The East Carolinian, December 5, 1985






y
She iEaat (Earnltman
Serving the Last Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 No.?- 2.?
Thursday, December 5, 1985
Greenville, N.C
18 Panes
Circulation 12,000
Holiday Season
May Be Sad
JB HUMBERT The East Carol in,an
Season's Greetings
Tom Norton (General Manager) and Jay Stone (Managing Editor) and the entire staff of the Kast Carolinian would like to
extend their warmest and most sincere wishes for a joyous Holida Season to the students, faculty and staff of ECU. Merry
Christmas and Happy New Year!
B DOl G ROBFRSON
Staff Wnlrf
lor most people, Christmas is
a joyous occasion filled with
family, friends and good cheer.
But tor others, feelings of
sadness, disappointment and
loneliness can turn a happy holi-
day into a haunting memory.
"Feelings of depression are
very typical during the holiday
season said ECU Counseling
(enter Director Wilbcrt Ball.
"Depression is a human condi-
tion - anyone can become
depressed under certain condi-
tions he added.
� 1978 study of co!
students found 25 percent to be in
some state oi depression on any
given day. "I would imagine the
percentage would be higher dur-
ing the holiday season he said.
A. 2 to Ball, there are
several reasons tot holiday
depression, "In genera a stu-
dent's life isn't going well, they
go home during Christmas vaca-
tion and they're not happy.
Therefore, they get depressed
The holiday season also leaves
students with more free time,
which in turn, may cause depres-
sion, "They have tin hink
about grades, social life - things
they may have left undone he
said.
Moreovt , the Christmas
holidays may cause additional
pressures on students' lives
"Developmentally, there are
lots of pressures on students. -V
Christmas, some students see
things they want to buy, but they
have limited financial
resources Ball said.
"These are internal pressures -
we see what we want and are im-
patient to get it he added.
Many people hold myths about
See HOLIDAY Page 2.
Christmas Tree, Santa Clause Have Old World Origins
By JENNIFER MYERS
st.ff Wnlri
The Christmas holidays as we
know them began with the tradi-
tional celebrations of the winter
solstice, years before the Chris-
tian era. Then with the birtl
Christ. Christmas became a
Christian holiday celebrated at
the same time. It was firs-
observed in the cold northern
hemisphere, where we associate
snow, frost, evergreens, fir
candles and the lengthening of
the daylight hours. Christmas has
always been, spiritually, and
materially, a day of new beginn-
ings, light and warmth, and the
revival of hope.
The Christmas tree, which
every American household
decorates during the holiday
season, first appeared in the 16th
century. In 1510 and 1514,
Book Exchange Initiated
By DOl G ROBKRSON
suff Wnlfr
Are ou tired : �� thing in
to sell your books back
Student Supph Store, onlv.
find they will give you hall
what you paid for then
then the Army ROT )
change program mav be I
Speaker of the SGA
Legislature Kirk Shelley said the
book exchange program will
"give students an alternative to
selling books to the student store
and losing a lot of money in the
process
Here is how the book exchange
program works. A booth will be
up in front of the Student
Supply Store during the exam
period, Dec. 10-17. Each day.
from nooi 4 p.m students
jl fill out advertising forms
listing their names, phi
nun. iey have
to sell.
1 hen. the ads will be printed in
the Jan. 14 edition of The 1 iasi
C arolinian. "The students can
read the newspaper and see what
books thev would like, call the
number in the ad and buv the
books he said.
Ideallv, students should set the
price of the book thev are selling
above the half-price they would
receive at the Student Store, but
below the three-quarter price
other -indents would have I
tor the book. Shelley said.
I or example, it a new book
si $100, the student will receive
when he she -ells the book
back to the student store.
However, students who purchase
the same book for the next
See EXCHANGE Page 3.
historical records report that
after the teas; on Christmas eve,
local merchants placed an
evergreen tree in the town square
decorated artificial roses.
Children danced around the tree,
which was later sel on fir�.
This first account of a
Christmas took place in Latvia
and Estonia, which, are now par:
of the Soviet Union, corre
the idea thai the Christmas
wa German.
However, it was the German:
who are responsible f( i our tradi-
tional tree. In 1605. Evergreen
and fir tree- were sold in
Strasbourg to decorate homes
during the holiday season,
trees were called
Christbautr. & netimes tips of
fir trees were used, as sma
trees. However, it was the
Americans who were the first to
decorate large trees in celebration
of Christmas.
Christmas' origins can be trac-
ed to Martin 1 uther, who used a
candlelit tree a- an image of the
starry heavens from which Christ
came. Because oi it- association
with I uther, the Christmas tree
was confined to Protestant
religions, and it spread slowly
over Europe. It was never
popular in I at in countries, and
reached American before it
reached England.
rhe first English tree was part
of a v a
membei 1 Queen Caroline's
couri The first tree at Wind
Castle was in 1841, under Prince
Albert ar.d Queen Victoria.
However, the common people i f
and hesitated to adopt the
custom, but within twenty vears
Christmas trees were a common
sight. Traditional Christmas trees
were decorated with apples.
paper flowers, candies, and
candles.
Another aspect of our
American Christmas with foreign
origins in Santa Claus. Everv
country or nationality ha- their
. version of Santa; dressed in
bes, riding rse,
arriving on boats, and putting
in shoes among others.
The gift-giving associated with
Santa Claus was originally a
See OLD Page 3.
Expected Violence Fails To Begin
PITTSBURGH, PA (C PS) - Last
week, all sorts of racist violence
was supposed to break out at the
University of Pittsburgh.
In the weeks preceding the
Nov. 14 campus appearance of
Rev. Louis Farrakhan, the Na-
tion of Islam leader whose
speeches often include denuncia-
tions of Jews and Jewish
theology, black and Jewish stu-
dent groups often traded barbs
and even threats of violence.
Farrakhan himself, as it turned
out, defused the tension by
delivering a relatively mild
speech, and even criticizing
blacks who blame whites for their
oppression.
But the episode illustrated a
new tension between campus
On The Inside
Announcements
Ch
2
-� classifieds8
Editorials4 ?
$ Featuresllgj
Sports14-JI
Rather than love, than money$.
than fame, give me truth.
Henry David Thoueai
Jewish and black groups nation-
wide.
Student 'leaders on both side-
attribute any -trained relations in
part to Farrakhan's ongoing na-
tional college speaking tour and
say it threatens to spill over into
the anti-apartheid movement.
Some student groups are link-
ing the South Africa issue with
the Middle East, and some even
are trying to push Jewish sup-
porters out of the anti-apartheid
movement as a result.
At the University of
California-Davis, for example, a
black anti-apartheid group
recently banned B'nai B'rith
Hillel House members from
speaking at a candlelight
demonstration.
Hillel speakers had refused to
denounce the Israeli role in South
Africa and would not publicly en-
dorse the United Nations' resolu-
tion equating Zionism with
racism.
"Israeli's economic and
diplomatic ties with South Africa
are in no way evidence of her sup-
port of that country's racial
policies contends Alisa Weiner
of the Hillel House.
In the incident's wake, Weiner
!
admits relations between the
organizations "could be improv-
ed
"We do not support each
other's philosophies (in this)
she says.
At Ohio State, the All-African
People's Revolutionary Party
publicly supported a Palestinian
student group's anti-apartheid
rally, simultaneously condemn-
ing anti-apartheid literature
distributed by a Jewish student
group.
Last weekend at the University
of Chicago, the Midwest Student
Conference Against Apartheid
held a panel discussion of Israel's
support of South Africa and, by
extention, of apartheid.
"The concept was that you can
work for divestment, but you
have to shut the back door ex-
plains Stephanie Weiner, a
University of Illinois student who
helped organize the Chicago con-
ference.
"Israel's support (for South
Africa) is one of those back-door
measures that should be ended
she says.
And though "there is pressure
for people in the movement to
condemn Israel's relationship
with South Africa Weiner
maintains there is "no tension"
between Jewish and other anti-
apartheid groups.
Testing Jewish, students' sup-
port or non-support for Israel as
a condition for working with
black anti-apartheid groups is "a
crazy situation says Josh
Nessen of the American Commit-
tee on Africa in New York, which
has been organizing campus
divestiture efforts for years.
"I've never heard of pre-
conditioning a group like that
before Nessen says.
He denies it happens frequent-
ly, asserting Jewish groups have
had "no problem supporting"
the anti-apartheid movement.
But the anti-apartheid ten-
sions, as well as provocative
statements by Farrakhan and his
ministers, seem to be causing rifts
within some Jewish groups, too.
Black and Jewish groups, of
course, had a major falling out in
the 1960's when civil rights
leaders pushed Jewish sym-
pathizers out of the movement's
leadership, arguing that only
black people could liberate
themselves.
JIMLEUTGENS - Th East Carohn,�n
Christbaum
Christbaum is the Oerman spelling of the Christmas Iree. In
fact, the custom of decorating trees for Christmas began in Ger-
many. See the related story on page 1 for further details on the
origins of the Christmas Tree and Santa Clause.
tmmh

i

" , . � �
- . k , ��





IHt l XNU ROtlNjAN DECEMBERJ 1985
Announcements
ECU RUGBY CLUB
'� � a .
� � - the Bahama
1
. -
� l KM � .����.
PHI BETA SIGMA
LATKAANDHANNUKAH
PARTY
� �
NEED MONEY FOR SPRING1
SIERRA CLUB
GAMMA BE TA PHi
PETITION REMINDER
' ' ' '� Heresl �; oups ma' Have
' " �� Buccaneer petition are askea to
return them to the MSO office by Wed Dec
198S rhe v Mice is located af 239
' ' ' us in the office, leave
the D" � �� , io, �
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
tl speakers from
�����"� ' ind Puilen proved
afive ro an who attended
some 'egular meetings next
' �� ' ' ' � very one on their
' ' ' � an en,oahie holiday'
PPHA
a he a general business
�' " ' h Rm 22! Menoenhaii ah
� � - � � I'VnrJ
ECU BUDDHIST MEDITATION
AND STUDY GROUP
present
� �� �� B
ecembi � �
" " � �� .
" � � '���-
ISA
-� � � � it the
' M p at 0 oopn at De �����.
- � � � �
COUNCILOF HONOR
SOCIETIES
SIGMA GAMMA RHO
Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority will De si
Candy O Grams m fro'i' it the Stude I
ly Store from Tuesday until Fr.da De I
Dec 6th Send a candy cane anc!
your tr,ends that spec ial person in yoi
or a professor on campus All procei
help a Needy Family have thai � � �
Christmas that they would no'
have All candy o grams w : � li red on
Reading Day
CAMP DAY
Camp Day is coming FeDrua nit
Students interested in working
�� environment, witl
tact c loperai ve t � � p
Building
PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT
T a. pos fions n person �
are avanabie in ReseH' h
� ' i � M�
es for Human Resoi e Mb
leta �
I ' H � 113 Raw
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
N a to begin working
ner posit
employers such as Pepsi. A � Pi -� �
; " ' � and Owe
summer prograi� �, �
GPA � .
Rawi 313
COMPUTER SCIENCE CO OP
�. . � � .
imputei . . . . .
.�����
"?or S ?86 posit A - .
corporal Park I
rormat � �
R iw
Holiday Season Sad
ADVERTISING SALES
POSITION OPEN AT
�te iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Applications will be available
Dec.5 & Dec. 6 Eas( �
rm 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. .
Continued From Pane 1.
the holiday season, which
them to fei sadness.
For instance, people assume
evei else is happy during
Christmas and if they themselves
an ippy, i he get
depressed he said.
According to Realrisis Direc-
Mary Smith, post-holiday
depression abounds.
"We see more people depress
���� er the holidays. There's a
b'g let iftei the Christmas
she said.
i the majority of
joy returning to
itmas vacation.
a; be the student
ad a happy Christmas
want o face the
returning to
v- � the national suicide
ra during the
added that ECl
ad a problem. "Our
ealthy, intellij
aid.
do become
holidays,
�vever, Ball recommends the
i friend
problem.
Examine your feelings to find For
what's causing the depressed feel depressioi
ings. Get some exercise or enjoy a ' ounseli
���
favorite activity "
.

East Carolina I niversi! .
Student Union
is taking applications for
Student Union President
Student Union Vice President
&
Student Union
Committee Chairperson
for the 1986-1987 Term
Any full time student can apply
Applications available at Mendenhall
Student Center's Information Desk.
Deadline: January 24. 1986
GORDON'S
GOLF & SKI SHOP
264 By-Pass (Beside G viile TV & Appl.ance)
RINGGOLD TOWERS
At The Campus -East Carolina Univei
� S-Cf AMI ttkTK. iirs
� LOCAtlV MECT TC CAjfjS
� �Ai� TO CiASSIS AM n.afcs
� imcwiacs. t t-Bi (ait
� fun rjSA:s� v.r A-ctsset- n �
� Amrte am: a COHtm �P
� nrcMEH wuAfV � fw�fc:f:
LAUfVPRv fAClLintS
� -sm mxAGEtctn
W�7 SECURITY PERSON
� KfSr.TsT PAMIHC STICj �
WARD PROPERTY BROKE I
�19 75684IO
y
Wei
.Vh
i aters
$24.95
K'Jr.
Jr.
Jr.
Shirti
,ZCT5:
S9.V
L Dec
rd f
ants
'aters
acrylic
S4. 9s
- s
H (
UcostC
M.SK
Jr. Golf Clubs (Bags included)
sizes $95.95 SX 95
Jweperst,niil service is our speeialitr'

.
4,


'
Wisljiijg Vou
a Safe aqd Happy
Holiday Season.
'en lV7
Come to the Kroger Deli
for your Holiday Parties.
PARTY TRAYS GIFT BASKETS
TURKEY DINNERS - HAM DINNERS
PARTY CATERING SNACKS
LET THE DELI DO IT!
STf- ��
Stroh's
Light
-tf
"AvQP
HUM
MORGAN
���� � PRINTERS, Inc.
2901 S. Evans St. Greenville N.C. 355-5588
i
i
m
i
-SMsmmsi
105 Airport Road 8
Greenville, N.C. J
757-0327 !
Lake Country
Wines . .
Lfi
Bv
M
m
m
m
m
m
m
s
m

Flounder, Shrimp
& Oyster I
Combination
Includes French Fries, Coleslaw & Hushpuppies X
� - -� I
mwMw.mmw.
' " �' R � � i n Zl
Whole
Milk . . .
Nacho Tortilla
Chips. . .
Coca
Cola . . .
.
Tropicana
Orange Juice
PURE
$4
JfimcAat 7ruau
Video Movie
Rentals
No Cl 'b Fbbs
OVER
650
TITLES
BETA
A VHS
SIMPLE HOOK UP
VHS Player
Rental
Dixie Crystals 5
Sugar . . Bag
V
BAGS
ASSORTED
Totino's
Pizza
NTl
$399
.V.
Red 5
Grapefruit
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
J500 Greenville Blvd - Greenville
�'
Class
H MIKI ij,U
Ca
I
Hu.
Exchang
N �

el - .
II �
cha i;

Store S
GET
CLIFFS
NOTES
HERE.
Get th�
to n5-
in tit
Availa
u.b.e:
SI � COT V�H Ht
GBEDTVTLU. 1 1





ad
Hi t -s I k l INI AN
) t MB! H '

�'
d 5
lapefruit
429
����
"
C�w Council Formed
h M1KF 11 DWKK
Senioi Class Presideni Kirk
Shellev announced yesterday the
ol a Senioi Class
V out
�;c" is jusi too much work
' ree elected officials
e need to ce! more
Nut as to whai we .tie
said Shelle "It's put
help and adi
( iass officers on pro-

d a
embers ol
� Nv Vice
I ' s, 1 isa
ton, I aura
Kath 1 dgerton and
Bi ian 1 assitei
Shellev saicLthe Council �ill
address two spet ific areas in
first meeting on De ! a Senioi
Information Night and the Seniot
Class Gift
c oncerning the Senioi In!
mation Night, Shellev said,
' There's a lot ol stufl you dot
get in the classroom, rhev di
teach son how to handle the big
inflow ol sash you vull be receiv-
ing. Moreover, students are leas
ing their student wav � teed
ear n how to exist pro-
fessional world
ccoii . 'Uev,
Senior Information Nig wi
held late
I he second specific area the
( ouncil will address is arranging
Senioi (. lass Gift. I his year's
gift, according to Shelley, should
b� a bell tower. "It's an idea I
have heard foi awhile, especially
from the North Carolina Student
1 egislature said Shelley
Shelle) voiced the opinion that
would be nice to have a beli
towei on ECU's campus.
However, up to now, no one has
taken the initiative to build a
� w �; " That's what we are star-
ting here now he said.
ellev would like to see the
ei completed, or at least being
constructed bv the end of 1986
Old World Source Of
Traditional Christmas Tree
Campus Voice
W hat do ou want for
( hrMmuC
IV
An thorn
Koaru
Hugnin
Roane vl
asked. "B
"I wa
Saundra 1 ittli
"1 �'�

I wai I isa Muggins
� �
M i �
V alt
Bnl
��
Continued From Page 1
pagan celebration, and va bam
ed b) eai lv hi i
Christmas began as being m
associated with I
and emmerged the same
German) as the Christ
Saint Nicholas, who wa
original Santalau .
the patron saini of childi
the helper of the opp H
brought miracles to
were good and knew
were bad Mans
celebrate St Nichola
December 6, the da
UK) A D H iwev:
celebration, Decembei 25,
decided upon to keep New v
and Christmas
The trad
tat old man dressed ji
originated from a
in 1922 bs c :
Moore He pi iv al
Visit ol St
dre
anonymouslv
newspaper. po
a hei e tl s' V � .
described becan
das Sai
with "furs '
clothes tarnished iti
� bundle ol
� ack. and he l oked
a peddler just opening his
? He had a broad I ind a
id little belly, thai shook when
. like a boss! tull ol jel-
. 1 i a chubby arid plum
right ld elf. x I
Sam i Clau begai
o w a j o 11 y
Merry hnstmas and Happy
Nt-w ear.
ittle
Bsrd
'
�'4


4
,J4
j
'4

4
4
91
1
'y4
4
iyj
�i
Exchange System Started

u Shelley
� to
ange "1 hope
ser v ice w e' r e
� 4000 ad
Vi
.
5t �. and i

If a si
T '
I
e S t u d
�ries he added.
The V v R() 11



"The 1
� Kei tucky

ai i �
. -
RECORDS
We Buy
Used Albums it
Tapes
"Best Prices Paid"
112 E. 5th St. 758-4298
GET
CLIFFS
NOTES
hl'HNl
;he scarlet
LETTER
Get the ones you need
to make better grades
in literature.
Available at:




I-
I
U.B.Ef
SI COTAMCHE
GBEEKVTLLE. N C
"A Complete Meai On A Bun"
215 E. 4th St.
Corner of 4th & Reade
752-2183
We Will Be OPEN Until 12:00 a.m.
During Exam Week
CALL 7 5 2j 2183
$1.00 OFF Large No. 19
SUPER SPECIAL
!
Expires 121785

8
i
XX.VA.VVXXXX.XV.VXWVVV
(tood On
Delivery
50CAOFF LARGE
y sub
Expires 121785
25oFF SMALL
Any SUB
Expires 121785
5TH STREET
IMPORT SERVICE
WhRLPAIR TOYOTA, HONDA, VVA,
MAI. PORSCHE, VOLVO, DATSl V
LOTUS, MERCEDES, BMW, ALDl
AND OTHERS
DIAL
w
758-1534
1�67 E. 5TH
GREENVILL
. �. -V "K " -V -k
- . - -v �� r-c-vrc.
rFrvjF�l
�ymWm � 9 V 9
s
This low price wIM not be offered again next semester.
We wish you a
Merry Christmas and a Happy New
7571606 Rear!
417 Evons Street Give yourself an early Christmas present.
Downtown You'll be glad you did after all the Holiday food is eaten!
MEXICAN MADNESS
FREE NACHO BAR 10 PM
� MARGARITAS ?5 DRAFT
IL MIDNTE
3 50 PITCHERS
TUESDAY.
LADIES NIGHT 5 - 9 PM
. ADIES Will RECEiVE A CARNATION
I 67 W NE SPECIA. 1 so HOUSE HIGHBALLS
CLOCK MUNCH '0 PM TIL MIDNITE
FREE PIZZA BAR
WEDNESDAY:
ALL YOU CAN EAT BEEF RIBS . . . 7.95
INCLUDES SALAD POTATO AND BREAD
THURSDAY:
COLLEGE NIGHT
3 50 PITCHER - 75 DRAFT - 1 67 WINE SPECIAL
FRIDAY:
i
SCHNAPPS NIGHT
STRAWBERRY PEPPERMINT APPLE
& PEACH SCHNAPPS FOR 1 75
FREE FIESTA FOOD BAR: 11-1 PM
SATURDAY:
SOURS & COLLINS FOR 1.99
FREE FIESTA FOOD BAR: 11-1 PM
SUNDAY:
.99 DRINK SPECIALS
TEQUILA SUNRISES � BLOODY MARYS
MIMOSA � CHAMPAGNE � SCREWDRIVERS
Darryl's Delivers � Call 757-1973
NEW
Fiesta Food Bar
On Friday & Saturday
Nights 11 p.m. to 1 a.m
FREE
m
m
'





(Bift Rant (Untolinmn
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, or mbm
Jay Stone, xiwnnriwrm
Mike Ludwick, v�td.
Scott Cooper. �&
John Shannon, n�� rwr
lorin pasqual. (
DeChami e Johnson, mmkw
Tom Luvender, pmm
Anthony Mar tin, � ���
John Peterson, , fi-�r-
Shannon Short. ��, f ur
DtBBIt ST! VI s. stcwm
December 5, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Yuletide Spirit
Some Gripped; Others Not
Tvvas' three weeks before
Christmas and every drug store in
town was having a run on Maalox.
On the campus of righteousness the
faithful were huddled in their
cubicles sweating and grunting over
tomes of western civilization's
greatest offerings in preparation for
exams. Ulcers and hemorrhoids
abounded in academe that week
and Christmas cheer was not a sen-
timent shared by all.
In fact, there were those who
could be heard to give voice to the
"Bah, humbug sentiment. That
such an antipathy toward the eg-
gnog swilling and tree trimming
season could be voiced by lovers of
Dickens caused consternation to
cloud the countenances of some
and a smirk of irony to creep across
the visages of others. After all, why
blame Christmas because Joseph
Goebbels is in charge of your exam
schedule, right? Nevertheless, there
you have it: "Bah, humbug
One has to wonder about that.
Upon inquiry, one person com-
plained to me that Christmas had
become a load of "commercial
crap In other words, she believed
that it had lost its metaphysical and
emotional significance for most
people. Instead, she said, it had
become an excuse for the merchant
class to push their wares with
almost total disregard for the sen-
sibilities of the consumer. People
have their fragile psyches bombard-
ed day and night bv salespersons
urging them to "Buy
In fact, the more deeply I dug in-
to this thing, the more obvious it
became that the reason that most
people have a problem with
Christmas is because of all the
money that is involved in it. My
roommate is depressed because, he
says, he doesn't have money to buy
people Christmas presents with.
Of course, the thing is that he's
not depressed because he has to
spend money, but because he
doesn't have it to spend. He doesn't
mind that he doesn't have it to
spend on himself so much. His ten-
nis shoes have been recycled so
many times that even Goodwill
won't take them. He wants to show
his friends that they are esteemed.
Most people probably share that in-
clination, it seems to me. And that
is what Christmas is all about.
Then too, though, there's the
thing of feeling obligated to give
presents to distant relatives and
aquaintances and them feeling
obligated to give something to you.
So you wind up giving each other
something cheap that nobody
would want and feeling awkward
about saying either "thanks a mil
bubba" or "don' worry about it
Well, who needs that? We should
cut that right out of the whole
Yuletide vibe. Do it with gusto or
forget the whole thing is what I say
But the thing is � I Tike Christmas
� I like celebrating it with my
friends and my parents, sister and
brother-in-law. I like trying to buy
something for my mother that she
will not wrap up and give to
somebody else the next Christmas.
It's a real challenge.
And I like Christmas specials like
Rudolph the Rednosed Reindeer
and The Grinch Mho Stole
Christmas, for instance. These
specials are great. They were the
major formative experiences of my
youth. A whole value system can be
founded upon them.
Then too, of course, there's the
road trip that comes after
Christmas, but that's another story.
The main thing to remember is the
next time you feel the anti-Season's
Greetings spirit creeping into your
veins after getting the latest
package of the holiday season ads
in the mail remember the Grinch.
The merchants can't steal
Christmas from you if vou keep it
in the right place. Nobody can
Happy Holidays!
TMDf&rTMcr
IF EDMEESE
WERE A
FOUNDING
FATHER
xmfmwrW'
�1
V8S'AWZ&v�&Bf4
A rmed Forces;PatriotismDefended
�Campus Forum-
l am glad to see that you have
figured out that members of the Arm-
ed Services are required to fight and,
as a consequence, may end up killing
somebody. What 1 think you are
missing in your indoctrination of the
military from the Greenville Peace
Committee and Students for
Economic Democracy is the rationale
of why the U.S. has a military. The
U.S. Armed Service is made up
Americans who prepare themselves to
defend our nation or to work to free
people who are oppressed and want
our help.
I keep getting the impression from
you that you think Communist
leaders are a bunch of nice guys who
will give up the idea of slaughtering
whole villages in Afghanistan,
Nicaragua, Indo-China, Angola and
Ethopia if you can convince enough
American males not to sign up for a
draft.
To help further your education
about the U.S. military may 1 suggest
the following:
1) Go over to the ROTC offices
and talk to the cadres. Odds are you
will probably learn that they knew
when they took their oaths to protect
our nation "from all enemies, foreign
and domestic" that they knew some-
day they might have to fight in a war.
2) Read a couple of books on the
morality of war. Again 1 think the
ROTC cadre can steer you in the right
direction. Personally, I feel that being
born free was an accident, but to die
free is a sacred obligation. Running
away from the responsibility to de-
fend your country is nothing short of
treason.
3) Talk to a couple of political
science professors as to who has the
power to declare wars. Odds are they
will tell you it's the President and the
Congress of the United States. If you
still believe that war, no matter what
the justification, is absolutely wrong
� then work to get candidates who
believe the same way you do elected.
Don't be surprised if the majority of
voters don't share your opinion. I can
remember one candidate who had a
view on war similar to our own:
George McGovern. Jimmy Carter's
views on war were probably similar to
your own � but he is the President
who advocated registration for the
draft and worked to push it through
Congress.
4) Attend a Veteran's Club meeting.
There you will find some individuals
who had the misfortune of fighting in
a war in Vietnam. They may or may
not have supported that particular
war, but this country asked them to
go and fight for a people who were
trying to keep from being invaded by
Communists, and they went. It was
people like you that blamed the
soldiers for the war, instead of the
voters. Unfortunately it is the soldiers
who alone carry the scars of being
called "baby killers" when they came
home from the worst experience of
their lives, who could not talk about
their experiences for close to ten years
because of fear of ridicule.
After you have fully looked at the
other side of the Armed Services, call
me and let me know if you still feel
justified in urging people not to
register for the draft, or blame
soldiers for wars. I really want to
know.
Kirk Shelley
Senior, Political Science
Not Warmongers
This letter is a response to the
editorial by Susan Haynie on Dec. 3
1983. I have trouble trying to follow
Ms. Haynie's reasoning about the
Armed Forces. She seems to have had
several flaws in her article. I have
elected, therefore, to point out five
areas in which Ms. Haynie needs to
set her record straight.
1) What kind of force are we ac-
tually speaking of when discussing
the Armed Forces? The Armed
Forces are composed of the same
freedom-loving citizens that make up
other American industries. Most ser-
vicemen go to their daily jobs just as
their civilian counterparts, it must
also be noted that the military is not a
seperate American entity; all the
Armed Forces are controlled by
civilians in the government. No major
policies are enacted without govern-
ment approval. The military is made
up of a system of checks and balances
which prevent it from ever evoking
into an independent force in our
society. An intelligent man once said,
"Soldiers don't cause war. Politicians
get us into war. Soldiers just do the
dying
2) What size of a force is the Arm-
ed Service? Relatively, the Armed
Forces is very small. Less than one
half of 1 percent of our population
serves in the military.
3) What is the mission of the Arm-
ed Forces? Ms. Haynie says the mis-
sion of the military is to teach men
how to kill. Here is where she is far
off base. The first point in the code of
the U.S. fighting man is "1 am an
American fighting man. I serve in the
forces which guard my country and
our way of life. I am prepared to give
my life in their defense This does
not say the military wants war. This
simply says that the soldier is willing
to put his life on the line and die if
necessary, to keep our freedoms here
in the U.S. � the freedoms which
allow someone such as Ms. Haynie to
continue to voice her opinions,
ludicrous as they may sound.
4) Is the learning "how to kill" the
only education the serviceman gets?
No, far from it! The military man has
several abilities to advance his or her
education. Professional education is
stressed in their service; approximate-
ly 98 percent of officers have at least
one college degree. Several enlisted
men who decide to make the military
their career go on to get a college
education, and some even obtain a
doctorate. The military can't
guarantee you a job after your first
tour, but neither can this college.
5) Is registering for the draft the
same as saying "war is okay?" This
statement almost makes one laugh.
When someone registers for service,
they are saying that they agree with
our country's way of life, and that
they want our way of life preserved
for our future generations.
I suggest that Ms. Haynie re-think
some of her statements, i feel sorry
that there are actually people in
America that think the same as her. I
also think she owes an apology to all
those who have died, and those who
may one day die, to preserve the
American way.
Timothy Williams
Junior, Computer Science
Angola
1 am writing to inform ECU of the
human injustice going on in Angola
which is located between Zaire and
Southwest Africa. This is a country
occup;ed by athiest communists from
Cuba and Russia. However, there is a
glimmer of hope for human rights in
Angola.
Jonas Savimbi, the leader of
U.N.I.T.A controls approimately
one-third of the southeastern section
of the country with a 60,000 man ar-
my, -which is poorly equipped
pared to the communist war mac
supplied by R milii
industrial comple. Savimbi
valiantly built a nation within a
by organizing hospitals,
farms, mines, fac
democratic government, fu
decade npy, cowardly
Democrat crybabying saying,
don want another Vietnam we
Finally have enough common sense
about reality to give aid to these b
freedom-loving people in their strug-
gl ' for t reedom and
determination.
However, Gulf Oil C orporation is
providing alm !ne
communisi government's GNP. rheir
business with the communists sup-
ports 35,000 Cuban Troops (Whai
CBS calls construction workers) and
5,000 Russian advisors, soldiers, etc.
who command troops, p � MIG's
and pilot helicopter gunships.
After 10 years, the communi
can't destroy tne.se freedom fighters
whoses ranks are grow ing. These peo-
ple need our help to be tree. If vou
buy Gulf products. then you are sup-
porting communist imperialism.
When it comes t Vfgl at istan,
Angola. Cambodia and Ethiopia,
where are Sue Haynie and Edith
Webber?
E. Sandy Hardy
Chairman, ECU College Republicans
Editor Criticized
Once again the East Carolinian has
shown their liberal editorial bias - on-
ly this time the end result was a
misrepresentation of an editorial verv
much in line with the now familiar
leftist leaning ot the editor. I am
referring to a contribution by Susan
Haynie published Tuesday, Dec. 2.
Ms. Haynie, (who incidentlv is a
junior psychology major not a
sophomore in general college), wrote
an article that was intended, I believe,
to provide a strongly worded yet ra-
tional argument against high school
aged students registering for military
service without fully comprehending
the implications and possible end
responsibilities of their actions. Her
editorial was not something deserv
of the infammatorv and simplistic
tie of THE ARMED FORCES KILI
PEOPLE. In the future, Mr. Editor.
I would suggest that you not cutt oi
your nose to spite you: face - par-
ticularly at the expense of the integri-
ty of a contributing editors message
Dawne E. Bost
Graduate Student, Sociology
Editor's Note: Ms. Honey's original
article read: "The next question is.
course, about the true nature of the
military if n is not for advanced,
highly skilled education and training.
The main purpose of the Armed
Forces is to prepare the country for
war � to teach people how to kill.
Period. Any other �purpose' is secon-
dary to this main goal. This aspect of
the armed service experience isn't
even discussed during the recruitment
process
I apologize if 1 missed the subtleties
or complexities of Ms. Hanev 's letter,
but headline writing is a finite art.
There is only so much space to work
with and thus only so many of the
points that the letter touches on can
be highlighted. In sum I do not
believe that the "integrity" of Ms.
Haney's message was compromised.
Editor's Note: We regret that space
did not permit the publication of all
of the letters that we received. Thank
you for writing.
Camp

becau
Christm
Bv Bf (H UHK KFK
Mei
Me
i
Opcra-
Ho
Tougher
FAST 1 .
If
ge
educai
mu.
ege
Undei
stud �
"re.
need s
teaching
have to obi a
degree empnasizing a
The grour
from 39
universr
itself The

educai

oth
for; '
teacher" fc
prestigious
sion.
In its '
released last week a M
State University, I
Group said i:
the education p
There is
ingness ot ii I
H,
mra! :�:
SI ivsl �
35 OFF
& LESSONS
TAKE
OFF FDR
tSNOWSHOl
Call i)i n
ansl
Studenf I D v ardrequ �
4





�r
I
I HI I AM AKOI 1MAS
D!IA1HI K
. )Bi
5
nded
a
�I
a
� rote
-� ra-
il
end
Her
tic 11 -
s KILL
Mi 1 ditor,
CUtt of
face � par-
' ir
�age.
n is, 0
we o
- : znced,
raming.
A rmed
ountry for
� - to kill.
is secon-
This aspect of
perience isn't
.� ruitmenl
the subtleties
' W Haney's letter,
a Unite art.
mm h space to work
many of the
f letter touches on can
ted. In sum I do not
integrity" of Ms.
message was compromised.
ote: We regret that space
permit the publication of all
"3 that we received. Thank
r writing
Campus Crime Rates Have Decreased
V SHINGTON, D.C. (CPS) �
College campuses probably have
become safer, more crime-free
places over the last few years,
tigures from the Federal Bureau
ol Investigation's just-released
Uniform Crime Report suggest.
No one. however, is sure
because the FBI report tracks
crime on onl 300 campuses, and
schools don't report their crimes
precisely
"The statistics (in the FBI
report) are not inaccurate, but
(they are) misleading said Rick
Huebner of the Cal State-
Dominguez Hills police.
Huebner's campus had one of
the highest college crime rates in
the country, but the investigator
says the rate maj be skewed by
"reporting differences" from
college to college.
One "aggravated assault" on
the campus, for example, was an
incident in which a 15-year-old
boy knocked down another boy
and stole his bicycle, Huebner
says.
In genera, most college police
officers believe campus crime is
falling nationwide.
They think a rising college
crime wave peaked in the early
eighties, and has gone down in
the last three years.
"There may be exceptions to
the trend, due to parochial
characteristics of a specific
school says Daniel Keller, head
of the University of Louisville's
police and a long-time leader of
the nationwide Campus Crime
Prevention Program.
Keller says theft is the most fre-
quent crime on campuses, though
police seem to be hearing about
sex crimes more frequently.
"We don't know if incidents of
sexual crime are up, but we do
know that the reporting of sexual
offenses if up on campuses he
observes.
"More women may be getting
on the bandwagon and standing
up for their rights University of
Connecticut security director Ted
Pawlich speculates.
In all, only about a third of the
crimes committed in the U.S. are
reported, the Bureau of Justice
Statistics in Washington, D.C.
estimates.
"We have instructions that tell
law enforcement agencies how to
process data says Robert L.
Wertman, who helps assemble
the annual Uniform Crime
Report.
But University of Delaware
campus security officer Jim
McGrory agrees with Huebner
that the FBI's college statistics
snould be taken with a grain of
salt. "There is no real final
check. You've got to remember
that the system is voluntary
University of Illinois officials
improved their poor showing in
the 1979 report merely by stopp-
ing reports of all fights,
regardless of how insignificant,
as aggravated assaults.
In 1984, there were only 15 ag-
gravated assaults on the
Champaign-Urbana campus,
compared to 46 in 1979.
Of the 46 in 1979, many involv-
ed no injuries worse than a black
eye.
The FBI specifies an ag-
gravated assault involves the
threat or actual use of a weapon
or results in an injury requiring
medical treatment.
At the University ol South
Florida, Officer Bob Siwick at-
tributes many of the 39 violent
crimes reported in 1984 to the
non-students attracted to con-
certs at the schools's new arena.
North Carolina State reported
47 violent crimes in 1984, one of
the highest rates in the nation.
But the rate is a significant im-
provement from 1983, wl
there were 102 violent crime
the campus, says N.C. State
C rime Prevention Officer Pet
McLeod.
She says at least 40
crimes could be traced to celel
tions ol the schools' winn i .
the NCAA national basketl
championship in 1983
The University of Marylai
College Park reported 53 violent
crimes, the highest among the 300
schools tracked bv the 1 HI ii
1984.
The Maryland campus, as are
most other schools with high
violent crime figures, is in an ur-
See CAMPUS Page 6.
Christinas Charity Programs Help Needy People
W
B BFIHWHK kFR
SUM Vnlr
Operation Santa Claus brings a
Merry Christmas to hundreds of
people who otherwise, might not
enjoy the holidav season. The
program is sponsored bv the
Mental Health Association in Pitt
County.
During the Christmas drive.
Operation Santa Claus provides a
personal gift for each resident in
Pitt County hospitals, and Pitt
mty residents in Cherry
Hospital and the Caswell Center.
According to the event's
chairperson, Winnie Nelson, gifts
of all kinds, including clothing,
canned food, toiletries, and
tobacco items, will come in han-
dy for the 1985 drive. Very few
requests for toys have been made
this year, she said.
"Money donated to Operation
Santa Claus will be put in a
restricted funds account and be
used to buy items as they are
needed for Pitt County
residents said Nelson.
"Food is a much needed item
for some of the Pitt County
residents. Some of the residents
have high medical expenses and
find that their money just doesn't
stretch far enough to provide
adequate food for their table
said Nelson.
According to Lisa Whitfield,
of the Panhellenic Council, her
group is planning on a large
donation to the 1985 present
drive. "Each girl in each sorority
will give one gift. Big brothers of
the sororities will donate gifts
also. This Sunday we will have a
Holiday Show where all the
sororities will donate all their
presents by putting them in one
large box
The group "participated in
Operation Santa Claus last year
and found that it was a very suc-
cessful and rewarding
experience said Whitfield. "It
was exciting to see the anx-
iousness and the excitement on
the faces of those who received
the gifts. They all were very hap-
py with their gifts and sent thank-
vou notes
"Operation Santa Claus pro
vides Christmas for those who
would be forgotten about or
those who cannot afford
presents. With Operation Santa
Claus, everyone has something at
Christmas commented Gladys
Howell, honorary chairperson.
"It's a very worthwhile activity
that makes a big difference
said Howell.
To donate money or gifts, con-
tact the Mental Health Center.
All monetary donations are tax
exempt.
CAMPUS
ADVERTISING REP
Be responsible for plai � . tismj
materials on your
Work on ex iting mart . � gran I i
clients such as merican Express T & T
Sony and Sierra Club Choosey ir ���
hours Good experiem e and gr i
For more information
� '�. 7 9-5pm
Westoast �
Representative Program
Vmehcan Pas- .
500 Third ve -
tie m -
Tougher Degrees Needed
I As I1NSINC.Ml(CPS
If aup i)f edion d
ion's
Cu ual o 1find it
much
colleg.
C 11 iiert h
mt��� me
c aer tea� l 1 V is" would
need5 .
teaching cei I pi
iionaJ careei would
av obtain a second advanced
degree emphasizing leadership.
The group of education deans
from 39 "leading research
universities" � which named
itsell The Holmes Group in
honor ol legendarv Harvard
education Dean Henry W.
Holmes � hopes to enlist 60
othei lieges in us ef-
fort to create "a new type of
teacher" by making teaching a
prestigious, highly-paid profes-
sion.
In its founding statement,
released last week at Michigan
State University, The Holmes
Group said it hoped to overhaul
the education programs by 1990.
There is, moveover, "a will-
ingness of institutions to move in
this direction says Richard
Prawat of the Holmes Coor-
dinating Committee.
Prawat, a Michigan State
education professor, helped pre-
set1 the group's suggestions to
the cademic Vice Presidents
immittee of the National
Association of State Universities
and Land-Grant Colleges
Prawat says the report was
"received very positively
Lhe Holmes report coincides
with similar findings released two
weeks ago by the Carnegie Foun-
dation for the Advancement of
Teaching.
The Carnegie study also sug-
gested tightening professional
standards to get greater recogni-
tion and rewards for teachers.
"It won't be enough to prepare
a new type of teacher Prawat
says. "We need incentives for
holding the best and the
brightest
To do so, the Holmes plan
would aim to create "career pro-
visional teachers" who have ex-
tensive academic training and can
lead the profession into better
supervising, and developing and
evaluating coursework.
"If we can change the
workplace, conditions and com-
pensation, then people will know
their career will reward them for
their efforts he savs.
'jfJyjfrare�aiyj&

1
UNSH1N!
V
IDEO,
Un
Qift CeRtificate
J,
.i,
'
(
(
(
(
�n
214 Arlington Blvd. Greenville

Vff M
f
7S&4392
JS
cW
i �
- - sh� West Virt i
TAKE
OFF FOR
BN0WSH0E
The Island In The Sk
now fur informant n reservations
anddirei lions KM 572 5252
Student I D i ard required
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
&
&
fa
Ml
fa
fa
i
fa
&
i
1
fa
fa
:m
fa
fa
fa
m
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
�Jm
fa
i
fa
an
fa
i
m
A
ft
fa
1
ft
i
ft
-X4.
40-AO7T
END OF
SEMESTER
PARTY FRI.
DEC. 6th
ATTIC
'f&ffy
22 10P
$100 Best Legs

Sponsored by
ECU Cheerleaders
ECU Admission Policy
When You See An
$1.00 or $1.50 ECU Gen. Adm
FREEor5(K ECU Dorms
ATTIC.
I 1 X SAT
I DEC. 7th
DECEMBER
1985
ATTIC
3
iV�U3
BRICE
STREET
DECEMBER
1985
?w.
� 6 FRI
' 7 SAT
8 SUN
�12 THU
�13 FRI
'14 SAT
�19 THU
�20 FRI
21 SAT
"26 THU
�27 FRI
�28 SAT
31 TUE
cult 5. :lass:C VIDEO "2 FB
TX BOOGIE u - � rae
J' XI LEGS CON
HIGH RISK
MAXX WARRIOR BNG roun hE�C
? JAILBAIT.
ICE WATER MANSION �- - , . � kTal
PANIC DCpms �
BRICE ST. r � - -� v part
SILENT RUN es; of exam m
DOC HOLLIDAY .v rwei m ro s. � �
? NIGHTHAWKS CHfl rvw
WHIE WING LADIES vg-
THE PC.NT � , - �.
JOHN WEST AND VOiCES BYE BYE 85
AVALANCHE new yeas S e.e
ki

I
12th Annual Christmas
Party
CHRISTMAS PART
" Ovt- $1 000 if Or sfias P-ese tl f
i �ncioCI ng vacation to' two to
WINTERGREEN
As
SAT
j in hah
SUN
DEC. 8th
1984
Star Search
Semi
Finalists
READING DAY
EVE CONCERT
Teen Show � 7:00
Reg. Show - 9:45
iy
DO
PANIC
ON
FRI
the 1 3th
� ��
� m
jo
fa
fa
i
fa
fa

m
fa

fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
M
PHPnMMMMWCtS
fa
fa
I
fa
fa
fa

fa
fa
fa
F
e rv
f '��. .
;
-





JLMEEASTCAROLINIAN
DECLMBER5, 1985
Physical Exercise
SAN DIEGO, CA (CPS) - It
wasn't unusual to come across
Patty Randolph jogging
stocking-footed, in the ladies
room just before an exam.
As a student, Randolph jogged
to give her brain an oxygen boost
tor the test. Now, as a
developmental psychology lec-
turer for San Diego State, she
passes along similar studv and
test-taking tips to her' own
students.
"Studying is a kind of hoop-
jumping event Randolph says
"There are certain skills vou can
develop that will put you a few
grade points higher.
"It can mean the difference
between a 'B�' and an 'A' or a
'C and a 'B she adds.
Keeping the brain stimulated
during an exam is as important as
keeping the rest of your body
relaxed, she advises. Randolph
recommends drinking fruit juice
during an exam to maintain the
brain's glucose level.
When you receive the exam
paper, she suggests putting it
aside, closing your eyes and clear-
ing your mind.
Helps
" lake a deep breath and relax;
concentrate on how much you
know and don't worry aboul
what you don't know. Be
positive she says.
Randolph says student,
sometimes "psyche themselves
out" on exams lo the point where
their completed test doesn't
reflect their actual knowledge.
Keeping you body in good
diape prior to an exam usualk
helps the brain stay active, too
"How well you think is reflec-
tive of how your body is doing
she savs.
She recommends eating fruit
instead of candy bar tor energy
because it makes you feel better
physically, and feeling positive is
a must tor doing well on a test.
Randolph compiled her studv
"Ps from fellow faculty
members, counseling center
'csour.es and students attending
study workshops she conducted
ai lexas Christian 1 niversity.
She savs freshmen in particular
need studv tips because they
"don realize the importance oi
studying as a regular habit
"They also have the added
Test Taking
Interg
ra
burden of training other people
to respect their study habits; to
have other people accept their
studying
fl a student is afraid of the
material, he needs to have a talk
with himself and start with his
tiaidest subjects first, when he is
freshest, she advises.
"But if he is absolutely
paranoid, start with the easiest
subjects to reinforce
confidence
But can you study too much
Yes, she says, il extra study
means skimping on sleep.
"It's okay to n -
on sleep versus si I
on flow well .
body. Cu1 dw
know vou can still or �
she advises " I
being i �
able to say whal �
exa
� some stud
rfie nigh! bel
feviewr .
learning it for tl I
cranr . Randolj
"waste of til
I ' � "F' waste oi ti
SlLfges Have Problems In Finding Students
Offid
GUNNISON, CO (CPS)
their ongoing efforts to entice
students to enroll at their schools
two relatively small colleges met
trouble in recent weeks bv trying
to burnish their images' in
unusual ways.
While a private college in Min-
nesota caused a controversy by
putting Nazis in its ads, Western
State College here decided to try
to stop people from calling it a
school for ski bums.
But it did so bv offering
students a free day of skiing for
each "A" they receive.
Western State President J.
Gilbert Hause says he started the
"Skiing Scholars" program to
dispute certain myths.
"We had to come up with a
program to dispel the ide that
any student who skis is a bum,
but, at the same time, we wanted
people to know skiing is an added
benefit to our fine educational
program Hause explains.
Hause's first move was to ban
Western State's ski team t-shirts
reading "Ski Western State, get a
degree in your spare time
He decided to reverse the mot-
"We re tickled to death to he
between two fine ski areas, and
we wanted to encourage students
to make use ol them - in their
spare time he says.
The result is the Skiing
Us which, in addi
lion to passmg out free lift tickets
"v" students, gives students
m the top 20 percent ol their class
a 20 percent discouni on a stu-
dent season pass, which is $275
Hause says the program should
not only attract new students, hut
"help retention
While marketing campaigns
make an image, in some
cases, thev can almost break it.
rhat's hai administrators
learned a; the ollege of St
rhomas St. Paul, Minnesota
Offered free advertising space hv
tl magames to celebrate the
school's centennial year, the
public affairs department speni
"an incredible amount of time'
creating an ad campaign.
"We saw it as a limited oppoi
tunity to make a strong statem
about the value of education
says spokeswoman Diane Disse
The ad's statement was strong
maeec

their aims oul
dolph Hil
The Studei �
immediate
calling tor
ad, and can
were equal!
But Disse �
Campus Crime Rates
Have Fallen Recently
Continued From Page 5,
ban area. The crime rate is higher
in the neighborhoods surroun-
ding the campus.
"We have generally found that
campuses have the lowest crime
Delawar
rate in the area
McGrory observes.
"We are fortunate crime is
lower on campus than the sur
rounding area, but we're not im-
mune adds Huebner of Cal
State-Domingue Hills, which
also is in an urban area



Cruise the BAHAMAS
During Spring Break
For $313.75
March 7-10 or March 13-16
Cruise from Ft. Lauderdale or Miami
Includes all meals, entertainment, taxes
and gratuities
Based on quad occupancy
Limited number of cabins
Call Travel Express
JpSSiM 752-1663
Christmas Hours
Mon-Sat 10-10
Don't Know What To Get
That Special Person In Your Life
For Christmas?!
Come By
The Style Shop
Plaza Mall
And Get That Right Gift.
SKI JACKETS
Assortment of Styles & Colors
On Sale Now For
Only $16.50
JEANS
Reg $37.50 Only $15.00
JACKETS, SHIRTS, PANTS & SWEATERS
All By Heet& Union Bay
TIES
By Christian Dior
SOCKS
By Pierre Cardin & Playboy
COLOGNE
By Chams
Yes, We Also Hove Gift Certificates!
20 More Days Left!
So Shop Now At
The Style Shop!
10 Off For Alt ECU Students with ECU ID
Merry Christmas
355-5222
DATE
LOW, LOW PRICES
Only $10 Deposit
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5
TIME: 9:00-4:00

PLACE: Student Store
H ��ff JONES
qJ a tradition of excellence
7
7
Am

X
As





Physical
e AKo HoveG
The Style Shop!
Merry Christmas
�tor
J
HCRF





s
iking
adc-of fs
depending
� your
:p il you
ate well
point to
aren't
� on an
u e cr.
- spent
but
e such
says, is a
Students
salute
until
' the
:aders
FHI I ASTAROI.INIAN
DECEMBER 5, 1985
Intergrated Students Are More Likely To Stay In College
(CPS) � Black students educated
in integrated elementary and high
schools are more likely to stay in
college than students from
segregated schools, a new Rand
Corporation study has found.
"I think it's a very significant
study. 1 certainly agree with its
findings says Robert Mitchem,
director of the National Council
o Educational Opportunity
Associations.
"Blacks need the experience in
dealing with whites. They are a
lot better off in dealing with
whites when they go to college
observes Robert Crain, who did
the study for Rand.
Crain tracked 661 black
students from 1966 through 1982
and found those from integrated
schools not only were more likely
to graduate from college, but
were more likely to find white-
collar jobs after graduation than
the students from segregated
schools.
Integration "does a lot for
their self-confidence Mitchem
asserts. "They realize that they
are the same as whites
Black students' "theory of suc-
cess is based on what whites will
let them do. It's not irrational,
but it's hard for us (whites) to
understand the connection bet-
ween well-being and race rela-
tions Crain explains.
"Boys in desegregated schools
were more likely to stay out of
n
Official Exam Schedule
There will be no departure from the printed schedule, except as noted below. All examinations for
one credit hour courses will be held during the last regular meeting of the class. Classes meeting more
than three times a week will follow the examination schedule for MWF classes.
E xaminations in undergraduate courses meeting at night will be held at 8:00 - 10:00 p.m on the first
night of their usual meeting during the examinatoin period (Dec. 10-17), excluding reading day.
Graduate courses meeting at night will hold their examinations during their regular class times the
first class night during the examination period. Courses meeting on Saturday morning will have the
final examination on Saturday. December 14, 1985, at the usual hour at which the class meets.
Those classes beginning between hours or meeting more than one hour will have the final examina-
tion at the time scheduled for the hour during which the class begins (e.g a 9:30-11 A.M. TTh class
will meet the examination schedule of the 9:00 a.m. TTh class; an 8-10 a.m. MWF class will meet the
examination schedule of the 8 a.m. MWF class).
C ommon examinations will be held according to the following schedule:
French 1002, Spanish 1002, German 1002, and Spanish 1003 - Thurs Dec. 12, 5-7 p.m.
Mathematics 1063. 1065 - Fn Dec. 13, 5-7 p.m.
Geography 1000 - Sat Dec. 14. 9-11 a.m.
Chemistry 0150. 1120. 1150, 1160, 2620 - Mon Dec. 16, 5-7 p.m.
French 1001, Spanish 1001, German 1001 and French 1003 - Tues Dec. 10, 5-7 p.m.
Physica 1001, 1021, 1251, 1261 - Wed Dec. 11, 5-7 p.m.
Other examinations will he held on Tues Dec. 10; Wed.
Mon. Dec. 16; and Tues Dec. 17.
Dec. 11; Thurs Dec. 12; Fri Dec. 13;
8:00 MWF-2-4 p.m. Dec. 12
8:00 TTh- 11 a.m1 p.m. Dec. 11
9:00 MWF - 2-4 p.m. Dec. 16
9:00 TTh-2-4 p.m Dec. 17
10:00 MWF - 8-10 a.m Dec. 10
10:00 TTh-8-10 a.m Dec. 12
11:00 MWF-8-10 a.m Dec. 11
11:00 TTh-8-10 a.m Dec. 13
12:00 MWF - 8-10 a.m Dec. 16
12:00 TTh -8-10 a.m Dec. 17
1:00 MWF- 11 a.ml p.m Dec. 10
1:00 TTh-2-4 p.m Dec. 13
2:00 MWF- 11 a.ml p.m Dec. 12
2:00 TTh- 11 a.ml p.m Dec. 13
3:00 MWF- 11 a.ml p.m Dec. lb
3:00 TTh- 11 a.ml p.m Dec. 17
4:00 MWF-2-4 p.m Dec. 10
4:00 TTh-2-4 p.m Dee. 11
Library's
Hours
Exam
Monday, Dec. 9 8a.m a.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 10 8a.rnI a.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 11 8a.ml a.m
Thursday, Dec. 12 8a.ml a.m.
Friday, Dec. 13 8a.ml a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 14 9a.ml 1 p.m
Sunday, Dec. 15 1 p.m1 a.m.
Monday, Dec. 16 8a.mla.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 17 8a.m9p.m.
trouble, and the girls were less
likely to get pregnant Crain
notes.
Cram's study also shows blatk
males from integrated schools
have a higher rate of college
enrollment than females.
Black females coming from
-g segregated environments,
however, usually have had an
j easier time adjusting to an in-
tegrated setting, Crain maintains,
because women are not as con-
frontational as men.
And the spread of school in-
tegration also convinces more
black students to enroll a. in-
tegrated colleges, he adds.
Crain thinks the students' bet-
ter self-images is part of the
I reason traditionally-black col-
leges are registering fewer black
I students.
Break Time
J B HUMBERT The Eas� Carolinian
This student took a well desered break from the rigors of studying for exams. Fxams start next
week and cat-naps such a.s the one above will become vital to students a.s they burn the midnight oil.
s
ER5
FF JONES
radition of excellence
S
t
,
NEW EXPANDED AREA
fc
US Htyy
mmnmwmmmmmmmmmm
�YS
PIZZA
2711 East 10th St
758-9999
� NlO
I
i �-
i
I CD
IRT33
IV�t g
I Q
s a:
i O
E LL
I x
I o
No Coupon Necessary
Just Ask For
"DOUBLE DEAL"
TWO 14" PIZZAS
ALOT MORE . . .
FOR A LITTLE MORE!
Cheese 9.00
1 Item 10.00
2 Item 11.00
3 Item 12.35
4 Item 13.70
$1.35 per extra item
llllW
V

YORK RD
flmitlHlllfllHMIMIIHlfc
HOURS: MON. THURS 11 A.M. 12 MIDNIGHT
g FRI. & SAT. 11 A.M2 A.M. SUN. 11 A.Ml A.M.
1 CL
E O
E tO
� O
I f
1 �
FAST, FREE DELIVERY
���.
'MMITED DF'IVFRY RFAl
mittuxv&s
. � r �� -� �
Mil MM





1 HI i S! C AKOl MAN
1K EMBER 5. 1985
Classifieds
PERSONALS
DELTA ZETA Congratulations new
ster; We're looking toward to
initiation soon, so hang in
there! I ove The sisters
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
NEW EXECUTIVE BOARD OF
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: President,
ke Stonesiter Vice President,
Lally Treasurer. Tom
Alumni Relations. Mark
Recording Secretary, Todd
k � kpati t k ana Pledge Educator,
� VAonaghan We have faith in
thai s why you are where
� � I DO ng toward to a great
ear! our Brothers
SHANNON SHORT, SHERI
ROSEN, TERI TROIANO, AND
JULIE HAMMER: Have a great
break Much love, MKL
START EXAMS OFF RIGHT Par
ty with the AOTT'S and GROG'S
tonight! 7 30 10 00 SI adm Free
membership and raffle c 75
longneck, $1.25 highball of the night
We'll be jammin at Grog's, see va
there!
WANTED
JACQUE v
�ow we give you so
ut ou we would
r. for ail our com
hin We love you"
rgotren to men
OTT pledges
PHI TAU'S Gtf our bag and pack
" ready to rage at the
Resort inn Be in Va.
� � I Sat Dec 7
SPC
ASH
�- eady to party all night
� ' the music Mr Bubble and
Va Beach nere we come11
RMH
Start packing your bags and
to float for 2 days and 2
�ceanfront suite.
chip Jus1 an early B.r'haay wish
� lay! To let
iking about you on
S R
ZBT PLEDGES � LIL SISTER
PLEDGES Congratulations You
� � ' - ' ward to a great year
rhers
TOUCHDOWN MAN T S S Our
pi e you are the
' - stock on you.
' � � ' � stock be with
� � - - Pr ate Stock
NEW SORORITY, you are cordially
� '� ' attend Junior Panhellenic
� arty for the sisters of all
' � s December 8, 1985,
' nis Theafre
GIGI
KAPPA SIGS
WILL ALL LOAD UP WITH CASH
go Possible
�� the E ich ready
jmpai �
be fuzzed
� � . � �
� ' H p � � � fast
� e theii ast!
ALL SORORITIES � FRATER
N'TIES - exams ana
eCh O's
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA: Good luck
� - iolleybal champion
i P-i'S
ELSWICK ' STEVE. . - for
" ��' great semester; Gooc luck
exa NAerr , tmas PS
� � � ' � � �� vt Cl O's
CHIOS Congrats on winning
Soccer!
biggest and best
aboii t0 occur this
it My rtle Beach! As usual
� the widest and craziest
jr! So, please do not
forget y - dope or cate and get
the iasf oot party with the
Boot Broth.
KAPPA SIGS: Get read for the 19th
fher Pledge Christmas
� ' � Pie �-��- your paddles better
� � shed Brothers please draw
name: fi n k K Pledges the s t's
HEY LOBBY POTATOES Have a
stmas and a Potatoe y
�� -r' See you m the lobbm 86'
CabDage Patch Kids aka The anti
� �
ARE YOU A LOBBY POTATOE?:
frel help has arrived For a
small fee, we can cure you, for more
call 1 800 Potatoe Note: Full
refund tor anyone diagnosed a ter
al loob Potatoe. Anti Potatoe
� uue
CONGRATULATIONS TO TWO
GREAT JERSEY BOYS: Glenn and
Bob1 Ya'ii will make terrific Alpha
Sig brothers Love, Kathy
AOTT AND ALPHA SIG: Will be
having a Happ Hour this Friday at
� �'�' Come on out and party
� � N the oest!
STUDENTS: Any witnesses to a
pedestrian accident at Hardee's on
10th and Verdant Streets, please call
752 2000 at once1
BIAN FITZGERALD LALLY:
Sorry i forgot your name we'll just
PRETEND that you were with us
(even though you weren't!) What a
wniner' SKS
SIG EP GOLDEN HEARTS Good
luck on exams and have a nice
X mas break! Get ready for Sunday
night!
JOE: Who believes you are finally
graduating?! We'll miss you lots!
Jimbob, Bobbob, and MikeBob
JOE. Good luck on your RE
test we're going to miss you! The
girls of 407 and 409 Holly St.
BROOKE AND MADDAWG: Con
grats on your victories Have an ex
cellent Christmas Your Big "B"
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Wanted to
share apt at Ringgold Towers Rent
$170 per month - Va utilities and
phone Call 758 5642 after 5
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
To share apartment 2 bedroom. 2 ' .
bath, fully furnished, pool and
clubhouse, $140 a month 4
utilities Call 757 3640 for more info
ROOMMATE NEEDED: For 3
bedroom apt in Eastbrook. $92
deposit, $114 a month ' 3 utilities
Private room Female preferred
Call 758 4127
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Village
Green $90 per month, '3 utilities,
private room prefer nonsmoker,
available immediately 758 7920
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 2
bedroom apt. located 3 blocks from
campus Call 758 4211
ROOMMATE WANTED: 3 bedroom
apartment with your own. private
room ' 3 rent ($125) and : 3 expenses
Walking distance to campus good
neighbors Wilson Acres Call Jac
que or Ronda at 757 0551
ROOMMATE NEEDED: 4 bedroom
house across from Overton's
blocks from campus, 4 utilities
baths, large kitchen Call 758 5953
AEROBIC INSTRUCTORS, INCEN
TIVES Call between 4 30 ana
p.m no other time 752 1946
PART TIME EMPLOYMENT: Per
sonal attendant for disabled student.
Tuesdays and Thursdays, Spring
Semester Wilson Acres. Females
preferred Contact Rick Creech
758 3214
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
To share 2 bedroom duplex 5 minute
walk to 1 ampus Rent $120
utilities Smoker preferred
Available end of December Call
Barbara 758 7990
MISSING: MAROON HATTERAS
BRAND BACKPACK TAKEN BY
MISTAKE LATE F RIDAY
AFTERNOON IN JOYNER
LIBRARY PLEASE RETURN
WITH CONTENTS AS SOON AS
POSSIBLE FOR FINAL EXAM
REVIEW TO ECU DFPT OF
PUBLIC SAFETY 10th ST NO
QUESTIONS ASKED
COUNSELORS. Openings
Florida, North Carolina, Vermont,
and Rhode Island, The Eckerd Foun
dation has exciting CAREER ot
turn' es n their ear ro
wilderness camps Group
Counselors are responsible for pro
vidmg leadership and successful
direction for 10 problem youth!
camp and on extended backp -
canoe ana raft trips Camr
youth care experience, and one .
college preferred for entry into
rewarding profession Salary $1C I
plus room and board, benei �
package. UNDERGRAD
CREDITED training. Call Staff
Recruiter. 704 3718355, or send
resume to Eckerd Foundat.on. P o
Box 31122 Charlotte, NC 2823!
EARN EXTRA MONEY WHILE
ATTENDING CLASSES: Studei '
wanted to prov di ���� , � �
services during spring seme
86 for disabled students on campus
Por an api itioi tact progi
mpaired I �
Brewster A 114 or call 757 6729
SALE
GRAND OPENING Chf stmas
special Vintage clothing, jew
collertables at Uniquely Yours 903
Dickinson Ave Open Tues Sa1
WORD PROCESSING We iffei �
perience in typing resumes
technical documents, and t
papers We manage and met
names and adcv
rs, labels, envelopes or roll
cards Our prices arv � � I
reasonable and we alway
percent discount to ECU stu
8. F Professional Computer
k of Franki � st
757 0
TYPIST: Low rates include pro
ofreadmg spell ii
matical corrections
757 0398 after 5 15 p
CHEAP TYPING ��
.
TYPISTS - .
Write: I
207
FOR RENT i
� "
iet Bluff an
SCORE HIGHER ON THE GRE
COMPREHENSlVI
T ION COURSE O M RED.
JANUARY ENVILLE FOR
MORE info .
.
VA(
ME N '
PROFESSIONAl TYPING

APARTMENT FOR RENT
ate l
ailabd
CRUISE MEXICO
ice avaiiabl
FOR SALE
E xci
I A
� -
APARTMENT
- �
-
TO SUBLEASf
FURNITURE FOR SALE �

DIAMONDS FOR SALE
FOR SALE
Sw t I sMHt I)
p U,
a"

FOOD
DAILY SPECIALS $1.99
during December
Large Plate � Al! You Can Eat Vegetables,
1 Meat, Bread & Tea S4.07 plus Tax
MEAL PLANS AVAILABLE � 100 plates for $250
512 E. 14th St. Near Dorms
Call t, rake-Outs 752-0476
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 11 a.m. 8 p.m.
' " .�.�, Brewster A 114 or call 757 6729. I
If Elizabeth Barrett
and Robert Browning had
AT&T's 60 and 40 discounts,
it would have been a terrible









loss for English literature.
And of course, she wouldn't have had to
restrict her feelings to a mere sonnet's
length, either.
After all. you can always think of one
more way to tell someone you love them
when you're on the phone.
Let us count the ways you can save.
Just call weekends till 5pm Sundays, or
from 11pm to 8am, Sunday through Friday,
and you'll save 60 off AT&T's Day Rate
on your state-to-state calls.
Call between 5pm and 11pm, Sunday
through Friday, and you'll save 40 on your
state-to-state calls.
So when you're asked to choose a long
distance company, choose AT&T Because
with AT&T's 60 and 40 discounts, you
can satisfy your heart's desire without
exhausting your means.
Reach out and touch someone.
AT&T
The right choice.
1 c 1985 AfeT Commumfat.ons "�MwaBB' O Kj j1UC. JL

4
4


4
4
4
4
4
4j
4
4
4
4
4

4
4

4
4:
4:
4
4
4

4:
4
4:
4:
4
4
4

4
4

4:
4

4
4
4

4
4
4
4
4
4
?
4
4
4
4�

4�
A
Sorrv. C
.
aiu:
as � m
Bi
cast





s
MEXICO Spring break
��: 6 nights only
es included
aoie Call nowi
10 speed
� n a 11 i o n !
� g $195

TOSUBLEASE
. bath
patty
ALE bectional
'able with
GE televi

' fl aa
Fin
$90
n p i6
s s 1 QQ
i plates tor S250
�y� vt �� ��� f� � �� r�
1 f Hr ��� �����
hts,
le

-
.�
�-








4


ySb TTTT'I1 v xf V 'A 'J.1 ���� � t

fU
it ri-
ie.
ice.
TIU FASTAROI NIAN
Entertainment
DEC! MM R 5. !
Page V
cccc
Pi
�m
A Toast, A Remembrance
Of Semesters Past
Have Yourself A Merry Christmas
A Tree Is Trimmed
B M I I Hi W .ll I Is


n
oi K I
w
ions.
( msidered
� a succ plauded
the dedi U pants
� ! ear,
� j . really
done Dudi The
ips did
especially w
tions the'
� entat i v
tions thai made them
Trace) Byrd, one ol the other
mmittee members, explained
that the ornaments, as in past
years, were judged on three dif-
ferent and important factors:
creativity, originality and craft-
smanship. "In the case oi
originality, the ornaments are
judged as to how well the repre-
Dupi
excellei
th this yeai
ppen to
of the o
he very
eani �
the organization that made
n Byrd added.
As the trimming went on, the
ing went on, but the Com-
mittee began basing a harder
time choosing the winners. Com-
mittee member Leslie Aperholt
said. "Yeah, the competition was
tough, but what made it worth
the effori was that the entries this
vear were very big on creativity.
1 hat made for a lot of good par-
� i on this year by the
student Union Crafts and
Recreation Director Linda Bark-
d was pleased by the
workmanship of the entries as
well. "We had quite a few groups
participating this time she com-
mented. "Also, they seem to
have taken more time to create
then ornaments � obviously,
. wanted to put a lot of effort
into doing them
Patty Lambe, secretary for the
Student Residence Association,
also was on hand at the tree-
trimming party. "It was a good
bit iif input to work on our design
and take part in doing this she
said. "We didn't spend much
time on ours, but we felt that we
had still done a pretty good job
A more elaborate ornament
hung on one side of the tree, done
in the shape of a large gold book
with a quill feather pen in the
middle. This ornament was sub-
mitted by Alpha Beta Alpha, and
according to Carol Worsham,
ABA president, "This is a largei
size replica of our emblem, which
represents our club, a library
science organization. We wanted
something that would really
represent us, and we put a lot of
work into it
.l'Ci'X&d VI "SSl'Si-a
First place went to Phi Beta
Lambda, the business honor
H WARREN BAKER
staff Wnlf.
"Do you remembei youi 1 I
beer?" the senii �i asked
freshman.
1 he fi eshman nodded
lead, the memory fcx
too clear ol one bee
another. He really
remember i apping ofl
memorable evenii
Daniels. but his fi
remembered. 1 hey
he Polaroids
"Come to think ol
senioi continued, "thai fit si I
is a lot like ECU. When
drank that first beet, tl
was bitter. But as the hoi
by. your taste buds had a
time differentiating betwi
and water, and the di ink i
all too easy
Easy was right,
freshman as he d
his drink, and �
friends, the JacV 1) i
pretty damn easy . '
Vhe senior poui
another dunk and '
half-lull bol '
Remy Mai
substitui
"1(1 . . yep
firsi beer the sei
studied the contents �
�' : firs; you ai
you look forward I I
get that firsi tast
familial and bin
" Bui once
"the freshman sa
"Yeah. Oi
EC1 �. �
the taste kii d ol
"1 ike a fungus
augl
his glass ol Remy, the reflect
ol the red liquor dai
his face.
"You '
live i
glass to his lips. Fhe I
appeared hurt, his
estlessly in
a
glass.
I know
senior said -
size ol Fick
you. 1 was
jokes. !
spot me a mile away
lil e a ne n sign
i freshman. Abuse
ikeovers on my
hal squeaked when
� el, hair thai
� ' . mid shatter it
looked into his
� � moment, his eyes
i'ke motif 'ns ol
thai was such
in his
he
� osity made
i his ears
. .rd.
fjve
aid. "I'm
it's hap-

eshman
eyes were truly the
. I. Lhe seni
ght in front
� ing
:ss, anger
'
� e senior
���� � a briel in-
tinued.
i ��
a hen
�lloi. 1 can siil!
plastered on
� ice deny-
it I
as a strange
vnMB .
s
� foun-
Whai a night
til this er
,vere � �b
�� ith be
id, 'Now
rime Hell, 1
: "
� on his
.ery word in and
�' - stories
� something
� . � a . the
v - he knew
from
F the end
lays could K'
- n ! n lina sky.
times the
�! games
times of our lives while shirts and
pants became indistinguishable
from the field we were playing
on. I gave a lot of blood in those
days The senior smiled
"I ots of grand times, huh?"
"I guess you could say that
the senior said as he poured
himself another drink. "But
there were tunes
for a moment, the senior ap-
peared lost somew here.
'What's w r the
freshman asked.
"I remember being awakened
b) a loud boon; one night. 1
shrugged it off until I goi
school the next day For the
first time that evening nior
took out a crumpled pack
cigarettes. He lit one. "That was
the day we heard about the
Village Green explosio
"A student was killed. 1
believe
"Yeah
Silei
"Then there were the tor-
nadoes the senior finally sa
"Even now you can see some
the damage done. 1 remember be-
ing trapped over at a friend's
house because of the curfew and
. worried my parents were
when bodies were counted
"1 isten
"1 know the sei
waved his hand sl �� "it ot
the freshman. "ECl
bad memories. Fi
important role in helping
keep vour sanity, rhey
drunk with you and be
g'ear
there
lauch
when you pray
porcelain god. They're
when you cry,
and sometimes
Shaky hand- d for
bottle of Remy.
and sometimes when you
remember. All of the : All
of the wee hours of the morning.
All of fhe preparation in going
out into the real world. The sex.
The drugs. I A and roll
The freshman sighed and said,
" 'us; hkc a fungus
distant but clear smile form-
ed on the senioi 's face.
"Yeah, tins place kind
grows on you the senior said as
the final drop of Remy splashed
into his gia-s, "Just like a
fungus
Thev both laughed.
fields. Having the
to
$8
i
i
1
society. Its entry was a scene of a fa
Christmas tree and elves sur-
rounded by three large packages JS
encased in a clear plastic box.
representing the society's motto.
Second place went to the finan-
cial society. Beta Kappa Alpha,
which submitted a simple orna-
ment of Santa Claus and his
sleigh, filled with bags full of
money.
Third place was the ornament
of the gold book and quill pen $j
submitted by the library science
society, Alpha Beta Alpha.
The competition was tough this
year, but what really came �
through was the involvement of w
groups that chose to take the time S
and give a little of themselves.
just by making or even bringing ?3
an ornament. W
For many, this shows greater Q
involvement on the part of ECU fa
as a whole � a feeling that is a jfo
unique part of this "season to be
caring And, maybe, that spirit g
will continue to grow, not just
during Christmas, but all through r
the year.
Sorry, Charlie
New Tuna
Auditions for the Ayden
Theatre Workshop production of
Greater Tuna will be held at the
Ayden-Grifton High School
Auditorium at 3 p.m. Sunday
and at 7:30 p.m. Monday.
Two in-depth roles are offered,
as twelve characters are played by
two actors. Even though the
Broadway version of the play
casts only men, women will be
considered along with the
possibility of an additional actor
or two. Men will have to be clean-
shaven for the performances.
Several varieties of Texas accents
will be needed, as well as several
people to serve on the production
crew.
Performances are scheduled
for January 23, 25 and 26 in the
Ayden-Grifton High School
Auditorium on Highway II, 2
south of Ayden.
Auditions are open and infor-
mal. Participants may bring
readings or use those provided.
Anyone who enjoys off-beat
comedy will probably enjoy
Greater Tuna!
For more information call
746-2121 or 524681.
A Tree In Regalia
Staff and students decorated this tree and celebrated the coming holidays Tuesday at Mendenhall'
�� annual tree-trimming party. Turnout for the event was high.
i
9 f �J-
'





10
-�i-EASTCpUNUNDECEMBfcR 5, IVX5
New Wing Houses Important Collection
(UPl) � It took new money and
old money to put the Virginia
Museum of Fine Arts on the map
this weekend as a major
repository of art, furniture and
design objects of the 19th and
20th centuries.
The nation's first slate-
supported museum has previous-
ly been best known for its unex-
pected collection of jeweled ob-
jects by Peter Carl Faberge, the
Russian Imperial court jeweler,
and its pioneering outreach pro-
gram in the form of touring art-
mobiles.
Now, Paul Mellon, third
generation heir to a Pittsburgh
banking fortune, and Sydney
Lewis, a self-made Richmond
discount sales merchant, and
their wives, Rachel and Francis.
have given the museum a $22
million West Wing and filled it
with collections as diverse as their
backgrounds and interests.
Although no alue has been
quoted on the Mellon and Lewis
art gifts, they are the most
valuable received by an American
Museum since Joseph H. Hir-
shorn gave his modern art collec-
tion to the nation in 1966 to be
housed in the Hirshorn Museum
in Washington, DC.
The Virginia Museum's new
wing, which opened to the public
Dec. 7, doubles the 50-year-old
institution's exhibition space and
is divided between the Mellon
holdings, English sporting an,
French Impressionist and
Modern an, jeweled objects by
Jean Schlunberger and the Leu is
holdings, contemporary art, and
Art Nouveau and Art Deco
decorative arts including glass
objects by Louis Comfort Tif-
fany and Jewelry by Rene l.ali-
que.
The Lewis collections, put
together in less than 25 years for
their home not far from the
museum, easily upstage the more
conventional Mellon collections
in size and importance.
Their 600-object survey of Art
Nouveau and Deco and early
modern furnishings, ranging
from Emile Galle and Louis Ma-
jorelle to Emile Jacques
Ruhlmann and Frank Lloyd
Wright, ranks as the most in-
clusive in the Western
Hemisphere. It is first quality all
the way, setting a standard few
other museums will be able to
match.
The Leu is gift of 1,200
American and European pain-
tings and sculpture of the post
World War II era � only 100 of
which can be displayed at a time
� constitutes one of the most im-
portant such collections in the
United States. It was bought bv
several major U.S. museums,
particularly New York's Whitney
Museum, but Leu is fell he owed
it to his native city.
The scope of the collection is
encyclopedic � Robert Arneson
through Tom Wesselmann with
every big name in between, par-
ticularly rich in art of the 1960s
and 1970s. After the collection
was promised to the Virginia
Museum, the Lewises filled in
gaps in the collection and
brought it up to date with artists
of the 1980s such as Julian
Schnabel, Francesco Clemente
and Sandra Chia.
"We started to collect in the
I960's when we saw we could col-
lect nice things that were relative-
ly inexpensive as compared to
Renaissance paintings said
I ewis. "We realized we had the
opportunity of acquiring the best
ol what was uist bubbling to the
top right here in America
New NCT Season
The North Carolina Theatre
will kick off its 1986 Professional
Showcase Season Jan. 9th with
the National Company of David
Merrick's 42nd Street, a prize-
winning Broadway hit directed by
choreographer Gower Cham-
pion.
Dreamgirls will take the stage
April 3-6, in a performance by an
international touring company
directed and choreographed by
Pulitzer Prize-winner Michael
Bennett and featuring the
original artistic staff.
From May 22-25, NCT, who
last season produced the acclaim-
ed Pippin and the popular Man
of La Mancha, will produce the
Andrew Lloyd WebberTim Rice
rock opera Jesus Christ
Superstar, an unusual treatment
of Christ's passion.
Cabaret, the Kander and Ebb
musical, shows viewers the
foibles of a night club entertainer
and the malevolent, multifaceted
v�occoonoooojuao'j'oooc
actions of the emcee in pre-World
Var 11 Nazi Germany as seen
through the eyes of a struggling
American writer. NCT's produc-
tion of Cabaret will run Julv
17-20.
NCT's season finale Grease
will run September 18-21. The
'50s rock V roll musical has
Rydell's spirited class of '59 �
gumchewing, hubcap-stealing,
hot-rod-loving bovs with D.A.s
and leather jackets and their
wise-cracking girlfriends in teas-
ed curls, bobby sox and pedal
pushers.
All performances will held in
Raleigh Memorial Auditorium.
Matinee and evening season
subscriptions are now available
through the North Carolina
Theatre (755-6916 10:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m. weekdays) for $40,
S60, S85 or SI00 per season
ticket. Tickets for individual per-
formances will be available after
Dec. 2.
o
Prepare Your Car for 'that CHRISTMAS
DRIVE HOME
NEW USED
R�tr��d Tlr��
$7.00 4 Up
SERVIC
Complete 5 Point
Brake Safety
lS5 50Chcck
andHJL-fi-
CAR SHAKES?

SUM
For
Alignment
erf' "T-�-
4-CyUnder
$29.95
6 and 8 cylinder
slightly higher
All size
tires
available.
tti fcCRJH CAROLINA SIM WSHtm SWtfN
Wl SCftVICC NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
BFGoodfich
SbTIRE CENTER
SATURDAY
I M A.M. 1:90PM
OPENMON FKI.
� :MA.M. S.MP.M.
'
' 'Consider us your cars'
k Home Away From Home 4
Cog gins Car Care
756-5244
320 West Greenville Bvd
"rmrrirTrrffTnffniriiiiim
In contrast, the Mellon collec-
tions reflect an eye for tradition
sharpened by daily contact in
childhood with Old Masters and
antiques collected by Mellon's
father, Andrew W. Mellon, one-
time U.S. Treasury Secretary and
founder of Washington's Na-
tional Gallery. Paul Mellon has
been a trustee of the Virginia
Museum for 40 years.
The 200 sporting paintings,
drawings, watercolors, prints,
and bronzes recall Mellon's vast
gift of English art to Yale Univer-
sity and his longtime residence in
Upperville, Va deep in hunt
country. The collection is
memorable for John Wooton's
monumental "Duke of
Hamilton's Grey Racehorse, Vic-
torious" and George Stubb's
"Black and White Spaniel
The 70 French paintings from
Eugene Delacroix and Edgar
Degas to Henri Rousseau and
Pablo Picasso seem like grace
notes to the Mellon masterpieces
in the National Gallery, gifts of
Paul and his sister, Ailsa Mellon
Bruce. Outstanding are Van
Gogh's "Wheat Field Behind
Saint Paul Hospital Renoir's
"Pensive" and Cezanne's "Vic-
tor Chocquet
"I hope viewers will feel in
tune with the life portrayed in the
landscapes and sporting scenes
and with the people in the por-
traits said Mellon. "I hope
they will see they are in the scenes
momentarily and they will carry
away with them a sense of
freshness and vitality
In addition, the Mellons have
given a group of 19th century
American paintings by George
Ratlin, Eastman Johnson,
Thomas Eakins, Albert
Bierstadt, Winslow Homer and
others. Mrs. Mellon's loan collec-
tion of decorative birds.
blackamoors, boxes, candelabra
and other exotica in gold, enamel
and jewels by 78 year-old Jean
Schlumberger, a Tiffany
designer, ties in nicely with the
museum's Faberge collection.
New York architect Malcolm
Holzman designed the chaste ex-
terior of buff-colored Indian
limestone treated in four dif-
ferent finishes suggesting design
elements in the 1936 structure.
Corner windows and a large ter-
race overlook the Robert E. Lee
Camp Memorial Park and several
historic buildings.
A two-story central wall with
twin floating stairways divides
the Mellon and Lewis collections
on the ground floor, but a
V-shaped mezzanine connects
them on the upper level. The hall
is sheathed in Verona Pink mar-
ble in gradating colors and
centered by columns of fossilized
Texas shellstone.
Vistas through the central axes
are puncuated by arresting
sculptures, including Claes
Oldenburg's giant "Typewriter
Eraser" and Barry Flanagan's
gilded "Large Leaping Hare
Oldenburg's "Clothespin"
sculpture, which once stood out
side the Lewis' residence to the
horror of some Richmonders, is
exhibited on the terrace at the end
of one axis
In tune with a recent renewal
of interest in natural lighting in
museums, there are eight
skylights in the wmg. The smaller
Mellon galleries are carpeted and
the walls covered with fabric in
keeping with the period exhibits
and the intimacy of the works ol
art. The larger Lewis galleries arc-
hardwood floored and white hail-
ed, with plenty of soaring space
tor display of outsize canvasses
common to contemporary art.
Several spacious galleries in the
Lewis section are reserved tor
temporary shows and one man
exhibits. They have opened with
a show ol sculpture by Polish-
born Magdalena Abakanowicz,
whose primal figures and human
forms of burlap, sisal, hemp and
flax comment on the terrors and
despair of the 20th century while
evoking the tenacity ol
human spirit.
The five-year expansion pro-
gram at the museum appears to
be one of the most successful ol
the many such projects at art in-
stitutions across the na:
Director Paul V Perrot. who
came to the lrgirua Museum
from the Smithsonian Institul
in 1983, describes the West Wmg
correctly as a "sympathetic ob-
ject
"There is an exquisite
chestration of materials and
spaces, an openness that provides
new excitement to this museui
said Perrot. noting that the ex
pansion will require staff addi
tions including a curator
decorative arts and ol prii
drawings and graphic materials, a
top conservator and someon
concentrate on American art.
"I want to develop traveli
shows ol American mod
for Europe and other parts ol the
world Perrot said. "I think we
have enjoyed shows from abr
long enough without gi
anything in return
Guided tours of the West W
begin Dec. 10. lours bv i
ol 10 to KM) visitors must K
ged two weeks in advance
calling 804 257-0859. All visit
except members, are asked '
make a minimum dor
each.
'
V
Malpass Muffler
2616 East 10th Street
Greenville, N.C 27834
Your complete automotive service and parts headquarters
Go Pirates!
758-7676
STUDENT UNION
Mendenhail Stuaenr. Center � East Caro.ma Un,vers,ty
Telephone. 9(9 757-66 I I. Ext. 2i0
� jreenv e. N.C 2334-4353
Dear CommuterOff-Campus Student and. or Faculty Staff Member:
te���1X�2to r- facul,ty' � �� ����� of
are just a small par, of the en�SS2S?wL�dS(?OM f L�uisville Balle!
also offer top-notch films on tttt�Z�. We
Mng'atuit" tebyoopt�T,ogrS' TT b We s,i� "� " "�, kno�
and mail it to the address on the form TtV, n h l" far 'r0m you' Jusl complete the form bX�
Mendenhail Student Center ' �P the aPPhcatlon �ff at the Central Ticket Office
Upon you completion and our receipt of this form vo� u,n h- j-j i
receive THE ENTERTAINER at homeasweUas filers 1 t � �" ma'llng lisL You wi�
your area(s). Armed with this knowledge you wtl tFSZSSt!? W� Programs in
tickets for the best in overall entertainment P d �' ever�"e else in getting
As our logo says, "We're Reaching Out To Serve Von " With ��
be able to serve you better Thank you for your support! H name on 0ur mailin� �� � will
Sincerely,
The Public Relations and Publicity Committee
I he Student Union
East Carolina University
YES!
NAME:
ADDRESS:
CITY:
I WANT TO BE ON .THE STUDENT UNION'S MAILING LIST
.STATE
I am very interested in: (Check as many as you wish)
TKCa!re i?ama) Dance (Modern)
?kC ,eAMuS,Cals) Classical Musk
��0n! t1US'C Sol� rumentalists
Dinner Theatre Vocalists
rhnH. � Madrigal Dinners
Children s Programs Comedians
Circuses
-Ballet
-Contemporary Music
�Jazz
-Travel-Adventure Film.
-Animal Shows
Turn in at the Central Ticket Office or, if you wish to fill out later mail to- a ,
Mendenhail Student Center, East Carolina University, GnenvUk Umon 2
Last
1 ��
the
say enerj
Ac
Carolina M
Instil 11
leas! e
moi
joints ai
side .
Ai
thru �
same i
Swim
Than Q
Bv M 1 n (, I I-





B ii


Mu
B .
Ricl
I (
�w
me;
Lookt
Skille
Pi
pers
Mondav
Dr. k .
s p e . .
I '
and
the (
pro .
throus
Shad
ages ai
tests s
Shad !
troph)
souvenir bi
ly disti
adv
during the V'
Festival.
sea '
the Griftoi v
contest to
artistic covei I
souvenir br
wishing to er
may send entrie
Festival. Hv g
28530.
gg g -5






ection
MUFFLER
C 27834
76
IHE EAST CAROLINIAN
DEC EMBER 5, 1985
11
r
idem c nion, 234
Last Chance To Winterize Off Campus
Fuel costs need not soar during
the cold, harsh winter months,
a energy officials
ccording to the North
C arolina Manufactured Housing
Institute, one of the easiest and
east expensive ways to save
money and energy is by caulking
joints and seams inside and out-
side your home.
Ulowing heat to escape
-ugh main small cracks is the
same as leaving a window open.
Be sure to check for caulking that
is chipped, cracked or peeling.
Check outlets for cracks around
pipes, gas lines and sewer hook-
ups. Make sure your siding is
secure; look for cracks in the ex-
terior finish and tighten any loose
screws. See that the seal is secure
wherever you find a construction
joint, where the frame meets the
siding, along window frames,
door frames, rails and corners.
Also, look under your home
for loose joints and where plumb-
ing and electrical lines go into the
house. On the roof, check the
caulking around the chimney and
aulk any leaky joints in your
gutters. There are many inexpen-
sive caulking materials that work
on most of these surfaces, in-
cluding clear silicone sealants
that dry fast and can be painted
to match the color of the surface.
After caulking the small gaps
and cracks, weatherstrip joints
between doors and thresholds,
doors and steps, windows and
frames and any other moveable
Swimmers Brave More
Than Cold In Daily Regimen
B MATTHKW GILLIS
SlMff Wnlrr
Arriving at Minges Coliseum at
6 a.m in freezing weather, then
.hanging into a swimsuit by the
pool where it's near! as cold,
.ause one to question the
value of swimming for ECU.
But then the coach yells "Hit
the water and the next 10
minutes are ex h i lar at i n g I y
strenuous.
Muscles strain to the limit over
il more laps across the pool.
and the desires and frustrations
' d week are concentrated into
that one final lap.
Of course, most people might
er find out what that's like.
But tor the swimmers involved
with the ECl swim team, it's a
. event, Long and grueling
�s along with it, but
tor the team, it's a wa of show-
- that the) are prepared.
Richard Kobe coaches the
ECU swim team. Kobe. wh
involved with ECl swimm-
says the team has
� ave a heavy pace, especially
with the competition this year.
We've won several champion-
ships in the past he savs. "and
we're favored to win both the
men's and w nference
again. There are a lot of good
swimmers on our team, and
everybody has a good chance of
becoming one of the top swim-
mers in the conference
"Each teammate has a tough
schedule we stick to Kobe con-
tinues. "After practicing from 6
to 7:30 a.m the team then
changes, eats, and gets ready for
class, which lasts unti' 2 p.m.
After that, they practice in the
afternoon and later on in the
evening. It takes a while to keep
in shape, but with the swimming
and the weight training that the
leant does, they keep on theit
toes. Still, they are able to
balance their time and take care
o their studies right now the
overall grade point average for
the team is 2.65, which savs
something in itself for these
students
Sherri Thomas, a junior
psychology major, has put her
own skills to the test by swimm-
ing along with the ECU team.
"The workout and the schedule
are tough, but it's hard to know
what it's like unless you're there.
The motion oi us kicking through
the pool sounds like a lot of
machines going all at once, but
all vou're concentrating on is
Looking For
Skilled Folk
search is underway in the
and 1 enoir County area for
persons who are interested in
crafts and-or history.
� free slide show at 7:30 p.m.
Monday will he offered at the
Grifton Civic Center as a first
step in that search. All interested
area citizens are invited to attend.
Dr. Karen Baldwin, folklife
specialist with the English
Department at East Carolina
University, will present the slides
and answer questions.
Charlotte Betts (524-5356) is
the Grifton liaison for the folklife
project, which is being funded
through a grant to the Town of
Grifton from the North Carolina
Arts Council, a state agency.
The purpose of the project is
somewhat like the well-known
"Foxfire" projects, that is, to
identify people in rural and
small-town eastern North
Carolina who have learned
various folk crafts and skills in
traditional ways rather than in
classes.
Dr. Baldwin will conduct a
series of workshops in Grifton at
the Civic Center and the Grifton
Historical Museum to introduce
interested persons in methods of
identifying and documenting the
folk craftspersons.
Shad Prize
Creative idea persons of all
ages are invited to enter two con-
tests sponsored bv the Grifton
Shad Festival. Prizes include a
trophy and recognition in the
souvenir brochure, which is wide-
ly distributed about a month in
advance of the festival as well as
during the April 9-13 Shad
Festival.
The contests are an annual
search for a secondary theme for
the Grifton Shad Festival and a
contest to design a colorful and
artistic cover for the 5,000-copy
souvenir brochure. Persons
wishing to enter these contests
may send entries to Grifton Shad
Festival, Box 928, Grifton, N.C.
28530.
The primary theme of each
year's Grifton Shad Festival is
always fish. The secondary theme
is chosen to encourage creative
entries in the parade and to pro-
vide variety each year for
costumes and decorations.
Themes selected in recent years
have included "Headin' for the
Shad Roundup" which had Mo
Shad (as in 'Eat Mo' Shad")
wearing a cowboy hat on the
brochure cover, and "Shad
Trek" which showed Mo Shad
and his finny friends wearing
space helmets and zooming
toward Grifton from outer space.

yourself as you try to go one
more lap
"There's not much time to get
any sleep adds David
Robaczewski, a senior biology
student. "It's a tough schedule
that you have to work with, but
you manage to work with it and
not let time get lost
Scotia Miller, an industrial
technology major, agrees. "It is a
busy schedule. The only problem
I have is not being able to find
any free time. I'm still able to en-
joy it, though
Bruce Brocksehmidt, one of
the newer stars of the lineup and
a computer science major, admits
that "there's still some time for a
social life, but the problem is that
you have to know when to find it.
It seems pretty tiring, and there's
not much of a chance to get any
rest. But I feel like I'm handling
it pretty well right now � I
haven't had anv real problems
yet
Despite their schedule limita-
tions, these students find they
still have time for sports, prepar-
ing for their careers, and for life
in general. By doing so, perhaps
they will be capable of making a
really big "splash" � in life.
joints. Loose doors and windows
allow lots of heat to escape.
Several types of weatherstripp-
ing are available, some more
durable than others. Foam and
rubber are the easiest to apply.
Rolled vinyl costs more and lasts
longer. Thin spring metal
weatherstripping is the most
durable and generally provides
the best seal.
Once you ve checked for
cracks and loose-fitting windows
and doors, look for cracked glass
or warped doors and windows.
Storm windows and doors can
help keep your energy bill down
because the two panes of glass
lose about one-half the heat of a
single pane.
Since portions of the sewer line
may be exposed to freezing
temperatures, make sure all the
joints are tight, and make sure
the proper slope is maintained so
liquids will not stand and freeze.
If you already have heat tape,
replace it if it's worn or loose.
Heat tape on water lines should
be the full length of the pipe, plus
e lough at each end to heat the
home inlet and service outlet.
The seams or expansion joints
of a metal roof should be sealed
once a year with an appropriate
coating. When coating the seams
never walk on the roof without
using two boards at least one-half
by 12-inches by 48-inches to pre-
vent damage to seams in the roof.
Ask your dealer or service
representative for recommenda-
tions, especially if you have
asphalt shingle or vinyl covering.
Make sure you get a good seal
around the vent caps for the fur-
nace, water heater and exhaust
fans, and cover the fastening
screws around the top edge.
Double check under your home
for tears in the bottom board and
look for loose seams or holes
made for plumbing and wiring. If
you have skirting, make sure it is
secure, but not so tight that it will
cut off proper ventilation for the
furnace intake and other ap-
pliances, which may need air cir-
culation. By the way, according
to Duke Power Co properly in-
stalled skirting will reduce heat
loss through the floor approx-
imately 50 percent.
One caution�be careful not to
seal up your home too air tightly.
You should open a window
slightly for fresh air on milder
winter days and to help control
the relative humidity inside your
home.
Remember, a little preventive
maintenance now can save money
on your heating bill and keep
your home more comfortable and
secure when the winter winds
begin to howl.
Sunday, December 8, 1985
9:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m.
Presents
Sunday
DRAFT NIGHT
DRAFT
ALL NITE
Admission:
Guys $1.50
Ladies 50c
18 Year-Olds $1.00
0�

GTYM
FITNESS COMPLEX
Located on the Evans Street Mall
(across the street from the Elbo)
O F
GREENVILLE
Formerly Jobb.es QymJ
SPRING SEMESTER
$70
($25 MONTHLY)
CALL ABOUT
SPECIAL
GROUP RATES
NAUTILUS EQUIPMENT
SUNTANA TANNING BED
AEROBIC CLASSES
Men & Ladies showers & locker rooms
5,000 sq. ft. of workout space
10,000 lbs. of weight
Air Condition all the time
NO CONTRACTS NO INITIATION FEE
� Gold's honors all current Jobbies memberships �
Hours M-F
Sat. S Sun.
10:00 A.M. - 8:00 P M
2:00 P.M. - 6:00 P.M.
FOR MORE INFORMATION
CALL TODAY 758-4359
A Licensee Of GOLD'S GYM ENT.
INC.
-v.iidiii �
� ' o





12
THE EAST CAROL INl AN
HK JMHLR5. 1985
The Family
da Slvm�ut w
CKief ; Nice work, Vvftslo iW cy.
o.y "o to Ko.t tocly wi'fc
of yours f0r me.f
Nuv
Doonesbury
Dooneshury
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
ZONK' HOW;
ITGOING,
STRANGER?
long vm
I SAW YOU
THIS MORNING
AT BREAK
TAST UNCLE
DUKE
THAT WAS YOUf
YOU LOOK DIFfER
bNT DONE SOME
THING WITH
YOUR HAIR
WHAT DO
YOUWANT,
UNCLE
DUKE7

wtu.rt some bad
news, son the new
heating oil bill came
in im cong to have
to raise room and
BQARPTU'lOOOAMY
WHAT7
I
I
I
SmOl1 ON ru HEUSE9
AN ABILITY luu HISUMP
10 PAY BASIS, uyr tMLt ON
ofGJuitse w si
ItlUL, BOY, YOUR LIFE'S COURSE
HAS TAKEN A DANGEROU5 HAlP
PIN TURN LIKE IT OR NOT YOU
NOW HAVE. TO ANSWER TO AN
AWESOME NEW MASTER-MONEv1
Doctor Of Rocks
noujay uNCa
DUKE MONEY
P0ESNTCHAN6E
A THING 2MC0N
TTNUINO TO STUDY
TO BE A m.m
NEPHEW THINK
HJRAM0MEN1
WHY IS IT YOU
WANTED TDK
A DOCTOR7
WUL.TO
MAKE
V; �
6O0D
POINT
ZDNKER DONT
BE AFRAID TO
AS? COR HtiP
IN WE DAYS
AHEAD
JP
��Mkii: (o86�u.
B William Jones
When a man whose name is
synonymous with sedimentology
and carbonate petrology visits
ECU, it may not excite the col-
lege populace in general. But it is
a real kick-in-the-pants for the
"rock-heads' of the Geology
Department. Especially when
such a famous geologist is here to
induct 30 Geology students and
faculty into the largest Geologic
organization in the world �
Sigma Gamma Epsilon, an earth-
science honor society with over
50,000 members.
Recently, Dr. Gerald 1. Fried-
man, of the Rensselaer Center ol
Applied Geology. National Presi-
dent of Sigma Gamma Epsilon.
inducted ECU's newest honor
society chapter and then
delivered a lecture to the
geologists. But, to the happy sur-
prise of many, the German-
accented hum me de le terre spoke
not in the customary dry, fact-
rich, humor-poor manner of
scientists. Rather, his speech,
"Shallow Diagenesis of Car-
bonates was spiced with anec-
dotes and stories of personal ex-
periences encountered during his
world-wide geologic investiga-
tions.
For example, one day of 100
degree heat at 100 percent
humidity was enough for the
post-graduate student doing field
work with Dr. Friedman"on a
Dominican Republic fossil reef.
So. the two wound up in town
thai night in a bar built in a cave
which formed in a fossil reef. The
student did 25 percent of his
dissertation in the bar, with the
patrons serving as field-workers.
Dr. Friedman presented a
public lecture titled: "Identifica-
tion of Reefs: an Experience in
Frustration In keeping with the
mood he established earlier, this
'lecture' was a humorous sharing
of the sense of frustration a
geologist undergoes in attempting
to identify fossil reefs � a major
type of petroleum reservoir.
Explaining that there are
Speaks Eloquently
several wavs to deposit very
similar looking rocks. Dr Fried-
man states, "There is more than
one way to skin a cat. Have you
ever tried to skin a cat? I fell
compelled to, since 1 use the
phrase so often. One day I was Dr. Friedman is certa
skinning the cat, and my wife known for h.s contribution;
rom he tail to the head, not the at ECU has read his sedimen-
head to the tail" (He was just tology textbook,
kidding!)
Share the Holidays
with those
you love
Arts Competition
With High Stakes
Cards and Gifts
from
Recycled Paper
Products, Inc
PET
VILLAGE
We Carry A Complete
Line of Dog, Cat, and
Fish Supplies
Hamster & Gerbil Kit with Hamster or Gerbil
DONNA EDWARDS
Owwr
511 Evans Street
Greenville, N.C.
Phone: 756-9222
Basic 10 gal. Starter Kit
$19.99- S3.9S
Available at
The Washington Chapter of
the National Society of Arts and
Letters is holding juried competi-
tions in the fields of jewelry
design, oil painting and piano.
Founded in 1944, NSAL is a
non-profit organization that
assists aspiring young artists in
dance, drama, art, literature and
music. Scholarships and awards
are given annually through com-
petitions.
The jewelry design competition
will carry an award of Si,000.
The oil painting and piano com-
petitions will each offer awards
of $2000.
Those wishing to enter the
jewelry design competition must
be between the ages of 18 and 35
as of Feb. 5, 1986. Applicants for
the oil painting competition must
he between 17 and 26 years old as
of May 24. 1986. Those entering
the piano competition must be
between the ages of 18 and 26 as
of March 8, 1986.
The competitions are open to
United States Citizens who are
residents or students in
Washington, D.C, Maryland,
Virginia, Delaware, eastern Pen-
nsylvania, North Carolina or
South Carolina.
For application forms and
specific requirements, write Mrs.
Gordon H. Smith, 4450 Dexter
Street, N.W Washington, D.C
20007. Phone: 202-337-2871.
Deadlines for entry are Feb. 5,
1986 for jewelry design, Jan. 3,
1986 for oil painting, and Feb
22, 1986 for piano.
amnmmmm
U.B.E.
ll � COTAKCMt
aarovmiAN c
S12.95
Deluxe 10 gal. Starter Kit
5 36.95
Parakeet set up with green parakeet S24.99
Master Card and Visa are accepted and financing is available
VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV
t
Holiday Greetings!
Universal Hub Health Club
618 South Pitt Street
(Between Dickinson A ve & 5th St, Turn at Goodyear,
Get In Shape Before & After The Holidays'
ONE FREE VISIT (first time) With This Ad
$5.00 OFF ANY MONTHLY RATE
Check out our ad on page 121 of the Yellow Pages
752-1946752-5048
fetf KANITi'CDAri P
SANTAS BACK
Gapd
m
M
M
m
m
i
m

M
M
M
M
"The Best Looking Place
In Town For Christmas
t i i
i i t i i i t i i
THE
DINNER
PLACE
4 p.m10 p.m.
Monday & Tuesday Night
Fried Shrimp� All You Can Eat $4.50
Wednesday Njgh t
Scallops & Soft Shell Crab Combo $4.50
Thursday Niglt
Cubbies Cheese Steak $2.50
Friday Night
Cubbies Shrimp Burger $1.50
Daily Special
2 Hot Dogs for $1.00
Hambu rger & French Fries $1.00
Hours:
10:30 a.m. to 2:30a.m.
7 Days A Week �f5tH 2 Evans �'
7 Days A Week Phone: 752-6497
i
S6-
ittto �. .
i DOW- C �
DOUGH ZDNKER' j M ,


�M
'0,
�r
3URS6
"A

1
��
H

I
ARTHUR ME
I ATT, I
I -CHILD SUPPORT
won STOD
I -SEPARATION GREEMi
I -dwi TRAFFK (
I MASTERCARD HC
VISA '
ACCEPTED 101
Cliffs Not
of stude?
better grj
GETCLI
HERE:
� - . h. .





RR TRUDEAU
�"�
v.
Wan
m
ks,
re -
a a& - A
,
X
�.jiii
w
-
J
uently
R
CE
$4.50
54.50
5f arti �vats 5rree
Phone: 752-6497
wwwvww
Poonesbury
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
IMF FAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 5, 1985
13
S( �H4T5 W v ft WQjMS
cw�rro mk !Amy im
'�� :onmT wrung out
flft C"
WOK HCfc� H4P f '5.
screwing off year after year
keeping your options open en
lvrjn6 the laughter, of frjenps
i4jmu. waiting for vour ship tv
come in ?
�.tsbeeu houjdoxxjtell.
za� for people that you
YOUHASNT WKMOWOU
IT BOY? HAVEARENPEZ
vous won destiny
PON" 6t t I M 1 I
BlTTERON JU5TU
ME NOW, OPU Hfil
NEPHEW BWEVEPIN
Kit
Doonesbury
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
- ' i
. �� AN)
t,
RT
WSV I hUl A RUSH 1&J
fle &D0iNtSS FOUOWEP ,
FteiNOS OF PIS- "�
ORIENTATION. QUEASiNESS
SHORTNESS OF BREATH
UKB r?M ��
'�; � aw?
� -
ft
�.


;
'3t
J3t?
T
fc.1
��.� rs
-v;t5 (XJT801H-NEW
iWR PtOPli AND
BUILDING K&teiAJHO
L�2 F&USZTDVA-
'Z
THE 6W ACFOSb The
HAu: A DRUG DEALER
I STEER CLEAR duT iOU
KNOW MIKE H$4mA
DETERMINED ID BRING (XT
E 3E61'V Pt, �
ME 4 v. , WANT
� :
-
t LOB
J

'S
ni
I h u o l
-v
JJ
� �:�� rENTLEMEk 'l-
BOTTOM
m -
fe �-

HUNGERRA6E
SEXUAL LONGING. UHA1 ABOUT
JERTiGO. BOREDOM AFTER THB
ANDHNAUi, A NEWS SUNK
TINGLING 5EH5A IN'
1I0N
HSr HEY. l�U'NETWORK �
BOYS HAVE BEEN HOG-
GING All ThE QUESTIONS
LET'S LET THE SUPERMARKET
MEDIA G�T IN A FEMJ OKAY

ZONKER ABOUT fOUR
LOVE-CHILD WITH
MRS GORBACHEV
Z0NK&WILL.
iOU BE SLAYING
MOM.OOED.SELF
IMr afrr9 ��'Hf
�v � m
�m . stto
'r ' � � ���:
�� rEVENU0W
'���' s � -v
. ?isr '
t
m


rl
.5
W47 - il UJ'RSP
w- ; � � 5 -� v HSARNCI
VENT VHILE AN ENDLESS
STREAM OF PEOPLE BRING
- M .6�
AMOUNTS OF
v STIFFSLK- V: ���
PUT IN 12-hour �
BE ABLE TAccor; '
�V. J'JEiNABl
2L- INGlAIITh V. -
r A BORSl -� - M
.11

T�xr
W MEDIA THIS MEERENI
HEPECIPEl REAL �
� �
ENTABOUTh ��
PLANS
�A. C
- v
7
0

MON Pizza
TUES Pasta
WED Salad Ba
Special
iiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiii
THURS RBS ai
FRI You
CEot NEW
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitimuiiiii YtAK j
SUN Lasagne aii You - OO EVE Nlte
with Bruce
S lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllillllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliilllllllllllflillll
Special an at
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiH
EVERY TUESDAY IS
LADIES NITE
Ladies Admitted Free
Complimentary Carnations
$1.00 Highballs
Se-icaiwwiia�Mcigtwii.rwi
ARTHUR MERRILL McGLAUFLIN
ATTORNEY AT LAW
�CHILD SUPPORT -RESIDENTIAL LOAN CLOSINGS
�PROPERTY DAMAGE
AND CUSTODY
�SEPARATION AGREEMENTS
�DWI TRAFFIC OFFENSES .SEPARATION AGREEMENTS
MASTERCARD 7571()55
Flexible
Fees upon
Request
ACCEPTED 101 W. 14th St. Office Hours
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREG.XAXCV
$195 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks ai addi-
tional cost. Pregnancy Test, Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For
Further information call 832-0535 (Toll
Free Number 1-800-532-5384) between 9
A.M. and 5 P.M. weekdays.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917 West Morgan St. Raleigh, N.C.
We're ready to
help you solve your
literature problems
with a complete
stock of Cliffs Notes
covering frequently
assigned novels,
plays and poems.
Cliffs Notes are used by millions
of students nationwide to earn
.better grades in literature
GET CLIFFS NOTES
HERE:
A GREAT
HOLIDAY PAIR
Buy any
SHIRT & SWEATER
SAVE $10
5 OFF any additional
Shirt or Sweater.
All items $16 or
over to qualify.
NO LIMIT!
U.B.E
516 3. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE. N.C.
I





I HI- � ASIAROl INIAN
Sports
HIl MM K 5. is Pawc 14
Bucs Move To 2-1
A lleyoop
JIMLEUTGEN5 The Eas'Crol.ni�n
f
reshman Al (lark (32) slams home this alletoop pass from Manhell
Henry in firsl half action of ECU's 63-58 win oer Kdinhoro.
By SCOTT COOPKR
SpwU Kdilor
The ECU Pirates picked up
their second home victory last
night, 63-58, despite a late com
eback effort from the Fighting
Scots from Edinboro University.
Senior guard Curt Vanderhorst
led the way for the Bucs with 15
points, while freshman John
Williams was the only other
Pirate in double figures with 12.
Although ECU was victorious,
head coach Charlie Harrison wa
not pleased with the Pirate per-
formance.
"We weren't sharp, we didn't
run our cuts � we just didn't
have our concentration Har-
rison said. "We didn't do
anything with crispness. It was
just a lack of concentration.
"I feel very fortunate to win
Harrison added. "I'll take the
win
The Pirates started out scoring
the first nine points of the con-
test. In fact, a Derrick Button
lav up with 14:20 left in the first
half was the Fighting Scots' first
points.
A John William's 10-foot
lumper with 7:45 remaining in
the first period opened the Pirate
advantage to 11 (19-8). From this
point. ECU remained on top and
took their biggest lead on a Mat
chell Henry baseline jumpshoi
with :50 1eft in the half. This gave
the Bucs a commanding 30-16
cad at the intermission
Pirates Get Past Edinboro
COOPKR At th. h-jlf tk. - inn �� � - .
At the half, the 2,100 fans on
hand got their first look at ECU's
Pure (iold Dancers. The Pure
Gold Dancers used flourescent
lights to enhance their dance
routine and enlighten the crowd.
The second half saw the Bucs
open as much as a 16-point lead
(34-18). This came on a Leon
Bass layup with 18:13 remaining
to play.
Pirate fans were then elec-
trified at the 14:02 mark when
Keith Sledge hit freshman
Manuel Jones inside for a two-
hand slam. The dunk gave EC I a
38-26 advantage. After an Al
Clark layup increased the Buc
lead to 14 (40-26). ECU was
outscored 23-12 over the next 10
minutes.
A Terrence Jenkins
jumper cut the Pirate
15-foot
lead to
three (52-49) with just 324 re-
maining to play. However,
ECU's Vanderhorst responded to
the call. Vanderhorst nailed a
baseline jumper, scored on a
layup and then connected on a
pair of free throws. This six-
straight point effort gave 1(1 a
8-49 lead and the breathing
room to go on and win 58-63.
Coach Harrison was pleased to
see his senior guard come and
perform when the situation .all
ed.
"Curt finally came in and .
back into it (the flow ol
game) Harrison commented.
"It was good ti see Curt an
the call when he did.
i dinboro University was lee
the game's leading scorer in
junior forward Pun Iaylor with
20 points. Junior Terrence
Jenkins chipped in 14 tor
. -
1 r the Buc freshman Jefl
Kelly had nine, including a fiveoi
six tree-throw performance in the
�r par; ol the game. Henrv
and Clark added -even apiece i
cente Ba ix.
Wi 11 EC I
2-1, wl I jrops �
and is now 3
1I will be ar hon
��
face Lo
1 1 at 7:30 p �'� �'� Mii t'c- (
ECU Snapper Successful
U� I A V LT L.UJDi.1 �v i . i i, ,
By JANET SIMPSON
�i�rr wnitr
On most football reams in
America, there are usually two
people, other than the kickers,
responsible for propelling the
football over long distances
through the air. Though both
have the job of throwing the ball
to a certain teammate, the only
difference, if done correctly, is
that one of the players is throw-
ing the ball backwards
The quarterback throws the
ball forward, while Stuart Ward,
EC 1 deep snapper, sends tl
tootball the other wav
The 6-2. 250-pound senior is
the also the team's residei
dian, according to one
teammates "Stuart is the I
ball team's own David 1 .
man said rim Dum
Being from Greenville,
didn't venture I far away I
home to further his ed . .
and plav collegiate I
"East arolina a
home, and 1 rea � ked
coaching staff said V . ��
also liked the atmosphere -
loo
Monj
��� er thing
1(1 "I .
ird said
hall pla ng like
,ard "
trd Stuai

four leg rate
rate
iware
-� � 4.v . s uu(. snapper, send, the too. wU,Uh
Bucs Face Bengal Tigers In Baton Rouge
B COJT COOPER Powers explained. "We've got to con provide an effective wall fo, abilitv to domin - - 0
t Pirate w
debut
1211
'
lead
� �
4-1-1
. action,
a Gators
ed A a (14-14)
� �-
fc Dal
Milliard, like EC I 's
will be trying
-
He net i 1 56
Pirates to sur-
N ander's mark ol
H vho averaged 115.3
Is pet game last year tl .264
trds) and was a third-team
Ml merica and a consensus all-
C onference per-
averaging 96.4 yards
games this year !S64
ick Garr lames
Milliard behind senior
a k Jen Wickersham.
s10 and 205 pounds, is a
versa'lie back and was the team's
tding rusher and third-
pass receiver in '84.
Wickersham, who completed
rrcent ol his passes for over
�'� yards and 12 touchdowns
r. owns 10 ESC offensive
rhis year, Wickersham
leted 191 of 321 passes
963 yards and four
Me needs just 37
trds to make it three
:onsecutive seasons in which he
passed for at least 2,000 yards.
With this talented backfield,
ihe I SU offense will present the
iefense with a tough pro-
blem. Defensive line coach Rex
Sponhaltz spoke of the high-
powered I SU offense in a press
.onference earlier this week.
' I his backfield is more
talented than any other team
we've faced this year Sponhaltz
said. "Their not only a great
team, but they're very unpredic-
table, from a defensive stand-
point, they're the most unpredic-
table team we've faced.
Their offense is extremel;
multiple Sponhaltz added.
'They have approximately 32
rent sets you name it, they
defensive coordinator
Don Powers also sees the potent
Bengal offense, but feels ECU
can respond.
"I like their (offensive) con-
cept. You'll see every offensive
concept we've seen all year
Powers explained. "Ve'vej
ry to present them (LSU) with
some problems. It's go; to be like
a bowl game for us
Perhaps the area ol creates:
concern for the Hgers is their of-
fensive line. Up front, the
Bengals are not b big a- some ot
the team's ECU has faced. Ehe
anchored b two-year starter
at guard. Curt Gore (6-4, 245
pounds I. Sophomore Eric An-
Keith lelan-
dolsek and senior
:on provide an effective wa
quarterback V ickersham.
A tenacious I SU defense is
spearheaded bv junior outside
linebacker Michael Brooks.
Brooks, a pre-season All-
American, has 54 tackles, in-
cluding seven quarterback sacks
and two interceptions
According to coach Arn-
sparger, Brooks �'has the poten-
tial to be the best defensive playei
ability to dominate a game.
Senior linebacker Shawn Burks
and left end Roland Barbav p
v ide added experiei .
defei e secondary is
anchored Kv vertera afe
t Steve Rehage Junior corner-
back Norman Jefferson, who was
injured earlier in the year, is
luishing dui
to ba. kup W ie Bryant.
" I is just like
rulsa's rnsive line c ac
Paul V dei
No : ii
"The have
aggressive front lines
do anythii y
added. �" rhey try to
to making mistakes
Despite the Pirat
losing streak, 1 SI y �
sparger respects the B
capabilities.
"Thev

- �
prepared to

"Tl
-
are con
� �
� e excellent speed
Defensi
peed, �
V Kia.5u THftNK Q0V THflrx jm, TrtE tfftT piGm oF SW0N�
The Pirates will have to put up their best fight when battling the 12th ranked Bengal Tigers
Ward
"nlinurd from pai.
"Mj
Lady Pi
Fayet
Bv riMt H Mi
HI v Delphine Mabn 14 s
Saturday, the I adv Piratfs will i
:

I
Sout
A
a
:
Complete At.
756-3023
310Gree
. . . . sysy. i�. .



SHOEO
Name Bra:
A t Disco u
Duck Shoes
Sperry Top Siders
Ladies Dress an
$1288 fo $
Large Selection
Tennis Shoes $1
203 West Ninth Sreet
H





inboro
IHI I as IAKOI INIAN
DECI MM R 5, 1985
15
was led by
ei m
n with
ence
the
let!
five of
in the
Henry
ce and
le next
il next
Dec.
�s Col-
essful
art
I ng
alls
ne
said
- a
2 i;ke
i ' �
is
that
ate
ate
a are
age 15
Rouge
e will
: to
-aid.
bowl
peed
seoN
n
Ward Successful ECU Grid-Iron Performer
Continued from page 14
of this meaning oi the word
lizard, don't feel left out.
couple of people, including
his parents and offense line coach
lohn Zernhelt, are credited with
being the most inspirational peo-
ple in Stuart's life. "Coach Zer-
nhelt really helped me out from a
player's standpoint said Ward.
"My parents were the most in-
spirational as far as a personal
aspect. We ate a very close fami-
ly, and that was quite instrumen-
tal
Coach Zernhelt also thinks
very highly of Stuart. "Stuart has
done an outstanding job for us as
snapper said Zernhelt. "He's
Stuart Ward
an outstanding young man and a
quality person
Given one wish (athletically,
that is), Stuart would like to play
any of the Florida schools again
and beat them. "I'd really like to
play any one of the Florida
schools again and win said
Stuart. "We never beat any of
them while I was playing here,
and I'd really like to
Upon his graduation from
ECU, Stuart already has some
plans concerning his future. "I
plan to go to New York to study
voice and diction under former
Pirate player Greg Zittel for a
year said Ward. "After that I
want to come back to North
Carolina and hopefully find a
job
Ward already has some work
behind him in this chosen field of
broadcasting, too. "I worked for
the past two summers at WZMB
doing the morning show he
said. "Working at WZMB gave
"He's an oustanding
man and a quality per-
son.

John Zernhelt
me the opportunity to see what
my career was really going to be
like. It was very educational and
a lot of fun as well
Deep snapper is a very impor-
tant position on a football team,
and Stuart handles it quite well.
He hasn't had a bad snap in three
seasons. Stuart isn't the only per-
son who recognizes this feat
either; his teammates are aware
of it. For instance, Tim Dumas
considers him the best deep snap-
per in the country.
Far be it from Stuart not to be
in step with the rest of his buddies
at Belk Hall. Dumas has all the
fishing apparel, Bubba Waters
has the stereo system, and Stuart
and his roommate. Brent
Holbrook, have the state-of-the-
art in television equipment. Their
setup even includes a remote-
control device that keeps Stuart
from getting up to change the
channel when he gets ready to
watch Dave Allen At Large every
night.
Stuart's other hobbies include
deer hunting, duck hunting and
reading. "I like to read he said.
"My favorite author is Steven
King, and I've read all of his
novels. Out of all of them, I liked
Pet Cemetery best.
What can you say? A deep
snapper that loves to read and
watch television and who wants
to live like a lizard. For some,
Stuar is a real special person
with a great personality and uni-
que sense of humor. So, if you
ever hear anybody say something
good about him, maybe you
should believe it because more
than likelv it's true.
Lady Pirates Get Ready For
Fayetteville, UNC-C
B IIM CHANDI FR
sports N rit
The 1 ady Pirates get cranked
up again this weekend with two
games on their slate. On Indav,
the Pirates travel to Fayetteville
take on Fayetteville State
versity in a came that carries
a 7 p.m. tipoff. On Saturday, the
Lad) Bucs return home for a 5
p.m. showdown with UNC-
Charlotte.
According to Coach Emily
Manwaring, the trip to Fayet-
teville will be a real test for the
Pirates. "The challenge for us
will be maintaining our com-
posure stated Manwaring.
"The bleachers are right beside
the sidelines, and their fans will
do everything they can to help
their team win
Manwaring believes that the
game will be similar to that of the
Francis Marion contest. "They
run about the same kind of of-
fense as Francis Marion added
Manwaring. The Pirates will try
to stop Annetta Faulcon, a 5-10
forward who scored 28 points in
the game last year. The Pirates
won that game, however, 2-60 in
the home confines of Minges Col-
iseum.
Manwaring said Saturday's op-
ponent, UNC-Charlotte, has
quick guards in the backcourt,
and with a 6-2 center, they have
height in the middle. Assistant
Coach Lillian Barnes said of the
UNC-Charlotte defense. "Their
weakest defense is inside. It we
can get the ball inside against
them, then we can score
UNC-Charlotte returns four
starters from last year's team that
beat the Pirates 68-61 in
Charlotte. UNC-Charlotte,
which is a member of the Sun
Belt Conference, will bring a 3-1
record into the ballgame.
Barnes believes the practices
this week have been better than
those of past weeks. "The inten-
sity has picked up somewhat
said Barnes. Manwaring stated
she would like to see production
from more of her players.
As for the Pirates' record.
"We should be happy that we're
2-2. We could be 1-?, or even
0-4 Barnes said.
Just Received!
From England
100
Trench Coats
Mini London Fog
$7.95 & Up
also
200 Pair Jeans
$2.95
Coin & Ring Man
Corner 4th & Evans Street Mall
I1 s Delphine Mabry (14) shows how to play tough defense. On
Saturday, the Lad Pirates will try to avenge last year's loss to UNC-C.
:
South Park
Amoco
T
T&
I!
Complete Automotive Service
756-3023 24 hrs.
310 Greenville Blvd.
SHOE OUTIE T
Name Brand S hoes
A t Discount Prices
Duck Shoes
Sperry Top Siders
Ladies Dress and Casual Shoes
$1288 to $15.88
Large Selection of Name Brand
Tennis Shoes $12.88 to $39.88
203 West Ninth Sreet
$10 to $20
$10 to $20
A GREAT
HOLIDAY PAIR
Buy any
SHIRT & SWEATER
SAVE $10
5 OFF any additional
Shirt or Sweater.
Jo All items $16 or
over to qualify.
NO LIMIT!
12 Blocf off Evans Street
Fashion Doesn't Cost A Fortune For Men & Women At
MAURICES
ROLINA EAST MALL






16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 5,1985
� �
CAME
Pirate's Last; Bowl Games Picked Over Holidays
ECU-LSU
Maryland-Syracuse
BYU-Ohio State
Alabama-CSC
Ela. StOkla. St.
Air Force-Texas
Ceorgia Tech-Mich. St.
Auburn-Texas A&M
Penn. StOklahoma
UCLA-Iowa
Miami-Tennessee
Michigan-Nebraska
RICK McCORMAC
ECU by 3
Maryland
Ohio St.
Alabama
Fla. St.
Air Force
Georgia Tech
Auburn
Oklahoma
Iowa
Miami
Nebraska
TOM NORTON
LSU by 13
Syracuse
BYU
Alabama
Fla. St.
Air Force
Mich. St.
Texas A&M
Penn. St.
UCLA
Miami
Michigan
BILL DAWSON
LSU by 6
Maryland
BYU
Alabama
Fla. St.
Air Force
Mich. St.
Auburn
Penn. St.
UCLA
Miami
Michigan
SHEWS MEWS
LSU by 21
Maryland
Ohio St.
Alabama
Fla. St.
Air Force
Mich. St.
Auburn
Penn. St.
Iowa
Miami
Michigan
TODD PATTON
LSU by 17
Maryland
BYU
Alabama
Fla. St.
Air Force
Mich. St.
Auburn
Penn. St.
Iowa
Miami
Nebraska
JOHN PETERSON
LSU by 24
Maryland
Ohio St.
Alabama
Fla. St.
Air Force
Mich. St.
Auburn
Oklahoma
Iowa
Miami
Nebraska
SCOTT COOPER
LSU by 3
Maryland
BYU
Alabama
Okla. St.
Air Force
Mich. St.
Texas A&M
Oklahoma
Iowa
Miami
Michigan
�D.J WATI
LSU by 6
Maryland
Ohio St.
Alabama
Fla. St.
Air Force
fieorgia Tech
Auburn
Oklahoma
Iowa
Miami
Nebraska
Classified
Continurd from page 8
MOVING OUT SALE. Eastbrook
Aprs, (furniture, lamps, etc.) Must
sell by Dec. 17 prices very
negotiable For more info call
758 6971.
FOR SALE: Apple 2 plus computer
with 64k memory, 2 disc drives, Ap
pie 3 monitor and a color monitor,
Okidafa printer, plus many games
and program discs, $1000 negotiable
Call 752 9175
SPRING BREAK TRIPS TO
DAYTONA OR LAUDERDALE:
High quality, low prices Contact
Lisa Dwyer at 758 2381 or 758 6260
FOR SALE: 19" Peugeot P8
12 speed bike One year old ex
celient condition $200 or best offer
Call Susan at 758 4801
NEED TYPING? Letters
Resume's, Term papers, etc. Call
Karen at 752 0498.
REMEMBER;
ECU HilleVs Hanuk-
kah and Latka party
Dec. 8 at Bonnie Kop-
pelVs house. Good
times and good food
� it 's a promise! For
more information,
call Lisa at 752-8932.
aBHOBBBimBaBB01
STANDINGS
TOM NORTON
SHEWS MEWS
JOHN PETERSON
SCOTT COOPER
"D.J WATTS
RICK McCORMAC
BILL DAWSON
TODD PATTON
LAST WEEK
9-3
7-5
7-5
10-2
10-2
6-6
OVERALL
98-41
97-42
96-93
95-44
94-45
9445
93-46
M-51
In Brief
Fun Cards and Gifts
for Christmas
from
Recycled Paper Products
Available at
U.B.E.
516 8. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.
.crrOtLAC
4
SPRING BREAK
EXTRAVAGANZA
Cancun, Mexico March 8, 1986 $376 per person
Air Travel From Miami
7 Nights Hotel Including Taxes
Transfers From Airport
Bahamas Cruise March 9, 1986 $425 per person
4 Days of Cruising in the Bahamas
All Meals and Entertainment on Ship
Port Taxes and Gratuities Space Limited
Make Your Deposits Now
Come in for brochure
QUIXOTE TRAVELS, INC
3 19 Cotonche Street Greenville, N C
Phone 757 0234
is ana (oratuit
.
SA'ENIEN ����
J -VUPU ,v ERE!
KINGSTON
PLACE
NOTICE
Kingston Place announces that there will be several
openings for students interested in renting apartments for
the semester beginning 1 January 1986.
There are openings for Both male and female students
All interested persons should call 757-1971 for details
as soon as possible
For More Information on Purchase or Rental (.ALL COLLECT or STOP BY NOW!
TELEPHONE (919) 757-1971
Kingston Pijtr �
Bcw 2579 � 282
- . ;v
1
ttllltlltfnHUtllllIIMllHIUHMIIIIHtlfltlflllllllllffffftfftMtMM�VnillllltlHtllllllSlllllfHliaillllltii
nttkrr Memorial Christian Church
iDUctpim of Chrtat)
1111 GrcmvtU Blvd 756-2275
?
�� H. Vann Kafeht
"In essentials, tinitu
In non-essentials, xedom
In all things. JHovt. "
Special Classes For College Students
9:45 a.m. Christian Education (all ages)
11.00 a.m. Worship- Open Communion
t0004 r r t ts jjj A. 1
I
i
'
�i
i




.
ill

��
� B
"I S
i
i
Viii(iiiiiiiiiffiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiitfliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitfTnntt�fl���auuii!iiiiiiiiiifiititiiiiiiiiitiitiiitiitiit
fr 0bi
of Greenville Store Only
Kentucky Nuggets Combo
9 Piece Kentucky Nuggets
Kentucky Fries
Large Drink $2.89
Locations:
600 W. Greenville Blvd
7564434
2905 East Fifth St. 752-5184
STUDEN
Heres a special break just for
students! When you pick up
your Student Discount Cardat
Hardee's, you save 10 every
time you order. So if you're
CONSOLIDATED
" THEATRES
MMMMMM
. CHILDREN
-� vjwhws? 5:30 1 ANYTIME
.Adults$2.ooTIL
BUCCANEER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
Sylvester Stallone
NOW PLAYING
ROCKY IV
SHOWS: 1:15-3:15-5:15-7:15-9-15
Dudley Moore in NO W PL A YING
�� SANTA CLAUS
7:00-9:15 (flC MOVie
PG
ssS
PG
PG
STARTS FRIDAY
The Super Hit Of the Season
Dan Ackroyd and Chevy Chase in
SHOWS:
1:00-3:05
SPIES LIKE US 2S"
-ft
hungry for our iamous
burgers, specialty sand-
wiches like our tender Chicken
Fillet or Roast Beef, or if you
have a taste for Homemade
Rise and Shine� Biscuits,
come on into Hardee's. And
enjoy great meals at an
intelligent price.
Hacdecir
Where good people go
for good food
B C MK Hanirrs h�J Systems Irx
llIIIIHIIIIIIIIHIIIIIItlllllll'IMIIMIIIIIIILKIlllll!lllll!lll)lll
llllllllll
IMUUHtMUtllUltltHIIMHUIIIIINMHHMIIlUllllimilttlli
IIHHIIIIIttlllHHI
Baker,
( ourtes) M l
sporK Information
Baker Ni eds 7
Sei
.Hit tou
H








1

;
S

1

Onet FourBo
I

-
Sell
A
Abs
F
Beginnirij
Hurry! Q
to 1st 2





y
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 5, 1985
17
days
l� J V Al'ls
Baker, Hilliard Go For Rushing Records
tLKALl
Courtes) of ECU
Sport. Information
Baker Needs 77
Senior tailback Ton Baker,
1 M) ards rushing and
ouchdown in 1 C I 's Nov. 16
to lulsa, moved closer to
miing ECU's all-time leading
e High Point, N.C native
is 2. SI career yards and
sed Theodore Sutton for
n the all-time rushing list.
The Bengal Tigers will travel to
Memphis, Tenn. Dec. 27 to face
8-3 Baylor of the Southwest Con-
ference in the Liberty Bowl.
Other teams on ECU's 1985
schedule set to make post-season
bow' appearances are:
Orange Bowl (Jan 1.): No.
PENN STATE vs. Oklahoma
Cotton Bowl (J �n. 1): No.
AUBURN vs. Texas A'&'M
Sugar Bowl (Jan. 1): No.
1
MIAMI-FLORIDA
nessee
vs. Ten
�5
i '
A( :i
.dents
r deta
I on Baker
began the season in
-pot with 1,874 yards,
:hool's all-time leading
ii d gainer � Carlester
by 76 yards. Baker,
7 yards against 12th-ranked
week, would overtake
umpler. Baker's current per-
tverage through 10 games
needs just 61 yards
ome only the fifth ECU
iei evei to gain 1,000 yards
a season. The other
i t Carlester Crumpler in
d 1973 (1,0420);
Colson in 1967 (1,135);
C ollins m 1979 (1,130),
Dave Alexander in 1965
,o math on the
all-time total offense list
2,813 yards and needs
ds rushing to claim a
ng ECU's top five in
e The 130 yards vs.
B I third 100-yard
. ; 985 season, with his
two coming against
a � rexas State (164 and 1
r D i mthwestern Louisiana
47). Baker now owns nine
rd rushing efforts for his
- hree this season
previous season best of
?83
One of Four Bowl Teams
. SI . 8-1-1 on the season going
this week's game with ECU
ing lulane 31-19 last
New Orleans, is just one
bowl teams on the
1985 schedule.
Dalton Hilliard
Hilliard After The Record
Senior runningback Dalton
Hilliard, with his 174 yards
rushing on 19 carries against
Tulane, moved into fourth place
on the SEC's all-time rushing list
and now owns 3,880 career
rushing yards.
Hilliard needs 156 yards
against the Pirates to become
LSU's all-time leading rusher, a
distinction now held by Charles
Alexander, who rushed for 4,035
yards from 1975-78. Hilliard,
with 964 yards rushing in 10
games this season, needs just 36
to reach the 1.000-yard mark for
the second straight season.
LSI Is On A Roll
The rigers oi I SU have been
enjoying a good deal of success
oi late. Since dropping a 20-0
decision to Florida way back on
Oct. 5, the Tigers of Bill Arn-
sparger are perfect over the last
seven weeks.
Included in those seven weeks
are six victories and one tie, back-
to-back shutouts by one of the
nation's toughest defenses, four
Southeastern Conference vic-
tories and a final SEC mark ol
4-1-1.
Although offense hasn't
necessarily been the name of the
game for the Tigers during their
current streak (only twice has
LSU eclipsed the 20-point mark
in those seven games), LSU's
defense has definitely picked up
the slack. Tulane scored 19 points
against the Tigers last week, the
most given up since that 20-0 loss
to Florida. The LSU defense has
recorded shutouts against Ken-
tucky (10-0) and Mississippi
(14-0) in successive weeks, while
limiting Alabama to 14 points (in
a 14-14 tie) and Notre Dame to
seven (in a 10-7 victory).
During the Tigers' current
streak, opponents have scored
just 62 points (8.9 per game)
while the Tiger offense is averag-
ing 20.7 points per game.
One More Top 20 Team
This Saturday's season-ending
contest with LSU, ranked 13th in
last week's Asociated Press poll
(12th in United Press Interna-
tional), will be the third time this
season the Pirates will face a
team ranked in the nation's Top
20 on game day.
First it was Penn State way
back on Sept. 21, then Auburn
on Nov. 9 and now the Tigers of
LSU. The Pirates also faced
Miami-Florida, currently ranked
No. 4 in the country, but back on
Oct. 5, the Hurricanes were 2-1 at
the time and did not occupy a
spot among the nation's Top 20.
If you count Miami, ECU has
faced four teams during the 1985
.$ $
season that have occupied a spot
in both the Associated Press' and
UPI's Top 20 poll, with all four
teams cracking the Top 10 at
some point during the season.
In last week's AP poll, Penn
State was No. 1, Miami No. 4,
Auburn No. 7 and LSU No. 13.
First Time Since 1957
ECU's Nov. 16 loss to Tulsa
was the Pirates' eighth straight,
the first time a Pirate team has
dropped eight in a row since the
1957 season.
That 1957 season saw ECU,
under legendary coach Jack
Boone, drop the first eight games
of the season before claiming a
6-0 victory in the season's final
game against Presbyterian, which
is ECU Head Coach Art Baker's
alma mater.
Merry Christmas from Apple Records
Warner Bros. Records and Atlantic Records
Albums and Cassettes on SALE From
NEED CASH?
Southern
Gun & Pawn
752-2464
500 N. Gr�n�
0
� Process & Print -
with this coupon
From 110, 126, 35mm or
Disc Color Print Film.
19V3C per print
(reg. 29C) & $1.98 de. chg. (reg. S2.98)
E arrple: 24 exp. film reg $9 94
NOW $4.73
Carolina East Mall
i North Entrance�Near Belk's)
756-6078
OPKN MONSAT.
8 AM to 9 PM
1 mil one roll per coupon.
So' valid �uh -Mher offers
hxpires 12-18-85
'm�wa44uimiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiMiti
EAK
ry f r i ur famous
irs, specialty sand-
lur tender Chicken
ist Beef, or if you
ite for Homemade
Shine" Biscuits,
lnt) Hardee's. And
�reat meals at an
intelligent price.
irieer
good people go
for good food
Sell Your Textbooks
to us
And look what
you'll get
Absolutely
FREE!
Beginning December 6, 1985
Hurry! Quantities Limited
to 1st 2000 students
Campus Trial Pak
Contains valuable
products, offers and
coupons, including
U.B.E
516 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.
Aika-Settzer Plus- Cold Medicine
OH Montr" Yogurt Rabins
Finesse Shampoo
Finesse Conditioner
Finesse Luminescent Mousse
Finesse Hairspray
Usterine Antiseptic
Lubrtderm Lotion
o.b Tampons
OhHenryT
Schick- Disposable Razors
Trident� Soft Bubble Gum
paks do not contain aW products shomm
QUANTITIES UMfTED, 1 PER STUDENT
IIIIIIIIU!
IIIHIIIIIillliililllllilHIUHlllilHUlrl
t
"
J
1





18
THE EAST CAROL IN1AN
DECEMBER 5, 1985
wwwww
A
fa
i
M
fa
$5
BARNES CHARGE VISA-AMERICAN EXPR!
j Daincs cl
And Diamond Gallery
Our Variety Of Rings Including Men's, Ladies,
Will Please Someone You Know!
LADIES DIAMONDS
Complemented With Genuine Rubies Mounted In
K Katat Yellow Gold Total Weight Of 1 20
Cts
Sale of Fine Jercdry
SALE
PRICE
750
00
LADIES
DIAMOND TIFFANY
lUerty Cltlistmas
LADIES MODERN
DIAMOND BRIDAL SET
65 Cts Diamond Weight Mounted In 14 Karat
Yellow Gold
SALE
PRICE
1525
00
'v Snr '$-?�
I-

fa
&
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
499
00
SALE
PRICE
25 Carats
14 Karat Yellow Or White Gold 4 Or 6 Prongs
LADIES DIAMOND RING
Price
550
00
GENTS .25
DIAMOND CLUSTER
fa
&
1
i
1
S Insert Or Guard Total Weight 30 Karats
.5 Mounted In 14 Karat Yellow Or White Gold
fa
i
i
M
m
fa
i
1
1
i
ft
I
fa
fa
ft-
c'c
fa
sZ Surrounded By Genuine Rubies Tola! Weigh:
2 1 35 Total Gem Weight Mounted In 14 Karat
fa Yellow Gold
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
&
fa
in
fa

fa
ft
LADIES GENUINE
GARNET PENDANT
Complemented With Diamonds On An 18 Inch
LADIES DIAMOND PENDANT
AND
PENDANT INSERT PENDANT
25 Cts And Diamo- Insert 25 Cts Comple
mented With A 14 K- � � '�. Or White Gold
Chain - - - -
SALE $70000
PRICE
799
Karat Yellow Or White Gold
SALE
PRICE
$1550��
l
lui
i
t
III
LADIES DIAMOND
PENDANT TIFFANY
Mounted In 14 Kara: W! � � � cw Gi �ld -1
plemented With - 1 Kar.it Rupe Chain
20 Ct
LADIES DIAMOND RING
Anniversary BanJ With 27 Diamonds With A
Total Weight Of 1 20 M iunted In 14 Karat
Yellow Gold
SALE
PRICE
SALE
PRICE
$1895��
299
00
. 0&.
4 &&&i
LADIES DIAMOND
COCKTAIL RING
With A 1 � A. jht �� I M H :ed In 14
GENTS 3 DIAMOND RINQf
With Total Weight Being 1 00 Cts Mounted lr 14 fa
fa
i
fa
fT)
GENTS 3.00 CTS. �
DIAMOND RING fa
Mounted In 14 Karat Yellow Goid fa
S4900MI
SALE
PRICE
SALE
PRICE
s1950��
ft
ft
�3
fa
fa
GENTS 1.00 CTS.
DIAMOND SOLITAIRE
Mounted In 4 Karai � it Ye
SALE
PRICE
3900
00
v'ujlkfX
Mounted In 14 Karat Yellow Goid
LADIES 1.00 CT.
DIAMOND
ANNIVERSARY BAND
M ted lr 14 - m �i -��� . � �. Row
Desigt
S7CA00
�sALE
PRICE
780
&k
Price
399
00
GENTS 1.00 CT.
DIAMOND CLUSTER
NUGGET RING
Very Ma
M inted ii 14 Kara
cuhne F
SALE
PRICE
1299
00
LADIES DIAMOND
AND RUBY RING fa
Mounted lr 14 Karat Yeiiow Golc With A Total X
Oem Weight Of 1 00 Cts
fai
SALE W
PRICE 0
fa
LADIES DIAMOND RING
Price
650
00
LADIES DIAMOND
ANNIVERSARY BAND
LADIES DIAMOND
Mour Kat tl
Weight Ol
� I ��

H

LADIES DIAMOND RING
2 00 Cts Pear Shap Desigi Mounted In 34
Karat Yeiiow Goid
SALE
PRICE
480
00
� i?�ci
���.
SALE
PRICE
238000
v �
Jr: I
LADIES DIAMOND
COCKTAIL RING
Mouie : Ii 14 Karai V, � G I '�'� rh A Total
Weight Of 50 Os
S7CA00
SALE
PRICE
750

lift
�' y
AND SAPPHIRE RING �
Mounted In 14 Karat Yeiiow Gold With Total jff!
Weight Of 1 15
001


fa
-4
fa
SALE
PRICE
1855
GENTS DIAMOND
CLUSTER RING
Mounted In 14 Karat Yellow Or Wmte Gold W-th
Solid Back 1 00 Total D.a-nond Weight
SALE
PRICE
$139900
LADIES
DIAMOND WATERFALL
Mounted In 14 Karat Yellow Or White Goid
Totai Weight Of 1 0( Ct
SALE
PRICE
750
00
5 14 Rope Cham
SALE
PRICE
325
00
LADIES DIAMOND
CLUSTER RING
Mounted In 14 Karat Yellow Or White Gold
Total Weight Of 50 Cts
SALE
PRICE
399
00
fa
fa

fa
fa
ft
LADIES DIAMOND
COCKTAIL RING S
Mounted In 14 Karat White Goid With A TotajCT
Weight Of 4 00 Cts ?!
SALE
PRICE
s4250�
SPECIAL
14 Kt Gold
Pierced
EARRINGS
50
EAR PIERCING
$099
AII14KT.
GOLD CHAINS
O off
2
INCLUDING
EARRINGS
y&
)
SPECIAL
50
On the premises appraisals
by a certified G.I.A. graduate.
On the premises repairs, ring
sizing, stone setting, remount-
ing, chain repairs, watch re-
pairs, engraving, ear piercing.
F�����?��?���?
BARNES CHARGE-VISA-AMERICAN EXPRESS
j OaTHCS cw
And Diamond Gallery
Hours 10-9 Mon -Sat Closed Sunday
KINSTON & JACKSONVILLE
THE PLAZA
756-6696
Charge accounts invited,
Mastercard, Visa, American
Express, Choice, Barnes
convenient charge plan and
layaway up to 24 months to
pay.
rmmirMrtn0
T
mmmmmmm
,w





a6fd405f91aa2c1b3d5e45e66416bb61 00057762.0001.tif
b22b3fcec8e5f1dc8807cb875c611fff 00057762.0002.tif
5f6809eff14d16ee639bd84e67d4eba9 00057762.0003.tif
c5026550e90938776b3c96c9900f3d43 00057762.0004.tif
f090bd79fabc1c3272587ac4427d75db 00057762.0005.tif
0b16a92ea20b3cf56c31a1d4782c71e1 00057762.0006.tif
739a8189661d3adbdaa2b0fe4de7dbf6 00057762.0007.tif
0b0b2b5022114c7c5a582136f3d25bb9 00057762.0008.tif
e59606d31a26fb741b1d6fa8cf388fad 00057762.0009.tif
0ddfc9c43d6dfa28864a457e04de6b3a 00057762.0010.tif
07af1b20653d3d93fe87a6700995974b 00057762.0011.tif
346cd3733a4a89d64793b10e0d2024e7 00057762.0012.tif
77cba1047d3db49ed5c2611b3fe642c6 00057762.0013.tif
e5d0850ad6f5ab8acf8521669a13a403 00057762.0014.tif
c2255292b227dd6b55ea37b5e39bcbd3 00057762.0015.tif
525a18b87a1c30fbb33859f3a4d41fa0 00057762.0016.tif
e8de8e83a7f686c82874d02d84fa1ca5 00057762.0017.tif
12737b66a1a8eef41a13c0dcb94b5225 00057762.0018.tif
bd687decc7c5ca0d95bebdc0be587a35 00057762.0019.tif





Title
The East Carolinian, December 5, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.446
Location of Original
University Archives

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy