The East Carolinian, December 3, 1985






She
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since IV25
ol.ftO v
ai
luesdav, December 3. 1985
Greenville, V( .
14 Paes
Circulation 12.000

ECU Survey
Students' Morality Scanned
H l)()l (. KOBEKSON
xiiff Wnld
An informal survey oi C I
students found thai most approve
of premarital sex but objeci to
homosexuality.
The asiarolinian sur e
2 tudei ts va- prompted b a
( .S. V � s and H i �rd Ay
Iv on morality. I he S
'ews and World Report surve)
ol 1,000 adults showed thai 61
percent feel premarital sex is not
Similarly, 70 perceni ol the
let students surveyed said the
approved of pren i ex.
In l9, only 52 percei
Americans . cd
e x
Oi
premarital sex com-
"1

about each other
Anothei studeni who is op
ed to premarital sex said, "Many
young people aren't emotionally
prepared foi the responsibilities
involved a sexual
relationship
v � moi e studeni � today ap
prove ol premarital sex, they are
opposed (trama I tfi
Ni iet perceni m .

undei all circumsta
Regarding . ard
2 pei i ei
' S. Xe wsd
H orld R, ;�����: sui vev sa

Howe

Ol the E( U students polled
ni opposed homose?
50 perceni said they would
. � imosexual rum
public office
One student added. "If I
e person was qualified,
I would vote � gard
his sexual preference
VA en asked about hoi
trlv 20 perceni ol tdults
surveyed in the nati tudy
said they iie to theii famiiie
employees.
ECU, � �
lents polled s hed to
then families or employers, while
80 percent call in sick when I
� �
� studei
i � �
� ident d.
: In
I
I
ii
ai h i I
� I
Reaizai
R
Greenville Nightclub Needs Permit
Has M 'inter 4
Milton Sawyer (leftj and Da . i repre-
sent the change in seasons that abru yesterday after-
noon. Monriav afternoon 1(1 greev
However, h Monda night the t to freez-
ing. Bundle-up EC I because wintei
Professor s Body
Found In Lake
Bn elizabe hi i�.i
1 he discovt
. . '

Lai
S i
V H
by, f Na
and 1 d m b e �
Wesley V. Crawley "d
gunshot ��
head Hobby pei
autopsy last Wednesday ii Na
Barry 1 vans, secre i
Roanoke Valley Rescue 5
. r rescue s . i I
m the Halifax (
ifl concerning a n
See
1
.
1
�ROFESSORS Page ft.
H Bl I H WHICKt H
�l�ff Hi

d I
p '
- i
.
d More.
' v
because we had indication
ould nt us a
al use permit
1 homas, pai i ow
Won
building, which
r gay nij
" 1 �
pr
and it will MX
f he aid.
s, I isii is
Zoning
Disi - king
d

taken c
i
I
rate a ace
5
Mc
X r
a
more of an at-
-
the
based ased
i ' imas.

See GKKf-NHI.l 1 Page 6
ECUHas New Crime Prevention Officer
ABETH PACK
Miff Wn
1 asi Cart � 's new
ne Prevention Officer Keith
Knox says he is eagei to w
make the campus a much safei
place. Kn x � also an in-
vestigatoi I i the ECU Public
Safety Department.
Knox, formei Winterville
police chief, plans to increase
sate al ECU's campus bv star-
ting seminars and simple preven-
n measures foi students.
cording to Knox, the best
wa to prevent crime is by. in-
SGA Legislature Passes New
Chancellor Recommendations
B MIKE II IWK K
I � e SGA Leg
the final recommendation
characteristics for the i
Chancellor Monday in its
meeting of the fall semester.
Those recommendations are
be send to the 1(1 H ard of
Trustees and to be incorporated
into the search for a new
chancellor.
Heading the list ol recommen-
dations is the desire to rid 1 C I
of the party school image. "The
students want the next
Chancellor to be committee
improving Fast Carolina's
academic quality and to rid the
On The Inside
iage,
n t v a
read the
Announcements2
Classifieds14
Editorials4
Features8
Sports11
Those who cannot remember
the past are condemed to
repeat it.
�George Santayana
call
ncrease
: 1(1 .be
N. .
i essable
pe with the
� S ; tnd its surroun-
tinue improve-
athletic program.
ri "are Commit-
tee, � I vw up the recom-
mendations, wrote a version that
differed from the final report in
that the Student Welfare Com-
mittee's recommendations called
for "making general college re-
quiretiKi ire stringent
However, during Monday's
meeting, SGA President David
Blown said, "General college re-
quirements are tough enough and
I think raiher than making them
more stringent, they should
reflect the national trend in
changing technology to include
basic computer skills
Brown's argument swayed the
Legislature, and, therefore, the
Legislature, in a show of hands.
voted to delete the words from
the final version.
In other business, the
I egislature appropriated $100 to
the It I North Carolina Student
I egislature. last Carolina's
NC SI needs the money to give a
breakfast to visiting students who
will be attending the state
meeting of the NCSI at ECU.
The Legislature, by a voice-
vote, also appropriated $500 to
the ECU Poetry Forum tor
v isiting lectures.
1 ast week, the Legislature
passed a new book exchange ex-
pansion program, which would
enable students to sell books
through classified ads in the East
Carolinian. Speaker Kirk Shelley,
who introduced the bill, said that
the new program would give
students more time to sell their
books at more profitable prices.
The Legislature chose the ECU
Army ROTC detachment to run
the new organization and ap-
propriated $300 for the group.
its' awareness ol
issue, "ilow they can play a
preventing of crinu
Knox
well as preventing themselves
from being crime victims is im-
portant, said Knox.
Seminars on rape prevention,
as well as crime prevention
isures, �
da
Knox will s .
lev. ECl rape preveni
program coord and 1I
, Safety Departmei
tl, to conduct rape preven
presentations on campus.
"I look al this new job as a
challenge said Knox. " 1
university atmosphere is going
be different than what I'm used
to he said.
" I here's a different class
people here than there is in a
small town added Knox. "I'm
ready to take a look at the crime
problems on this campus and
various areas that are potential
crime risks, and then I will
recommend new measures to
reduce or eliminate those risks
Knox has received training
aw �
incl
N
.
is ais
i
"1 ' ,iu spe .
identifica
eludes idei
is well
crime scene aid K-
even taken phoi
scenes
As for the fuf "1
ward to workii � w
d faculty a
said Knox. "1 �
excellent people
will
Discussing The Issues
J B HUMBERT Th�E�OC0hnn
The SGA Legislature wil
again Jan. 13, 1986.
meet
Speaker of the SGA Legislature Kirk Shelley (left) and SGA President David Brown (right) talk
about the issues before the SGA meeting Monday night. For details about the meeting see the related
story on page I.
!
"� ��






!HI EASTC kil N1AN
IU . I MHl-k ), 1W
Announcements
WHO EPSILON
ATTENTION ALL FALL
SEMESTER GRADUATES
ECU RUGBY CLUB
ECU LAW SOCIETY
iw S
. - Ird, at 7 30 pm
Ml Our gues' S � �
A ' a j - � �� Crtmmj a
' " � R

ECU BUDDHIST MEDITATION
AND STUDY GROUP
' � ima t he
���'� ,
ll k i �
Wind ' on I . � .� Dm
� � � enkins I nt �'�� ��
� � �
VETERANSCLUB
� A
� �
IV � � . �
plans for a
ECU ICE HOCKEY CLUB
There will be a meeting tomorrow Dt
at 4 00 in room 10S B of Men �
Everyone nteres'ed in pl.t,
tenn we will be disci . . � .
c annol
rsa 1332
a'ter

' �
V �� . , �
PHI BETA SIGMA
�. rattle for
� � � a at Oarryl's -
Jl 00 Drawing a �.�-� placi
led Touch I
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. . - �
Dec 5. I 0 pn
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PARTY
Dec e home . .
pen Lot" I food and I � � , .
� For more inf
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& Sima Tau (.amrna
Present
DRAFT NITE
Tuesday December 3, 1985
Admission Si .50 Gins
9:00-1:00 A.M.
SI.00 Ladies
10 Draft All Nite
& Pi Kappa Phi
Present
DRAFT NITE
1
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Wednesday, December 4, 1985
Admission I Guvs
9:00-1:00 A.M.
Sl.oo I adies
10 Draft All Nite
Compton
Graduct Fellowships
for Black Americans
At Vanderbilt University
If you would like to earn a Ph D in preparv
for college teaching, a Compton Fellowship
for BUck Americans at Vanderbilt University
may help you achieve your goal
Each Fellowship pays full tuition nd U-i
plus an annual tax-exempt stipend
of at least ScjQ0 for up to
four years
For further information,
call or write
Mr. (iMiyMrjtnv
The Graduate School
B a 126 Peabod
Vanderbilt Unrvervty
Nashville. Tennesvee
(615)322 3936
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CHRISTMAS SALE
Dec. 5, 8 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Dec. 6, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Second Floor Jenkins Foyer
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Rear Wind
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Return of (he Jedi
Production C
Christmas I ree I ril
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Travel Comm
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JThe I nderero
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I ucsda
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ONF Or I HI YEAR1
NATIONAL KUROOf REVIEM PAT i
Rl X Rllll II CHTH RH
THE DRE;
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JAMES STEWART
KIM NOVAK.
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S
VEPTIBCJ





THE USK AKOl INI AN
DECEMBERU?853
vhlp
ECU Professors Meet To
Discuss Conflict's Impact
Sigma Gamma Epsilon Charter
Gerald M. Friedman, second from rit. talks �ith Ralph kinse, left, chairman of the ECl Board
of trustees.hancellor Howell and Mrs. Howell andharles Brown, riuht, chairman of the ECU
ieolog Department during a reception at the chancellors home. I he evenl was held for inductees ot
ihe newlj established geolog; honor society, Sifcma Gamma Epsilon, and members of the Geologj
Department and was h(�sted b the Ho wells and the ECU Council of Honor societies. Friedman, na-
tional president of Mtma Gamma Epsilon, initiated members into the honor societs during
ceremonies held earlier on the ECL campus. He is from I ro and Brooklyn, V.
Read The Classifieds
rU ELIZABETH PAGE
Staff Vkrtljr
Professors from the
psycholog) . philosoph) .
sociology and history depart-
ments met last Thursday to
discuss issues concerning the
dilemma arising from the
Palestinian-Israeli conflict.
The International Student
Association (ISA) sponsored
event brought together Phillip
�dler from the department of
history, Sandra Wurth-Hough
m the department oi political
science, Buford Rhea from the
department o sociology and
lohn Ko Jr. from the depart-
ment of philosophy. Student
Government President David
Brown moderated the event.
ISA President Naresh Tolani
said he hoped a better understan-
ding between foreign and
American students could result
m such discussions. "The
puropse of the ISA is to promote
an exchange � cultural and
political ideas among American
and foreign students, "said
j lolam. Discussions such as this
will do just ilia'
"It's hoped that a better
Palestinian-Irsaeli conflici can be
reached this evening aid SGA
President David Brownand
that tears and misconceptions
could be cleared up
�dler viewed the problem from
a historical perspective and show-
ed the heavy influence history has
played on the problem. Accor
ding to lder, the search tor the
Jewish homeland and Zionism
play an important rule in the
'aiest i
nian-lraeli conflict.
Political scientist Wurth-
Hough, however, blamed the
conflici on the lack of political
independence, which she called a
"shot-gun approach The lack
ol political independence,
"would cause an intensification
ol v iolence she said.
Afterward, the ISA asKed ea
member ol the panel to explore a
particular topic.
I ash speaker then had 20
minutes to discuss his or her
topic. Alter each member of the
panel spoke, an open discussion
began, and the audience asked
questions.
One student who attended the
� rum but who preferred to re-
main annonymous said this
forum was a wonderful oppor-
tunity for American students as
well as foreign students to get a
better grasp on the dilemma ris-
ing from the Palestinian-Israeli
conflict
� A o
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Carolina East Centre
Off Highway 11
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Phone 756 6401
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Wednesday Night
THE LADIES ZOO AND LOCKOUT
Ladies Only 8 p.m.�10 p.m.
Guys admitted at 10 p.m.
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The BostoniansWed Dec. 4
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Rear WindowFri. &Sai.
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VertigoFri. & Sat.
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LATE SHOW: WoodstockFri. & Sat.
11:30 p.m.
The Spirit of the BeehiveDec. 11
8:00 p.m
Return of the JediDec. 12, 13, 14
Production Committee:7:00 & 9:30 p.m.
Christmas Tree Trimming PartyTuesday, Dec. 3
4:00 p.mStudent Lounge
Madrigal DinnersDec. 4-7
7:00 p.m.
Travel Committee:
"Dutch West Indies"Dec. 5
with Clint Derm8:00 p.m.
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KIM NOVAK.
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S
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2tye Eaat (Karnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, am,
Jay Stone, famagttanot
MlKELUDWICK TOMLUVENDER
ScottCooper. Anthony Martin. fl
John Shannon. � John Peterson , M
Lorin PASQUAl. . �. �� Shannon Short
DeChanile Johnson. � D,BH11 Slt VI Ns v
December 3, 19$
OPINION
Page 4
Peace Corps
Agency Keeps Idealism A live
In the minds of many the Peace
Corps has become synonomous
with volunteerism and John F. Ken-
nedy. That is because the Peace
Corps originally grew out of a 1960
campaign promise made by Ken-
nedy and a challenge which he ex-
tended to students at the University
of Michigan. Since then it has
grown to encompass nearly 6,000
volunteers serving in sixty-one
countries. And it has continued to
grow, even in the face of the
Reagan administration's efforts to
reduce appropriations. Congres-
sional support has even enabled the
agency to increase the number of
countries in which volunteers serve,
though the 10,000 volunteers which
the Peace Corps now has still falls
short of the 15,000 in service in the
mid-1960s. All things considered,
on its twenty-fifth anniversary, the
Peace Corps appears to have earned
itself a permanent niche in
American government.
Yet, one has to wonder how this
has been acheived given the
criticism that the agency has faced
since its inception. Advancing a
left-wing critique, author Marshall
Windmiller argued in his book The
Peace Corps And Pax Americana
that the Peace Corps program is lit-
tle more than window dressing for
the projection of American power
abroad. In other words, the Peace
Corps doesn't really do anything
substantial to solve the problems
that it was created to address. It
simply legitimizes the projection of
U.S. power overseas. Later, in a
1984 report, The Peace Corps: Out
of Step With Reagan, The Heritage
Foundation alleged that in the
1960s and 1970s "the Peace Corps
became a haven for those opposed
to American foreign policy" and
that the agency has continued this
tradition into the present. It was,
therefore, partially in response to
such claims, that Harris Wofford, a
former associate director of the
Peace Corps, authored an article
for The Nation magazine.
Wofford points out, among
other things, that it has been Loret
Miller Ruppe, Reagan's appointee
as director who has presided over
many of the recent policy decisions
that The Heritage Foundation was
critical of. According to Wofford,
Ruppe has turned out to be one of
the "most effective and devoted
heads the agency has ever had
though it is doubtful that such'a
turn of events is what Reagan in-
tended when he appointed her.
Wofford responds to left-wing
critics who claim that the Peace
Corps is just camaflauge for ag-
gressive U.S. power politics abroad
by pointing to the returned
volunteers and former Peace Corps
Staff members who have acquired
political influence. lor example.
Christopher I) odd and !a
Rockefeller are among the former
Peace Corps volunteers who are
serving in Congress. Paul rsongas
was the first volunteer to be elected
to the U.S. Senate. The point is,
Wofford seems to say, not so much
that volunteers can actually have a
large-scale impact upon hunger,
poverty or disease in even one coun-
try. The agency is still too small and
underfunded for that. The real
point is that volunteers are exposed
to the realities of conditions m the
Third world and they may, in turn,
have an influence on U.S. policy
once they have returned home and
become active in politics. For exam-
ple, a special committee ol returned
volunteers based in Washington.
D.C. published a report on U.S.
policy in Central America that was
highly critical of Reagan's military
approach in the region. Also, the
National Council of Returned
Peace Corps Volunteers has started
programs in several high schools to
teach students about the problems
of Third World development. Still
other ex-volunteers who are profes-
sional journalists are planning to
launch a magazine, tentatively be-
ing called Third World.
Taken together, these efforts are
illustrative of what Wofford
believes is the Peace Corps" most
vital contribution to the work of
improving conditions in the Third
World. The agency, he claims, of-
fers volunteers an opportunity to
learn first-hand what life is like and
what the policies of governments
are in underdeveloped countries.
This, he concludes, cannot help but
have an impact on politics in the
U.S. when the volunteers return
home.
uronWG&ww&&crt&o o&Ufv&M
Campus Forum
The Armed Forces Kill People
The Armed Forces. im high Be
al that you can be. Get training,
education, financial aid foi college,
comradery. s brighi an alterna
as American society has ffei her
yot �ay.
The Armed orces spend
on dollars a year, making sure
tl ese and other promises saturate the
senses and lives ol the young people
! h ii stance, tl � high
� idem and ir
d college, the military offe
pa for y njr educa
qualified foi college, tl (Of-
fers you "advanced
ron
ei is �
pleted. It also gives a fee
� c.ivie: ;�. discipl
ia :
ige, lsi as
tpones an) ma d ns.
esc are son e ol the promises
made by the rmed Forces. I hey are
seduction techniques that effectively
confuse the Ai public about
the nature of 1 urse
the military does . money for
education. But does it really te
people to he leaders.1 Does i
guarantee c: ; I � � � aftet
disc! arge '
I nfortunately, theanswei seems
be overwhelmingly "no Foi exam
pie. in The Wall Street JournaI(Oc
9,1985), it was reported that "n
veterans find military jobs no road
civilian success Most ol the skilled
service jobs are done by outside con-
tractors because it's too expensive to
train the constant flow of recruits for
anything requiring complex skills.
The next question is, of course,
about the true nature of the military
if it is not for advanced, highly skilled
education and training. The mam
purpose of the Armed Forces is to
prepare the country for war � to
teach people how to kill. Period. Any
other "purpose" is secondary to this
main goal. This aspect of the armed
service experience isn't even discussed
during the recruitment process. Con-
sequently, the militarization that
dents will undergo is
cured by these secondary purposes
I ei . (such as educational
and employment oppor-
tunities).
is problem is symptomatic ol a
blem much larger in scope: our
ght of the real pur-
' the rmed 1 orces. 1 he
mtry gearing up for
� interventionist war is going
almost completely unrecognized by
� iblic I vidence of this
a up" process can be seen
n the recent escalation of
ment procedures in high
he re-enstatemei
tration tor the dr.i"
r is an especiall � en-
' the country's gearing up
at rhe argument for advai
ition is that it saves tune in
case emergency. It I
to say that it only saves two weeks'
Reagan himself said in 1980 that "ad
vanced registration will do Imle to
our military preparedness
The only real use of the draft is "tor a
:ted conventional war that
lacks enough popular support to at-
tract volunteers" like Vietnam or
even like Central America.
Out government is trying to gain
support in the event of a war in Cen-
merica bv saving that we are
trying to defend the U.S. from Soviet
domination and the domino effect.
W hat they don't tell us is how futile a
war with Central America would be.
We would be fighting to keep the
ets out of our sphere of in-
fluence, according to our govern-
ment. If this were the case, then it is
truly a valid and important thing to
do.
But unfortunately, what our
government is doing is fighting to
keep governments that are sym-
pathetic to the U.S. in power, no mat-
ter how they are treating their
citizens. These citizens, however, are
fighting to eat and to feed their kids.
There is no way that the U.S. can win
a war against these people, unless
they completely annihilate tl
Why then keep u
' nisi :
The bottom line
register with Selective -
uldn't I?" There a
answers here. It you rej
in effect, putt
it a
complete undei
with vour life 11
you are breaking the la a j
u are breal law
� you a r�g wat
Therefore, before deciding to
regis the draft, or even enlisting
in the Armed 1 k beyond the
sedu.tr niques and ancj
he aware of the underlying meaning
n s.
Susai Hay
al College
More Arms Talks
In respoi my lettei
Novembet 14 M I mas F. (
Ion visualize ;va summit as a
dinner
Soviets bring a U.S
would bring ai ;
I rather like the
elephant into the p 1 hastei
assure y'all 1)a1 I
something more mul :om-
prehensive test ban tl
ottered would have been satisfa
though if I'd had my druthers I'd
have had our President bring a little
more � maybe a bunch of parsley as
well as a rabbit.
It irks me to see our nation, l
has been dedicated to democracy for
centuries, expected to do no be
than a nation that was feudal in the
lifetimes of main Americans alive
day. We should be able to do better
than that!
Eidith Webber
Greenville Resident
College Democrats Blast Republican Record
By ROBERT E. BELL III
Once upon a time, there was a king.
His name was Louis XIV, and he ruled
over a vast and great land, France. The
reign of the "Sun King" was known for
its elegance and glory. France would
prosper for a short period, but short-
sighted policies in both economic and
foreign affairs enacted in Louis' reign
would bring these gains to an end.
There were those who attempted to
warn him. Colbert, his minister, would
warn Louis of an ever-growing deficit as
well as other policies, but Louis would
choose not to listen. France's prosperi-
ty, it was thought, would last forever.
The truth would come later when
France would fall into turmoil, the
decendents of Louis would face the
guillotine for past errors.
We of the College Democrats are try-
ing to call attention to a similar situa-
tion in a different time. He has been
called the "Teflon President the
"Great Communicator" and the leader
of the "Reagan Revolution He and
his party would have the American peo-
ple believe that the country is in good
shape. Slogans such as "America is
back "America is safer than at any
other time in her history and "Big
government has been made smaller" are
often heard. We put forth a question to
you, the voter: "Is this true?" Are the
Republicans really living up to their
promises? The answer to this question is
an important one, for it precedes the
coming of a new election in 1986. In
that election, the American people will
be asked to accept the short-sighted
policies of the Republican Party or
think of the future of America.
On a national level, the Republican
Party's claims have not measured up.
The Republicans would have the
American people believe that the nation
is safe and at peace. The opposite is
true. The Union of Concerned Scientists
have moved their "Atomic Clock" (an
imaginary device, which supposedly
measures how long it will be before we
are likely to see a nuclear war) closer to
doomsday. The policies of the Reagan
Administration were the primary cause
for the UCS's pessimistic forecast. Con-
cern has also come from the organiza-
tion over the president's Star Wars pro-
posal. In their book, The Fallacy of Star
Wars the group explained the danger of
placing faith in such a system: l) It
could not work because it would have to
be 100 percent effective and 2) It would
make future negotiations with the
Soviets even more difficult. Both of
these arguments have been proven cor-
rect in the past six months.
The Republicans would have the
American people believe that the size of
the government has been reduced. This
again is not true. Remember these
statements?
"Last night I signed a bill that raised
the debt ceiling to more than $l trillion
The SI trillion debt figure can stand
as a monument to the policies of the
past that brought it about � policies
that as of today are reversed Presi-
dent Reagan, October l, 1981
"People don't want delay and
demagoguery. They want action to
reduce the burden of that terrible
trillion-dollar debt on their children and
grandchildren, and it's up to us to pro-
vide it President Reagan, October 11,
1982
I have a personal dream that I
will see the day when we begin to
make payments to reduce the national
debt We must not saddle our children
with the debt of their parents Presi-
dent Reagan, January 19, 1983
The national debt is now estimated to
be over 2 trillion dollars and is expected
to continue rising.
On the issue of human rights, the
Republicans have again fallen short.
Their support for the "contras" in Cen-
tral America has led to the deaths of
thousands of innocent civilians, and the
decision to let the CIA mine the
Nicaraguan harbor was, not only a
violation of the "War Powers Act but
it damaged the reputation of the United
States around the world since the World
Court ruled the act a violation of inter-
national law.
The move spearheaded by the
Republican-controlled Senate to give
$10 million in military aid to Guatemala
has also hurt human rights efforts.
Guatemala is recognized by everv
reputable human rights organization,
including Amnesty International, as
having the worst human rights record in
Central America. Its record on human
rights was and is so bad, in fact, that the
Carter Administration cut off all
military aid to that country.
Even Reagan continued that prohibi-
tion until recently. But now the United
States is rescinding its prohibition
against military aid to Guatemala � not
because of any substantial improvement
in the human rights record there � but
because the United States hopes to use
the Guatemalan government to put ad-
ditional military pressure on the San-
dinista government in Nicaragua.
In North Carolina, the Republican
record is not much better. In the face of
growing moral outrage at the
discrimination and violence suffered by
blacks in South Africa, the U.S. House
voted overwhelmingly to pass a bill call-
ing for economic sanctions to pressure
the South African government into
granting greater rights and freedoms to
the majority of its citizens. Every single
North Carolina Republican voted
against the bill. (June 5, 1985, CQ 130)
With more than 100 North Carolina
communities under building moratoria
for lack of water and sewage facilities,
and many sources of drinking water
threatened by underground pollution,
every single North Carolina Republican
voted against the Clean Water Act,
which helps prevent water pollution and
provides federal help to communities
with sewage treatment needs. (Julv 23
1985 CQ 226)
As for the economy. North Carolina
Republicans have continued tl
Party's tradition. Examples are
numerous. Twenty-nine counties in
western North Carolina have increased
growth and reduced poverty through
the Appalachian Regional Commission
In 1981, Congressmen Broyhili, Hen-
don, and Martin voted for a budget that
called for shutting down the ARC.
(June 26. 1981, CQ 102) Bill Cobev
acted in the same manner. In 1985,
Cobey was one of only 12 congressmen
to vote against the National Develop-
ment Investment Act. This bill is
especially important to North Carolina
because it includes funds for the Ap-
palachian Regional Commission, which
has brought roads and jobs to western
North Carolina. (July 24. 1985, CO
231)
Perhaps after reviewing the facts
presented above you will conclude that,
not only are the Republicans not
"America's party as they have claim-
ed, but they are not your party. If you
do, then attend the next meeting of the
College Democrats. Meetir s are held
every Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center. Ask at the
lobby desk for our room number.
' �
Anti-A
.
HEALTH'
column!
The Health
student s qm
about health relax
Anyone who he
would like
cern the:
clarified, sen a
concern to the
The bast Car
lions Building. TCI
W ha! is u hanyi

fat j
Same people will
symptoms
I
others may
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i





I HI AM AROl INIAN
DM I MHI R 3
People
More rms 1 alks
i Record
23,
i na
eir
.ire
in
� I ed
ugh
�mmission.
I, Hen-
Igel that
the H C
�- CQ 102) Bill (obey
manner, In 1985,
ngressmen
al Develop-
hill is
� lorth Carolina
ludes funds for the Ap-
. which
- � roads and jobs to western
24. 1985, CQ
Perhaps after reviewing the facts
presented above you will conclude that,
nlv are the Republicans not
vienca's party as they have claim-
but they are not your party. If you
then attend the next meeting of the
liege Democrats Meetings are held
every Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center. Ask at the
lobby desk for our room number.
Anti-Aparthied Protests May Be Changing
�l
(CPS) Administrators1 rea
tion to campus anti-apartheid
protestors � until now usual h
mild, cooperative and even sm
pathetic � ma) be changing
taster than campus police
thought.
While a numbei ol schools like
Cornell, Harvard, Missouri and
Illinois in recent weeks have
resuscitated "get tough" policies
they haven't used since the
massive campus disruption oi
the Vietnam Wat era, most ac-
tivists and campus police
nationwide agreed the tenor of
confrontation was generally
mellow.
vw some critics charge the
National Association liege
and University Attorneys met in
Septembei to figure oui hs
stifle campus dissent.
The meeting's organizer,
however, maintains the
ticipants discussed how indie
campus demonstratioi
keep them from c-
tng.
Attendees discussed applying
Supreme Court rules to restrict
the size of demonstrations, col-
lecting evidence with videotape
foi com! proceedings, and when
to refei cases to the district al
torney
Claiming such discussions are
"routine (. laire Guthrie, who
organized the meeting foi
NACUA, contends the meeting's
purpose was "education, not ad
vocacy
Some observers don'l agree.
"NACUA is just using
euphemisms foi squashing pro-
test says Cecilia Ham. vice
preside of the United Slates
Student Association. "The (ses
sions) were full of a lot ot self-
help gossip about "how we did it
oui campus
Ham. who observed th
torneys' sessions with a handful
ol oth � . d stuck'
MOW
k people �
HEALTH;
coivn
How can I �et rid of a hangner?
V
The Health Column answers
student's questions and concerns
about health related problems.
Anyone who has a question they
would like answered, or a con-
cern they would tike to have
clarified, send your question or
concern to the Health Column,
The hast Carolinian, Publica-
tions Building, �CL .
hat is a hanyoxer?
� a
thin ;o excessi - - di

ma foil � i
Som
i .
thirst, nausea,
fatigue, depression and anxu �
Some people wni uasc these
symptoms after drinking relative-
ly small amounts of alcol
others may noi be
alter drink

ot black - '
Mrt egj
In
tre best
iev e
es
I as
"Some of them, who had been
protestors in the '60s, were even
culling down students tor not
knowing the light way to protest
and tor not being good at civil
disobedience, like they were
Ham recalls.
"But if students are protesting
wrong, how come it's so effective
and that they (the attorneys) are
so scared
Guthrie maintains the meeting
wasn't a response to ad-
ministrators' tear or anger ovei
the growing anti-apartheid move-
ment .
She says most of the meeting's
sessions dealt with other
divestiture issues and that only
the last two sessions included talk
about campus disturbances.
Moreover, only 40 of the 100
people at the sessions were
lawyers, Guthrie adds.
At least one participant,
however, feels campus tension is
gi owing.
king such as cheese or
peanut food helps slow the ah-
n of alcohol into the
bloodstream.
� drink when you're relaxed.
� ious.
� pay attention to yout "espouses
to the alcohol so you don drink
much.
"The demonstrations haven't
drawn massive amounts ot peo-
ple yet, but the people who turn
out are fairl) confrontational
sas Michael Smith, attorney tor
the University of California
Davis. "Some are cooperative,
and some aren't "
" I here are unique prohler
arresl now. Students use take
names, like Steven or Stepha
B i tint during the '
students weren't reluctani
I i es Smith po,
l acl

.
How can 1 keep from getting
hangovers when 1 know I'll he
drinkinu during the holidays?
I r i n 1
slow !
1
rj
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HI b ASTR01 IN1AN in c t MM K . 8!
�f Liber
K'PS) ,v ura.s in cademia,
:iuil watchdog group
ting foi "liberal"
is tali, has
imes and, accoi
appl pressure
icm in i!
fessi �� �,
I ac-
Vnona State political
Mai k Readei of us-
espouse his
Aeaponrj
sent a lettei com-
Readei to the
Mai
iv I will be
"monitors" ,us
students who inform
ai the perceive as
teat hers have alreach
in the names
strut i
in Septembei
"I would ass -
numbei (ot tht
valid Scull says
N i fai. Sl has stood I
Reader, the lone pr I
Mc .
Rea
H'
. KXJ people
N �es to name
s 1A will
e has
tlar Kara
I niversitx
�m.
hei e a r e
" essor s w or kin g
� da.
as s 1
Greenville
Club Needs
Permit
( ontinued I-rum Page 1.
I
We
i
ol
aid ;

� ' tb, the
. m il n
receive a
"We'll have
- as simple a
� r t u na
I �
Professor's
Body Found
( ontinued From Page ,
for con ment, .is he
� day, said the
i found, and the
e itieation.
Brown
presidei
" I1

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us
Hunt
I HI I AM . AKOl MAN
DE l-MBl-K 3, 1985
Liberal P r ofessors Targeted
ive told
ling to
id pro-
talk
anymore,
sat ion to
ees with
ai gel)
class

. f'atfr
� � �
N
( ontinued From Pajje 6.
"He deotes his whole class to
the nuclear issue Scully says.
"If you call a course one thing,
wu should not teach sometti
entirely different
'The charges are false"
Reader says. "What's so loveh
us that) 1 hae so much docum
tation. It will show thai the)
inaccurate
An anonymous I monitoi
contends Oakland Universit)
Prof. Karasch presents i
"leftist" viewpoint ab
America in her classes
Scully refuses to elaborai
the Karasch case, and Karas�
did not return phone calls to (
lege Press Service.
Scully sas Al A looks
monitors' reports bel
"reviewing" professoi -
newsletter.
But AlA's investigations and
professors' confidence that their
schools will support them haven't
muted the alarm in the academic
community.
"1 have never had the volume
ol iespouses to an) issue as this
It's of great concern
itsk) says.
implications of what AiA
to do worry Reader.
'It's absolutely fi ightening
"One step leads to another.
M started b labeling
pie communists, but then
some of them lost their jobs
Davis administrator Hill An-
taiamian observes.
1 his is w hai was done in Nazi
(iei Students did this for
Hitlei when he was getting
taramian adds.
tends l Vs objective
ik 11 ee and open
in lews of leftist pro-
Sl Reader attributes the ef-
Winter Weather
Week Begins In N. C.
fort to what he sees as AlA's un-
willingness to allow free and open
debate.
"Most political thinking (to-
day) is being cast against the
possibility of extinction of the
human race he says. "These
people don't want to think about
the extinction possibility
But Scully asserts it's the pro-
fessors who aren't thinking.
"They (professors) have led an
insular existence. A word oi
criticism to them represents cen-
sorship Scully observes.
"When you have an ideological
fever swamp, a little chill might
do them some good
Schools don't see criticism of
conservative academics as censor-
ship, he asserts, noting the case
oi Stanford anthropology grad
student Steven Mosher, whom
the university dismissed after he
reported stones of alleged forced
abortions in China.
"Why do professors talk about
unlimited freedom and Mosher
does not get it? He (Mosher) of-
fended their progressive sen-
sibilities Scully maintains.
Stanford dropped Mosher
from a doctoral program in 1983
after a panel of faculty and
members determined that Mosher
had "endangered the subects of
his research" by reporting the
alleged abortion scandal, a
serious example of "ethical
misconduct
Mosher himself charges Stan-
ford failed to treat testimony
from his former wife about his
"misconduct" in China as
charges from "a scorned
woman
"Nobody expects professors to
be bias-free Scully says, but he
wants them not to abuse the spirit
of academic freedom by ad-
vocating their views in class.
Winter Weather Awareness
Week began yesterday in North
Carolina, and officials of the Na
tioi al Weather Service and the
N.C. Division ol Emergency
Management are encouraging
people to prepare for winter eai
ly.
Keys to surviving a wink-
storm or extreme cold are know
ing how serious the situation can
be, knowing what to do and hav-
ing the proper emergency sup
plies available in the car or home.
During the record-breaking
cold of last January, tor exam
pie, 14 people in North Carolina
died ol hypothermia, as lows
ranged from minus 5 degrees in
the east to minus 34 al Mounl
Mitchell.
Hypothermia, an abnormally
low internal body temperature
resulting from exposure to cold,
is caused when the body loses
heat taster than it can be replac
ed.
I� guard against hypothermia,
homes should be adequate
heated and insulated, and people
should be dressed warmly dui
the day and night. Several layers
1 lighter clothing or blankets are
warmer than a single heavv layer.
Officials urge people to stock
up on food, fuel and first aid sup-
plies and to service their vehicles
before cold weather hits
Foods that should be bough I
include items such as peanut but
ter and raisins that can be turned
into energy quickly by the bodv
and items that can be prepared
without cooking, in case power is
lost.
It heal is losl during a powei
outage, officials say to huddle in
one room to stav warm. To keep
pipes from freezing, wrap
them in insulation and leave
faucets dripping slowly.
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THE EAST C'AROI INIAN
Entertainment
Dl ' I MHf H 3, JS�Hf
Pai�-M
A Seasoned Fan
Looks At Leno
B MATTHEW A.Gil I is
Jay Lena
( omedian Jaj Leno communicated his special wa oi looking at things to a full house at Hendrix
Monday.
last
Sl�ff Wnin
I here was an aii ol anticipa-
tion as people filed into Hendrix
Theatre last Monday nighl
crowd was somewhat rowdy, but
not too much to wonder just
what kind oi show they would be
getting. After all, the figured.
they had seen him during on
his doen or so appea
David 1 etterman's I w.
and he had I ust as funny
person. What they would
find out was thai Jay 1 en was as
funny as they hoped- in fact.
e en funnier.
lay I ;
edv business
making appearances
puses and
aci �� � � . a
tele
L e 11 e r m a
I ei.
irp w it, I
mosi ever.
periei
news I
events ,
-

Davidson r-shirt, proceeded to
win the crowd over with a tew
lessons in current affairs. The
President and his wife were
among the first targets, with
1 eno complaining about the
press' constant coverage of the
President's recent illnesses
"Why do thev have to keep br-
inging up all that disgusting in-
formation?" he asked
I ater on, 1 eno got into a wide
pics, such as
? ies ("In the old Javs, .
knew that a soft cookie m
' it was fresh Now they've
found a way to make stale
cookies), toxic shock syndrome
She died from that toxic sh
stuff), current movies ("Sly
e's back with another
Rocky movie�now he's getting
serious i �,
- ' ' Kinston ("I �
' sc ��ie flij
maj they have on � e
'her "i
� ��
1 a
wall � v stage ai
i
i
g pa
�� : end.
in worked
the audience had already been
well-prepared bv sitting through
1 eno's first hour of quips
wisecracks, which proved to be a
better heard in person than on
TV I he audience that night was
able to laugh at them; dong
with I eno, and they show
delight b playing a
went one-on-one with them
Some'ne might have later ap
proached I eno and said. "V
are you�a wise guv ?" In
would've
But Jay Lei he a
funny man. especial
see hin
I hi; pas: Mond
Hendrix, 'lie crowd tl
show tour: :
i
I en
-ing
him a dozei :eM.
in per- i lot
In fact ght im-
the caliber ol I eno - may
eno
hardened armchaii bserver I
check out the real thing � .
con . .
dience may be an eye-opening
perience to the n ,
of the comedic experience.
Shoplifters Beware This Buying Season
(UP1) tmas seas n
and trees
bells, the . ;
and shoplil
e percent of every
occurs betw
and New Yea
Day. Retailei
: E , I .
I ' -
' ' bat the pi
. developed
ttic ol Boca Rai
t � a thin plastic label that
- to nearly any
: will set ofl alarms if a
customer tries to leave before
has been deactivated.
Brad Kane, Sensormatic pro-
ager, said shoplifting
�- at Christmas because of in-
. traffic in stores and the
greed Chris i i sometin
spires.
ippers go into a store
very frustrated because they
can't buy everything they see
Kane said. "Christmas
aniplifies the feeling
iplifting costs American
lers $25 billion a yeai
devices
M
"77u
customer is the avera
shoplift i
ime way
i
me:
I
But tl e new
.
wide and 2
long
that can be
' ' ' ipes, auto par's
ns on which the
would be ini-
e pi
lead vated bv a
i cashier. If
I e, alarms hid-
mats or
; ing when the
Out ol the store.
ype ol protec
if jiiis! shoplifting competes
her high tech and not-so-
techniques, whose
ails to provide
st-effective method of
' j consumer crime.
. roven effective
Is include the inside-
r, through which a
hoplifter must be per:
let out (especially suc-
cessful in small stores with only
endant), and the
automatic video camera, which
deters shoplifters through in-
timidation.
man. was founded in
� a: ()hio super-
i lagei ��ustrated after
ased a shoplifter out of his
e. It now d
market, Kai
V- )U 75 i 30
the
Stai

: - I o-
n Buen s ires to
la 1 am;
el iystem already
d by several majoi di ig
tins, department stores
record shops, but Kane �aid
not limited to large reta:
"What it can allow 1
P -� is concentrate on their
'ather than wa g people
in the store Kane sa
Letterman Book Disappoints
(t I'll rhe write
Sight with David 11 � are
renowned in I V land I
fresh approach 1 1 .
Hlstlv so.
thei show would dress
host in a S ei.ro suii and I
him tiirow himself aga
Velcro wall? Or have as gu
people from all over the coui
who have taught their dogs, cats
and buffalo to perform tricks the
animals would never have learned
in nature
The innovativeness does not,
unfortunately, extend to the
book, Late Sight Huh David
Letterman, edited bv Merrill
Markoe.
Strangely enough, the fa
the letterman show will be the
most disappointed by the book
It's simply a rehash ol jokes and
is which have been presented
during the program's almost
' year run, with the only new
and funny items being short
essay 5 from the staff.
1' e jokes are accompanied bv
photographs from the episodes in
which they appeared. For exam-
ple. "I levator Etiquette" is a
series o 10 photographs from the
on-location sketch that originally
appeared on the show.
I he same dialogue viewers saw
is placed either in captions below
the pictures or in little balloons
coming out oi the mouths oi peo-
ple m the picture. The black and
Wind Ensemble
To Perform
white photographs themselves,
like most in the book, appear to
have been taken ofl a :e!ev
screen and are of very poor quaii-
�v
The best artwork are the draw-
ings that accompany chapters
such as "Frank and Fred" and
"The World o the Future" in a
color section of the book.
The jokes were funny the first
time around, and are funny in
reruns. But something about see-
ing them on paper, without the
pauses and eyebrow-raises oi I el
terman in action, kills the joke.
It's not the writers' fault. Their
stories and essays m the middle of
Please see DAVID, page 9
lillllllllllllllllllllllimilllliiiiiiiiiilliiiiiiiiiniiillHIIII
Students, faculty, stafl and
their families are invited to attend
the annual Christmas concert
presented by the ECU Symphonic
Wind Ensemble and sponsored
by the Friends of the School of
Music The concert, which is free
and open to the public, will be in
Memorial Gym on Wednesday.
"for the benefit of children
who attend, this concert will
begin at 7:30 p.m. and will be
under an hour in length said
Herbert L. Carter, director of the
ensemble. "We have also plann-
ed a visit from St. Nick and au-
dience participation in the singing
of several familiar carols
Daphne Dunston, a senior of
the ECU School of Music, will be
soprano soloist with the ensemble
on "Gesu Bambino She is the
winner of numerous awards, in-
cluding the 1983-84 ECU Concer-
to Competition.
Eddie Lupton, a graduate
teaching assistant in the ECU
?ol ol Music and dirt
the 1l Jazz and Show Choir.
will sing "The Christmas Song
made populat by Mel I
Other familiar holiday music
will include "What Child Is
This conducted by music stu-
dent Louis Bean, themes from
"The Nutcracker Suite "Jingle
Bells" and "Sleigh Ride
brass choir directed bv graduate
assistant Scott Whitlev will per-
form "The Twelve Days of
Christmas" as well.
According to Mrs. Nelson
C risp, president of the Friends oi
the ECU School ol Music, the
organization sponsors this pro-
gram as part of its desire to be a
liason between the School of
Music and the community. The
Friends are also committed to
raising scholarship funds for
music students; currently 30 ECU
students hold Friends of Musk
Scholarships.
Rea
N A
New HemL
later
H
H(
Fry �lua.
at Greenville Sfores 0
it
ip

ii
1
0
II
Hooker HH
i
a m
R H V.nn hotjh. IB
10 ft t rr r rrrrrr-rrrrrirrr-rrrrrrrl
Herbert L. Carter Conducts The Rehearsing ECU Wind Ensembl
CLIF
Seafood House
Washington
Flounder
Popcorn Shrimp
Hours 4:30-9
NEWLY REi





THEfcAST CAROl IMAN
DIEMBER 3, 1985
d Fan
Leno

ng th
.
'
g11 was




c
ade it
both
lay


I eno

.com-
i be
"
.1
e-op
vei
Season
said
isappoints
selves,
- .

funn �
. see-
tlt. Their
mdd.
Please ee DAII), page 9
iitiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiitii
P
� � TONY UMLB Ff?n!iw!f5?
7irf Ensemble
Read The Family
NASTYMOuTH
EVERY TursdaY!
Doonesbury
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
I'

0KA1 THE BOYS
ANDME IS 6GNNA
TAKE A TVm BREAf
BUT DON'T 60 AWAy'
THUMW Jx.
r
T- COULD I NOT TO
HAVE SECONDS UW?1 TO
AND THIRDS LiOl THERE'S
UlTTH Ml FIRSTS. PLENTY
please?
50 10U THIW hON HEY THE
QEP HAS INCREASED STORIES
PRAMAlKAr IN I GOUU?
THE LAST FEW HL Ob
EARS AUCS fAARi
HEAR THAT'I
KNEWHUH6ER S
UJfiS ANECDOTAL ' J
c �' ' Y i I I m
- : -Cl . � �?�-�-�- m � -
. l
� �n
Fw,rd
URBAN HMF
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OKAY 11S MUSIC (UMONTANP
TIME ON "URBAN THE DUMP
OME COMPANION ' STEP DIVERS'
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bam aim ��"� : � 00)
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� :�
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1 GET NO KICK FRQV �'
1 CHAMPAGNE. SO
B6AT 1
V sect r �4vvj � t
WS5 � � �� OVAH
V. FUNNY VAu
eNTINB-
5K
15
M� NETUE'D
UK� TOP LAY
THE THEME FRO1
NEWS CENTEP4
7T 11RBAS HJ0MF F� $
TH ' UMPYV10N A
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' Fk I'Ra-VN H0M1
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��� v mfiTuFBFOR.
��V r. ��� Cv
� ieoiNQj -
MEANER UJHA1 � ' � �
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FOP WE 7 �
- �. ���-�.
JHAVi v
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IFRBANH'JMI r?f
COMPANION If �
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TCRZAM
Dave Letterman Transcribed
New Hemingway Biography Begun
Conlinued from pane 8
the book, as well a Markoe's
own at the beginning, bear all the
marks of the biarre humor that
has endeared Late Wight to thai
group oi television watchers who
have tired of The Tonight Shaw
ana
Sal trda Sight I ive
But those essays were written
tor the hook. The other jokes
were written for television and
there's just no wa) for a printed
page to replace the original
presentation of "Camping with
Barry White" or the beloved
ueekK "Viewer Mail
It you like the jokes that much
the first time, there are always
reruns and ideo tape. If you
missed them, then you n ight get
a laugh from the book�the first
time.
But remember, like Dave sas.
"C omed is a serious business
tatei
. hful
in the merit,
bulance driver. I here, he was
� and flailed by shrapnel, and
while recuperating, he mei nurse
jj nes von Kurowsky , eight yeai s
� senioi I heir love attair.
more intimate than some
reports indicate, according to lei
shrew
writing as well.
Five previously
short stones are in
arly, Gril I
HeminewaN 's attii
Griffin set out on lii s
task by contacting
way, the writer's
ibing plans foi a
: the num. She
At alth o material.
five toi ies, " The
Met "s "Tl e - h Heel's
' � issroads " I he
I "P the
H the raw material
novels sprang.
panicularly, we
ngway style
. ;� . se tences emi
thei
. nents, including letters
Hemingway wrote from Italy
. W orld W ai 1 and others to
ve fresh
inal and ar-
tistic developm
Hemingway was K- when he
weni to Italy as a Rod . ross am-
Kentucky Nuggets Combo
9 Piece Kentucky Nuggets
Kentucky Fries
e Drmk $2.89
frdvkufrUfakn.
at Greenville Stores Only
Locations:
600 W Greenville Blvd.
756-6434
2905 East F.fth St 752-5184
R�w H Vann Koighl
Hooker Memorial Christian Church
(Disciples of Chrtat)
1111 Gre�nvi�� Blvd. 756-2275
?
"In essentials, 'Unity
In non-essentials. tt.dom
In all things. -Lout.
Special Classes For College Students
9:45 am Christian Education (all ages)
11:00 a.m. Worship- Open Communion

i!

.

i!


-I
.
i:
� i
CLIFFS
Flounder
Popcorn Shrimp
$325
$325
Hours 4:30-9:30 MonSat.
- NEWLY REMODELED -
ters Griffii I, ended when
.mes announced she planned to
marry an Italian count. The mar-
riage never came about, but the
liason was over. Still, Hem-
ingway nevei forgol and made
her the model for Catherine m his
1929 novel, -1 Farewell fo Arms.
Along With Youth, named for
a Hemingway poem about leav-
marrying the first o four wives,
Hadly Richardson, and moving
to Pa. is, where he honed his
nt under the influence of Ezra
Pound and Gertrude Stein and
ing the past behind and moving began a climb to literary immor-
ahead, ends with Hemingway talitv.
STUDENT UNION
Seafood House and Oyster Bari
Washington Highway iN C 33 Ext Greenv.lle. North Carolina
Phone 752-3172
(Past RiverblufAptsj
Mendenhall Student Center � East Carolina University � Greenville. N.C. 27834-4353
" � ephone: 9 i 9 757-66 i I. Ext. 210
Dear Commuter Off-Campus Student and or Faculty Staff Member:
The Student Union o East Carolina University provides the students, faculty, staff, and members of
the community with many diverse, entertaining events. Dinner productions like the Uouisville Ballet
are just a small part of the entertainment provided. Speakers such as Larry Linville (Major Frank
Burns) of MASH can inform you, and comedians like Jay Leno can humor you. Musical
entertainment is provided by classical artists, jazz performers, and rock concerts such as HEART. We
also offer top-notch films on the big screen for freestill the cheapest "cheapest" date in town.
The Student Union has publicized all of these great opportunities, but we still hear "1 didn't know
anything about it This is your opportunity to let us hear from you. Just complete .he form below
and mail it to the address on the form, or drop the application off at the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student Center.
Upon you completion and our receipt of this form, you will be added to our mailing list. You will
receive THE ENTERTAINER at home, as well as livers concerning interesting upcoming programs in
your area(s). Armed with this knowledge, you will be one step ahead of everyone else in getting
tickets for the best in overall entertainment.
As our logo says, "We're Reaching Out To Serve You With your name on our mailing list, we will
be able to serve you better. Thank you for your support!
Sincerely,
The Public Relations and Publicity Committee
The Student Union
East Carolina University
YES!
I WANT TO BE ON THE STUDENT UNION'S MAILING LIST
NAME:
ADDRESS:
CITY:
.STATE.
.ZIP CODE.
I am very interested in: (Check as many as you wish)
.Theatre (Drama)
.Theatre (Musicals)
.Choral Music
.Dinner Theatre
.Lectures
.Children's Programs
.Dance (Modern)
.Classical Music
.Solo Instrumentalists
.Vocalists
.Madrigal Dinners
.Comedians
.Circuses
Ballet
Contemporary Music
Jazz
Travel-Adventure Films
Animal Shows
Turn in at the Central Ticket Office or, if you wish to fill out later, mail to: Student Union, 234 Mendenhall Student
Center, Fast Carolina University, Greenville, NC, 27834-4353





10
'I i I MHI K Wn
looiushur
BY GARRY TRUDEAU

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Man-G-Stiek BY JARRELL & JOHNSON
Walkin' The Plank
BY A. GUY
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BY BROOKS
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Overkill
ms.ANPAft&uuipmse
BY FRIEDRICH

ea - a -� t -ro
- � rH if. ijfts
r
Opens Friday, December 13th
At A Theatre Near You.
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Opens Wednesday, December 4th
At A Theatre Near You.
Alarie Lei
Blue Devi
Bv i ii h win R

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to
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ft
After last ears 87-63 loss to HilU K
ranked Ihike blasts K I 'in m t �m�
I





"1
HI i S1 l ROl INIAN
Sports
DECEMBER J. 191

SuccessFor Pirates?
.h
i irst year head coach Art Baker leads his squad in a practice session.
Alarie Leads Sixth-Ranked
Blue Devils To Triumph
By IIM llM)l IK
&
Hvs(()OOPKR
.1

iI
98 hh
Johnny Daw kins was second with
16. followed bv backcouri mate
Tommy Amaker, who had 10
Disk. ed quickly. gaining
a 14 4 ad � u tage early in tl firsi
ill I he P cut
the Du) nine(37-28) ith
o go in the 1 ma
4 I f
closes
made
me i
Devils a
ECU .
w as elad
I )ixon lay up. I his was the
E( I tvould come as Duke
t 10-2 uin in the last 2:2 ol
gi ing the Blue
e edge.
e Harrison
opportunity to
power such as
tor
(
J11! i
:en
-
their
Mat
ie
W
Wi
. � � the Blue
vard Mark
a game-high 2
ineton, D.C. native
play a national
Duke.
"It's always a great opportuni-
ty to play a team like Duke
Harrison said. "We knew we
would have a tough time coming
in here K ameron).
"1 felt that we played pretty
zood ball, hut they eventually
I .
mber 4th
You.
By SCOTT COOPER
&
DAVID McGINNESS
After the departure o former
Pirate head coach Ed Emory,
ECU once again finds itself on
the tail end of a losing season.
However, the Bucs have a
positive outlook on their future.
One key to a successful Pirate
football program will be first
year head coach Art Baker.
Baker is one of the most
respected coaches in collegiate
football today, both for his pro-
fessional coaching expertise and
his personal commitment to his
players, according to many
coaches around the nation.
Auburn head coach (and
former ECU head coach for four
years) Pat Dye praised Baker
highly.
"You can only see that kind oi
effort from a team that has the
greatest respect for its coach
Dye said. "If you give Art Baker
the time, he'll turn that program
around. East Carolina is in a
good location to recruit good
athletes who can run. I can see a
dream that I saw years ago � to
have (ECU) a good Southern In-
dependent power
Despite the Pirates 2-8 record
in 198 II has shown sigi
brilliance during tl
paign. After a big win ovei N (
State and Southwesl I
E I battled the '�
before dropping a P-10
Die Pirates' valiant but futile ef-
fort again Penn Stati
took the drive oul
have been a banner yeai
Perhaps inconsistei
the Pirate squad mosi I he Bucs'
inability to pass the hail has p
strain on their often und
attack. Accord r $
Baker, the team I
sistency, but not n
"V e 'save been in
Baker said "B
been good. The play
stuck togei
"We've only
poorly on I -�
added "But w
lose, weai
takes the plac
And a wm in the Pira
game would b
ing for the Buc .
Bah
"To win �
tant Baker explained
(ovet 1 si i w
impetus :
been mak it
and I see
young players)
However, ECU's days as a
power" may be in the distant,
r than the near future. One
factor inhibiting the Pirates is the
erne strength of the op-
ponents they face.
P iwers such as top-ranked
n State, Cotton Bowl-bound
iburn, Sugar Bowl contender
Miami and 14th ranked LSU (this
weekend) exemplify the level of
petition faced by the Pirates.
It j easier for the Pirates
in 1986. Road games at Penn
State, Auburn, Temple, South
( arolina and Miami, along with
me stands against West
Virginia, Southern Mississippi
and Georgia Southern, are
fierce competitors
� g E
Baker admitted that a lighter
edule would accelerate the
g tm's progress, but he
��ives he can make the best of
at I CU.
rebuilding of the Pirate
I I program will bean uphill
mb, but with the personnel and
iessed by Baker and his
ECU may see an explosive
:re down the
id. Onlv time will tell.
Lady Bucs Top FMC
beat us up he added. "1 want
to build on the good things and
eliminate the bad
Duke continued their relentless
inside attack in the second halt.
as Alarie and a hosl of other Blue
Devils delivered goal atter goal.
Just over one minute into the
second period, senior co-captain
Scott Hardy went down with an
ankle injury, and did not return
to action, freshman guard Jefl
Kelly replaced Hardy and played
well, according to Harrison.
"Jeff Kelly came in and showed a
lot of poise in leading the team as
a young kid he said.
for the game, the Blue Devils
grabbed 38 rebounds, while ECU
snagged onlv 23.
Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski
felt that the Pirates played well
despite their youth. "They are a
young team, and they have a
good program to build on
Krzyzewski said. "They try to get
good student athletes
leading the Pirates, junior
center Leon Bass put in a career-
high 20 points, mostly coming
from within the lane area.
Sophomore guard Dixon added
11, and junior Keith Sledge had
seven.
With the win, Duke is 6-0 and
ranked at least fifth nationally
(rankings will be released today).
ECU, now 1-1, will be at home
for three straight contests. The
Pirates will battle Edinboro State
Wed Dec. 4, at 7:30 p.m. in
Minges Coliseum.
By TIMCHANIHTR
Sporti vni�f
The Lady Pirates, with the help
ot a cold shooting performance
by Francis Marion c ollege, won
their home opener in Minges Col-
iseum Saturday by a "5-65
margin.
Despite the Lady Pirate vic-
tory, ECU coach Emily Manw
ing was not pleased the the team's
performance.
"I was disgusted and em bat
rassed with out play Manwar-
mg said. "I wanted to get oul of
the gym
Manwaring was also not im-
pressed with the I ady Bucs'
defense. "We gave up easy
shots Manwaring commented.
"If they had made their shots,
they could have won bv 20
points
The Pirates did manage to out-
shoot their counterparts from the
field. ECU connected on 46.S
percent, while Francis Marion hit
just 34.5 from the floor.
Senior forward Lisa Squirewell
led all scorers with 22 points, and
her 15 rebounds and three steals
were tops in those departments as
well. Senior Sylvia Bragg came
off the bench and connected on
10 of 15 shots for 21 points.
Alma Bethea chipped in nine,
and Loraine Foster added six
points after grabbing seven re-
bounds.
The first half was fairly even,
as the score was knotted on seven
different occasions. The I dy
Pirates grabbed their first lead of
the game (12-11) on a Bragg free
throw with 10:25 left in the open-
ing period.
Francis Marion came back and
opened a five-point lead (29-24)
on a Pam Brock layup with 3:17
remaining until intermission,
however. ECU retaliated with
some outside shooting and took a
35-33 halftime lead on a Bragg
15-foot jump shot with :10 left in
the half.
In the second half. Traces
Tillman's two 5-foot jumpers put
Francis Marion back on top
(37-35) with 17:57 left to play.
ftei
pair oi
went on a s
With ECl
16:02

1 5-2
� �
!rcc a - �
Pirates a
id
Froi
: was never less than
h b 58-53) or more than a dozen
I to a "5-65
Tillman led Francis
Mai th 14 points and 10 re-
lice Creed added 12,
i .i Waldrop chipped in 10.
W � in, the Lady Pirates
. yeai and will battle
e State I niversity in
C , Dec. 6.
Lisa Squirewell (3I led
15, in the I.ady Pirates
Saturday evening.
J B HUMBERT The EaK Carolinian
all scorers with 22 points and rebounders with
75 65 triumph oer Francis Marion College on
Intramural Services Fitness Classes
After last year's 87-63 loss to Billy King and the Biue Devils, top-
ranked Duke blasts ECU 98-66 in Cameron Indoor Stadium.
By JEANNKITE ROTH
Sl�f( Whirr
The Department of
Intramural-Recreational Ser-
vices' Physical Fitness Program
will be offering drop-in aerobic-
fitness classes during exam week.
On December 9-12 classes will
be held from 4-5 pm and
5:15-6:15 pm in room 108
Memorial Gym. On December
16, two classes will be held at 4-5
pm and 5:15-6:15 pm. December
17 and 19 are the last days to
aerobicize at 5:15-6:15 pm. One
Advanced Toning class will be
held December 10 and 12 from
5:30-6:30 pm.
The intramural soccer season is
slowly winding down with all-
campus finals this week. Some
great individual performances
highlighted this year's action
along with outstanding team
play. The Renegades, in the
men's division, kicked for this
year's single game scoring record
with 12 goals. On the ladies'
field, the Lady Pirates also
scored 12 goals to make them the
top-game scorers.
Congratulations are in order to
Dave Henenlotter of Zeta Beta
Tau who scored four goals in one
game to take this year's top in-
dividual honor. Jackie Kirby of
the Umstead Jockettes knocked
in six goals for the ladies' in-
dividual high.
Upset could be the only word
used to describe this year's co-rec
flag football championship.
After scouting las am
pions. Third Regiment, Micaker
Sam once again placed then
the top of the polls But after a
shakev regular season, Sam mov-
ed the champs below the sensa-
tional Spoilers.
The All-campus championship
became a showdown between the
two top-ranked teams with most
oddsmakers betting on the
Spoilers. At the halt, however.
Third Regiment held the Spoilers
in a defensive struggle and both
remained scoreless. In the second
half, Third Regiment scored first
on a 10-yard pass from Phyllis
Willis to Don 'Slick Hands Terr
with 12 minutes remaining. The
Regiment once again showed
their championship stripes by
ring on a 35-yard touchdown
pass from Kevin Williams to
Melanie Ehling with 2:48 left in
the game
fhe Spoilers refused to throw
in the towel and scored by a
�iarrv Bishop interception.
However, Third Regiment sewed
the game up with their second TD
md the Spoilers were unable to
clinch the title or this year's
coveted T-shirt.
Need money? The Department
ol Intramural-Recreational Ser-
vices needs talented student ar-
tists for the spring semestei. Ap-
plications are being accepted
now. Please bring a portfolio of
work on your scheduled inter-
view. For more information, con-
tact JR. at 757-6387.
1





12
HI I M i Kv )l ll
IM I t MM K V 1J8
Sanchez Premier Soccer Player
World premier soccer plaer Hugo Sanchez watches action a recenl
( amel Worldup Soccer exhibition t:amt
1 os NGE1 s When they
saj the hand is quickei than the
eye, they're not talking about
Hugo Sanchez's hand. For San
chez, nc ol the premiei soccer
players in the world today, the
feel have it.
In fact, the things Sam hez can
do with Ins feet could almost
make hands obsolete. 1 or non-
soccei tans, imagine dribbling,
passing, kicking, and otherwise
maneuvering a 16-ounce, black
and-white ball through a horde oi
defensive players without evei us
ing youi hands Imagine dome it
w hile i unning.
Sanchez does it all ver well.
so well, in fact, thai the ver
mention ol his name elicits sighs
"��� women and cheers from
men who emulate his gait and
name then tits! born sons after
"N' � ec nd nature
tid i ecentU dut
tk a c amel World
Ke iew . a series ot
�red b
ties "M. ki!
a numt ei
Indeed they have San, hez has
ig soi cet since he
d. H ardh had a
iil iwo .Id
-

is to stand on them I hat's when
he sheds the mantle ol Sanchez
t he-soccer-player and dons the
� loak ol Sanchez the dentist.
"I am three separate and
distinct personalities: the profes-
sional soccer player, the dentist,
and the family man he said
"When I plav soccer, I am
nothing less than the total soccei
player. nd. when I practice den
listry at m clinic in Madrid, i am
a dentist, not a soccer playei
It was the soccer playei who
was very much in evidence thai
day as Sanchez, with his quit k
�Hid cunning feet, led the Mexican
national team to a 2-1 victory
overhile.
Although the amel
up Soccer Rev iew . fe i
tional teams from around the
world, will continue at the I
�ngeles Coliseum through this
month, it was the las! I ,S. per
formance foi Sanchez this yeai
Now, he and his team members
will complete their final train
in preparation tor -lie i
World c up Sociei hampi
ship in Mexico.
become the fit i M
play on a team in Spam He sign
ed that year will tico de
Madrid foi $125,000 1 arliei
ir, lie signed with Real Madrid
foi $1 8 million, one ol tl
gest amounts ever paid
player
"I don compare m.
Pele (considered b)
been the finest soccei playei
the world) said Sanchez "Pele
played in a different era wl
" were fewer top
players foda
fine playei
distinct stvli
sioi er has f;
in the I S is its la ,
i
"So � � he I
g JS it
tr4n
����
-�
tfj&&
�, AWUAcJcAMM
N t ne wi
pulai spori. is ni
i n
v
i s
I fie
never
Hug Sa
' I
mti
:

Born 2 . .m: -
so ;

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Greenville, N.C.
757-0327
All You Can Eat
SHRIMP
M;
$5
99
Includes French Fries, Coleslaw
and Hushpuppies
Offer Good Tues Wed Thur. Only
s
:

:
RlMl 'MRI R
ECl Hillel Hanuk-
kah and Latka party
Dec. 8 at Bonnie Kop-
pel's house. Good
rimes and good food
� it a promise! For
more information,
call Lisa at 752-8932.
42
s3
U


wgh
v� I
�r
SO
N.
J
j�
5Q
fto


?5
CO

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DUKEUNIVERSI





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in day
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IMF I AMAKOI !M
!K t MHI k 9. I9K
13
National Collegiate Sports Festival
H (
'It
d roN bih
al Col leg Sports
is man) as
I
�all.
tennis (male and female),
' (male and female), rugby,
running K (male and female),
sailing (co ed), cycling (male and
female), crew (co-ed), swimming
(male and female), tug-o-war,
ball (male au female).
basketball, ultimate frisbee (co-
Jackson Leads 1985
Heisman Balloting
N! V YORK (I
51st H will
I

. ision

351 attempts for 2,978 yards and
26 touchdowns. He finished third
ficiency under the
�. complex rating formula
d Jim Harbaugh o
M higan and Mike Shula o'
a. neither of whom is ex
pec ted to poll main votes
Perhaps the longest longshot
may come from Plymouth State
. Hampshire) running hack
I hidek, featured on
Sports Illustrated
2. 1985), was thrust into the
al spotlight when he broke
Pay ton's cai eer
rd of 66 (al
tnd the NA1A
set b Wilberi Mon-
(ai hilene Christian).
in I rophy has been
awa iali since 1935 to
ttion's outstanding college
er as voted b
member ol the media. There are
itei v l 50 in each
. pineal regions.
� rst winnei was lav Ber-
� e Universit) ol
ed). foosball, i heerleading (co-
ed), rollei speed skating (male
and female), and "rivial Pursuit
(co-ed).
rhe i estival will be held from
the weekend of Marcl the
weekend ol pti! 5-6. Events will
be held during the week from
am to 5 pm. No events will be
held Saturda) oi Sunday unless
inclement weather forces
rescheduling.
All students who are currently
enrolled in any college or univer-
sit) are eligible to :ompete. Var-
sity athletes are eligible only in
sports other than those wl
they are competing on a varsit)
level. Ml intramural participants
are eligible including club sports
(e.g. rugby, frisbee, soccer)
rhe N.( S.F. will be held in
Daytona Beach. Fla. Event sues
include the beach. Daytona Inter-
nal iwa, two of the
. st country clubs. In-
digo I ak s, Peli( an Ba). etc.
I he il! K ippi �xin :
$2Ci �. onies
aw : tnd
trai V innei s
weekl)
receive �� ne) in a
dition to the overall
A point system will reward the
top 50 schools with money ear-
marked tor their intramural
department and club sports. The
top school will also receive a
championship trophy and a
bonus award for its accomplish-
ment. I he N.C.S.F. will be
televised by an Orlando-based
iduction company (SP I V) and
will broadcast to cable companies
nationwide. The N.C.S.F. will
�vide an athletic alternative to
traditional Spring Break ac-
tivities, provide an outlet to more
than 400,000 students who vaca-
tion in Daytona Beach annually
during Spring Break, and provide
the mtramural and club athlete
with the opportunity to showcase
theii talents.
1 its! Annual N.C.S.l . will
hold weekly round-robin tour-
naments for all 20 events. (iroups
oi five teams or in-
dividuals will compete against
! 'our guaranteed com-
i. Winners of each group
then face each other in single
elimination pla), culminating in a
weekl) champion, fter the foui
weeks are ovei. the N.C.S.l . will
weekl) winners (expenses in-
ack to Daytona Beach
for a "HNAI FOUR" tourna
ment which will decide the Na-
tional Collegiate Champion tor
each event.
Registration for this National
Collegiate Sports Festival is
$15.00 per competitor, rwo
dollars of each registration tee is
retained by the intramural
department as our contribution
to help build the intramural club
sports program. With each
registration the student receives a
four-color custom T-shirt to wear
during competition (it
applicable), a map of Daytona
Beach, a U.S. map leading to
Daytona Beach, discount
coupons to Disne) World and
I P )T Centei. coupons tor sun-
products, jifts from our
sponsors, and social events tor
teams and their supporters durmg
their sta in Daytona Beach.
We see the opportunity to
develop a long term relationship
with the college athlete. This is
your school's opportunity to en-
JO) a sports event and to have fun
cheering fellow students ;n their
competition with hundreds of
colleges from across the country.
WBA Rules
Welterweight
Title Fight
I as VI GAS, Ne (UPI)
Donald urrv and Milton Mc-
Crory flipped coins Saturday to
determine the scheduled len
and other conditions oi their
welterweight title ion
fight.
Mc Tory won a coin tli;
picked 12 rounds as the scheduled
length oi the bout, while Curry
won the right to have the fight
leld under World B i
Association rules.
Under WBC rules pion-
ship bouts are scheduled for 12
rounds, while WBA and IB1 hold
15-round title tights.
The two boxers meet 1 rida) to
unify the 14" pound crown.
Earlier, McCror won a com flip
that allows him to enter the ring
last. The coin flips wen :
Bob Arum's idea to se
disputes and
bout.

- son performance, Bo Jackson leads a
leisman hopefuls.
ago. Last year's winnei was
. i lutie of Bosion College,
; quarterback to capture
the Heisman since Auburn's Pat
van in 1971. Most of the
rophy has gone to a
g hack The only non-
it were two wa)
: 1 arry Kelley o Yale in 1936
Hart ol Notre Dame in
4y No interior lineman or
defensive player has ever
Heisman.

Na-
f i na
:
duke
I IS ON
THE
MOVE!

hi

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Title
The East Carolinian, December 3, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.445
Location of Original
University Archives

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