D. �!�
punction With Any Other Discount
Subliminal Messages Can Not Harm
By BETH WHICKER
Miff Wrtltr
Legislatures, parents, clergv
and musicians Frank Zappa and
John Denver have raised public
awareness by campaigning and
voicing their views on the effects
of subliminal messages in rock
music and advertising on the
public.
The Arkansas State Legislature
felt strongly that rock music af-
fected children in adverse ways.
The legislature felt so strong that
in 1983, the legislature passed a
bill that requires the following
message be attached to all records
and tapes sold in the state: Warn-
ing: This record contains
backward masking which may be
perceptible at a subliminal level
when the record is played for-
ward. Moreover, other states are
considering the same legislation.
Backward masking is hidden
messages that can be heard if the
record is played in a reverse mo-
tion on an ordinary turntable.
Proponents for the warning label
have suggested since the mid-70s
that backward masking is evident
in Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to
Heaven
Is it possible to understand
messages played backwards?
Psychologists John K. Vokey and
J. Don Read at the Univeisity of
Lethbridge conducted a study in-
volving 65 students to examine
the comprehension of subliminal
messages. Vokey and Read state,
"To our ears, messages heard
backward retain many of the pro-
perties of their forwardly
presented counterparts
According to Vekey and Read,
as taken from American
Psychologist, 99 percent of
students in the survey could
discriminate the sex of a speaker
as the tape was played in the
reverse motion.
Students were able to
discriminate paired backward
passages spoken by the same in-
dividual with a 78.5 percent ac-
curacy rate.
In a related task, students were
asked if backward sentences
would make sense if heard in the
forward direction. Less than 50
percent accurately chose the cor-
rect sentences.
Another task consisted of hear-
ing Psalm 23 (religious messages
are said to have no subliminal
messages) and Lewis Carroll's
"Jabberwocky" backwards. The
The Facts Behind Halley's
Continued From Page 1.
For one thing, my parents
thought they were seeing a fiery
object streaking across the night
sky. How wrong they were!
As astronomers now know,
Halley's comet is more like a big
snowball that moves slowly in
relation to the stars.
Scientists theorize that comets
are composed of such frozen
substances as water, ammonia
methane, carbon dioxide and
hydrogen cyanide.
I don't know what they figure
a snowball is composed of, and
the Geographic doesn't say. I
don't even know whether they
pronounce it properly.
It is known, however, that
some of the ice evaporates w hen a
comet gets close to the sun.
Halley's comet, incidentally,
has a tail that is about 4 miles in
diameter and 50 million miles
long. Yet, we are told all of its
cosmic dust, which may be the
same stuff from which the
Economics
Vital Part
Of School
Continued From Page 1.
"Economics is actually com-
mon sense and making good
choices in your personal, profes-
sional and civil life he said.
"A knowledge of economics
also helps a person vote better
Huzerford said.
According to the Journal, the
economically literate person
realized there are no easy
answers.
The Journal's report concludes
that economics courses can pro-
duce economically rational
citizens who are immune to
economic snow jobs by politi-
cians.
universe was formed, would fit
into a single suitcase.
I'm just guessing now, but I
would suppose that if all of its
gases were fitted into your
stomach, you would have a case
of heartburn that even a suitcase
full of Rolaids wouldn't relieve.
At any rate, the comet's 1986
visit is said to be among the dim-
mest on record. It must have been
brighter in 1910. Otherwise, my
family probably wouldn't have
noticed it.
Thev sav you need binoculars
to spot it now, and I can tell you
that nobody in my family
habitually went outside at night
with field glasses.
The so-called "Oort Cloud
where Halley's is believed to have
originated, is suspected of con-
taining at least 100 billion or-
biting comets. About half a
dozen are discovered each year.
There is talk of putting a per-
son on a comet, possibly before
Halley's next scheduled return in
2061.
experimenters detected hidden
messages in the material before it
was given to the students.
According to Read and Vokey,
"Several creative listening pat-
terns of the backward passages
could be interpreted as sounding
like something meaningful
Only 15 percent of the students
involved in the experiment
detected the phrases that had
been heard previously by those
directing the experiment.
According to Read and Vokey,
"We could Find no evidence that
subjects are influenced either
consciously or subconsciously by
the semantic control of backward
messages
Key is mostly concerned with
advertisers' intent to sell by
associating products with sex.
According to Key's studys, taken
from American Psychologist, 95
percent of college and males
recognized a Playboy magazine
advertisement one month after
seeing the ad.
Other findings by Sheppard,
Standing, Conzzio and Haer
show that most college-age males
recognize almost all material
shown to them.
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$te iEaat Kar0lttttatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
rOMLUVl NDER. Ge�enlHtumt,
J -W S I)1 . tanagmgEdito,
Mike 11 dwick, .�
SCOT LX)i K, s,
John Shannon, ���
LORIN PASQl l . .
DeChaNUEJohnson
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Greg Winchester, n dlui�t
Anthony Martin, am
John Peterson, om
Shannon Short. ���� v�
Dfbbii- Stevens, v.�
December 5, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Financial Aid
Student Welfare Cheats?
Virtually every semester 1 o to
myself that 1 will write something
about the ways in which the finan-
cial aid system for higher education
is flawed and virtually every
semester 1 fail to do so for reasons
that remain mysterious even to me.
But this semester there is one aspect
of the aid system in particular that
has piqued my ire and so I have
decided to keep my appointment
with destiny.
It is not on an infrequent basis
that students who want to write for
this newspaper have discovered that
it they do so the meager wage ;
they will earn from us will bite into
their financial aid. 1 his is so
because the government considers
any wage that a student earns as
"self -help" and thus a sum that
disqualifies him or her from being
considered for the full amount of
federal or state funds. That is
because financial aid for higher
education is "need based mean-
ing that only the poor and destitute
should receive it.
Ot course, students who confront
the possibility of loosing financial
aid money general!v choose not to
become involved in working with
the campus media or u other-
salaried campus occupation. Never-
theless, it is common knowledge
that many who receive financial aid
do, in fact, hold jobs off campus
from which they receive a sup-
plemental income. This is true at
schools all over the country.
Many people will in all likelihood
conclude that students who conduct
themselves in such a manner are
welfare cheats. Strictly speaking,
they are correct. And vet. this
generation of "welfare cheats" has,
by and large, come from s ;
working class families and ;i
were raised on traditional values.
They have shown a measure of in-
itiative simply by choosing to come
to college and some ol them will
make the Dean's List and go on to
become MAs and PHDs. They do
not fit the "welfare cheat"
stereotype of the lav and shiftless
deadbeat.
Students who are working a job
in addition to receiving financial
aid are actually being ambitious. I
have a friend who goes to Yale who
told me of a clever scheme whereby
he invested all of his student loans
in money market funds which pay
substantially higher interest rates
than the government requires
students to pay on their loans.
Thus, in the end, my friend ex-
pected to actually pay off his loans
and make a tidy profit with the
assistance of the government.
O.K 1 know what you must be
thinking. By now you're probably
wondering if I'm trying to be ironic
or it I even have a point to make
here. Well, my point is simply this;
the current financial aid regulations
seldom prevent anyone who wants
to from earning a second income.
1 hev only, foster a contempt for of-
ficialdom because they appear to
discourage initiative and the desire
to work. Since somehow or other
college is supposed to teach people
io become productive contributing
members of society this doesnT
make sense. The financial aid
system should provide more
generous rewards for people who
do work. In the long run, however,
what would make the most sense is
H higher education was paid for in
return for some kind of national
service such as a stint in the Peace
Corps or Vista.
Those who have served in the
military have enjoyed the benefits
of the Gl Bill (rightfully so). Now it
is time that our country recognized
the contributions of those who have
combated poverty, hunger and
disease overseas and at home. More
the point, education is the vital
life blood of a democracy and of an
advanced economy. Many Euro-
an nations pay for the education
of their citizens. The L'nited States
should do likewise. Without a
highly educated citizenry we will be
bound to fall behind other advanc-
ed nations in both economic perfor-
mance and the rate of cultural pro-
gress. We should stop making
welfare cheats out of our students.
At the very least we should not
penalize them for working.
Marcos Vs. Aquino
Democracy
Mrs. Corazon Aquino, the c;
of anti-Marjos Filipinos, has declared
that if elected president, she will allow
Communists into her cabinet.
mind, she told reporters in whai wa
obvious appeal tor the Communi
a coalition government. You
gather from this that she is hersel
Communist. "1 would he the I
in the world to be a Communist,
said. But Mrs. Aquino, wl
as a law-and-order candidate in
tion to the excesses o Presideni Marcos,
which may or may not have ii
assassination of her husband,
Filipinos and the world to know
has in mind a verv special kind i
munist, namely "Communists (w
nounce all forms ot violence " It Mi
Aquino can produce Commu
fit that description, si
Nobel Prize for alchemy
es in a countr so situated a :
geop i as to be critic .
American interests m the area. "Of 159
' ites of the tinted Nations
leasi 100 ai ably governed m
Philippines l �

while ii
IN n s.
ON THE RIGHT
B WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY
The big debate about the Filipino
engagement has begun not only
but also here. Mrs. Jean Kirkpatrick has
written in her column that American
purism is causing difficulty in viewing
the Filipino election realisticall) . V (
asking of Marcos the kind ot behavior
we don't ask ot other world leaders with
whom we have normal relations, and
this notwithstanding that Marcos heads
a government friendly to the United
tve rthui Schles . i
'�� reel Journal. He
ikes the argume
fa . back tl
by failing to ba �
. acknowledges that M: Reaj
� Marc is as he has .
nous r
I : lously 5
1 dX'� is faci exercising ex
ized ii
More . Mi n
inger, there isn't any other course
ike, because
rnal di
t
' zes . ne in. So' "S
Marcos Packing his col ruled.
something :r;e
iv( b wen insufficient attention
- - ocratic procedures
ins guarantee pleasa
d law abiding governments
w j- are we going to do - b we, 1
mea Schlesingers and the Solarzes
and the Americans for Democratic v
pens in the Philippines
is thai Marc s is returned'1 Returned,
-over, in air election judged bv
observers to have been fairly conducl
V e should begin bv rem
�elves that in our tune, people voting
free!) have made disastrous political
mistakes In German in 1932, if you
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HUM GARY flART
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M0R�VOT7AJG5
ELECTION
Deficits, Debts And Eurodollars
TW6W0RIPS0NW (NAMMATc PSMOCRAr
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A PRAFf
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�gflra ij�rnc�vn�yx�;
By 3A STONE
Over the course of the past sear, both
the federal deficit and the national debt
have been hot topics of public debate.
Most people, however, have remained
largely in the dark about the most fun-
damental issues underlying this debate.
What, for example,is the difference bet-
ween the federal deficit and the national
debt and what is the impact of each on
the national economy? Simply put, the
federal deficit represents the difference
between the money spent by the federal
government in any given year and the
revenue it receives that year. The na-
tional debt is the cumulative total
deficits from past years. The debt is held
in the form of U.S. bonds and bills.
most of which are owned by individuals
rather than collective entities such as
corporations.
The graph above shows the relation-
ship between the federal deficit, the na-
tional debt, and the level of production
in the U.S. economy. Over the past
decade, the federal deficit has sometimes
represented an increasing share of the
gross national product; at other times, it
has represented a diminishing propor-
tion of GNP. The national debt, on the
other hand, has followed a more consis-
tent pattern. Only during the last four
years has the national debt begun to rise
(dramatically in relation to GNP. This
eflects the impact of the record deficits
ncurred by the Reagan administration.
When the federal deficit or the na-
tional debt rises as a percentage of GNP,
t is growing faster than the economy;
when it shrinks, it is growing more slow-
than the economy, rhroughout most
ot the 1960's and I970's, the debt grew
more slowly than the economy, did.
Although the government ran modes;
deficits, the growth of the economy
meant that the ratio of debt to GNP
tended to decline over time. In the las;
foui years, on the other hand, annual
deficits have been enormous and the rate
o increase of the debt has far outpaced
the rate ol economic growth.
The most obvious effect of the na-
tional debt on the economy is servicing it
� paying interest to the people who
hold U.S. government bonds I verv
year, part of the federal budget is alloted
to paving the interest on the national
debt As the size of the national debt has
grown as compared to the level of GNP,
the cost of the debt has taken ever-larger
shares of government spending. Accor-
ding to Dollars & Sense, since the begin-
ning of the Reagan era, interest
payments on the debt have increased bv
seventy billion dollars � more than the
sum total of al of his cuts on social
spending. The primary recipients of
U.S. interest payments have always been
the nation's wealthy, among whom
bond ownership is concentrated. But in
the 1980's, they also include bond
holders in other countries. Past deficits
were largely owed to U.S. citizens. Now,
for the first time, a large portion of the
money is owed to foreigners.
If the economy continues to grow
more slowly than the national debt,
these interest costs will continue to ac-
count for an ever-larger proportion of
federal spending. Given the current ad-
ministration's unwillingness to rescind
its tax cuts for the wealthy, and its attat-
chmei
ding,
paying inten
it �
Decembi r 191 � Dollars A v
i
Campus Forum
Forum Rules
The tost Carolinian welconu
expressing all points 0J vie .
drop them by our office in tin Pui
ttons Building, across from the en-
trance ot Jovner I ibrar,
for purposes of verificath -n all let-
ten must mclude the name, ma,or and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s) I,
are limited to two typewritten
double-spaced or neatly primed ill
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no persona,
attacks will be permuted. Students
facultv and staff wntmg letters for this
page are reminded that they are limited
to one every five issues.
fH� l ASI AMJ
Manu
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prograrr.
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increased :
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The resui: was
surplus in the S
for the r,e: 2! yeai
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will offset rev reree-
"babv-bust" c
boomers retir aftei
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higher payroll taxes r . n p
presumabiv Socia v
good phvsica! shape ,
centurv
Still, if Socia. Secui ty is
ciallv, it remains unstable ideoK ,
and politically. The prograrr j
dally redistribute m its impact.
universal in its coverage, it ex
degrading means tests. s such
always been resented by conservati
especially now when privatization lj
in vogue, and politically, a lotf
younger voters are growing skep:
about its worth.
The conservative critique of Sc
Security is fourfold. First, it is argi
people would be better off if the- j
invest their payroll deductions, rat
than having them compulsonly
lected by the state. Citizens would
more "free to choose and they mil
well be financially better off. Secol
,i
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THE EAST CAAOLIMIAN
i I VY
nes
dollars
-
n A Sense
ipus Forum
hrum Rules
nes letters
ievk va or
�. Publica-
�he en-
all let-
major and
ss, phone number
I etters
" panes,
d All
editing for brevi-
i libel, and no personal
(' be permitted Students,
an anting letters for this
unded that they are limited
tes.
Other Opinion
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY !4. 1V8S
Manufacturing Consent With McCar thy ism
ByMARKSCHAPIRO
Mother Jonct
Dario Fo, the Italian author of more
than 40 satirical plays, seems an unlikely
threat to the security of the United
States. One of Fo's plays. Accidental
Death of an Anarchist, debuted on
Broadway in 1984, but the author was
not allowed to supervise rehearsals.
After Fo was invited by the producers,
the U.S. State Department denied him a
visa, deciding that his membership in a
prisoners' rights organization known as
Soccorso Rosso branded him a "ter-
rorist sympathizer After the American
Civil Liberties Union and a dozen other
civil liberties and theatrical groups laun-
ched a public campaign in Fo's behalf,
the State Department reversed itself and
gave the playwright a visa just before his
play's premiere. The novel approach
taken by the play's producers may have
been the key to the State Department's
about-face; they claimed that denying
Fo a visa infnnged on their ability to
earn a living as investors in the play.
In 1983. Hortensia Allende, the
widow of Salvador Allende and a resi-
dent of Mexico, was invited by several
universities in the United States to speak
about the role of women in the opposi-
tion to the Chilean dictatorship. But the
U.S. embassy in Mexico denied her a
visa; it cited Mrs. Allende's ties to the
World Peace Council, which State
claims is a Soviet front. The rejection of
Mrs. Allende's request for a visa came at
a time when the Reagan administration
was considering the resumption of arms
sales to Chile. The denial had a par-
ticularly ironic outcome: soon after-
ward. Hortensia Allende's "successor
Mrs. Augusto Pinochet, was Nancy
Reagan's guest for tea at the White
House.
In the 1960s. Nino Pasti was Italy's
representative to the NATO Military
Committee, stationed at the Pentagon.
Later, he served at NATO's vice-
supreme allied commander in Europe
tor nuclear affairs and, after retiring
from the military, served two terms in
the Italian senate. But Pasti's sentiments
have changed since his days as a four-
star general. Now over "0 years old, he
claims to have American military
documents that dispute NATO's asser-
tion of Soviet military superiority in
Europe. After Pasti was invited by peace
groups to speak against the cruise and
Pershing II missile deployments, his re-
quest for a visa was denied in the fall of
1983. His entry into the United States,
said the State Department, would be
"prejudicial to the public interest
Fo, Allende. and Pasti are three
among thousands of foreign intellec-
tuals, authors, and political figures who
have been denied U.S. visas because of
their political beliefs. The case of Farley
Mowat, the renowned Canadian writer,
provides another recent example.
Last April, Mowat was snared by the
U.S Immigration and Naturalization
Service at Toronto's Pearson Interna-
tional Airport before his flight to Los
Angeles to kick off a publicity tour fo-
his book Sea of Slaughter. The INS per
formed a routine check of airline
passengers against its visa lookout book
of "excludable" aliens and discovered
that Mowat was included. The
Canadian-U.S. border is supposedly
open, and Mowat did not legally require
a visa.
The INS refused to explain whv it ex-
cluded Mowat, as it does with all foreign
citizens denied entry. An anonymous
source later issued a partial explanation:
Mowat, the author of over a dozen
naturalist books, was put on the INS
"hot" list after being quoted in a 1968
newspaper article saying that he was
ready to defy American B-52 bombers
with a .22 rifle during their low-level
training runs over Newfoundland. "My
threat still holds Mowat explained
during an interview after the airport in-
cident. Soon after, the immigration ser-
vice made what it considered a con-
ciliatory gesture, offering Mowat a one-
shot waiver to complete his publicity
tour. In a now-celebrated declaration of
Canadian nationalism. Mowat retorted
to the immigration service. "Stuff it
(He subsequently indicated that he
would accept the offer only if it were ac-
companied by an apology from Presi-
dent Reagan and if he were flown into
the country on Air Force One.) "It was a
scurnious, scatological offer explain-
ed Mowat, who has since written a book
on the border controversy. My
Discovery of America.
As Mowat's case illustrates, some of
the State Department's "excludables"
are issued visas with highly restricted
travel rights, limited to particular cities
or special public appearances. Some are
denied once, then admitted after another
try. The practice makes the United
States the only Western democracy to
exclude foreign citizens on ideological
grounds.
The law keeping America pure is the
1952 McCarran-Walter Act, which
forms the basis for current U.S. im-
migration law; it is described by
playwright Arthur Miller as "one of the
pieces of garbage left behind by the sink-
ing of the great scow of McCarthyism
Miller suffered his own travel problems
in reverse when Joe McCarthy's Senate
committee succeeded in getting his
passport revoked in the 1950s, thereby
preventing Miller from legally leaving
the United States. President Truman ex-
coriated Congress after it passed the law
over his veto: "Seldom has a bill ex-
hibited the distrust evidenced here for
citizens and aliens alike
The McCarran-Walter Act sets out 33
reasons for excluding individuals from
the United States, combining pro-
stitutes, paupers, and the insane with
ideological undesirables and homosex-
uals. Of the two political sections in the
Act, one permits the exclusion of in-
dividuals associated with Communist
party or affiliated organizations. The
other section can be used to exclude in-
dividuals considered a danger to the
"welfare, safely, or security of the
United States or whose entry is deem-
ed "prejudicial to the public interest
The State Department maintains what
is probably the world's largest blacklist,
a global computer network known as the
Automated Visa Lookout System
(AVLOS.)
There are about a million names in
AVLOS. according to the Legislative
and intergovernmental Affairs Office of
the State Department. The list includes
all people considered offenders under
the provisions of the McCarran-Walter
Act. An estimated 40.000 to 50,000 in-
dividuals have been judged excludable
for ideological reasons. A classified list
of "proscribed organizations" is in the
Foreign Service Manual issued to
diplomatic staff in American embassies
and missions overseas.
According to Charles Gordon, the list
of individuals and organizations is com-
piled from a number of confidential in-
telligence sources, including the Central
Intgelligence Agency, local informants
and a host country's police services. The
Royal Canadian Mounted Police, for ex-
ample, provided the information on
Farley Mowat that formed the basis for
his exclusion.
The Bureau of Consular Affairs' ex-
cludable list includes some of the
world's most distinguished authors and
artists, all of whom have experienced
visa difficulties at one time or another:
Nobel laureates Gabriel Garcia Mar-
quez. Pablo Neruda, and Czeslaw
Milosz; Mexican writer Carlos Fuentes,
English novelist Graham Greene. South
African dissident poet Dennis Brutus,
and Spanish filmmaker Luis Bunuel.
Every administration since
Eisenhower's has abused the ideological
exclusion provision of U.S. immigration
law. The Reagan administration,
however, has gone a step further to limit
public debate - most notably concerning
its Central American policies.
Eloquent spokespersons opposing the
adminstratiors policies have been
repeatedly denied visas, preventing them
from keeping speaking engagements, ap-
pearing at congressional hearings, or at-
tending meetings with activists, business
organizations, or university officials.
Representative Barney Frank
(D-Mass.) has challenged the ad-
ministration with a bill that would
revamp American visa policies and pre-
vent the State Department from con-
sidering its own foreign policy interest in
deciding who is allowed to enter the
United States. "Getting into the United
States should not be seen as some make
of approval says Frank.
The American Civil Liberties Union is
challenging several of the visa denials in
court. Representing some of the people
who invited Hortensia Allende, the
ACLU is suing the State Department for
violating their right to hear her speak.
The ACLU also claims that the latest
rash of exclusions are contrary to con-
gressional intent, which was aimed at
barring the entry of espionage agents,
saboteurs, and active revolutionaries,
not those with controversial political
views.
When people apply for visas at their
local U.S. consulate or at border check-
points (as is the case for Canadians),
their names are automatically checked
against the AVLOS memory
bank.Membership in any proscribed
organization is reason enough for get-
ting on the list.
Most excludable aliens are ultimately
"waived in and issued visas. But once a
name is added to AVLOS, it is nearly
impossible to have it erased, as Mowat
and others have discovered. The only
guaranteed method is to prove that one's
association with a proscribed organiza-
tion was involuntary, or to engage in a
ritual or repentance by demonstrating
five years of active opposition to the
priciples of communism. Afficionados
of this escape clause refer to it as the
"Koestler Amendment named after
Hungarian author Arthur Koestler, who
defected, renounced his ties to the Com-
munist party, and wrote about his
negative experiences in the Soviet bloc
for the next 40 yars.
The most haunting aspect of the
Automated Visa Lookout System is that
an individual may never know what ac-
tivity qualifies him or her for exclusion.
Like poor Josef K. in Franz Kafka's The
Trial, an alien is never informed of the
specific cause of a denial.
Critics charge that U.S. visa policies
violate the human rights provisions of
the 1975 Helsinki accords, which
guarantee the free flow of ideas between
nations. Helsinki Watch, the Fund for
Free Expression, the Association of
American Publishers' International
Freedom to Publish Committee, and
more than 30 civil liberties, political,
and cultural groups have organized the
Coalition for Free Trade in Ideas to
repeal the ideological exclusion sections
of the McCarran-Walter Act. PEN, the
international writers' group, will hold its
48th congress in New York this Januarv,
and a score of excludable writers will be
invited as a test of the law
Satirist Dario Fo offers comfort to the
excluded. Unable to cross the American
frontier last year to address a Free Trade
in Ideas conference, he spoke via
satellite from a Toronto television
studio. Appearing on a screen in a
Washington meeting hall, Fo told the
conference: "The fact that the State
Department deniedthe visa is
something which makes me very proud.
I took a look at the list of people denied
visas to the United States, and :her. I
realized that I am in beautiful
company
Carlos Fuentes, who has faced the I
ful experience of applying and reapply-
mg for waivers to enter tl : i
since he was first denied a visa in 1961,
also spoke out at the conference.In I
talk, Fuentes captured the absur- I
U.S. policy. "It is hard to imagine
Fuentes declared, "that the insi I
of this great republic, its den
edifice, its vast economy and
power, can in any wa be endangered
the physical presence of Gra
Greene, Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Da'
Fo, or Mrs. Salvador Alende. Or. ' .
contrary: experience has :augh:
that it is the application of the exc
sionary clause that endangers the
republic, mocks democracy, demora.
the true friends of the United States, and
offers undeserved aces to the S
UnionThis is a clause that be I .
the realm of sadomasochism, noi I
legal ledgers of a self-respecting, power-
ful d e �
Is Social Security System Really Over The Hill?
.
By ROBERT KLTTNER
In 1982, a presidential commission
chaired by Alan Greenspan undertook
one of history's great rescue operations,
the stabilization of the Social Security-
program.
Following the commission's recom-
mendations, Congress pared benefits,
increased payroll taxes, made half of
Social Security benefits taxable for af-
fluent retirees, phased in a higher retire-
ment age and modified the cost-of-
living escalator so that Social Security
benefits can increase only as fast as the
growth of real wages (which are the
source of Social Security revenue).
The result was to create a large
surplus in the Social Security accounts
for the next 20 years, during which time
new baby boomers in the work force
will offset new retirees of the previous
"baby-bust" cohort. By the time baby
boomers retire, after 2010, the retire-
ment age will have been raised and
higher payroll taxes put in place;
presumably Social Security will be in
good physical shape well into the 21st
century.
Still, if Social Security is stable finan-
cially, it remains unstable ideologically
and politically. The program is substan-
tially redistributive in its impact, but
universal in its coverage; it exacts no
degrading means tests. As such, it has
always been resented by conservatives,
especially now when privatization is so
in vogue, and politically, a lot of
younger voters are growing skeptical
about its worth.
The conservative critique of Social
Security is fourfold. First, it is argued,
people would be better off if they could
invest their payroll deductions, rather
than having them compulsorily col-
lected by the state. Citizens would be
more "free to choose and they might
well be financially better off. Second,
conservatives contend that Social
Security was too good a deal for the
first generation of pensioners, and a
bad deal for young people just entering
the workforce.
The founding generation got to pay
very low taxes, but reaped rising
benefits in inflation-sheltered dollars.
The younger generation, in contrast,
must pay very high payroll taxes, and
will collect benefits that cannot possibly
keep pace, because the ratio of workers
to retirees keeps falling.
Third, despite the 1983 congressional
restructuring, Social Security is held to
be economically destructive. It sup-
posedly depletes the savings rate, drags
down economic growth and cannot
possibly fulfill its promises without a
confiscatory rate of taxation.
Finally, it is argued that Social
Security is redistributive the wrong way;
it taxes the working people, many of
whom are poor, to pay the elderly,
many of whom are rich.
The remedy, for conservatives, is to
privatize retirement income, as much
and as fast as possible, and to let Social
Security gradually metamorphose into a
means-tested program for the cer-
tifiably needy.
Peter Ferrara of the Cato Institute,
formerly at the Reagan White House, is
a prime exponent of this view. He wants
to create a "super-IRA even more
tax-sheltered than the present IRA, and
allow people to opt out of Social Securi-
ty.
Politically, the danger to Social
Security is not that such proposals will
be taken seriously in the short run, but
that as the upper-middle-class public
gradually comes to rely on IRA's,
Keogh plans, so-called "401-Ks
private pension plans and similar tax-
subsidized private retirement schemes,
the broad constituency for Social
Security will gradually erode. The tax
subsidy to privatized retirement
schemes will exceed $100 billion in 1986.
Over ha'f of all newly retired couples
have retirement incomes from private
pensions.
Those critics wringing their hands
about the distributive inequalities of
Social Security would do well to con-
sider the topsy-turvy distributive effects
of tax-subsidized private retirement.
Social Security is regressive in the way it
collects taxes, but highly progressive in
the distribution of its benefits. But the
tax subsidy to private retirement
schemes is 100 percent regressive.
The average recipient of a private
pension is far more affluent than the
average retiree. IRAs are ubiquitous
among upper-income professionals, but
are used by less than 20 percent of peo-
ple with incomes below $18,000. .And
Keogh plans and 401-Ks are used
primarily by doctors, lawyers and in-
dependent business people with enough
discretionary income to shelter.
A $100,000-a-year lawyer who socks
away $15,000 in a Keogh plan needs to
pay income tax on only $85,000. The
tax that he didn't pay is paid by all those
low-income workers straining under the
burden of Social Security payroll taxes.
Indeed, the $20,000-a-year worker pays
both Social Security and income tax on
all his earnings; the $100,000 profes-
sional who shunts pan of his income in-
to tax-sheltered savings pays neither tax
on those earnings.
We have slipped into a multi-tiered
retirement system in which the haves are
being subsidized by other taxpayers to
provide for their own retirement, while
the have-less class is still very heavily
dependent on Social Security. There is a
real emerging danger to the public pro-
gram. As the upper-middle class comes
to rely more heavily on tax-sheltered
private income schemes, Social Security
will loom smaller.
Most of the conservative criticisms of
Social Security are primarily
ideological, not factual. Economically,
there is no proven effect of Social
Security on savings rates. Europe has a
much more generous Social Security-
system and much higher private savings,
too. Fiscally, Social Security should be
quite stable well into the next century,
thanks to the 1983 amendments, and if
wages moderate, so will Social Security
pay-outs.
My generation will indeed get a lower
return from Social Security investment
than my parents' did, but that was by-
design. The program's designers
recognized that pay-outs would have to
be adequate to coax older workers out
of the work force, even if the first
generation paid its dues in the Great
Depression.
The one element of the conservative
critique that has real power, though, is
the last one. Payroll taxes, especially on
the working poor, are too high, and in-
defensibly regressive. Rich retirees do
get Social Security benefits (though only
about 10 percent of Social Security reci-
pients earn even $25,000, and rich
retirees get even more subsidy via tax-
sheltered retirement income). The
young are indeed increasingly overtax-
ed, and skeptical.
But the remedy is to change the way
we finance and tax Social Security, not
to privatize the whole program. A big
exemption on income subject to payroll
tax, or a partial shift of Social Security
finance to general revenue sources, or
even to a value-added tax. would solve
the regressivity problem. Making Social
Security checks fully subject to the in-
come tax above a moderate income
threshold � say $15,000 a year �
would deal with much of the millionaire
problem.
As the upper-middle class relies more
heavily on retirement income, defenders
of Social Security need to shore up the
program's political vulnerability.
Defenders need as allies today's young
workers, and those workers deserve a
financial break.Why not remove some
of the tax subsidy now going to
economically inefficient private retire-
ment schemes such as the IRA and use
the money to reduce payroll taxes on
moderate-income workers? and why not
fully tax Social Security benefits, the
same way we tax private retirement
benefits?
Even with its flaws, Social Security
remains a successful and efficient form
of social income. It has allowed tens of
millions of working Americans to enjoy
a dignified retirement. It has reduced
the poverty ratio of elderlv people to
that of the general population. In
evaluating the criticism of Social Securi-
ty and its remaining flaws, one always
needs to ask: Is the critic out to perfect
the program or to dismantle it?
6W0,� fM 6tAP WU'Rg PMALW H TOUCH WITH TWfiST
1

i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 14, 1986
Congress Makes Students Pay Taxes
News Bureau Photo
Street Artist
ECU senior Donald Rees of Philadelphia, Pa letters a new sin
on "Greek Street" on the ECU campus. Greek Street is a
pedestrian walk-way and catering place for students between
classes. Rees is painting the logo of the honor and service society.
Gamma Beta Phi.
WASHINGTON, D.C. (CPS) -
Students are returning to campus
this month to find themselves in a
new role: as taxpayers.
Thanks to congressional inac-
tion in December, for example,
grad students who get tuition or
fees paid in return for teaching or
research work are going to have
taxes withheld for the first time
and will have less take-home pay
starting this month.
In addition, all students who
get scholarship, grant, stipend or
fellowship money that they don't
use for tuition soon will be sub-
ject to higher taxes if the Senate
approves the new tax reform bill
the House passed in December.
But educators, who are
scrambling to undo the tax
damage done to students over the
holidays, hope the damage will be
temporary.
For the time being, however,
the Internal Revenue Service will
consider grad students' tuition
and fee remissions as taxable in-
come.
Some colleges will begin
withholding taxes from fee remis-
sions this week.
The reason is that Congress
could not agree to extend the tax
exemption on remissions before it
recessed in December.
"You're going to be taxed on
money you don't even receive
United States Student Associa-
tion (L'SSA) lobbyist Kathy Ozer
laments.
Tom Butts, i -crsity of
Michigan lohb. imates the
average student will have S100
per month les- take-home pay
under currr .ite because of
the new re- - ilicies.
Help keep
America
looking
good.
SB&
!
X

'�
i
�$
No one was willing to guess
how many students nationwide
will now find their take-home pay
reduced, but Butts thinks some
1,300 grad assistants will be af-
fected at Michigan.
Withholding, moreover, is
"going to be a terribly expensive
thing to administer maintains
Indiana University adminstrator
Sheila Cooper.
The burden will be even
heavier on out-of-state students,
who have to pay more taxes
because they are subject to higher
tuition rates. "It's terribly un-
fair Cooper contends.
Although Indiana intends to
start withholding taxes in
January, it's not certain how
many schools will do so initially.
"I don't think they (colleges)
will withhold until it is definite
there will be no extension of the
exemption Ozer speculates.
The same problem came up last
year when Congress delayed ex-
tending the tax exemptions, and
many schools waited until a law
was passed.
Lobbyists expect Congress will
extend the exemption when it
reconvenes this month and make
the exemption retroactive. "The
question is when Cooper says.
While the lobbyists say there's
little organized opposition to the
remission exemptions, they fret
"it could get lost in the shuffle"
observes Sheldon Steinbach,
lawyer for the American Council
on Education (ACE).
He adds remissions could
become a casualty of congres-
sional deficit-cutting fervor.
But lobbyists are attaching bills
to extend the tax exemptions to
Hooker Memorial Christian Churrii
Dirple. of Chiiat)
1111 Greenville Blvd 756-22 7 5
"as many bills as possible" to
assure its passage, Steinbach ex-
plains.
Steinbach is less certain than
other lobbyists that Congress will
restore the exemption. He feels
the odds are about 5050.
But one of the bills that would
restore the exemption - the new
tax reform act passed by the
House and approved by the presi-
dent in December - would tax all
kinds of student aid, except
Guaranteed Student Loans.
If the bill passes in its present
form, students would have to
declare aid money they don't use
to pay for tuition or fees as tax-
able income.
In other words, if a student got
a $2,500 Pell Grant, and used
$2,000 of it to pay college costs,
he or she would have to declare
$500 worth of income that could
be taxed.
Student aid has already beer
diminished by inflation, so taxing
it will mean even more hardship
for students in making ends mee;
Steinbach believes.
But observers note soi
students' outside earnings
aid together often keep then
under the poverty line, thus spar
lng them from paying taxes.
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ECU
K I New, Hurr�u
spr ig whi
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have a �
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was

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project va .
might not hav
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had '
and
could bcgii

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various pla.
sity Bratton said. "M I
stored in the basemer.
ing Dormitory and
closets
Fortunately.
the catalog
newspapers ai d
publisr s
1909 were a-
Librarv. aj
them.
"Fr e very
we've had som�
put" Bra
"We had, aftei 3 -
called The Tra.
Quarterly. It ha(
teachers and r
had a section on wha I
were doing, a:
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students
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"From the time we wer
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dent of pub; c
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of trustees B i
ev ery one
J
i





rHEEASlAkOI IMAN
JANUARY 14, 1986
ay Taxes I ECU Publishes Its First Official History
In other words, if a student got
0 Fell Grant, and used
pa college costs,
would hae to declare
v � income that could
HI News Bureau
.in alread been flat ion, so taxing vcn more hardship naking ends meet,
sves
note some - earnings and keep them
us par-g taxes
PASSMUFFLER f
i East 10th Street
IM.C 27834
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9.00
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13.70
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AM to 1 AM
to 2 AM
ELIVERY
ARFA
East Carolina University will
reach yet another milestone this
spring when its first official
history is published.
The book, titled "East
Carolina University: The For-
mative Years, 1907-1982 was
researched and written by Mary
Jo Bratton, professor and direc-
tor of graduate studies for the
ECU Department of History.
Bratton is not sure how she
ended up with the project. "1 had
not written an institutional
history before she said. "My
field is in southern cultural and
intellectual history, so 1 have a
general background in many of
the factors involved in this
The book covers ECU's first 75
years - from 1907, when the bill
establishing East Carolina
Teachers Training School was
passed in the legislature, until
1982.
"You've got to stop
somewhere Bratton said. "1
went through 1982 because that
made it a convenient 75-year
history
The book was the brainchild of
former Chancellor Thomas B.
Brewer. In the summer of 1980,
Brewer was preparing for ECU's
75th anniversary celebration,
which was scheduled for 1982.
Needing information, he reached
for the university's official
history only to discover that one
didn't exist.
Believing that an institution the
size and stature of ECU should
have a written history, Brewer in-
structed the office of academic
affairs to prepare one. The chair-
man of the history department
was contacted and "eventually it
trickled down to me Bratton
said.
If Bratton had known what the
project was going to involve, she
might not have accepted it. Since
ECU had no archives, Bratton
had to first find the documents
and organize them before she
could begin writing. That task
took a year.
"We had documents filed in
various places all over the univer-
sity Bratton said. "Most were
stored in the basement of Flem-
ing Dormitory and in various
closets
Fortunately, complete files of
the catalogs, bulletins, student
newspapers and yearbooks
published by the university since
1909 were available at Joyner
Library, and Bratton read all of
them.
"From the very beginning,
we've had some very good
publications Bratton said.
"We had, after 1914, a quarterly
called The Training School
Quarterly. It had articles for
teachers and future teachers; it
had a section on what the alumni
were doing, and it served as an
annual; the spring issue contain-
ed all the lists and pictures of the
students
She also spent a lot of time at
the state archives in Raleigh.
"From the time we were founded
until 1954, the state superinten-
dent of public instruction was, by
law, the chairman of our board
of trustees Bratton said. "In
every one of those superinten-
dent's files, there are a number of
files on East Carolina
Another valuable resource was
people: former students, faculty,
staff and administrators. "I was
fortunate enough to be able to
talk with the last five presidents
or chancellors Bratton said.
"Those who I haven't talked
with, I've talked with a member
of their family
Aware that memories can fade
with time, Bratton relied on the
written word whenever possible.
"What the oral history does is
add another dimension that you
don't get out of the press account
or out of the records Bratton
said. "A lot of times, you get the
underlying reasons for what hap-
pened.
"I've talked with a number of
people who since I began this
project have died Bratton add-
ed. "I'm very glad I was able to
preserve a lot of their memories,
many of which I could not incor-
porate directly into the
manuscript, but they're there in
the University Archives for other
people who might want to do
research
The book included many battle
scars from ECU's first 75 years,
as well as the institution's suc-
cesses. "That's been one of the
challenges of writing this
history Bratton said. "We have
a very excellent historical record
of achievement. Like any institu-
tion or individual that is 75 years
old, we have chapters where we
have not been as successful. I
have included those in the
book
Bratton organized the book
around the four names ECU has
had. "First we were a two-year
teachers training school with two
years of college, two years of
high school. That was called East
Carolina Teachers Training
School. Next we were East
Carolina Teachers College, then
we were East Carolina College
and then East Carolina Universi-
ty. So that presented me with a
very obvious division of the book
because it's not just a change in
name, it's a change in function,
responsibility, degrees, programs
and everything
The book is unique in that each
division includes a chapter on
campus life. Most institutional
histories, Bratton said, relegate
only one chapter to its students.
"I think that's one of the most
important parts of the book
Bratton said. "It's more of a
social history - not just the recor-
ding of names � but their major
assumptions, their values, what
they were trying to do, what their
concerns were
The history is written in such a
way that it can be enjoyed by
both alumni and scholars, Brat-
ton said. Footnotes have been in-
cluded for those who are in-
terested in sources. "I hope it will
please the alumni, because I have
written it with them in mind
she said. "I am eager for the
alumni to embrace the pride in
their alma mater that they have a
right to
Bratton completed the
manuscript in 1984. "It's taken
up this long to go through the
publication process she said.
"It's a long book, and it takes a
long time to get every stage
done
Chancellor John M. Howell,
who has read the manuscript,
says Bratton has captured "the
essence of ECU" in her work.
"It's a document that anybody
who's had any association with
ECU will enjoy Howell said.
"It's an extraordinarily well-
documented and well-written
book
Included in the book's 550
pages is an extensive index and
appendix. "It's going to be a full
index Bratton said. "It's im-
portant that people should be
able to find themselves or their
great-aunts, or their grand-
fathers, or whoever
The appendix will include lists
of all members of the board of
trustees, student government
presidents, yearbook and
newspaper editors, and alumni
officers and their dates of service.
The book will be bound in deep
royal purple cloth, with gold let-
tering. "That's our official color,
not lavender Bratton said. "I
spent a whole afternoon over in
the art department going through
their color charts to get the right
color
The title of the book will ap-
pear on the spine; the seal will be
stamped on the front.
The book is being printed by
the University of North Carolina
Press in Chapel Hill and publish-
ed and marketed by the ECU's
Alumni Association.
"When the leadership of the
Alumni Association saw the
depth of the research and the
readability of Dr. Bratton's
manuscript, we asked to be
publishers because we were proud
of the story this volume tells
said James L. Lanier, Jr vice
chancellor for Institutional Ad-
vancement.
Lanier says the book will play
an important role in the future of
ECU. "I think anyone who reads
Bratton's accounts of our pro-
gress in 75 years will more clearly
understand our future potential
for service and achievement. We
often hear the phrase that East
Carolina is destined to become
one of the great young univer-
sities of the south. Bratton's
work certainly defines the foun-
dation upon which that recogni-
tion will be based
Don Leggett, assistant to the
vice chancellor for Institutional
Advancement for University
Relations and Alumni Affairs, is
also excited about the book. "As
our alumni know. East Carolina
University is a unique place, and
an ECU education is a unique ex-
perience. Much of the specialnes
of ECU derives from its unique
history. We're happy to have the
story recorded now and to be able
to make it available to our alum-
ni
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DATE: January 13-17, 1986
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� � ?� ' - - � - �





8
I'll 1 sAkoi inian
ANl ARY 14, 1986
Classifieds
SALE
WORD PROCESSING: We ofter ex
perience in typing resumes, theses
technical documents, and term
papers We manage and merge your
names and addresses into merged
letters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards. Our prices are extremely
reasonable and we always offer a 15
percent discount to ECU stuaents S
& F Professional Computer Co
(back of Franklin's 115 E 5th St
757 0472
FOR SALE: 1 pair of Men's Lange
Ski Boots s.ze ?; . Like new $95
Call 757 0273 after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE : Twin size mattress, box
springs and frame S50 pr.ce neg
Call 757 3325
MOBILE HOME FOR SALE:
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Water a c par' al furnishing $750
or best offer anc assume land lease
FOR SALE: Cohn fromb
case $200 Call
HOUSE FOR RENT Near universi
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living room q
758 5299
FOR SALE: 1975 Honda Civic. Runs
gooa, needs some wo? k $500 or best
offer. Call 78 7791
FOR SALE: 3eige sofa Cai
p.m. 758 5422 Reasonable
after 5
HOUSE FOR RENT : bedroon
bath with appliances Nea universi
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students S7 '79g
MEDICAL DICTATION SERVICES
AVAILABLE 7
746 3513 aftei 6 p.n P01
SENIORS! SENIORS: SENIORS!
Enjoy the last phase of our college
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NEED TYPING? L e 11
Resume's Terr papei I Cai
Karen at 752 0498
WANTED: Looking for one or two
persons, M or F, to share a house 2
blocks from campus Rent $130 a
month � ' 3 or ' 4 utility. Remainder
of January's rent free. Call David or
Jeff anytime at 752 9788
NEED FINANCIAL AID?: Scholar
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We have over 4 billion dollars worth
of financial aid in our computer
banks $135 million dollars worth
went unused last year. We have
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WANTED: 6 conscientious black
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Training Jan 29, 1986 at 9:30
Simulation Jan.31, 1986 at 9 30. Con
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ROOMMATE WANTED IM
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ROOMMATE NEEDED To snare 2
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Danny after 4pm at 752 0792
MODELS NEEDED: If interestec
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:ampus ut � es 2
'� s arge k l � en Ca '58 5953
FOR SALE 510"p n
Surf boar � �v .
756 2620
MOVING OUT SALE F �
Apts (furniture
sell by D - . ery
negotiable For mon
758 6971
WANTED
ROOMMATE NfccDED 3 BR
house, V 2 m.ies from campus $120
per month, 3 j1 I t es P- vate
bedroom. Gooa for people with pets
Call 355 5318
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Own room, 3 utilities ana j ex
penses $135 per month � depos � 1
mile from camp- "58 2477
ROOMMATE WANTED $70 a
month, own room, 1 block from can
pus Cai 752 1471 Prefer male
SUMMER JOBS: Trinity Center,
new Episcopal Camp and Con
ference Center at Salter Path, N.C,
accepting applications for summer
jobs, lifeguards (WSi's), sailing In-
structor (WSI also), counselors, RN,
and Arts & Crafts Director. Apply
to: Edward M. Hodges, Jr Trinity
Summer Camp Director, 101 E. 10th
St Washington, N.C. 27889
ROOMMATE NEEDED: SiOO a
month, �� utilities. Across from
Overton's, 3 blocks from campus
758 5953.
PRIVATE ROOM: Female, non
smoker preferred. Rent $114. A
deposit of $92 is required, ' 3 utilities
Available immediately. Call
anytime. 758 4127.
PART TIME EMPLOYMENT: Per
sonal attendant for disabled student,
Tuesdays and Thursdays, Spring
Semester Wilson Acres Females
preferred. Contact Rick Creech
758 3214
PERSONALS
HELP While in the midst of a
drunken stupor last Saturday night I
lost the ring that my boyfriend gave
me tor X mas. The diamond and
sapphire ring was lost downtown in
Grog's There is a reward offered!
Please can Debbie Edwards at
355 2871 because my boyfriend is
chafed majorly!
PHI TAU LIL' SISTERS: Welcome
back1 if you wish to be active this
semester you MUST attend a
meeting Wed Jan 15 at 5 p m
Please bring dues if possible See
you there!
PH. TAU BROTHERS: Let us
Aeicome you back the right way
Come to our Happy Hour at Beau's
Wed Jan 15 Let's Rock the Place
Down! Your iiI' Sisters
WELCOME BACK Stop mto Uni
quely Yours for a 10 percent dis
count th s week on unique clothing,
furniture ana jewelry 903 Dickinson
�ve Open Tues Thur 11 5 ana
Saturaay 11 5
SPRING BREAK CRUISE Decide
NOW to cruise to the Mex.can isles
$445 ps ana gratuities included 5
n g's 6 aas Can now for a
GREAT SPRING BREAK: 758 0074
or 752 3178
FOUND: H.gh School class ring
Founa in parking lot of Ringgoic
Towers, identify ana ciaim at 622
R �ggoia Towers befwee" 7 9pm
East Carolina University's
Student Union
is taking applications for
Student Union President
Student Union Vice President
Deadline: January 24, 1986
&
Student Union
Committee Chairpersons
Deadline: February 5. 1986
for the 1986-87 Term
Any full time student can apply
Applications available at Mendenhall
Student Center's Information Desk
Health Column
With
Mary Elesha Adams
My New Year's resolution was
to quit smoking and lose weight.
HELP! Congratulations for wan-
ting to have a healthier 1986!
There are many strategies for ac-
complishing your goals; let's take
smoking cessation first:
�List all the reasons why you
want to quit. Every nght before
going to bed, repeat one of the
reasons 10 times.
�Involve someone else. Ask a
friend to quit with you or be! a
friend you can quit on your target
date for stopping.
�Switch brands. Switch to a
brand you f;nd distasteful and
lower in tar and nicotine than
your current brand.
�Cut down on the number of
cigarettes you smoke. Smoke on
ly half of each cigarette and each
day postpone lighting your first
cigarette one hour.
�Stop buying cartons of cigaret-
tes and stop carrying cigarettes
with you; leave them at home
when you're in class.
�Do not empty your ashtrays.
This will not only remind you of
how many cigarettes you hae
smoked each day, the sigh: and
smell of stale butts will be very
unpleasant.
�Change your eating habits to aid
in cutting down. If you associate
smoking with drinking coffee or
alcohol, drink something
ferent such as ju
drink.
These are just a few ideas 1 .
you started on stopping smoking.
Some people try the "cold
turkey" approach -md are quite
successful. Others benefit more
from taking a smoking cessai
class. Still others try both ap-
proaches together. C heck The
East Carolinian for ads about the
smoking cessation cla
would like to attend.
lor many, smoking ces
and weigh; maintenance
in hand. Pe ften rep
they gain weight when they
smoking. That often is the case
because they substitute I
cigarettes. One of the best ways
to maintain or lose g
increase the amount
activity you get. Here are some
specific suggest
weight loss and vr maintenance:
�Learn about y
habits by keeping a ret rd
your daily food c
�At home, limit all food intake to
one specific room, preferably the
room with the kitchen table in it.
Sitting in front ot the TV is
distracting because it's easy to
watch TV and eat compulsively.
�Keep lower calorie foods more
available and more visible than
higher calorie foods.
-Go to the grocery store when
you're not hungry.
-Ask family and friends not to
use food for gifts or rewards.
When eating meals, eat the
foods vou like best at the first of
the meal so that you can avoid
the "eat everything on your
plate" syndrome.
-Use stairs instead of elevators
whenever possible.
-Set realistic goals for yourself
Don't make your weight-loss
goals too difficult; that's or
the mam reasons for diet failure
If you would like additional
formation about smoking cessa
tion or weight lossmainter.a
check the brochure racks ai
Student Health Center
Mendenhall Student Center.
355-5222
For ' � . Mai ,Vho
Wants To Dress To Impress
Ready to start the new year off
right? Come by the Style
Shop � Plaza Mall where we are
featuring a 30 off sale on most
of our merchandise.
Such As:
Union Bay -
Rigolletto -
Heet � shirts
pants, jeans & shirts
leans
Also a variety of sweaters
(Pullover & Button Dourn
Hurry & come see the Style Shop
Gang, they 7 help you to dress to
impress!
Style Shop
Welcome Back Special
Mon. thru Wed.
7 AM to 11:30 AM
All U can Eat
Pancakes and French
Toast
See For Yourself
on All Frames, Sunglasses,
and Contact Lenses
Everyday.
Sou ttvrv arc rwo locations thai offer BQ0 jjiiermi fmns u choose
from at everyday savings t M)1 6051 rt regular retail pneev Th:
Eye Srtt- .it rhe PLij. jjxi The Eye Care Center at the Tipur .Annex
In advlttjiifi. eye enmnaoons or- available at The Eye Care Center
No appointment necessary Cafl tor exam hours
MARATHON RESTAURANTS
rh lu
Phone So-gyi
OPTOMCTNC
Oft CAB� CENTER
For Frame Selection and Fe Examinations:
21H (.rrenvillr Blvd tTipiiin Annul
Phone 756-V404
Dr. Peter Hollis
O.O.
�.A.
SUBS
Steak and CheeseS3 45
Steak and MushroomsS3.45
MeatballS3.45
Reuben with French FriesS3.95
Ham and Cheese$3.45
Roast Beef and French Fries$3.95
Cold Sub$3.45
Chicken Salad SubS3.45
Pastrami SubS3 45
Turkey and Cheese$3.45
Super Sub$3.95
B.L.T$3.45
GREEK DISHES
GYRO Sandwich$3.35
Souvlaki Sandwich$3.35
GYRO Platter$3 95
Marathon Special$3.95
Athenian-Style Chicken$3.95
SANDWICHES
Aegean Grilled Cheese$2.40
Hamburger$1.30
Cheeseburger$1.50
Hot Dog$ 95
Chicken Salad Sandwich$2.40
Chicken Breast$1.95
Shrimp Eggroll$ .95
"Greek Owned and Operated Since 1
Delivery Menu
SALAD
Greek SaladS3.50
Chef's SaladS3 50
Chicken Salad PlateS3 50
Tossed Salad$1 35
Potato Salad$1 2C
979"
CALL US
FAST DELIVERY
752-0326 or 752-3753
560 Evans Street
Greenville. N.C. 27834
GREEK PASTRIES
Baklava
PIZZA MENU
SMALL 12
CHEESE PIZZA
ANY 1 ITEM
ANY 2 ITEMS
ANY 3 ITEMS
ANY 4 ITEMS
ADD L ITEMS
Z MUSHROOMS
Z GROUND BEEF
Z GREEN PEPPERS
Z HOT PEPPERS
; ANCHOVIES
MARATHON DELUXE:
$4 30
$4 65
55.30
55 95
56 60
S 85
S 95
LARGE 16
$6.00
S6 85
$7 7
58 55
59 40
S1 00
PEPPERCNi
ONIONS
SAUSAGE
OLIVES
12' 16
$8 00 $11 00
Pepceroni. Onions. Grouna Beef
Mushrooms. Green PecDers
SOFT DRINKS
Small S 60 Large70
FRENCH FRIES
Small $.55 Large $.65
Gram
WASHINGTON D I
Congress' new budge
bill, passed in December
mean student aid uld
cut by as much as 60 ;
some college lobbyists here war
The first round
March . Vari
estimate the I
mean decreases
from two to 4
student aid prograt
The nev.
Gramm-Rudman law
senators Philij
and Warren -
who co-sponsored I I
federal governmei
budget by
But in do i .
not allowed
Social Secut
programs, ma
grams
debt.
So, u;
to help ha
SG
j
$
(i
Rubber
A
s
Tone
Take A
JOIN NO'

No
calI
FRE
THE
South P.
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 14, 1986
H ith
1 dams
can avoid
on your
I elevators
yourself.
eight-loss
- one of
diet failure.
ditional in-
ng cessa-
aintenance
acks at the
center or
I oilier
P.
Mon-Sot
10-9
cy
ear off
Style
we are
on most
:ters
Shop
dress to
lecial
iru Wed.
11:30 AM
can Eat
Les and French
roast
o
Kvpires Jan. 31
ANTS
l
i�S
�zza m
5 95
LARGE 16"
S6 00
i 56 35
58 55
59 40
51 00
E?PERONI
ONIONS
SAUSAGE
OLIVES
ON DELUXE: 12' 16"
$8 00 511.00
c Beef
is jl
jcoers
SOFT DRINKS
Large $70
FRENCH FRIES
�mall S 55 Large.65
Gramm-Rudman May
WASHINGTON, D.C. (CPS) �
( ongress' new budget-balancing
bill, passed in December, could
mean student aid soon could be
cul by as much as 60 percent,
some college lobbyists here warn.
The first round of cuts is due
March 1. Various sources
estimate the first round could
Mean decreases of anywhere
om two to 40 to 60 percent in all
tudenl aid programs.
The new law, usually called the
i-iramm-Rudman law after
senators Philip Gramm (R-Tex)
and Warren Rudman (R-NH),
who co-sponsored it, forces the
federal government to balance its
dget by 1991.
But in doing so, Congress is
allowed to cut spending for
Social Security, some welfare
grams, many defense pro-
ims or to pay off the federal
debt.
So, unless the government tries
help balance the budget by
raising some taxes, education
programs will be tempting fiscal
targets, lobbyists say.
Just how deep the first round
of cuts will be is open to debate.
By calculating current Gramm-
Rudman targets and the
escalating deficit, Susan Frost of
the Committee for Education
Funding figures the U.S. Dept. of
Education will have to shave all
its college program funding by
4.6 percent in March and another
30 percent in October.
Educators are reluctant to
specify just how many students
would be forced out of school by
the cuts, or to estimate how much
schools would have to raise tui-
tion to compensate for them.
They do, however, think the
cuts will hurt badly.
"Consequences of Gramm-
Rudman's possible 40 to 60 per-
cent cuts in higher education (by
next fall) will be absolutely-
disastrous to millions of current
and future students observes
Kathy Ozer, legislative director
of the U.S. Student Association
(USSA).
The same pressure to reduce
spending could also force Con-
gress to reduce college program
funding in the upcoming Higher
Education Act of 1985, which
sets spending levels through 1990,
adds pat Smith, legislative
analyst for the American Council
on Education (ACE).
Under the new law, Ozer
estimates Congress will have to
trim about $11.7 billion from the
1986 fiscal year budget by March.
If it doesn't, President Reagan
would "sequester" funds,
deciding by himself which pro-
grams not to fund in order to
save money.
Based on what he's done
before, the president would seem
likely to cut education programs
to do it.
In each year since 1980, Presi-
dent Reagan has proposed cut-
ting federal student aid programs
by as much as 50 percent. Con-
gress historically has rejected
those cuts, choosing instead to
freeze most programs at or near
their 1981-82 levels for the last
three years.
The federal government will
spend about $8 billion on student
aid programs this year - about
the same as in fiscal 1985 before a
supplemental appropriation bill
funding Guaranteed Student
Loans passed.
After March, the Gramm-
Rudman law then mandates the
government to find ways to keep
reducing the federal deficit by
$36 billion a year through the rest
of this decade.
One way t: reduce the deficit,
of course, is to raise taxes.
"More and more people are
talking about a tax increase. It
will be the only way reports
Tom Gleason, a spokesman for
Sen. Gary Hart (D-Co).
"I don't think there is a pro-
clivity toward cuts agrees Bob
Sneed, an aide to Sen. Ernest
Hollings (D-SC). "Most people
think drastic reductions" without
accompanying tax hikes "will be
dead on arrival" in Congress.
Gleason thinks some conser-
vative senators will endorse tax
hikes if they help spare the
defense budget from cuts, though
he doesn't expect them to public-
ly support the hikes until after
next fall's elections.
Ozer worries fall may be too
late for many student aid pro-
grams.
"Clearly cuts will be triggered
before possible tax legislation
she says.
A similar nationwide letter-
writing campaign helped defeat a
presidential proposal to cut
federal student aid programs in
1982.
ARTHUR MERRILL McGLAUFLIN
ATTORNEY AT LAW
DWITraffic Offenses
Personal Injury
Property Damage
Child Support and Custody-
Residential Loan Closings
Separation Agreements
757-1055
No Fee for Initial Consultation
Fees Upon Request
Flexible Office Hours
SGA Carpet Sale
January 14-16
On the Mall
$10.00 - $18.00
on most rolls
Rubber Insulated Backing
And Fireproof
Pre sen ts
1K Draft All Nite
Tuesday & Wednesday
Jan.14,15
Admission $1.50 Guys
DRAFT NITE
9:00-1:00 A.M.
$1.00 Ladies
STILL NOT OVER
THE HOLIDAYS
Tone Your Body Back In Shape At
THE
Take Advantage of Our Special Student Rates
JOIN NOW
$25.00
per month
No Contracts
No Initiation Fee
CALL NOW FOR
FREE VISIT
SouthPark Shopping Center
756-7991
COED WET AREA
Includes:
Steam
Sauna
Whirlpool
Dynacam Equipment
Free Weights
Aerobics 52 times a week
New Wolff System
Tanning Bed
$4.00 per visit
10 visits $30.00





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY U 1986
I,

Out-Of-State Student Quota Tenative
(UPI) University of No.th
Carolina campuses would have
new limits on the number of out-
of-state students they can admit
beginning in 1988 under a policy
approved Thursday by a UNC
Board of Governors committee.
The policy is designed to force
some campuses to reduce out-of-
state enrollment and to slow the
growth in out-of-state enrollment
at other campuses, said Raymond
H. Dawson, UNC System's vice
president for academic affairs.
The policy would set an 18 per-
cent ceiling on out-of-state
enrollment at all 16 UNC cam-
puses except the N.C. School of
the Arts.
"Somewhere a line has to be
drawn between diversity and hav-
ing a large amount of university
resources committed" to out-of-
state students, Dawson said.
The policy will go before the
full Board of Governors for ap-
proval in February. The UNC
System has been under pressure
from members of the General
Assembly and from Gov. James
G. Martin's Efficiency Study
Commission to set a limit on out-
of-state students.
Dawson said out-of-state
enrollment had declined after the
legislature approved huge in-
creases in out-of-state tuition in
1969 and 1971, but had risen
steadily since 1980.
The problem has become par-
ticularly acute at five UNC cam-
puses, he said. Out-of-state
students made up 34 percent of
N.C. A'T State University's
entering class this fall, 32.5 per-
cent at Elizabeth City State
University, 25 percent at N.C.
Central University, 26 percent at
East Carolina University and 20
percent at UNC-Greensboro.
For N.C. State University, the
figure was 17.6 percent, and for
UNC-Chapel Hill, 19 percent,
Dawson said.
Except for the School of the
Arts, 19 percent of the system's
freshman class this past fall was
from out of state, up from 15
percent in 1980. The total out-of-
state enrollment, except for the
School of the Arts, was 14 5 per
cent, up from 11.8 percent in fall
1980, Dawson said.
If the policy is approved, the
universities would have 1986 and
1987 to reduce out-of-state
enrollments. The new limit would
take effect in fall 1988.
Lawyers Challange Gramm-Rudman
WASHINGTON (UPI) �
lawyers for challengers of a
federal budget-balancing law told
a federal court Friday that the
month-old act puts Congress'
power over the government's
purse strings on "automatic
pilot" and should be stricken as
unconstitutional.
But defenders of the Gramm
Rudman-Hollings Act, designed
to reduce the annual deficit from
the current $212 billion to zero in
five years, argued thai the
measure was a lawful delegation
by Congress of its budget-making
powers and should be upheld.
The three-judge U.S. district
court panel hearing the case -
shaping up as possibly the most
far-reaching constitutional
separation of powers issue before
the federal judiciary since the
Watergate era - took the matter
under advisement after a three-
hour hearing.
The court's ruling is certain to
be appealed directly to the
Supreme Court regardless of the
outcome.
Twelve members of Congress,
led by Rep. Mike Synar,
D-Okla and the National
Treasury Employees Union are
challenging the constitutionality
of the law, which would trigger
across-the-board budget cuts if
Congress failed to institute
specified annual deficit reduc-
tions.
Attorney Alan Morrison,
representing the dozen members
of Congress, told the court the
bill was enacted because "Con-
gress has refused to pass the very
laws to do what it contends must
be done - that is. balance the
federal budget
Morrison said the act, in giving
the power to proscribe budget
cuts to the non-elected heads of
three agencies - the Congressional
Budget Office, the White House
Office of Management and
Budget and the congressional
General Accounting Office - had
given away powers the Constitu-
tion vests in Congress.
"Certain functions are so
legislative in nature that they may
not be delegated. This is one of
the things the revolution was
fought over said Morrison,
who is a senior lawyer for Public
Citizen, a group founded by con-
sumer advocate Ralph Nader.
And although President
Reagan signed the measure into
law Dec. 12, a Justice Depart-
ment lawyer argued that one of
its key features - the part trigger-
ing spending cuts - should be
overturned but the remainder of
the law should stand.
"We think the unique status of
the president in our constitu-
tional scheme has been tran-
sgressed said Assistant At-
torney General Richard Willard.
Under the law, automatic cuts
would have to be ordered by the
president if the General Accoun-
ting Office determined that Con-
gress had not reached deficit
targets under Gramm-Rudman.
The Congressional Budget Of-
fice and the Office of Manage-
ment and Budget would make
separate projections of the
deficit, but the GAO would be
the final arbiter, deciding how
large the mandatorv cuts should
be.
If Congress failed to come up
with its own package of cuts
within 90 davs, the reductions
spelled out would take effect.
A HO RTI OSS L'P
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
1195 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks a'
additional cost Pregnant Test, Birth (
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling Foi
Further information, call 832-0535 (toll tree
number: 1-800-532-5384) between V a m and 5
p.m. weekdavs General anesthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917 West Morgan St. Raleigh, N.C.
&&&



escort service
unbav, $nt. 19
noto accepting
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erators & escorts
4
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JAN CLEARANCE SALE
Hurry in. Limited quantities
We have the guaranteed lowest
� '�'WHH

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hbi M59
OPP Rnq 249 I Nj
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PADDED RAILS $29 � WATERBED SHEETS $29
$
MEDIUM FIRM
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49
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it
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FACTORY MATTRESS & WATERBED OUTLET
730 Greenville Blvd. (Next To The Plaza)
355-2626
Open MonFri. 10 to 8 Sat. 10 to 6
90 Days
Same As Cash
Delivery
Layaway
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M
-mmMMi
i!
i!
8
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OPTICAL
PALACE
$1 5.00 OFF
I Any Complete
� Pair of
I Eyeglasses
(excluding sale items)
i r
i i
i i
i i
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Ray-Ban
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SUNGLASSES
20 OFF
ASK ABOUT OUR 20
SENIOR CITIZENS
DISCOUNT
OPEN SATURDAYS BY
APPOINTMENTS ONLY
Cm Amtf
FwYmOb
TieSaaeDay
Soft Contacts
$59.00 pair
Phone
756-4204
Offer Expires Jan. 31
713 Grwavttt Ihrt. (Acroa Froa Pin Ptaa, Next To ERA Realty)
Gary M. �mmVUmmmI Optidaa Opes 9:30 a.a. loap.a. MmFri.
SHOE OUTLET
NAME BRAND SHOES
At Discount Prices
Quality Casual Shoes $15
Ladies Dress and Casual Shoes
at discount prices
Large Selection of Name Brand
Tennis Shoes $12.88 to $29.88
752-2332
ySMySAfSArSSSSrSSSSSSAVSSS
203 West Ninth greet
one block off Evans
mmteui,
wedtegekff 7km(Li faibt,
The VERANDA
Featuring HAPPY PAYS!
DOG GONE IT
DAY
No Cover
Build the "perfect"
Hot Dog
House High Balls
$1.75
WING IT
DAY
Chicken Wings
With All The
Condiments
Draft $.50
Pitcher $2.00
The Arbor
Chef
Special
Chef
Special
SOUTH OF THE
BORDER FIESTA
Build Your Own
Taco with all
the ingredients!
Margaritas $1.75
Tequila Sunrise
$1 75
Dos Equis XX $1.50
Shrimp &
Chablis
$9.95
Join us for HAPPY DAYS, Mor -Fn serving Hot and Heavy Hors
d'ouervres, 5-7p.m.
Band hours are 9p.m. -1 a.m Daily drink specials are available all day
long. Dress Code Enforced. Open 6 p.m a.m.
Ramada Inn � 301 Greenville Blvd. � 756-2792
PIRATE PARTY
Featuring our
Fabulous Pizza
Spread
Draft50
P'tcher $2.00
Schnapps $2.00
Crab legs
& Shrimp
with Chablis
$9.95
FESTIVE
FRIDAY
Chef's Choice
of Hot & Heavy
Hors d'ouevres
Irish Coffee $2 00
Hot Cider $2 00
Choice of our
3 all you can
eat specials
$10.95
THF FASTABC,I
A Vie To 1 Kill, the Jam
at Mendenhal! Mudent t t-ntl
Admission to bo'h film
A Hi
B BETH DAMEI
Welcome back I
Carolina.
Something hot anu
I help -
awa When
rru
N.C. A:
"Heavenh
Minnie Evans" m
the North Carolina Mus
Art January 18 thr
1986. The ev .
works produced a
by the 93-yeaj
artist from Wilming
Deeply influent
lifel v
the natural beau r
Garden near Wilmi - I
she was gatekeepei year
Evans has produced a
work rich in religious . J
imagerv Colorful flowers
and animals are often arra
symmetrical formats remi I
of Near Eastern art. w j
Realism
The V . Museui
of An will present "An
Figurative Painting Since I
an exhibition of 15 worl
the Sara Rob Foundation C c
lection. Feb. 1-April 2
The Foundation was
ed in 1955 b Mrs Rob)
time resident of Ne� V
who currentU resides in Nai
tucket. Mass Ho
pose was to form a
works in various
American artists
them to institution
the United States and i
Mrs. Roby. hersel! I
sought to combat ;he
tyranny of abstract movemen
art by demonstrating that
realist tradition continued
thrive. Her collection. �
wide diversity, represents
in its many forms
Included in the exhib I
paintings by Edward Hoppo aa
Reginald Marsh, wrfeoac � v
characterized tn aa
promising reai x
"Cape Cod Mc
subject it a woman �
window. The � -v
however, is p .s.
straighiforwatd i





native
1980 The total out-of-
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Si ts, was 14.5 per-
8 percent in fall
� d
O is approved, the
ive 1986 and
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.(vv limit would
1988
( 12th w EEK
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tree
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THF EAST CAROl INIAN
Entertainment
JANUARY 14, 1986
Page 1 1
Shad Festival Is
Finally Underway
Grace Jones Hefts A KGB Agent
A View To A Kill, the James Bond thriller starring Roger Moore and Grace Jones, will screen Friday and Saturday at 7 and 9 p.m
at Mendenhall Student Center. Paris, Texas, an award winning fjm starring Harry Dean Stanton, will show tomorrow night at 8.
Admission to both films is by ECU l.D. and activity card.
The annual Grifton Shad
Festival Hickory Shad Fishing
Contest is officially open, accor-
ding to contest chairman George
Sugg of the Sport Shop in Grif-
ton. AJthough the first fish of the
season is not usually caught until
early February, the contest tradi-
tionally opens on January 1 and
closes the first day of the Shad
Festival in April.
Dates for the 1986 Shad
Festival are April 9-13, with a
Bass Fishing Tournament
preceeding the major events by
one week. The Bass Tournament
is scheduled for Saturday, April
5, and Danny Joe Humphrey of
Kinston and the W.E.T.S.U.
Bassmasters will head this event
up again this year.
Other athletic competitions
will include tournaments in ten-
nis, archery, horseshoes and golf,
a 27-mile bicycle race, a Canoe
Race with three divisions (adding
a Racing Canoe Division for the
first time), and running events in
One-Mile, Two-Mile and 10 KM.
The latter are appropriately call-
ed the "Spring Shad Run nam-
ed for the term used to describe
the annual springtime migration
of hickory shad up coastal creeks
to spawn.
The Hickory Shad Fishing
Contest is limited to fish caught
on hook and line and American
shad are not eligible. This is
because in the Grifton area,
hickory shad outnumber the
American variety. Fish must be
weighed and recorded at the
Sport Shop in Grifton.
Shad, a migratory fish living in
the ocean, swim up coastal rivers
to spawn in fresh-water creeks
further upstream. The date when
the fish "run" up the creek varies
according to the temperature of
the coastal waters. Tagging
studies have shown the same fish
off Florida in the winter and off
Nova Scotia in the summer, over
2000 miles away.
In eastern North Carolina, the
peak of the "shad run" is March.
Trophies will be awarded to the
fisherman who enters the first
shad, and the the adult and youth
catching the largest shad.
For those who would rather lie
about it than actually catch a
fish, there is the "Fishy Tales"
storytelling (or liar's) contest.
"Shad-O" (bingo on special
cards) is another of the fun word-
plays around fish and shad
dreamed up by the festival plan-
ners.
Crafts, a parade, food, a clog-
ging and street dance, a flea
market and historical exhibits
and demonstrations are among
the other 25 Grifton Shad
Festival events to appeal to all
ages and interests. For a schedule
of activities, write to Grifton
Shad Festival, Box 928, Grifton,
NC 28530.
A Hot Idea To Alleviate The Chill
Bv BETH DANIELS
Staff Wrll�r
Welcome back to East
Carolina.
Something hot and flavorful
will help warm the winter chill
away. When I was young, my
mother fixed a beverage very
similar to this on Halloweenwe
called it "Witches Brew Here
in Greenville and other parts of
the South, versions of this
delightful beverage are called
Russian Tea.
Old Fashioned Russian Tea
2 quarts of water
4 family size tea bags
1 large can unsweetened pineap-
ple juice
juice of 6 squeezed oranges
juice of 2 squeezed lemons
1 tablespoon whole cloves
1 stick cinnamon
sugar to taste
Bring water to a boil in a large
sauce pan. Add the tea bags and
simmer 5 minutes. Add pineap-
ple, orange and lemon juices as
well as the spices. Return to a
boil, lower heat another 5
minutes. Remove tea bags, and
simmer the tea mixture for an
hour or so. Remove the spices
before storing in the refrigerator.
Serve reheated.
Not only is this a great warmer-
upper, but it makes the house
smell terrific, too.
Another method for making l teaspoon ground cloves
Russian Tea, quicker and one-half cup sugar, or to taste
perhaps more convenient: (optional)
1 18-ounce jar Tang
1 6-ounce package lemonade
flavor Kool-aid
one-half to three-quarter cup ins-
tant tea
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
Mix all of these ingredients in a
large bowl with sealing lid. To a
cup of boiling water add 2 or
more tablespoons of tea mixture.
Stir and enjoy.
N.C. Artist Minnie Evans Properly Praised At Age 93
"Heavenly Visions: The Art of
Minnie Evans" will be on view at
the North Carolina Museum of
Art January i8 through April 13,
1986. The exhibition presents
works produced across 40 years
by the 93-year-old, self-trained
artist from Wilmington, NC.
Deeply influenced by her
lifelong stuay of the Bible and by
the natural beauty of Airlie
Gardens near Wilmington, where
she was gatekeeper for 26 years,
Evans has produced a body of
work rich in religious and exotic
imagery. Colorful flowers, trees
and animals are often arranged in
symmetrical formats reminiscent
of Near Eastern art, with a cen-
tral figure that may be inter-
preted as a divine or royal image.
The symmetry of these works
reinforces Evans' joyous vision
of the world as orderly and
stable, with a central focus on
belief.
Born in 1892 in Pender Coun-
ty, near Wilmington, Evans was
reared in Wilmington and
Wrightsville Beach by her mother
and grandmother. She worked as
a domestic during the period bet-
ween the world wars and was the
gatekeeper of Airlie Gardens, a
private tourist attraction, from
1948 to 1974.
Evar created her first images
in 1935 as the result of a religious
vision. Her two earliest works, on
view in the exhibition, are
abstract pencil drawings almost
like hieroglyphics. Within a few
years Evans began producing still
lifes, figures and abstract
designs, using crayons and col-
ored pencils.
In the 1940s and 1950s Evans
experimented with a variety of
formats and media, including oil
painting, and developed a use of
traditional perspective. Her work
from this period includes exotic
images, such as a temple by the
sea, and religious themes like the
Crucifixion and the Resurrection.
By the 1960s, however, Evans
had settled upon a flat, vertical
arrangement of images as her
favored mode, working both with
figures and with abstract designs.
She is best known for the richly
detailed, symmetrical paintings
of this period.
The exhibition comprises 30
paintings, drawings, and col-
lages, tracing Evans' work from
her earliest efforts through the
late 1970s. In addition to the ar-
tist and other private individuals,
lenders include the National
Museum of American Art,
Washington, DC; the Weathers-
poon Art Gallery, UNC-
Greensboro; the Ackland Art
Museum, UNC-Chapel Hill; and
the North Carolina Museum of
History, Raleigh. Evans has had
numerous solo exhibitions over
the past 25 years, including a
1975 show at the Whitney
Museum of American Art in New
York.
The exhibition is supported by-
funding from the North Carolina
Art Society. The accompanying
48-page catalogue includes an
essay by Dr. Mitchell Kahan,
curator of American and contem-
porary art, who has organized the
exhibition. It is the first publica-
tion devoted entirely to Evans'
work.
Related programs include
"The Angel That Stands By
Me a free 30-minute film about
Evans, to be shown Sunday at 3
and 4 p.m. Three lectures on folk
art and alternative art traditions
will be presented on Thursdays,
March 20, 27 and April 3 at 8
p.m. Speakers will be Henry
Glassie of the University of Penn-
sylvania, author and collector
Herbert Hemphill and Charles
Zug of UNC-Chapel Hill. Tickets
are $9 for the lecture series or
$3.50 for individual lectures.
Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. Wednesday, Thursday,
Saturday; 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Fri-
day; 12 noon to 5 p.m. Sunday.
There is no admission fee. For in-
formation, call (919) 833-1935.
Realism Is Thriving
The North Carolina Museum
of Art will present "American
Figurative Painting Since 1950
an exhibition of 15 works from
the Sara Roby Foundation Col-
lection, Feb. 1-April 27.
The Foundation was establish-
ed in 1955 by Mrs. Roby, a long-
time resident of New York City
who currently resides in Nan-
tucket, Mass. Her primary pur-
pose was to form a collection of
works in various media by
American artists and to lend
them to institutions throughout
the United States and abroad.
Mrs. Roby, herself an artist,
sought to combat the apparent
tyranny of abstract movements in
art by demonstrating that the
realist tradition continued to
thrive. Her collection, with its
wide diversity, represents realism
in its many forms.
Included in the exhibition are
paintings by Edward Hopper and
Reginald Marsh, whose work is
characterized by an uncom-
promising realism. In Hopper's
"Cape Cod Morning" (1950), the
subject is a woman gazing from a
window. The isolated figure,
however, is presented in a
straightforward rather than a
sentimental manner.
Works by a slightly younger
generation of artists, including
Paul Cadmus, Honore Sharrer
and George Tooker, demonstrate
their interest in "magic realism
which emphasizes the inex-
plicable and surreal. Realism as
social commentary is seen in
works by Philip Evergood and
Jacob Lawrence, while satire and
fantasy are employed by Roy de
Forest.
Other artists represented in the
exhibition are Charles Bur-
chfield, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Bruce
Kurland, Gregory Gillespie,
Raphael Soyer and Saul
Steinberg.
The exhibition is accompained
by a free gallery guide written by
Huston Paschal, assistant curator
at the North Carolina Museum of
Art.
In conjunction with the exhibi-
tion, films on the work of Ed-
ward Hopper and Jacob
Lawrence will be screened Sun-
day, Feb. 2 at 3 p.m. A film on
Pal Cadmus will be shown Sun-
day, March 2 at 3 p.m. The free
programs are part of a series of
films on American artists.
f" fh
feM: jfr- �
' 4B
Michelangelo Would Not Be Pleased
The Rev. Jerry Falwell is typical of fundamentalist television evangelists in his pursuit of money for the selling of God, according to
the latest cartoon from political satirist Ori Hof mekler in the January issue of Penthouse magazine. Using Michelangelo's famous ceiling
of the Sistine Chapel as a backdrop. Hofmekler shows God with a naked Falwell, forefingers outstretched and only a dollar bill between
them. Hofmekler, an internationally acclaimed Israeli artist, has won worldwide recognition for his incisive portraits
m m "

, , - . �
�0 0 -m � m A
� ���,
H"
h





12
1 HI l AM CAROl IM

Original Rock Music Migrates North
U PI) - Miami may be the cit)
of beach bunnies, scaring sun
shine, Latin tango maniacs and
disco dudes, but it is no haven ol
lock.
For the four guvs in Sunlen-
ding, it's time to pack theii
guitars and synthesizers and hit
the trail. Next stop Boston
"We're living in an adverse en
vironment said Ron I lear, 26.
lead guitarist and singei fot the
band.
"Our influences have nothing
to do with Caribbean music,
Latin music, sun and fun, beach
music or southern rock said
Rossi Kane, the group's
manager. "We're a total em.
here
Perhaps it is best put b Corin-
na Sampson, a model and 1 l
longtime honey. "I'm a real
Miami person, a real beach bun
nv she squeaked "A: first I
was against the move. But i'c
never seen snow before
Sunlending has all the
stuff to make a dent in the n
biz. Hear, Tom Beier. 23, on
keyboards, David Freedman, 23
on bass guitar and Doug s-j
Cray, 24. on drums make
point to do it their wav !
have their own sound and
own songs; thev have a ma
they have a press packet
have an 8-by-10 black �. I
publicity photo, the have tl
biographies. There .
tie problem: thev ar .
up with nowhere
have no audience, no
no place to hang tl
cords
The problem is thai Miai
music scene is
like South Afri
' bands have i
stay awa -
The are staving aw
there is no su I - .
rock and ro
The loc
dead K.
ha' 1
M i
ing in me;
s,i
gae
"En ery
that has
wl
taved open three week-
months � has gone un : ��
problem in Miami genei
to do with how transient tl
is. It ha- a serious lack of �
and tradition- People
down here to swim. The:
communitv except I at in. I
no 'hometown' feeling
"Original music is tl
Boston has a great oca
scene. It has never bow . .
to the Top 40 droe and it w
"In Boston, thev pul
music on a pedestal
Miami radio statio
local bands, so the dee
no power in pushing
favorites. They don't seen in-
terested in developing
and the Orange Peels, or i
Bop's Bikini Bumpers, i : Sammy,
Blue Sky and the Suns.
Nor is there mingling
cultures in Miami. The Latin-
have Little Havana, the sen
have Miami Beach, the kid
the strip in Fort Lauderdale.
Everthing is diced up and dmcj
out in categories. Individual
styles stay on their own side ol
�he fence.
So when a hot local band like
unlending looks around for an
audience, things get tough.
There's no club scene, no radio
promotion, no record company
action, no demand, no deal.
After three years of sun and fun,
it's time to pack and split.
On the other end of the musu
appreciation dial, Boston makes
gods and goddesses out of its
golden-tongued brethren. Out
side the rat holes of New York
and Los Angeles, Boston has one
of the best track records for pro-
ducing music the nation wants to
hear.
Innovative groups like 'til
Tuesday, the Cars and Aerosmith
all got their breaks in Boston
before hitting the national
radiowaves.
The strong local music scene is
partly responsible. So is the
abundance of young folks. The
fact that Boston is a hotbed of
talent pricks the ears of record
companies. The music biz types
have strong regional setups in
Boston, which means lots of
showcases, lots of music industry
events, and more than the city's
fair share of signed records con-
at ns reallv push Miami said Llear. drivel. You don't have to eat
Ihev even have local That environment is what helps shards of glass or dye your hair
Kinds. bands flourish and it makes for chartreuse to get attention, but
!v the opposite of good new music � not the same you do have to do something dit
i said about old record company formula ferent. Call it a musical halt twist
it you will.
The envii
And Boston i�
to the musical de
So Sunlending
B
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rth
IHl I AM -K01 INIAN
JAM AKt M
13
Gregory Peck Remembers A Long Career
toy � ami ELLIOT1
kKWl 1
Sr�,
ngel oj
M - the
� B .
Revision
.is been enjoying
. screen.
- specifu com
Prince
M . the
. lub in Wellington, Fla. " 1 here
are always things on the back
burner, but right now nothing
specific I nist plan to go right on
living and having a good time. I
hope that is in the future. I'm just
having a marvelous time wat
stung the Prince play polo
Peck went to Hollywood in
W41 aftei a brief stage career on
the road, in summer stock, and
on Broadwa)
"Clarence Brown, mv director
in The Yearling once described
me as 'an inspiration, an actor of
quiet strength Peck said in
describing himself
Born Eldred Gregory Peck on
April 5, 1 v 1 s. the future actoi
was raised in his native I a Jolla,
a southern California seaside
town, where his father owned a
drugstore.
lor a year, he was enrolled at
San Diego State College, but left
to work tor an oil company as
night watchman and utility
delivery man.
"When I was told by my assis
tant manager that 1 had a future
with the company, that 10 or 15
years would brmt me as mucl
$300 a month, 1 decided to go
back to school, this time at the
University of California, at
Berkeley Peck recalled "I had
hoped to become a doctor, an
ambition which my father en-
couraged, but found that 1 had to
wade through too many books to
make people well
"It there's anything the world
doesn't need, it's a bad doctor
he continued. "1 changed my ma
jor to English and drama
At the University of C alifor
ma's Little Theatre, he plaved in
Moby Dick and Anna'hristu '
"i got rid of Gregory Peck, the
guv who was so unsure of himself
and became to myself, a veritable
wonder man Mv first New York
job, however, was as a
$25-a week talker in the amuse-
ment area of 'lie World's 1-air m
1SH9 "
Peck won a scholarship in a
contest sponsored by the
Neighborhood Playhouse School
of the Threatre in New York He
later toured in The Doctor'
Dilemma. After the completion
of the tour, he was assigned '
understudy Philip Merivale and
Jean-Pierre Aumont in Hose
Burke, a McClintic production,
which did not reach Broadw
"In the summer of 1942, 1 ai
at the Cape Playhouse in De
see PI pane )4
Take Care With Batteries
cries
eel way
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ndness,
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I HI EASTCAROl INIAN
FANUARY 14. 1986
Page 14
Peck Looks Back On Satisfactory Career
Some Maestros Were Oddballs
continued i. page 13
Mass he recalled. "1 received a
call from McClintic to play the
lead in Emlyn Williams' Morning
Star. When it opened in
Philadelphia, I received about as
bad a set of notices from the
critics as it is possible for an actor
to get
His five nominations as Best
Actor were for To Kill a Mock-
ingbird, for which he won the
Academy Award. The Keys to the
Kindgorn, The Yearling,
Gentlemen's Agreement and
Twelve O'Clock High.
"Of my early films it was the
role of Father Chisholm in Keys
of the Kingdom that I liked the
best
"When I worked on a film, 1
was never pleased with a scene
and always wanted to do it over. I
am an actor who play by play in
every way gets better and better. I
enjoyed stage because it was there
I received real body blows
"1 enjoy politics, but I'm not a
chronic crusader Peck said.
"People have said 1 have a
resemblance to Lincoln, with a
suggestion of nobility in my
bony, rugged face and rather gen-
tle, shy manner. Any pictured
resemblance lies in the frame. My
honest face, if any, never im-
presses anybody, except once
when I bluffed in poker and ran a
pair of nines over a straight
Overkill
B Y FRIEDRICH
KiMO f
JkSAfi
BT THE fVKt M ��
w
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&
(UP1) � Classical music lovers
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The Book of Musical Anecdotes
by Norman Lebrechi, a well-
researched volume about little-
known eccentricities and pro-
clivities among a group that as a
whole tends to be a little weird.
Composer George Frederic
Handel (1685-1759) once dined at
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three. There was such a long
delay in serving him that he asked
the waiter why it was taking so
long. The waiter replied that he
was waiting for his guests to ar-
rive � to which Handel retorted
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Handel, who produced more
than 50 operas, loved to eat and
drink and once received a gift of
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Handel wanted to keep H tor
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German symphonist Johannes
Brahms once fell asleep listening
ran I is: play, Anton
. kner's Jg was trained to
a when listening to Richard
Wagneer's compositions and
Russian Igor Stravinsky hated
(wing van Beethoven's com-
positions.
Beethoven loved to eat bread
soup made with 10 raw eggs and
Giuseppe Verdi, the great Italian
composer, disturbed by the
sound of street organs playing
anas from his operas, hired them
all for a season and kept them
locked in a room.
t, arts writer for the
London Times, collected hun-
dreds of anecdotes from
thousands of books, articles and
unpublished manuscripts.
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Reagan taped her appearance
in the video with a chorus of
children in the Blue Room of the
White House. New Edition,
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Jackson, Arnold Schwarzeneg-
ger, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar,
David Hasselfhoff, Michele Lee,
Stacey Keach, Herb Alpert, Toni
Basil and radio host Casey Kasem
are among those who appear and
peform in "Stop the Madness
The video was created by Tim
Reid for the Entertainment In-
dustries Council, a non-profit
organization comprising enter-
tainment industry leaders. Coun-
cil founder Brian Dyak served as
executive producer of the video;
Michael Stokes produced and
directed the music.
Dyak said: "Tim Reid and I sat
around for a year trying to think
of an anti-drug music video that
would be commercially com-
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that if we had a strong dance tune
with a driving beat, eventually
the lyrics would sink in. I was
very impressed with Mrs.
Reagan's commitment to this
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music is not her kind of music,
she liked the message and saw
right away that using contem-
porary sounds was a technique
that could r lly work
"During the taping, Mrs.
Reagan was exceptional. We had
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White House and she kept wan-
ting to turn the music up louder.
She liked the beat and agreed that
the theme, 'Stop the Madness
really worked for her. Thanks in
part to her help, that theme has
sort of become the theme of the
entertainment industry's efforts
for drug prevention
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Doonesbury
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 14,1986
YOU
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cm
: Mkl A GUY WHO WANTS
IN A CLUB HE'S OPENING
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DM PONE' INCREDIBLE
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Eastern Carolina
Fitness Center
Formerly
NAUTILUS
1002 Evans Street
758-9584
Home of ECU Pirates Baseball Team
and Cheerleaders
OUR GYM HAS:
� Over 8000 lbs. of Olympic Weights
� A 16 Station Nautilus Circuit
�Tanning Center
� Aerobic Classes Daily
� Sauna
� Showers
� Nutrition Counseling
� Air Conditioning
Aerobics
Schedule of Classes
Monday 4:00 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 7:00 p.m.
Tuesday 4:00p.m. 5.30 p.m. 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday 4:00 p.m. 5.30p.m. 7:00p.m.
Thursday 4:00p.m. 5:30 p.m. 7:00 pm.
Friday 4:00p.m.
Saturday 12:00 p.m.
Sunday 4:00p.m.
Other times will be added if there
is sufficient interest.
GYM HOURS
Monday
Tuesday
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Friday
Saturday
Sunday
10:00a.m.
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COUPON
$10 Off First Month
or Semester Rate
$75 Semester
$25 Month
Expires 1-19-86
Where Winners Train
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1985 Gold's Classic Jr. OverAII
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Short Class
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Sharon Bartha 1985 M$s Traid Overall Winner
i
i
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i V
Sports
Pirate Sports Take No Break Over Holidays
I to'i s
- �
I

n -

I t

((. lockwiv ne I osier handles hall; Ml 's No. 2 all-time rusher lun
Baker rambles for irlier competition; Scott Hard) fires away; Jefi Heath con-
cludes outsl irln Harrison directs his squad vocally.
������������1
Bucs Pick Up Sixth Victory
i k;




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Ba.ss.ECl
:m with a tu f((
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7 points v hil�
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.i - ed Mid
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( 1 squeaking out
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See HOOPS! I Rs. Page IK
Lady Pirates-Finish
Second In Classic
B IliHNI)I hK
sp n

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it
. game by a ?0 65
i. assiv the University
Rhode Islai
Depth Is Key To Women
Swimmers Conference Win
Bv DWII) l,(,lMss
�A I!
Mini
rhe III
i an the second le
'85 '86 season wil
over
William & Mai �
Natatorium last Saturday i
record now stands ai 8-1 ii
record seven
v ictories to thi
'Depth' wa the k �
ladies victory i
place in only se r 14 swm
mg events 1 he womei
to place .tt leas; (hud m every

'�
� yard
while
p honors in
' II i
am ol
� � grabbed
oints foi the
i -
ites,
sweepii i
one ai ?tei events
Bucs Sheri y . ampbell took fii si
Pofl second in both
the one and three meter events,
a n over illiam Jv. Mar y
is an important one tor the ladies.
ause that school, along with
lames Madison University, will
biggest k hallenge tor
them in the c Ac conference
tournament in February
Sec SWIM, Pane 22
. � M �
� �
U-29 v,
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to Gretta ONea
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Sy a Bra
the Pirates with 24
followed b I isa Squirewi
See 1 l) pak; 2.





18
�lyjLEAST C A ROLINI AN
JANUARY 14, 1986
Hoopsters Stumble At Siena Tournament
Continued From Page 17
American University and snap-
ped a tour-game losing streak for
the Bucs.
Vanderhorst was second for
ECU with 13 and center Bass ad-
ded a dozen.
The Pirates started slowly as
they trailed early 7-2 just minutes
into the contest. However, ECU
came back and opened a seven-
point lead with 2:15 left in the
first period. The Eagles fought
back and the teams were
deadlocked (30-30) at the inter-
mission.
The Pirates grabbed the second
half lead and never looked back.
ECU opened as much as an
11-point lead on a pair of Sledge
free throws late in the game and
went on to win 70-62.
American was led by guard
Frank Ross with 20 points while
Eagle center Henrv Hopkins add-
ed 10.
Sat. Dec. 28, 1986
A balanced scoring attack in
which five players hit double
figures was enough to pace
Bucknell University to a 68-61
victory over ECU in the consola-
tion game of the Siena Invita-
tional Tournament in Loudon-
ville, N.Y.
The Pirates led early in the
contest on the hot shooting of
senior guard William Grady.
Grady's 10 first-half points kept
the Bucs close as thev trailed
31-28 at the half.
The second half was just as
close as the teams battled back
and forth. Two Jack Turnbill
free throws knotted the game at
61-61 with 3:10 remaining.
However, ECU went cold and
Bucknell went on to victory
68-61.
For ECU, Grady led all scorers
with 18 points. Bass had 15 while
Hardy chipped in 10.
Fri. Dec. 27, 1985
The Ivy League's Cornell
University defeated ECU in over-
time in the opening round of the
Siena Invitational Tournament,
54-53.
A low scoring first half saw
both teams shooting poorly from
the field. Cornell connected on 34
percent of their attempts while
ECU hit just 30.
The second half saw the lead
change hands 10 times. Henry's
basket underneath gave the Bucs
a 49-47 advantage with just over
a minute left in regulation. But
two Josh Wexler free throws put
the game into overtime.
Cornell got an inside basket
and made three of four foul shots
to squeak past ECU 54-53.
Henry led ECU with 16 as
Vanderhorst added 13 and Bass
chipped in 10.
Sal. Dec. 21, 1985
The SMU Mustangs defeated
ECU 71-62 in second-round ac-
tion of the Kentucky Invitational
Tournament.
The Pirates kept the action
close and trailed 33-30 at the
halftime intermission. The
Pirates cut the Mustang lead to
just one (33-32) early in the se-
cond half on a Bass turnaround.
However, the Southwest Con-
ference members showed their
strength and cruised to a 71-62
victory.
Walker En-Shrined
ECU's senior cornerback
Kevin Walker participated in the
61st annual East-West Shrine
Game, played on Jan. 11 in Palo
Alto, Calif.
Kevin Walker
The Shrine Game took place in
Stanford Stadium as the East was
coached by Earle Bruce (Ohio
State) and the West by Lavelle
Edwards (BYU). Walker was
teamed with LSU's Garry James,
Bowling Green's Brian McClure,
Miami's Kevin Fagan and
Maryland's Rick Bdanjek to
mention a few.
The game, mostly controlled
by the defensive units, saw the
East team overpower the West
squad as they rolled to an 18-7
victory. Walker, who was around
the ball all afternoon, recovered a
fumble and picked off a pass.
Walker, a Greensboro, N.C.
native played for the East Squad
after concluding the 1985 season
tied with Tennessee's Chris White
as the nation's interception
leader. Both Walker and White
managed nine intercepts in 11
games. Walker led the nation in
interceptions for six consecutive
weeks during one stretch in the
season.
The 5-11, 185-pound Walker
earned first-team all-Southern In-
dependent and first team all-
ECAC honors during his brilliant
senior year. With his nine interc-
pts. Walker fell just one shy of
the school's single-season record
of 10. His 18 career pick-offs
leave him just four short of the
school career mark of 22 set Jim
Bolding (1975).
Walker earned ECAC Defen-
sive Player of the Week honors
twice this past season as he had
two games where he intercepted
two or more passes. In the
Pirates' 27-15 loss on Oct. 5 to
the (then 2nd ranked) Miami
Hurricanes, Walker intercepted
three Vinny Testaverde passes
and tied ECU's single-game
record.
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"The game was lost in the first
five minutes of the first half and
the first five of the second. They
had command of the game at
those times coach Charlie Har-
rison said.
Bass led the Bucs with 17 as
Sledge added 14 and Vanderhorst
chipped in a dozen.
Fri. Dec. 20, 1985
Kentucky University's All-
America candidate Kenny
Walker scored 19 points to lead a
powerful Wildcat squad past
ECU in opening-round action of
the the Kentucky Invitational
Tournament.
Kentucky came out hot, scor-
ing the first seven points of the
contest. The Wildcats led 36-24 at
the half and went on to win han-
dily 86-52 in Rupp Arena in Lex-
ington, N.C.
Henry and Herb Dixon paced
the Pirate scorers with 10 points
apiece.
T
Sat. Dec. 14, 1985
Henry's 25 points and
Vanderhorst's 14 led the Bucs
past Winthrop College 77-69 in
Minges Coliseum.
The victory gave ECU a 4-1
mark which was the best start
since the 1962-63 squad.
The Bucs enjoyed a 34-29
halftime lead, but extended the
lead to 10 (43-33) on a Hardy
steal and layup. The Buc lead was
largest 61-45 when freshman
Jones had a slam dunk.
Winthrop could manage to cut
the Pirate lead to just six (61-55)
with 5:50 remaining to play.
However, ECU was able to hold
off any threats of a comeback as
they went on to win easily 77-69.
Wed. Dec. 11, 1985
ECU used an 18-10 run late in
the game paced by William
Grady's two clutch baskets to
give the Pirates a 68-60 win over
the Longwood College Lancers in
Minges Coliseum.
The Bucs were led by Henry's
25 points and Vanderhorst's 14
and Bass' 11.
The Pirates opened a 10-point
lead early on a Jones slam with
14:23 left in the first half.
Longwood came back and
managed to knot the game 34-34
at the intermission.
With the game tied 50-50 mid-
way through the second half,
coach Harrison inserted Grady,
who responded with two quick
buckets. With the Bucs up 54-50,
they never looked back. Good
free-throw shooting down the
stretch sealed the victory for the
Pirates.
The Bucs outrebounded the
Lancers 26-19. The Pirates also
shot well, connecting on 62.5 per-
cent of their field-goal attempts
The Lancers were not far behind
as they hit 55.3 percent.
Kenneth Fields led Longwood
with 20 while Lonnie Lewis add-
ed 18 and Kevin Ricks had 10.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 14,J986
19
nament
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Kid
,sJK C9
iring.
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20
-IMJLEASTCAROLINIAN
JANUARY 14. 1986
ECU Army ROTC Book Exchange
The Army ROTC Book Exchange is provided through the
I courtesy of The East Carolinian. Information provided to us is
listed in this order: Subject, Course Title; Book Name; Seller's
Name; Seller's Phone Number; and price. The East Carolinian ac-
Icepts no responsibility for incorrect information, nor exchanges
between students.
FINA
Security and Port. Management
Martha Moallar
758-1895
$12.00
ACCOUNTING
ACCT 2401
Financial Accounting
Tammy Lee
758-2219
$14.00
BIOLOGY
BIOL 1050
Biology
Tanya Rhudy
758-8284
$20.00
BIOL 1050
Humanistic Aspects of Biology
Connie D. Bell
758-8306
$6.50
BIOL 1051
Humanistic Aspects of Biology
John Conway
752-9872
$7.00
BIOL 1060
Living In the Environment
Gayle Pugh
758-7222
$16.50
BUSINESS
Managerial Econ
Managerial Economics
Martha Miller
758-1895
$15.50
BUED 3200
Retail Business Management
Kym Perry
758-9689
$13.00
CHEMISTRY
CHEM 1020
General Organic & BioChemistry
Shelley Perry
752-9927
$17.00
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Switching Theory
Digital Logic & Computer
Design
Melody
758-2402
$18.00
CSCI 2600
Fortran w Problem Solving
Gayle Pugh
758-7222
$5.00
Assembler
Assembler Language w Assit.
(2nd ed.)
Melody
758-2402
$16.00
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
CORS
Police and Community
Kathy S. Williams
756-7494
$18.00
DECISION SCEINCE
DSCI 2223
Computers and Data Processing
Connie D. Bell
7584306
$13.00
DSCI 2223
Computers and Data Processing
Kym Perry
758-9689
$16.50
DSCI 2244
Computers and Data Processing
(2nd ed.)
Tammy Lee
758-2219
$14.00
Management Science
Management Science
Ginger W. Chenoweth
758-1627758-4111, X251
$20.00
ECONOMICS
ECON
Economics (Micro)
Study Guide to occompany
Thompson's Economics
(unmarked)
Tracy Simmons
758-9978
$8-6
ECON
Economics (micro) ThompsonFRENCH
Economics
Tracy SimmonsFREN 1001, 1002, 1003
758-9978Theme et Variation
$18-15Brando Bass
752-8609
$10.00
EDUCATION
FREN 1004
SPED 2000Premiers Textes Litteraires
Educating Exceptional ChildrenGerald Joyce
KirkGallagher758-5075
Suzanne R. Harrell$8.00
1-751-1043
$12.00FREN 1001, 1002, 1003
Theme et Variation
ENGLISHLauren Bollinger
ENGL 1100752-8783
The Women of Brewster Place$15.00
Gerald Joyce
758-5075
$4.00GEOGRAPHY
ENGL 1100GEOG 1000
Concise English HandbookGeog: An Intro Perspective
Lee WalstonSusan Perry
752-3239758-9689
$10.00$16.50
ENGL 1100GEOG 1000
McGraw Hill ReaderRhoads & Murphy: The Scope of
Tanya RhudyGeography
758-8284Melody
$11.00758-2402
$6.00
ENGL 1100
Writing: A College Handbook
Tanya RhudyHEALTH
758-8284
$5.00HLTH 1000
Health
ENGL 1100Lee Walston
The McGraw Hill Reader752-3239
Shelley Perry$10.00
752-9927
$9.00HLTH 1000
Health
ENGL 1100, 1200Tammy Visconti
Reading and Writing Across752-1088
the Curriculum (New)$10.00
Melody
758-2402HLTH 1100
$8.50Hearth
Tanya Rhudy
ENGL 1100758-8284
The Writing Project$14.00
Robert Jordan
757-1768HLTH 1100
$3.00Health: Science of Human
Adaptation
ENGL 1100Shelley Perry
The McGraw Hill Reader752-9927
Gerald Joyce$9.50
758-5075
$9.00
HISTORY
ENGL 1200-
Language Awareness (3rd ed.)HIST 1050
MelodyAmerica: A Narrative History
758-2402Susan Perry
$8.00758-9689
$5.50
ENGL 1200
Literature: The Human Ex-HIST 1051
perienceAmerica: A Narrative History
ElaineElaine
752-4731752-4731
$11.00$7.00
ENGL 1200Political Science
Writing Research PapersThe American Polity
(4th ed.)Donald Roberson
Lauren Bollinger1-792-1902
752-8783$18.00
$2.75
History
ENGL 2730A History of Modern World
Understanding and UsingChuck
English758-7860
Kirk Shelley$19.00
756-6029 $9.00HOME ECONOMICS

Consumer Affairs
Victorian LiteratureEconomic Decisions for Con-
Victorian Prose and Poetry
Lou Ann OwensHarvey Clark
757-0548
$8.00
ENGL 3850
Story First: The Writer as Insider
Tammy Lee
758-2219
$4.00
f.hAhtt
REAL ESTATE
Appraisal of Real Estate
Randy Meetre
752-1617
$20.00
Financial Analysis
and Planning
Martha Moallar
758-1895
$7.00
FINA 2244
Legal Environ. Of Business
Business Law
Alise Rowan
756-5750
$21.00
sumers
Mike Sherrer
758-9686
$20.50
Home 1103
Marriage and Family Experience
Debbie Preston
758-5499
$12.00
INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY
Quality Assurance INDT. 4300
Quality Control
Kurt Yanchenko
7584587
$17.00
MANAGEMENT
Principles of Management
Ginger Chenoweth
758-1627 or 758-4111, ext. 251
$21.00
MKTG. 3832
Basic Marketing
Kym Perry
758-9689
$25.00
Marketing Management 3832
Basic Marketing
Marilee Bienes
355-6477
$20.00
MATH
College Algebra
College Algebra 3rd ed.
Gerald Joyce
758-5075
$20.00
PSYCHOLOGY
with Analytic
Math 2171
Calculus
Geometry
Gayle Pugh
758-7222
$23.50
Calculus 2119
Technical Calculus
Dreston Storks
752-1794
$12.00
Linear Algebra
Introductory Linear Algebra with
Applications
Melody
758-2402
$18.00
MUSIC
Music 5426
19th-Cenrury Romatnticism in
Music (by Longyear)
Casey
752-6985
$8.00
Music 6887
A Guide to Research in Music
Education (Phelps)
Casey
752-6985
$12.00
PHILOSOPHY
PHIL. 1100
Man Asks Why
Molly Harrell
758-8364
$8.00
PHIL 1100
Man Asks Why
Lee Walston
752-3239
$10.00
Ethics
Beyond Good and Evil
Dee Sounders
752-8793
$1.50
Ethics
John Stuart Mill- On Liberty
Dee Sounders
752-8793
$2.00
Logic (PHIL. 1500)
Understanding Natural Deduc-
tion
Melody
758-2402
$9.00
PHYSICS
Conceptual Physics 4th ed.
Kym Perry
758-9689
$12.00
Physics 1080 Astronomy
Exploring the Cosmos
Frances Ridley
758197
$13.00
Physics 1500
Physics (Paul Hewitt 4th Ed.)
Casey
752-6985
$8.50
Physics 2250,60,70
General Physics
Ben Wilbanks
758-5673
$30.00
POLITICAL SCIENCE
Southern Politics
Southern Politics in State eV Na-
tion
Kirk Shelley
756-6029
$15.00
Psychology 1050
Shelley Perry
752-9927
$20.00
Psychology 1050
Ann Mizefle
752-0254
$20.00
Psychology 1050 & 1051
Psychology Today
Kym Perry
758-9689
$14.00
Statistics
Fundamentals of Statistics for
the Behavior Science
Kirk Shelley
756-6029
$10.00
SOCIOLOGY
Social Life
How to Impress Girls (By Bill
McVicker)
Bill
756-2544
I will pay you $5 a copy
Courtship and Marriage
The Marricge Exercise Book
Dee Sounders
752-8793
$9.00
Sociology 1000
Sociology
Tammy Visconti
752-1088
$14.00
Sociology 2110
Sociology
Russell Ebelherr
757-0599
$20.00
SOC. 2110
The Social World
Russell Ebelherr
757-0599
$12.00
ed. -Jon M.
SOC. 2110
Sociology 2nd
Shepard
Tammy Lee
758-2219
$14.00
SOC. 3220 -Deviance
Interpreting Deviance
Robin Wilson
758-4245
$13.00
Modern Social Problems
Social Problems -Henslin & Light
Karhy S. Williams
756-7494
$15.50
Modern Social Problems
Social Problems & The Quality
of Life
Lisa Stoebier
758-9754
$8.00
SPECIAL EDUCATION.
Special Education 2000
Education Exceptional Children
Donald Roberson
792-1902
$15.00
SPEECH
SPCH 2001
Your Speech, A Manual
Kym Perry
758-9689
$8.50
SPCH 2001
Your Speech (Includes Progress
Sheets)
Melody
758-2402
$8.50
SPCH. 2001
Your Speech
Ricky Gilis
757-0623
$7.00
THEATRE
Theatre 1000
The Essential Theatre 3rd ed.
Tammy Lee
758-2219
$8.50
Chrysler
if Pirate basketball game
aren't fun enough. h
sound to I nance
new car ai
gar;
That's rig
will ha1.�
new
hah
bal! . i
random i
have 2'
Pii
fan
l
H

be
NC; Rac
Hanna M
Du;
sophon
Nl- K bin Jones, a
m Colonial Heights
imai
. an
Bonetu
I
I
� TOPPING!
I
I
I
I
I
L
��
��





I HI 1 AS! i AROl 1N1AN
JANUARY 14, 1986
21
e
PSYCHOLOGY
Psychology 1050
Shelley Pe
7529927
$20 00
P$. 10 SO
Ann Mu�'
752-0254
$20 00
oqy 1050 & 1051
Psychology Today
n Per�
7 59689
$1400
Statist
Fundamental ot Statistics for
the Behavior Science
Shelley
$-6029
$1000
SOCIOLOGY
mpress Girls By Bill
5 2544
I pay ou $5 a copy
Courtship and Marriage
The Mamcge Exercise Book
Dee Sounders
752-8793
$9 00
000
Socfdog
Tammy Viscontt
752-1088
$14.00
Sociology 2110
Sociolc
Russell Ebelherr
757-0599
$20 00
SOC 2110
Social World
Russell Ebelherr
757-0599
$12,00
2nd ion M
SOC 2110
Shepard
Tammy Lee
758-2219
$1400
SOC 3220 -Deviance
Interpreting Devia
Robin Wilson
758-4265
$1300
frierr Social Problems
Social Problems -Hensi�n & Light
Kathy S Williams
7 56-7494
$15 50
Modern Social Problems
Social Problems & The Quality
of Life
Lisa Staebler
758-9754
$8 00
SPECIAL EDUCATION
Special Education 2000
Education Exceptional Children
Donald Roberson
792-1902
$15 00
SPEECH
SPCH 2001
Your Speech, A Manual
Kym Perry
758-9689
$8 50
SPCH 2001
Your Speech Includes Progress
Sheets;
Melody
758-2402
$8 50
SPCH 2001
Your Speech
Ricky Gilis
757-0623
$7 00
THEATRE
Theatre 1000
The Essential Theatre 3rd ed.
Tammy Lee
758-2219
$8 50
Chrysler Giveaway Scheduled
It Pirate basketball games
arenM fun enough, how would it
sound to have a chance to vin a
t each ECl home
game?
rhat's right! ECU students,
lt and Greenville citizens
have a chance to win a brand
I slei 1 ifth venue ai tin
� every Pirate baskei
came
25
ple v�, 111 be drawn ai
ach participant wil
:onds to make ton
a tree throw .
shot from the top-of-the-key an.
a successful half-court shot coul
make some lucky fan a ne
owner of the beautiful Chrysl
Fifth Avenue.
If this wasn't enough, hi
about the talented performa
of the Pure Gold Dancers, i
Dancers return to Minges (.
lseum for the Pirates next hoi
game on Sat. Jan. 25. Followi
this performance, the Dana
will make four more appear am
throughout the year.
This basketball vear Pira
fans will see a new look from the
Pure Gold Dancers. Some of the
reasons why this group will be
changed from last year include: a
new coach, an almost entirely dif-
ferent cast of performers, and an
emphasis on precision routines.
Ms. Bobbi Collins, a dance in-
structor with over 25 years of ex-
perience, is the coach-advisor.
This season's Pure Gold Dancers'
edition is comprised of 12 Easi
Carolina University coeds from
three different states; North
Carolina, Virginia, and Florida.
MINGES COLISEUM
�t�ii;W�ilu�Mm�itt.�'�.���� � �"� lilW)W�K'i'i
nd anoM are the beautiful Pure Cold Dancers with the new car that will be given away to some lucky
Deitona, FL. These young ladies one of several halftime promo-
will entertain Pirate fans with tions scheduled at men's basket -
their precision dance routines, ball games to entertain all Pirate
The Pure Gold Dancers are just fans.
� ei I) Mcli
W i In
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8
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small pizza with any
two of your favorite
toppings PLUS two
servings of Coke
You pay only $5.99!
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One Coupon per pizza
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Call us.
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520 l985Domin P i �
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Located on the Evans Street Mall
(across the street from the Elbo)
THE LARGEST FREE WEIGHT
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(Over 7,000 sq. ft.)
SPECIAL
STUDENT RATES
Semester4 Months
$70.00
New Year Special 1 yr. Only
$99.00
Expires Jan. 25, 1986
Monthly $25.00
YOUR MEMBERSHIP INCLUDES
Nautilus Equipment
Over 50 Exercise Stations
10000 lbs. Free Weight
Aerobic Classes Karate Classes
Men & Ladies Shower & Locker
Rooms
Members Get Discounted Rates on Suntana
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GOLD'S AEROBICS
Semester
Special
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Good until Jan. 25, 1985
NO INITIATION FEE
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Hours: M-F 9:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M.
Sat. 12:00 P.M. - 6:00 P.M.
Sun. 2:00 P.M. � 6:00 P.M.
FOR MORE INFORMATION
CALL TODAY 758-4359
A Licensee of GOLD'S GYM ENT. INC.
� � � ��





22
I HI- I AS CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 14, 1986
Swim Team Training Trip
( nnfinn�1 I'rnm Paop 17 1 IM liiv.n �m�Kl ur KM) PI. r . . .
Continued From Page 17
Over the Christmas break the
Pirate tankers traveled to North
Palm Beach, Fla. for their winter
training session. But for the
Pirates, this was not a vacation,
but a rigorous week of almost
nonstop practice. Both men's and
women's teams had two daily
training sessions designed to put
the athletes in top condition prior
to the conference championships.
Pirate swim coach Rick Kobe
was pleased by the dedication of
his athletes. "This was the best
training trip we've ever had, we
worked extremely hard, and that
kind of work pays off
Kobe had reason to be pleased
with the Bucs' performance. Bet-
ween Dec. 27 and Jan. 5, the
Pirates cranked out an amazing
102,(XX) yards in 14 workouts. In
addition, they competed against
and defeated two collegiate teams
with whom they were sharing
training facilities; Notre Dame
and Johns Hopkins.
According to Kobe, about 90
percent of college im teams
travel to Florida for their winter
training. "We come here for one
reason, to work hard Kobe
said. 'The kids know they are
here to work, and the atmosphere
really motivates them
doing to Florida is not all fun
and games for the Pirates
though. Not only are they work-
ing out harder there than at any
other time during the season,
they have pay for the trip
themselves.
Following the week in Florida,
the Pirates traveled back for
another week of intensive
workouts in Greenville, as they
begin to taper down to their tour-
nament conditioning level. Dur-
ing that week the Bucs swam
another 60.000 yards as they
began to gradually decrease their
intensity.
Around the last week in
January the swimmers will start
making their workouts shorter
and lesN strenuous. The idea
behind this
let their bodies
rest without losing conditioning.
This easing up brings the athletes'
energy levels up to their peak in
preparation for their final and
most important meets of the
season.
The Bucs next dual meet will be
this Saturday at 2:00 p.m. when
they lace the Seahawks o UNC-
Wilmington.
The following are the results
from the men's and women's
meet against American Universi-
ty, followed by the women's
results against William & Mary.
Men's Meet
400 Medley Relay: ECL
3:39.21; American 3:45.2.
1000 Free: Smith (EC) 9:59.80;
Wells (EC) 10:40.41.
200 Free: Killeen (EC) 1:47.55;
Cook (EC) 1:49.82; Quinones
(Am Univ) 1:51.23.
50 Free: Kaut (EC) 22.24;
Potocki (.Am Univ) 22.54; Hector
(Am Univ) 22.84.
200 IM: Hidalgo (EC) 2:02.25;
Mac Donald (Am Univ) 2:02.59;
Brennan (EC) 2:04.81.
IM Diving: Stevens (EC) 131.9;
O'Connor (Am Univ) 122.0;
Laney (EC) 121.7
200 Fly: Blockschmidt (EC)
1:57.45; Quinones (Am Univ)
2:04.42: Hawkins (EC) 2:11.56
100 Free: Kaut (EC) 49.02;
Potocki (Am Univ) 49.05; Hector
(Am Univ) 49.16
200 Back: Hidalgo (EC)
2:06.05; Porch (Am Univ)
2:06.42
00 Free: Smith (EC) 4:54.33;
Berry (Am Univ) 5:00.86; Kay
(Am Univ) 5:11.21.
3M Diving: O'Connor (Am
Univ) 146.70; Stevens (EC)
134.35; Laney (EC) 118.90
200 Breast: MacDonald (Am
Univ) 2:13.24; Giametta (Am
Univ) 2:30.16; Smith (EC)
2:17.65
400 Free: Am Univ 3:17.88;
ECU 3:18.27
Women's Meet
200 Medley Relay: ECU
1:56.30
1000 Free: Poust (EC)
11:26.53; Augustus (EC)
11:44.37
200 Free: Pierson (EC)
2:01.33; Wawczak (Am Lniv)
2:03.31; Miller (EC) 2:03.36
50 Free: Wir.stead (FX) 26.39;
Wentink (EC) 27.31; Wilson
(EC) 27.46
200 IM: Gorenflo (EC)
2:20.67; Grand (EC) 2:21.91;
Halstead (EC) 2:23.89
1 IM Diving: Campbell (EC)
290.80; Poff (EC) 266.05; Kerber
(EC) 244.45
100 Free: Pierson (EC) 56.91;
Wawczak (Am Univ) 57.53;
Miller (EC) 58.36
100 Back: Livingston (EC)
1:03.66; Horton (EC) 1:04.40;
Palmeiri (Am lniv) 1:08.66.
500 Free: Gorenflo (EC)
5:36.61; Vituli (Am Univ)
5:52.37; Grand (EC) 5:33.34
3M Diving: No Entry
100 Breast: Conroy (Am Univ)
1:19.79; Wentink (EC) 1:14.63;
Halstead (EC) 1:15.02
200 Free: Am Univ 1:51.49
Women's Meet
200 Medley Relay: ECU (Hor-
ton, Wentink, Poust, Winstead)
1:55.36
1000 Free: Vallere (WM)
10:41.25; Miller (EC) 10:59.81;
Olivo (WM) 11:10.27
200 Free: Allee (WM) 2:00.32;
Pierson (EC) 2:01.41; Miller (EC)
2:01.44
100 Back: Poust (EC) 1:03.10;
Horton (EC) 1:04.05; Alleva
(WM) 1:04.90
100 Breast: Wentink (EC)
1:12.47; Alleva (WM) 1:13.20;
Ennis (EC) 1:13.98
200 Fly: Johnson (WM)
2:13.72; Augustus (EC) 2:15.18;
Grand (EC) 2:18.16
50 Free: Welch (WM) 25.00;
Winstead (EC) 25.82; White
(WM) 27.25
'00 Fly: Conroy (Am Univ)
1:06.50; Ferrero (Am lniv)
1:06.88; Poust (EC) 1:13.13
IM Diving: Campbell (E )
212.4; Poff (EC) 208.35; Martin
(WM) 206
100 Free: Welch (WM) 54.29;
Johnson (WM) 56. S8; Pierson
(EC) 57.51
200 Back: Poust (EC) 2:15.43;
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57S

i





larulfnian
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 14, 1986
23
Lady Bucs Rout Richmond, Indiana State
?CH v
ENS v
w V
Continued From Page 17
: points and a team high of
ven rebounds. Other scorers for
'irates included Alma Bethea
eight. 1 oraine Foster with
and Gretta O'Neal, who
four points.
In the consolation game,
de Kiand defeated Miami
S6 65.
1 ad Pirate v lassie
In Friday's opening round of
1 ad) Pirate Classic, the
rates almost led the entire way
?sting a 63-52 win over the
�ersit ol Rhode Island.
Hragg's two free throws at
e 12:51 mark gave the Pirates a
I the) never relinquished. The
I ad Bucs built their lead to as
as eight (32-24) in the first
.ilt before taking a 35-30 lead at
intermission.
In the second half, it was much
e same 'or the Pirates, who
red the First six points of the
and half to grab a 41-30 lead
18 26 to go. After that, they
er sav-v their lead get any nar-
wer than six points.
1 he Pirates shot 44.7 percent
n the tloor for the game while
de Island shot only 33.8 per-
1 eading the way in scoring for
Pirates was Loraine Foster
18 Also scoring double
figures tor ECU were Sylvia
igg with 15 and Lisa
jquirewell with 14 points. The
n had a high of 13 rebounds.
inding out the Pirates scoring
e Delphine Mabry with six.

Chris O'Connor with four and
Alma Bethea with three. Moni-
que Pompil and Gretta O'Neal
chipped in two points apiece.
In the other first-round game,
LSU handily defeated Miami
94-54.
Jan. 4, 1986
The Pirates routed the Univer-
sity of Richmond 67-33 to win
their conference opener. The
Pirates were never threatened as
they built a 30-11 halftime lead.
The ladies shot 50.8 percent
from the floor for the game,
while Richmond only shot 32.8
percent.
The Pirates were led by Lisa
Squirewell and Sylvia Bragg, with
14 points a piece. Loraine Foster,
Alma Bethea, and Monique
Pompile all chipped in eight
points each. Also scoring for the
Lady Pirates was Chris O'Conner
with four and Rose Miller with
three. Delphine Mabry, Cathy
Ellis, Therese Dartin and Gratta
O'Neal all chipped in two points
each.
Dec. 31, 1985
The Lady Pirates won their
New Year's Eve showdown with
Indiana State University by a
66-56 margin.
The Pirates only shot 43.1 per-
cent from the floor, while In-
diana State shot an even 50 per-
cent.
Gretta O'Neal led a trio of
double-figured scorers for the
Pirates with 14 points. Delphine
Mabry chipped in 12, and Sylvia
Bragg added 11. Also scoring for
the Pirates were Squirewell and
Foster, with eight points each.
Dec. 30, 1985
The Lady Pirates lost on the
road to their First game after
Christmas, dropping a 82-65
decision to Old Dominion on the
road. ECU shot 39.7 percent
from the floor, while Old Domi-
nion shot 47.9 percent.
ECU placed two scorers in
double figures for the game; they
were Squirewell with 17 and
Bragg with 12. Bethea had a team
high of seven rebounds.
Dec . 19, 1985
East Carolina completed its
stay in Florida with its third win
of the road trip with a 58-43 win
over Miami.
The Pirates shot 38 percent for
the game, while the Hurricanes
shot 32.7 percent.
The Pirates had three players
who had double-figure scores.
Bragg and Squirewell led the way
with 11 points each, while Gretta
O'Neal chipped in 10.
Dec. 17, 1985
ECU, playing in their second
of a three-game Florida road trip,
steadfastly defeated South
Florida, with a score of 65-43.
The Pirates shot 49.2 percent
from the floor for the game.
ECU had a trio of players to
score in double figures. Bethea
and Bragg led the way with 14
points each, and Foster chipped
in 12.
Dec. 16, 1985
ECU began its Florida road
trip barely escaping with a win
over Florida 56-55. The-Pirates
shot 44.7 percent for the game.
Alma Bethea led the way with
an impressive 25-point perfor-
mance.
Dec. 14, 1985
After being tied with North
Carolina Centra! at halftime, the
Lady Bucs blew past them in the
second half to bring on a 70-50
victory.
The Pirates shot 48.4 percent
for the game and were led in scor-
ing by Lisa Squirewell, with 16
points.
Dec. 13, 1985
The Lady Pirates blew a five-
point halftime lead and lost a
65-60 decision to Radford.
For the game, ECU athletes
shot 51.9 percent from the floor.
They were led in scoring by
Squirewell and Foster, with 14
points each.
1
yre
y-
7
The taste of
things to
COME.
A delicious new world of dining
excitement is headed your way as Anna-
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American taste, enjoyed without haste
Annabelle's extensive menu is full
moi the cuisine you love most. From crisp
salads and hearty soups, to juicy
burgers and piled-high sand-
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steaks, to succulent chicken,
seafood and pasta From
appetizers to dessert,
unch to Idtenight,
Annabelle's is "the Taste
of America �
Visit us soon in The Plaza.
SPRING SEMESTER
SPECTACULAR!
at Bond's
Russel Athletic Sweatshirts
XS, S, M
reg. $10.95 NOW $8.88
Hooded Sweatshirts
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Far West Ski Clothing Special
Buy a Jacket at regular price
Receive a pair of bibs FREE!
AH Shorts 20
Adidas and Nike Warm-L ps 25 off
All shoes in stock 20 off. Children's shoes 30 off
Air Jordan's Red White & Black reg. $64.95 NOW $50.95
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Group of Shoes Only $15.00 a pair
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Women's Leather $40.95
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Is Your 1 Sporting Goods Store
218 Arlington Blvd
Greenville 756-6001
SPORTING GOODS
Hours Mon Sat
from 11:30 am
Sun from 12 noon
RESTAURANT & PUB
The Plaza
Greenville Blvd
756-0315
Tr.eHUB-
618 South Pitt St.
752-1946 or 752-5048
�&
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'Several Energizing Aerobic Classes Daily
Machine and Weight Rooms
Relaxing Yoga Classes
'HOT Tub and SAUNA Villiage
2 Food Bars
For the price of 1 Only $2
with meal $1.69
Feast on 8 farm fresh hot vegetables at no extra
charge when you visit the famous Western Steer salad bar. By any
stretch of the imagination�Western Steer's salad bar and hot vegetable
bar is the best deal in town.
Build your favorite mile-high salad. Pick delicious farm fresh
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after choice. Western Steer
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same low price as our salad
bar alone.


Sunton Booth
"Juice, Beer, and Snack Bar
Live ond DJ Musk Room
TV and Movie Lounge
'Lockers and Dressing Rooms
Aerobic Class Schedule
ice.
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
10:15
10:15
10:15
10:15
10:15
11:00
3:00
3:15
3:15
3:15
3:15
3:15
4:30 5:45
4:30 5:45
4:30 5:45
4:30 5:45
4:30 5:45
7:00
7:00
7:00
7:00
7:00
8:00
8:00
8:00
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Club Hours
Monday-Friday
Saturday
Sunday
9:00 � 9:00
10:00 - 7:00
1:00.6:00
S'udent Special
Get a whole semester a� UNLIMITED
use of trie ENTIRE cluB tor only
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to the club lc you ond a friend
�NO Sales Pressure'
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untvtbsai m� MtAim am
6I� SOUTH PITT ST
� . f T �
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.





24
ES EFFI
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M
I HI
TO WALL PRICE REDUCTIONS
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN GREENVILLE.
Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli Bakery & Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current
I Week Ad With You. We Will Match Like Items or Equal Quality:
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRESH
MARKET
MARKET BREAK CALIFORNIA
Fryer Leg Qtrs. I Sliced Bacon I Head Lettuce
10 LBS. OR
LIMIT ONE
stf
large
head
DIET COKE AB -DIET SPRITE
� MELLO YELL
Coca Cola
DIXIE C WSTAL
Pure
Cane
Sugar
88
G
j
cJt
Ik
2 Liter Bottle
bag
'�' ' Nl � H E A H ADDITIONAL
RCHASE AT EVERYDAY I H PRICI
EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
Florida Oranges
j-
MC -
AO
C f
t
for
Purex Bleach
rr1
ft
Paper Towels
LIMIT TWQJ
PURCHASE WITH
WITH AOOmONAL
LUNCHEON MEAT
Armour Treet
SIN
12 oz.
can
88c
PLAIN- SELF-RISING
Red Band Flour
5 lb.
bag
3V :
48�
��
LIMIT ONE WITH ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE VT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
BUTTER-REGULAR
Crisco Shortening
3
lb.
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' 81c
68
ANN � At
Shortening
�J28
MIT ONI ����. sa,
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LIMIT TWO WITH ADDITIONAL
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LIMIT ONE WITH
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703 Greenville Blvd. Greenville, N.C. 0PEN24H0URS EStSilvm OPEN SUNDAYS 7 "V11PM





Title
The East Carolinian, January 14, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 14, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.447
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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