The East Carolinian, November 19, 1985






Shu
(fJarnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
ol.60orfcV P
luesday, November 19, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
( irculation 12.WM)
Reagan, Gorbachev
Begin Their Talks
By IMH G ROBERSON
Sl.ff Wrtlrl
With a simple handshake,
President Ronald Reagan and
Soiet leader Mikhail Gorbachev
began their historic summit in
Geneva this morning.
However, it is unlikely major
differences will be resolved dur-
ing the two-da) meeting between
the superpower leaders, said
ECU Political Science Chairman
Maurice D. Simon.
"1 don't believe wide-ranging
strategic differences can be
resolved in the course of a highly
publicized summit meeting. But.
this does not preclude some pro-
gress if both sides work diligently
to enlarge the area of
agreement he said.
vears. he added.
From the Soviet perspective,
Simon said an arms-control
agreement would provide "a
direct acknowledgement of
Soviet military and diplomatic
equality and status" with the
U.S.
"An arms agreement would
also free some Soviet resources
for the kind of modern economic
development Corbachev has been
developing and the Soviet con-
sumer drastically needs he said.
But dcspne the need for arms
reduction, Simon said he is "only
mildly optimistic that a far-
reaching accord" can be attained
during the summit.
"I think there are some
positive indications that both the
U.S. and v i �' - are seiious
about reducing their strategic
nuclear arsenals. Both sides are
uneasy oi the nucleat sword that
hangs over I he head .f
humankind he said
The I S
recognize 11
LS K
i � �
be reduced bv up : 50
, s mon adekv.
�V in previous summits, the
. i, � bachev meeting will
i � Idwide attention.
I s su is to a larger
Maurice Simon
In his televisec
Thursday, P
said, "If we red
of war. there w
only winners
Simon said h
Reagan
iU I I V.
i puns
sers,
agrees that
.in arnis-cDnlrnl agrcemcnl would
benefit the U.S. and U.S.S.R.
"For the U.S President
Reagan should want to receive
historical approval as a leader
who not only st rengt h e n e d
America, but also bega
the way to a less frightening
nuclear world Simon said.
Reagan also realizes the
public's desire 'or some relief
from the "massive" military
spending programs ol recent
degree a mi
Reagai ha
m
Gorbachev
" V the
very gnific;
si akes a
cd
C ncerning progress in other
areas during the summit, Simon
ia . � - because
been a media
! he world is
e about
e said
te time - a
ummii because
� aiv
expev
. ommitn
from both sides on future and
more regular meetings.
"There are a variety of issues
that need to be handled more ef-
fectively Some are of nearly
equal i m p trtance with the
strategic nuclear arms race,
dangerous regional conflicts,
continuing conventional arms
race and the divergent positions
of both sides on human rights
issues Simon said.
In his preview speech, Presi-
dent Reagan said. "My mission.
stated simply, is a mission for
peace.
"It is to engage the new Soviet
leader in what I hope will be a
dialogue tor peace that endures
beyond my presidency
Simon said he believes Reagan
and Gorbachev are "pragmatic
enough to realize" the limitations
on progress during a two-day
summit.
"1 suspect Reagan will realize
some accommodations over the
SHI need to be readied. Mv guess
is thai we will try to find a way to
cap the Star Wars race
somewhere before the full
deployment stage he said.
"Both Reagan and Corbachev
can be realists and politicians in
effective wavs when they want to.
Both wish to make their marks ,� :
their respective political
systems he added.
In general, Simon said summits
'end to "promote cooperation"
between the superpowers
"1 believi thai
our younget generation, in the
I S. and I s S.R be given
: p through
understand i g. Otherwise,
negativity and passivity may lead
us to the brink of nuclear destruc-
tion he said.
Students erest ed in
L . S Soviet relations should con-
taci the Political Science Depart-
ment. Simon will teach a course
on the dilemmas and prospects of
superpower relations in the spr-
ing semester.
Plastic Money
j B mumbebt TM East Carolinian
A shopper makes a purchase with a credit card � plastic money. Since retailers and other
businesses have recognized the potential of the college student as a consumer, credit cards have
become relatively easy to acquire. See the related story on page 1 for more details.
Residents Voice Concerns
Over Proposed Dorm Change
By FI IZABFIH PAGE
staff W nlrr
Fleming Dorm residents voiced
their grievances concerning the
possibility of changing from all
female to either coed or all male
dorm at last Thursday's open
forum ol the Residence 1 ife
Committee.
According to Associate Dean
Residence I ife Carolyn
Fulghum, three or four years
ago, plans were made to renovate
Cotter Jarvis and Fleming. I"he
plans cleared the way for the a;r
conditioning of those dorms,
which, at that time, were all
female.
Fulghum said Residence Life
staff members knew they would
have to either make the dorms
coed or offer some oi the air-
conditioned space to male
students at ECU.
Currently, out of the 59" air-
conditioned spaces offered at
ECl . "2 are
students, while 465 are a
to female s! i ei
plans are undei way to a ndi-
i wing f Scott
is still d ivho will be
ed ' reside in
cond : spaces �� ath
non-athletes.
cc
� enough spa
See DORM Page 3.
Students Easily Acquire Credit Cards
By BETH THICKER
siiff Wrllrr
"Eighty percent of college
students who applv for credit
Media Board Discusses Lab
By JENNIFER MVFRs
Miff Wmrr
The Media Board discussed the
decline in the quality of services
offered by PhotoLab, the prin-
ting of Expressions magazine
and also the release of a
marketing survey concerning the
East Carolinian and WZMB
radio.
Problems have been occurring
regarding services provided by
the East Carolina Photo Lab. Ac-
cording to various organizations
needing assistance, the
photographers at the lab have
been difficult to contact.
In addition, campus organiza-
tions have spent extra money un-
necessarily to get pictures
developed. For these organiza-
tions, outside developers had to
be contacted or additional sup-
plies had to be requisitioned to
meet the organization's needs.
The photo lab receives enough
money to have the supplies to
assist most campus organiza-
tions.
The Rebel used an outside
photographer, Joseph Cham-
pagne, to photograph the recent
edition to improve the quality of
the magazine.
Expressions will print an edi-
tion by the end of fall semester.
Color pictures will be numerous
in this edition with fewer color
shots in the spring edition and
even less in the summer edition.
This decrease stems from the
large cost of color-separation
processing needed for the fall edi-
tion.
The Media Board said results
o a marketing research study will
be released soon. Students in
Hawa Altuner's marketing
classes prepared and distributed
the surveys. Out of six student-
written reports, one will be
choosen as the final conclusion to
the study. The research involved
an analysis of the circulation and
readership patterns of the East
Carolinian and the listening
habits of WZMB's targeted au-
dience.
e
cards are accepted said Michael
From me, public relations
representative o the College
Credit Card Corporation.
"It's very easy to get a major
credit card with this program. To
qualify, a student must fill out an
application and provide proof of
enrollment in college Fromme
said.
"Companies are very in-
terested in college students.
Retailers and other companies
are realizing the potential of the
college market, which consists of
12 million students. Special con-
sideration is given to college
students since they are making an
investment in their future by go-
ing to college Fromme said.
"We'd like to give them (col-
lege students) every opportunity
to apply tor our cards, as the
start of a long-term financial
relationship said John R. Post,
vice president and director of
Bankcard Acquisitions for
Citibank.
Citibank has announced plans
to be a major sponsor of a
24-hour toll-free hotline that will
enable many juniors, seniors and
graduate students to request their
Visa and Mastercard applications
over the phone
"The idea evolved when 300
campuses were surveyed in 1983.
The studv found that students
bearing credit cards are
greater risk than ordinary card
holders cited Fromme.
"Nationally, the v.
Credit Card Corporation offers
four major credit cards: Citibank
(Visa or Mastercard), Sears,
Amoco, and Zales. On a regional
basis, the College Credit Card
Corporation offers credit cards a:
department stores or specialty
stores said Fromme.
"Credit limits vary from stu-
dent to student. A student's
credit limit is a bit lower than that
of a regular card holder's, and
the credit limits increase
periodically. Moreover, a student
who charges to his limit and pays
on time is likely to receive a
higher credit limit cites
Fromme.
"Most students pay their bills
each month; they are as likely to
pay on time as regular card
holders. A portion of college
students are irresponsible just as
a portion of people with jobs are
irresponsible Fromme said.
"We believe that college students
are educated, reliable people. If
they do not pay their bills, they
are treated like anvone else
Citibank Visa or Mastercard
charges at; annual percentage rate
19.8 percent. Howevei
is a charge of 5o cents ea i b
period Moreover, cash advai
drawn from aut mated teller
machine . a Si5
each withdrawal. More imp
tant, the $1.75 is added on to any
other previous I or c�
advances other than tl
withdrawn from the automated
teller, each non-au teller
withdrawal is . 12 percent
of the withdrawal amou
However, NCNB otters a stu-
dent Visa for Si8 annually 1' e
maximum line of credit for a stu-
dent Visa is S200.
NCNB charges 18 percent in-
terest on purchases and cast: ad-
vances. No other charges are bill-
ed to the card holder.
"To apply for the student
Visa, one needs to fill out an ap-
plication stating his her
allowance, money from jobs and
other financial informal
Some students' parents co-sign
the application with the
student according to Julian
Williamson, manager trainee a:
NCNB
"The cards are not very dif-
ficult to receive. We have found a
number of students apply for the
card said Williamson.
- W. i Legislature Sides With Scott

SGA Legislature Meets
J 8 HUMBERT - Th East Carolinian
The SGA Legislature met Monday night in Mendenhall. The Legislature voted to give Scott Dorm
residents priority in reserving rooms in the new air-conditioned wing. See related story on page 1 for
further details.
By LANCESEARL
suff Wrll�f
The SGA legislature approved
a resolution Monday that would
enable residents of Scott Dorm to
have resident living priority next
year.
Due to ECU's attempt to
recruit top athletes, Scott Dorm
has been chosen to house its
athletes in a comfortable, air-
conditioned environment. As a
result, many of Scott's present
residents will be displaced.
According to Legislator Gor-
don Walker, the resolution is
neither for nor against the univer-
sity's plans to renovate Scott. It's
main purpose is to help the
students who would be affected
by ECU's plan.
In other business, the SGA ap-
propriated $840 to the ECU Am-
bassodors to attend conferences
at Memphis State University and
$200 to Pirate Walk for printing
and supply costs.
According to Speaker Kirk
Shelley, future legislative
business may include a "future
funding program This would
require legislative bodies to ap-
propiate money to organizations,
which would have to receive
money from the SGA for at least
five years on a two-year basis.
(That year and the year after).
"This would give new
legislatures a better idea of what
and how much money they can
and can't appropriate to certain
organizations without previous
legislative bodies actually
deciding for them Shellev said.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds12
Editorials4
Features7
Sports10
Friendship mu kes prosperity
brighter, while it lightens
adversity by sharing its griefs
and anxieties.
� C icero
T






THfc LAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 19, 1985
Announcements
PUBLIC PROGRAM
The Dubiu s n?ptf �o a program on
Family Vioierue A �an i issue' Tue
aa� November l� at 8 p m a' 'he First
Presbyterian Church af Greenville icna'eo
at the comer oi Un ana Eim Streets Mar,
� a worker at ECUS
Fan ir Practice Center nois� spei.aiist in
rsc � "rn wii: be the speaker The
� ' ��� xus or- tne dynamics of
� Olence n Tf family and rtowr our values
I id �'�,� society often combine with
mil pr essures V P'eve-i v In'strom
escap My Abos ve 't'a' onsnips The meeting
�s sponsored Dy the Greenv ue P'tt County
i-eague ot Women yoters For rnore nor
mation e-ease coi '�.� . � c a jms a1
134
ZETA PHI BETA
imbda Mu Cl Ap'e ot Ze'a P" Beta
a be Elding .Ts thiro annuai
ed tood1 � and clothes drive social on
Hi a'he LeooPia Wr.gnt Cultural
'1 with the donation ot cann
�is is tree wthout canned gooos ad
m ssion is 11 oo a terns collected will be
a ted I eedy fan es n Greenv e T he
SIGMA GAMMA RHO
� � - . Rhc Sorority �, "�vt j �n at Mov 23 at the Cull . S'uaeTs 's � 2 drittl Non students $1 00 ten v a th Come an � Gamma - l nake some
PHI BETA LAMBDA
B� la amboa 1 it netl a�. � s, . n Ras. u. al ! 00 speaki be Dr a � -peak fcmer car fee EntercjeV
ECU CHORALE
�� . ' ia nws ers Com-i eehot se on Thurj . .
PHYSICAL THERAPY CLUB
Treat yourseit to a massage1 The Pt�ysi a
Therapy Club s having a massage ctina
Tues Nov i� trom 6 X to 10 00 at the Beik
Buiidmg Cost is one dollar tor ten minutes
Everyone is welcome1
THEATRE ARTS
Usher and see ECU s production ot The
Three Sisters Nov 20 23 F RE E ' A tew spots
are stui open tor each n.gh' however, in
oroer to usher you mus' sign op betore the
night you wish fo usher' Sign up sheets are
'cxated on the bulletin boards in rVless'Ck
Theatre Arts Center
LSS
The ceisure Systems Studies Soce'r
be having a meeting on Wed Nov 20 m the
multipurpose room at rVenoennati at 7 00
p m There will be a guest speaker on iob
placements at the meeting
LSS
Leisure Svs'ems Studies Society w'll be
navmg a bake sale F day Nov 22 'O front of
the Student Store to ra-se fund for upcom
�ng events Come oo ouT and buy some r � �
cooked goodies to kill those Fridav morning
my nc hies
PPHA
USE YOUR SRA CARD
ECU RUGBY CLUB
Pre Proessiona Hea " ft an e a
meet Nov 21 a 6 30 pm .n 'x n
"lAenoenhan Our gues' speaker , o M
Lor "a Lews trom the oepar'men' ot sot a
work Ai. members and interested guests sr
encouraged to attend
PSI CHI
Apt 11 procedures for Gradua'e
Schoc � � psychology maors D' Pt'ra'
Durham and Or Grossn � e Tes
N 1 ,6 a' 7 0C .n Brews'er C '0:
PSI CHI
Lectun Ps choiogs's as an e�per'
a rss ex a -� itioi a n c
a � : N . 1 it 7 31 n B ���.� � B 102
TURKEY SHOOT BOWLING
There w be a Turkei ' 1 �-
red bi 1 ��� 1 Reci eai -
Comm f n No 21 (17 OOP n Pa
�a a4 a �� sf � H sei ' � �
'anes knew � � vv- ai east eight f 1
?er a-es a ' a � � �� rive entry fe
s: x ac mt - � � � rnes . mj -��
un mited - r ore turkey c- pet
COUNCIL OF
HONOR SOCIETIES
� r ��v rtg w oe
p Brewstei E - � S
Seafood House aid Oyster Bar;
Washington Highway N.C. 33 Ext.) Greenville. North Carolina
'J Phone 752-3172
pt (Past RiverbluffApts. j
; Flounder $325
Popcorn Shrimp $325
Hours 4:30-9:30 MonSat.
- NEWLY REMODELED -
This Style Frame
With Single Vision RX
Lenses for only
$24.95
All Other Frames
30 to 60 OFF
with purchase of RX Lenses
RAY BAN sunglasses30 OFF
Xfe
iciaas
31 5 PorVview Commons
Across From Doctors Park
752-1446
Op�n MonFri. 9 a.m. til 5:30 p.m.
OREAT AMERICAN SMOKEOUT
The Great American Smokeout is
November Jlst Come to Room 107 at the Stu
dent Health Center on the 2lst (or cookies.
candy and information on hoyy to quit smok
nfl Lectures will be at 10 00 1 00. and 00
tor Specific Tips on Becoming a Non
Smoker For more information can Mary
Elesha Adams at 757 6841 or E D G!Ov�" a'
757 6961
ECU SURFING
The next club meeting will be "
night at 8 00 at John McCann s noost-
ner ot First and Meade' Lates' video!
be shown and final plans will be made tor the
Thanksgiving trip to Florida Free brews
will be supplied and all members are urgei.)
to attend i it you are gomg to Fia you MUST
attendi
GENERAL ACCOUNTING
OFFICE
A represen'a'ive trom the US Get �
counting Office vrgin.a B � I w
on campus Tues, Nov 26 W85 to int� � .
Coop stuoents who would kc to wort g
GAO Evaluators Accounting maiors who
have completed 60 semester hours anc I .i.�i
a 2 9 GPA or nigner snouic; �� t the Co op
113 Raw! to arranoe a- rMerve. m
med'a'eiy
Dorm Could Switch
( ontinued From Pa ��
students at kC'L. "Wc need lo
provide more space tor male
students she said. "We (at
Residence Life) had to turn down
about 50 men this year
The number of male students
on the campus is also rising,
which calls for more housing
whether or not it's air condition
ed said Fulghum
( aroln Fulghum
The needs in Residence 1 ife are
brought before the Residence
Life Committee in the form of a
suggestion, according to
Fulghum. "We Jon tell them
what the alternatives ate said
Fulghum. "It's up to the Com-
mittee to make that decision
After the Residence I ifeom-
mittee members 'hear the sugges-
tions, the make their decision.
which is then handed ova
Vice-Chancellor tor Academic
Affairs Elmer Meyer, who makes
the final decision
The committee consist oi the
three Area Residence Council
presidents, Mary Fowler, Direc-
tor of Housing Dan Wooten and
Fulghum.
I ast Thursday, the committee
held an open hearing to hear
grievances against the proposed
changes of Fleming,
Residences of the dorm armed
themselves with homemade but-
tons proclaiming "We love Flem-
ing
1 leming Dorm President lod
Jameson spoke before the -
mittee trying to persuade them
against such a change. She
pointed to the damage caused to
the dorm during the summer
when male students were allowed
to live in Fleming.
"Most of the residents who li -
ed on the first floor had to re-
paint their rooms said
Jameson, "just to cover up the
damage done during
summer
According to Jan esoi . moving
would also cause the resident;
a place they have cal
home for man) yea
Jameson argued that moving
the women who live in Flen
could be putting them in dang
"lor safety reasons. I -
ideally Icoated said J,
"The farther av- a
them trom C. entral C am; .
more risk you'll be
"It Fleming must change
the: me coed 11
there will still be
dorm, and they will still ha
say in Residence Hall .
men? added James
"We have no) bei
satisfy the needs
students w hi ivai
ditioned facilities
manj beds it's j
Maybe the c
he ad
A . �r J; 11 �� ' � V
pas' '�
waiting
Howevei
� �
students. "1 a
have used "5 mon
students added V
"We need add

tdded v
a behind � .
pace w
space nee Is foi
lid.
v �
lenl f Fleming
ermined
ird refle'ed it, "Keep i
a 2
H� H Kniqhl
Hooker Memorial Christian Church
I'isi iples. oihrisf
1111 Greenville Blvd 756 2275
Special (lasses tor College Students
9.45 am Christian Educatinn all ages)
11 00 am Worship- Open Communion
;rviNG
rm. w. iff
U Wk F Elective
Wt
mmmrm
4AJ

1
� c
�Ji
" - �1
MARATHON
RESTAURANT
Greek Owned & Operated Since
1979
SUBS
GREEK DISHES SANDWICHES
SALAD PIZZA
Call us Fast Delivery
758-0326 or 752-3753
560 Evans St
Greenville, N.C. 27834
Michelob
Beer

Pepsi
Free .
Paul Masson
Wine
$449
Moore's Potato
Chips
99
Riunite 4
Cuties. .
Smoked
Ham
Breyer's
Ice Cream
Video Movie
Rentals
No Club Fees 24 Hour Service
OVER
650
TITLES
BETA
& VHS
VHS Player
Rental
PREVIOUS! � - H Zl N
26 5.
Jumbo
Headless
Shrimp
f 1R PAR �
Fresh In-Shell
Oysters &�,
$1999
- -ECTE
FROZE Ct DOV
Grade A
Turkey .
$399
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd - Greenville
W
Go Krogertng
Added Al
Success
HEALT
COLUnN
fhe Ht
studen
about health
in
juid like
� �� the fi
The I
Buildr .
W hal in h.

:
Twc:
Wilhr.
FREE POSTER
TO AT&T CUSTOMERS
� KTS BES�NTl�l

r) �
.( 4 'Wit M
I





" �
Added Activities Predicts
Success In College Academia
SGA Transit Board Names
New Manager In Session
MIM I I )M( K


HEAL
CC
1M
rade �
urkey .
59
� A o
Night Club
Carolina East Centre
Off Highway n
Hear Plitt Theatre,
Phone 75a
Wednesday Night
THE LADIES ZOO AND LOCKOUT
Ladies Only 8 p.m.�10 p.m.
Guys admitted at 10 p.m.
25C Wine and Draft all Night Long!
Friday Night
WAM BAM END OF THE WEEK JAM
Doors Open at 8:00 p.m.
Wear Purple and Gold and get in
for JUST $1.00
$1.00 Tall Boys � 50c Wine 8 Draft
$2.50 Pitchers
ALLNITELONG
paddy Cool plays the jams both nij
Early Bird
Specials
Of
November
Special
:iub for Members I Guests
Air ABC
tSENTS
A SPECIAL SCREENING
roes Just dancs:
and each other
I IQl IDA 1 ION SALE
FINK QUALITY HAM) KNOTTED
INVESTMENT PIECES OF
PERSIA V R LGS &
OTHER ORIENTAL
CARPETS
65 ro to 75 OFF
��
Sheraton Greenville 203 W. Greenville Blvd 264 By PassRepossesed By the Order o Secured Parties
GreenvilleOver MH) pn
Ml Sizes: I arge, Small
' 'nd Palace Sizes
:�-?. m
I
WHITE NIGHTS
Wm-

MAN H
Q
POSTER
TOM1
AT&T
i s
M I Studenl I nion Films Committee
8:00 p.m
Hendrix I heatre
sundMN . nfinhfr 24

Ml
RED HOT
CHILI PEPPERS
WED NOV. 20th
DOORS OPEN AT 10:2
ADVANCE TICKET $5.00
Ticket Locations Pirate's Chest � Apple Records � TWA Nitelil
Don't DRIVE Call the �ikxty J?uL
for a FREE RIDE 758-5570
Private Club AM ABC Permits





Site Eaat (Earolinfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton. G,wMflnafr
Jay Stone, Manning Editor
Mike Ludwick, �. �� Tom Luvender, ���, 0Adwnmt
Scott Cooper, �a Anthony Martin, ���,
John Shannon. ��� � jOHN pETERSON Crfrf� Wonr
LORIN P-XSQl IAL. .�n SHANNON SHORT, ���, �,
DfChamle Johnson. �� �, Debbie Stevens, �
November 19, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
uorrvptzBrtxurztjA�� nft�-aktppvPtur
Scott Hall
4 thletes In; Academics Out
The current controversy brewing
over plans to air condition the
South wing of Scott Hall is il-
lustrative of a larger truth. The
reason for air conditioning Scott is
not to provide a more congenial
and livable environment for the
average geology or art major here
at ECU. It is instead to offer 120
members of the Pirate football
team more comfortable accomoda-
tions. It is hoped by athletic direc-
tor Ken Karr that, in the long run,
providing such niceties to football
players will enable the school to
recruit better talent. Yet, many-
students who currently live in Scott
feel that the administration is
pandering to football players at the
expense of the average student. The
reason for le grassroots antipathy
toward the administration's plan is
that some students who currently
live in Scott must be moved out in
order to make room for the
athletes.
Of particular importance in
evaluating the merits of this case is
the fact that many students seem to
feel that Scott is one of the better
dorms on campus. In fact, statistics
show that Scott has the highest
retention rate of any other
residence hall on ECU's campus,
with an approximate 71 percent of
its residents choosing to continue
living there.
Of course, it must be conceded
that the administration is being
confronted with a sticky situation.
On the one hand, a strong football
program can undeniably have the
effect of buffering a school's
reputation as well as its coffers.
Our administration is clearly striv-
ing to build up our football pro-
gram because it sees that as the best
strategy for building a strong
university. One needs only to look
around the country at the generous
contributions which alumni are in-
clined to make to universities with
strong athletic programs to unders-
tand the logic that is at work here.
Yet, at the same time the decision to
move students out of Scott and
replace them with football players
was an autocratic one. The students
affected were not consulted or of-
fered compensation. (Though new
rooms will be found for them
elsewhere.)
Yesterday the SGA passed a bill
which was designed to ameliorate
the problems in Scott. The bill
states the opposition of students to
the administration's move. After
doing so, however, it adds what the
bill's author calls "a reality
clause The clause simply asks:
OResidents of Scott Hall who
would be displaced be granted
highest priority of available rooms
in the residence hall during the spr-
ing room sign up. 2) The coaches
and staff of the ECU Pirate foot-
ball team encourage their players to
pay the optional Student Residence
Association fees. 3) The staff and
coaches of the football team active-
ly participate with the staff of Scott
Residence Hall to maintain social
order on and off season. Of course,
the "reality clause" is included in
the bill as a tacit acknowledgement
of the fact that nothing that student
government does is going to change
the administration's plans. Thus
the three provisos above are
representative of a compromise
which the SGA considers fair. It is
an attempt to salvage the best
bargain possible for the current
residents of Scott in the face of a no
win situation.
PLANNED
PARENTHOOP
HQRS.
UNPLANNED
PARENTHOOD
HQRS.
�Campus Forum
A n ti-A bortion A rticle Criticized
I can not sit quietly in the face of
the self-righteous pontification
presented by Michael Garnder's anti-
choice, bibiically-based tract. It
seems very odd that this impassioned
piece comes from a fellow who is
most probably a young white middle-
class male; he is entitled to his opi-
nion but I d take his position more
seriously if he were female and or
minority and or below the poverty
level and or urban. I'd especially give
his opinion more credence if he didn't
claim that he has a direct line to
God's thinking.
I really think men are just great to
have around, but I get tired of men
who think so little of women's minds
that they feel they should tell women
what to do with their lives and bodies;
1 get more tired still oi those who do
it in the guise of religion. Religion
was used to justify the inquisition
(Christians against the non-believer
infidels. I believe it was), to justify
slavery (land-owning white males
claiming God's authority over the
savages, you could sav), and it is still
being used to justify all the in-
ternecine wars in the middle east (i.e.
Iran and Iraq).
People who say that their way is the
right way. that they have the truth.
and that anybody who disagrees with
them is wrong and probablv bound
for hell, could be called arrogant.
Verv often they do it in the name of
their faith, forgetting that not all peo-
ple are Christians, and that not all
Christians are fundamentalist, or
Baptist, or whatever faith the truth-
proclaimer professes. In tact, accor-
ding to a recent almanac, not all
Americans protess a faith and while
added together all the various Chris-
tian denominations (Protestant
faiths, Catholics, etc.) make a large
majority of North Americans of
faith, not all North Americans of
faith are Christian, and fewer than
half of all North Americans of Chris-
tian faith are Protestant, although the
Protestant faiths are growing. A
ding to the Information Please
Almanac 1983, Muslims and Hindus
together total more than all branches
of Christians world-wide, and that's
not counting any of the
religions which claim a sul
number of believers world-w
My point. Mr. Gardner is this: You
are entitled to your own opinions,
your own faith, your own beliefs.
However, our countrj is founded
upon a pluralistic philosophy, with
nobody's faith having prioi vet
anyone else's faith and we a ;n-
titled to our own beliefs. Don try
trivialize what is an acutely difficult
personal, social and economic deci-
sion for other people bv quoting a
higher authority based upon vour
own beliefs. And since the issue of
abortion is not one that you are likelv
to ever have to face personally (as a
male), don't pass harsh judgments on
a woman who chooses that as a solu-
tion. Rather, wait to judge until you
have walked a mile in that woman's
shoes, until you are personal 1
prepared to take responsibility for
that unwanted child's needs tor the
next 18 years
Iti our country. n
get an abortion, and womei 1
choose to have abortions ligl
many women, it is tl
to a difficult problem that n
erwise mean a lifetime I
people, il
brief period
woman who must n �
lice. Deciding w
"human" life beg
and ie of the qua
an alread)
are tor each
are matters
and
whi
f1 ave
a spern �
�So
� �
Mind) Macha
ss t Prof
Desig
Forum Rules
The East I .
expressing all pou Mail or
drop them by our ofj
dons Building, at �
'ranee of Joyner Libra
Fr purpt es '
ters must include the nann
classification, address, phone nun
and signature of the author(s).
Economic Downturn Predicted
Eerie Echoes Of The 1920's In The 1980's
By MICHAEL HARRINGTON
Does the spector of the 1920s haunt
the Reagan '80s? Not in any literal
sense. But the echoes of that decade are
at the very least disturbing, even eerie.
The '20s, in hindsight, represented
the triumph of supplv-side economics.
The latest scientific discoveries radically
transformed the production process
itself. Business investment and output
per worker soared. There was a bull
market on Wall Street, and middle-class
investments abounded as the dividend
and interest portion of the nation's in-
come rose dramatically. Corporate
mergers proliferated, and there were
even some people who worried about
the way in which real assets were shuffl-
ed and reshuffled in an intricate finan-
cial game.
Labor was on the defensive, and
sophisticated capital alternated between
union busting and trying to sell workers
on cooperation rather than conflict.
Prices were stable, and there was a
modest increase in wages.
The '20s, of course, ended with a
crash. One critical reason was that pro-
ductivity had outstripped buying power.
The New Deal improvised a response to
that crisis of underconsumption and
overproduction. President Franklin D.
Roosevelt, a superb politician and no
kind of an economist, spurred the na-
tion into a recovery, and then in 1936,
blundered into a recession because he
cut back on public works to balance
the budget.
And yet, after World War II, those
improvisations somehow cohered in a
systematic whole that solved the pro-
blem of the '20s. Fiscal and monetary
policy insured sufficient effective de-
mand; union wages in key industries ad-
vanced in tandem with productivity and
set an unofficial national norm; the
"social wage" of Social Security and fr-
inge benefits increased enormously.
Americans thus created the mass con-
sumption that was � and is � the con-
dition of mass production.
Has Ronald Reagan forgotten 'hat
truth, so dearly learned under the
tutelage of his hero, F.D.R.? Yes, but
that is not to say that a second crash is
at hand, not least because of some of
the changes that Mr. Roosevelt made.
But the echoes are there.
This year, the top 25 percent of our
society is doing quite well, but there is a
new poverty of former smokestack in-
dustry workers, sweatshops exploiting
the undocumented and a dispropor-
tionate number of poor women and
children.
More to the point, income statistics
look somewhat like those of the 1920s.
In 1968, arguably the last year of New
Deal economics, wages and salaries ac-
counted for 67.9 percent of personal in-
come, and rents, dividends and interest
13.7 percent. But in the preliminary
figures for 1984, the wage and salary
portion had declined to 59.8 percent;
the rent, dividends and interest fraction
had climbed to 19 percent.
Those numbers clearly show two
trends: most jobs are now being
generated in the service sector, where
the pay is low (manufacturing employ-
ment actually went down in February);
the price of the monetarist assault on in-
flation has been extremely high interest
rates, which now transfers 15 percent of
the federal budget from average tax-
payers to rich investors, both domestic
and foreign.
So the '20s suggest an unpleasant
truth about the '80s. For a time, indeed
there can be a boom based upon
robotizing production, gentrification
and the emerging croissant sector. But
sooner or later, the exceedingly modest
consumption capacity of the service sec-
tor, where 80 percent of the new jobs
have been generated, won't be able to
buy the output of laborless, computer-
controlled machines.
No one knows when, or how, this
contradiction will assert itself. But one
might hope that the neo-liberals of the
Democratic Party will not liquidate the
heritage of FDR. on the eve of its
renewed relevance. That heritage does
not offer an answer to our crisis. But it
is the point of departure for solutions
that must go as far beyond the New
Deal as the New Deal went beyond
Herbert Hoover.
Michael Harrington, whose most recent
book is The e American Poverty,
teaches sociology at the City University
oj ew York and inspired mans of the
anti-poverty programs of the '60s with
his book The Other America.
Teach

,
Zf
CJ?
.�
NO
No Risk
NC
�"
0�lt
�s
SATOFA'
GUARANTEI
ROUG!
NOVEMBER. "��
MosterCord
m





IHI I AS I ' KOI IMA.
MAI MBI k 19, I98J
ijfcp .r�'4f
S&I
1AMNEP
ENTHOOD
ORS.
iticized
. ed to
: not
jtion
' fering
� ng a
the
not
hey
The
ition.
ople
thev
Forum Rules
tiers
m Vfai or
let-
ind
�;umber
1980's
the
� ith
ITS rim
S0M�
KAUSUPPOFsT
5 5MAIL
4 FARM
-tf
9M6A
�N6l50N)

Teacher Speaking Skill Tested
(CPS)More schools m recent
weeks hae moved to keep hard
to-under stand, foreign-born
teaching assistants out of college
classrooms.
The wave of complaints from
students who said thev had trou-
ble deciphering the accents and
speech of their teachers seems to
crest last year as colleges, which
regular 1 assign graduate
students to teach lower-level
courses, literal!) began to run out
ol native Americans to teach in
some disciplines like engineering
and computer science
Georgia, Arizona State and
si ol the public colleges in
Honda and Oklahoma tor the
tirst time hae just given foreign
born I-s tests on their English
speaking abilities. Those who
don't pass will be shuffled out ol
their teaching assignments.
University of I"exas and
Southern California ad-
ministrators two weeks ago an-
nounced they might soon give
oral English exams reign
grad students.
In all.
more than �
ools
hav
Service ills
give foreig
ucational res
Eng � tests to
11 n teach
assistants ovei the last year, the
ETS says.
So far, colleges arou I
country report they have
to push many foreign-born g
students out of their teaching
duties
But all the effort ultii
could rob grad scl ols ol
students needed to keep
enrollments up. make campuses
much less vital and interesting
places to be, and even lead to a
teacher shortage in lower-level
undergraduate courses, some
educators worry.
The foreign-born teaching
assistants themselves, moreover,
fear the testing will cost them
their stipends, on which they de-
pend to stay in the country
The teaching stipend is "the
main income lor us explains
Chung Kuang Chao, president of
Arizona State's Chinese
(Taiwanese) Students Associa-
tion.
He says foreign students have a
very difficult time getting othei
jobs off campus.
"We can't bring someone from
hall waj around the world and
say your stipend is cut off adds
Marilyn Baker, associate deai
Southern CaFs graduate school
Southern C'al. among others, is
trying to judge foreign students'
English skills before they're ac-
cepted or given teaching
assignments.
Iowa State 1 sic - -
Chairman Stanley Williams, .
says students had been coi
ing bitterly about not being able
und rstand cei tain g
as- stants, w sounds pros
tive teachers oui by phone "1
made the phone calls to test
1 nglish
Testing foreign studc-
glish skills before thev
mitted to grad school, ;
could depress enrolln t
"It will be I
futu : for
ne to I S( � iew I it
competency tests are adopted,
taker asserts.
Discouraging foreign students
from coming to the U.S. con-
ceivably could have a devastating
impact on main American grad
schools, where foreign students
make up about one third of the
student body .
�nd because starting salaries
for bachelor degrees in engineer
ing and computer science have
been so high, native students who
in othei decades would go on 10
grad school are instead taking
jobs in priv ate industry.
( onsequeni lv. science and
nical grad schools often
recruit students
gressively to keep their depart-
ments full.
1 50 percent ol the
students enrolled in graduate
science and technical school pro-
lis yeai are foreign born.
ng to a recent article in
Thi M all Street Journal.
Keepr .rents from
moreover, could cause
some lower
leve irses.
"We really had to scratch (i
nough instructors)
reports Ben
airman ol
V zona Si � uter science

B li id students
a-I ike oral E nglish
id well enough
gei ai I certifica
tes.
. i
hi ipes thev '11
� seme
ASl also is trying to get them
research projects so they won't
lost their stipends.
"There are many other jobs
they can do adds Madelyn
I ockhart, dean of Florida's grad
school, which recently adopted
new English skills standards for
teaching.
"We have strains on our pro
gram, but that (not enough grad
students to teach) is not the
reason 1 ockhart says
"Without sufficient funds, we
can't hire enough TAs. We are
not unusual in that respect
" I lie supply of TAs is there
concurs Philip Holden, president
ol Graduate Assistants United, a
union for teaching assistants
But students and campuses in
general lose something bv
limiting the number of foreign
grad students who can teach,
Southern Cal's Baker observes.
A dded A ctivities
Predict Promise
Continued From Pane 3.
study's findings have prompted
him to "pay a lot more attention
to the stick-to-it-iveness kid
rather than the spread-vourselt
thin kid "
In announcing the study's fin-
dings earlier this month, College
Board President Hanford said
the results "put I some
long-standing myths about the
admissions process
lor example, work experience,
attendance at a private secon I
school and the subject ol an ap-
plicant's essay actually indicate
little about a student's potential,
Willingham found.
In particular, the study
minimized the importance ol
college interview as a "tool that
says anything about future suc-
Perham adds.
"It's our experience that the
interview is really an exchange ol
information and not something
that hoids the key to the student's
iiMal Perham says. Other
studv participants concurred.
In addition to Colgate,
Bucknell, Ohio Wesleyan, Oc-
cidental, Williams, Kenyon,
Kalamazoo, Hartwick and the
versity ol Richmond joined
the study.
i quality for the project,
schools had to have a 1983 class
numbering at least Ai) and had to
use the common application
form.
Great
Salad
Pffi price
w
c ' JtXt) Um all
Sou


Jdi t(v all tuw
University tcrU
Special
Mon - Fri.
Jr. Sirloin
& Salad Bar
$3.
99
4 yreac fitaee &� catf
STEAK HOUSE
BUY 'EM & TRY 'EM, WITH OUR MUSIC -BACK GUARANTEE
OUR
"NO RISK"
GUARANTEE
rd Bar believes in new
I we I ict I a
, "No Risk"
our exel
- :� n lee � fe
you're not 1 '
i "No Risk"
mply retun r foi
con plett md I i
efund r exchai
reo
CHARLIE SEXTON
PICTURES I
h fron "
� � '
sin jerguitarist ha .
wot idmirei ke Keitl
Richards, J
ish. Wit! � il �
chai sma 1 I
for big thing H lei ut all n
includes Be it's S
MCA RECORDS
DIVINYLS
WHAT A LIFE!
-nPk including
Pleasure 4 PainIn My irt
Don r You Go Walking
Steeping Beauty
CLARENCE CLEMONS
HERO
including
You re A Friend 01 Mine (Duet With
JacKson Browne')
The Sun Am t Gonna Shine Anymore
I Wanna Be Your HeroTemptation
DIVINYLS
AHAT ALIFI
ive I rtheii 1983 debut
� I the I Now con ��
�� � m we've I een waitii .
;�� izing Chnst
Amphlett on lead vocals ai I
; � d cti i by Mike Chapmai
E � lie Benatar, Hu Lew
. ' , levastate! Includes �
r ire and Pi i �
Ckrvulu
CLARENCE CLEMONS
HERO
Millions of fai � now him is
' of Sprii : �eel
: Now he steps out front,
a " it i; m of solid i
; � .ocals. li les 1
; luet witl ; �
Brov' ie Ybu re A Friei I
Mine. When the Big Mai
� )s, you t ettei
CBS RECORDS
STRENGTH
THE ALARM
STRENG
This Welsh foursome got " i
' I U.S. exposure opening for
U2 u' I The f iers. Now
they re et 1 take America by
: powerful album
' . nary rock 'n
roll. Features the breakthroug
Cut Str -
tit
Record Bar
SATISFACTION
GUARANTEED!
ON SALE THROUGH
NOVEMBER 27TH
THE PLAZACAROLINA EAST MALL
CASSETTE OR LP
'





I HI EAS1 CAROLINIAN
NOV! MBfcR 19, 1985
South's Infant Mortality Must Be Solved
VSHINGTON (UP1) - A "col-
aborative commitment" by state
and federal policy makers, health
ssionals, business and com-
t leaders is needed to solve
he chronic dilemma" of infant
rtalit) in the South, a report
� Mondaj
A task force, created in July
I by the Southern Governors'
Vssociation, made 46 recommen-
in the areas oi services,
financing, education and
irch, all aimed at improving
s poor record on infant
ink this report is a
oi action said South
Carolina Gov. Dick Riley, who
chaired the Southern Regional
Task Force on Infant Mortality.
"It's comprehensive. We think
that is the only fair way to deal
with this issue said Riley, who
spoke to reporters in a telephone
news conference.
The recommendations range
from a call for state and federal
changes in certain poverty laws to
the establishment of specialized
health care clinics and statewide
oversight councils on maternal
and infant health.
Model state legislation based
on the recommendations is due to
be completed in Januarv
Although many of the recom-
mendations have high price tags,
Riley said that in the long run,
preventive action would save
money.
"The primary recommenda-
tions in this report are designed
to save state and federal dollars
in the long term. That's what
really counts said the governor,
calling the problem in the South a
"persistent and chronic
dilemma
Indeed, the problem of infant
mortality, the number of babies
who die before their first birth-
day, is particularly acute in the
South. Nine of 11 states in the na-
Insurance Increases For Bars
tion with the highest infant death
rates in 1983 were in this region.
Mississippi had an infant mor-
tality rate of 15.1 per 1,000 live
births in 1983, and South
Carolina, Louisiana, Georgia,
North Carolina, Alabama, Ten-
nessee, Florida, Virginia,
Maryland and Kentucky were
above the national rate of 11.2,
"The preventable death of an
infant is a sad and perplexing
event. It is particularly sad in the
South, the region where babies
die at higher rates than any other
region in the country the report
said.
"The answer to the problem.
as complex as it may be, is a
laborative commitment b polic)
makers, health care pro
sionals from a variety ol
disciplines, and corporate
community leaders to make
taut mortality a priority deserv-
ing special attention and im-
mediate action the report said.
1 ow birth weight is i iften
associated with infant dea
The task force said no one fa
can he pinpointed as the sole
cause oi low birth weighi and in-
fant deaths but said that pov
is a "significant (actor affet I
the health and well beii s
women and children
Since povertj likely
eliminated, the rep
trateg
�� situations leading
i and intervene at
str .
II
idard
'r c id to i
Medi
be set at
less
'v le � � a yeai
-H, NC (UPI)
g liability insurance
liui tor taverns.
a o � ei sellers of
beverages are forcing
ers t( stop coverage
stop sales, at-
ys and businessmen say.
Payne, co-owner of
' "s Rathskeller restaurant
unge, said her liability in-
e premium almost doubled
he vear, up to Si,200 a
Another Raleigh bar
said he has been shopping
tor liability insurance,
is bracing himself with the
paving perhaps
I a yeai for coverage,
u're on thin ice said
Ray, a partner in Crow ley's
tes Restaurant and
"It's a shame, really,
he law is holding us
ble. If you don't have m-
. can lose everything
ked tor all youi life, what
work for the rest of
; somebody leaves
' as ai accident and
jranee pro-
r re I owner
by people
drunken driver u
- at the person's
establishment.
This month, four people hurt
in a March collision with an adult
drunken driver, who subsequent-
ly committed suicide, filed suit in
Wake County Superior Court
against the driver's family and
the tavern where, the suit says,
the driver got "skunk drunk"
before the accident. The plain-
tiffs are asking for more than S50
million in damages.
North Carolina's 1983 drunken
driving law makes tavern owners
responsible for up to $500,000 in
damages if a minor is served
alcoholic beverages and is later
involved in a wreck. A separate
state law prohibits bars from ser-
ving alcohol to intoxicated peo-
ple.
Large awards from suits across
the nation are causing the in-
creased premiums, said Max
Powell, special assistant to the
state insurance commissioner,
William Potter Jr a Raleigh at
torney and lobbyist wh
represents tavern owners, said
some of his clients are passing
along their premium increases
through price increases, while
others are closing down, selling
out or taking the chance ol str-
ing open without insurance.
"It may end up that the only
people who can afford them
(premiums) are the big hotel
chains, and 1 don't think that's
going to be good for the business
community Potter said.
The size of premium increases
vanes from 20 percent to 600 per
cent, said Dennis Jav, a
spokesman for the National
Association of Professional In-
surance Agents in Alexandria.
Va. Jay traced the increases to
the national focus on drunken
driving and a movement to find
out "who was responsible and
put the blame wherever you can
for the problem
Potter said the nation is involv -
ed in a kind of "hysteria of trying
to punish people who sell
alcohol Other lawyers question
the insurance industry's assertion
iha increased lawsuits
necessitated the higher premiums
and believe that companies are
raising premiums because they
are not getting enough return
invested .ash. run because
more claims or awards.
"In 1985, we've ail become
bad risks suddenly - people with
automobiles, restaurants, cities,
counties, transit systems, fishing
fleets, day-care centers, said
Alan Briggs.
The Night Away
At the 3rd annual Air Band Contest
Sponsored by The Leisure Systems
Studies Society
When: November 26
Time: 9:00 p.m.
Where: Elbo Room
All profits will go to the 1986 Spring Banquet. Call
756-9817 for more information
Sponsors
Apple Records
Chico's
Marsh's Surf V Sea
Hearts Delight
Susie's Pizzeria
New Deli
Eastern Carolina
School Of Bartending
Bicycle Post
Time Out
Simon's
Chinatown Express
FREE
FRAMES
WITH THE PURCHASE OF PRESCMPTION I I- NSES
ALL FRAMES IN STOCK �
WITH PRESCRIPTION LENSES
Must present coupon with order for discount
Not Good With Other Advertised S petjals
CpUPEXWRKNOV.JpJogs
SOFT r
CONTACTS
GET
CLIFFS
NOTES
HERE.
t
� Ask About Our Senior
Citizen 20�o Discount 'r M Harris
Acto� from
Tb� PImji
The
OPTICAL PALACE
OPEN 9:30 M to 6 PMMOM) IURi KRIi)N
PHOM- -JUm
I
U.B.E'
Listen ForTh e SLEIGH BELLS 2
And You Co Jd Be A WINNER
m
And Theae ECU Supporters:
ATTIC
GROG'S
SUBWAY
JARMAN STABLES CHICO'S
SUB STATION II FABRICATE TOO
NEW DELI pepsi
TW'S NITELIFE PIZZA HUT
BUCCANEER MOVIES TREE HOUSE
1$
CHINATOWN EXPRESS
WRONG WAY CORRIGAN'S
HEART'S DELIGHT
FRANK'S PIZZA
JEFFREY'S BEER & WINE
FOR HEADS ONLY
FRANKLIN'S
MARSH'S SURF & SEA
THE PLAZA RECORD BAR
SUNSHINE VIDEO INC
SUSIE'S pizzeria'
g
THt t AV
I hi- muchj
spectrum oi
Mozart,
-
School Of fu

Hea

WZMB is your source for Dynamic
MUSIC and G1VEAWA YS
Just Follow Thes e 3 Easy Steps To Be An Easv
WINNER:
1 - TUNE to 91.3 W2MB
2 - LISTEN for the Sla'gh Bells
3 - CALL 757-6913 TO WIN
CHRISTMAS IN
NOVEMBER
AND WZMB
WE MAKE WINNING EASY!
ECU PLAYHOUSE BOX OFRCE g DOU 7 FOf
Bx i YY
ovei S
marl
app
' pes
imp
ten
perience
sec ure
Vs H
business,
about th
of drev- '
cor .
ol )'
standard wa) �
tervieu I
as
cream .
one is to r
herself in a bus
For men, a suil
portant item. 1 is the
with which mosi pcop.c ju .
wearer status, character, and
abilities, it is a
authority, position and power
Basic conservative
the best choices I
blue and gray are the best
I





olved
ectivcl)
eading to
u'ne at
the
eed to
lilies
Medicaid
.i yeai
GET
CLIFFS
NOTES
HERE.
ed
R FT '
' S Ml
S I
a
� & ha ImmI
n
JT
jSE
DS
g
)NLYi3
1
a
AR 2
RCE
)r Dynamic
iWAYS
s To Be An Easy
INGEASY!
THF EAST AROt INIAN
Entertainment
N() MM K 19. 1985
Page
Folger Consort
To Play Hendrix
e Folger Consort
This much-accJaimed Renaissance and Medieval quartet will be appearing Wednesday night at Hendrix Theatre. Iheir music covers a wide
peetrum of Jacobean and Elizabethan stles, including songs from some of s,hakespeare s plas.
Mozart, Salieri Tangle In Amadeus
B( APP IVE
SUff Wr1l�r
Coming to Hendrix Theatre on
the Fast Carolina University
campus in Greenville on Nov. 20
is the Folger Consort, a quartet
of professional musicians
specializing in Medieval and
Renaissance music. They have
emerged from a broad spectrum
of experience, including or-
chestra, solo and chamber per-
formances.
The quartet is currently per!
ming in residence at Folger
Shakespeare Library's
Elizabethan Theatre, rhe g a
these regular performances is
provide the growing early music
audience with a realistically vital
� scholarly representation
Medieval, Renaissance and Ba
que styles o music.
The ensemble is comprised of
K bert Fi sen stein, viola;
Christopher Kendall, lute; Scott
Reiss. recorder, and Ann
Monoyios, soprano The music
presented will be a . ross section
ol the weal" vanetv
1 zabethan and Jac bean music.
Musical numbers by Roberi
! n and perario
be played, rhese Jacol
masque dances, elaborately
ed and c �stumed, were run
series, with the participa
both, nobility and the ll au-
diences.
uilv en
1984'
n e
al
film p til the
events in the
decade ol Wolfgang Amadeus
Moart
H
is music
Bi
Amadeus, wi
Peter Shaffer,
�vard play (
81 M
i I976's Academy '
sweeping One f � ' �
dominates the film, and son
prominent pieces are from
Mo; peras
Most imp ). the movie is
based on the encounter betwei
common person and a genius
The common person is Antonio
Salieri, the 18th-century ltahan
court composer to Emp
;eph 11 - tria and broi
� Dui ing
I id �
� u
. Best
lies- !
M
ii I disgust �'�
spark
u also the

tesque (to Salieri's
child. Salieri is also
that Cod is obviously
ring him but rather the
Mozart.
Mozart, an uneducated and
single child reared by his father,
was ility Where
most children rebel during their
adolescent years. Moart's
lescent rebellion was postpon-
until his later years when he
opposed the rchbishop of
Salzbui
Cast as "v: Hulce
Best V
imal House 1
Murray v plays Salieri,
essed interior Boi
ties convincingly. i
; f Best Actoi
been a difficult one tor the
V.ademv ol Motion Picture
rnces.
Mucl ' movie is filmed in
Prague, Czechoslovak the
netown of Milos 1
Mozart s " The Marri ige
"Don Giovanni
"The Magic Flute" have all been
recreated in breath-taking scenes
within the film, giving the au-
dience a sense of enthrallment.
Admission to Amadeus is free
. :nts and guests with
IDs and also for ECl
Staff and guests IDs and ;
ester 1 ilm Passes.
The consort will ah
some works ol 11 mas Morley,
whose works were used
William Shakespeare in -cu
his plays Mosi notably,
Desdemona sang "The Willow
( Khello and "It was
a lover and His Lass" was incor-
porated into the first production
of "As You Like It
The Folger Shakespeare
Library, in Washington, D.C,
has been praised as the most
significant collection of English
and continental Renaissance
materials in the Western
Hemisphere. It boasts some 79 of
Shakespeare's first Folio (the
first full collection of
Shakespeare's work) compared
to the British Library's five. The
Folios, printed in 1623, are,
��ever, the "tip of the
iceberg The Folger Library-
houses the largest collection of
Shakespeare's work anywhere in
the world. It is no small wonder,
then, that the Folger Consort has
gained an international reputa-
tion for giving precise, pleasing
renderings of the music of early
yesteryear.
The Folger C onsort will per-
m the November 20 concert at
s p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
Tickets are on sale now at the
Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center,
pen Monday-Friday from 11
to b p.m. Tickets are S2 for
(I students and guest, S2 for
iths (high school aged and
under), $4 for ECU faculty and
� f, and S4 for the public and at
I
oi tickets and more informa-
tion, call 757-6611.
Fhe Folger Consort is touted as
one oi the best performances in
field and said to bring
freshness and vitality to a musical
style which could seem "dusty-
material Don't miss this oppor-
s season!
Ceramic Sale
School Of Music Faculty Will Perform At Georgetown
A selection of "giveable, affor-
dab pottery" will be
Fered for sale Dec. 5-6 at 1
c at olina University's Jenl
Fine Arts, Center
1 he sale items, worl I stu-
dent members � the PC I
Ceramic Guild, will be displayed
from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursdav
and from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday
in the Jenkins Center's foyer.
Previous December sales by the
Guild have included such func-
tional pieces as mugs, platters,
bowls and pitchers, along with
plaques, vases, ornaments, tiny-
animals and other decorative
items.

D.C .
H
ting. Tl will
will be
wed bv a ;
in the Hall o Nation;
� ei holders.
s sponsored by 1 ast
University Alumni
in the Washington,
i) i �
$10 per adult and S foi studei
I Xvlult tickets purchased in
blocks ol four or more are $8)
rickets may be ordered bv mail
a check or money order
tde payable to Washington
Metro E I Alumni
ation") to Col. Bryan Ben-
. 2913B South Woodlev
Street, Arlington. VA, 22206.
1 hey will be held at the door until
concert time.
The evening's program will
aith Selma Gokcen, cellist,
: Pan; 1 ardif, piano, perform-
ing Haydn's "Divertimento in D
majorChants d' Espagne" by
Joaquin Nin, and "Rondo" by
C M. von Weber, hollowing will
be "Divertissement" by Pierre
Max Dubois (performed bv
David Hawkins, oboe; Deborah
Chodacki, clarinet; Kim Peoria,
bassoon, and Brad holey, sax
ophone) and Moart's "Diver-
timento in B-tlat" performed bv
Hawkins. Chodacki, and Peoria.
The concert will end with favorite
duets from shows bv Irving
Berlin ("Call Me Madam"),
George Gershwin ("Of Thee 1
Sing") and Jerome Kern ("Girl
form Utah") among others, sung
by Antonia Dalapas. soprano,
and Edward Gleen. bass-
barritone, and accompanied on
piano by Everett Pittman,
lor more information, cal
Page Stout Aman at 757-60"2.
Don 9t Forget To Dress For Success
Bv CAPP INKY
stjff �nin
e tall semester is aim
Soon December graduates
� the "real" world�the
Resumes and letters of
ication will be mailed in
es ot landing the all -
?rtant job interview. The in-
�� is a nerve-wracking ex-
nce, yet must be endured to
ire a job.
As with any other aspect of
business, there are special rules
about the interview and the code
;tess for men and women. As
cording to John Molloy, author
� Dress for Success, there are
dard ways to dress for an in-
terview. Unfortunately, these
ays do not leave room for
creativity, but are necessary it
one is to present himself or
herself in a business-like manner.
For men, a suit is the most im-
portant item. It is the garment
with which most people judge the
wearer's status, character, and
abilities; it is also associated with
authority, position and power.
Basic conservative colors are
the best choices for a suit, and
blue and gray are the best of
these. These colors, in darker
shades, indicate the most
credibility to a potential
employer. Brown is a definite
ative for an interview and
should be avoided. Molloy states
that a brown suit is negative,
if you are trying to be more
authoritative and if you are too
authoritative
In choosing a shirt to match a
suit, pinks and pale lavenders
should be avoided due to less-
than-masculine associations. A
pastel-colored shirt (pale yellow
or blue) is acceptable, providing
it has a white collar and the job
interview is for a high-fashion in-
dustry. Otherwise, choose a basic-
shirt in a lighter shade than the
suit, either light gray, eggshell, or
white.
The next item to consider in a
suit is the tie. Molloy claims the
tie is the single most important
denominator of social status for a
man in the United States today. It
symbolizes respectability and
responsibility. The tie should be
darker than the shirt and made of
100 percent silk. There are three
main types of silk ties: the
foulard, regular weave, and
woven. The best of these is the
regular weave; the foulard is too
light for a sturdy Windsor knot
and the woven is too heavy. Solid
ties are the best choice; they will
match everything. A patterned
tie. providing it is tastefully
designed, is also acceptable.
Small polka-dot designs are the
most appropriate choice.
The uniform for women is
much the same as the one for
men. To begin with, to wear
slacks would be a definite faux
pas. Slacks are far too casual for
an interview and would be as bad
a mistake as overdressing. A
female should strive to appear as
a serious and capable person, not
to sell herself as an object of
decoration.
Once again, blues and grays
are safe colors. A blazer and skirt
look business-like and are ap-
propriate. Be wary of skirts with
high splits or ones that are too
body-conforming. A straight-
lined skirt is best; one that allows
the interviewee to move freely.
A matching shirt in a conser-
vative color is necessary to com-
plete the business look. A shirt
with a collar is preferable so a tie
can be worn. A silk sash in a solid
color should be worn around the
neck; this is the equivalent of �.
man's tie.
Experts consider suntan-
colored hose to be the most ap-
propriate leg covering. It is best
to avoid patterned hose and those
of various colors. Be sure to wear
pumps with a low heel. If the
heels are too high, the interviewee
may tower over the interviewer
and cause him or her to be on the
defensive. Also, heels that are too
high are more difficult to walk in
and may cause wobbling.
Accessories are fine for an out-
fit, but don't overdo it. Large,
clunky jewelry should not be
worn; however, simple rings,
watches and bracelets are accep-
table. Another accessory to avoid
is perfume, especially if its scent
is heavy. If perfume must be
worn, choose one with a light
scent and use it sparingly.
Although dressing ap-
propriately will not guarantee a
job, it will be helpful to those in
the interviewing process. Good
luck to all of you hunting for jobs
now � appropriate dress will
give you one less thing to worry
about during the interview.
"Well, Do I Get The Job?"
When choosing your wardrobe for that all-imj. rtant job interview,
take a tip from the photo above � save this outfit for Halloween.
.� ?





8
IHl i AMAROl INIAN
s I MBI K is� is)h�.
Madrigal Dinners To Usher In Season
It's difficult to think about the
holida) season when it is still so
fai olt. but it you wam sure
to begin vour holidays witl
time-honored tradition, now is
the tune to purchase tickets to the
Madrigal Dinners sponsored eat I
yeai bv the Department
Universit I nions, I his
these Elizabethan leasts will be
held Decembei �i 7 at 7 p.m
the Multi-Purpose Room
ECU's M Stud
v entei
IV l
I
Din
Universit
Madi igal
open the
ciav
1 nglish fashion. I he dinners are
modeled aftei an Elizabethan
festival in a country manor
house. I he lord and lads of the
manoi preside ovei the entire
least; they are dressed in lux
urious period costumes ol velvet
and lace and stand ready to greet
� guests gain this year, Jim
I rancine Rees will host the
e em
I i tient is provided b
magicians, poets, and musicians.
1 lie Madrigal Singers, under the
: reel �n of Di Charles Moore
the School ol Music, will
highlight the evening. Dressed in
period attire, they will sing a
tiumber ol age old Madrigals and
Christmas selections and will per
form traditional Elizabethan
dances.
Dinner will be served b
costumed waiters and waitresses
I ong banquet tables, covered
with snowy white cloths, add to
the feeling of a royal feast Sei
vomation Corporation, under the
direction of Ira Simon, will pro
v ide the meal.
I ickets, which are $14 per pei
son. go quickly and can be pur
chased in advance. The can be
obtained at the Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall Student
Center, ot hv calling 757 6611.
exi 266 Mondays through
Fridays from 11 a.m to 6 p.m
One dollar ol the ticket price i
lav deductible contribution to the
School of Musk Scholarship
Fund.
Anyone interested ma) direct
mail orders to: Central I icket Ol
fice, Mendenhall Studententer.
Please make the check payabli
" entral Hcket Office and
dicate the full names ol all ticket
holders win are ordering
can be placed on the ho ol
"honored guests "
It's Something Special You e Been Looking For
B MUCH EATON
SUfl �m,i
i d a
irk
on t he
�a
V
S :
is a
. atei ing a
w edding
erii a bab
tid70
md 140
W �' using any
ad e � mouth
and
w th
yeai
Ka
v el
1 he-
discus
K.O
'
i
� .
e da
e
arger kii
:
' Bui
w c a e � e
da work w �
.
worked
Cynthia and Ka wanted to
create a pleasant, warm at-
mosphere with good food foi
students and downtown business
people. They replaced the navy
walls and dark Kood of the Blue
Moon with white walls, floral
:ahle cloths, plants and ceiling
tans.
� � �
The next step was to tl il
name After thinking ovei a
man) possibilities, c ynl
turned to Ka and said. "
we need is something spec :
Ka answered, " I hai
name
I he peoph � I
ege students
Ka believe "it is impoi u
idents, since i c l
int in ,nthia
son lohn, and ka' -
Ka
and Allison, a
business. i said "i
could probabh I
I h e res
weekdays from 11
foi lunc h only. I he me
eludes soup, salads,
sandwn
deserts 1
1 1 25 to $4 50
I .
lude op Ka
s
I
even i ngj I - �

meel
MONDAY
MEXICAN MADNESS
V
MARGAR f �
TUESDAY
LADIES NIGHT 5 - 9 PM
Al L l ADIFS Wll
Al
K MUNCH
F-Rt f P .
WEDNESDAY
ALL YOU CAN EAT BEEF RIBS
7 95

THURSDAY
COLLEGE NIGHT
FRIDAY
SCHNAPPS NIGHT

FREE FIESTA FOOD BAR: 11-1 PM
SATURDAY
SOURS & COLLINS FOR 1 99
FREE FIESTA FOOD BAR 11-1 PM
SUNDAY:
99 DRINK SPECIALS
-
Darryl s Delivers Call 757-1973
New Fiesta Food Bar
On Friday & Saturday Nights 11:00 to 1:00
FREE
Brass Plays It Duo
R

i I
Hal
Deuv 1 anses
the
�v is .1
the Bat I M isu :
( reorge Brou Rid
A 111
He . - a candidate foi 11 e
Bachelor ol Music Educai
degree

3P Tc 3?
CONTACT LENSES
$105.00
$ 145.00
OPTOMeTWC
�WCAR�C�KT�R

kV'
Honors Program3.4 gpa
Anth 1000 Europ. Studies 3001 Econ 2113 Eng 1200 For
2221 Geog 2001 'Hist 1551 Hist 1553 Phil 1100 Soa 2110
Sem What's All This Fuss About Humanism?"
Seminar: Church & State In The U.S.
Seminar: Masculinity Femininity: New Perspectives tsoc
V: .red)
Seminar Astronomy: In Celebration of Halley's Comet
Seminar: Astronomy Lab -
Seminar: The 50's (H � OR !
Any student with o 3 4 gpa qualifies to take Honors courses any
time
For more into, see Dr David Sanders, 212 Ragsdale (757 6373)
Hlth 1000 Libs HUM) Libs 3102 Math 1085 Math 2171
105 Airport Road
Greenville, NC 27834
758 0327
A VA. I A MJ 4
SHRIMP
All You Can Eat
$5"
Includes french fries, cole slaw & hush puppies
Tues Wed Thur. Only
THE
DINNER
PLACE
4 p.m10 p.m.
Monday & Tuesday Night
Fried Shrimp� All You Can Eat $4.50
Wednesday Nigh t
Scallops & Soft Shell Crab Combo $4.50
Thursday Night
Cubbies Cheese Steak $2.50
Friday Night
Cubbies Shrimp Burger $1.50
Daily Special
2 Hot Dogs for $1.00
Hambu rger & French Fries $1.00
Hours:
10:30a.m. to 2:30a.m.
7 Da vs A Week
Corner of 5th and Evans Street
Phone: 752-6497
Dotllll s)
y J
Man-O
Walkin Th
a




.�.� .


Overkill
"

EC I Artist
M
at the C
a
Carolina Des �
Fa;
weekei .
in Raleigh, c
Gregg ann
near! 9
give out three Aw
cellence tor
smanship
V �ors, a gra;
received the
and award





00 to 1:00
FR
JljJLV
iw Evans Si reel
Phone: 752-6497
looiu stmr
fHE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVFMBf R 19, 198! 9
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
: ! 41
J
U.
? y �
M
� ��'?V,
.�� �,
� �. � � �
v ' � �
- .
r
U. 7
k
i
4
tt
n

.�
� P0N5i
�-

�� '
v1 fE

-y.

I' .
J
K
ft?
k ! �
.5
A
�t:
! -fM-Cl 1 gsvJS;
j
�' y

i
'��
�1
�ru.
Man-O-Stick
r

�'
n
u
3
Bv JARRELL & JOHNSON
Walkin' The Plank
Bv A. GUY
vy: �'�'
V
� . . � 1MB Jl�
3 1 I � 3 t t c
itpfte
�� �;o i ��- .
7 '� r !��" 'pnr1 �
a
H Kfcpfc '�" r ��� XI .
. . t 1.005 . : �
s Irt� H
�T'l.a" : -
4
1 �
L ,f

'W
I- V
�-�� rt
. !l
�,
, HAT� 1 t �-

Overkill
By PAUL FRIEDRICH
���
WHffTRl iTS COOL
' � '
r
& 4
xk
ECU Artist To Judge Craftsmen's Fair
Brain Food
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
L
TOPPING!
�� � �.
delicious 1 - item
�id get your
nd toppmq
ABSOLUTELY FREE1
Offer good through 12 1 85
throwing a ; ny
jetting a,
mecl �
� �. .�
. .� .
-��
that

Call us.
758-6660 752-6996
r
i
i
i
i
i
i

i
i
i
i
30 minute
guarantee
or
Don i brings
you fa ' -� �.
30mmut
GUARANTEED
rnhb
FREE:
'� � AM S ii Fhui
1 At � &Sat
DOMINO'S
PIZZA
DELIVERS
FREE.
m
4MI
Upcoming Events
Films Committee:
Amadeus
Thurs Fri & Sat Nov. 21, 22 & 23
6:30&9:15p.m.
Travel Committee:
PARIS AND THE SEINE �
Presented b kathv Dusek in Hendrix Theatre.
Tuesday, Nov. 19
8 p.m.
Recreation Committee:
Men's Billiards
ruesday, Nov. 19 at 6 p.m.
Student Center Billiards Room
Turkey Shoot In Bowling
Thursday, Nov. 21 at 7 p.m.
Student (enter Bowling Alley
� Sign Up Nou !
Special Events Committee:
JAY LENO
Monday, Nov. 25 at 8 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
Tickets Available at Mendenhall Central Ticket Office
$1.50 for students, S3.00 for faculty and $4.00 for the general public and at the
door.
Minority Arts Committee:
International Week
No. 17 through Nov. 21
Michael H Voors, instructor
the I Schoo �1 rt, w
uror fur the 16th annual
�lina Designer (raftsmen's
fair, scheduled for rhanksgiving
weekend at the s;ate fairgrounds
in Raleigh, CDC President Jan
f iregg announced Thursd.i-
Voors will judge the work
nearly 90 fair exhibitors and will
give out three Awards in I n
cellence for outstanding craft-
smanship.
Voors. a graphic artist, has
received the following honors
and awards: Honorable Mention
Award and Purchase Award, 6th
Annual Juried Exhibition,
(ioldsboro Community Arts
( ouncil, 1985; Purchase Award,
Kansas Ninth National Small
Painting, Drawing, and Print Ex-
hibition, Fort Hays State Univer-
sity, Hays, Kansas, 1984, and
First Place Award for Graphics,
5th Annual Juried Exhibition,
Tarboro Arts Commission, Tar-
boro, N.C 1984. His profes-
sional affiliations include Board
of Trustees. Greenville Museum
of Art; College Art Association,
and Philadelphia Print Club.
Carolina Designer Craftsmen,
a guild dedicated to contem-
porary applications of traditional
crafts, sponsors the Research
Triangle area's largest craft show
sponsored by a professional
guild.
Fair hours will be 6 to 10p.m
Nov. 29, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. No
30 and noon to 6 p.m Dec. 1.
Admission will cost $3 for
adults and $2 for students and
senior citizens. Children aged 12
and younger will be admitted at
no charge.
The Underground:
For Lunch
160f3sm3500 at 1:30 p.m
Rock world Kieos
Thursdays at 1:30 p.m.
Movie Shorts
With The Keystone Kops in
"The Desperate Scoundrel"
WINNER OF
ACADEMY
AWARDS
BEST PICTURE
W
L
REACHING OUT TO SERVE YOU
riiim iwimhii imiinini
ALSO INCLUDING
Best Actor
F. Murray Abraham
Best Director
MUos Forman
Best Screenplay
Peter Shaffer
AmadeuS
n�i Vbrkei f Urns Reteas ,POi





I HI I ASI . ARO INIAN
Sports
VIM ' M k 19, lvx
PiratesCome Up Short
Rallies Tulsa
JmS��"
Senior tailback Ton, Baker rambles for some of his 130 yards Satorda,
LSI (on Dec. 7, to surpassblesterrumpler as EC!
s al
Haker needs just 76 vards ajjainsf
-time leading rusher.
Seniors3 Last Home Action
By SCOT! COOPER
DAVID McGINNESS
� amon8the Performers in cost the Pirates greatlv. s
the
S O
f main oi the
LIr,rat.J5ackfe,d were sen" game wound down. Holtzclaw
Bob,b 'Dirx 30 C,a" and managed to find his touch and
'Rock' Pirate receivers lonv Sirith a d
vert
wai
Ficklt
e Da :i d
fine I
eai �
Desp .
ECl coacl V
I
ich M � Bal
h e did v er v 11

n
V
important role in the P
game � kej
ns to n
es.
Defensively, -
unt racked
Robert Wa�
"A
N1- � alsi ad
� -s (six -
.
back K
v all
Wiln and Rim McCaliun
our fill in.
u on felt the Pirates
3d P'ayed ell in the fin � hut
"I w
heca vhoie
My backup was hurt
u lid. "We cou
ived Amos 'Slice' Adam;
Wr
id B �
ma
Berke Holtclaw
"Berke Holtzclaw was a plea-
ts coacl Bakei said.
"He gave us a glimpse ol w
he's going to do fot us. He had
confidence in himself and 1
thought he made a great pass in
the end to gel us in a position to
B DAVID McGINNESS
&
SCOTT COOPER
SfMM fdllnrs
Junior quarterback Steve Gage
led the Tulsa Golden Hurricane
to a narrow 21-20 comeback vic-
tory over a struggling 2-8 Pirate
squad.
The Tulsa victory came before
a Shrine Day crowd of 23,126 on
an overcast Saturday.
Gage, who passed tor 157
vards and one touchdown while
rushing tor 52 vards and another
score, was the driving force in
Tulsa's offensive attack, rhe
Golden Hurricane rallied in the
third quarter, scoring two
touchdowns while effective!
shutting down the Pirate offense.
Tulsa first-year head coach
Don Morton did not give up on
his squad, despite their first half
17-6 deficit.
I told the players to keep a
positive attitude and to maintain
their poise out there (during
halftime) said Morton.
Tulsa took first possession and
mounted a drive of 68 yards
before a strong defensive play.
resulted in a Hurricane turnovet
On a third-and-goal from the
is l 12, Cage tumbled and
lulsa receiver Eric Brown
recovered but tumbled to ECl s
Robert Washington on the P
25
ECl was unable to capitalize
�-� I I miscue, and Tim
Wolter punted Hurricane
39. However, the Buc defense
responded again as Essray,
I aliaferro put i c iage, I
ring a fumble, which raliaferro
himsell recovered on the II J3
rhe Pirates, behind a sti n e
offensive line, use:
middle running plays to put tl e
hail on the Iuisa six yard line.
I ' C big play was a 15��
scamper by seuicM fullback Bob
bv'air The scoring play, came
a pitch to senior tailback lony
Hake. who dove between
Iuisa defenders. I he 33-vard
on a 2 yard (�age ; a Ron
Kellev I he Buc defense stiffen
ed, forcing a lason Stauro �
tield goal of 12 vards. "his cut
the Pirate lead to 7-3 witl
maining in the opening period
I he strong Pirate ground
tack led by (lair. Maker dwd An-
thony Simpson moved the ball 79
vards in 13 plays, giving the
Pirates held position I I
seven yard line On third down.
HoltJaw rolled right and
Simpson in the endone. With
10:21 left in the halt. EC I
command 14 1
rhe Hurricane retaliated
moving rhe ball 69 .
Phi e Pirate 1 1 yard
Seinoi Keith i I topped
11 third-down plav
rovsky, fiel I
I he 28-yard held e q .
led to 14-6 witl 5-17 eft i
halt.
However.
was not ovei
pleting a 14 ya v .
iainey, 1
39. H Kevin !
� ' '� '
plays
ebackei Bubba kVai
recovered a
giving the P ra
own 13 with 2:02 i
halftime.
I n t he
drive. 1(1
range I - a Heatl �" .
fieldj
17-6 lea
sue- ful a
17 12
54 yard
the good fi
52- i
wid
I .
plav. 64
I

a
� i '
u , �v "u lv KC1 us m a p.
, beause e were trying to v that last field goal
P the i which :
hall up the middle "
Holtzclaw, who completed
lony Bal 13 arc1
1 c l &eco" d ��� �� a lown in his first stari
fading rushei combined touches of precison-
s �" : 30 car� med passing witl a b
' 76 vards 'freshman-itis' The Valdosta
" ,the P '�' Ganative experienced some dif-
as lie fumbled in two
: ' ' ' s) as
'� �� time leading rusher. I
Holtzclaw, though, was
somewh i less self complimen-
tary. When asked what he
lEer ards he would r�r oi
��l start, the freshman
replied. "I'll remember all the
tumbles 1 made
1 I will have some time to
rest and prepare before traveling
to Baton Rouge. 1 a on Dec. 7
to face the Bayou Bengals of
I SI
scoring drive consumed 2:17
five plays and the Jet: Heath kick
gave the Bucs a 7-0lead with 7:12
left in the first quarter.
fter both teams were unable
to gam a first down, Iuisa
managed to move o the Pirate 1 5
� was �
c Stai
1
two Pirate .cores. And a
. �
tie,
wed 15-s�
Neither ream could gain � firsi
Kevin Walk� and Keii
collided and w � �
:
Hake; I � ECU
! I ree plav
pleted a 17
to Kev
in tl
in six
outing and
ending
their
M
Lady Bucs Look To Tourney
magmg situations.
turnovers did not
Ih
e Pirate fullback position played a vital role in Saturday's
mmizzs;�zi 2?�"s,adium-Here Berke
my.
Lagnaf Football I
Tourney Scheduled
Do you like to play flag foot-
ball If so, enter the first annual
LAC VAFInvitational Flag Foot-
ball Tournament the weekend of
Nov. 22-24.
All teams are invited to par-
ticipate. There is a small entry fee
of $20 per team. There will be
prizes awarded to both the firs:
and second-place finishers. The
first place team will receive a
trophy and a keg of beer. The
second-place finishers will also
receive a trophy.
The team's captain meeting is
tomorrow at 7 p.n n the Jar-
vis Dorm lobby. All team cap-
tains must attend and are urged
to bring their entry fee as well.
For more information concerning
the tournament, contact Richard
Frazier at 752-8208, John
Faulkner at 758-9255 or Billy
McShea at 758-5077.
Managers
Needed
The ECU men's basketball
team has a need for several
managers. The managers have
several duties and are entrusted
with a large amount of respon-
sibility.
Scholarships can be earned
through loyalty and hard work.
In addition, there are many
benefits offered to basketball
managers. To apply and to find
out more about the position,
come by Minges Coliseum at 5:30
p.m. and speak with the head
manager, Burt Jenkins.
By riM CHANDLER
M�ff Wncr
The Lady Pirate Basketball
team held their final Purple-Cold
intrasquad scrimmage of the yeai
this Saturday.
The game was held in Minges
Coliseum immediately after the
completion of the ECU-Tulsa
game. Head Coach Emily Man-
waring said that she felt that
there was improvement from the
last scrimmage. 'The girls knew
where to go offensively stated
Manwaring. "but they need to
show trust in their teammates
and show some patience
"The girls knew where
to go offensivelybut
they need to show trust
in their teammates, and
show some patience. "
Emily Manwaring
Coach Manwaring stated that
she felt that defense would be the
key to the team. "We're not go-
ing to be able to let our op-
ponents have wide-open shots
stated Manwaring, "their hands
have to stay up on defense
The Lady Pirates have only
three more practice days before
they open their season. And
Coach Manwaring said that the
three days of practice are needed.
According to Manwaring, there
was too much that has to be
changed. She also stated that the
girls know what to do, they just
need to start doing it. Coach
Manwaring stated that the star-
ting lineup for the opening game
had not been selected yet. "I am
still considering eight players for
starting positions said Man-
waring.
The Lady Pirates will certainly
have their hands full during their
first three games this weekend.
They open up on Friday, 'o 22
'he "ennessee rech
merit Their opponent will he
rennessee Tech the del
Ohio Vallev (
rech finished las: -A
2d-9 record and also made a
the N( -V tournamei
Saturday, the 1 adv Pirates
take on the winner
Georgia-Central Michigan game
that will be played Friday. I
Bulldogs are ranked second in
preseason polls. ftcv were 2
last vear and finished as nati
-
p
NCAA
a 22
� are
preseason poll
bv Pal cd,i Sumi
Sr
IRS
Bv IfUSt !? km
n
aloriK
Dwa
CjU.j D �
I
3) H o m '
4)
5) P
) Po
:
The Lady Pirates' Monlque Pomoilli Hriv�T JO"Dn cu "ho,� L"
William Mary ,as. ye.r.VheiSZZX u� 22. ��
Tennessee Tech Tournament this weekend c�Paign in the
r
Men's Ba.



"He
some p
s hke he
and
the -
spo?
duct H
National B
P
still �
'
fwi
(jrivelhl
Ibr
Res'
ABffR� ;toi�i
-
PH:
stat
reltg
as this i
BB&I
ks
I "h





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 19, 1W
11
es Tulsa
sas
B ' ! 11' 11
o Tourney
I
JON JOBDAN
mique Pompilli drives for two points against
tar. The Bues open their '85-86 campaign in the
lament this weekend.
IRS Team
H JEANNETTE ROTH
Staff �ni�
I he Department ol
imural Recreational Services'
�cam bowling is rolling right
g into the playoffs. The top
bowlers in the men's divi-
are 1 rank 1 ee with 586,
Dwayne rayloi 579, and Mike
$73. Fhe women's lead top
arc Kri Martin 2"M and
i Dixon 295. Sneakei Sam's
picks have changed their
es ' men's diision
Kappa Alpha ' V
Sigma Phi Epsilon V
I Home Crown
4) fau Kappa Epsilon Sitty
�es
�a erhouse
ip ladies teams going into
ayoffs arc
11 Powerhouse Women
sie Rollers
pi a Delta Pi
i u i racquetball competi
a:i vith last
s open-dh :l ampion
waj � Raym nd Song
. captured lasi earV cham-
pionship but may run into a little
more trouble this year. Three
'racqueteers' have a shot at
dethroning Song, Andy Altman,
David Patton and P.J. Hughes.
In the intermediate division,
Troy Miller, Robert Buckley and
Patrick Ricci are this year's top
wall bangers. With the playott
picture closing inthese three will
highlight the action in Minges
Coleseum.
Intramural volleyball is in it's
last week of action. Sneaker
Sam's original league leaders are
holding their own. In the ladies'
divisions. Good, Bad, and Ugly
are topping the charts with an
undefeated 4-0 record. Other
teams with perfect records in-
clude the Hawaiian Noises and the
Sig Hp Goldenhensjwho could
be the teams to beat Good, Had
and Ugly.
The sorority leaders. Alpha
Phijare spiking their way into the
all-campus tournament with little
competition from fellow op-
ponents. The Gumbys are stret-
ching out their lead in the
women's residence hall division.
Three unbeaten teams lead the
Coach Pleads Guilty
men's independent division.
Lucky Seven, Phi Kappa Tau 'C
and Alpha Phi Big Brothers have
each netted 3-0 records. Sig Eps
and Phi Kappa Tau are still
fighting it out for the number one
spot in the fraternity division A
and B leagues. The number two
ranked CHUD leads the
residence-hall division along with
the 3(H Spikes.
The Chicago hears and this
year's number one co-rec football
team. The Spoilers, have
something in common, and it is
not 'Refrigerator Perry Both
are wiping out their opponents.
Recently, the Spoilers scored 54
points in one contest and are
averaging 40 points a game. Se-
cond ranked. Royal Invaders are
not far behind with an average of
35 points a game.
The final intramural event of
the semester is close at hand, so
be sure to find the nearest free-
throw line and practice your toul
shots. Registration tor this year's
t r e e -1 h r o w contest ends
December 2
Memorial Gym.
in
'oo m
104
Men's Basketball At Tulane?
Sew i ans (UPI) - The
having scandal
at -�.Max. old Tulane
pe col-
� . la be

rCU.
"Never" n'
ee " s'
. . � ' � be i
. - ave �
deni Earn on Kelly
c men's -arsit pro-
p- the wake of a
. ; ai dal and allega-
� NCAA violations, in-
. stat centei
'Hot K d" Williams .
�� � iign wit I
Y
led-
Aould
.el
ed. i-
cour age
1 ater, K
stance a bit.
"He has indicated to me that at
some point in the future, if he
Is like he could bring back the
program, and do il right, he
would be for u -aid Mack
Brown, first-year athletic dire.
c ach.
"It he could not do it I
ass, .i ng it rig!
: Aould not re for it
w illiam case is still in court,
or are ti
. him on
erj �'� am
� trial resulte i i mistrial on
ba-is ol pn :ial miscon-
His uncertain status promp-
ted the Cleveland Cavaliers o the
Nati � al Basketball Association
Iraw their contract otter.
Point guarcTDavid Dominique
face charges, but no date
has been sei for his trial.
wo former players testified
against Williams under grants o
immunity, and a third testified
for the prosecution in a plea
bargain.
gag order is in effect,
preventing discussion of the case
bv anyone involved.
I ntil the matter is settled.
Browi said ii was premature to
-peculate on the future of Tulane
basketball.
"I think that after this thing
gets out of court. Dr. Kelly and I
will talk, and he will bring me up
date on it Brown -aid.
I wo ol 1 ulane's most ardent
financial backers want to see
basketball revived, but only on
Kelly's term
"Jl w aid seem that someday a
university like this ought to have
a basketball program back. One
itake sh aldi '1 -pell the end ol
a progra i I �rever -aid Ben
Werner, one ol Tulane leading
fund-raisers.
"He (Kelly) knows my opi-
nion. I backed him on what he
did at the time he did it, but it
iuld be open for reconsidera-
:i Weiner said.
Kent McWilliams was Tulane's
first scholarship basketball
player, a poor kid who used his
degree a- a springboard to wealth
a- nead of McMoRan petroleum
exploration company.
In addition to I is financial sup-
port of athletics, McWilliams is a
major contributor to "ulane's
medic1 center and has endowed
a chair in geology.
Academics come first, he said:
"As much as I love athletics, you
have to have priorities
However, he said he believes
the matter could have been
handled without abolishing the
basketball program. "You don't
blame basketball for the frailties
of a few people
"Down the line, we hope we
can establish enough credibility
for them to consider reinstating
basketball he said.
Some five doen members of
the athletic department staff -
coaches, administrators and sup-
port personnel, have either quit,
been fired or reassigned to other
duties since the scandal broke.
NASHVILLE, Tenn.
(UPI)Former Vanderbilt
strength coach E. J. "Doc" Kreis
pleaded guilty Monday to illegal-
ly distributing steroids to a Clem-
son coach in a case that focused
national attention on the use of
chemical bodybuilders by
athletes.
The misdemeanor counts could
bring a maximum sentence of 11
months and 29 days to Kreis
"This case has alerted college
football programs all over the
country that the use of steroid
drugs without a prescription is
not only illegal, but, in our opi-
nion, is harmful to them said
Davidson County District At-
torney General Thomas Shriver.
"We feel that college athletes
should not have to be drugged to
be competitive he added.
Kreis' co-defendant, one time
pharmacist Melvin "Woody"
Wilson, pleaded guilty to one
count of distributing and another
of conspiracy in the same case.
Both men were tentatively
scheduled to be sentenced next
week.
The investigation began over a
year ago with the death of Clem-
son University track star
Augustinius Jaspers. An autopsy
on the athlete showed traces of a
prescription drug in his system.
The drug was traced to
Nashville, where a Tennessee
Bureau of Investigation probe
disclosed that more than 30 pre-
sent or former Vanderbilt foot-
ball players had been using
steroids.
The scandal rocked the private
university and prompted drug
testing on athletes at many
schools.
Kreis had been indicted on
sever m.soemeanor counts of
distributing and one count of
conspiracy. All but the con-
spiracy count were dismissed in
September by special Judge Bob-
by Capers, who said the statute
of limitations had expired.
Kreis pleaded guilty to
distributing steroids to a Clemson
coach, which was one of the
counts dismissed by Capers
In exchange, the burly former
all-sports strength coach will not
be prosecuted on the conspiracy
count.
Kreis' attorney, Roger May, a
former Vanderbilt quarterback,
said "it's no secret" that both
Kreis and Wilson will attempt to
get a probationary sentence.
The third defendant in the
case, former pharmacy employee
Thomas Patterson, has already
received pre-trial diversion in the
ase.
During Monday's verv brief
hearing, Kreis admitted he sold a
steroid drug to his friend, Sam
Colson, then the strength coach
at Clemson. That transaction oc-
curred in February, 1984.
"You're pleading guilty
because in fact you are guilty0
Capers asked Kreis
"Yes, sir Kreis replied.
A separate investigation
South Carolina led to a guilty
plea from Colson on similar
charges. Colson received a
suspended 18-month sentence
and was placed on three years
probation. He was also required
to perform 16 hours of public ser-
vice work a week for a year.
"Mr. Kreis was approached by
Sam Colson about obtaining
steroid drugs Shriver said. "As
a result of those conversations,
Kreis obtained dianabol from
Woody Wilson.
"Then in turn Sam Col-
wrote a check paying for the
drugs to Doc Kreis. Mr Kreis
took the check and endorsed it
over to Mr. Wilson in payment
Shriver said.
The steroid scandal broke on
the Vanderbilt campus after the
death of Jaspers. Jaspers died ol
a heart defect, but an autopsy
disclosed traces of a drug in his
system. Jaspers had no prescrip-
tion for the medication, which
was not steroids. South Carolina
investigators traced the source to
Nashville.
� l ,renill� stores )nl
Kentucky Nuggets Combo
9 Piece Kentucky Nuggets
Kentucky Fries
Lg drmk S2.89
vocations
600 A Greenville B'vC 7 56 6434
2905 E 5tM St 752 5184
Put your time
and energy
together.
SPEEDY REEDY'S
PIZZA
FREE EXTRA CHEESE
on every pizza1
PRICES:
jsaaz
CHINATOtDN EXPRESS
Western Siz
PLAIN CHEESE
1 ITEM
2 ITEMS
3 ITEMS
4 ITEMS
5 ITEMS
6 ITEMS
7 ITEMS
8 ITEMS
9 ITEMS
DELUXE
VEGETARIAN
RUNNER
MARATHON
14"
660
7.85
8.80
9.75
1O70 i J2J0
11 65
12.60
:
960
10.60
11 60
1360
14 60
15.60
14 20
15 60
10 60
11 60
11 60
13 55 15 60 19 80
ta� already 'ncluded
17 00
18.40
i9 60
12 80
14 20
14.20
FREE PEPSI'S
WEVERY PIZZA
Unless Using Coupon
SUBS EVERYDAY
11:00-6:00
758-9999
2711 I. 10 Si
Hour: Mort-Thurt 11 a.m. - 12 mid.
Fri. and Sat. 11-2 a.m.
Sunday 11-1
1-16" 2-item pizza for only
j plus 4 free Pepsis $8.00
M�� .nnM.e. ne Co"P��, � P,ZZ�
coupon wh�n ordering Expires I 2, 3 1 85
JBLHL
& Kappa Sigma
Present
QvelheRisC
for Christmas
Resent
A Literary and
Visual Celebration
of North Carolina's
Quadricentennial
from BB&T.
Capture the Tar
Heel spirit and Old
North State- heritage of
the past 400 years in the
perfect Christmas gift
tor friend, famil or
business asscx iate
Contemporary
North Carolina writers and photogra-
phers have contributed to this enchanting collection d
p lignani essays and over 250 color and black-and-white
itographs This unique journal includes reflections ot out
state's heritage in the arts, business, atWetics. education, cuisine,
religion, agriculture and politics with an extensive time line
lacing it all together
However this isone bit of history that will not repeat ltseit
as this the List printingo our ba k Copies are available U
$ 37 SO plus tax in any BBT lobby ltsa( hristmas present
tn ,m the past th.it v. ui il enj vy U r years t. o �ne C let y� urs t da
BB&T
IfeMoreThanABank
It's An An it udt
DRAFT NITE
Tuesday November 19, 1985
Admission $1.50 Guys
Nite
9:00-1:00A.M.
$1.00 Ladies
& Pi Kappa Phi
Present
DRAFT NITE
Wednesday, November 20, 1985
Admission $1.50 Guys
Draft All Nit
'





12
HI t AS I k
Classifieds
SALK
NEEDTYPING
' 5 '4 D4V8
PROFESSIONAL TYPiNw SER
V IC I � �
2 6, 3 Bt DROOM AP T
from f
t
FOR SAi t
qift
ROOWAt A AN TED
FEMALE ROOMM1
ROOMMATE
PKRsON 1 s
S IG V A S
LING
Sl
. HUNDRtD f'AID
f OR SAI f
WORD PHOCI SMNi
A PAR T M t N T M tfV W I N 1
edi apart � � �

( OR SAI I
I Y PINO SI kvll fs I . .
M R A TI
A PAR ' V I NT f;lv P N
V,MKI
MATI
T Y PINO ,t W
E : WOl
NG M �
R ' NGGOI D !Owi ws
fi
f f SSI ON At ! T CING
I
mat h rui
' HI AP I 1 PING ��
r y pis t
SAI E
ROOMMA T t ,
� t � �
SUN NO
Sat nO
ap ik
gmenvilli
' l��S NOT
AVAILAiLI
I HR
ritaii dialirs
OK WHOltSAUKS
�i RESIRvi �?�!
�l(iH ' ID LLMjT
�-(T!l5
I'til:
SIII'IKVIOKI
Wll'H
A" r
HELP WANTED
Stock Clerks
Available For Work From
6 00pm unti!700om
NOW IN PROGRESS
� II
UBLE
COUPONS
SEE STORE FOR DETAILS
LOWEST PRICES
IN GREENVILLE
MATCH ANY ADVERTISED FEATURE
GROCERY Pt
-
U.S.D.A. GRADE "A
BUTTER BASTED
Ybung Turlceys
2 LITER
(NON-RETURNABLE BOTTLE)
Pepsi Cola
I a: 1 c-i
Green Cabbage
20 lbs
and
PICA
DAYS
AZD
RAFT NiGH'
t .
A0C
40c
Bach
stf
DEAR DUMPLIN �
FOUND�
WET BUNS CONTEST . nembet 1 ;
PHI KAPPA TAU
S 1 G M A S R d m k
��
Socrates: 4 To do is toIt be. h
t Plato:
4
y To be is to f Sinatra:do -ft
Do be, dobe. 4
?3HEF"fr ?"�"?��"
$
Ann Page
Waffles
FRENCH S SAUCES &
(1 OZ. - 1 . OZ.)
TURKEY
� e?
Gravy
Mixes
Flav-O-Rich
Sherbet
ANN PAGE
12 CT -9 . OZ
Butter-Me-Not
Biscuits
FLAV-O-RICH
(6 PK.)

? gZte
FLAV-O-RICH
S (8 0Z.)
Scooter iSour
Crunch
Cream
DIXIE CRYSTALS
PLAIN � SELF-RISING
Pure Cane Sugar I Red Band Flour
I
LIMIT OMC WtTM AOOmOHAL
PURCHASE AT EVERyIStLOW PRICE
UMTT ONE WITH ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE.
CAMPBELL'S
Tomato Soup
uT
10.75 oz.
can
b
UMIT SIX WTTH AOOmOHAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
703 Greenville Blvd Greenville, NC
SKINNER
(16 OZ )
Elbow
Macaroni
BUTTER � REGULAR
disco Shortening
L�T ONE WTTM AOOmONAl
ENCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
DUKE'S
Mayonnaise
32 oz.
LIMIT ONE WITH
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE





3a306a6f69b56f23285bdd48e881dd71 00057758.0001.tif
1e565f4331ba5c12c29fb2ca24404fa1 00057758.0002.tif
0b9d4532d369a3732d234c49013fed08 00057758.0003.tif
e85e1b8b1befcce612be79cbbb58ea5b 00057758.0004.tif
f9ea73bf460cbb7c567fc6f860d8604e 00057758.0005.tif
860f5b92e67b72bb02f5599d81b716f6 00057758.0006.tif
a680e597b5d15c5c426062458de34f6a 00057758.0007.tif
63a1a7ec4b6aff45ddad01c4f911377f 00057758.0008.tif
853aaf514d157e44a82f760979828441 00057758.0009.tif
e176410f9bef5bfc488dbea36d2c6a84 00057758.0010.tif
6c9e44fe16152c1aaa6b63c651b84df6 00057758.0011.tif
a14b0667a987145658768d06dea29227 00057758.0012.tif





Title
The East Carolinian, November 19, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.442
Location of Original
University Archives

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy