The East Carolinian, November 14, 1985






She
(Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
ol.60Nurtt- Q2
Thursday, November 14, 1985
Greenville, NX
14 PaKes
Circulation 12,000
Contracts Signed, Sealed;
Work Begins On Building
Bv IXH IG ROBERSON
Miff rilr
Contracts have been signed,
and work will soon begin on
ECU'S new $10.4 million general
classroom building, said director
o the physical plant James
I owry.
"The contractors have been
notified that they can commence
working, arid we expect comple-
tion of the building within 630
calendar days. We hope the
building will be finished by July
19, 1987 he said.
I he university plans to begin
using the general classroom
building in the fall semester,
1987, and I owry said he thinks
the timetable is feasible.
'There'll be a lot o work to do
betweeen the time construction is
completed and the time we move
in�cleaning, shaking down
arious areas and moving in
equipment. We're hoping to be
rcad for classes bv mid August,
198
At more than 160.000 square
feet, the brick veneer, steel-
framed structure will be the
largest building on the E( l cam
pus. said I owry .ur iciitly .
Brewster Building is 1(1 's
largcsi classroom facility.
Tie first flo r of the building
will be occupied by the Branch
Banking and Irusi Center for
leadersip development and
several seminar roomv "These
seminar rooms, or case rooms,
will have fixed seating. The
rooms will be shaped like an am-
phitheater with semicircular
sealing thai provides a vice view
foi anyone m the room he said.
Occupying the second fl
will be the English Department
and classrooms, foreign language
labs, business education
classrooms and word-processing
labs The third floor will be oc-
cupied b the School o Business,
but 1 owry said the honors and
international studies programs
will be in the building as well.
In all, the building will contain
65 classrooms and 180 faculty of-
fices. "Offices will be located
along the perimeter of the
building, with the classrooms in
the center lie said.
Students will have no problems
finding a place to study in the
building. Each floor will have a
glass-covered atrium with bench
seating where students can relax
and study between classes. Im
c o m m o date handicapped
students, the barrier-free struc-
ture will have two elevators.
Two advanced features ol the
building will be a digital-energy-
management system and hinged
access panels in all corridors. The
energy management system is
designed to monitor thermostats
and airflow throughout the struc-
ture, while the hinged panels will
allow easy access to telephone
and data processing cables,
I owry said.
On the exterior, the building
will feature arched windows and
a two-toned brick veneer. I owry
said the building will face west,
toward Flanagan, and "will
blend in well with the existing
buildings on campus
Fewer Middle Class Favor New Loans
Quiet Moments
I ! V LBUTGE N S
The Est Carolinian
Monique Wriyht quitely studies before class in a hallway in
Brewster. However, the new classroom building that is being con-
structed on campus will not have such sights as these. The reason is
the new classroom building will contain glass-covered atriums on
each floor where students can stud) between classes. For more
details see the related story on page I.
Luxury Price Index
Lists Luxury Goods
WASHINGTON (1 PI)
� Americans can rel) on
isumer Price Index to re:
dail) commodit) costs, but t!
witl a penchant for luxury may
find the Cost-Of-Living-Well In-
dex much more revealing.
Consumers with a yen for the
d life, for instance, will find
they'll have to pay $6 dollars
more this year to tip the good
bubbly. Nevertheless, the cup will
still runneth over; They can
always stay warm this winter with
a Burberry trench coat without
digging deeper into their pockets.
Thai information comes
courtcsv of The 11 ahmaton
Dossier, a magazine which has
been keeping an eve on such
items as caviar and perfume.
"Republicans have done a
good job ol keeping it tairly
stable a spokesman sas oi the
( ost-of-I iving-Well Index
For example, October. '85
prices, as published in the
November issue, were only .0002
points higher than in September.
Although a wine importer
compiles a similar index on an
annual basis. Dossier, apparent-
ly, is the first to maintain a mon-
thly watch over the rise and fall
See LUXURY Page 7.
NI YORK, NY (CPS)
I ewer Americans favor letting
middle-income students take out
Guaranteed Student I oans, a re-
cent survey show
Public support for the idea has
been dwindling since 1983.
I he survey, released Oct. 21 in
conjunction with National
Higher Education Week, shows
that of 1,000 people polled b
telephone early this fall, 40 per
cent strongl) supported the
government's loan program tor
middle-income Mudents.
That's down from a 46 percent
rate last year, and 51 percent in
1983.
The poll, conducted by t he-
New York-based Opinion
Research Corporation for two
higher education organizations,
reveals a decline in support tor
federal financial aid programs in
other ways as well.
Two years ago, for example. 63
percent ol those polled supported
increasing aid to financially-
needy college students.
Moreover, citizens thought aid
to poor students was the third
most important program among
14 federal aid programs.
This fall, however, only 53 per-
cent supported increasing aid to
poor students, demoting it to the
seventh most important program.
They considered government
financing for medical research,
medical care for the aged, overall
aid to higher education, aid to
Clove Cigarettes Harmful
B BETH WHICKER
si�ff Wrilrr
One out of three students at
ECU have tried clove cigarettes at
least once without knowing the
risks involved, according to
Elbert Glover, associate pro-
fessor of community health.
According to Glover, clove
cigarettes are imported from In-
donesia and are also called
kreteks. The clove cigarette craze
began in California, and the
cigarettes are most popular with
the 17- to 30-year-old age group.
"I think it's fashionable right
now to smoke cloves. It's the
California influence, and the fun
is in just being different said
Glover.
"Most people think clove
cigarettes are safer than cigarettes
made with tobacco. Clove
cigarettes contain 60 to 70 per-
On the Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds14
Editorials4
Features8
Sports11
The goodness that thou
mayest do this day, do it; and
delay it not till tomorrow.
� Chaucer
cent tobacco and 30 to 40 percent
cloves Glover said.
"The public holds many
misconceptions about clove
cigarettes, the first being that
clove cigarettes have no tobacco
and also that clove cigarettes are
not harmful. Both of these are
truly misconceptions cited
Glover.
"Clove cigarettes contain two
times as many tars, nicotine and
carbon monoxide as regular
cigarettes Glover said.
"Clove cigarettes contain
eugenol, which gives the cigaret-
tes their aroma. Eugenol is the
chemical which causes severe
lung problems. Eugenol has
anesthetic effects as it numbs the
throat and allows for deeper in-
halation Glover said.
"Those who smoke clove
cigarettes complain of respiratory
problems, nausea, vomiting,
shortness of breath and
headaches. By smoking cloves the
smoker becomes susceptible to
respiratory infections because of
the eugenol cites Glover.
"Eugenol appears to have fin
immediate affect. The Center for
Disease Control has reported two
deaths due to the smoking of
clove cigarettes as of March,
1984. One of the deaths occurred
after only a few drags of the clove
cigarette. The center has also
reported a
number of serious illnesses due to
the cloves Glover said.
According to Glover sales of
the clove cigarettes have increas-
ed. In 1980138 million packs of
clove cigarettes were sold. By
1984 the figure had jumped 12
million to 150 million packs, br-
inging a 4 million pack a year in-
crease in clove cigarette sales.
"We sell about 40 packs of
clove cigarettes per week accor-
ding to Mary Grace Baker,
employee of the Tinderbox.
The clove cigarettes sell for
about $2 a package and ten non-
filtered cigarettes make one pack.
"The sale of the clove cigaret-
tes have decreased since the
dangers of the cigarettes have
become public. The publicity
over the past few months has
been really bad for sales. Many
customers who buy clove cigaret-
tes ask us about the dangers. A
tew customers have disregarded
the warnings about the cloves and
continue to buy ten or more
packs per week said Baker.
"We can expect to see some
problems in the future with the
clove cigarettes. Having two
times as many tars, nicotine and
carbon monoxide will cause
serious problems; all of which
will be compounded by the
eugenol cited Glover.
agriculture, aid to primary and
secondary education and fund
clean up 'fie environment more
deservin budget hikes �
aid to poor siudc
siirvev appears to reflect
increasing public support for
some of the student aid budge
cuts proposed tor the past several
years bv the Reagan Administra-
tion.
I he Opinion Research survey
does no; indicate why public sup
port tor federal aid programs is
declining.
But the survev docs show tar
more people believe the quality ol
higher education is improving (44
perct an believe it is declin-
ing (lei percent I.
Parad -xically, support foi
fede grams is declining
even though seven ol It)
respondents say the) would be
unable to afford a college educa-
tion without low-interest loans or
nts, and three o tour expect
the cosi ot college to be beyond
the reach ol most Americans in
the foreseeable future.
Other survey results show
�A substantial majority tavors
retaining the current tax deduc-
tion tor contributions to chanties
and educational institutions. The
administration has proposed cur-
tailing the deduction in its tax
reform package
�More Americans than ever (40
percent) intend or hope to go to
college, a 4 percent increase over
last year, and a 16 percent jump
over 1982.
�Vocational technical schools
and two-year colleges seem to
have growing appeal to many
Americans.
�Ol all tvpes ol federal aid tor
education, public support for
medical research is the creates
crams
social science research th
smallest
The survey wds co-sp
bv the Council for the -da:
ment and Support 1 Education
and the New i
Higher Education.
Program On Debt
Helps Students Out
11 PS) � As more students get
deeper and deeper into debt, the
Educational Testing Service
(1 rS) has started selling a soft-
ware program to help decide how
much money students can afford
to borrow to go to school.
I lie program considers how
much the student is borrowing,
student's major, and when
the student will graduate in deter-
mining how hard it will be to
repay the loan, savs Dwight
Horch, an ETS financial aid ex-
pert.
C ailed the Student Loan
Counselor debt-management
svstem. Horch designed it for use
bv students working with
counselors.
According to many reports,
students need help badly.
Since Congress cut back
federal grants in 1981, students
are relying more on loans to get
them through college.
A September survey by the Na-
tional Association of Student
Financial Aid Administrators
found students are falling so far
into debt so rapidly that they are
having smaller families and
delaying major purchases after
college.
The survey of 3,000
Guaranteed Student Loan bor-
r -vers also found women, who
get average starting salaries
almost $6.tMK) below those ot
men. are having a particularly
difficult time repaying loans,
sometimes not breaking out o
debt until they are in their thir-
ties.
Horch designed the loan
management program to help
students decide whether or not
they are taking on a reasonable
deb! burden.
The program contains infor-
mation for five o the most
popular student loan programs
and stores a list of starting
salaries tor 250 specific profes-
sions.
Students enter their personal
data into the program. Taking in-
to account inflation rates and
estimated taxes, the computer
figures the percentage of future
income that will be spent repay-
ing the loan.
"This tells a student just how
much the debt is going to cost
them after graduation says
ETS spokesman Marilyn Ballas.
Bronze
HUMIHT - Th� East Carol,man
Left to right Roshank Moghadam, Greg Shellnut and Roggi Barber pour molten bronze into molds
at the ECU foundry. More important, ECU has a reputation as being one of the foremost art schools
in the eastern United States. Judging from the hard work art students put in the reputation is well
deserved.

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I Hi i ,
' -Ki 1 INIAN
MiS�k 14 985
Announcements
ECU BIOLOGY CLUB
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COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
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FOODFOR THOUGHT
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BULIMICS ANOREXICS
'����oar lor holiday st.ess � ,
�� �-s Support Group V.
� ��. Wednesday � tarl ng s , ij
'odenl Mea tl . ti -oon-
10 I � "lormstmn , all jolei �
nigan or Mar, t a Ia s ,� �
SKI AUSTRIA
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" .vona piease con
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ECU RUGBY
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MINORITY STUDENT
ORGANIZATION
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ORGANIZATION
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STUDENT UNION VISUAL
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ECU PEACE
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Students Protest Test Balam
Miam . R (CPS) � Soi
ts ai he
M an Arc protesting ha
' i 1 In :� istei parts ol
� ' q � ted annual stud
:ollege students' polii
stud. .
v ouncil on I ducation
. Universit) ol (. alifornia
geles, usualh covers
it 200.00
11 ' .
Bui last week. M .
ants, v�. ho surve �
fresl English t. lasses,
tested the studs wl re
cent sears revealed thai fewei
students call themselves "libe
was biased and thai it could
violate students' privacv
I he grad students asked m
be requued to administer
sui y'e.
I he surveys are designed to see
happens to students' ai
titudes when thev gel to college.
Schools then can evaluate then
programs better, according to the
( I UCLA book, in �.
survey results are published every,
Li nuai s
helps the university
evaluate itself? I hat's hogwash
Dawn arleton, one ol the
Miami insti
the survey
"How di a �
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asking
aga
a university n
( arlett ���
the quest
question a
disagree .s
plies
"I � ai
rased quest n
iew concedes . i
I ' stud�
c al-Berkeley
Bui "it you tint.
questions, you may u
continuity ol the survey
adds, because resea I art
to measure change in stud'
attitudes through the
common yardsl ��
C ai leton and othei n
also worry
privacy
'You
something will conn
ni vii arleti
citing incidents dui t
law enforcemei i
1
1
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I HF I ASIAKOI INIAN
sovi MBI k 14, iym
� d
t Test Balanced Budget May Hurt Many Students

Vk SHINGTON, l (CPS)ol Gramm Rudman meri
les 1esi effort to balance the ouncil on Edw ation (AC1lob
ild be the worstbj isl 1 arry Zaglaniczan says.
.ii!aid1 he bill calls foi Congi e
lobbut the deficit 20percent anm
Kuntil the budget is balam ed
erBut Congress would ha
ite,� ill�are cei tain progi .mis S
im.�Security, the on tht
ideinal debt and al ; he def i - in l
cuts f .


�1 III' 1 !lUS be spai i
-student aid
�Kathy Oi
a� . i ed
l SS
I
.
thai v. hi( h is left on the
table asserts legislative aide
William Blake tot Sen. Paul
on (D 111). 1 ong student aid
i roponent.
()zei predit ts ome studeni aid
igrams could be cut in halt il
he Hous Senate
I Ik bill passes
However, n h is sure
:pth ol the cuts de-
! on the deficit's cuts.
Predic tions ol the deticit's size
underestima
Bud et ()t-
the deficit will

illion in 1980,
d States' huge
1981
I he House and Senate eisions
ot the Gramm Rudman Hotlings
bill differ mostly in foi m.
The Semite version allows he-
president to cut budget items at
his discretion it Congress cannot
make the 20 percent reduction as
mandated by the bill
The House version of the
deficit bill has a recession clause,
which deactivates the budget cuts
il the economy falters, she adds.
Educators and students are
worried thai giving President
Reagan authority to cut 'lie
budget himsell would doom most
federal student aid programs,
which the president has sought to
cut dramatically eveiv year.
But no one is reallv sure about
the balanced budget hill's impact
because Congress won't have a
final list of which programs will
be spared the axe until the end of
the month.
"Such uncertaintv �� the big
gesi problem Zaglaniczany
savs. who is unwilling to guess
about the ultimate impact.
" Those who live by the crystal
ball end up eating the glass
Some, in tact, don't think stu-
dent aid will suffer much in anv
case
"I don't think you will see any
one program gutted. We are very
aretul not to single out any one
program says Larry Neal, press
secretary to Sen. Phil Gramm
(k lex).
Neal does think congressional
efforts to exempt programs from
budget cuts invariably jeopardize
those not protected.
See BAIANC ED Page 6.
,wvn�v ww
Graffiti Not Big Problem On Campus
11
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�be East (Earnlinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
MlKl LUDWICK, wn
St ('i'l CCX �PI K
John Shannon, , �
i I K!N Pasqi
1)1 CHANl! i Johnson.
roM Norton, if.J, mm
llAl 1 UV1 NDER, v� � 4dv,r,u,nf
Anthony Martin, kMM ita�
John Peterson, r, v�
Shannon Shor i , � mm
DEBBIl Sli VI NS, smMin
14. 14S
Ohnion
Page 4
NCSU Trustees
Partial Divestment Endorsed
I he recent decision by the Board
ol ! rustees at North Carolina State
University to partially divest from
firms operating in South Africa can
be considered a small victory for
anti-apartheid activists in this state.
Hie trustees actually decided to on-
ly withdraw the funds of the univer-
si y's endowment from the more
than 100 American companies that
have not pledged to abide by the
Sullivan Principles.
I he Sullivan Principles are a set
of fair employment guidelines
developed by Reverend Leon
Sullivan. They call for non-
segregation in the workplace and
non discrimination in hiring,
salaries and promotions. Yet, even
if a company chooses to sign the
pledge stating that it intends to
uphold the Sullivan Principles it on-
ly does so voluntarily. The prin-
ciples do not cany the knee of law
behind them.
That, in part, is why the recent
move by the NCSU trustees was
reported to have been a disappoint-
ment to man anti-apartheid ac-
tivists. For the Sullivan Principles
are not an alternative to total
divestment. Even it' the principles
were adopted by every American
firm currently operating in South
Africa only one percent of the
African labor force would be af-
fected. In addition, the principles
'he political status of
� . South Africans who are still
d the right to vote or to serve
Parliament. The Sullivan Prin-
ciples, therefore, make no demand
r a change in the fundamental
structure of apartheid, a system
which confines the majority of the
African population to 1? percent of
iuth Africa's land while 87 per-
cent is reserved for whites.
Moreover, the mere fact that the
me South African government
which banned the foreign press
corps from that nation approved
i Sullivan Principles makes the
Principles suspect.
For some time now those who
seek to preserve American in-
vestments in South Atnca have
sought to convince the public that
American interests represent a pro-
gressive force in South Africa �
one that can help bring an end to
apartheid. Yet the truth is that
American corporations actually
strengthen the apartheid system.
They do this both directly and in-
directly. For example, Flour Cor-
poration led an unsuccessful effort
in 19"6 to repeal the ban on Export-
Import Bank direct loans to South
Africa. U.S. mining companies,
which often participate in joint ven-
tures with South African mining
finance houses, use connections of
key board members to convince
U.S. government officials to
strengthen American dependence
on South Africa for strategic
minerals. And, on a grosser level,
IBM makes the computers which
are used to enforce the pass laws
that regulate the passage o' blacks
onto and off of the bantustans.
Vet, just as significant as such
overt forms of support for apar-
theid is the fact that foreign invest-
ment in South Africa enables the
minority government to divert
resources awav from productive
uses and into a system of repression
and control of the majority popula-
tion. As Timothy Smith of the In-
ter faith (enter On Corporate
Responsibility argues:
"If foreign funds were not
available to the parastatal agencies,
the government itself would have to
finance them, thus limiting cash
available for maintaining apar-
theid. Let us not deceive ourselves
that a loan to ESCOM (the Elec-
tricity Supply Commission) can be
simply classified as a loan for elec-
tric power. It is a loan directly to an
agency of the apartheid government
that helps that government balance
its overall budget
Thus it is clear that any invest-
ment in South Africa only
strengthens apartheid and the only-
moral act for an institution of
higher learning is to divest fully and
completely.
DEWORS
PROFILE
ptWtUiAai&uiurnTXJrstMJ-
Clark Kent
Occupation
Daily Planet columnist
A
An-80s kind of guy
Last Accomplishment
Breaking up a BMW theft nag
The Perfect Evening
Tossing pasta salad with Lois Lane
Last Book Read
Fear Of Flying
Specialty Dish
Micnmaviag quiche with his eyes
Goals
Able to leap the corporate ladder
in a single bouid
Favorite Drink
Deworswitharwistofkryptonite
Campus Forum-
Upcoming Peace Talks Offer Hope
What a happ turn oi events to
have the Soviet and the American
heads-of-state competing with peace
proposals! There is ground tor hope
that Gorbachev is offering something
real. He has declared a unilateral
moratorium on nuclear tests till the
end of the year. He has agreed to let
Elena Bonner (wife of dissident An-
drei Sakarov) go west for eye treat
merit. My experience this summer
suggests the practical importance ot
Reagan's offering real concessions in
return.
My husband and 1 spen! seven
weeks with peace walks in West Get
many. We staved in homes and chur-
ches and talked with hundreds of peo-
ple on issues of war and peace
We knew when we went thai man)
Europeans objected strongly to the
stationing of Cruise and Pershing
missiles in their countries. We knew
that thousands had taken part in
peace walks. We knew about the
human chain, more than 100
kilometers (62 miles long, thai ssas
formed to protest the stationing ot
Cruise and Pershing missiles in Wesl
Germany. And we knew that the
German (and other) governments had
rebuffed these citizen protests and in-
vited the missiles in.
During the summer we learned
much more about the peace move
ment there, we encountered the iron
curtain and came to understand the
political background better. Ask us
some other time about the European
peace movements.
One political fact came out loud
and clear. Forty years after the end of
WWII, West Germany is still an oc-
cupied country. It hosts at least 156
American military establishments, in-
cluding housing areas. In addition
there are French and British
establishments and there are soldiers
n three other countries. Man)
people told us of their frustration
because decisions about the Pershings
are made in a foreign country Oh
ves. they are made with the concur-
rence of the German government
tar. And perhaps the peace move-
ment in the United States has no more
influence. But these facts didn't seem
to assuage their feelings much.
Wh) have the German pe
toierated this foreign occupation, you
ask I suppose thai a' first the) vvere
too busy rebuilding to have I
think about it. Then things were
ing well and the) were becoming pro
sperous. But the biggest factor ha
be their rehet that it was the We
countries that occupied 'heir country
rather than the Soviets It wa;
K a Canadian we met in
made I he generalization for i
all: "Better Uncle Sam than the F
sian bear
But now re
plete. limes are not no prospei
G rbachev is taking steps to reduce
tensions. And as the mayot ol
Hersbruch said in his welcoming
remarks, the Wesl Germans hav
stomach for a war in which the)
would be called on to kill their
brothers in Easi Germany.
Our greatest capital as Americans
is our democratic, humane image in
contrast to the arbitralv and infiexi
ble image of those who must wail
their citiens in. However, images
change gradually. We are taking
the attributes of a high-handed power
that makes enemies and rides
roughshod over the sensibilities of
out allies. The Soviets are show
themselves to he a bit more flexible.
The result could be that we find
ourselves wearing the cloak of the
villain across the water.
Or can both countries be children
ot light leader Reagan and (:
bachev. we're
1 I � Webbei
le Kes
Peacemakers
1 i l students and facu I

M dav,
N vembei - u the
' s' 1 5 1 :
On the ev( f tl
Pi
immuni-
� als, with
veen the
Pe and go
. hour vigil.
� 11 be included.
red � Me
M
Forum Rules
The East
i all r- � Mail or
� ��
ting, acra-
tram ler I ibrc
I ' putjx ses eriicc
ten must if r and
classification, address, ph
and signature
are limited to two typewritten
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
" are subject editing for
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will v permitu
Freedom Of Thought And New McCarthy ites
B HARRY I BROWN
WASHINGTON Across the na-
rse but ill-boding network of
student- is forming, eyeing the
iblishment, trying to stop the brain-
washing, the bias, the bending of truths
and young minds in America's
classrooms. They allegedly fight for �
and call themselves � Accuracy in
Academia. At least, their version of it.
Start here: how did Socrates arrive at
all those truths? With the Greek version
of the Mclaughlin Group: a few guys
i'ting around arguing politics. They
thought a little more closely and
carefully in the old days, unconstrained
b) commercial breaks. The results were
the Dialogues.
That is all Accuracy in Academia
claims to want: a fair and open
dialogue, balanced and thorough to
cover all the bases. So they line up
students to monitor college teachers, to
make sure the reading list is balanced,
the lectures not one-sided, all points of
view heard. Who could argue with that?
Then, what's wrong with a little
pressure on uncooperative professors?
The argument sounds familiar. It br-
ings back memories of another coalition
looking only for fairness � Fairness in
Media. They were out to buy a televi-
sion network, so Jesse Helms could
replace Dan Rather and root out liberal
bias. Twin si3ter Accuracy in Media was
started by Reed Irvine, who founded
Accuracy in Academia, and both are
out to rid us � save us � from mind-
altering, knee-jerk liberalism adhered to
by those unsavory fringes of society:
journalists and college professors.
These movements arise mostly of
their own cold fire and passion. Ac-
curacy in Academia is overwhelmingly a
vehicle of college Republican clubs,
burning with the fever of conservatism
as '60 kids did with liberalism. They are
out to stop liberal bias, but also to
replace it with a conservative emphasis.
Their efforts are not likely, nor I
suspect even intended, to stimulate
dialogue. With newsletters and publicity
to pressure targeted teachers (and
10,000 Marxist teachers need targeting,
says Irvine) into submission or retire-
ment, such winning through intimida-
tion will more likely stifle exchange of
ideas and impose a debilitating caution
among professors trying to avoid the hit
list.
A few professors, no doubt, are guil-
ty as charged; but far fewer than the
group assumes. More of the blame can
be attributed to the portion of the pro-
fessoriate who, if not trying to indoc-
trinate, are at least lacking intellectual
vigor and clarity, having given up the
effort to challenge their own assump-
tions as well as their students' with the
debates that exist in any field of
thought. But this does not warrant the
thought-police tactics of sophomores,
or the McCarthyism of their organizers.
There is a secondary element. This is
also a symptom of the state of our
universities, where teachers are First-
name acquaintances in rumpled cor-
duroys, social equals that, in the minds
of sophomores, easily become intellec-
tual equals. Student reverence for
teachers is nearly gone, partly because
fewer merit revering. Accuracy in
Academia is a brash intimidation of
authority that many professors long ago
abdicated.
I remember a story of a German in-
tellectual who had immigrated to
America to escape Hitler. He came
from a tradition-bound European col-
lege where students still carried their
teacher's books and opened doors for
them. He was abruptly awakened to
American ways when a student barged
in his ofFice to ask, "Hey doc, got the
time � " The old master's heart sank.
To burst in without knocling was of-
fense enough, but to address a teacher
as "doc" and bother him for such trivia
as the time, that was unpardonable. But
it is routine in a place of egalitarian eti-
quette. .All men are equal, right � if
you can call him doc, why not doc-
trinaire?
There ought to be a bit of consititu-
tional monarchy in every classroom, but
too many professors are unable to rule.
Now the peasants are unruly, fancying
themselves as Big Brother. Accuracy in
tdemia is ludgment by students who
believe they know what to censor and
what to preach. Let's hope they permit
the reading of Hamlet, who warned us.
'There is more in heaven and earth, O
Horatio, than is dreamt of in vour
philosophy
AMP HOW C0N6WERE WU WMrWrW PRU66EP PJ
THE CIA WORE WJ COUPHAKE .T0W7D FRgQWI?
The
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Californ
Universi
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Nautilu
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Forrest
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Sammy'
Sub Sta
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HMU





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER M, 198 5

"lark Kent kcupation
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Jtst Accomplishment tuM wf � BMW men nag b� Perfect Fveninc iwjpd Hhi iiilfc UbLa-
mrm :rrr �
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Drink
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Peace makers
par-
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Monday,
at the
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�.eluded,
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who
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warned us,
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D66EPW


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Ma$ic By
r,e Dillon
oirs
DRAWING FOR BEACH WEEKEND FOR (2)
AT
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INCLUDES: OCEANFRONT ROOM. DINNER & IV
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California Concepts
University Book Exchange
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3:00 - 6:00 P
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Speedy Reedys Pizza
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�- � � -





HE bAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 14, 1985
Today's Question:
W hat do you dislike most about ECU?
Campus Voice Balanced Budget May Hurt
Continued From Page 3.
The threat to federal student
aid programs � which include
Pell Grants, College Work-
Study, Guaranteed Student
Loans, State Student Incentive
Grants and National Direct Stu-
dent 1 (Kins as well as some
specialized programs � follows
three seats of college lobbyists'
efforts to fight back the Reagan
administration's repeated at-
tempts to cut them.
After agreeing to dramatic cuts
in 1981, Congress has kept most
programs intact, freezing their
budgets or increasing their fun-
ding levels marginally, Ozer
recalls.
The proposed budget for this
Fiscal year, for example, includes
spending ot about H billion on
student aid, about the same as
1984-85, according to U.S. Dept
ol Education data
Moreover, an increasing
percentage of the Guaranteed
Student Loan (GSL) budget is go-
ing toward collecting delinquent
loans, says Dick Hastings, who
heads the Education
Department's loan collection ef-
forts.
To compensate tor the freezes
tuition has had to increase at
twice the rate of inflation s
this decade, Oer savs
The proposed allowance cut,
added to the consequence
deficit bill "will have
pounded impact
many bankers to get out
GSL business, banking lob'
Billlohan says.
Rebel Announces Winners Of Contest
B MIKKI.l nWICK
i Mltor
Bowers
Mack Bowers, a gtaduate stu-
dent studying clinical psychology
"The lack o academic rigor.
There's a lack of emphasis on
school excellence. I would make
the requirements a little more
stringent-strict
Mike Bunt on. sophomore in
general college
"People tend to have a drink-
ing probelm here. That's one of
the downfalls. Campus Police.
They hassle me. They don't like
me. I don't like the parking
tickets either
Burks
Arthur Burks, senior in in-
dustrial technology
"There's nothing I don't like
about ECU. It's treated me real
well. I like the people. Everyone
seems so friendly around here
Mar Ixu Dingman, senior in
theatre and speech
"What I don't like is the pro-
fessor situation. Some o my pro-
fessors don't take teaching here
seriously. A lot of them have the
attitude that we're not Chapel
Hill Hill so why is it worth it? I'm
not talking about courses m m
major. It's evident throughout a
programs
The Rebel announced the win-
ners of its art and literary contest
Saturday night at a reception in
the Art and Camera Gallery.
Editor o the Rebel Tim
Thornburg said, "We sponsored
a literary contest, which consisted
of a poetry and proe division
and an art contest
The purpose of the contest, ac-
cording to Thornburg, was to
choose the articles and artwork
that the magazine would publish.
"We had 104 art entries and
about 64 prose and poetry entries
this year said Thornburg.
"Even though we went down a
little bit on the number of entries,
the quality of the work was much
better than last year's, so we are
pleased
Thornburg mentioned that the
1986 Rebel will go to the printers
around the middle of January.
Consequently, the Rebel should
be available to students by Spring
Break.
Prize money for the contest
was donated by the Attic and Art
and Camera Gallery. Thornburg
said, "Everybody on the staff of
the Rebel would like to thank
both organizations for their sup-
port
Winners of the contest are:
�Poetry: first place, Sarah Dun-
can; second place, Jeffrey S
Jones; third place, E. Reinbold.
�Prose: first place, Gngg
Thomas Denton; second place.
Crystal Fray; third plae, Martha
Cherry.
�Art Competition: Sculpture,
first place and honorable men-
tion, Robbie Barber. Ceramics:
first place, Agyeman Dua.
Design: first place, Leah I-orce.
Printmaking: first place, Ellen
Moore; honorable mention, Laua
Wilcox
Painting: first plae, Fred
Galloway; honorable mention,
Melissa Varbrough. 111 u s
11r s; place, Jeff H o
Photography: first place. (
E. Walker; honorable merr
C. Joseph Champagne. Drav.
first place, William I.eidenthal;
honorable mention, Martha Pel
ty.
Mixed Media: first place, K
Hammond; honorable men:
Mary Hat.h Besi In Show: S
Eagle.
The Rebel has been one ol
three college literary
magazines in the nat:
Moreover, the Rebel has bee
P.uemaker magazine for the ;
Bunton
HORACE MANN insirance group
Bob Lawhead 1428 Greenville Boulevard
Senior Account Execu five Tel. 756-4757
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DATE: Wednesday November 13
Thursday November 14
TIME: 9:00-4:00
PLACE: Student Store
HERFF JOMES
.3 tradition of excellence
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( onlinued From Ha'
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Construction
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THh LASr AROMNIAN
NOVEMBER K 1M5
v Hurt
freezes,
ease at
so far
ce cut,
� of the
i com-
ol the
bhvist
Contest
ion:
Hoppa.
C.
ion,
ing:
thai;
a Pet-
ice, Kara
ion,
Scot!
' the
� -art
on.
- been a
past
0
ctf:
ce
mber 13
mber 14
b lill fill S
tradition of excellence
Luxury Proce Index Might Not Be Comprehensive Enough
(Ontinued From Pane I.
ol luxury item prices.
The October prices certainly
bode well for Republicans and
others who hold the belief that
living well is the best revenge or
w ho simply cleave to the good life
without any sort o political
motivation.
1 ast month, consumers could
buy an ounce of Beluga caviar for
a mere $35, the same as during
September. The price of Joy de
Jan Patou a Pans, a fragrance
guaranteed to make the wearer
smell better, also remained un-
changed at $200 an ounce.
It is true the price of Roederer
Cristal champagne rose $6 a bot-
tle to $56. but offsetting that
boost was an $85 drop in the cost
of a Burberrv trench coat.
The upward swing of cham-
pagne might have been balanced
by the downward trend of trench
coats, depending, of course, on
such variables as the weather and
how much of the bubbly you
drink.
The stress factor apparently
counts for a lot in living well.
That element, however,
needn't be figured in the prices of
such items as Russian sable coats,
unchanged in October at $35,000,
and hotel rooms on the French
Riviera.
I mean, if you can afford to
pay $155 a night to stay at the
Grand Hotel du Cap Ferrat,
what's another $15, which
brought the rates to $170?
Although Dossier dc sn't sav
so, I assume the Concorde ticket
was for mid-week coach travel
and had to be purchased at least
six months in advance.
The problem with the index, if
there is a problem, is that it isn't
comprehensive enough. All of us
have our own ideas as to what
constitutes luxury and may not
find meaningful a monthly price
comparison for some of the
items.
10C DRAFT
Construction
Starts On
New Building
(Ontinued From Page 1.
A similar structure was built on
the Universit) of North Carolina
at Charlotte campus four years
ago.
I owry added, "The architects
(Little and Associates) designed a
building for UNC-Charlotte that
cost S55 per square foot. We were
pleased and surprised when our
building came in at about $45 per
square foot
1 owr emphasized that several
factors were involved in the dif-
ference between the estimated
cost and actual bid. but quality
was not among them. "Certain
things cost more in a large city
such as Charlotte. Transporting
concrete costs less in Greenville
- little things like these make a
big difference. But the qualitv of
the building isn't affected by the
price he said.
The depressed state of the
building industry was also a fac-
tor tor the lower than estimated
bid. 1 own added.
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Ladies 50C
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ECU PLAYHOUSE BOX OFFICE
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i t;






� M� F AS1 AR IM AS
Entertainment
Sting
Sting Brings
On The Night
H I and lllidll
KRWI I
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I
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Classic Beauty In Classic Drama
Playhouse Plays Chekhov

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the I fan � u
lerful chance I
plav

he Iruee Sisters
a
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i : Wind ell,
i � ' ippiness is
the
' a i us. fail to mal
But Chel i takes
Pleast- swlit KIIO . pajit 9
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�a. "Y'all come ba�. k now
i we mean ii Howevei.
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and New lersej '
"sil down to Sunday dinner"
with u Nevertheless, not
therners are coming down south
in dnes and it's up t North
( arolinians to welcome
ne thing worries me It all
the northerners move to the
th, does that mean North
Can lina will become the possi
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Time
eell
Auditorium 244 of
Sting
l ontinued from page 8
the band would sound like. I'd
like to try it. These guys are not
sidemen. No one can blow us ott
as musicians, performers or
anything else
Sting was born Gordon Mat
m Sumner in 1951, in Newcas
tle, England. Raised a Catholic
b) truest and Audrey Sumner,
aended a parochial school
IHfcLASI CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 14,1985
and began to play guitar at age
nine. At 17, he applied for a
seaman's card, and signed with
the Princess Cruises as a bass
player with Ronnie Pierson.
After a series of odd jobs, such
as ditch digger, civil servant and
bus conductor, he attended a
teacher's training college and
graduated three years later. Sting
landed a position teaching
English and coaching soccer at
St. Catherine's Convent School
in Newcastle.
t night he continued to plav
bass as a member of the jazz
combos Phoenix and Last Exit.
At this time, he met American
drummer Stewart C'opeland at a
jazz club. Sting moved to Lon-
don and formed The Police with
Copeland and Henri Padovani.
When Padovani left the band, he
was replaced by guitarist Andy
Summers. The newly constituted
Police's first engagement took
place on Aug. 18, 1977, at Rebec-
ca's Club in Birmingham,
England.
"Pop music is very good at
reflecting the mood of the time
Sting said. "What I'm trying to
do now is change the mood of the
time
ChekhovV'The Three Sisters"To Include
Authentic Costumes, Imaginative Scenery
(ontinued from page 8
m this frustration a renewed
faith in life, and generates a spirit
ot' hope
There is emotional tension
throughout the pla) that is rein
forced b unique and imaginative
scenery designed b Theatre -its
faculty member Alpers. "I've
Tied o offer a metaphor with
this set by fashioning all the walls
out of rope said Alpers. "As
the stage lighting changes, the
rope walls become transparent
giving a light, airy feeling not
unlike the transparent lives of the
sisters To build these walls. 5
miles of rope, weighing in at
more than 300 pounds, were
otdered from Hatteras Ham-
mocks of Greenville.
Costumes also play an impor-
tant part in the production. Some
of the women's gowns have been
rented from the NC School of the
Arts m Wmston-Salem; including
a white lace dress valued at
$2,000 and a black lace gown
designed completely around jet
beading. In all, there will oe more
than 40 authentic costumes on
stage including turn-of-the-
century Russian army uniforms.
"The Three Sisters" is the se-
cond major production this
season by the East Carolina
Playhouse. Reserved seat tickets
are currently on sale in the
McGinnis Theatre Box Office,
corner of 5th and Lastern Streets
in Greenville. The Box Office is
open Monday through Friday,
from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. For
reservations call 757-6390.
Culture Comes To Campus
j' 'Paris and the Seme the firsl
film in the 1985-86 East Carolina
U ni ver sit Travel- Advent u re
Film Series, will be screened a -
p.m. Tuesda it; Hendrix
Theatre.
Presenting and narrating the
film ss its producer. Kathleen
Dusek. a filmmaker from San
Mateo, California.
The film follows the rivei 5
from where it rises I the
ground 150 miles southeast ol
Paris until it empties into the
glish Channel at the pori ol i e
Havre. Highlighted are the P
Neuf, Notre Dame and the
trolling artists a
� image- typically
:eJ with the banks ol
rivet, as well as sues ot historical
events and industrial centers A
large portion of film is devoted to
Pans, a city "whose heart is the
Seine iccording to Dusek.
Ticket- for the film are S3.50at
the door or in advance from the
E U Central Ticket (ffice in
Mendenhall Student Center.
for tickets and inforn �
i 757-6611, ext. 266
Quais,
associ;
� The .1. S. Bach partitas and
sonatas for solo violin will be per-
formed at Last Carolina Univer-
sity bv Dr. Richard I uby,
violinist, Saturday at 7 p.m. in
the Fletcher Music Center Recital
Hall.
I ubv is artistic coordinator ot'
i nc -Chapel Hill Society tor
Performance on Original In-
struments and a faculty member
at UNC-Chapel Hill.
He began performing baroque
violin in 1973 during doctoral
indies at the Yale University
School ot Music and has since ap-
peared with many of the leading
American ensembles devoted to
historical instrument perfor-
mance. He is a member of the
Moartean Flayers, a chamber
ensemble featuring strings, flute
and piano, whose subscription
series at New York's
Metropolitan Museum and recor-
ding- for Arabesque Records
have won critical acclaim.
The concert, held as part of
ECU'S observance of Bach's
"ricentenary year, is free and
open to the public.
BACK SUMMER
FOR flHQQ
Cassefte or Lp
ut on a Jimmy Buffett album and it s summer
again. Every song brings back those days of sun
and rum and fun. Now MCA Records brings
Jimmy s best, on one great album.
They re ali here the songs of open seas and open
roads, coconutsandcheeseburgers, blendersand
benders, sailboats and sunsets. Songs to bring
back summer. At a price that'll bring a smile.
ON MCA RECORDS 8. CA55E
SONGS YOU KNOW BY HEART
JIMMY BUFFETT'S GREATEST HITS
INCLUDES 13 OF HIS ALL-TIME BEST:
Volcano Cheeseburger in Paradise
Boat Drinks He Went to Paris
Pencil Thin Mustache Fins
Grapefruit - Juicy Fruit Son of a Son of a Sailor
Why Don't We Get Drunk A Pirate Looks at Forty
Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes Margaritaville
Come Monday
THE PLAZA
CAROLINA EAST MALL
Record Bar
SALE PRICES GOOD THROUGH NOVEMBER 27
International Week To Offer Variety
The ECU Student Union has
announced plans for the 1985
Annual International Festival
which is scheduled for November
17-23. The festival is a col-
laborative effort of the Student
Union and is coordinated by the
Minority Arts Committee.
The festival will open on Sun-
day, when Kenny Buffaloe,
"Karate World of Japan's"
number one performer, will be
featured in Kyokushin karate
demonst rat ion and lecture. Buf-
faloe has appeared in several film
documentaries and recently was
cast in the new karate action
movie "The Search Foi Ultimate
Truth He is the North Carolina
representative for the Kvokushin
Karate Organization and has
twice been the recipient ot
Governer's Award for his ex-
cellence in karate. The lecture-
demonstration will be held in
Auditorium 244 of Mendenhall
Student (enter at 7:00 p.m.
I here is no admission charge.
Dr. Bob Rupen, Professor ot
Political Science at the University
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
will deliver a lecture on the sub-
ject "Gorbachev and the Sum
mit" Monday at 7:30 p.m. in
Auditorium 244 ot Mendenhall
Student (enter. Rupen, a
member of the UNC-Chapel Hill
faculty since 1958, received his
PhD from the University of
Washington. The author of two
hooks, he has traveled extensively
throughout the Soviet Union.
Rupen is considered by his col-
leagues as a Soviet expert. In ad-
dition to his teaching duties at
UNC-Chapel Hill, Rupen cur-
rently serves as Research Fellow
of the Russian Research Group at
Harvard University. There is no
admission charge for the lectur
I he festival continues on Lues
day when Kathleen Desek will ap
pear in Hendrix Theatre
Mendenhall Student Center, to
personally present her travel
adventure film, "Pans and the
Seine Desek's journey down
the Seine captures on film main
of the great events of French
history. The program will begin
at 8:00 p.m. Admission for L I
students will be by ID and Activ
ty Card. Public tickets are priced
at $3.50 and are on sale at the
Central Ticket Office.
Jj�Itie Folger Consort, a much-
acclaimed ensemble of profes-
sional musicians who specialize in
Medieval and Renaissance music,
will perform at Fast Carolina
University Wednesdav as part ot
ECU'S 1985-86 Chamber festival
series.
I he concert will begin al x
p.m. m Hendrix 1 heatre.
The ensemble, consisting ot
violas, lute, recorders and
soprano, is m residence a; the
Folger Shakespeare Iibrarv,
ashington, D.C known tor its
collection o English and con-
tinental Renaissance materials.
The consort performs s; con-
certs (each repeated four times)
per season, in ihe library's
Elizabethan Theatre.
Tickets to the ensemble's I CU
concert are available for S4 each
at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student (enter and
at the door, it available. Ticket
reservations may be made by call-
ing 757-6611, ext. 266.
JAY LENO
Comedy For The Eighties!
Monday, November 25
8:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre












ECU Students & Guest: $1.50













ECU FacultyStaff andDependents: $3.00
Public and at Door: $4.00

Tickets available Monday through Friday from J
11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall StudentCenter. Phone 757-6166, J
ext. 266 for more info.
j Sponsored by the Student Union Special Events
J Committee .
t4f
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10
Hl I AS C K(1 INIAN
NOVJ MBLR 14. 198?
Doonesburv
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
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B LANCE SEAR1 F
and
MAX PARKER
M�ff � nlrr�
Pete rownshend's White Citv.
A Novel, his latest soundtrack
album, is a majoi breakthro
Townshend and old Who
ich
fans. rhe album, wh
somewhat resembles Pink
Floyd's The Wall, conceptuall
capsulizes rownshend's misspent
youth and mid-life crisis.
Pink Floyd's David Gilmour
participated and wrote one track.
�"White City Fighting His in-
fluence on rownshend goes fai
toward making this release the
Smooth, richly-textured Floy-
dian influences blend witl
rownshend's best singing and
guitar playing, allowing fans to
enter not only his music but also
his mind. Townshend looks ii
and around himself ; 'is t
justify and understand his past.
Effectively arranged I n
pianos, acoustic guitar- and
special effects create a flowing
melodic feel in cuts like "I Am
Secure which appears to sum
up the aibum thematically. The
blend is on-target for fans
waiting for a portrayal of this
well-traveled rock legend.
n contrast to Townshend,
who's been been around forever,
it seems appropriate to review a
newer band. I he Hoodoo Gurus'
second album Mars eeds
Guitars is their follow-up to
Stone Age Romeos, winch was
number one on the college radio
tarts.
his tout person band from
Australia creates music that is
verv difficult to rev iew. I he
album has a hazy, undefined
sound thai is hard to categorize
and compare with other bands.
which ma be one reason a
following is growing around
them.
u Seeds Guitars is reminis-
cent ol I 2 second album Ot -
(ober in thai it needs a third
album to cause more people I
perk up then ears WMH has
s
album on heav v i
put youi
this a
sn.
dial on 91.3 and give
rownshend's album a
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Read
SHOE OUTLET
Name Brand Shoes
At Discount Prices
The
Duck Shoes
Sperry Top Siders
$10 to $20
$10 to $20
(Class if iedsl
Ladies Dress and Casual Shoes
$12.88 to $15.88
Large Selection of Name Brand
Tennis Shoes $12.88 to $39.88
203 West Ninth Sreet 12 Block off Evai
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NO BRUSHES
NO BRUSHES
X
O
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Protect Your Investment at
T"he Pirate's Bay
Car Wash
til
z

3
a
m
O
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300 East Tenth Street In Greenville
(Beside Big Daddy's Chuckwagon
ALF-PRICE
DOUBLE WASH N WAX
Only $2oo (Regular $4.00)
Van Harrington Says: "You MUST try it to believe it! You WILL be back
Introducing
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This Coupon must be presented to an attendant Monday through Friday from noon until 5 p.m
Present this coupon to The Pirate's Bay Car Wash for $2 Of on a Double Wash 'N Wax
Offer Expires Nov. 30, 1985
Satisfaction Guaranteed!
z
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wM foraotter ort' AN
Illf
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3 .
. � :o
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The Attic
Tburs. PASSENGER
Fri. SIDEWINDER
Sat. ROBBiN THOMPSON
BAND
Ram ad a Inn
Thurs. thru Sat. KEVIN REYNOLDS
New Deli
Thurs DEAD HEAD JAM III
Fri. THE GRAPHIC
Sal. THREE HITS
On Campus
T. W. 's
Thurs. AMERICAN GRAFFITI (7 & 9 p.m.)
Fri. and Sat. THE BREAKFAST CLUB
(7 & 9 p.m.)
Thurs. CLOSED CIRCUIT BOXING
Fri. SUPERGRIT
PETER ADONIS MALE REVUE
Sat. SUPERGRIT
SCOTTS
Dry Cleaning and Laundry
Service
Proudly Supports The Pirates
Every Wednesday, Thursday and Friday
In November are Pirate Discount Days
e&ttb
x
x
� Alterations
� Laundered Shirts
�Silks
Recieve 20�7o Discount On All Regular Cleaning
With Your Student I.D
� Custom Orchid Service
� Sweaters
� Coats
111 West TOtti Street
752-2131
ii
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i
Emory I
With SeA
(jRf ENVI1 I
agreed 1 ue :
head fo
J139.0D
coac � ��
school
"The '����
call foi E I
the ba
proxima
moi
said
is t
and I
Em
ed b
the u!
dire '
I

I
u
ed H

En
�s 1 4V1
I
Waters is
B JNr I sIMPMIS
Ml" ��
Bat) N.(
ver
trulj
pen
Bubba Valer
Pirates. Blackbeard tan
drama staged in Ba:r .ailed
Blackbeard; Mght of (he Mack
Flag) roams the byways and
waterways of Bath while Bubba
Waters is terrorizing opponents'
offensive units on the football
field at ECL
The 6-0. 208-pound
sophomore chose to come to
ECU over many other fine
schools. "Coming from a small
town, ECU was the perfect place
for me to go to school and p!a
football Waters explained "It
was close iO home and 1 realh lik
cd the atmosphere and the
coaching staff
B
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I





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KFMN RKWOLDS
�5
AN GRAFFITI (7 & 9 p.m.)
HE BREAKFAST CLUB
A 9 p.m.)
s
Laundry
W Pirates
and Friday
:ount Days
111 West! Oth Street
752-2131 I
ree

by Anton Chekhov
irolma Playhouse
through Saturday
�0-23 - 8 15 pm
ieatre
ih & Eastern)
its S3 00
0
tons Cad 757 6390
�a
� of the handful of genuine,
wieres of the twentieth century
IH� i AM c K1 INIAN
Emory Satisfied
With Settlement
Sports
NOVEMBER 14, 1985 Page 11
v.RI EN 11 1 E (UPI) 1I
cd 1 uesdav to pay former
' football coach. Ed Emory
9,000 to settle the formei
- lawsuit against the
I he terms of the settlemeni
foi E i to pa Mr. Emory
balance oi his contract, ap-
iximatety $139,000, over 25
incelloi John Howell
� settlement made bv ECU
� generous and reasonable
1 am satisfied with it
ry said m a statement releas
by ECU "1 have no hard feel
and hold no grudge against
rsity, Chancellor
well, Di Kan (ECl "s athW
:tor) or members of the
u d oi trustees
Vs the football program at
� as moved ' ward over the
years, the players, coaches
administration have chang
How el! said in a prepared
ement. "During 'his time,
y different people have made
ificani contributions to the
ad ancement ot the
in i d 1 m ry is included
pic. 1 again
� - dc i'
alma natei and to t he
" cram
in general to know, and par
ticularly my friends who have
been very supportive of me, that
Chancelloi Howell has
negotiated fairly and openly with
me since my termination in his ei
torts to resolve myu contract in
an amicable and equitable man-
ner said Emory
"I am happy and pleased thai
the matter is now resolved
Emory said "ECU is my alma
mater. 1 still hue ECU and
pledge my support to its pro-
grams and in particular the toot-
ball program with which 1 was
associated tor so many years
"1 encourage all my friends to
continue their support ol the
university, the Pirate Club, the
football coaching stafl and the
young ECl athletes whom 1 a
mire er much Emory added.
1 he settlement was filed in Pitt
County Superior Court luesday,
the universii ��
During Emory's five-season
stint as head coach ol the Pirate; .
1I compiled a 26-29 record, a
47.3 winning percentage, against
osition.
ECU enjoyed a banner sear in
1983 , going 8-3 nly
to Florida State, I It � ida and
Miami in close decisions. Emory
ed in 1984, aftei tl
1 a' i dissap-
ECU Pirates Maul
Irish Nationals
Former K I head coach Ed Emory was satisfied with the decision.
Pirates Face Strong
Tulsa Offensive squad
B s oi I COOPER
Sporti I tfttof
1 I Pirates will be at
' � al time in '85
when they host the Missouri
Valley �nfei ei e leadei I ulsa
I niei ' �
e Hun ane, undei
Head i i Moi -
Kick Derriere
games and have a 5-5 record.
Morton comes from a successful
six-year career at North Dakota
State, where his team won the
Division II National Champion-
ship in '83 and advanced to the
finals in '81 and '84
I ulsa is a perfect 4-0 in M(
plav. and thev have won their tasl
25 conference games dating to
1981. Interestingly, the luNa-
1(1 game will be considei I a
conference game tor the Golden
Hurricane due to scheduling pro-
blems.
I uNa has been red hot lately,
averaging 43.7 points while reel
ing olf an astounding 464.3 sards
per came over their last three
contests. II also got into the
�cord books two weeks ago. I he
Golden Hurricane had two
players rush for over 200yards -
the lust time in NCAA history.
Quarterback Steve dace rushed
for 26 yards, and runningback
Cordon Brown netted 214. And
last week, II ranked sixth in the
nation in rushing, with a 311.8
vard per game average.
The high-powered offense
returns rime starters from a year
ago with plenty ol depth as well.
Cage, who led the MV( in pass-
ing in '83, and Brown are joined
in the backfield b senior
fullback Bobby Booker. A
veteran offensive line anchored
by all-conference guard David
Alecander (6-3, 272) and senior
tackle Chad Muirhead (6-3, 260)
vs 111 support the explosive
backfield.
"They attack the perimeter,
but they can hurt us inside as
See Tulsa, page 13
By SCOTT COOPER
Spufii Mllof
The ECU men's basketball
team enjoyed a successful exhibi-
tion game Tuesday night,
crushing the Irish National Team
71-50.
The Pirates controlled the
game from the start and
dominated in nearly every
statistical category. The Bucs rul-
ed the boards, grabbing 45 re-
bounds to that of 27 for the Irish.
ECU shot an even 50 percent
from the floor, while the Irish
connected on 42 percent of their
shots.
A balanced ECU scoring at-
tack saw three Pirate players
finish in double figures. Junior
college transfer Marchell Henry
led the wav with 18 points. Senior
guard Curt Vanderhorst was se-
cond with 15, and 6-10 center
I eon Bass added 10.
Fourth-year ECU Head Coach
Charlie Harrison was pleased
with the Pirates' performance but
says he believes improvement is
also necessary.
"Overall, I was pleased with
our plav. I saw some good
things Harrison said. "We ex-
ecuted well at times in the first
half, but we lost our patience at
times. I don't like to see a jumper
taken after a second pass We
get that anytime
Before a crowd of about 800,
ECU opened with an intense
man-to-man defense. The Irish
began with their 2-1 -2 one. Herb
Dixon started the Pirate scoring
on a follow-up shot. After suc-
cessive baskets bv Bass and
Henry, the Pirates never looked
back.
ECU had a 24-17 lead with
8:54 remaining in the ope:
period, when they blew the game
open bv scoring the next 10
points. A Bass turnaround, a
John Williams jumper and three
consecutive lavups bv Jeff Kelly,
Vanderhorst and Williams ac-
counted for the scoring. The
Pirates built up as much as a
21-point advantage in the first
half. The Irish relied heavilv on
the scoring of Hempstead, N.Y
native Mike Smith. Smith led al!
scorers at the half with 12. and at
the finish with 22.
Although the Pirates have been
banged-up a bit, coach Harrison
utilized his players throughout.
B JANET SIMPSON
Suff Wntfr
Bath, N.C, a small town not
very far from Greenville, has one
truly unique distinction. It hap-
pens to be the home of two fierce
Ironically, the team Waters
ge's fired up the most to play is
the school he almost decided to
attend. His choices came down to
ECU and N.C. State. According
to Waters, the Wolf pack is the
team he loves to line up against
most.
This season's game was
especially sweet for Bubba in ad-
dition to the fact that the team
won. The N.C. State game was
the first collegiate game that he
had started in. "Not only did we
beat 'state, 1 got my first chance
to start. It was really great
Waters stated.
N.C . State is the team Bubba
gets the most tired for, but his
two biggest thrills came in the
Bubba Waters
Pirates. Blackbeard (an outdoor
drama staged in Bath called
Blackbeard: Night of the Black
Hag) roams the byways and
waterways of Bath while Bubba
Waters is terrorizing opponents'
offensive units on the football
field at ECU.
The 6-0, 208-pound
sophomore chose to come to
ECU over many other fine
schools. "Coming from a small
town, ECU was the perfect place
for me to go to school and play
football Waters explained. "It
was close to home and I really lik-
ed the atmosphere and the
coaching staff
Homecoming game against the
University of Miami. Bubba took
both his first sack and his first in-
terception from Miami quarter-
back Vinnie Testaverde.
Bubba's life was changed
somewhat in the spring of 1983.
This change involved switching
from working with the quarter-
back (runningback position), to
going after him (at defensive
end).
"I was playing on the offensive
scout team one afternoon and the
ball got intercepted, so I just
caught the guy and tackled him.
Everybody went crazy, yelling
and screaming Waters said.
a HUMBERT - The Eatt Carolinian
Bubba Waters (39) and Willie Powell (84) insure that Penn State punt
returner Ray Isom dosen't try to advance the football.
"ECU was the perfect
place for me to go to
school and play foot-
ball
�Bubba Waters
"After that the coaches asked me
if I wanted to move to defensive
end. The move wasn't my idea
but I don't regret making it
In the fall of 1984 Bubba once
again packed his bags. This time
he went from defensive end to
linebacker. "I really like playing
linebacker Waters added. "I'm
the smallest one on the team at
6-0 and 208, but I think my speed
helps me make up for my size
Looking at his statistics, one
would tend to believe his size is
See BATH, page 14
With 10 players seeing at least 10
minutes ol action, substitutions
were frequent Coach Harrison
believes he will use many players,
including the six freshmen.
Waters is strength for Pirate Defense
Charlie Harrison
"We will play quite a tew peo-
ple. The freshmen will con-
tribute Harrison said. "The
freshmen will make mistakes, I
don't care who you are
The second halt was much like
the firs as ECU took as mucl
a 26-point lead. The transition
game continued as the Bucs push-
ed the ball up court, converting
on many layup opportunities.
Henry led the Buc second-half
surge with 14 points. The transi-
game was most apparent at
the 17:09 mark. Dixon hit
Vanderhorst the break for a
layup and a three-point plav. t
ing ECU a 46-23 lead. From that
point, the Pirates coa me
as the Irish could get no closer
than 17 points (56-39 al the 8:0
mark�. 1 reshman A. Clark's
tree throws with 3:21 remaining
av C l its biggest lead (67-41)
ol 26 points. The Bucs won
71-50.
Pleased b a fine Pirate perfor-
ach Harrison felt Bass'
play was muh improved.
"I eon played as well as he ever
Harrison -a; "He show-
ed sorne aggressiveness, he took
his time, and he squared up (to
the basket).
"We wanted to establ
inside game Harrison added.
"We wanted to plav ive
defense, and we wanted to
eliminate (their) lavups
The Pirates will open
regular season on Nov. 25 at 7 JO
p.m. in Minges Coliseum when
thev host the Campbell Camels.
Volleyball Team
Ends Campaign
By JANET SIMPSON
suff �nl�
This past weekend, the ECU
Lady Pirate volleyball team
traveled to Viriginia to take part
in the Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion Volleyball Tournanment.
The two-day event closed out the
remainder of the season for the
Lady Bucs.
The Lady Pirate's opening
match was against William &
Mary University. They hung
tough in the first game before los-
ing 12-15, and dropped the match
to the Lady Indians, losing the se-
cond game 3-15.
UNC-Wilmington was the next
team on the agenda for the Lady
Bucs. They started out strong
winning the first game 15-10, but
dropped games two and three,
losing the match 11-15,4-15.
The Lady Pirate's last tourna-
ment match and final contest for
the season was against George
Mason University. George
Mason won in three straight
games, 13-15, 8-15, 12-15.
Coach Imogene Turner felt her
team did pretty well in their three
tournament matches. "We were
in all three matches we played in
the tournament Turner said.
"We played William & Mary a
lot better than we played them up
there and I felt we should have
won the Wilmington game
Service errors and defensive
problems proved fatal for the
Lady Bucs. "Service errors were
a downfall. They really came
back to haunt us Turner ex-
plained. "Our defense wasn't
what we would have liked it to
have been either
Blocking, which has been a
thorn in the Lady Pirate's side all
year, was also a problem in the
tournament. "Blocking has been
a problem throughout the entire
year Turner explained.
Injuries also hurt the Lad
Pirates. Traci Gall, who was
given the okay to play, was no
where near her full playing
strenght. Tracy Smith who suf-
fered a sprained ankle in the last
practice session before the tour-
nament kept her out of action.
"At no time during the season
did we have all of our big girls in
there together. Allyson (Barnes)
was hurt at the first of the season,
Traci (Gall) in the middle, and
then Tracv (Smith) at the end
The tournament wasn't only
the end of the season, it was also
the last collegiate action for
senior Martha McQuillain. Her
services will be missed next
season.
Coach Turner is now preparing
for next year. "Our prospects for
next year are looking good
Turner said. "Timing is very im-
portant in volleyball and these
girls are just learning to play with
one another. We're also in the
process of recruiting some very
fine players
Another help next year will be
that the team will be playing a
conference schedule. "I look for-
ward to playing a conference
schedule Turner stated. "It
gives you a lot more motivation
and you also get the chance to see
all your opponents play
The Lady Pirates, having com-
pleted their 1985 season, have an
overall record of 10-19.
� �
A





- 12
I HI I AS IA.ROI INIAN
NOVrMrU K 14. 983
OVERT0N&
2 Blocks From ECU
Corner Third & Jarvis Streets
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26-i
The line . �
ECU Golf
Final Sea
B I1M C HANDl.KK
tmtr � run
The ECU men
competed last M
day in ihe North C ai
Invitational Goli V
Pirates finished lOl
12 teams.
Duke L �
ov erail winnei ol th
with a str �ke
Dominion
593. followed b S
which finis
stroke total I
was 626
The individ la
lournameni was '
ODl Hull
stroke total
355-5222
For I
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Assortment of Cl
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'?
�I





V'EMBER �
THI EAST AKOl INIAN
NOVEMBER I 1985
13
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99C
$4
39
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:htood 2
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89C
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79
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excluding advertised items Without
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Norton, Mews Remain On Top
(,AMK
U I -lulsa
Air I'orce-BY I
labama-S. Miss.
Auburn-CW'orjjia
Maryland-Oemson
Boston t ollege-Syracuse
I-V ashington
Notre Dame-Penn St.
I-Virginia
Pill-Temple
ay-S. Carolina
Kansas-Nebraska
RICK MkCORMAC
ECl by 3
�ir orce
Alabama
uburn
Maryland
Boston College
I SC"
Penn State
IM
I eniple
S Carolina
Nebraska
TOM NORTON
ECU by 3
Air Force
Alabama
Auburn
Maryland
Syracuse
use
Notre Dame
Virginia
Temple
Navy
Nebraska
TODl PATTON
ECU by 5
Air Force
Alabama
Georgia
Maryland
Syracuse
Washington
Penn St.
Virginia
Pin
S. Carolina
Nebraska
SHOES MEWS
ECU by 1
Air Force
Alabama
Auburn
Maryland
Syracuse
Washington
Penn St.
UNC
Temple
S. Carolina
Nebraska
BUT. DAWSON
Tulsa by 7
BVU
Alabama
Auburn
Clemson
Syracuse
use
Penn St.
Virginia
Temple
S. Carolina
Nebraska
JOHN PETERSON
Tulsa by 12
Air Force
Alabama
Auburn
Maryland
Syracuse
Washington
Penn St.
Virginia
Temple
S. Carolina
Nebraska
SCOTT COOPK
ECU by 3y 1
BYU
Alabama
Auburn
Maryland
Syracuse
Washington
Penn St.
Virginia
Temple
S. Carolina
Nebraska
D.JJ WATTS
Iuisa by 8
BYU
Alabama
Auburn
Clemson
Syracuse
Washington
Penn St.
UNC
Temple
S. Carolina
Nebraska
STANDINGS
TOM NORTON
SHOES MEWS
JOHN PETERSON
SCOTT COOPER
"DJ WATTS
RICK McCORMAC
TODD PATTON
BILL DAWSON
LAST WEEK
6-5
6-5
7-4
6-5
5-6
5-6
5-6
6-5
OVERALL
84-32
80-36
79-37
78-38
77-39
77-39
74-42
74-42
Tulsa Hurricane Blows Into Ficklen
Continued from page 11
well defensive line coach Rex
Sponhalt2 said. "We're going to
have to play four quarters like the
firs! two (quarters) against
Auburn
"he Golden Hurricane
defense, somewhat overshadow-
ed b the potent offense, returns
just six starters from last year.
1 ed by two all-MVC conference
selections, senior tackles Joe Dix-
on (6-2. 26) and Kevin I ill) (6-3,
2641 head the defensive front,
linebacking spot may be a bit
sore as two sophomores and a
junior fill those positions. The
secondary, which lost a few
starters from a year ago, will be
anchored by junior free safety
and backup quarterback Richie
Stephenson.
"They read very well and plav
an aggressive type of defense
offensive line coach Paul Ander-
son said. "They play a lot o peo-
ple at a lot of different positions.
They are a fairly big (defensive)
team and have a strong secondary
� like last week (Auburn)
The game will be featuring
each o the school's leading
scorers. ECU's Jeff Heath will be
ECU Golf Team Ends
Final Season Tourney
matched by Tulsa's senior
placekickei Jason Starovskly.
Starovskly and Heath both own
their prospective school's record
for career points, career field
goals and career extra points.
With an injured Ron Jones, the
Pirates will be looking to the
guidance o freshman quartet
back Berke Holtclaw. Coach
Baker feels Holtclaw can live up
to the task.
"He's the guv who can do the
things we count on him to do
Baker said. "He has the skill; he
just dosen't have the experience.
He's going to do O.K
Senior tailback Tony Baker,
with his 6V yards rushing against
Auburn, is just 701 yards away
from being ECU's all-time
leading ground gainer. Baker is
only 4" yards away from the No.
B TIM CHANDLER
-��ff � run
The ECU men's golf team
competed last Monday and Tues-
day in the North Carolina State
Invitational Golf Match. The
Pirates finished 10th in a field o
12 teams.
Duke University was the
overall winner o the tourney
with a stroke total of 588. Old
Dominion took second with a
593. followed by N.C. State
which finished at 595. ECU's
stroke total for the two-day event
was 626.
The individual leader of the
irnament was John Hulbart of
ODU. Hulbart finished with a
stroke total of 144. Mike Had-
dock was close behind in second
with a 145 total.
John Chapman led the Pirate
scoring with a two-round total o
156. Chris Wintel shot a two-
round 157, followed by Mike
Nadeau with a 158. Pat King and
Paul Steelman were tied for
fourth in the Pirate's scoring with
two-round totals of 160 strokes
each. Chns Riley rounded out the
Pirate scoring with a stroke total
of 166.
The Wolfpack Invitational
completed the fall schedule for
the Pirate golfers. The team will
get back into action this spring
when they begin the second half
of their season.
355 5222
M on-Sat
10-9
"For The Man Who
Wants To Dress To Impress
Go to the last ECU Football Game in style
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2 spot on the Pirate rushing list.
When coach Baker was asked
about Baker's rustling record, he
said. "I'm aware o Tonv break-
ing the record. 1 wish him all the
luck and would like to see him
break it, as long as it's in with
winning the ballgame
ith the Pirates having their
lasl home game ot the season.
coach Baker would like to see his
seniors have a good game on
Shrine Day
"1 would like foi out seniors to
play well and do a good job
Baker stated. "1 also would like
to have some momentum for next
year
"It's important that we show
the fans thai we can play well at
home Baker said. "1 hope to
leave a good taste in their (the
tans) mouths.
ATTIC
Thurs.
Ladies Night
Passenger






Fri.
Side
Winder


: � � ROBIN THOMPSON
�?
Thurs.
� ECU Students $1.00
� Dorm Students free
BAND
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OF
GREENVILLE
'Formerly Joooes Gym)
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Located on the Evans Street Mall
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FOR MORE INFORMATION
CALL TODAY 758-4359
A Licensee Of GOLD'S GYM ENT. INC.





14
I HI t M c AKOl IS1
N l MBER U.isuss
Classifieds
SALK
NEED TYPING: Letters Resume's,
Term papers eK Call Karen a�
752 0498
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE. Experience quality work,
IBM Selectric typewriter Lanie
Shive 758 5301
2 & 3 BEDROOM APTS Four biv -
from ECU Call 746 3284 or 524 3180
FOR SALE 5 10 Be kei Tri Fm
surfboard Good cond $90 756 2620
SPRING BREAK CRUISE 6 days
nights Mexican islands Ship goes to
port 3 ' mes Tips anci gratuities in
eluded! $445 Limited number o
tickets avaiaole CALL NOW
752 3178 or 758 Oct
V60.00 PER HUNDRED PAID tor
remaiimg letters from home! Send
self addressed stamped envelope
for information application
Associates Box 95 B Roselle, NJ
07203
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICE Wo r d processing The
Dataworks spe al zes m student
document serv ces including
reports term papers dissertations,
theses, resume's and more All work
is computer checked against 50.000
word electronic dictionary Rates
are as low as $1 75 per page in
eluding paper (call for specific
rates. Call Mark at 757 3440 after
6 15pm
WORD PROCESSING We offer ex
Defence m typing resumes, theses,
technical documents, and term
papers ve manage and merge .
names and addresses mto merged
letters labels, envelopes or rolooex
cards Our prices are extremely
reasonable and we always offer a 15
percent discount to ECU students S
8. F Professional Computer Co
Back of Franklin's! 115 E 5th St.
757 0472
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
tronic typewriter Reasonable rates
Call Jan.ce at 355 7233 after 5 30
FOR SALE: Get ahead on buying a
great gift for that special person on
that special occasion The ECU Col
lapsible Chair Co. (INDT 4092 4093)
is now (?t2 taking orders for
the sale T vS. of the ultimate
m sitting pleasure.
Call
752 2110
or
752 6677
APARTMENTFORRENT
bedroom' '
c l ose to campus
Available janl C.iT nn
75 7 6366 befon 7882��� � �
FOR SALE Sub'
Gooc frarrvs ?5
FOR SALE
oar and4
cle' '
C a 756 5090
ALTERATIONS: Same Gay pick up
Formal ant; dresses �'� and
s coats hats & suits Have
sometl i foi 129 E van
APARTMENT FOR RENT .
next semesti $14 " s.
���
2 bedroom include1- pool &
clubhouse. Must t� �� i i!e For
more info call 757 3640
TYPING NEEDED' 11 you have
letters, reports, papers, etc that
need to oe typed, can 756 8934 after
5 30 p.m Very reasonable rates
TYPIST: Low rates include pro
otreadmg, spelling and gram
matical corrections 10 years ex
perience Call 757 0398 after 5:15
p m
HOUSE FOR RENT: Near campus
2 bedroom unfurnished Enclose
garage tor storage Available Dec. 1.
Females only. Call 757 1798
PERSONALS
J.J Missing you! Love, L
AOTT'S: Contratulations on winning
Lambda Chi Field Day! Kappa Sigs
KAPPA SIGS Contratulations to
our new EC Pres Rusty Wiley,
V P. Matt Rizzolo, G T Mike Riley,
G S Mark France, and G.M.C Jeff
Cashion
SIG TAUS: Come party at the house
on Friday Let's all awe a great
time with the music supplied by
Diamonds
AOTT: Sisters get ready tor some
tun Don't even try to run, We're all
going to scream and shout. So get
psyched to cut out! This message is
for the sisters, From their msides to
their edges, From the ones you love
the most the Beta Zeta Pledges!
LAMBDA CHI'S: Troy Chris P
and Chres L Thanks tor the great
coaching! We love ya'll the Alpha
Delta Pi's and Pledges
SIGMA TAU, SIGMA PHI EP
SILON, LAMBDA CHIS Thanks
for a great fall greek week1 Love,
the Aipha Delta Pi's and Pledges
PARTY TIME ! : Start off your week
with the Alpha Sig Lil' Sister
pledges join us at Cubbies for a
Fun T,rne" on Sunday the 17th at 9
p m
ALPHA SIG BROTHERS
PLEDGES AND LIL SISTERS Get
� to throw down at Black and
, � � We're psyched, how bout
you"3 Love L "e Sister Pledges
NEILR: Hey! Have a terrific birth
day We'll help you clelbrate with
style Thanks again tor our loft
Headquarters is complete, except
now it WOBBLES (Oh No!) Love ya
los, Buh wheat and the chick who
wonts outta here.
TO RICHARD, CHARLES AND
WHOMEVER ELSE IT MAY CON
CERN: Thank you very much for
our crickets! It was an encounter we
shall never forget. Janet and
Shirley
MARY HANSGEN: Happy 21st bir
thday on Friday! Can't wait to
celebrate in Georgia It's going to be
awesome! So be prepared Love,
Maria
PHI SIGMA P�: A special thanks to
the Phi Sigma Pi brothers for giving
us such a terrific Halloween party!
The Phi Sigma Pi Pledges.
KA BROTHERS AND PLEDGES:
We are ready to party alright, and
the best time will be Thursday
Night In boxer shorts is how to
dress, so wear your best to really im
press We will drink until all is gone,
so get ready KA's to party until
dawn! We love you, Your Little
Sisters
NEW SORORITY: There will be a
meeting this Thursday at 8 m room
221 Tickets will be handed out at the
meeting
ECU FOOTBALL TEAM: This is the
last home game of the year Le'ts
end it on a high note You have a
very good opportunity to win this
game We all know that the defense
will keep us in the game and we all
know the offense has the capabilities
to score a lot of points This is my
last home game, as it is also the
seniors last home game, and I would
appreciate a win This is a type of
game that we can fake ah our
frustrations out on Don't forget that
Tulsa has been playing strong lately
Let's all get emotionally high and
�.some butt on Saturday Give me
100 percent Good Luck The Fan
$
NEED CASH?
Southern
Gun & Pawn
752-2464
500 N. GrMM
r$
i
I� �c J
Hooher Memorial Christian Church
liisijrs of Chrikli
111 1 Greenville Btvd 756 2275
h
Y
H�v H V .iii Kiuqhi
essei rials (i't
entiais vt�cJ. m
1 ovt
Special Classes For College Students
9:45 a.m. Christian Education (all ages)
11 00 am. Worship- Open Communion
University Optometric Eye Clinic
DR. DENNIS O'NEAL
� Comprehensive Eye Examinations
� Contact Lenses
Soft, Hard, Gas Permeable Tinted
Extended Hear, Contacts for Astigmatis m
� Glasses
� Student & Faculty Discounts on Contacts &
Glasses
� Convenient to Campus
61 2 E 10th Street
(Across from campus security)
758-6600
4�
105 Airport Road
Greenville, N.C.
757-0327
r
AWHAOfAMlA:
Flounder, Shrimp &
Oyster Dinner $4.99
Trout, Shrimp &
Deviled Crab Dinner
Includes Coleslaw, HushpuppiesJ aa
French Fries or Baked Potato w � Jr jf
Scrimmage
Emily Manwaring and the
Lady Pirate basketball team will
be having an intersquad scrim-
mage this weekend.
The Lady Bucs will take to the
courts at 4:00 pm, following the
TCU-Tuisa football Game. Man
waring urges all students, faculty
and citizens to come out and sup-
port the Lady Pirate squad.
Admission is free, so come on
out and see the conference
champs in action.
Bath Native Successful
FEMALE ROOMMATE: wanted
Spring semester Two bedroom apt
$97 50 per month & ' utilities Serious
student preferred 758 3375 evenings
FEMALE CHRISTIAN ROOM
MATE: Needed to share 2 bedroom
duplex $135 includes utilities. 1' i
bath Cal 756 8676 after 5 30
ROOMMATE NEEDED: $98 a
month 7 utilities. 302 Ash St Call
Tom Allen or David Springer at
758 1893 or 752 0101
LOST Black Alba Watch Lost after
intramural games in soccer field
Call Jamal 830 1174
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Responsi
ble graduate students looking for
female roommate to share 2
bedroom apt beginning Jan 1 ' 3
utilities rent Near Allied Health
Ca 11 756 5536 weekdays between 5 11
TAR RIVER ESTATES Female
roommate needed to share expenses
with 2 others Furnished big
Dedrooms, 2 baths, patio $106 per
month Please call Terry or Susan at
752 6229
WANTED: A good home tor a
5 month old black and white kitten
Please Call 752 429,
Continued from page 11
no handicap. Waters has a total
of 79 tackles (40 unassisted and
39 assisted) along with two in-
terceptions and two quarterback
sacks. He is currently the second
leading tackier on the team.
Waters is very highly thought
of by linebacker coach I es Her-
rin. "Bubba is a pleasure to be
around and a pleasure to coach
stated Herrin. "He's a fine young
man who works very hard. He
has done an excellent job for us
and has a bright future at East
Carolina
Many players have different
routines they go through before
games and Bubba has a couple of
his own.
"I'm always the last one to
leave the locker room and the last
one to go out on the field
Waters explained. "I don't have
any certain reason for doing this,
but it happens the same way
every game
Bubba credits his high school
coach with having the most in-
fluence on his career. "Coach
(Walt) Davis believed in me and
stood bv me Waters said.
"He's been a big help to me '
Excelling in football and
academics are two of Waters'
tfoais he'd like to accomplish
bet ;re leaving the hallowed halls
of ECU. "1 want to graduate.
and excel in football it possible
Waters stated.
Waters, a corrections major,
would like to become a probal
officer one day.
Football means a great deal to
Waters, but he also has another
love, which the residents ol Belk
Hall have probably 'heard' aboul
on many occasions. This
love is music. Just turn
"Atlantic Star" and watch him
smile. "My stereo stays on maybe
15 hours-a-day added Wau
Professional football
something Waters would like tp
pursue a career in, but he is not
depending on that possibi
"I'd like to play pro ball, but if i
doesn't happen for me, I'l
okay explained Waters
Vox a person that spends Satur-
day afternoon hitting people and
throwing them around. B
Waters is quite a shy a: .
spken person. He is Ba"
ECU's 'special- Pirate.
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$lv5 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks a: addi
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Problem Pregnanc Counseling For funnel
information call 832-0535 (Toll Free Sumoer
1-800-532-5384) between 9AM and 5 P M
weekdays
RIUDOK WOMIH-S
HEALTH
OROAMIZATIOMS
917 Wart fcUrgoaSt.
HC
WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
to share a two bedroom trailer S80
r?nt and � utilities Call Susan at
'58 8664 after 7 00 pm Non smoker
please!
REWARD: Lost 35 mm earners lost
downtown Thurs night (HaMoween)
about 2 30 or 3 00 am W. 11 pay to get
it back! No questions asked call
� H M'tcheli 752 3475
South Park
Amoco
AMOCO
Complete Automotive Service
756-3023 24 hrv
J10 Greenville Blvd.
4
at (,reenilk Stores ()nl
Kentucky Nuggets Combo
9 Piece Kentucky Nuggets
Kentucky Fries
Lg dnnk $2.89
Locations
600 W Greenville 8!vd 756
2905 E 5th ST 752 5184
?
?
6434 4
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X
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�l

.
l



'

'

Student Stores
Computer Orientation
Seminar
IBM and Apple computer products
demonstrated. Hands-on experience encouraged.
PC Portable, PC-XT, PC-AT, PC, Macintosh and
much more featured. Company representative
available for assistance and information.
Everybody welcome.
1
8
3
r
: fl
Refreshments provided
I � . 1 t
TP
&

Date: Thursday, November 14, 1985
Time: 3:00 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Location: Soda Shop, Wright BuildingfT
Register for door prizes
i
.?iVWW3�V?n'
STUDENT STORES
East Carolina University
Wrieht Buildin
83
:
A





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Title
The East Carolinian, November 14, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.441
Location of Original
University Archives
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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