The East Carolinian, November 26, 1985






�he
(Earnlmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 Notlf-36
Tuesday, November 26, 1985
Greenville, N.C
8 Pages
Circulation 12.000
College Presidents Rate Universities
ECU Ranks Top 10 In South
B l)()l (, KOHK.KSON
SUff V� nlrr
I ast Carolina University ranks
as one of the top It) comprehen-
sive institutions of higher learn-
ing in the southeastern United
States, according to aV Sews
A World Report survey.
EC! tied for seventh place
with Rollins College, a
prestigious Florida institution.
1 or theii poll,SNA WR ask-
ed chancellors of colleges and
universities to choose lie top five
Huh ell
undergraduate institutions in the
Southeast The chancellors pick-
ed the top schools from a list ol
institutions similar to their own
in size and academic offerings
In choosing the top five institu-
tions, the chancellors were asked
to considei factors such as
strength of curriculum, quality o
teaching, relationship between
faculty and students, and the at-
mosphere for learning at the
school.
ECU Chancelloi John Howell
told the ECU News Bureau.
"We've been telling people for
some time that ECU was a good
university. It's good to know that
recognition oi the institution ex-
tends beyond eastern North
ilina
ECl was the largest com-
prehensive institution among the
i considered in the southern
and border states. comprehen-
sive institution is one that grants
more than halt their bachelors
degrees in occupations such as
business, education, technology,
nursing, music and art.
The University of North
Carolina at Charlotte and Ap-
palachian State University also
ranked in the top 10 in the same
category. The University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill
ranked ninth in the national
university category.
Volpe
"In North Carolina, where
Chapel Hill has long been the
jewel in the crown, successful
restructuring o' the state univer-
sity system brings theharlotte
campus, hast Carolina and Ap-
palachian State to the
forefront stuted the article.
Vice Chancellor tor Academic
Affairs at ECU Angelo Volpe
said everyone at ECU can take-
pride in the survey results.
"Faculty, alumni and current
students deserve the credit �
we're all very pleased
According to Volpe, the survev
results are a recognition oi
ECU's commitment to a "firm"
general education foundation for
all students.
"Irrespective of the students
major, everyone at ECU has a
strong foundation in humanities,
social sciences and fine arts �
basic education he said.
The results o the survey are
significant, Volpe said, because
the "people polled are in
academia and know what they're
talking about He added the
University will use the survev
results in future recruiting
Teachers Need Community Support
E I News Hurt-mi
Teaching in the public schools
be encourage among
fessionals in other fields i
relieve teacher sh rtages and
strenghten programs, the lieute-
nant governor o Vermont I
an audience of educators
business leaders here Friday
Addressing an ECU Rui
Education Institute conl
on math and science educai
; at Ayden-Grifton High
ool, I Gov. Peter Smitl
Montpelier, Vt said. "We must
build bridges be:ween business,
community, and the teacl
Dorm Decision Delayed
By Committee's Action
B KI.IZMU1H HACK
suff Wnlrr
Further investigation b
Residence 1 ife'ommittee caused
a delay in tne Scott dorm deci-
sion, which is whether the newly
air-conditioned wing will house
members of the football team or
not.
According to Residence I ife
Committee Direct oi Mary
Fowler, the decision will be held
up due to the need o further m-
. ion in the issue. There
was no hint as to the reasons foi
the delay, a Associate Dean o
Residence Life Carolyn Fulgum
declined to talk to reporters.
Members of the Residence 1 ife
Committee also declined to talk
to reporters, pending further in-
vestigation in the issue.
After a meeting, the Residence
I ife Committee met for an ex-
ecutive session, which was closed
ee COMMITTEE Page 3.
Up, Up And Away
CHI
� Th� S�tt Carolinian
profession so that gifted practi-
tioners can work in our
classrooms even if they are not
traditionally trained teachers
In addition. Smith, the former
president of a New England
education consultant firm, said
the state should consider using an
incentive lan to reward teachers
financially for superior work. He
aiso proposed a program to allow
teachers to travel between schools
to share their expertise with their
colleagues in other classroom.
And he encouraged the state to
study a plan to link existing
voice, data and telecommunica-
tions systems to carry informa-
tion to schools in rural areas.
Smith said his proposals could
strengthen the math and sciences
curricula especially in rural areas
and could help the state relieve a
shortage oi teachers in these
fields.
The conference was part of a
three-state project initiated by the
Institute for Educational Leader-
ship and funded by the Standard
Oil Company (SOHIO). It has
been scheduled for Sept. 27 but
had to be postponed due to Hur-
ricane Gloria. Business, industry
and education representatives
from 51 counties attended.
"There is simply a scarcity of
teachers Smith said. "And it is
a scarcity which will increase
dramatically over the next several
years unless major changes oc-
cur he said.
"We know that almost 50 per
cent of the existing teaching force
will leave the classroom during
the next 7-10 vears as the p
war teacher boom comes to a
halt Smith said. Also, he said
"higher aspirations for women
has eroded the once reliable and
high quality feminine base for the
teaching profession in America"
while the private sector, with bet-
ter working conditions and
salaries, is "gobbling qualified
candidates" from math arid
sciences
Included in Smith's proposal is
the suggestion that the business
community develop a "lend-
lease" program with school
districts to allow industry people
to come into schools to teach sub-
jects.
"We should create bridges into
the profession of education for
people who aspire to teaching at a
later period in their lives he
said. He also recommended
scouring communities for the
gifted people, retired and senior
citizens who can help in our
school programs where resources
are short.
As for teachers' salaries. Smith
proposed creating "an incentive
plan for local districts to reward
teachers financially for superior
work with both pay increments
See PROFESSIONAL Page 3.
What Is It?
JIM LEUTGEMS
Th� Ejs' Caolin,�ri
It's a kiosk. Kiosk's are popular in Europe and are found on
street corners on which advertiements are posted, lor more details
see related storv below.
ECU9s Kiosk Makes
Debut On Campus
B BETH WHICKER
suff Wnt�f
1 ast Carolina's first kiosk, a
cylindrical structure common
European sidewalks on wl
advertisements and an-
nouncements are posted, stands
between Joyner Library and
Mendenhall Student Center.
The idea evolved when
Rudolph Alexander, director of
University Unions sketched a
kiosk he saw when traveling in
Europe, "I remember seeing the
kiosks in Furope and liked the
design he said. The
Maintenance Shop took the
design, and a kiosk fa la ECU)
resulted.
"I liked the kiosk because it
was attractive and didn't take up
much space. The kiosk is eye-
catching and, therefore, receives
a lot of comments and
attention said Alexander.
"If the idea catches on, we
ght put more of them on cam-
pus. New kiosks would be in high
ffic areas on campus. The
� sk at Mendenhall is visible to
students going to Mendenhall,
residence halls and parking lots.
It's available to on-campus and
off-campus students Alexander
said.
"The main objective to using
the kiosk is to help boost atten-
dance at university functions I
guess I want them (university ac-
tivities) to be overly successful. I
want a full house every time
said Alexander.
"I think another kiosk should
be in front of the old library by
the sidewalk. Many students walk
by that area every day on their
wuv to class according to
David Brown, SGA president at
ECU.
"We need a more inofrmed
See ECL Page 3.
Thanksgiving Unique To Each Culture
This past sunday was a beautiful day for a ballon ride. Many
students took advantage of the good weather to take a break from
studying for those pre-Thanksgiving exams.
By JENNIFER MYERS
surr Writer
Turkey food .Pilgrims .fo-
otball family stuffing and a
break from school
All these are popular images of
Thanksgiving, and people living
in the United States associate
food, family and football with
this holiday. However, our ideas
about how to celebrate
Thanksgiving are only a few of
many.
Thanksgiving began as a
harvest festival over 2,000 years
ago in honor of the abundant
crops and in hopes of the more
plentiful yields to come. It also
marked the last big meal of the
season and remains the oldest
holiday celebrated in the U.S.
Thanksgiving began in 1578
with the English settlers in New-
foundland setting aside a day of
thanks. Then, the Pilgrims
established the day to give thanks
to God for the colony's survival
of the long, hard winter.
The Pilgrims' Thanksgiving
was held in autumn 1621 when
the crops had just been harvested
and food abounded. The feast
lasted three days. Later in
American history, President
Washington proclaimed
Thanksgiving a national holiday
to be celebrated by all religious
groups, giving thanks.
Originally, Thanksgiving
began in England with the
Puritans, who had abolished
Christmas because they felt it
dealt with Roman Catholic
beliefs to which they were oppos-
ed. Therefore, the Puritans
wanted a day to replace
Christmas, so the governors ap-
pointed a day in autumn, general-
ly at the end of November, as a
day of thanksgiving.
iUj
The American Indians also had
their day of giving thanks. They
hung three ears of corn and a
gourd outside their teepees, from
which the birds could eat.
This ritual was performed after
a plentiful harvest, by thanking
the gods tor proper weather and
the hope for good crops in the
future. When the birds pecked at
the corn and gourds, it was a sign
that the gods were accepting their
gift of thanks.
In Germany, Saint Martin's
Festival is celebrated as a
thanksgiving. The festival takes
place Nov. 10 and 11 and honors
St. Martin, a friend of children
and patron saint of the poor and
good harvests.
Feasts of geese, cranberries
and new red wines will be shared
with family and friends. At night,
children form processions, sing
and carry lanterns.
Israel, however, celebrates its
Thanksgiving in September or
October, with Succoth, or the
Feast of the Tabernacles. Huts
are built to represent the dwell-
ings of the Jews during the 40
years of wandering after the ex-
odus from Egypt. This com-
memorates the annual pilgrimage
to Jerusalem, as is directed in The
Bible, to give thanks for their
people and for the harvest.
In Irelan, celebrants make
huge bonfires in the autumn
season to offer encouragement to
the sun, for the days have gotten
shorter, and harvest time is near-
ly over.
In every country, a unique
Thanksgiving is held in some
form, whether celebrating a plen-
tiful harvest or giving thanks for
what each has. Every festival or
holiday holds a special meaning
for that country or religion, as
does ours.
This holiday should be
remembered as a day of giving
thanks for our loving family, the
food we have on our table and
the freedom in which to enjoy all
that we have.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifiedsg
Editorials4
Features5
Sports7
Man has his will �
but woman has her way.
�Oliver Wendell Holmes
1
" � -






mi EAST k.il NIAN
VW Mm K 26 !S"K
Announcements
Ski Injuries
ECU RUGBY
ECU SURFING
lei v � �
SUMMER JOBS
BIOLOGY Cl UB
LAW SOCIETY
BN

� � � �, .
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
PHYSICAL FITNeSS
COMPETENCY TEST
ROOMS AVAILABLE
FOR SPRING
EASTERN N.C CHAPTER
OF PHYSICIANS FOR SOCIAL
RESPONSIBILIT Y
COUNCIL OF
HONOR SOCIETIES
University Optometric Eye Clinic
DR. DENNIS O'NEAL
� Comprehensive Eve Examinations
� Contact Lenses
� G!asses
;
� Student & FacuH
Glasses
�Con . ro QanVt
612 E. 10th Street
its on Contacts &
)SS trc
$
NEED CASH?
Southern
Gun & Pawn
752-2464
500 N. Greene
$
South Park
Amoco
AMOCO
11"
implcte Automotive Service
756-3023 24 hrs.
310 Greenville Blvd.
Kentucky Nuggets Combo
9 Piece Kentucky Nuggets
Kei lucky Fries
Large Di $2.89
600 W. Greenville Bi. j
756-6434
at Greenville Stores Only 2905 East Fifth S' 752-5184
FIGHT OF THE
CENTURY!
5-BOUTS DAILY-5
Stmtih WED HOY. 27
ROCKY Balboa
P.S.S.B. Ben
EXHIBITION BOUT:
APOLLO CREED
- ENTERTAINMENT
JAMES BROWN
BUCCA NEER MO VIES
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
� f
. . .

g
COMPUTER SCIENCe CO OP
� � �

� � �
'���� � . . . . . .
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
i
PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT
Health Column
I plan to hi snow skiing during
the holidays. Vha( tpe of
preparation should I do to avoid
hurting myself on the slopes?
A physical conditioning pi
gram maj hel ain strength
and endurance, which in the -
run, will benefil
youi
is in to :
1 bu youi equip
and

More
HI

u'll be
the
1t ii �
correctly, I
ursell wi1-
inc e i A �
sequently, wri
lures are

illy, wai
hit the si

Vhai types ol injuries oi pro
blems can occur and how can I
prevent them?
� Hy
.
� I ea
CAMP DAY
NCIO IOG
T MANKSGIVING DINNER
TONIGHT
PRE MED
BEAU'S
Night Club
We will close for the
Thanksgiving Holidays
Thurs. Nov. 28
RE-OPEN
Wed. Dec. 4
& Fri. Dec. 6
HAPPY THANKSGIVING
Beau's, A Private Club For Members A Guests
PPEN THANKSGIVING DHY
ECU STUDENTS, GO KROGERING
for all of your Holiday party needs.
Merry C
Hv I
Profe
ECUKio
Committee
Decision � j

Cl
Seafood House
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Popcorn Shrimp
Hot
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FRA
with thy pi R( hv
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ALL FRA Nit
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v Ol PON r
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CONTACTS
$59
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ThtPlHi
The
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OPTICAL
OFEN �:30 AM to PM MONDAY 1
i





I HI 1 AM I -K)I S
NOVEMBI K 26, l'

I " �;
lidays
IVING
NC DAY
e Potato
Pepsi
115
MfA
Ytejm
1' rida angelcs .10c
�fXA. qenng
i
Merry Christmas Object Of Show
By LANCE SEAR
Staff WtHtf
Most children dream of having
a "merry Christmas Foi some,
however, the dreams can turn to
nightmares, festered b lack ol
money and an unfortunate
homelite
That may all change due to the
efforts of the hbrar stafi at
loyner I ibrary. I asi Saturday at
Fletchei Auditorium, the staff
put on their third annual variety
show to raise money foi the Pitt
County Fostei Children
Christmas Fund.
ccording to Bette Can. a
librarian at Joyner, many people
from the community donated not
onl then money but also their
tune, talent and work tor the
show
"Putting on a show like this
lakes a lot out ot souarr
said. "But working for such a
good cause makes all our efforts
worth while I he more money we
raise for the children, the better
we feel about out work; every
dollar counts
Professional Latitude Needed
(Ontinued From Pane 1.
and greater professional latitude
in the classroom
"We simply must address the
forces which discourage git ted
professionals from staying in the
classroom. Fhey include financial
a.s well as motivational and pro-
fessional disincentives he said.
To create additional resources
especially in rural areas, he p
posed a study of the state's e
isting voice, data and telecom-
munications capacity in both the
public and private sectors Citing
Vermont as a state where such a
study is being made, he said.
"Our goal is to assess the current
combined capacity of our com-
munications system and its
potential to aide the educational
system in our rural areas as well
as their economic development
With a linking telecommunica
tions system "you would then
have the ability to conned the
resources of your universities i
business communities with
tanl parts of the state he said.
Finally, Smith proposed a
' eacher -a i nc e progi am
similar to one already beg i
Vermont called "Teachers H
mg Teachers I ndei the pro-
gram, teachers share the
and abilities through an in-service
catalog. " I here is a pro, .
release time so tl at
be in ited be: wee jc ho 1
district to help other teachei
their areas of exp i
"None ' ' ese s
ions
: eal and tidy said Smith. "But
1 do not believe thai there is a
: eal and tidy answei to this pro-
blem
rhese proposals are "ottered
directions m
you all might direct your
King than in the belief that
they are the absolute wa North
c ai olina ought to go he aid.
"Bui they suggest what 1 believe
reality fot all ol us
1 ieutenant (io ernor since
Smith holds a Doctoi
1 dut degree from Harvard
and entering politics was
a New England
educa iltant firn He
was 'm as Esquire
- .ime's "Best of the New
The show included many E 1
departmental acts from the
School of Music and Theatre
Arts. Elvis Presley impersona-
tions, singing, dancing and
dramatic and comic routines were
all part of the festivities. The
show also had local sponsors who
donated door prizes to lucky reci-
pients in attendance.
As for next year, the Staff
plans to move the show from
Fletchei to a bigger auditorium,
"The more tickets we can sell, the
more money we can make, the
more gifts we can buy, the more
'Merry Christmas' there will be
C'arr said.
Tickets were at least $2, and
many people donated more. As
of 2 p.in Monday, the show has
raised more than $700 for Pitt
County toster children.
Anyone interested in donating
to this fund, which is tax deducti-
ble, can do so at Joyner's mam
circulation desk. After Dec. 4,
contact Becky Starke ai
58-216" or go to the Social Ser-
vices Office on 1901 West Fifth
Street.
Tickets tor next year's show go
on sale on No 1. !s6
IRS Asked To Catch
Student Defaulters
WASHINGTON, )
K psi i he Internal Revenue
Service, recently signed up to
help corral students w fault
on then student loans, ma
gel in the busii leciding it
students are telling the ti
their aid appli a
To "catch error
aid applications, the Ol
Management and B i lj (OMB)
said last week it will a �
to give federal agencii
IKS reo'ids.
( laiming student loans ha
the "highest error ral
tedeia! bench: program, OMH
spokesman Steve I upper
plan could save the
at least SI billion
But some student aid
say the OMB
overestimating the ror ra
' 1 Mere see: titudi
that there are a whole bund
people out there cheating.
Dallas Martin, head of the Sj
tional Association of Stud
financial Aid Administrat
"But our experience has been
people are very, ver
est he notes.
I upper is quick to sa he
doesn't believe students
� eatii g " though he d-
measure "very necessary
believes Martin "is
!lg
Nineteen percent of all P
ml recipients, for exan
are overpaid because of informa-
e applications,
I upper maintains.
By ��if imily income in-
with the IRS. institu-
te "everyone
ives just the right amount of
re entitled to he
ECU Kiosk Makes Appearance 'ffi&fiS
Continued From Page 1.need some boards �1 i cat post an adethinglet needs is
student bod. It is difficult commuter students ' keep up with campus events, said Brown. "ECU needs larger bulletinmessage. Matt he dpy posted Brown sa "Inhapel Hi wooden bulleti:Br �-� i "I tl 1nk it w ould be ' we could ti . i apai' om-� I
boards on campus. We seriouwhich-
l.i , S. . ,Kk n th
Committee Delays
Decision On Dorm
process of reunification in Japan
during the late sixteenth century;
before which the shikaua
shogunate ruled Japan,
MiORTlOW UP
I() 12th WEEK
OF PREGNA NO
� � �� - � � � 18 weel it add
i Prcj
.
Further ml
- � een 9
� M .i . 5 P M �� �
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917 West Morgan St. Raleigh, NC.
Continued From Page 1.
�porters, as wel 1 as !
preside Hosea (
Fleming dy James
�khough the Fleming issue
reportedly was never brought up
in the closed session. C otten said,
"whatever happens I N. I will
control what happen
Fleming
According to tten, when he
and Jameson asked for figure
the possibility of air conditioning
ie' ses

if Scon
Be!k as opposed
ing v were i
able Ihe Kesidee 1 if
nmittee said n
sion that h was cheaper
condition the south wing i
than any othei I
campus.
v date � I
the Committee
make a final di n c �n
her of the two issues
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Hambu rger & French Fries $1 00
Hours:
10:30a.m. to 2:30a.m.
Corner of 5th and Evans Street
7 Days A Week Phone:752-6497






�Ut �aat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
I om Norton, (�wu uanw
Ia Stone, vnuum t.dm�
MlM- I UDW1CK, ��
Scott CooptR. spommtm
John Shannon, Fmuun,Edno,
LORIN PASQl'Al . , . -
DeChanu t Johnson, i, o �
Tom Luvender, D.r��owmmmv
Anthony Martin, suj-n,u ���
John Peterson, r,rf,( ���
Shannon Short, px��
Debbie Stevens, smw,
Nsember 26. 1S8
Opinion
Page 4
Thanksgiving
Turkeys & Chow Mein
Thanksgiving is swiftly ap-
proaching and all across the land
the righteous and the prosperous
are anticipating a feast that is
bound to manifest itself in as many
forms as there are dietary
preferences. Somewhere, I am cer-
tain, militant vegetarians are con-
spiring to loose a flock of gobblers
from their stockades on an un-
suspecting township. The fatted
fowls will doubtless carry encircled
drumsticks on flags with slashes
drawn through them in their beaks
and their liberators will issue an
emancipation proclamation of sorts
to the press after the birds are safely
in hiding. After that, of course,
the will settle down to a succulent
feast of tofu casserole and miso
soup.
In other places people will surely
be hunkering down to pizza and
beer in front of their T.V. sets and
psyching themselves for a prolong-
ed orgy of holiday football. Still
other folks will decide to eat shrimp
chow mein and tortilla chips and
forget the whole thing. Hey, let
Americans be Americans. We're a
strange land made up of strange
people. The Pigrims, after all, did
not come here to be like everybody
who they left behind. They came
here to break new ground and thai
is precisely what they did.
When they organized the first
Thanksgiving feast, which lasted
for three days, the purpose was to
do more than make merry and
thank God for a bountiful harvest.
The Pilgrims also wanted to thank
their new found friends the Indians,
who could have been enemies but
weren't, for their assistance in help-
ing them to gain a toehold in the
new world. And in a broader sense,
they wanted to thank Providence
for the fulfillment of their vision of
founding a religious community
that would serve as an example to
all the world of how human beings
should live together.
This is a dream that has not died
in America. We have long thought
of ourselves as a special people who
had something to teach the world.
And this has particularly been true
since WWII. In fact, it has been this
very theme that many presidents
have sounded upon in order to
strike a responsive chord with the
people of our nation. That it served
most recently as the basis of a cam-
paign speech which helped elect
Ronald reagan to the White House
is a testament to the fact that
Americans still believe that we are a
special people with something uni-
que to teach the world.
This Thanksgiving maybe we
ought to ponder what it is that we
have to be thankful for and to offer
the world as a nation. President
Reagan and Secretary General
Mikhail Gorbachev recently met in
Geneva and promised that they
would make a commitment to
meeting regularly and working
toward an end to the arms race,
though they acheived no tangible
arms control agreements. Clearly
that is something that we can ap-
preciate and there is nothing better
that we can give the world in the
present epoch than a reprieve from
nuclear holocaust. We have also
seen people in our country
demonstrate their goodwill and
generosity by sending millions of
dollars in food, development aid
and medical supplies to the famine
victims in Africa. In fact, one of the
best things to happen in recent
memory was the Live Aid concert
organized by rock musician Bob
Geldorf to help feed the hungry.
(Because of his efforts on behalf of
hunger victims Geldorf became the
first Rock musician ever to be
nominated for a Nobel Peace
Prize.) The Farm Aid concert,
organized by country music legend
Willy Nelson, was another initiative
undertaken by entertainers to help
out a group of people who are in
trouble. In this case it was farmers.
Small wonder then that many
young people are once again look-
ing to artists and rock stars for
moral inspiration and insight.
It's not surprising then that the
current era of involvement and the
fervor to do something about the
world's problems has caught hold
among the young. College cam-
puses have gotten involved with
hunger issues and marching for
peace, among other things. There is
a renewed spirit in the air � the
feeling that a few people with the
right ideas can make a difference.
Perhaps that, in the final analysis,
is the best thing that we have going
for us as a nation. For that is
something that people all over the
world hope is true and America has
in the past often represented a vin-
dication of a tentative faith in the
power of people with ideas.
WHEM EE HUTTON
SPEAKS,
,�THE5SCURIT9ANP
EXCHAN6E COMMISSION
OUMPS
THF FAST ARo: II
Campus Forum
Jesus Was Authentic Lord Of All
After reading Tuesday's letter to
the editor that criticized the anti-
abortion piece, I was compelled to
write this letter. I do not want to ad-
dress the issue of abortion. The more
significant issue is that of "religion
Mindy Machanic made some good
points, but I feel her Mew toward
Christianity is misconceived (as is by
many others). She stated that people
have the right to believe what they
want to believe. This is true to a
point, but one must be willing to ac-
cept the possible consequences
their belief. I would like to present
some supportive facts-evidence for
Christianity in hopes of clearing up
some of these misconceptions and
showing that it is based on more than
opinion.
The center of Christianity is the
person of Jesus Christ. Jesus made
many claims. There is a misconcep-
tion that Jesus' claims are similar to
other religion's leaders. This is
the case. In major religions of the
world, the teachings � not the
teacher � are all-important. Confu-
sianism is a set of teachings. Islam is
the revelation of Allah, with Moham-
med being the prophet, and Bud-
dhism emphasizes the principles of
the Buddha anu not Buddha himself.
This is especially true of Hinduism,
where there is no historical founder.
What Jesus taught is not the impor-
tant aspect of Christianity, but what
is important is who Jesus was. Christ
is the only religious leader who has
ever claimed to have deity and the on-
ly individual who has convinced a
great portion of the world that He is
God. Was He God incarnate? Is He
the only way a person can reach God?
This was the claim He made for
Himself. If He is God as He claimed,
we must believe in Him, and if He is
not, then we should have nothing to
do with Him. Jesus is either Lord of
all, or not Lord of all.
The claims Christ made are record-
ed in the Bible. Christianity teaches
that the Bible is the revealed word of
God. Even though it was written by
men, the ultimate author was God
Almightv. This is the claim the Bible
makes for itself. 1 do not have room
to present in depth evidence that the
Bible is valid and reliable. 1 can only
touch on it.
The Bible has been read by more
people and written in more languages
than any other book. Unlike
mythological writings, the Christian
Greek scriptures are built around
people who actually lived and places
that exist even to this day.
It was written by more than I
authors from all walks of life, was
written on three different contine
and was written over a 1500 year
span.
One thing that makes the Bible s
unique is us unity. The authors of the
various books wrote in different
places, they came from different
backgrounds. The contents deal with
controversial subjects. But the Bible
is unity. From beginning to end is the
unfolding story of God's plan of
salvation for mankind. This salvation
is through the person of Jesus Chi
The historical reliability of the
Scripture should be tested b the
same criteria that all historical
documents are tested. Upon testing,
the evidence reveals that the Bible is
trustworthy and historically reliable
in its witness about Jesus.
Christianity stands or falls on the
resurrection of Jesus Christ (1 Corin-
thians 15:12-19). If Christ did not
come back from the dead, then the
Christian faith tumbles The sign of
resurrection was sent to set Jesus
apart from anyone else who ever liv-
ed, and it would designate Him as the
Son of God (Roman 1:4).
All but four of the major religions
are based on mere philosophical pro-
positions. Ot the four that are based
on personalities rather than a
philosophical system, only Christiani-
ty claims an empty tomb for its
founder. The resurrection is either the
greatest miracle or the greatest delu-
sion which history records. After ex-
amining the evidence for the resurrec-
tion from a judicial perspective, Lord
Durling, former Chief of Justice of
England concluded a: "There e
such overwhelming e
and negative, factual i
tial, that n Jal jury
�id could fa
that the rection :rue
If I were i ud
like ' know God in a pers nal �
ha' . r response ' I: yes!
the:
How? Not by j -very
r by
igl a personal
itionship with Jesus i Bv
placing . j fajth
person I fesus Christ and what He
did on the cross 2,000 yeai and
acknowledg g that H
plae to pay the pena ty
the only way a person ca � s a
personal
relation ence
His piai � . mr life.
1 encourage eacl I you to look at
the claii hrist for yourself. It is
a choict individual must make.
Chri relies on !he pei
Jesus Chrisi 1: He - not who He
claimed to be. then He can be
nored. but. if His claims are true, to
ignore Him would mean the
eternal salvation.
Tracv Price
Senior, Therapeutic Recreation
Forum Rules
The East C arolinia
express, � v
drop them by our office in the Put
lions Building, at � the en-
trance of Joyner I ibrary.
1or purposi - let-
ters must include the name, mc
classification, address, ph imber
and signature of the author's. Letters
are limited to two typewr
double-spaced or neatly printed IL
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no pi �
attacks will be permuted.
By STEPHEN R. SHALOM
In Ihf�- Times
As the crisis in the Philippines inten-
sifies, the controversy over how best to
respond to that crisis grows sharper.
But both sides of the intra-
governmental debate share basic
premises that are antithetical both to
peace and to the well-being of the
Philippine people.
The still-dominant view, backed by
Reagan personally and the right-wing
ideologues in his administration, is that
Ferdinand Marcos, who has ruled the
Philippines with an iron hand for 13
years, should be kept in power �
though pressure may be necessary to get
him to enact reforms. Marcos has
favored the two huge military bases in
the country, Subic and Clark, has pro-
tected American capital and has been
hostile to the left. These credentials
have convinced Reagan to support Mar-
cos until the end.
The alternative view, increasingly
championed by some in the State
Department and many in Congress, is
that Marcos is a liability. His
authoritarian rule and corruption have
devastated the economy, alienated even
the church and much of the business
class and converted a communist in-
surgency of minor dimensions into a
powerful force active in all of the coun-
try's 73 provinces and capable � accor-
ding to U.S. officials � of fighting the
government to a standstill in as little as
three years. Too close an identification
of Marcos with Washington, the argu-
ment goes, might lead to the loss of
U.S. interests in the country when Mar-
cos falls.
Accordingly, measures are needed to
dissociate the U.S. from the Philippine
dictator � a change in the mix of
military and economic aid or even calls
for Marcos to step down.
Although the two views differ in their
perception of Marcos, their backers
have the same goals. As liberal Rep.
Steven Solarz (D-NM) explained on the
floor of the House, he shares the con-
servative view of the strategic impor-
tance of the U.S. bases in the Philip-
pines and the need to protect them; he
differs only on the question of how
these assets might best be preserved.
But the bases shouldn't be retained at
all. The bases do not protect Filipinos
from foreign attack, for as every U.S.
official for 40 years has acknowledged,
the Philippines does not face a credible
external threat. Indeed, the presence of
the bases may well be a magnet for at-
tack, for any rational Soviet military
planner would surely want to target the
important U.S. facilities located at
Clark and Subic.
Require New Policies
If the bases do not protect the Philip-
pines, do they protect the U.S. or other-
wise promote world peace? Historically,
the bases have served as springboards
from which Washington has been able
to project power in the Pacific. From
these bases, Washington was able to
supply Dien Bien Phu, airlift arms to
rebels in Indonesia and deploy forces in
the Quemoy-Matsu area. More impor-
tantly, during the Vietnam war, the
bases provided the principal logistical
support for the U.S. Air Force and were
the cheif supply and repair depot for the
Seventh Fleet. Today, the bases play an
even broader role, for they are an essen-
tial part of a nexus that allows the U.S.
to project military force all the way
from Korea to the Arabian Sea. An ag-
gressive and interventionist foreign
policy needs the Philippine bases; a
non-intervetionist one does not.
U.S. officials point to the Soviet ac-
cess to military facilities at Cam Ranh
Bay in Vietnam and argue that Clark
and Subric are needed to counter this
Soviet presence. But one should be
skeptical of a justification for U.S.
bases that materializes 30 years after the
U.S. bases have been established. And
one might plausibly conclude that the
Soviet bases in Vietnam are more a par-
tial attempt to balance the U.S. bases in
the Philippines than the other way
around. Certainly Clark and Subic are
vastly more important facilities than
Cam Ranh Bay. In any event, if the
Soviets are a genuine concern, the U.S.
government should welcome the call of
the Philippine Anti-Bases Coalition for
the elimination of all foreign bases from
the Western Pacific.
Before martial law in 1972, the
Philippines had the formal trappings of
democracy, with regular elections, a
congress and independent judiciary. But
the elections pitted one elite party
against another. The parties did not dif-
fer in ideology but shared a commit-
ment to the status quo; indeed, politi-
cians routinely switched from one party
to the other. Elections reflected not the
popular will but the results of massive
vote-buying, fraud and widespread
violence. The human costs of this
political system were immense: abysmal
real wages were falling and income
distribution � already among the worst
in the world � was growing even more
skewed. Popular pressure, organized by
the left, began to be felt in the early
'70s. But then Marcos declared martiaJ
law, crushing all dissent.
To return to the elite politics of the
'50s and '60s will not meet the desperate
needs of Filipinos. Only a politics that is
democratic economically and socially
can offer hope to the urban poor or the
landless peasants � though this will in-
evitably challenge Washington's
military and economic interests. Is such
an option possible? Vigorous debate on
post-Marcos alternatives is taking place
on the Philippine left. Father Balweg. a
commander with the communist New
People's Army, has recently called for a
multi-party socialist system. The out-
come of this debate cannot be
predicted, but surely it is a matter for
Filipinos to determine for themselves. It
will certainly not be aided by the
counterinsurgency efforts that Reagan
favors.
Unfortunately, no one in Washington
challenges the U.S. right to intervene in
the Philippines. Protecting "Western
interests" is the goal shared by all fac-
tions in the government. Reagan would
do it in the context of toughing it out
with Marcos; Solarz would prefer to
return to the elite pseudo-democracv
of the past.
It is important to explain to
Americans that this is a false choice.
With or without Marcos, we don't want
to preserve the bases or even move them
elsewhere. And we don't want the U.S.
to intervene in the Philippines to smash
the left, whether in collaboration with
Marcos or with some new champion of
the status quo.
Mikhail Barvshmkov i
and romance. Directed h
kolimouski.
Plan
Bv Bf 1H DASIt
Thai �
M
meai S
Tw�
. g
pieces a

broi
cup mea
cup of �
cup Bea: �
fork or wl
lumps S mme
ing pan drippings
make sure no lun p v
salt and pepper :�
over the turkev and di
Notes Vlways remove th�
ing from the turkc
ing to eliminate the pos
food poisonii
Grocery store containei
spices can be expensive,
amounts o! spices can be pur
chased at local natural food an.
specialty stores.
Additional traditional fo
go with the turkey and stuffing
Green bean bean supreme.
� 2 tablespoons margarine
� 1 medium chopped onion
� 1 tablespoon parsley
,
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COMMISSION
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Washington
intervene in
Protecting "Western
il shared by all fac-
nment. Reagan would
if toughing it out
- ,id prefer to
�he elite pseudo-democracy
1 is important to explain to
Americans that this is a false choice.
With, or without Marcos, we don't want
reserve the bases or even move them
elsewhere. And we don't want the U.S.
ntervene in the Philippines to smash
the left, whether in collaboration with
Marcos or with some new champion of
the status quo.
THE EAST CAROI INIAN
Entertainment
NO tMBt-R 26, 1985
Page 5
Baryshnikov, Hines
In Political Drama
Mikhail Baryshnikov and Gregory Hines star in Columbia Pictures' White Sights, a story of international adventure, suspense
and romance. Directed by Taylor Hackford, the film also stars Isabella Rossellini. Geraldine Page, Helen Mirren and Jer
Skolimowski.
Bv( APPYIVFY
In the Artie Circle, day and
night are each theoretically six
months long, producing one
24-hour period of daylight and
one 24-hour night each year. The
phenomenon is commonly called
"Midnight Sun but is also
referred to as "White Night
rhe movie White Nights is a
phenomenon in itself, bringing
together two great dancers to
create a spectacular event.
White Sights is the story oi
Kolya Radchenko, played by
Mikhail Baryshnikov, a ballet
dancer who defected from
Russia. On his return from
I okyo, his plane is forced into an
emergency landing at a Soviet
military air base in Siberia.
Rodchenko, sustaining minor
injuries, is considered a criminal
Soviet Union because of his
defection, and he is forced to re-
main in the countrv.
Gregory Hines portrays Ray
J Greenwood, an American
tap dancer who fled to Ru-sia in a
protest against Amerua's in-
volvement in Vietnam. He and
Ins wife, Darya (Isabella
Rossellini), are assigned to v.on-
remain in Russia
dventure, romance, and in-
resuh as Kolya attempts to
the S v id I nil in .ikiam.
Pi essui the K( iB arks a
conflict between Kolya and Ray-
mond, but it eventually leads to
an everlasting friendship and a
escape, which gives Kolya,
Raymond and Darva their
freedom.
The movie is sporadically
reminiscent of Baryshnikov's
1 considered uy main to
be one the greatest of modern
dancers and proves this in the
film. Baryshnikov has had cameo
roles in several films, but White
whts is his first true acting role.
He definitely deserves recogni-
tion as both a dancer and as an
actor.
Gregory Hines has several
films to his credit; two of the
most noted are History of (he
Weld -Part I andCotton Club.
He has been nominated for a
Tony Award for his work on
Broadway and has contributed to
the new awareness of tap dance
among young people today.
New to the American screen is
Isabella Rossellini, a veteran of
Italian films but perhaps most
recognized for her modeling
career. She is the daughter of In-
grid Bergman, yet may lack her
mother's great talent. Her perfor-
mance is overshadowed by the
dance sequences.
The movie not only has a great
plot, but it can boast of fantastic
dance routines,as can be expected
with the cast it carries.
Baryshnikov brings to the stage
his fine talent. His movements
often resemble those of a gym-
nist; he leaps about the stage with
the grace and professionalism of
a well- trained performer. Hines
needs no music and provides
sheer entertainment for anyone
watching.
When the two join forces for a
jazz-ballei combo routine, the
w's energy and magic soars.
ach onvevs his own style to
present a brilliant spectacle.
The movie White ights is a
throughly enjoyable event.
Baryshnikov and Hines combine
to perform some o the best danc-
ing captured on film. The direc-
tor. Taylor Hackford, has
definitely added a hit to his list,
which includes An Officer and a
Gentleman and Against All
Odds. White Sights should be a
box-office smash and should be
seen bv everyone.
Plan For A Thanksgiving Feast
Bv BK III DANIELS
Sliff � nlrr
I as; v tidbits for the
! iai � days are easy
: delicious to eat. If
� the lucky ones
;al will be prepared bv
Morn, have your friends in for a
Neither you nor they will
regret it.
Menu
Roast Stuffed Turkey
with dressing and gravy
Boiled sweet potatoes
Greenbean supreme
C ran berries
Pumpkin Pie
rcey Gravy
Chop the giblets into small
pieces and set aside. In a large
ng pan, add the pan drippings
m the turkey and some of the
� ith from the giblets. In a two-
cup measunrg cup, add a half
� Hour and about a half
I broth. Beat well with a
k or whip to remove any
lumps. Slowly add to the simmer-
pan drippings, stirring to
make sure no lumps form. Add
alt and pepper to taste. Serve
ner the turkey and dressing.
Notes: Always remove the dress-
ing from the turkey before stor-
ing to eliminate the possibility of
food poisoning.
Grocery store containers of
spices can be expensive; small
amounts of spices can be pur-
chased at local natural food and
specialty stores.
Additional traditional foods to
go with the turkey and stuffing:
Greenbean bean supreme.
� 2 tablespoons margarine
� 1 medium chopped onion
� 1 tablespoon parsley
� 2 tablespoons flour
� 1 teaspoon sa
� one-half teaspoon grated or
finely chopped lemon pee!
� 1 large package froen trench
style green beans
� one-half cup grated cheddar
cheese
Brown the margarine, onion and
parslev over medium heat Stir in
everyone to
eer eaten.
best they have Roast Stuffec
Pumpkin Pic
Preheat oven to 375 degrees
and bake on a cookie sheet 70
minutes. Purchase a deep dish,
9-inch pie shell.
Combine the ingredients in the
order giver
the flour, mixing until smooth.
Add the salt, lemon peel and the
green beans. Mix well.
Turn into a cassarole dish; add
cheese to the top; cover and bake
in a 350 degree oven for about 30
minutes. Delicious
Cranberries are a wonderful
accompaniment to turkey. Pur-
chase them whole, frozen or can-
ned at your favorite supermarket.
Dessert cannot be left out on
this important day. Fix a pum-
pkin pie in no time at all and treat
� 2 slightly beaten eggs
� 1 16-ounce can Libby's solid
pack Pumpkin
� three-fourths cup sugar
� one-half teaspoon salt
� 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
� one-half teaspoon ground
ginger
� one-fourth teaspoon cloves
Pour into pie shell and bake.
� 1 6-8 lb turkey
� 1 large yellow onion, chopped
� 1-3 sups chopped celery (4-6
stalks)
� 12 pieces of wheat or oat bread,
toasted and cubed
� 1 tablespoon chopped parslev,
or dried parslev
� ihree-fourths teaspoon salt
� one-half teaspoon marjoram
� one-half teaspoon thyme
� one-fourth teaspoon pepper
� one-half cup broth from cook-
ed giblets, or one-half cup
chicken broth, instant
� 3 tablespoons shortening
Thaw the turkey according to
package directions, or better yet,
purchase a fresh one at the super-
market. Remove the giblets from
the cavity and simmer them in
water for a few hours. In a large
frying pan, melt the shortening
over medium heat and add the
onion and celery. Stir and cook
until tender, about 15 minutes.
To the toasted bread cubes, add
in a large bowl all the spices, toss-
ing to mix well. All the above
may be done a day ahead of
cooking time.
On the day of the feast,
preheat oven to 325 degrees,
grease a shallow baking pan large
enough for the turkey and bring
turkey to room temperature.
Toss the vegetables together
with the bread cubes and spices
and add the half cup broth to
moisten. Lightly stuff the turkey
in both the wish bone cavity and
the large cavity. Close the open-
ings by overlapping the skin if
possible. Pop into the preheated
oven for approximately 20
minutes per pound, making sure
you have covered with aluminum
foil without touching the bird.
Remove the foil to check for
doneness by pressing the thick
part of the drumstick between
fingers or by moving the
drumstick up and down � it
should move easily or twist out of
joint.
Brown the turkey for 20
minutes or until golden by
basting with the pan drippings
every five minutes after returning
to the oven.
Boiled Sweet Potatoes
Wash and place covered in
boiling water for 30 minutes or
until easily pierced with a fork.
Photo by MARK S BARBER
Stryper Lays It Down
Oz Fox, Lead Guitarist for the Christian heavy-metal
("Godrock ') band Stryper, lays down searing licks during last
Saturday's concert at the Greensboro Auditorium.
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SPEEDY REEDY'S rteH
PIZZA O
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Wed. Dec. 4
9:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 3 at 4 p.
m
o
The Underground:
For Lunch
Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m.
Rock wo rid Videos
Thursdays at 1:30 p.m.
Movie Shorts
Special Show
"TheDecco Brothers"
Tuesday, Nov. 26 ai 8:00p.m.
' K
OUT
gathering place
Ground Floor, Mendenhall
Curl Vanderhi ncentrai
Bv PAVIDMcGlN
Wei




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ECU s
Pirates
K MM C HAND! rK
vv ec -
vc- ed
Toi
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b a nian1. a- 19 p
coi ihev v
hold on a.s the dropped a 75
decision.
"We made some
kes (tun
capitalized,
the L adv Pirate-
performance. "We learned a
from that game"
About 2,000 fans attei
Lady Pirate contest and. aa
ding to Coach Manwai �





;s
ll
758-9999
for onlv
S8.00
day
NIGHT
01'

vents
Wed. Dec. 4
Op.m.
Wed Dec. 4
P.m.
3 at 4 p.m.

pedal Show
m.

JJ gathering place
Ground Floor, Mcndenhall
I HI t AS1 I'AROl INIAN
Sports
NOVf-MHl K 26, 1985 Page 7
IB HUMBERT ThtEatt Carolinian
Pirates Win Home Opener
1
ECU Tops Campbell
By SCOTT COOPER
Sport Mllnt
I he ECU basketball team
opened its '85-86 season in grand
style last night with a 69-62 defeat
of the Campbell Camels.
Although early Pirate shots
were not finding the range, a
tenacious defense kept ECU in
command.
"Our defense v.as pretty dog-
gone good coach Charlie Har-
rison said after the game. "We
didn't get beat defensively. For
the most part, we kept them out-
side.
"It (the win) wasn't very pret-
ty Harrison added, "but I'm
really pleased with the way we
played
The Pirates, who were led b
Marchell Henry's 21 points, took
some time before getting on track
offensively. A Henry free throw
with 17:07 left in the first period,
gave I Cl us tirst pom; as they
trailed 6-1. However, the Bucs
managed to outscore Campbell
9-4 over the next five minutes to
tie the name, 10-10.
A! Clark's three-point pla
with 10:47 remaining in the open
ing period gave the Bucs a 13-12
lead that they never relinquished.
After a pair oi Curt
Vanderhorst free throws with
10:16 remaining, the Pirate
Charlie Harrison
defense came alive a the 3,900
tans got vocal. From this p
on, K I built as much as a six-
pom: lead (27-21, with 2:58 lei
betoie going into the locker room
with a 2" 23 advantage.
Coach Harrison telt the Pirates
performed well, but didn't
capitalize on certain situations.
"We were struggling a bit in
the first half. At one time we had
four freshmen in the game
Harrison remarked. "We had
some problems with our offen-
sive execution. We were awfully
impatient and didn't take advan-
tage of some opportunities
At the half, the 3,900 fans saw
the infamous Bud Light
Daredevils put on a fine display
of dunking. The Daredevils
displayed their gymnastic ability
with various flips, tumbles and
flying dunks. They will be tour-
ing other Nort Carolina schools
like UNC, N.C. State and Wake
forest.
I he Pirates came out in the se-
cond halt where they had left off
in the first With the Camels in a
full-court pressing defense, Scot'
Hardy broke the pressure and fed
Henry at the foul line for a
15-foot jumper. This gave ECU a
32-25 lead with 17:59 left to play.
Campbell retaliated by scoring
the next six points, cutting the
Pirate lead to 32-31 with 16:42 re-
See SEASON, page 8
IRS Shoot-out Scheduled
( art Vanderhorst concentrates deeply on this foul shot during the Pirates' opening season win.
B JEANNETTEROTH
��urr �rtut
I he Depart men t o f
Intramural-Recreational Sen ices
will be rounding out the fall
semestei with two exciting aoot-
outs. Practice those extra-point
attempts tor spring semester
basketball b entering this year's
tree throw contest. Registration
will end Dec. 2, the day o the
competition.
On the same day. the annual
pre season basketball tourna-
ment will begin its registration,
held tor two days only. This is a
prime opportunity for students,
faculty and staff to get together
with their regular season tea
mates and warm up for spring's
basketball season. A mandatory
team captains' n, will be
held Dec 5, at 5 p m. in Bi
C-103.
"he 1 ntramural Ph
fitness Program will be offering
drop-in classes in aerobic fiti
after the Christmas holidays.
Just so you van take
well deserved holiday pounds,
classes will be held Jan. 13-23 in
room 108 Memorial Gym. From
4 to 5 p.m. and from 5: 1 to 6:1 5
p.m. you can work on aerobics
and still have time to join in on
the advanced toning ass held at
5:30 to 6:30 p.m. in room 112 of
Memorial Gym, on Tuesdays and
Thursda
()n Jan. 2 first- classes
will begin. Registration will be
held Ian 20-24 in room 204
Memorial Gym.
Every Tuesday and Thursday
at 2:30 and 5:30 p.m. on WZMB,
91.3 FM, the FCC campus radio
station, hosts "The Tennis Shoe
Talkshow The Department of
Intramural-Recreational Services
sponsors show, which serves
highlights, interviews and scores
o' the latest intramural activities.
Swimmers Topple UNC-C; Look To Navy
DAVID McGlNNESS
� tfltlM
I . hed
i I NC Charlotte
both
ting
isted I NC -
tg i 1 o 12 events
and three-
2 10 medley relay, the
Lori I ivingston, Susie
k. fill Gorenflo and Jenm
took first with a time of
a Miller's first-place time
! .6 in the 1,000 freestyle
� an 11-second advantage
nate Patricia Grand.
2 10 freestyle, Susan
us beat out another Buc
:� Nancy Fudwig, 2:04.3
2 05.3 respectively.
nabbed first in the 50
with a 26.6-second time.
.02 seconds separated first
second in the 200 individual
. with Jill Gorenflo topp-
McPherson's 2:22.07.
I C U swept the women's one-
diving. Sherry Campbell
took first with 24" points. Denise
Poff was second with 225 and
Becky Kerber third with 196.
Gorenflo won again in the 100
butterfly with a 1:04.0. I.udwig
was close behind in second, los-
ing by only .4 seconds.
Pirate women Picrson and
Grand fell to their UNC-C op-
ponents in the 100 freestyle. Pier-
son took second with a 52, and
Grand was third with a 60.3.
Caycee Poust won in the 100
backstroke, topping fellow Lady
Buc Livingston 1:03.8 to 1:05.0.
ECU one-two'd UNC-C in the
500 freestyle also, Scotia Miller
winning with a 5:30.5 over
Augustus' 5:35.3.
In the three-me'er diving it was
all ECU once again. Campbell,
Poff amd Kerber were again one,
two, and three with scores of 245,
220 and 202 respectively.
Went ink took the 100
backstroke by 4.8 seconds, topp-
ing teammate Jennie Halstead's
time of 1:15.6.
Finally, in the 200 freestyle
relay, ECL's team of Miller,
Augustus, Wilson and Poust was
first with a 1:49.3 time.
The INC C men did not find
I Cl any easiei than than then
women, losing by a 42 "1 mat.
David Killeen was nearly 40
seconds ahead oi teammate I rk
Hawkins with his first place time
ot 10:09.2 in the 1000 freestyle.
Kevin Hidalgo won in the 200
freest vie in 1:57.5.
butterfly with a 54.4, downing
teammate Brown by 1.1 seconds.
Killeen was forced to take se
cond in the 100 freestyle with a
time oi 4s 8, followed by Ronald
Flemming in third with a 50.6
Bruce Brockschmidt was first
in the 100 backstroke with a time
oi 55.1. Stratum Smith took
Durkin took first with 274.3
points, and Stevens nabbed third
199.6.
flemming led the Bucs to a win
in the 100 breast stroke wit
1:01.9. I ee Hicks was third, just
2.4 seconds out of first place.
finally, in the 200 freestyle
relay, the team o Brockschmidt,
Cook, Killeen and S. Smith took
first with a time of 1:33.2.
Swimming against L'NC
Charlotte served as something of
a break for the Buc swimmers.
"The Navy girls are tough. We have won the last unc-c is a young team and the
, . , , , � . Pirates'overall superiority allow
Jourhut it has always come down to the last
relav. M
"If there's one meet that I really want, it's Navy. "
�Andv Cook
�Rick Kobe
Jeff Brown took second in the
50 freestyle in 22.6 seconds.
Al Smith was second and
Richard Wells third in the 200 in-
dividual medley I heir times were
2:09.4 and 2:13.4 respectively.
In the one-meter diving, Luke
Durkin took first with 264 points.
Cireg Stevens was third with 211.
Hidalgo won again in the 100
third with a 59.8.
Andy Cook and Patrick Bren-
nan battled it out in the 500
freestyle, with Cook emerging the
victor by .4 seconds over Bren-
nan's 4:57.6 time. Wells was far
back in third with a 5:16.0.
In the three-meter diving, the
Pirate men repeated their perfor-
mance in the one-meter event.
eti them to make the contest a
"fun meet
"This was a good chance to
relieve some of the pressure on
the kuis said coach Rick Kobe.
"We swam everybody in dif-
ferent events just to see how they
would do. They might not get to
swim these events (which are not
their specialties) again in com-
petition
The Pirates' following meet
will be against the Naval
Academy at Annapolis, Md
Navy is one of the strongest
teams on the Bucs' schedule, a
team that beat the Pirate men by
only three points in last year's
contest. The Navy men are rank-
ed in the top 10 on the East
Coast, and will be looking to
maintain their streak agiansi the
Pirates. But the Buc men are
psyched for this one. according
one Pirate swimmer.
"If there's one meet that I real-
ly want, it's Navy said senior
Buc swimmer Andy Cook.
The navy women are no
slouches either, but the Lady
Tankers have edged them out the
last four years in a row.
"The Navy girls are tough
said Kobe. "We have won the
last four meets, but it has always
come down to the last relay
The meet will begin on Fn.
Dec. 6 at 4 p.m. in Annopolis.
On the following Sunday, the
women will be back in Minges
Natatorium to host the Universi-
ty of New Hampshire.
Pirates Skid In Season Opening Tourney
B TIM CHANDLER
Sports r1lr
I he I ady Pirate basketball
opened up its season this
weekend with three games on the
I in Tennessee. The women
e out of the road trip with a
1-2 record, and a consolation
hy from the Tennessee Tech
iirnament.
On Friday, the Lady Pirates
opened up in the Tennessee Tech
Tournament against the host
team. Although the women led
hy as many as 19 points in the se-
cond half, they were unable to
hold on as they dropped a 75-73
decision.
"We made some careless
mistakes (turnovers) and they
capitalized said Sylvia Bragg of
the Lady Pirates' second-half
performance. "We learned a lot
from that game
About 2,000 fans attended the
Lady Pirate contest and, accor-
ding to Coach Manwaring, that
made a difference.
"A lot of our younger players
have never had the opportunity
to play in front of so many
Emily Manwaring
fans Manwaring remarked.
"All that added noise, and
pressure took over
The Lady Bucs shot 56 percent
from the floor in the first half
and took a 47-34 lead at the half.
They ended up shooting less than
50 percent for the game as they
made 31 out of 63 shots from the
floor.
Leading the scoring for the
Lady Pirates was Lorraine foster
with 19 points, followed by Lisa
Squirewell with 18. Other players
scoring in double 'vures were
Delphine Mabry, with 14, and
Sylvia Bragg, with 12. Rounding
out the Lady Bucs' point totals
were Alma Bethea, with 6, and
Monique Pompili, who chipped
in four. The leading rebounder
for the game was Foster, who
pulled down eight boards. Bragg
handed out four assists from her
guard position.
In the consolation game Satur-
day, the Lady Pirates faced Cen-
tral Michigan. The Lady Bucs
took advantage of their
60-percent shooting from the
floor to hand Central Michigan a
77-71 defeat.
Leading the way for the
women was Squirewell, who
chipped in 26 points and pulled
down a team high of eight re-
bounds for the game. She was
followed in scoring by Foster,
with 22 points.
The only other double figure
scorer for the women was Bethea,
with 10 points. Other scorers for
the Lady Bucs included Pompili
and Mabry, with eight points
each; Linette Tucker, who added
two points, and Crystal Grier,
who rounded out the Lady
Pirates' scores with one point.
On Sunday, the women travel-
ed to Knoxville, Tenn to play
the ninth-ranked Lady
Volunteers. Although the Lady
Pirates stayed close during the
first 20 minutes, only trailing
29-25 at half time, they had
shooting problems in the second
half and ended up dropping a
74-56 decision.
Despite the loss, coach Man-
waring believes the Lady Bucs
played well and only need to
make a few changes.
"I have the feeling that we will
get there. We need to make
changes this week and work on
the things that didn't happen �
that should have (happened) this
weekend Manwaring said.
"Just by changing a few things,
we can beat these Top-20 teams.
"1 think we have the caliber of
ball players to be a nationally
ranked team Manwaring add-
ed. "We've shown it, when we
were within four points of Ten-
nessee for about 25 minutes of
the game
As for the game, the Lady
Pirates shot 40 percent from the
floor. Squirewell, who grabbed a
team-high of seven rebounds, led
in scoring, with 14 points. Foster,
the only other Lady Buc to
receive a score in double figures,
brought on 13 points. Bethea ad
ded nine, and Pompili tossed in
seven. Rounding out the scoring
for the Lady Pirates was Mabry,
with six, Bragg, with five, and
Gretta O'Neal, who chipped ir
two points.
Senior guard Foster com-
mented on the Lady Bucs'
opening-season performance.
"At first, we weren't in-
timidated at all. Then we lost
some confidence in ourselves
Foster said. "We've got to
believe in ourselves and play a
full 40-minute game.
Lady Pirates assistant coach
Lillion Barnes believes the team
can improve, and she hopes it will
begin with an aggressive defense.
"Our defense is geared to score
Barnes said. "We're going to put
pressure (on the ball) for 94 feet,
particularly with our guards. Our
speed can compare with any team
we'll play. If we play good
defense, overall, it will make us a
See LADY, page 8
f





8
I HI I AM CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 26, 1985
Classifieds
PERSONALS
TO THE 4th FLOOR AT
WRIGHTSVILLE BEACH: Hoseball
was too radical! The next meeting
will be Luau 86 GET PSYCHED!
PS Wasn't check out a surprise?)
SPE'S: Don't mink this past
weekend wasn't fun because it was!
The AOTT's
ALEX CAMACHO: Happy 20th Bir
thday you stupid spic! Get ready to
party tonight1 We love ya!
ALPHA PHI PLEDGES: You die a
wonderful job! We are all very pro
ud of you1
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA: Thanks for
the great social! Let's go on vaca
fion next semester The Alpha
Phi's
HAPPY HOUR: The Alpha Sigs will
have a happy hour at the Alley
tonight at 9. Come by for some grogs
and good times.
ALLEY HAPPY HOUR FUND
RAISER: Send us to New Orleans
Dec 4th, SI admission 9pm lam
MIKE PAULA, JIM, E LIZ, AND
KEVIN: What a great way to
'finish' Roseball '85! We can
defmately hang! Too bad we never
founo Nathan but at least nothing
really tragic happened, like to roof
oeing on fire then we would have
had trouble! Thanks for a wonderful
time that goes for the rest of you du
ha heads too! Love, Pam the Pledge
PARTY WITH THE AOTT'S
TONIGHT: We're having a happy
hour at Cubbies from 9 to 1 Come
join the fun
AOTT The Beta Zeta's hope our
sisters have a great Thanksgiving!
Thanks for the terrific Roseball
Don't forget about cutout the fun is
just beginn.ng.
PHI TAU'S; Be -� e a d y for
Thanttsgiving dinner Tues rnte at
830 and festivities to follow!
PIKA S- Hey you PiKA's we really
hKed ya' The Social was a blast, out
it enoed too fast! Thanks for the
backing, you guys are great! Tne
New Sorority
MISSING: Maroon Hatteras brand
oackpack 'aken by mistake late
Frl afternoon in joyner Library
PLEASE return with contents as
soon as possible for final exam
�ev ew to ECU Dept of Public Safe
y 10th St. NO QUESTIONS ASKED
WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share
mobile home 15 min from campus
$80 per month and ' utilities and
phone Call Bill at 752 1955
FEMALE ROOMMATE: To share
Apt Ringold Towers Rent
$170 month plus 4 utilities and
phone Call 758 5642 after 5
TYPISTS: $500 weekly at home!
Write P.O. Box 975, Elizabeth, NJ
07207
FEMALE ROOMMATE: To share 2
bedroom Apt (Village Green).
$135 month, - utilities. Deposit and
on the bus route Call 757 1507
ROOMMATE WANTED: 3 bedroom
apartment with your own private
room. 13 Rent ($125) and 13 of ex
penses Walking distance to campus
good neighbors Wilson Acres Call
Jacque or Rhonda at 757 0551
ROOMMATE WANTED. Tfo share
Apl at 32 Wildwood Villas Call
758 0479 Ask for Johnny
ROOMMATE WANTED: Non
smoking male to share a beautiful,
large garden apartment for only
$140 a month ' j utilities. All in
terested call 355 5766
WANTED: Part time labor for
month of Decemgber Flexible hours
during week and weekend Plant &
see nursery 756 0879
CHEAP TYPING. Reports, etc Call
758 6011 and leave a message
ALTERATIONS: Same day pick up
Formats and dresses Woman's and
men's coats, hats and suits. Have
something for everyone. 429 Evans
St Phone 830 1019 Ask for Lemonia
Express Stitch
SPRING BREAK TRIPS TO
LAUDERDALE AND DAYTONA:
High quality low price. Bus, hotel or
both. Contact Lisa Dwyer at 758 2381
or 758 6260 $30 deposit needed by
Dec 12
1 BEDROOM APT: Screened in
porch, outside entrance, 2 blocks
from campus. Deposit Lease $240
monthly includes utilities Call
752 5778 after 5 30
2 & 3 BEDROOM APTS : Four
blocks from ECU Call 746 3284 or
524 3180
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: Experience, quality work,
IBM Selectric typewriter Lanie
Sh!ve 758 5301
NEED TYPING? Letters,
Resume's. Term papers, etc Call
Karen at 752 0498
FOR SALE: 510'
surfboard Good
756 2620
Becker Tri Fir
condition $90
SALE
GRAND OPENING Chnstmas
special Vintage clothing, iewelry
collectables at Uniquely Yours 903
Dickinson Ave Open Tues Sat n 5
APARTMENT FOR RENT 7th
floor, corner apt Ringgold Towers
$275 per month Ready Dec 1st Call
637 6885
WORD PROCESSING: We offer ex
penence in typing resumes, theses.
technical documents, ana term
papers We manage ana merge your
names and addresses into merged
letters, labels, envelopes or rolodex
cards Our pnces are extremely
reasonable and we always offer a 15
percent discount to ECU students S
& F Professional Computer Co
HAPPY
BIRTHDAY
ALEX!
(back of Franklin's
757 0472
15 E 5?h St
A�9������@
TYPIST: ral
otreadmg s 1
maticai corrections
757 0398 after 5 15pm
nclude pre
q and gram
10 yrs exp. Call
SHOE OUTLET
Name Brand S hoes
A t Disco untP rices
Duck Shoes
Sperry Top Siders
$10 to $20
$10 to $20
Ladies Dress and Casual Shoes
$12.88 to $15.88
Large Selection of Name Brand
Tennis Shoes $12.88to $39.88
203 West Ninth Sreet



'
h
s
h

w
s
X
s

4
l
1
C,
Hooker Memorial Christian Church
iDl&ciples of Chrict)
1 1 11 Greenville Blvd 756-2275
fy
s


i
i
s
"l

h

.


'I
i!
'i
ii
ii

Re.
0
2
H Vann Koiqht
T
"In essentials. U-lnify
In nun-essentials. Jitedom
In ail things. J.ovt
Special Classes For College Students
9:45 a.m. Christian Education (ail ages)
11:00 a.m. Worship- Open Communion
" HAMtfT
��nr
Check our stock of
Cliffs Notes for the help
you need in under-
standing difficult nov-
els, plays and poems.
Millions of students use
them to earn better
grades in literature.
GET CLIFFS NOTES
HERE:
SI 8 COTAKCHE
GBtDfvTLLE, N.C.
& Leisure System Studies
Present
AIR BAND CONTEST
Tuesday November 26, 1985 9:00-1:00 A.M.
Admission $1.00 $2.00 18 yr. olds
85C All Cans
PRIZES
1st $100 cash plus 1 year pass to the ELBO
2nd $50 cash plus 1 year pass to the ELBO
3rd $25 cash plus 1 year pass to the ELBO
Sponsors
Chico's
Time Out
Young Arts
Simmon's
Apple Records
For Hoods Only
Marsh's
Chinatown Express
Heart's Delight
Suxie's Pizzeria
Bicycle Post
J.E. Horiey Davidson
For More infomation, coll 758-4591 or LSS Deportment (ECU)
Season Opening Win
Continued from page 7
maining to play. The Bucs then
got the transition game going.
Baskets by Henry and
Vanderhorst gave the Pirates a
seven-point lead (38-31).
The Camels managed to come
back and chop the Pirate lead. A
Tracy Williams jumper clipped
the Buc lead to three (40-37) with
Lady Bucs
Face Francis
Marion
Continued from page 7
better team
The next competition for the
Lady Pirates will be Saturday
when they play the Francis
Marion College team at 7:30 p.m
in Minges Coliseum.
Coach Man waring expects a
tough game from Francis
Marion, which has returned two
all-American's from last year's
squad and has held the title of
1982 NCAA Division-II national
champions.
Last year. Francis Marion had
their best record ever, finishing
with a record of 26-4. They
averaged 93.5 points per game,
which was the highest of any
team (men's or women's) in the
country. They led the NAIA in
winning margin, with a 30.2 ad-
vantage per game.
11:17 left in regulation.
The Pirates began to work the
ball inside and increased their
lead to 48-39 on a pair of Leon
Bass free throws. The Bucs the
extended their lead to double
figures (53-43) on a Hardy free
throw with 5:34 remaining.
Consecutive inside baskets h
Bass, coupled with the Pirates
shooting 10 of 15 free throws in
the last four minutes of pla,
were enough to give ECU a 69-62
victory and a season-opening
win.
As a team, the Pirates con-
nected on 56.4 (26-39) percent ot
their field goals, while the Buc
defense forced a 41.3 (26-63)
percentage for the visiting
Camels. The Pirates went to the
foul line 36 times, connecting on
25.
Vanderhorst was second for
the Bucs with 17 points while
Bass was third with 10. The
Pirate freshmen added 14 points
for ECU.
Campbell was led by junior
guard John Huffstetler with 16
points. Senior gpard Juan Austin
added 12, while forward
Williams chipped in 10.
"It was a fairly close game
Harrison said. "Bill's (lee,
( ampbell coach) kids played
hard, they did a nice joh.
"I was pleased by the way our
young kids played, I'm not afraid
to use any of them Harrison
added. "They're going to get bet-
ter and better as the season
on
The Pirates have a week ofl
their next game is Dec 2 in
Durham, when (hey battle the
highly touted Duke Blue Devils.
"Our kids are looking I
to it, I'm looking forward
Harrison said. "They're deser'v
ing of their ranking, they've pro
ven it in the past
Monday -DRAFT & DRYER DAY
25C Draft & 25C for 18
minutes on the Dryers
Tuesday TWO FOR ONE DAY
Wash one load of clothes,
the 2nd wash is on us
Wednesday -SOAP & SUDS DA Y
75C Long neck bottle
beer and free soap
Specials Run All Day
pen 8 am 12am 7 dd,b a weu
25101 I II . .
THIS IS 0 BULL!
TO RENEW:
CGMTACT:
ALL BOOKS ARE DUE ON DECEMBER 5 th
L. HAT
HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY
Mr-jr-vr nnitC lO Pi' Hall rT -Qnr3 llr�- rf � n r rrt-s-r
r"i
Thanksgiving Hours
WOVtA�t9�R 21S a.m. - 9 p.m.
N0VEM3ER23CLOSED
NOVEMBER 29Resume Regular Holts
LIQUIDATION SALE
FINE QUALITY HAND KNOTTED
INVESTMENT PIECES OF
PERSIAN RUGS &
OTHER ORIENTAL
CARPETS
65 to 75 �7o OFF
The collection which is the finest quality. The partial list: Silk Qume, Esfahan,
Nain Part Silk, Chinese, Kerman, Tabriz, Sarouk, and Many Other Sizes from 2 x 3 to
10 x 14. Each rug comes with certificate and appraisal
Terms: Cash, Check, Master Card, Visa
Sponsor: Dryus Liquidators
203 W�GvXBM � By the Order of
24 By Pass Secured Parties
Grnvl,l Over 300 pieces
Friday, Nov. 29 All Sizes: Large, Small
10 a.m. to 8 p.m. And Pfltocg 5fagg
fh
" " r , " "� '
I





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Title
The East Carolinian, November 26, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.444
Location of Original
University Archives

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