The East Carolinian, November 21, 1985






She
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.60 Nh4425
Thursday, November 21, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 12.(KM)
- -�"m�'l "�����
I ECU Provides Equal
iJobs, Pay To Women
This Doesn 7 Hurt
JIW LEUTGENS - The Ea�t Carolinian
Cheryl Curtis (right) donates blood as nurse Carolyn Belch looks on. The Bloodmobile is here on
campus today from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. in the Mendenhall Student Center room 244 and is sponsored
by SRA. The Red Cross reports that college students donate over 15 percent of all blood donated. So
give the gift of life � give blood.
N.C. Has Teacher Shortage
Bv JENNIFER MYERS
Maff Wnirr
North Carolina, along with
every other state in the United
States, is experiencing a teacher
shortage. Graduates with
teaching degrees from East
Carolina University alone have
declined from 885 in 1973 to 353
in 1985.
According ro Tina Drye, (he
director of Certified Personnel of
Pitt County, "A major reason is
the changing role of women in
society. Teaching used to be a
good choice for wives who
wanted a back-up job for their
husbands' incomes, as well as a
good job to hold while raising
children due to the teacher's
schedule. Nov. women are
reprogrammed to be self-reliant,
and not to enhance a man's in-
come, but to have their own
career
"Women and minorities used
to be encouraged to enter the
teaching field. They weren't
sought after in the business
world. Now the tables have been
turned
Furney James, director of the
ECU Career Planning and Place-
ment Office, said. "Now at ECU
42 percent of the business majors
are females and over 50 percent
of the accounting majors are
female
Another cause of the teacher
shortage is due to the population
boom. James said, "More
children are coming into the
public schools. This is caused by
the attitude of the '70s crowd not
having children 'til they were in
their 30s. They were career-
oriented. The '80s crowd are hav-
ing children at a younger age
This causes an overflow, for the
children of '70s and '80s parents
are reaching school age at the
same time.
Salaries are also a cause of the
shortage. With women now in the
working world, possible private
industry salaries tend to be higher
than those obtained by teachers
and offer more monetary growth
opportunities. Drye said, "The
entry-level salary for teachers is
as good as or bettet than most
graduates will get. Yet 15 years
down the line and only making
$22,000 is a deterring factor
"North Carolina teachers have
had a 25 percent raise in the last
two years according to James.
"This year, the entry level pay iv
$15,680. The governor proposes
to raise it next year to S16.390
Teachers specializing in areas
such as math, chemistry, foreign
language, drama and speech,
among others, are the hardest to
find. Graduates with these
degrees tend to seek jobs in the
business world where salaries are
higher and advancement more
certain. There are more teachers
certified in kindergarten through
fourth grade than any other age
group.
As to whether a teacher prefers
elementary grades, high school or
college, "it depends on the in-
dividual's temperament and per-
sonality Drye said. "If the
teacher loved children, he or she
would probably concentrate in
elementary education
According t o James,
"Teaching in public school isn't
easv. You have to keep the
children all day, and you work
from 25 to 30 hours a week. Col-
lege professors work 10 to 15
hours a week and only see the
students a few hours at a time
However, more years of educa-
tion is required.
"Teachers are their own worst
enemy says Drye. "They tell
you not to go into it. It is an un-
conscious stance that we are not
supposed to take. They will say
they love it, yet they put it down.
They tend to be responsible for
discouraging it
According to James, "The
jobs will be in education. School
systems from Florida, Delaware
and California are coming to the
ECU Placement Office to inter-
view possible teachers
"Teachers do a lot of shaping
and molding, contributing a lot
to society. In choosing a career, it
should he self-fulfilling, not
necessarily glamorous
By DOUG ROBERSON
Slmtt Wr1lr
ECU strives to provide equal
employment opportunities for
women; however, men continue
to outnumber women in some
areas of higher education, said
Director of Affirmative Action
Mary Ann Rose.
"ECU is an affirmative action
employer, which means more
than not discriminating against
minorities. Affirmative action
means making positive efforts to
attract more women and blacks
she said.
According to Rose, ECU has
an affirmative action plan design-
ed to attract more qualified
women to the University.
"We try hard to get a number
of qualified women applicants.
We advertise our job openings
and hold the job open so more
people can apply she said.
By holding positions open,
Rose said ECU is attempting to
prevent a closed network of hir-
ing, "In the past, job openings
were publicized by word of
mouth. Men told men about
jobs; therefore, more men were
hired
Rose said the number of
qualified women applicants has
been increasing in recent years.
"The Education Amendment
of 1972 made it illegal to
discriminate against women in
educational settings. After 1972,
the number of females in non-
traditional fields increased she
added.
Since the mid�1960s, more-
women have been entering tradi-
tionally male-dominated profes-
sions.
"With the women's movement
over the past 20 years, there is
less channeling of women into
nursing, teaching and other
female-dominated professions.
Now, we are seeing more and
more women in traditionally
male fields Rose said.
The difference between the
number of men and women at the
full professor level is "getting
better, as more and more women
work their way up she added.
However, women's progress in
attaining equal representation in
higher education is slow because
of social issues, such as those
concerning child-rearing and
parental obligations, according
to Rose. "Some women have '
balance career advancement with
marital and social respon-
sibilities, ro advance in a career
is a lot of work � someone has to
do the housework
As for faculty pav, Rose -
ECU conducts studies to deter-
mine if any discrepances are pre-
sent between male and female
salaries.
"In pay studies, we look at the
productivity of the individ
We look at their qualifications.
prior teaching experience, and
research and publication
efforts she said.
"The University pays tor pro-
ductivity Rose added. "The
more they produce, the more they
make
According to Rose. 34 percent
of EC L faculty hired are female;
however, more women are leav-
ing the University than men.
"We don't know if the condi-
tions at ECU aren't conducive, if
they aren't acheivtng tenure or if
they're being hired out from
under us. We've establishe
committee on the siatu
women and minorities to deter-
mine whv they (women) are .�
mg she said.
The University attei
avoid discrimination in del
mg faculty salary increa
a;d. "This adrn -ally
tries not to discriminate, !
are aiwavs isolated in . but
we make sure �he-
remedied
"It women or mm
. : salaries arc the res
appropriate decis -an
ne to me and I will see
� as il these people ha
discriminated
"Women have . tade 're?: ;
progress in the past ten y�
But, we're not there yet
New Chancellor's Attributes Released
Bv MIKE 1.1 DWKK
N�w� fdllor
The SGA Student Welfare
Committee released a preliminary
report on the desirable
characteristics of a new ECU
Chancellor.
Speaker of the SGA
Legislature Kirk Shelley said,
"The Board of Trustees asked us
to get as much student input as
possible as to what students
would like to see in a new
Chancellor
Shelley, summarizing the
report, said that one of the
desirable characteristics of the
new Chancellor would be to get
someone from outside the univer-
sity. "The purpose behind this is
to help bring in new ideas of how
to run the university Shelley
said.
Shellev added, "The new
Chancellor needs to be someone
from the south and preferably
from North Carolina The new
Chancellor must be able to work
with the General Assembly and
the Board of Trustees; thus the
regional limitation.
"Someone who is young. That
is someone who can stay with the
university 10 to 15 years stated
Shellev, as another characteristic
of the new Chancellor.
Shellev emphasized that the
new Chancellor should be so-
meone who will rid ECU of the
party school image. "This is a
major factor in choosing a new
Chancellor said Shelley.
Another desirable
characteristic of a new
Chancellor, according to Shelley,
would be someone w ho can main-
tain a relationship with the
students similar to the one
Chancellor Ho well now enjovs.
"We want someone who is
prepared for the increased
growth of IC I and the Green-
ville area. Also, we want so-
meone who will continue the
growth ol ECU athletics
Shellev said.
Shellev stated that the Com-
mute would like to see someone
who will strengthen the academic
standards here at ECU. especially
in the first few semesters for
students Moreover, according to
Shellev, the committee would like-
to see a new Chancellor who
would encourage the use ol
seminar-type teaching strategies
throughout the university.
Finally, Shelley said, "We
would like to get someone who
wili work with professors so thev
can get more national research
grants More important, valley
emphasized that the new
Chancellor should kee ing
ability in mind when acq
new professors
November 2 will be the iast
opportunity tor input
before the final report, whicl
due Dec. 8, -dd Shelley.
The SGA will sponsor a forum
Tuesday afternoon at
Mendenhall, and all students are
highly encouraged to attend.
For the exact time, call
Mendenhall or check Tuc-dav's
edition of the East Carolinian.
Charges Against
Lab Are False
BvJENNTFER MYERS
SUM Writer
Problems earlier this semester
caused confusion over the perfor-
mance of the ECU Photo Lab at
last Monday's Media Board
meeting.
Charges made by former East
Carolinian staff member Steve
Sherbin, said the Photo Lab was
not providing adequate services.
Sherbin said he had asked the
Photo Lab employees to develop
some of his film, and they did not
do so quickly enough. However,
it is not the Photo Lab's respon-
sibility to develop non-
photographers' film.
Media Board member Chris
Tomasic said, "It is up to each
publication to get their work
done. The Photo Lob has no
control over the photographers.
!f any problem existed, it would
not be related to the Photo Lab
Photo Lab Director Jon Jor-
See CHANGES Page 2.
Smokeless Tobacco Presents Risks
Bv BETH WHICKER
Maff W rtlr
Despi'e advertisement and pro-
motion for smokeless tobacco, its
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds11
Editorials4
Features7
Sports10
On all these shores, there
are echoes of past and future:
of the flow of time,
obliterating yet containing all
that has gone before.
�Rachel Carson
increased use presents a signifi-
cant health risk, said F. G.
Glover, an associate professor in
community health.
"Nearly 20 percent of all males
aged 18 to 24 use smokeless
tobacco in some form accor-
ding to a study conducted by E.
G. Glover; Paul Altson, Pro-
fessor of Rehabilatation Counsel-
ing, and Polly Edmundson,
graduate student in Health
Education.
The study, which included 632
students, male and female, was
headed by Glover, who is cur-
rently an expert witness in a land-
mark case involving the effects of
smokeless tobacco.
Glover, who is concentrating
his research in the prevalence,
patterns and effects of smokeless
tobacco use, has appeared on
Good Morning America, 2020,
and the Congressional Cable
News Network. He has also been
quoted on smokeless tobacco by
Reader's Digest, Time, USA To-
day, and the Associated Press.
"The prevalence of smokeless
tobacco use has risen dramatical-
ly in the U.S. in the last decade.
Use of smokeless tobacco in-
creased by an average of 11 per-
cent per year between 1974 and
1981, especially among young
males in high school and
college cites Glover.
"The increased use of
smokeless tobacco involves a
high risk to the user's health.
Smokeless tobacco has the poten-
tial for causing cancer of the oral
cavity, pharynx, larynx, and
esophagus. Moreover, smokeless
tobacco can produce significant
detrimental effects on the soft
and hard tissues of the mouth
said Glover.
"Users' of smokeless tobacco
chances of getting oral cancer is
four times greater than that of
the non-user. The area of the
mouth in which the tobacco is
held stands a 50 percent greater
chance of contracting oral
cancer says Glover.
"Forty-three percent of ECU
See SMOKELESS Page 2.
Want One Daddy
CHif�r
� The Eait Carolinian
Jonathan David Stotesbury checks out a new tractor that his
father would like to own. Jonathan and his father are enjoying the
Tobacco Growers Show, which runs through today. More than
20,000 visitors are expected to attend the largest show in the
southeast.


I





I Ml t s C RQ1 IMN
NUi 1Bl K 21, 1�VK
Announcements
THANKSGIVING
DINNER
A H - -�
SIGMA GAMMA RHO
i

BIOLOGY CLUB
� - . . �
.
SM.OKEOUT

� .
SENIOR VOICE
RECITAL
� . "
� . � � ' � .
y"S �' V�
� � ' ' V
. iai at the �. .��
CATHOLIC STUDENT
CENTER
� i m it tn Nnvmai I e �- -
�. ited a
GAMMA BETA PHI
Beta Pi a ia :� � -
�. . .
- - .
FORENSIC SOCIETY
� ��� Hov 25 Jl
i .s � . ' at last v
����
COUNCIL OF
HONOR SOCIETIES
- . .
SIGMA TAU DELTA

lay. N
PARADE
� I H �t ��. Dav � I
v - . . . �. .
�.
� � �
'��� '���
� � � � . � .
i � � .
GRADUATE STUDENTS
�-� .
'�' �
PREPARING FOR FINALS
-

� �
Smokeless Tobacco
Hazards Signifigant
Photo Lab Does
Provide Services
ontinued From Pae 1
toba 22 per

and i 3 pei cent ai e
� less toba
reites �
females report being ex
one perce
kers.
h
5

I
awai -
� or
Gl

M
1
Continued rrom Pane 1
said, " 1
le lal �
d'lMSMl
Medi
� I!
need
:e fi Lal
f
i
oi evei
pub;
' rdan Si me times ese
ther assignments. If filn
�' takei b
B, " i t' s
n iffy pro
ill be developed quick
due to the her
assignments Jordan said. "We
ilways guarantee prompt
service for othei people We are
not a fast photo
Jefl Canandy, editor ol �
pressions said, "I don't think the
i Photo 1 abi services have
decreased I he just can't otter
some ol the services that we need
ie. The Photo
I an is fine "
1 xr ' accord ng to
lor photos
n. And Photo 1 ab
i c k - a n -
services
Read.
CThe
Shop N jhl . " ?The Pio2c
Christmas Shopping H01
f a ana easy A for bus :
the n r exti jiffs around few
� � " . . ' :
lamps � dinnerware � glassware � gifts
housewares � linens � decorative accessories
cards & stationery � lifestyle furniture
galleria
&aieigh�Durham�GreensDOfo�Wiison�Greenvil!e�Wilmington�Fayeftev:le
0lKlLlirS4�
UIMIIOVS
ou've got talent, we I ave a place for you at Opry-
�nd -� w For 1986 we'll produce a dozen
different musical sin iws i Bering the past and pres-
ent of Ameri a - fa i trite musk . We're looking for
over 350 of Amei ica's most talented, dynamic
young pe ple. Ak II be auditioning SINGERS
(prepare three selei lions and bring sheet music in
the proper key); DAN ;ERS (prepare a routine of
no more than one Minute); CONDUCTORS and
INS! RUMENTAUSTS (most instrumentalists will
be ask� I to id first); interv ieu ing STAGE
MANAGERS, and a cepting resumes for TECH-
NICIANS. Our winter audition tour will stop in 30
c ities coast-ten oast. Check belou for the auditions
in your area, No appointment is necessary and a
pian) ac (ompanist will be pr a ideci.
HAPflHIII NOHIHC AHOIINA
-
WINS JON SAIJM N (
� 198' �
h
2802
� �
I si
Opuxmndusa
RECORDS
We Buy
Used Albums &
Tapes
"Best Prices Paid"
112 E. 5th St. 758-4298
i;hanks( ;ivlg
f, -
.

'
,
�tS
t ,1


r
Pepsi
Free .
Michelob
Beer
s319
Paul Masson
Wine
J
$449
Moore's Potato r�
Chips 99�
Riunite 4
Cuties . .
Smoked
Ham
Breyer's
Ice Cream
Jumbo
Headless
Shrimp
Fresh In-Shell
Oysters . . . .
$1999
Grade A
Turkey .
0
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd � Creenviii
�a�a�C-
Drasti
Uni
vers
EC
Ticke
11 a.m.
Mend
5
Pi
R
Cal
Call Fi
Call I -
"
� �





obacco
figan t
IHl IASAKOI I MAN
NOV1 MBI-K21. 1985
Ti ffjj T
lunite 4
uties . .
Smoked
Ham
98
rade A
urkey .
59
�'
Go Krogermg
Drastic Campus Smoking Policies Considered
College Paik. Md. (CPS) I he
chancelloi signature in all that is
needed for the I niversit) ol
Mass land to implement on
the most drastic smoking policies
ol am college campus.
Joseph Gilmour, Chancellor
John H Slaughter's top assistant,
says slaughter fully supports the
tough new restrictions.
The polic) would ban smoking
in classrooms, lecture halls,
libraries, hallways, a third ol the
campus' dii I ills and lounges
and an offk e in ��� tn non
smoke: objects to smoking
Mai s land's measure,
he faculty-dominated
Campus Senate, n
ardlv �und break;
Already, hundreds of schools
havt ed sir
espoi new
bing smcl
restaura
some case ses.
1
system,
. omph wit
e smokii
Pacilic I utheran. South.
-�

In all, ;
have enacted sn -
� . Nai

But the Mais land faculty
wasn't responding to any highei
lass when it began discussing its
own smoking ban, points out
Student Government Association
President Kim Ric
Instead, faculty members were
ai oused by the Surgeon General's
citing the harmful ef-
fects ol smoke on nonsmokers.
While Rice admits "students
here favot some sort ol policy
she says some did object because
ti had been instigated by faculty,
but would primarily affect
students.
Because Mats land students
"are in favoi of some sort ol
polii Rice dn othei SGA
members passed a resolut
ate's measure,

desi as.
'� I he v ampus Senatei

m ust I abl
day say s Ric e "Si udents
shouldi
wai Me
SI .
SGA � n say -
Historically, campus legisla-
tion rarely is received favorably
by faculty, students and ad-
ministrators alike, but when it
comes to smoking, campuses na-
tionwide seem to be m concur-
rence.
Stanford, foi example, reports
"across the board compliance"
with its January, 1985, ban on
smoking in any open environ-
ment. Presidential assistant
Marlene Wine attributes such
cooperation to Stanford's high
percentage between 80 and 9()
percent oi nonsmokers.
Associated Student member
I eslie I eland says the measure
"simply hasn't had that much ef-
fect because hardly anybody
smokt d anyway
Ml this did was give someone
to speak up to someone
ose smoke ssas bothering
n she adds.
A survey in The Stanford Daily
found students had "no com-
plaints" about the smoking
measure.
Stanford adopted the ban in
1984 when Santa Clara County,
in which Stanford is located,
passed a law requiring it to
establish written policies.
Florida's Clean Indoor Air
Act, passed last June, forced the
entire Florida State University
system to ban smoking in all
public places this summer.
Creating designated smoking
areas has met with little
resistance, says university
spokesman Bill Shade, primarily
because students know the ate
has demanded it.
While campus police depart-
ments consider violations of the
law a misdemeanor, University ol
Miami police, for one, base had
no reports of outlaw smokers.
University Optometric Eye Clinic
DR. DENNIS O'NEAL
� Comprehensive Eve Examinations
� Contact Lenses
. � � ,
� Glasses
� Student & Fac � . scounts on Contacts &
Glasses
� Convenient t
We're ready to
help you solve your
literature problems
with a complete
stock of Cliffs Notes
covering frequently
&VSt asS!9ned noveis,
' ��� I plays and poems.
Cliffs Notes are used by millions
of students nationwide to earn
better grades in literature
iET CLIFFS NOTES
HERE:
At Oregon's Chemetel i
munity College, students .
plained immediately, aboul a
campus smoking ban "I
there were only two
smoking areas Snow sas
Since the policy became effe
last spring, "things ha
very quiet
Snow, who also set .
dent of the Commun
of Oregon Student
sass practically every schoo
!
! has enacted, or at l�
dering, similar legislat
Most schools have g
the same process
g smoking area I
haven't I und it a problem he

It any one finds the new smok
a problem, it is tacul
� t members who si
�bservers n
see Kit GH Pae 6.
612 E. 10th Street
758-6600
i
t
A Complete Meal On A Bun"
Party Subs Avaiable
i 28 Different Subs To Choose From
r
$1.00 OFF Large No.
19
SUPER SPECIAL
EXPIRES 11 30 85
50C.OFF
Any
LARGE
SUB
�"i
EXPIRES 11 30 85
516 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE. ti.C. C
25C OFF SMALL
y SUB
EXPIRES 11 30 85
J
I

;

;






I



I

JAY LENO
Comedy For The Eighties!
Monday, November 25
8:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
J ECU Students & Guest: $1.50
ECUFacultyStaffandDependents: $3.00
Public and at Door: $4.00
Tickets available Monday through Friday from
� 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Central Ticket Office,
� Mendenhall Student Center. Phone 757-6166,
ext. 266 for more info.
Sponsored by the Student Union Special Events
t Committee
MONDAY
MEXICAN MADNESS
FREE NACHO BAR 10 PM til WIDNITE
1 99 MARGARITAS - 75 DRAF 3 50 PITCHERS
TUESDAY:
LADIES' NIGHT 5 - 9 PM
ALL LADIES WILL RECEIVE A CARNATION
1.67 WINE SPECIAL - 1 50 HOUSE HIGHBALLS
10 O CLOCK MUNCH 10 PM TIL MIDNITE
FREE PIZZA BAR
WEDNESDAY:
ALL YOU CAN EAT BEEF RIBS . .
INCLUDES SALAD POTATO AND BREAD
7.95
Pirate
Walk
Call For Reservations.
Make Permanent
Reservations
Call Before Class
Call For An Escort
Call Us
"We're Here
For You
Applications For Next Semester
Now Being Excepted At
Office.
6
6
1
6
SUN
THURS
6 pm
to
12 am
THURSDAY:
COLLEGE NIGHT
3 50 PITCHER - 75 DRAFT - 1 67 WINE SPECIAL
FRIDAY:
SCHNAPPS NIGHT
STRAWBERRY PEPPERMINT APPLE
& PEACH SCHNAPPS FOR 1 75
FREE FIESTA FOOD BAR: 11-1 PM
SATURDAY:
SOURS & COLLINS FOR 1.99
FREE FIESTA FOOD BAR: 11-1 PM
SUNDAY:
.99 DRINK SPECIALS
TEQUILA SUNRISES � BLOODY MARYS
MIMC3A � CHAMPAGNE � SCREWDRIVERS
Darryls Delivers � Call 757-1973
NEW
Fiesta Food Bar
On Friday & Saturday
Nights 11 p.m. to 1 a.m
FREE
mm






�Iu iEaat (Earnlimati
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
llkl I i DWICK, w�&
St oi i Cooper, v
U HN Sli so.
1 ORIN PASQl V! . .
Di en wi! i Johnson i
rOMNORTON ,
3m Stone, ������� i
POM I t VENDER, ,
Anthony Mar iin. �� w
John Pi rERSON, , MiWagr)
Shannon SHORT, p � w
Di bbii Sum ns w�
Novembei 21. Wfo
Opinion
Page 4
Signs Of Disquiet
Campus Is Restless
A state of expectation has settled
in and it's difficult to pinpoint why.
This campus is on edge. The elec-
tricity is as palpable to the discern-
ing observer as it was to Benjamen
Franklin in the days of yore. It
feels like Churchill downs before
the gates open on the Kentucky
Derby. 1 he signs are clear.
Nh sports editor has taken to
babbling distractedl) about the
psychedelic properties of a rare
South American herb called
piplezintzintle. And I am led to
suspect that its effects might ac-
count for the way he's been wat-
ching reruns o' "We're Going
After the Best commercials on
the VCR lie installed in here at the
beginning of the semester and talk-
ing about taking up skydiving or
motorcycle racing. It's a sorry spec-
tacle, but as he points out, the
Pirates have only one game left to
redeem themselves this season and
he has alot riding on the outcome.
He's been betting heavily on
Pirate victories this season and now
everything he owns except his VCR.
an ice chest and a pair of Darth
Vadar wrap around sunglasses is in
hock He'll be ruined, he says, if
the Pirates don't win against LSU.
My news editor, meanwhile, has
been staring ar me with wild bulging
eyes in between fast and savage
slashes with an exacto knife and in
termittent gulps of coffee. The of-
fice rumor mill has it that he's been
on diet pills for weeks now ever
since word came from the Media
Boa: d that one of his staff writers is
being accused of moonlighting as a
root doctor. "My reputation on
this campus will be ruined he
moans. Indeed, root doctors are
not in good repute in this part of
the country, though it's been
reported that some members of the
faculty attest to their curative
powers with passion and fervor
among a small circle of intimates.
1 ocked in a lonely office off in
an obscure corner the new Features
editor labors over tomes of Sanskrit
and mumbles half-audible mantras.
I ately, as he sips brandy in his cof-
fee and smokes strange smelling In-
donesian cigarettes, he's been talk-
ing about the pulse of the campus.
People are in a state of agitation, he
says They want turkey. They want
T.V. football, the "Macv's thing"
and a break from school. They're
tired of culture and a kaeidoscope
ot serious thoughts. What's needed
is a period of brainlessness.
Everyone would appreciate it. I'm
sure he's right.
Faculty members have begun to
complain that their students are gig-
gling distractedly and drooling on
i hem selves openly in class.
'They're test happy one teacher
told me. Whole sections of their
brains are in rebellion.
It's true and the writing is on the
wail. But how else can one behave
when the tale ot a generation hangs
in the balance? Men are wringing
their hands in Geneva. Halley's
comet nears and the walls o! the
nearest men's room beats an
ominous coded message that I am
still unable to crack: "Man will
never cease his exploration, and at
the end of all his exploring, he will
arrive at where he started and know
the place for the first time
Ralph Waldo Emerson or Henry
fhoreau or Sartre.
SiMCe THE WJRCHENKD AFFAIR, 7HATS TAKEN QUA MOIS
m M6ANIW6
Campus Forum
South Africa Editorial Criticized
I he editorial entitled "NC si
trustees; Partial Divestment" (The
I ast Carolinian, Novembei 14. 1985)
contains a grotesque combination of
factual errors, selective ; d il-
logical ai gumt � . h can only be
described .is bizarre. Con i few
examples ol some ol ihe "gems"
foi ced upon i eadei s:
1) Ve are offered the empirical ob
vation thai apartheid is a sy tei "
which confines the majority oi
African population to 13 percenl
" � land while s
is resei sed for In i
the Black popul i
political right i in
some
country, it elesx
demographically
Vfrica with 1
Moreovei. the lai e
�' I '
- a
nation of Blacks occui �
'ed on ' :iskir'
nesbui g
2) We ai formed if
American corporal i
strengthen the apartheid
an atten justify this
claim, we are even provided witl
"example "I he Floui ttion
led an unsuccessful effort in Wf to
repeal the ban on Export-Im
Bank direct loans to South, fri
What we are not told is that the Flour
Corporation had secured a contract
to build several oil-from coal produ
tion plants in the rransvaal, and thus
had a commercial interest in the con-
tingent financing of the project. Fur-
thermore, no mention is made ot the
stiff competition Flour faced from
multinationals representative ot other
Western nations each offering its own
financial package. Ihe opportunistic
selection of material may he
highlighted b another purported
"example" of heinous American cor-
porations deliberately supporting
apartheid; to wit, IBM makes
the computers which are used to en-
force the pass laws that regulate the
passage of blacks For the
record, the South African police en-
force those aspects oi pass law legisla
tion thai still remain b the random
checking of personal identification
documents oi individuals. It is oi in-
terest to note that since the threat oi
sanctions first arose in the early
sexenries both the South African
police as well as the military have
employed computer hardware and
software produced inside the country
to prevent any dependence on foreign
firms. Selective bias is not only
dishonest journalism, but also insults
the intelligence of the informed
reader.
3) Finally, readers are presented with
supposedly logical arguments It is
argued that foreign u.vesrment
in South Africa enables the minority
government to divert resources away
from productive uses and into a
system of repression and control ot
the majority of the population This
claim defies economic logic. Firstly,
in a free enterprise economy there are
significant constraints upon, and
even limits to, the transfer of
resources from the private to the
public sector. Secondly, should
foreign investment decrease, nothing
prevents the South African
authorities from reallocating public
expenditure away from socially
benefitial services like education and
health, towards military and police
spending. Consider the argument
regarding the level of American in-
volvement in the south African
economy: "Even if the principles
were adopted by every American firm
currently operating in South Africa
only one pel Urica
e would be ' V � iming
this ace u r ai
magnii ud
loss ot �(i few
V
real oI ha kely
indu i M
'�
cons!
� �
desti

l

tl of rhe rela
1- for insta
duces
poll . ges, a :
not less, foreign investment
vill assist m removm. : In-
deed, Ml ! dil . � 'u will be pleased
to learn that a deal ot serious
academic research has been de
to precisely this issue. You max even
wani to ventui i ! � ner I it
tead Hermann Yiliomee
Lawrence Schlemmer's new text
titled I p Against the Fences: Pover-
ty, jsc and Privilege in South
Africa (Si Martin's Press, 1985 I
Bi ian Dollery
Greenville Reside!
Editors Sole: To begin with, accor-
ding to the Americanommittee on
Africa, the black population does not
haw freehold properly rights in any
area oj South A frica except for (he 13
percent oj that country that is known
a the Bant us tans. Moreover, "the
movement oj fricans is strictly
regimented by 'influx control' which
regulates who may enter 'white'
South Africa and under what condi-
tions. The number oj Africans allow
ed to remain in the white areas is
determined b) the needs oj the white
owned economy. African, who are
not employed in the white-owned
economy are regarded as 'superfluous
appendages i.e. women, children,
and old people, and are sent to the
ban tus tans furthermore. "No
African may purchase land outside
the ban tus tans. "
Space does not permit a point b)
point reply to all of the points raised
by the writer above. Yet it is instruc-
tive to note that, as the American
Committee On Africa has stated:
"U.S. investment provides "the
bricks" for certain key sectors of the
(South African) economy. U.S. firms
control 75 percent of the computer
market, 23 percent of the automotive
market, almost 40 percent of the
petroleum producers market, and a
sizable share of the electronics
market. " Consequently, divestment
would be more than a psychological
blow to the confidence of the ruling
minority government. "The effect of
the cut-off of advanced' U.S.
technology would be enormous "
Arms Race
Mrs. Edith Webber's letter in the
Nov. 14 issue of The East Carohnian
shows a sad misunderstanding ot con-
temporary and recent history and
serious flaws in logic. In her first
paragraph, she notes pitifully small
� bachev (a un
x ea �
�.
ills oi
return

elepl ;w

i
� �
' I I
Western I Aas
S
he NATO i Bi
1979,
irger
Western Europe rhe acrion by rhe
SATO l ;ure
Helmui Schn
Den
ed dee uro.
pean security, , �
deployed. 1 ac 1979
1984 the NATO id an
mity to rexersc
limously. Moreover,
NATO countries had
tions during the period 1979 -
in which the Cruise-Pershing
deployment decision xxas made
issue. I he European people -
of them, but a substantial majoril
them - voted for "he governm
which had supported deployment I
missiles. There couldn't be
anything more democratic tha
Is Gorbachev, as Mrs, Webbei
saxs, "taking steps to reduce ten
sions"? I: doesn't look that wax I
me. Soxiet troops continue their ag-
gression in Afghanistan, while a
Sox iet lackey. (Cuba) continues its ag
gression in Ethiopia and Angola.
Soviet media are routinely filled w
violent invectives against the t n
i et's hope lor some improve-
ment in U.SSoviet relations, but
let's be realistic about it.
rhomas 1 Conion
Graduate Student. His
Peeping Tom
It is a shame for someone who
comes to this school tor educational
purposes not to be able to take time
out to be with their friends socially.
This complaint concerns the incident
downtown Saturday night, of which I
was unfortunately a victim - because
Oi this ignorant, half-brained,
muscle-bound football player who
finds pleasure b looking through a
hole in rhe wall to the ladies' room
He was so desperate that he physical-
ly shattered the mirror m order to
seek his peek. It's pretty bad when 1
have to explain to my family and
friends that I have cuts on my face
and arms because an East Carolina
athlete gets his thrills by looking at in-
disposed women through a peep hole
I know that not all collegiate athletes
are like this, for I am one oi them
This is directed to that inconsiderate
fool in Cubbies Saturday night. You
know who you are, and so do I. You
really give college athletics a bad
name, and we all have to suffer
because of the few like you!
Cindy Barbour
Junior, Art
A
ECU
MIS
Green vill
Runs For
��I

-
Vftei
Bloui
men: �
guberi .
84
campaign. Blou - cam
Republic
and brother
Helms. R-NC,
H
stay,
B
ing i
Com
"Founi
Belk. a C .
store ex.
Re:
Dax .
Broyhill, R N
gain the v
tion. I a
would
B.
campaign pt
North s
Thursday a:
throuj
com . � �
believes it �
oi his own n
said. "We'll pu
take to rui
I'm out
His
based
l) l RUSE
�I





ECU Plant
n
n

m � L
ilGCK
Out
The
Library
&
flfc
E NIGH
FREE POS
f" I Ok I
:00 p.m.
Hendrix Theati
Sunday, November 24
ECU Student Union
Films Committee





THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 21. 1985
itNCE

w-
Criticized
s Met leader
(a unilateral moratorium
the end of 1985
completed this
d the release of
sil the West � why
the first place?). She
. President Reagan to
rts" in return.
pe tor rabbit and
they contribute the
ind we contribute the
re's the logic in that?
v . misstates the
' the decision to deploy
Pershing missiles in
I srope. This decision was
the U.S. � it was made
incil in Brussels in
n response to the
if a much larger
missiles targeted against
Western Europe The action by the
N ' uncii reflected pressure
West German Chancellor,
i t, the Social
eader who express-
n over Western Euro-
t missiles were not
� ear between 1979
N ATO Council had an
reverse its decision
loreoer. most of the
tries had one or more
5 dun: . period 1979 �
n which the Cruise-Pershing
� eni decision was made an
rhe I iropean people � not all
a -ubstantial majority of
ted for the governments
rted deployment of
There couldn't be
democratic than that.
irbachev, as Mrs. Webber
iking steps to reduce ten-
' It doesn't look that way to
me. Soviet troops continue their ag-
in Afghanistan, while a
ickej (Cuba) continues its ag-
n in Ethiopia and Angola. The
iei media are routinely filled with
ectives against the United
let's hope for some improve-
meni I SSoviet relations, but
realistic about it.
(onion
Student, History
Peeping Tom
It is a shame ibr someone who
comes to this school for educational
purposes not to be able to take time
out to be with their friends socially.
This complaint concerns the incident
downtown Saturday night, of which I
was unfortunately a victim - because
of this ignorant, half-brained,
muscle-bound football player who
finds pleasure by looking through a
hole in the wall to the ladies' room.
He was so desperate that he physical-
hattered the mirror in order to
seek his peek. It's pretty bad when I
have to explain to my family and
friends that I have cuts on my face
and arms because an East Carolina
athlete gets his thrills by looking at in-
disposed women through a peep hole.
I know that not all collegiate athletes
are like this, for 1 am one of them.
This is directed to that inconsiderate
fool in Cubbies Saturday night. You
know who you are, and so do 1. Vou
really give college athletics a bad
name, and we all have to suffer
because of the few like you!
Cindy Harbour
Junior, Art
ECU Planners Help N.C, Coastal Town
MINNESOTT BEACH�ECU
planners may decide the future
status of an enclave of summer
homes that are completely sur
rounded by the Neuse River 1'
will be made according to an up-
dating of the town's land-use
plan that is being prepared by
ECU planners.
Possible annexation of the
residential community along the
waterfront is one of the issues to
be studied, according to Richard
Brockett, development specialist
with the ECU Regional Develop-
ment Institute (RDI).
Among other things, Brockett
said, "We want to determine
whether Minnesott Beach wants
to maintain its retirement village
growth pattern In effect, he
said, the town "has grown up
around this residential area on
the waterfront,which is surround-
ed by, but not part, of the town
In addition to the waterfront
Greenville Lawyer
Runs For Senate
RALEIGH, N.C.
(UPI)�Greenville lawyer Marvin
Blount vowed Wednesday to
avoid the political skirmishes
reminiscent of past elections in
his bid for the Democratic
nomination for Senate.
"It seems like we have a war
instead of an election Blount
said. "This must stop and it
will
Blount stressed his background
as a special Superior Court judge,
businessman, farmer and com-
munity activist at his first news
conference on a swing through
the state to kick off his Senate
campaign.
The "ideological battles that
did so much to damage" North
Carolina's image during the 1984
races would not inhibit his bid
because he is a political
newcomer, Blount said.
"I think that the people of this
state want a new kind of leader-
ship, a leader with fresh ideas,
with a different way of looking at
things he said. "I'm indepen-
dent. I'm free of political bag-
gage. I'm free from special in-
terest pressures
After his news conference,
Blount said he hoped his involve-
ment with the unsuccessful
gubernatorial campaign of Eddie
Knox in 1984 would not hurt his
campaign. Blount, 46, was cam-
paign manager for Knox, who
after his defeat, switched to the
Republican Party. Knox's wife
and brother supported Sen. Jesse
Helms, R-NC, over Democrat
Jim Hunt in the 1984 Senate race.
"Eddie went his way and I
stayed with the Democratic Par-
ty Blount said.
Other Democrats in the runn-
ing for the seat held by Sen. John
East, R-NC, are Mecklenburg
County Commissioner Thomas
"Fountain" Odom; William
Belk, a Charlotte department
store executive; and former state
Sen. Melvin Daniels, Jr of
Elizabeth City.
Republican political newcomer
David Funderburk and Rep. Jim
Broyhill, R-NC, are trying to
gain the Senate GOP nomina-
tion. East has announced he
would not seek a second term.
Blount promised to take his
campaign person-to-person to
North Carolinians beginning
Thursday and zero in on voters
through the media and television
commercials. Asked whether he
believes it would take $1 million
of his own money to win, Blount
said, "We'll put whatever it will
take to run a good campaign
I'm out to win
His "new style of leadership
based on common sense,
pragmatism and fairness" was
one of the keys to the makings of
a successful campaign, Blount
said.
"I am committed to running
the kind of campaign North
Carolina will be proud of he
said. "I am committed to serving
the people. I am committed to
taking North Carolina's values to
Washington and I'll do this by
devoting my time, my resources
and every ounce of energy to win-
ning this election
and marina, one of the retirement
attractions of Minnesott Beach is
a private golf course, which was
designed by RDI about the time
the town was incorporated in the
early 1970s.
Minnesott Beach is also the
northern destination of a state-
ferry that serves Cherry Point,
Havelock and Cateret County on
the south shore.
Located in Pamlico County,
Minnesott Beach is about 15
miles downstream on the Neuse
River from New Bern. It has a
permanent population of about
150 but doubles or triples its
population in the summer.
"Much of the property is se-
cond homes Brockett said. All
of the property owners, whether
permanent or summer residents,
will be reached in a mail survey,
he added.
"We want to know what the
people think and what their needs
are Brockett said. "We do
know that it is growing in
popu' rity as a retirement
village
"Public views are important.
We want to get input from
everybody he said.
Growth of the town itself
presents problems that are to be
addressed in the land-use study.
One problem is development of
public access to the water.
"There is a lack of public
access Brockett said.
Other problems involve the ef-
ficiency of water and sewer
utilities and the availability of
adequate public services. Also
mandated under provisions of the
state's coastal management act is
development of emergency pro-
cedures such as evacuation in the
event of a hurricane. "There
must be an approved plan of
what to do in the event of a hur-
ricane Brockett said.
Under the Coastal Manage-
ment Act, a land-use plan for
towns such as Minnesott Beach
must be updated every five years.
The work here is funded by the
town at a cost of $3,938, provid-
ed by a grant from the NC
Department of Natural
Resources and Community
Development.
Brockett met with Minnesott
Beach town officials last week.
He said the land-use plan, which
is to be developed within a year,
will be prepared with the town's
planning board and that the plan-
ning board will submit final
recommendations to the town
council. He said a first review
plan should be ready by late spr-
ing.
Brockett, who is working with
the assistance of interns from the
Department of Geography and
Planning, said RDI prepared a
growth development plan for
Ocracoke, NC, several years ago
and has given technical assistance,
such as mapping for development
projects in other northeastern
North Carolina communities.
But the Minnesott Beach pro-
ject is the first land-use plan
"that we have contracted to carry
through fro.n start to finish
Brockett said.
f
'i
ii
ip
�i

��

��������������������,�������������������������fv
(��1
Hooker Memorial Christian Church
(Disciples of Christ)
11 1 1 Greenville Blvd 756-2275
'
s

Y
"In t'ssentials. 'Un.tti
In non-essentials. Jxttdam
In all things. .Lout.
Special Classes For College Students
9:45 a.m. Christian Education (all ages)
11:00 a.m. Worship- Open Communion

R H Vann hmqht
Honors Program3.4 gpa
Anth 1000 Europ, o.udies 3001 Econ 2113 Engl 1200 Forl
2221 Geog 2001 Hist 1551 Hist 1553 Phil 1100 Soci 2110
Seminar. "What's All This Fuss About Humanism?"
(Hums, credit)
Seminar: Church & State In The U.S. soc. Sci credit)
Seminar: MasculinityFemininity: New Perspectives (Soc.
Sci. credit)
Seminar: Astronomy: In Celebration of Halley's Comet
(Science credit)
Seminar: Astronomy Lab (Science lab credit)
Seminar: The 50'S (Hums. OR Soc. Sci. credit)
Any student with a 3.4 gpa qualifies to take Honors courses any
time.
For more info, see Dr. David Sanders, 212 Ragsdale (757-6373)
Hlth 1000 Libs 1000 Libs 3102 Math 1085 Math 2171
ADVERTISE
Two men. Not soldiers. Not heroes Just dancers. Willing to risk their lives for freedom and each other.
I
A TAYLOR HACKFORD FILM
WHITE NIGHTS
COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS A NEW VISIONS PRODUCTION MIKHAIL BARYSHNIKOV GREGORY HINES "WHITE NIGHTS"
STARRING: GERALDINE PAGE HELEN MIRREN � JERZY SKOLIMOWSKI �S ISABELLA ROSSELLINI � MUSIC SCORE BY MICHEL COLOMBIER
MUSIC SUPERVISED BY PHIL RAMONE CHOREOGRAPHY BY TWYLA THARP � SCREENPLAY BY JAMES GOLDMAN AND ERIC HUGHES
STORY BY JAMES GOLDMAN � PRODUCED BY TAYLOR HACKFORD AND WILLIAM S. GILMORE � DIRECTED BY TAYLOR HACKFORD
PG 13 "(�" tutOMircftUTiOMO-s 1)1? I I) M I
mm� Mat. �( M 9t IMWHrJIt �' CIMMr UMI' 13
ORIGINAL SOMOTRAC ALBUM WAitABi
OtiATlAITC RECORDS AM) CASSETTES
stAC m ABSAMS 90T
POATMi! Of A rllM
nriPXTSTEHK)l
"SAY YOU SAY ME"
(TITLE SOMG)
? �� � � ���
u.LIONEL RICHIE ST"
Motown Reuyi
"SEPARATE LIVES"
MMMMB)
ft�.h PHIL COLLINS M MARILYN MARTIN
FREE POSTER
TO AT&T CUSTOMERS
STUDENTS PRESENTING THEIR CURRENT AT&T LONG
DISTANCE PHONE BILL OR THEIR PERSONAL AT&T
CALLING CARD AT THE DOOR OF THE THEATER WILL
RECEIVE A FREE MOVIE POSTER.
Brought to you courtesy of ft.QO r m
Hendrix Theatre
Sunday, November 24
ECU Student Union
Films Committee
AT&T
The right choice.
0 � �� �� -r m -mm n� Mp �� MM M I
1JP �" W & f � � fPI 0f -JMW ���;��!?� P I
m �� ?
'�-�i imfrlmmmwim
ir
� wmAgmjigmiglbift i





w
1 Hi I si t -xkoI INIAN
V'Vl MHl K 21, is�s
r
Mi-CulU
Campus Voice
Which system of preregistration do you prefer,
the old card system or the new on-line
registration system?
Peelt
"I prefer the new on-line
system is much better than the
old said Catrn McCttHey, a
freshman planning to major in
physical therapy. "You know ex-
actly what you have right away
she added.
" The new system is much more
practical said innie Peele. a
senior majoring in corrections
"The new system not only con-
serves time, but it also allows you
to see your transcipt from years
past, making working with your
advisor a lot easier said Peek.
"It also gives you a more per-
sonal input with your advisor
because you can actualh sit there
and talk to him as you look at the
screen added Peele.
"I like the new system better
because it is much faster than the
old said IanaSea, a pre-med
biology junior. "You know it
you are closed out of a class right
away said Seay. "There is
waiting and wondering if you got
a particular class she added.
"I like the new system better
said Bobb Miehaud. a junioi
majoring in finance, "because
Tin getting more of the classes
that I want than with the old
svstem. The new system just
seems a lot easier to me because i
know what ! have right away
said Miehaud "I: cuts down on
the guessing game added
Miehaud.
Sea
Miehaud
Researchers Look For Lost Colony
! Wll O. i .1 PI) II
� torn
ot :les su
ke h
st G sei
"Itwe d e idence that
.col-
11e isbmei ged in
ke sgoing
a w �. ime
rtu rider -
isi ai ECU. "It
nosi ex-
.� :i
Aatei.ike place in

fail
.da side
t eci
sound's hot: ' sectors

�,has three ave the
'g up

Fin

T OS!
Colony settled bv English
adventure who could nol be
found when their fellow coun-
trymen returned to the area
severai years later. I he merica's
400th nniversar Committee
provided ai 58,001 . tor the
three-week survey.
i he researchei s base i
vestigations on a "rathei signifi-
cant" erosion ' d : ising sea
level during the last 400 ears,
said Richard Stephens
fessoi oi geograph and geology.
barrel well similai I ne used
for retrieving watei during
was f o u n d
s-v ei 5 ag i ofl orthern
end ot Roanoke Island and sup-
. Step
The barrel we
been from the settlement's
posi mentioned in writing f tl e
time, he said.
"It v.e can find rei
the settlement, I thin!
would be probabl �
portani discovery archaeology-
wise in North Ca a for q
some tune Stephensoi
"There are a lot oi unanswered
questions as to exactly, where I
as located. The more
re e
d our what exa
the Losi c olony. It is a
tery

eii -ii:i. ey next week, ���
di es possible ii theii scans
. v items on the sound's
d if the weather holds
' How ev

and we
. d

ECU BIOLOGY CLUB
Giveaway
i
Tough Smoking Policies
Considered A t Maryland
Most state, md campus
ances ban smoking
irity of
? �� : the University
�her
schools, smoking is prohibited if
only one occupant objects.
Faculty and stafi members ai
Boston College, all Minnesota
schools, Harvard and V .
colleges have found the policies
to be trying ai first.
13" Color Television
Remote Control � Cable Ready
Retail Value $350.oo
Purchase tickets for a Si .00 donation
Drawing Dec. 2, 7 PM
Dinner for two; Highest Salespers
Proceeds no to Scholarship und.
University Of Texas
Gives Winners Bonus
sun, i K PS) i
truly a
sister scl oi
i buy tl
respectal ge Ha aid in
tuncemei
less. V -
then
Prize w
Michae Bi
(ioldste
pne I
officia
Gree
i �
.

M
204 Eg 758-1427 fcx
Albums and Cassettes on SLl For $6.99!
Latest Releases By:
A .
Vfany Mure On Sale
SPECIAL DEALS
V .

$4 99
S5 99
11
��?�.
Wow In Stock
Stevie Sicks � "Rock A I �
� Pat Benatar � "5 Hard
� Thelash
99
One tost where only
you know the score.
a
II L
ept ,
" plUSm X
Fwr. tci mat) leiuli
Wt�U TOT �T
I
-
Compton
Graduatj Fellowships
for Black Americans
At Vanderbilt University
If you would like to earn a Ph D in preparation
for college teaching, a Compton Fellowship
for Black Americans at Vanderbilt University
may heip you achieve your goal.
Each Fellowship pays full tuition and fees
plus an annual tax-exempt stipend
of u least $850C for up to
four years
For further information,
call or write
Wn. jwtvWrrn
The Graduate School
Box 32b Peabody ' it i
Nranderbilt Untvervry
Nashville. Tennessee 37203
(615) 322 3936
m
M
si
ft
ft
m
ft
m
ft
Ik
ft
STUDENT STORES
Owned and Operated by East Carolina University
H right Building
GIFT BOOKS
reduced up to 60
�" �'�KsSa��H��� j�
SHOE OUTLET
Name Brand S hoes
At Discount Prices
Duck Shoes
Sperry Top Siders
$10 to $20
$10 to $20
Ladies Dress and Casual Shoes
$12.88 to $15.88
Large Selection of Nam e Brand
Tennis Shoes $12.88 to $39.88
CHRISTMAS LIST
Cook Books
Fiction
Craft Books
Humor
Literature
Game Books
Children's
Books
j
K
ft
ft
i
��
ft
ft
i
di-
ll
B
ft
ft
ft
ft

ft
ft
ft
s
ft
ft
Sale Begins: Monday, November 25
203 West Ninth Sreet
M For A Lasting Gift This Christmas
2 Give A Book! ft
Dramatu -vene from





fexas
ers Bonus
less
IHI t AS1 Rni isns
Entertainment
sc)vj mwn
Greenville Gets Taste Of New Sound
Hv ions Ml o
and
Mll MM Rs
$6 99!
S4 99
$599
1 99
i
only
ore.
Red Hot Chili Peppers Sizzle At J. .
AVS
M
s
If
i
m
m
i

sr
Cook Books
Fiction
Craft Books
Humor
Literature
Game Books
Children's
Books
Is Monday, November 25
m
m
M
M
M
m
m


M
m

m
m
m
m
Deco Bros, i nderground
Pictured from left to riyht: Dayglo Deco, I . Greco Deco, Dada Deco, Sluggo Deco, and n Deco will plav at the I nderground
luesdav from 8 to 10 p.m. Admission is 75 cents for EC! students and mocktails tr�
The Three Sisters Opens To Acclaim
mmmm-mmmm m umtmm
Dramatic scene fromhekhov play The Three Sistei
Bv I ORIN PASQl VI
play about
f the cen-
deliberately slow and

I he
I hrt� istt-rs, Chekov creates a
tverful charactei
iristo atic family
I . live in a
il tow P
e produ
to execute, the
�� m the ECU
: no problem hi -
ng tale to life.
if- first production in
M ow in 1901, I he Ihree
Sisters has become a worldwide
classic, which has been produced
Europe and the
ites ften termed "an
, t it gives each
ious acting
opp each part, from
old family
set v
. begins as three y
sis am oi escaping their
and moving to
Moscow, where they hope to br
life sophistication and

lie unfolds in a stately
country home, the relationship
and iggles of the three sisters,
i and Masha,
cleat v1 . iment the loss o( bei
times and their their father wl
longing foi Moscow's I . .ex
cite : 1 'i.e contemp
romance with attractive soldiers
in their town's local regirm
once led by their father; and. like
others in the cast, they seat
the happiness and fulfillment that
will make their lives meaningful.
Throughout the nearly three
hours of intense soul-searching,
the characters painfully deal with
the hardships and short bursts
happiness of day-to-day living,
I tie dreams they share oi finding
greener pastures bee om e
obscured, And, ultimately, when
they begin questioning life
love, they come to a simple
pragmatic realization: that they
will endure and must go on,
because of, and in spite of,
themselves and adversity.
In the midst o I such
seriousness, however, the
characters remain witty, funny
and ovetlv exaggerated at times
Their personalities and
philosophies become the mosl
important aspect of the play, and
the plot comes across as in-
teresting, but only incidental
Ann Secord plays Olga, an in-
trospective, romantic school
teacher who has never been mat
ried but enjoys her independence.
�� ai
t
dim s a sy
strug I
Sandra Bu
mg vivacious
desp avel
and love � rs only
mori � ippiness
in the pi iddition to fin
dmg her j � om
small a as 1
mot.
d in
ECU'S n Peter Pan
assumes the role oi Masha, an
emotional woman wl an
love a g bored
with her husband
timid old professoi prone to
hysterics and i nbl-
�11 three won serve high
praise tor performing the deman-
ding roles with ease and a sense
oi professionalism. They are fur
ther complimented bv other ac-
complished actors in the troupe,
including Kellv Anchors, as
Natalva Ivanovna, Scott Rymer,
ire
Kev Wil
j
it in j i
More thai �
mes graced
eluding turn-of-thc
army unifi rms a
�d at S2 K
pletely
beat
scenery and ;
unted bv EC1
rk-study and - . I
lents, ad I
al effect of th
� i
liance evident
d uct i o n s
l hrected bv hell,
I he Three Sisters will continue
through Saturday at EC I '
McGinnis Theatre and should no)
be missed. All performances
begin at 81? p.m. and end at
about II M
I ot tickets and information,
call the 1 CU Central Ticket I M
fice at 57-6611.
I





8
I HI EAS1 CAROl INIAN
ViVIAtHIR 21, lsih
Doonesburv
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
K
&A
-�!V V
�.�. ���:�� r. �
, . , �.

r
.4TC'
�V . -f i : �. r ' v c �
HA

?

(
i
�r
y' V
yz
-n
f-
�A
: o
"S
- "� "� � M i
� .
9 ,h
W
li

1
r-
1
0

ft


i4-�(�

, .
M-
Creative Anachronism Society At NCMA
Me
itive na
sen! i
oi M

bury: A M

n i
i
1
I � i -
Cai
la
ay Leo To Appear At Hendrix
ed
B PATMOI.I.OV
M�ff Wrllcr
I was dining at Darryl's I
other evening when. I heard a I
that vas supposed to ha-
kept secret. 1 haw lea .
started the leak, or how. tr
found out for thai matte
true. NBC is grooming me I ta
over the David Letterman
Believe me, folks, it si cl e
as much as it has probat �
ed you. I received a p
from Larry "Bud Mel-
forming me that there ua a ne
to fill a vacancy tor Mr I el
man, who has bee diagi
having a pa.
disease usually asso vitl
the elderly. As s pens
in situations sue! is thi
has started that there exists a
competition between me and the
soon-to-be-visiting corned; a
Jay Leno.
People, let me assure you that
no such competition exists. How
could it? Let's face it; Jay Leno is
simply a comedian who tours col-
leges and dresses like Ted Kopel.
1, on the other hand, am a
respected (?) satirist who reads
Cosmo and watches every rerun
of MASH that was ever created.
No, I feel no sense of rivalry
betweeen us.
You know what's so damn fun-
ny? This man gets paid serious
bucks by television and bv col-
.$'
NEED CASH?
Southern
Gun & Pawn
752-2464
500 N. Greene
9
I
I
I
Process & Print!
with this coupon
Hum l 10 126 15mm
Dtvolor Prim Film
13V2$ per print i
Ireg 27c. & M t9drv hg n g S2 �- I
Example 24 exp film rrg S9 M
Now $4.73
Carolina East Mall
(North Entrance Neai (MK
756 6078
OPEN MON SAT
8 AM to 9 PM
ll
1 imil ipiw riJt iet cotii
oi ,4jkJ with othrr utters
V EXPIRES 12-4-85
F 11
However, let use sa n
.
- �' - � iredh makes an am ta a
k digit would be
e fessional
nytu � v, seriousl�� i rated
dy gets the urge to 1 .
Okay. I ad
� A s a sense side � 1
depai � usi � me, Vfaybe I do feel I wi
ling I'i a
gri
cramps Bui
gy Mi
Sow, I
" ision on
pai' to wh 1
. �

� I've
woken tp M alwavs
It.
lav
THERE'S NEVER BEEN A COMEDY
QUITE LIKE ARER HOURS A RACY
RAUCOUS RIDE THROUGH THE NIGHT
BOUND TQ LEAVE AUDIENCES
REELING WITH LAUGHTER
� � �
ak itl
�ligl lest ti ilur,
and 1 : . ��
my hand. I k at 1 eno He
wears a ninei yd u pa i I (iuc-
ci loafers, and aalvin Klein silk
tie. Have you looked at his 1 �
I -wear to God it l oks like
been flash frozen. If Ja 1 ei �
asn'i a comedian, he w
have :ertainl been one
Bee Gees.
ONSOLIDATED
"HEATRES
:Adults$2.oo;CAHN,lrD,RMEEN
J
BUCCANEER MOVIES
758-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
R 5TH WEEK (Ena
DEATH WISH III
Stern
SHOWS
R

0(i
i on
J oo
f 00
4 (JO
Ends I;

KRUSH GROOV E
Slurry Sheila I . 1 u I t B
Run D.MX Curtis Bl an iS
Von Plaving 2n . H
'
ONCE BITTEN
PC, 13

R
Starts
Friday
Sk y CENTER
Weekdays
7:10 - 9:10
Pre sen ts
Sunday
DRAFT NIGHT
100 DRAFT
ALL NITE
Sunday, November 24, 1985
9:00p.m. to 1:00 a.m.
Admission:
Guys $1.50
Ladies 50C
18 Year-Olds $1.00
Interm
Srt rein led p
Bs 11 NM III ,
New Sh

"
VtS
W
H 1 N I f
VIW PARK1

up.
"I
the n
inte
the a
Anv
ing I
1
of in .
instrun
ba-
ed sine
Nicks
the nig'
N .
bring!
-
We about
album i �
was over ki
album? rh
Wei:
don't make a dun �
This album has
life, grandiose sound
made sia famous,
forget the thoughtless
lyrics either The L P
begin too badlv. with a
ed '�Go which will :
the big video seller, but n plui





k
IHI AS IAROI.INIAN
NOVfMBbR21, 1985
NC MA
OMEDY
RACY
NIGHT
CES
ER
H eekdays
7:10- 9:10
HT
:g � �
� I" �
Intermural Turkey Trot Held
see related pholo, pajje 11
Bn jeannette roth
Muff Wrlln
Depai iment ot
amural- Recreational Ser-
firsi annual 1 urkey 1 rot
.i huge success, with more
2S female and M male trot-
i aiming the tour-mile event
in the fraternity division.
a Phi 1 psilon narrowly
ated Kappa Sigma by a
nd margin in the group
ake first place. Pi Kappa
a captured third, lpha
la Phi fourth, Phi Kappa
id 1 au Kappa Epsilon
the fraternity B division, the
hers from Phi Kappa Tau
V home the "meat with a
g tune fo 51:13 seconds.
a Phi Epsilon is looking foi -
to a "stuffing" rhanksgiv
; placed second in the
B d 1 aki Kappa I psilon
ith third place in front
� K na, Army ROIC
ir.test in the men's
. � div ision, as it w a
the only team that entered.
However, their members ran a
remarkable 48:30 seconds.
In the sorority division, Alpha
Delta Pi came out on top, beating
Alpha Phi by more then foul
minutes. Sigma Sigma Sigma ran
away with third, followed by
Delta eta.
In the women's independent
division, Ian Kappa Epsilon's lit-
tle sister not only flew by
Women's Arms ROTC, but
walked away with the women's
best overall time. Iau Kappa Ep
silon's little "speedsters" crossed
the tape at 55:14 seconds.
Army ROTC followed in the
overall standings with 58:32 ticks
on the clock. Alpha Delta Pi took
the overall third, and Alpha Phi
captured fourth place.
The men's independent divi-
sion became the men overall
winner, with an unusual team
called I K VI k surpassed divi-
sion opponents Army ROTC A.
B and C with a speedy time ol
40:25 seconds. The men from Ar-
my ROTC placed second, third
and fourth in the overall stan-
dings.
Some outstanding individual
performances are as follows:
Barry Scott lead all men's times,
clocking in at 9:37 for his seg
men! ol the race. Milton
Mat hen v fell only five seconds
behind Scott to finish second
among 64. Biker Mike Adrion
finished third overall at 9:59.
The first lady to cross the tape
was Stephanie Ingram, with a
time ot 12:15 seconds. I ihan Ar-
mour ran behind Ingram at
13:19, and Kelly Cox crossed the
line 20 seconds later tor third
place.
Barry Scott, the men's overall
trotter, ran tor the men's overall
team winners, YUK, with team-
mate and individual second-
placer Milton Mat hen v.
Stephanie Ingram trotted for Iau
Kappa Epsilon along with team
mate 1 ilian Armour. It looked as
though YUK and Iau Kappa Ep-
silon packed an awesome one-
two punch in the event.
In Intramural Sport Club hap-
penings, there will be an
organization meeting for the
I uropean Team Handball Club
at 7 p.m. today in Memorial
Gym, Room 105-B.
Those interested in playing
should attend.
The ECU Karate Club com-
peted in the third annual Isshm-
Ryu Karate Classic in Jackson-
ville, N.C Nov. 10. Anne
VanLith placed second in
women's form and fighting in the
Black Belt division. Club presi-
dent Chuck Johnson placed se-
cond out of more than 40 com
petitors from North Carolina,
South Carolina, Virginia and
Maryland in the men's Black Belt
do ision.
The Karate Club will sponsor
beginning classes in karate in
January. On Thursday the 23,
registration will be held will
available class times on the agen-
da.
Crafts Fair
Many of North Carolina's
finest professional designer craft-
smen will display their work
Thanksgiving weekend at the
16th Annual Carolina Designer
Craftsmen's Fair.
The fair is the Triangle area's
largest juried craft show spon-
sored by a professional guild. It
will open Nov. 29 at the Scott
Pavilion at the State Fairgounds
in Raleigh.
Potters, graphic artists, jewelry
makers, glass blowers, fiber ai
tists, furniture makers and
leather workers are among those
who will offer iheir work for sale
at the fair, which traditionally
draws 8,000 to 10,000 viators.
Carolina Designer C raftsmen
is a guild dedicated to contem-
porary applications of traditional
crafts. Members of this guild
hold many national and regional
awards and have their v
featured in museum collections.
The fair hours will be 6 to 10
p.m. Nov. 29, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Nov. 30 and noon to 6 p.m. De
1.
Admission fees are: adults, $3;
students and senior citizens, S2
and children aged 12 and
younger, free.
The guild, which uses tan pro
ceeds to sponsor educational pn
grams for craftsmen and
general public, will also i
craft demonstrations during the
fail.
� oiu i � � i:i � �

1
Museum
Works bv many of the majoi
America fi om I - -
World War 11 will be
wn in the exhibition "An
an Perspective: Paintings
! he Maiei Museum oi -VI,
Randolph Mason Woman's Col-
at the North Carolina
Museum ot Art. The exhibition
will be on v.ew Dec. 14 to Jan
26. 1986
.mong the ; paintings in the
are woi ks by merican im �
ssionists Mary Cassatt, Childe
Hassam, John Twachtman,
Rohm son and
Frederick Frieseke, as well as
sh v an
� R obei � Henri, John
�. B iws.
I he exhibition purports to pre-
sent a balanced representation of
American art, beginnii . th Ed
ward Hicks' "The P
Kingdom"( 1840-45) and land
ipes bv i , ole, sher B.
Durand, John I Kenserr and
George Inness. Small figural
works by Winslow Homer,
I astman Johnson and Thomas
1 akins show anoi he: aspect of
N century painting. Also in-
cluded is a small oil painting bv
James McNeill Whistler.
From the earlv 20th century,
the exhibition includes works by
William Merntt Chase, Maurice
Prendergast and Arthur B.
Davies. These are followed bv a
group �' paintings from between
the wars, including works bv
Georgia O'Keefe, Stuart Davis,
and Arthur Dove, John 1.
and Edward Hopper. Among the
more recent works in the exl
tion are paintings bv Milton
Avery, Morris Graves, Ben
Shahn and Jack 1 evine.
T h e R a n dol p h - M ac
Woman's College collection was
founded in 1920 under the leader-
ship ot 1 ouise Jordan Smith,
professor and directoi ol at:
"Through astute purchases and
anate gifts, it has expanded
to become one ot the best col
collections of America! trt n the
countrysaid Dr. William j
Chiego, chief curatoi of the
North Carolina Museum ol -V
who has organized the exhibition.
" The quahtv of each work in the
collection is exceptionally high.
often at the level of the artist's
best efforts
The exhibition will be accom-
panied by a fully-illustrated
catalogue with an essay on the
collection by Dr. Nancy
Mat hews, curator oi The Maiet
Museum ot Art and author of the
recently published "Cassatt and
Her Circle: Selected Letters
There also will be an accompany-
ing slide-tape presentation cm the
conservation treatment of nine
paintings in the exhibition during
the past year bv the North
Carolina Museum of Art conser-
a:ion staff.
The exhibition is sponsored in
par bv Branch Banking and
rrust Company with additional
funding from Martin Marietta
Vggregates.
Related programs include a
symposium intitled "Impres-
sionism, Realism. Abstraction:
Six merican Painters to be
presented Saturday, Jan. 18 from
s V) a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Ciuest
speakers will be Dr. Nancy
Mathews of The Maier Museum
and Bennard Perlmen, an
authority on the New York City
artist' group " The
Light
off a cliff m following songs.
Although the band itself hasn't
"cliffed they have been visibly
rolling down hill ever since cer-
tain members left Yes to form
Asia in days gone bv.
To sum everything up, we'd
like to thank the good people at
WMB for their continuing sup-
port in our combined efforts to
inform you of your favorite new
releases.
B LANCE SEARL
and
MAX PARKER
M�ff Wrlim
Ste ie Nicks' Rock a Little, her
awaited third solo album.
was well worth the two years wait
e she released The Wild Mean
Hack in 1983. In a distinctive.
almost crying voice, Nicks sings
of thwarted love affairs and
�ms of dancing, which build
n, but do not duplicate, the
themes of her previous two
albums.
"I Can't Wait" starts the
album with a bang, and although
the moods change effectively, the
intensity never falters throughout
the album. The concluding song,
"Has Anyone Even Written
Anything tor You had us weep-
ing by its end.
Fvervthing in between is a mix
nteresting beats, rhythms and
instrumentation by Nicks and her
band, who seem to have improv-
ed since the last effort.
Nicks sings, "but you cannot
know a dream till you've known
the nightmare in a song "The
Nightmare which conveniently
brings us to our next review �
Asia's Astra.
We about had to take this
album off the turntable before it
was over. Remember the last
album? The album before that?
Well blow the dust off those and
don't make a dumb purchase.
This album has the bigger than
life, grandiose sound that has
made Asia famous, and don't
forget the thoughtless literal
lyrics either. The LP doesn't
begin too badly, with a song call-
ed "Go which will probably be
the big video seller, but it plunges
C rf
lav
Thanksgiving Charity Dance
� .
When '��. S
where M - �- .
limc-
Tickets Available at Trull's,Goodyear
Or at Door
$25.00 per couple
ATTIC �QE
Hi
FRIGHT Mmfbft
a
PRESENTS
ECU
Voftms
Thursday MAXX WARRIOR
Friday NANTUCKET
Tickets are S12. A free lecture on
"Three Collections of American
Art: A personal iew" will be
given by Barbara Millhouse,
president of the Reynolds House
Museum of American Art in
Winston-salem, on Sunday, Dec.
15 at 3p.m. Free films about
American artists will be shown on
Sundays at 3 p.m Dec. 29, Jan.
5, 12, 19, Feb. 2 and 16.










Share the Holidays
with those you love



�r
-


ts
Cards and Gift
from
Recycled Paper Products. Inc
Professionally
Prepared
RESUME'S
Special Student Rates
355-6810
Fill Your Stockings
Hith Our
Sports near and FT � �
516 S. COTANCHE
GHEENVIIJ.E. N.C.
Gifts

Listen ForTn e SLEIGH BELLS �
And You Codd Be A WINNER from
And These ECU Supporters:
ATTIC NEW DELI PEPSI
GROG'S TW'S NITELIFE PIZZA HUT
SUBWAY BUCCANEER MOVIES TREE HOUSE
JARMAN STABLES CHICO'S FOR HEADS ONLY
SUB STATION II FABRICATE TOO FRANKLIN'S
CHINATOWN EXPRESS
WRONG WAY CORRIGAN'S
HEART'S DELIGHT
FRANK'S PIZZA
JEFFREY'S BEER & WINE
MARSH'S SURF & SEA
THE PLAZA RECORD BAR
SUNSHINE VIDEO, INC.
SUSIE'S PIZZERIA
ECU PLAYHOUSE BOX OFRCE
WZMB is your s ource for Dynamic
MUSIC and GIVEAWA YS
Just Follow Thes e 3 Easy Steps To Be An Easy
WINNER:
1 - TUNE to9F3 W2MB
2 - LISTEN for the Sleigh Bells
3 - CALL 757-6913 TO WIN
y
M'
CHRISTMAS IN
NOVEMBER
AND WZMB
WE MAKE WINNING EASY
t
1





I HI t AS1AROl INIAN
fc�i. �?�
The newcomers shown above are (clockwise from top left) Marchell
Henry, Al Clark. Manuel Jones, and John Williams.
East Carolinian Exclusive
Greenville Kickboxer
Takes Shot At Title
B STEW AGE REE KS
( ontnbudng Untrf
(Rockford, 111.) - Greenville
kickboxer Curtis "Cowboy"
Crandle suffered the onl two
knockdowns ol his career last
night as he lost the world
heavyweight championship to
"Bad" Brad Heft on.
It was evident from the outset
that Crandle was at a disadvan-
tage. He gave up a four-inch
reach in both the arms and legs to
Hefton. The first two rounds
were scored even as both fighters
felt each other out. However, by
the third round. Hefton gained
control of the fight by stinging
Crandle with hand-foot combina-
tions and not letting his
challenger get inside.
Hefton put Crandle on the can-
vas for the first time in the fifth
round with an inside-round kick.
Crandle recovered and was able
to make it to the ninth before he
was floored again by the same
k i c k, r e n d
ding up fc
count.
"1 war I
famih, trail i
not winning tl
said, followmn
:apab . I
and � a ag(
. ' eht C :
Sic tie I
"I had a
hurt leg and wa fighting ovei m
weight limit, but I'm thankful
that Brad gave
tunutv to fighi him
Crandle, who was ranked .
cond in the Professii �nal K ,
Boing ssociat ion's I i
heavyweight division, had beef
up an extra nine pounds to meet
the minimum weight requiren
in order to fighi
hea yweight title.
Crandle's manage t B
McDonald indicated
would return to the li.
heavyweight division follow
the bout. Crandle's next I
expected to be : . world
chamnionshin m thai rii
:hampionship in that aivistor
Bud Light Daredevils Will
Be At Buc Season Opener
The Bud Light Daredevils will
be making their first appearance
at a North Carolina school and
their second appearance at ECU
when they visit Minges Coliseum
for the Pirate's home opener on
Monday at 7:30 p.m.
During the past three years.
The Daredevils have performed
in more than 175 American cities
in front of millions of spectators.
Ty Cobb, Guy Cobb, Brad
Bramich and Evan Elliot put on a
slam-dunk performance like no
other.
They came to Minges last year
and put on an unforgettable per-
formance at the half, as well as
during first- and second-half
time-outs. They will be featuring
the 'flip dunk 'slam dunk and
the infamous 'Spiderman dunk
"When it comes to slam
dunks, Julius Erving, Daryll
Dawkins and David Thompson
have nothing on a 5-9 Bud Light
Daredevil named Ty Cobb ac-
cording to a UPI wire service
reporter.
The Bud Light Daredevils
started their '85-86 tour at a
Washington Bullets' game earlier
this week. After they visit ECU,
they will appear at UNC, N.C.
State and Wake Forest before go-
ing abroad to Australia, Japan
and Europe.
The Daredevils are being
brought to Greenville by the local
Budweiser distributor in coopera-
tion with the ECU athletic
department. So for an event you
won't want to miss, be at Minges
Coliseum Monday at 7:30 p.m.
"It's the most spectacular act I
have ever seen. And the best
thing is, it relates so well to
basketball said Bob Ferrv
the Washington Bullet
Sports
N( VI MBI k 21, ! Page 10
Newcomers Join Bucaneers
B SCOTT COOPER
Spurn r dltr
The ECU Pirates open their
regular season Monday night,
when they host the Campbell
Camels. Earlier this week, coach
Charlie Harrison and some first-
year players spoke about the
coming season.
Although the Pirates en-
countered a tough season last
vear, coach Harrison believes the
Bucs have improved greatly.
"I can't see how we can't get
better; we are better Harrison
staled. "We've got to get our
guys happy with their roles. And
their roles will change. It's on a
wait-and-see basis
With a fine recruiting class,
Harrison foresees a bright future.
as he plans to play many players.
"Our young men are awfully
confident Harrison said.
"There will be a lot more com-
peting for positions and playing
time. It leads to the team getting
better
Junior college transfer and
team co-captain Marchell Henry,
who sat out last year, feels the
recruits and himself will add to
the team.
"Mv role will be my reboun-
ding and inside play, which was
lacking last vear Henry said.
"And the freshmen have really
pushed the upperclassmen for
playing time. It makes us more
competitive.
"The coaching staff has a lot
of confidence in me Henry said
of his leadership role. "Together
we will all share that role
� sore spot for the Pirates a
vear ago was their inside play.
However, coach Harrison sees a
bright future in the middle, with
the addition of some new faces.
"We're stronger inside. We're
going to force things inside We'll
make it get better Harrison
said. "With Manuel (Jones), Al
(Clark), Tree (Leon Bass) and
Marchell, we can do that.
"Leon put on some weight and
he's improving every day Har-
rison continued. "If his foot
work and body catch up, he's go-
ing to be a very good player
Freshman Washington, D.C. ,
native Jones wanted to play
basketball in The South and
believes he can contribute to the
team as well. "1 was trying to get
out of the city, and I always
wanted to go to a southern
school Jones commented.
"I'm aggressive, quick, a good
rebounder and can score prettv
well
Another freshman from the
same area (Alexandria, Va), Al
Clark, also can add to a plentiful
Pirate roster. "I can definitelv
make a contribution to the
team Clark said. "I feel 1
srtong rebounder and will
whatever it takes to get the
balland to get playing time '
Yet another tresr
some interesting words ab
'85-86 campaign. Atlantic (
N.J native John Willian
been improving since
ECU. "I feel that I'm getting I
ter with drills and practice
improving my fundamenta
Williams said. "Wherever
coach needs me, I'll be there
With these four new.
along with freshmen Jet! K
and Gus Hill, (a 6
trom Virginia who will n
season because ol a leg
should provide an add
boost for the Pirates ii
'85-86 seas
ECU Swimmers Downed By Wolf pack
Bv l)AMDMc(.INfss
The ECl swim team was
unable to end its quest foi a vic-
tor) again time rival (
State in last Monday's meet a:
Minges Natatoriun
Intimidation may have bee
n the Pirate loss
top-20 � w Ifpack "1
think our t been a
timidated going up aga
State said Pirate a I Kick
Kob "Howev

make- us sw im fast
V eh Statt
meet derail, 3-39
points), several Pit i their
w - aj . compt
Sophomore Bruce Brock?
took fir; the 200 I lal
medlev and secoi d 20
backstroke. Senior Keith kaut
got second m the 50 and KXJ
freestyle. 1 David
Killed placed second . 200
5 � � freest) ic. and ph n
I cc Hik- edged oui leamn .
Pan ick Bn I 24 seconds
he 200 bi east
�ke.
( Kerall, K be fell 11 men
swam verv well ag I the
� top teams "Swimming
against Stai
its caiiberi has made us a lot
- hei over the vear Kobe
said
1 he 1 ad Pirate s� imi
fared no better than their male
counterparts against the
W olfpack,(89-51). I :o take
first in any event, but placing se
cond in tour and third in three.
Junior Caycee Poust put in a
strong performance for the
women, placing second in the 200
individual medlev and third in the
100 and 200 backstroke
freshman Susie Wentink con-
tributed with a first in the 100
breast stroke and a second in the
loo breast stroke and a third in
the 200 breast stroke. Classmate
Jenni Pierson nabbed second
place in the 200 freestyle, topping
fellow adv Pirate Scotia Miller
by 2.31 seconds. Pierson also
took third place in the Kx
freestyle, fresh, man Susan
Augustus had the highest finish
for the ECU women in the 100
butterfly, beating teammate Jen-
ni Piersoi b) 12 seconds to take
rd.
I C I a omen springboa
errv ampbell and
Denise Poff -wept second and
d in both the one- and three
meter diving, accummulating
lable pom foi the Pirate ei
In vie of the better perfor-
rtces o! ihe meet, tour
freshmen women set an ECU
freshmen record in the 200
medlev relay. Brenda Horton.
e Wentink, Susan Augustus
and Angela Winstead topped the
old record with a time of 1:55.91
in that event.
Ihe Bucs will be on the road
' ' their next meet, when the)
take on UNC-Charlotte on Satur-
day at 1 p.m. Kobe rates the
trlotte -quad as a young (the
program is three years old), but
improving team.
Meet
400 medlev relay: NC State
(Van Ryne, Aceto, Niemeyer,
Frederick) 3:37.31.
1,000 tree: Matt Dressman
(NCS) 9:52.43; Jon Randal
(NCS) 9:56.59; Patrick Brennan
(EC) 10:10.8.
200 tree- Rocco Aceto (NCS)
1:44.32; Scott Frederick (NCS)
1:46.81; David Killean (EC I
1:47.02.
50 tree: Kellv Barnhill (NCS)
22.30; Keith Kaut (EC) 22.44;
Randal (NCS)
Killean. (EC)
Cook (1 i
Benton Satterf (NCS) 22 6f�
200 IM: Bruce Brockschmidi
(EC) 1:58 04; Rick Shinnick
(NCSi 1:59.71; Stratton Smith
(EC) 2:04.96.
1-meter diving: Glen Bai i
(NCS) 293.925; rom Neusii
(NCS) 26s25; Luke Durk
(EC) 263.025
200 fly: Rid S! I (N S)
1:55.36; Kevin Hida EC)
2:00.16; Chuck Niemeyei (N S)
2:03.51.
KM) tree: Matt Dret
(N si 48.56; Keitl Kaut (EC)
49.04; Benton Satterl (N S)
49.62
200 back: M V an Ryne (NC S)
2:00.55; Bruce Brockschmidt
(I c2:01 19. Rick Shinnisk
(N S) 2:01.21.
500 free Ion
4:47.54; David
4:49.43; Vidv
4:55.66.
3-meter diving: Glen Banoncini
iNc SI i 311.325; Tom Neusinger
(NCS) 258.975; Luke Durkin
(EC) 235.125
2(H) breast: I ee Hicks (EC
2:16so; David Robaczewski
(EC) 2:19.24; Jon Randall (NCS)
2:21.67.
400 free relay: N.C. State (Van
Ryne, Barnhill, Dressman,
Acetoi 3:15.13.
W omen Meet
200 medlev relay: N. C. State
(Steinocher, Mumm, William
Butcher) 1:54.21.
1000 free: Sue Kuglitsch (NCS)
10:20.50; Maya Codelli (N S)
10:35.22; Jill Gorenflo (EC)
11.39.82.
200 free: Tricia Butcher (NCS)
1:58.48; Jenni Pierson (EC)
2:02.34; Scotia Miller (EC I
2:04.65.
100 back: Melinda Moxm
(NCS) 1:01.37; Sue Sutcher
(NCS) 1:02.46; Caycee Poust
(EC) 1:05.53.
100 breast: Holh K
1:10 37; Sue Went i �
1:11.01; 1 isa A
1:13
200 fl) M
(NCS) 2:09.47;
NCS) 2:13.55 Susai
(EC) 2:17 39
re: Tara A
25 l i. nge a V I
2 I Kath) 5i ker (N
26.28
l-mt
(NCS) 16f
(EC 155 45; Denise P I
140.0.
100 free lenni I
56.05 l Winstead E(
c 09; Kai � r(NCS)
2 � back c aycee P
2 16.76; Brenda Horton (EC -
- 77; let- H � (N S)
2:19.66
2(JO breast: Susie Wentink (PC.)
2:33.43; I isa Wilson iN
2:39 02; Jennie Halstead (I C
2:44 73
500 tree Sue Butchei (N -
?-15.44; Sand) Trapp (NCS)
" 21.9; Scotia Miiier I
5 37 16.
10 tlv: Chris Dckraa) (NC S
1:02.44; Susan Augustus (EC)
1:02.62; Jenni Pierson (EC)
I 02 74.
3-meter diving: Susan Gomack
(NCS) 252.30; Sherri c ampl
(EC) 226.95; Denise Poff (EC)
214.28.
200 IM: Holly Kloo- (NC S)
1:15.77; Caycee Poust 11 I
2:17.59; Incia Butcher (NCS)
2:18.60.
200 free relay: N. c Si
(Anspach; Moxin; Bute1
s einocher) 1:38.63.
Washington Spurs Defense
Bud Light Daredevil skies in for the slam during and NBA exhibition
as the crowd watches in amazement.
B DAVID McGlNNESS
The Pirates are now 2-8 and
there is not too much to cheer
about in this 1985 season. But
one of the bright -pots on this
year's team is defensive
linebacker Robert Washington.
Washington leads the team in
tackles in 1985 with 102 total
stops (64 solos, 38 assisted). He
also leads the team with five
tackles behind the line of scrim-
mage and three quarterback
sacks.
What makes Washington such
a successful linebacker? Accor-
ding to inside linebacker coach
Les Herrin, the amount of effort
that Washington puts out is part
of what makes him such a
valuable player.
Herrin calls Washington a
team leader. "Hard work is the
key to Robert's success Herrin
said. "He doesn't lead the team
with talk, he's an example
setter
Washington is not only a hard
worker, he possesses great
natural ability. "Robert's
strength and speed are his great
physical assets Herrin said.
"He is easily one of the strongest
players on the team
Washington's strength is very
apparent in the weight room,
where he squats 770 pounds, ben-
chpresses 470 and deadlifts 700.
One might assume that such
strength would cut down on his
speed, but Washington can still
run with the best of them. His
time in the 40-yard dash is an im-
pressive 4.39 seconds.
Washington is an integral part
of the defensive unit. And despite
a tough year, he has led the team
defensively all season. Toward
the latter part of the season,
Washington and the defensive
unit had to reevaluate some of
their early season goals.
"At the beginning of the year,
Robert Washington
our main goal was to have a good
enough season to go to a bowl
game Washington said. "But
as the season went on we saw that
was not going to happen. It got
harder for me to motivate myself,
when the team wasn't doing well.
So I went back and tried to set in-
dividual goals, instead of team
ones
Washington came to ECU
after two years as a junior college
All-Amencan at Hudson Vallev
Community College in Troy
N.Y. Washington values the ex-
perience he got there, but prefers
the atmosphere and people here
at ECU.
"In junior college, the student-
treated the football players like
dumb jocks Washington said.
"Here (at ECU), everyone treats
us like regular students, and I like
that
Prior to his years in junior col-
lege, Washington attended Glen-
ville High School in Glenville.
Ga where he led his team to the
state 3-A championship in 1980
The Georgia native was voted one
of the best high school defensive
linemen (end) in the country, a-
well as his team's most valuable
player.
Although Washington has high
hopes to have a career in the
NFL, he feels his height (5-11)
may be an obstacle. "I've got the
strength and speed, my height is
the only thing holding me back '
Perhaps height is not as big an
obstacle as it might seem, as
Washington has alreadv been
contacted by two NFL teams, the
Atlanta Falcons and the New
York Giants.
Washington will close his col-
legiate career with the Pirates
when they face the Bayou
Bengals of LSU on Dec. 7. Win
or lose, one can be sure that
Robert Washington will be giving
100 percent.
Classifi
SALE
(.RAM) Oft MS(,
i
f
ki isi voxh o
.
.

1 rERATION


.
CHEAP 1 v. I'js.
�' - ,
r U. MiIX,i t
S2 rOOTA)
tPAKlMI
M 1 H II
Kl's' �
IM'IM,
PRot 1 ssj
VV I i H i
i � H M IH i
)'H it 1 - � I
sun iwiM,
I HMI'l UH1HI IVVISI, -IW
HlR - ! 1
Kt SPONMB1 I (,K i)l
Ml DtMs
ROOMM 1V vv s ; H
-
New .
ROOMM I I W.ANTFD:
-
ROOMM 1 r w v
W WIN)
� XMtO
.
ROOMM M t W ! l
-
"
ARI MAJORS
adver .
N
752 667" - .
I OR ROOMM lt WVS
sublei
ROOMM At t M 1 I't n
bed

I
v
758 -
lMAlt ROOMMATI
Rinf Rent J
utilities and
IOK2FEMAU BOCMWHATESNEEI
ED Available
$10
Apt- ail 752 2641
TYPIMV v .
P O By sl"
FEMALi ROOMMrt
bedroom Ap; (Village
1135 mot liiities, Dq
the bus route. Call 757
FEMALE ROOMM A tl WAKTWD
a King's Row Apt Seeded I
Semester C al! 2 286 betee
or after 9 pm
A





laneers
a

Wolfpack
-
Defense
Classifieds
SALE
PERSONALS
( III O IMHK.ts Sunday a a
RND OPKMMi !3 : ks great! and d
day �.is terrifu You girls are the best!
' � Love the sisters
oII 2 more da � � ai d tw .1- :
Kl IM MEXIt O! . � ! will 1 Beta Zeta's are psy
for Roscba . .
�pace thai we � aj � . lei ready I
- � B
I I K I IHNs
St. Mi
in vp 1 y pin, Rep
( HI () MMIRs VM) PI t IX.I S
W.C
I IrSMON HIK s((III. and
JOI 2 moredays KOI
B' prepaied foi I : s A
1 ove: Ann, Ama
Bv the way Scoti s beat
Northern (But A
A
'5 Mi. MUM,I II
:
1 MBDA CHI:
� - never t Wei �
ame, the I a
DTA I rl.l( A � tie beer. A
- New Yeai I ove, hi )'s
si (reading, HR 1 I W(l (,M M(lll Ml'
PORI I
. M. : NO 25 la
iKt'MKNT FOR RENT: Now � x
- �
It) III! I OBBN POl IOIV i
: ; 1 1
Who do y )
A e a.i .
M Mil II IOR: . by Now
Rea . Nuke 1!
es
l l I y Ha ; � H ui I und Raisei send
v a 1 �� leans l 4. SI on admis
sion pm I .tin
STUDENTS I! - � are i" Mendenhall
teria, don't sit at the table closest to
the sell serve machine li could be
.uis to youi '
M I M (��: ons on youi
new office bui watch out! "he yeai thai
u will bo 1 hallenging 1 ove, youi
little si .tei ad isees HOI '
GENI r.AYLOR: I hank you foi being
� We'll mi" you
! We love

M(,M ni Rama la Inn
9 a � Hy by 10 Be
I lets get li ' ��buf-
sU KWIII M N) Hit HI! K

Lo
PIKA: t
. . � ' li
I- � � playofl
Nt w SORORITY n P I V look
,ing itl ii all
I Ml 1 AS I
CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 21 "
11
CHIP PV � Th� E��' CaroliPH-
1) KIWlRs.
M.i-
y PIM. slK.K l � �
HEVIONAI IM'INd
W SORORIM : 1
at Grogs. 1
and - !
� .
,Us. Bls( I 11 N1) I ll)l� N
� a v,
Sam
v I H sORORIh
II
Fo
406
l�l K l'iJ I'HI n
1
B la
� A � ,
I
HI MKIrK II
� � rgei aboul
�1 ready foi

Turkey Trot Winners
rma Ihe winners of the First Annual Intramural Turkey Trot pose here with Ira Simon (back row. left). EC!
- � a Dining Service. Steve Cohen (back row, middle). Director of IRs and Dr. Klrner Myer (back row. right)
Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs.
M
I
HI HROllllRs M III MMIR
Kl) 1'KiK I nnN(
Mt.M V I'HI I P��M S
MsIIR
I I I I I
'�
MUM,I I -
KM 1 y M s- N
W I KI K
l
. .1
1
ND ki1iy
A
I MKIIHMI II M
was a sl a j
i body gas 1
id that look in youi
w
1
am
Every! gh. You
for LSI
n �
� � ralk 1
I 1
OIH: . a
ti GreenviHc Storw Onlv
Kentucky Nuggets Combo
9 Piece Kentucky Nuggets
Kentucky Fnes
Lg di S2.89
:
:
Locations
600 A Greenville Biva 756 6434
2905 E 5th St 752 5'84
J

B � SPI
HN
' A I)
I BII
HI DROOM VPTs I
.� . � . . � �
'ROI I win s 1 I y IMS. Sl KN II )
�V -
MID IN IMM, '
ill'l IIKIII) ni'IM. IHl( I
PI kPP I'HI IM I IX,I �
I'l K IP PHI
seme
;
1 � �
. in
Musgi
SIGMA I'HI ll'sll on
An
� � � .
1 �
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
Abortion from 1? to 18 weeks at addi-
inaJ cost Pfegnaruv Test, Birth Control, and
robiem Pregnancs Counseling For further
formation .all 832-0535 (Toll Free Number
SOO-332 1K4) between 9 AM and 5PM
eekdavs
RIU0GH WOMIHI
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917W��tM�ajoaSt.
laWati. NC
ELLIE S
Ladies Fashions & Men's Wear
Grand Opening
Bargains
Brand Name Jeans from S17.95
Men's I acoste and London Fog Sweaters from S15.v
Men's Suede Jackets$19.99 2806 10th st
and Fashion Jewerly Located in the shopping
PHONE: 830-123� center across highway patrol
PRESENT IHls D FOR 10 PFRCFNT DISCOUNT
:


i
'��S'SXSX5)��SSxl)'�S-���-�����-�"����J.S ��-� J �ASMAi ?� . �
-Ml
�POslBl I
ill V Is
(,K M)l 1 I
iMM-M I W N I I l
i a
MS1 Ml W NII1)
n
�-
I
a n A
��'
MMA II WANTI I)
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
10th Sl Dickinson Ave.
WE BUY GOLD & SILVER
INSTANT CASH LOANS
All Transactions Confidential K'
BUY�SALE�TRADE
� 752-0322 t
pMMSit.
T
HANKSGIYING IS A TIME OF SHARING
Share the feelings and excitement of the holiday with a
Thanksgiving card from American Greetings.
WANTED
A 1 Ml
week
. p i � Nursery
�MM M I V N I HI-
. .JB
�1
-�'�
HI MAJORS 4 ' '
.�
g Fancy. Pi
OR j ROOMMA IIs WANTED:
II R -

'HmummmI NEEDED
,u Pi
ed. 1
. December 1 .
B1 1 MM 1 ROOMMA 1 1
Rei i sn " "luv
5-11)-� 5642aftei 4
-� nei K 2FEMAI F ROOMMATES NEED-11 if r �
: �! utilities I '
is big a; 2648
3� ecn1 ! VPISTS 150 - � ' � � home' ,Ar"e B � 1 liabeth. NJ 07201
Buccaneer Babes Needed
To Assist The Athletic Department In
Be A Part Of The Team That's
"Going AHer The Best"
Information Meeting And Social Open To Any ECU
Coed
Pirate Club Building
Monday, September 25, 1985
8:00 PM
Call 757 6447 For Additional Information
STUDENT
STORE
4 Building

M
WttRK A GREETINGS
105 Airport Road
Greenville, NC 27834
758 0327
lege
inia Faicuns and the Nev
� k (iiaiv
Washington will close his col-
legiate career with the Pirates
when thev face the Bayou
Bengals of ISC on Dec. 7. Win
or lose, one can be sure that
Robert Washington will be giving
100 percent.
HMMI ROOMMATE: to tare 2
: (Village Green)
.limes. Deposit and on
57 107
II MAI E ROOMMATE W ANTED. For
king's Row Apt Needed for Spring
Semester all "2-2986 between V7 pm
�r after si pm
SHRIMP
All You Can Eat
99
$5
SPEEDY REEDY'S 0
PIZZA -jj 0
FREE EXTRA CHEESE
on every pizza!
PRICES
12"14" 66016"
PLAIN CHEESE5.00 5 957 20
1 ITEM7.608 60
2 ITEMS 3 ITEMS6 90 7.85 8 808.60 9.60 10.60 11.6010.00 11 40 12 80 14 20
4 ITEMS
5 ITEMS9.75
6 ITEMS10.70126015.60 17.00 1840 19.80 12.80 14.20
7 ITEMS11.6513.60 14.60 15.60 1060 11.60
8 ITEMS12.60
9 ITEMS1355
DELUXE VEGETARIAN RUNNER8 80 9 75
97511.6014.20
MARATHONj 13.55156019.80
PEPSI
FPEI PEPSI'S
WEVIRY PIZZA
Unless Using Coupon
SUBS EVERYDAY
11:00 6:00
758-9999
Includes french fries, cole slaw & hush puppies
Tues Wed Thur. Only
TAX AIREA0Y INCLUDED
2711 I. lOrtiS.
Hour: Mon-Tttur 11 a.m. - 12 mid.
Fri. ond Sat. H-2 a.m.
Sunday. 11 � 1
COl'POS1
1-16" 2-item pizza for only
J plus 4 free Pepsis $8.00
. One Coupon Per Pizza 1
coupon .kwi oraVm9 Expires 123185 I





wm
m
12
HI L A SI R O L1NI N
i ! Mhl K
Cooper, Peterson Advance In Stan dings
rfcaOMs-SM1
Hmlm ItMv
( 'Irimon-S. � aroltna
lukr I Nt
1 M -Noirr Dane
ohiti St.�Michigan
Nrnrak Ik I a horn
I CI A-S.Biiforaia
lenn -KeatMCk)
Iex�s UMKI
( al Stanford
Penn M Pill
KIM NOKIIIN

M
.
1
Si
lolls PI rt.RSQN
k I
mown ims
SMI
! exas
i lemson
i (
I M
Michif
aska
UCLA
�vM
Pcnn Si
s (Ml OOPiR
Arkansas
Baylot
S aroltna
I N
i SI
Mic Kigan
t)kla!
UCLA
Kentucky
rcxas WM
( al
Penn S:
"DJ WATTS
�i kansas
Bayloi
S. Ca
i v.
I SI
1 ' .
()klat
i
rcxas &M
Stanford
Pcnn Si
Kit K M( (IHMM
SMI
Bayloi
i
Duke
l si
UCLA
I X M

HII 1 DWsON

� �. M
lOIH) PM'IDN
STANIHNO
IOM NORTON
JOHN PETERSON
SHEWS MEWS
SCOTT COOPER
�D.J. ' WATTS
MCE MeCORMAC
BILL IMWSON
iUDD PATrON
I A"I WEEK
4-5
10-1
H I
10-1
V-2
7-4
9-2
�-3
liURAIJ
KV-J

86-41
H4-43
83-44
�2-45
Bl rRY 'EM, WITH OUR MUSIC -BACK C?UARANTEE
OUR
"NO RISK"
GUARANTEE
'No Risk"
THE DREAM ACADEMY
Record Bar
SATISFACTION INXS
GUARANTEED!
DEL FUEGOS
mw
DEL FUEGOS
JOE LYNN TURNER
RESCUE YOU
Includes
Endlessly
Eyes Of Love
Young Hearts
0
JOE LYNN TURNER
ROBERT PALMER
THE CURE
THE HEAD ON THE DOOR
THE CURE
THE PLAZACAROLINA EAST MALL
CASSETTE OR LP





fc85c7af954f195f90025aa859a10ce7 00057759.0001.tif
1cba76b435aaaaa4fca03b9e2f90169b 00057759.0002.tif
807853af48d22420d1e81cf25d474d2b 00057759.0003.tif
d97889c3e6102dbb915abb423bb7bf6b 00057759.0004.tif
57c0076d7c50bf36beb466b6275bf31f 00057759.0005.tif
e640640ece75d439b11339c294e55e31 00057759.0006.tif
c94c4030cb845cb860a57bd53d9b18e4 00057759.0007.tif
b51ffc391dc7e39c69d737219d24c528 00057759.0008.tif
74b19f134dca9ffd16cc1752bc707629 00057759.0009.tif
93c81291902243edfd1afb84499cf7fc 00057759.0010.tif
67ba60359e53e4b7c24a4ff5e769af06 00057759.0011.tif
bb4e6ebae213c5ec7ba7c98fc66d44a4 00057759.0012.tif
1576412f872bfb4dc55d2a252561c698 00057759.0013.tif





Title
The East Carolinian, November 21, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.443
Location of Original
University Archives

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy